WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear reactor plant

  1. Nuclear reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Laurer, E.

    1977-01-01

    The invention is concerned with a quick-closing valve on the main-steam pipe of a nuclear reactor plant. The quick-closing valve serves as isolating valve and as safety valve permitting depressurization in case of an accident. For normal operation a tube-shaped gate valve is provided as valve disc, enclosing an auxiliary valve disc to be used in case of accidents and which is opened at increased pressure to provide a smaller flow cross-section. The design features are described in detail. (RW) [de

  2. Nuclear reactor kinetics and plant control

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Understanding time-dependent behaviors of nuclear reactors and the methods of their control is essential to the operation and safety of nuclear power plants. This book provides graduate students, researchers, and engineers in nuclear engineering comprehensive information on both the fundamental theory of nuclear reactor kinetics and control and the state-of-the-art practice in actual plants, as well as the idea of how to bridge the two. The first part focuses on understanding fundamental nuclear kinetics. It introduces delayed neutrons, fission chain reactions, point kinetics theory, reactivit

  3. Space nuclear reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Ranken, W.A.; Koenig, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements for electrical and propulsion power for space are expected to increase dramatically in the 1980s. Nuclear power is probably the only source for some deep space missions and a major competitor for many orbital missions, especially those at geosynchronous orbit. Because of the potential requirements, a technology program on space nuclear power plant components has been initiated by the Department of Energy. The missions that are foreseen, the current power plant concept, the technology program plan, and early key results are described

  4. Regulatory requirements for desalination plant coupled with nuclear reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Woong Sik; Jo, Jong Chull; Kim, Hho Jung; Song, Jae Myung

    2005-01-01

    A small-to-medium sized reactor has been developed for multi-purposes such as seawater desalination, ship propulsion, and district heating since early 1990s in Korea. Now, the construction of its scaled-down research reactor, equipped with a seawater desalination plant, is planned to demonstrate the safety and performance of the design of the multi-purpose reactor. And the licensing application of the research reactor is expected in the near future. Therefore, a development of regulatory requirements/guides for a desalination plant coupled with a nuclear reactor plant is necessary for the preparation of the forthcoming licensing review of the research reactor. In this paper, the following contents are presented: the design of the desalination plant, domestic and foreign regulatory requirements relevant to desalination plants, and a draft of regulatory requirements/guides for a desalination plant coupled with a nuclear reactor plant

  5. U.S. Nuclear Power Reactor Plant Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — Demographic data on U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors, including: plant name/unit number, docket number, location, licensee, reactor/containment type, nuclear...

  6. Nuclear reactor plants and control systems therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Boer, G.A.; de Hex, M.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor plant is described comprising at least two hydraulically separated but thermally interconnected heat conveying circuits, of which one is the reactor circuit filled with a non-water medium and the other one is the water-steam-circuit equipped with a steam generator, a feed water conduit controlled by a valve and a steam turbine, and a control system mainly influenced by the pressure drop caused in said feed water conduit and its control valve and having a value of at least 10 bars at full load

  7. Fuel handling system of nuclear reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulstich, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a fuel handing system for nuclear reactor plants comprising a reactor vessel having an openable top and removable cover for refueling and containing therein, submerged in coolant water substantially filling the reactor vessel, a fuel core including a multiplicity of fuel bundles formed of groups of sealed tube elements enclosing fissionable fuel assembled into units. It comprises a fuel bundle handing platform moveable over the open top of the reactor vessel; a fuel bundle handing mast extendable downward from the platform with a lower end projecting into the open top reactor vessel to the fuel core submerged in water; a grapple head mounted on the lower end of the mast provided with grappling hook means for attaching to and transporting fuel bundles into and out from the fuel core; and a camera with a prismatic viewing head surrounded by a radioactive resisting quartz cylinder and enclosed within the grapple head which is provided with at least three windows with at least two windows provided with an angled surface for aiming the camera prismatic viewing head in different directions and thereby viewing the fuel bundles of the fuel core from different perspectives, and having a cable connecting the camera with a viewing monitor located above the reactor vessel for observing the fuel bundles of the fuel core and for enabling aiming of the camera prismatic viewing head through the windows by an operator

  8. Fuel handling grapple for nuclear reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousar, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a fuel handling system for nuclear reactor plants. It comprises: a reactor vessel having an openable top and removable cover and containing therein, submerged in water substantially filling the reactor vessel, a fuel core including a multiplicity of fuel bundles formed of groups of sealed tube elements enclosing fissionable fuel assembled into units, the fuel handling system consisting essentially of the combination of: a fuel bundle handling platform movable over the open top of the reactor vessel; a fuel bundle handling mast extendable downward from the platform with a lower end projecting into the open top reactor vessel to the fuel core submerged in water; a grapple head mounted on the lower end of the mast provided with grapple means comprising complementary hooks which pivot inward toward each other to securely grasp a bail handle of a nuclear reactor fuel bundle and pivot backward away from each other to release a bail handle; the grapple means having a hollow cylindrical support shaft fixed within the grapple head with hollow cylindrical sleeves rotatably mounted and fixed in longitudinal axial position on the support shaft and each sleeve having complementary hooks secured thereto whereby each hook pivots with the rotation of the sleeve secured thereto; and the hollow cylindrical support shaft being provided with complementary orifices on opposite sides of its hollow cylindrical and intermediate to the sleeves mounted thereon whereby the orifices on both sides of the hollow cylindrical support shaft are vertically aligned providing a direct in-line optical viewing path downward there-through and a remote operator positioned above the grapple means can observe from overhead the area immediately below the grapple hooks

  9. The program of reactors and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, Carlos R.

    2001-01-01

    Into de framework of the program of research reactors and nuclear power plants, the operating Argentine reactors are described. The uses of the research reactors in Argentina are summarized. The reactors installed by Argentina in other countries (Peru, Algeria, Egypt) are briefly described. The CAREM project for the design and construction of an innovator small power reactor (27 MWe) is also described in some detail. The next biennial research and development program for reactor is briefly outlined

  10. Reactor shutdown: nuclear power plant performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The article essentially looks at the performance of nine of Sweden's nuclear reactors. A table lists the percentage of time for the first three quarters of 1981 that the reactors were operating, and the number of hours out of service for planned or other reasons. In particular, one station - Ringhals 3 - was out of action because of a damaged tube in the associated steam generator. The same fault occurred with another reactor - Ringhals 4 - before this was brought into service. The reasons for the failure and its importance are briefly discussed. (G.P.)

  11. PWR reactors for BBR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure and functioning of the nuclear steam generator system developed by BBR and its components are described. Auxiliary systems, control and load following behaviour and fuel management are discussed and the main data of PWR given. The brochure closes with a perspective of the future of the Muelheim-Kaerlich nuclear power plant. (GL) [de

  12. Design for reactor core safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Guide covers the neutronic, thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, chemical and irradiation considerations important to the safe design of a nuclear reactor core. The Guide applies to the types of thermal neutron reactor power plants that are now in common use and fuelled with oxide fuels: advanced gas cooled reactor (AGR), boiling water reactor (BWR), pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) (pressure tube and pressure vessel type) and pressurized water reactor (PWR). It deals with the individual components and systems that make up the core and associated equipment and with design provisions for the safe operation of the core and safe handling of the fuel and other core components. The Guide discusses the reactor vessel internals and the reactivity control and shutdown devices mounted on the vessel. Possible effects on requirements for the reactor coolant, the reactor coolant system and its pressure boundary (including the pressure vessel) are considered only as far as necessary to clarify the interface with the Safety Guide on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13) and other Guides. In relation to instrumentation and control systems the guidance is mainly limited to functional requirements

  13. Future of nuclear power plants and reactor dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.; Cregut, A.

    1994-01-01

    After some considerations on dismantling experience, technology, legislation and costs, the various causes for dismantling a reactor are reviewed (research program termination, plant obsolescence, ageing and safety problems) and the present and future situation concerning the French nuclear park is examined. The various tools, equipment and techniques for reactor dismantling and the related researches are presented: cutting techniques, decontamination techniques, remote control, robotics and automation, waste processing and conditioning

  14. Nuclear plant-aging research on reactor protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the rsults of a review of the Reactor Trip System (RTS) and the Engineered Safety Feature Actuating System (ESFAS) operating experiences reported in Licensee Event Reports (LER)s, the Nuclear Power Experience data base, Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, and plant maintenance records. Our purpose is to evaluate the potential significance of aging, including cycling, trips, and testing as contributors to degradation of the RTS and ESFAS. Tables are presented that show the percentage of events for RTS and ESFAS classified by cause, components, and subcomponents for each of the Nuclear Steam Supply System vendors. A representative Babcock and Wilcox plant was selected for detailed study. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research guidelines were followed in performing the detailed study that identified materials susceptible to aging, stressors, environmental factors, and failure modes for the RTS and ESFAS as generic instrumentation and control systems. Functional indicators of degradation are listed, testing requirements evaluated, and regulatory issues discussed

  15. Plant with nuclear reactor, in particular a thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, H.

    1988-01-01

    The reactor core of the plant has tubular and vertically movable control rods moved by a flow of coolant under pressure. Each control rod surrounds a similarly tubular guide rod, stationary relative to the reactor core, leaving an annular slot-like space therebetween. The inside of each guide rod forms a first pressure chamber supplied with the coolant under pressure. The upper end of each control rod is closed and has a vertical shaft that extends into the inside of the guide rod and forms therewith a second annular slot-like space. At least one first restriction is provided in the first annular slot-like space and at least one second restriction is provided in the second annular slot-like space. A second pressure chamber is formed between both restrictions. The coolant supplied to the guide rod thus returns to the pressure vessel surrounding the reactor core through the second annular slot-like space, the second pressure chamber and the first annular slot-like space. Controlling means are provided, with which pressure thrusts can be generated if necessary in the coolant within the first pressure chamber. (author) 5 refs., 10 figs

  16. Training nuclear power plant personnel on SR-O reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerny, K.; Boucek, F.; Kveton, M.; Prokopec, Z.; Fleischhans, J.

    1983-01-01

    The SR-O reactor is an experimental pool-type reactor with a maximum output of 1 MW and maximum thermal neutron flux density of 5.3x10 13 m -2 s -1 . The reactor is described in detail and its specifications are given. The protection and control systems of the reactor permit both manual and automatic operation. The reactor is used for training courses for nuclear power plant operators and for post-graduate study courses for other specialists. Intensive courses for 4 to 6 persons take 15 to 20 days. The course is adjusted to the results of introductory theoretical tests. An optimal teaching method has been developed based on the flowchart algorithmic method, dividing activities into operations (manipulations with controls, issuing commands, making records, etc.) and decision making (information reception and processing). (M.D.)

  17. Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

    2006-12-11

    This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

  18. 1980 nuclear plant survey: no reactors sold; more cancellations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedlander, G.D.

    1980-01-01

    No sales were reported in 1979 by any of the big four reactor suppliers. Three cancellations were reported and construction was suspended on the Jersey Central Power and Light Co.'s Forked River unit. Since last year's survey, the commercial operation dates of about 80 units have been postponed from one year to indefinitely, and nuclear commitments are down from last year's 195 units to 193 units. Presently, there are 72 plants on line, with a capacity of more than 53,000 MW. A resumption of new reactor orders is expected in either late 1980 or early 1981

  19. Nuclear power plant laundry drain treatment using membrane bio reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Masaaki; Kohanawa, Osamu; Kinugasa, Atsushi; Ogawa, Naoki; Murogaki, Kenta

    2012-01-01

    In nuclear power plant, the radioactive effluent generated by washing the clothes worn in controlled area and the hand and shower water used at the controlled area are treated in laundry drain treatment system. Although various systems which treat such liquid waste preexist, the traditional treatment system has disadvantages such as high running cost and a large amount of secondary waste generation. To solve these matters, we have considered application of an activated sludge system, membrane bio reactor, which has been practically used in general industry. For nuclear power plant, the activated sludge system has been developed, tested in its adaptability and the adequacy has been proved. Some preexisting treatment systems have been replaced with this activated sludge system for the first time in a domestic nuclear power plant, and the renewal system is now in operation. The result is reported. (author)

  20. Reactor core cooling device for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Masahiko.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor core cooling facility upon rupture of pipelines in a BWR type nuclear power plant. That is, when rupture of pipelines should occur in the reactor container, an releasing safety valve operates instantly and then a depressurization valve operates to depressurize the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. Further, an injection valve of cooling water injection pipelines is opened and cooling water is injected to cool the reactor core from the time when the pressure is lowered to a level capable of injecting water to the pressure vessel by the static water head of a pool water as a water source. Further, steams released from the pressure vessel and steams in the pressure vessel are condensed in a high pressure/low pressure emergency condensation device and the inside of the reactor container is depressurized and cooled. When the reactor is isolated, since the steams in the pressure vessel are condensed in the state that the steam supply valve and the return valve of a steam supply pipelines are opened and a vent valve is closed, the reactor can be maintained safely. (I.S.)

  1. Nuclear energy center site survey reactor plant considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    The Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 required the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to make a nuclear energy center site survey (NECSS). Background information for the NECSS report was developed in a series of tasks which include: socioeconomic inpacts; environmental impact (reactor facilities); emergency response capability (reactor facilities); aging of nuclear energy centers; and dry cooled nuclear energy centers

  2. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  3. Nuclear power plant monitoring method by neural network and its application to actual nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabeshima, Kunihiko; Suzuki, Katsuo; Shinohara, Yoshikuni; Tuerkcan, E.

    1995-11-01

    In this paper, the anomaly detection method for nuclear power plant monitoring and its program are described by using a neural network approach, which is based on the deviation between measured signals and output signals of neural network model. The neural network used in this study has three layered auto-associative network with 12 input/output, and backpropagation algorithm is adopted for learning. Furthermore, to obtain better dynamical model of the reactor plant, a new learning technique was developed in which the learning process of the present neural network is divided into initial and adaptive learning modes. The test results at the actual nuclear reactor shows that the neural network plant monitoring system is successfull in detecting in real-time the symptom of small anomaly over a wide power range including reactor start-up, shut-down and stationary operation. (author)

  4. Design aspects of LTE desalination plant utilizing waste heat from nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, I.S.; Srivastava, V.K.; Tewari, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear research reactors produce significant amount of low quality waste heat which can be utilized for producing high quality water from seawater by coupling a Low Temperature Evaporation (LTE) desalination unit. Salient features and design considerations of the desalination plant coupled to the nuclear research reactor and the performance of the desalination plant under varying operational conditions applicable to waste heat utilization from the reactor are discussed. Chemical and radioactive analysis of the product water is given to indicate the usefulness of the water to meet the demineralized water makeup requirements of the reactor. The general scheme of integrating desalination plant with the nuclear research reactor is also presented. This LTE desalination plant utilizing waste heat from a nuclear research reactor is the first of its kind and is a demonstration of safety and economics of nuclear desalination technology as a viable alternative to produce demineralised water from seawater. (author)

  5. The development of reactor vessel internal heavy forging for 1000 MW pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhifeng; Chen Yongbo; Ding Xiuping; Zhang Lingfang

    2012-01-01

    This Paper introduced the development of Reactor Vessel Internal (RVI) heavy forgings for 1000 MW Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant, analyzed the manufacture difficulties and technical countermeasures. The testing result of the product indicated that the performance of RVI heavy forgings manufactured by Shanghai Heavy Machinery Plant Ld. (SHMP) is outstanding and entirely satisfy the technical requirements for RVI product. (authors)

  6. Nuclear liability and research reactor fuel. A plant supplier's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, H.-J.; Hetzmann, A.

    2000-01-01

    Contracts on Research Reactors are normally entered into by the owner and - very often - later user and the supplier of such plants. They are not concluded by the fuel supplier, except fuel supplier and plant supplier are identical. Thus, the fuel supplier mostly has no direct influence into the contract negotiations and the clauses which are eventually agreed upon between the parties. So has any other subcontractor for any other system or component. Any such subsupplier can and will negotiate a subsidiary supply contract (subcontract) with the supplier of the plant. The supplier drafts the related clauses so as to pass on to the subsupplier as many risks out of his contracts as possible. The subsupplier, on the other hand, tries to protect himself, tries to limit the risks he takes over, e.g. to the worth of his subcontract maximum. A critical issue in such negotiations is those concerning the risks the supplier had to accept and the subsupplier, although he may be responsible later for the risk changing to reality; i.e. the occurrence of a loss, cannot be hold liable for in full because the subcontract limits his liability, e.g. to the subcontract value or a certain delay penalty. A typical example for this conflict are delays of the entire project caused by one subsupplier. A very specific case in this context is the so-called nuclear liability. Nuclear liability means being hold responsible for the consequences or damages originating from a nuclear event in the plant. Those consequences or damages may be suffered by third parties, which are neither the owner/operator nor the supplier and result in a liability to such party (third party liability). Several of the aspects below may be related to the nuclear liability issue: The supplier often has its registered office not in the country where the plant is; The supplier may have far bigger assets than the owner/operator. The legal system of the supplier's country may be more favourable for enforcing claims of

  7. Nuclear power plants without the risk of a reactor disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, L.

    1980-01-01

    Nowadays everybody believes that all nuclear power plants are an inevitable risk for the life of the people in its environment; this is a prejudice. This article points out that it is possible to plan nuclear power plants in a way that no deaths in the population have to be feared, even in the heaviest possible disturbances. In order to realise such nuclear power plants, it is necessary either to improve the cooling of the fuel rods by passive additional safety measures of which one unlimitedly efficient thus excluding a nuclear melting accident or to improve the safety containers so that it remains sufficiently tight. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Nuclear Power Station Kalkar, 300 MWe Prototype Nuclear Power Plant with Fast Sodium Cooled Reactor (SNR-300), Plant description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    The nuclear power station Kalkar (SNR-300) is a prototype with a sodium cooled fast reactor and a thermal power of 762 MW. The present plant description has been made available in parallel to the licensing procedure for the reactor plant and its core Mark-Ia as supplementary information for the public. The report gives a detailed description of the whole plant including the prevention measures against the impact of external and plant internal events. The radioactive materials within the reactor cooling system and the irradiation protection and surveillance measures are outlined. Finally, the operation of the plant is described with the start-up procedures, power operation, shutdown phases with decay heat removal and handling procedures

  9. Nuclear reactor plant development for submarine propulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladkov, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    History of creating nuclear submarines in the USSR is considered. The above-mentioned works began in 1952. Water cooled and moderated reactor was chosen for the submarine propulsion system. Small-sized high-intensity and high-mobile power facility meeting the submarine requirements was created

  10. Studies on environment safety and application of advanced reactor for inland nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, L.; Jie, L.

    2014-01-01

    To study environment safety assessment of inland nuclear power plants (NPPs), the impact of environment safety under the normal operation was researched and the environment risk of serious accidents was analyzed. Moreover, the requirements and relevant provisions of site selection between international nuclear power plant and China's are comparatively studied. The conclusion was that the environment safety assessment of inland and coastal nuclear power plant have no essential difference; the advanced reactor can meet with high criteria of environment safety of inland nuclear power plants. In this way, China is safe and feasible to develop inland nuclear power plant. China's inland nuclear power plants will be as big market for advanced reactor. (author)

  11. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mysels, K.J.; Shenoy, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core consists of a number of fuel regions through each of which regulated coolant flows. The coolant from neighbouring fuel regions is combined in a manner which results in an averaging of the coolant temperature at the outlet of the core. By this method the presence of hot streaks in the reactor is reduced. (UK)

  12. 77 FR 3009 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0010] Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power... comment a draft NUREG, NUREG-2104, Revision 0, ``Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant... developed using this Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examination Standards for Power Reactors...

  13. Inventory of nuclear power plants and research reactors temporary or definitively stopped in industrialized countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauzon, J.; Vaubert, B.

    1984-12-01

    This paper presents data and information on the end of the life of nuclear reactors. One deals more particularly with installations of industrialized countries. This report gives the motivations which have involved the definitive shut down of nuclear power plants and of research reactors in the concerned countries. A schedule of definitive reactor shutdowns is presented. Then, one deals with nuclear power plants of which the construction has been stopped. The reasons of these situations are also given. The temporary difficulties met during the construction or the starting of nuclear power plants these last years are mentioned. Most times, there are economical or political considerations, or safety reasons. Finally, the nuclear power plants stopped for more than two years are mentioned [fr

  14. Stress analysis of nuclear power plants reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alujeiv, A.

    1977-01-01

    During the nuclear reactor operation, one of the most important limiting factors in fuel element duty is the mechanical iteraction of fuel and clad. This interaction produces cyclic stresses and strains in the cladding, and these in turn consume clad fatigue life. It is expected, that compressive hoop stress at the clad ID reaches 14500 psi (100 MPa=MN/m 2 , ie. 1000 bar). Tensile stresses could be created once the clad has come in contact with the fuel pellet, approximately after 15000 hours in the reactor core. Reactor pressure vessel is also being exposed to high mechanical load and to an intensive neutron flux irradiation. During the life time of the NPP, this leads to a gradual deportant in the event of LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) with action of ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System), and thus with an instant vessel temperature drop. The reactor containment has to comprise relatively high pressure developed during the accidental fluid release from the reactor piping. The steel structure is additionally loaded by a crane circular rail under the dome, and the strength and stability analyses prove to be very difficult. (author)

  15. Rock siting of nuclear power plants from a reactor safety standpoint. Status report October 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clearify the advantages and disadvantages of an underground nuclear power plant from a reactor safety point of view, compared to a plant above ground. Principles for the technical design of a rock sited BWR nuclear power plant is presented. Also questions of sabotage and closing down the plant at the end of the operational period are treated. (K.K.)

  16. Safety analysis of an expert reactor protection system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kafas, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the dissertation is to develop real time expert reactor protection system (ERPS) for operational safety of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant. The system is developed to diagnose plant failures and for identification plant transients (with and without scram). For this erps, probabilistic safety analysis techniques are used to check the availability and priority of the recommended safety system in case of plant accidents. The real - time information during transients and accidents can be obtained to assess the operator in his decision - making. Also, the ERPS is able to give advice for the reactor operator to take the appropriate corrective action during abnormal situations. 5-15 figs., 42 refs

  17. Development of technology for next generation reactor - Research of evaluation technology for nuclear power plant -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kyun; Chang, Moon Heuy; Hwang, Yung Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1993-09-01

    For development of next generation reactor, a project for evaluation technology for nuclear power plant is performed. Evaluation technology is essential to next generation reactor for reactor safety and system analysis. For design concept, detailed evaluation technologies are studied as follows: evaluation of safety margin, evaluation of safety facilities, evaluation of measurement and control technology; man-machine interface. Especially for thermal efficiency, thermal properties and chemical composition of inconel 690 tube, instead of inconel 600 tube, are measured for steam generator. (Author).

  18. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilliette, Z.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor and especially a high-temperature reactor in which provision is made within a pressure vessel for a main cavity containing the reactor core and a series of vertical cylindrical pods arranged in spaced relation around the main cavity and each adapted to communicate with the cavity through two collector ducts or headers for the primary fluid which flows downwards through the reactor core. Each pod contains two superposed steam-generator and circulator sets disposed in substantially symmetrical relation on each side of the hot primary-fluid header which conveys the primary fluid from the reactor cavity to the pod, the circulators of both sets being mounted respectively at the bottom and top ends of the pod

  19. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor core of nuclear reactors usually is composed of individual elongated fuel elements that may be vertically arranged and through which coolant flows in axial direction, preferably from bottom to top. With their lower end the fuel elements gear in an opening of a lower support grid forming part of the core structure. According to the invention a locking is provided there, part of which is a control element that is movable along the fuel element axis. The corresponding locking element is engaged behind a lateral projection in the opening of the support grid. The invention is particularly suitable for breeder or converter reactors. (orig.) [de

  20. Safety analysis of an expert reactor protection system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Kafas, A.E.A.E.

    1996-01-01

    the purpose of the dissertation is to develop a real time expert reactor protection system (ERPS) for operational safety of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant. The system is developed to diagnose plant failures and for identification of plant transients (with and without scram). for this ERPS. probabilistic safety analysis techniques are used to check the availability and priority of the recommended safety system in case of plant accidents . the real- time information during transients and accidents can be obtained to asses the operator in his decision - making . Also, the ERPS is able to give advice for the reactor operator to take the appropriate corrective action during abnormal situations. The system model consists of the dynamic differential equations for reactor core, pressurizer, steam generator, turbine and generator, piping and plenums. The system of equations can be solved by appropriate codes also displayed directly from sensors of the plant. All scenarios of transients, accidents and fault tress for plant systems are learned to ERPS

  1. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  2. The working lifetime of nuclear power plants and new types of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataille, Ch.; Birraux, C.

    2003-01-01

    The report on the working lifetime of nuclear power plants and new reactor types, by Mr Christian Bataille, deputy for the Nord, and Mr Claude Birraux, deputy for Haute-Savoie as well as President of the Office, supplements the studies carried out by the Parliamentary Office on the Safety of Nuclear Installations and Radioactive Wastes: it examines the remaining working life of the EDF nuclear power plants and the current status of projects that might, if circumstances were right, replace the reactors at present in service. The report investigates the different physical and other factors that influence the ageing of nuclear power plants and tackles the question of whether the design life of 40 years could be exceeded in practice. The whole issue of French nuclear power plant is put in perspective and compared with the situation of nuclear plants in Finland, Sweden, Germany and the United States, from the technical and regulatory standpoints. Believing that any attempt to optimise the working lifetime of the power plants currently in service must be accompanied by simultaneous moves aimed at their replacement, Messrs. Christian Bataille and Claude Birraux go on to review in detail the various light water reactor projects being proposed around the world for completion by 2015, as developments of existing models, in particular the EPR reactor of Framatome ANP, characterised by its competitiveness. They suggest that a first such reactor should be built as quickly as possible. Describing the other nuclear systems being investigated by research organisations not only in France but also in the United States and Sweden, Mrs. Christian Bataille and Claude Birraux review the objectives of these and the circumstances in which they might be developed, which would be unlikely to be before 2035 in view of the technological problems to be overcome and the industrial demonstration plants that would be needed

  3. Design of the reactor containment systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The present Guide deals with the following design aspects of containment systems: The considerations which make containment necessary; The purpose of, and functional requirements for, the containment system; The design basis for the containment system; The specific design requirements and features needed to implement the functional requirements of the containment system; The tests and inspections needed to ensure that the functional requirements of the system can be met throughout the operating life of a nuclear power plant; The general quality assurance and documentation requirements for design of the containment system. This Safety Guide covers the method of limiting the radionuclide releases resulting from accident conditions

  4. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given. (UK)

  5. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  6. New advanced small and medium nuclear power reactors: possible nuclear power plants for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dussol, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years interest has increased in small and medium sized nuclear power reactors for generating electricity and process heat. This interest has been driven by a desire to reduce capital costs, construction times and interest during construction, service remote sites and ease integration into small grids. The IAEA has recommended that the term 'small' be applied to reactors with a net electrical output less than 300 MWe and the term 'medium' to 300-700 MWe. A large amount of experience has been gained over 50 years in the design, construction and operation of small and medium nuclear power reactors. Historically, 100% of commercial reactors were in these categories in 1951-1960, reducing to 21% in 1991-2000. The technologies involved include pressurised water reactors, boiling water reactors, high temperature gas-cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors and molten salt reactors. Details will be provided of two of the most promising new designs, the South African Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) of about 110 MWe, and the IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) reactor of about 335 MWe. Their construction costs are estimated to be about US$l,000/kWe with a generating cost for the PBMR of about US1.6c/kWh. These costs are lower than estimated for the latest designs of large reactors such as the European Pressurised Reactor (EPR) designed for 1,600 MWe for use in Europe in the next decade. It is concluded that a small or medium nuclear power reactor system built in modules to follow an increasing demand could be attractive for generating low cost electricity in many Australian states and reduce problems arising from air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels

  7. Requirements for the reactor regulating systems of CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    This is the first edition of CSA Standard CAN3-N290.4, Requirements for the Reactor Regulating Systems of CANDU Nuclear Power Plants. It is written in SI(metric) units. The development of this Standard was initiated by the Canadian Nuclear Association to help the prospective owner of a nuclear power plant as well as the designer, manufacturer, fabricator, and installer of nuclear power plant components, by compiling the various requirements of regulatory authorities. Although this compilation includes requirements of a regulatory nature, users of the Standard should recognize that it has the force of law only when adopted by a regulatory authority. For this reason users of the Standard who are concerned with its legal aspects should consult the appropriate authority. In this connection the involvement is to be noted of both the Atomic Energy Control Board - for the acceptance of the site and the plant design, and the issuing of licenses for the construction and operation of the nuclear plant - and the relevant provincial government department - for the registration and inspection of the nuclear power plant components. The specific objective of this Standard is to establish the minimum requirements for the design, manufacture and fabrication, qualification and installation of reactor regulating systems in CANDU nuclear power plants, in order to ensure that they will operate as intended. The purpose of this Standard is not to stifle improved system design, but to provide a minimum base against which innovations and new techniques can be compared

  8. Reactor building design of nuclear power plant ATUCHA II, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rufino, R.E.; Hermann, E.R.; Richter, E.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented the civil engineering project carried out by the joint venture Hochtief - Techint-Bignoli (HTB) for the reactor building at the Atucha II power plant (PHWR of 745 MWe) in Buenos Aires. All the other civil projects at Atucha II are also being carried out by HTB. This building has the same general characteristics of the PWR plants developed by KWU in Germany, known for the spherical steel containment 56m in diameter. Nevertheless, it differs from those principally in the equipment lay-out and the remarkable foundation depth. From the basic engineering provided by ENACE, the joint venture has had to face the challenge of designing a tridimensional structure of large size. This has necessitated using simplified models which had to be superimposed, since the use of only one spatial mode would be highly inadequate, lacking the flexibility necessary to absorb the numerous modifications that this type of project undergoes during construction. In addition, this procedure has eliminated resorting to numerous and costly computer processings. (Author) [pt

  9. Development of operator thinking model and its application to nuclear reactor plant operation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Tetsushi; Endou, Akira; Himeno, Yoshiaki

    1992-01-01

    At first, this paper presents the developing method of an operator thinking model and the outline of the developed model. In next, it describes the nuclear reactor plant operation system which has been developed based on this model. Finally, it has been confirmed that the method described in this paper is very effective in order to construct expert systems which replace the reactor operator's role with AI (artificial intelligence) systems. (author)

  10. Draft report on compilation of generic safety issues for light water reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    A generally accepted approach to characterizing the safety concerns in nuclear power plants is to express them as safety issues which need to be resolved. When such safety issues are applicable to a generation of plants of a particular design or to a family of plants of similar design, they are termed generic safety issues. Examples of generic safety issues are those related to reactor vessel embrittlement, control rod insertion reliability or strainer clogging. The safety issues compiled in this document are based on broad international experience. This compilation is one element in the framework of IAEA activities to assist Member States in reassessing the safety of operating nuclear power plants. Refs

  11. 75 FR 5632 - Office of New Reactors; Interim Staff Guidance on the Review of Nuclear Power Plant Designs Using...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... COMMISSION Office of New Reactors; Interim Staff Guidance on the Review of Nuclear Power Plant Designs Using... Review of Nuclear Power Plant Designs Using a Gas Turbine Driven Standby Emergency Alternating Current... for Nuclear Power Plants (LWR Edition),'' June 2007. Background: Emergency diesel generators are...

  12. Considerations on safety against seismic excitations in the project of reactor auxiliary building and control building in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, S.H.C.; Castro Monteiro, I. de

    1986-01-01

    The seismic requests to be considered in the project of main buildings of a nuclear power plant are discussed. The models for global seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures, as well as models for global strength distribution are presented. The models for analysing reactor auxiliary building and control building, which together with the reactor building and turbine building form the main energy generation complex in a nuclear power plant, are described. (M.C.K.) [pt

  13. The contract of the reactor design in Yonggwang - 5, 6 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    This contract describes the reactor design in Yonggwang -5, 6 nuclear power plant. It lists the detail contract conditions, which are the coverage of the supply and liability, schedule, guarantee, drawing and document, provision of the services, technical assistance, drill, examination, provision and standard and code of regulation and list of items and prices.

  14. Study on reactor power change and ambiguous control of third Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Gongzhan

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon of the average power reduction during long term full power operating in Third Qinshan nuclear power plant is analyzed . According to the basic conclusions of reactor power fluctuating derived by probability statistic and calculation the corresponding ambiguous control project is proposed. The operating performance could be achieved by the present controlling project is predicted additionally. (authors)

  15. Temperature conditions of foundation plates under nuclear power plant reactor compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehsaulov, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Method for calculation of temperature conditions for foundation plates under reactor compartments located in the main building, used in construction of the second stage of the Kostroma nuclear power plant, is considered. The obtained calculation data can be used for determining the most suitable period of concrete placement, composition, initial temperature, manufacturing technology and ways of delivery of concrete mixture

  16. Geodetical survey concerning the reactor vessel of the Paks nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czellar, A.; Zergi, I.

    1982-01-01

    A geodetical survey concerning the reactor vessel of the Paks nuclear power plant is reported. The accuracy of the position of the joining parts of the vessel to the primary coolant circuit was inspected by photogrammetry and by geodesic measurements applying iteration and traversing. The resulting dimensions of the vessel proved to be within the tolerance of the specified values. (Sz.J.)

  17. Seawater desalination plant using nuclear heating reactor coupled with MED process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shaorong; Dong Duo; Zhang Dafang; Wang Xiuzhen

    2000-01-01

    A small size plant for seawater desalination using nuclear heating reactor coupled with MED process was developed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, China. this seawater desalination plant was designed to supply potable water demand to some coastal location or island where both fresh water and energy source are severely lacking. It is also recommended as a demonstration and training facility for seawater desalination using nuclear energy. The design of small size of seawater desalination plant couples two proven technologies: Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR) and Multi-Effect Destination (MED) process. The NHR design possesses intrinsic and passive safety features, which was demonstrated by the experiences of the project NHR-5. the intermediate circuit and steam circuit were designed as the safety barriers between the NHR reactor and MED desalination system. Within 10-200 MWt of the power range of the heating reactor, the desalination plant could provide 8000 to 150,000 m 3 /d of high quality potable water. The design concept and parameters, safety features and coupling scheme are presented

  18. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.F.; McLaughlin, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    In the pressure vessel of the water-cooled nuclear reactor there is provided an internal flange on which the one- or two-part core barrel is hanging by means of an external flange. A cylinder is extending from the reactor vessel closure downwards to a seat on the core cupport structure and serves as compression element for the transmission of the clamping load from the closure head to the core barrel (upper guide structure). With the core barrel, subject to tensile stress, between the vessel internal flange and its seat on one hand and the compression of the cylinder resp. hold-down element between the closure head and the seat on the other a very strong, elastic sprung structure is obtained. (DG) [de

  19. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleite, W.; Bock, H.W.; Struensee, S.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the use of burnable poisons in a nuclear reactor, especially in PWRs, in order to improve the controllability of the reactor. An unsymmetrical arrangement in the lattice is provided, if necessary also by insertion of special rods for these additions. It is proposed to arrange the burnable poisons in fuel elements taken over from a previous burn-up cycle and to distribute them, going out from the side facing the control rods, over not more than 20% of the lenth of the fuel elements. It seems sufficient, for the burnable poisons to bind an initial reactivity of only 0.1% and to become ineffective after normal operation of 3 to 4 months. (ORU) [de

  20. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  1. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices VII, VIII, IX, and X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the release of radioactivity in reactor accidents; physical processes in reactor meltdown accidents; safety design rationale for nuclear power plants; and design adequacy

  2. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices VII, VIII, IX, and X. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the release of radioactivity in reactor accidents; physical processes in reactor meltdown accidents; safety design rationale for nuclear power plants; and design adequacy.

  3. Reactor coolant and associated systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Safety Guide outlines the design requirements for the reactor coolant and associated systems (RCAS) and the features required in order to achieve their safety functions. It covers design considerations for various reactor types and encompasses the safety aspects of the functions of the RCAS both during normal operation and following postulated initiating events, and to some extent also for decommissioning

  4. 1994: Notifiable events. 161 notified events in nuclear power plants and research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    In July 1995, the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Reactor Safety (BMU) presented the 1994 survey of 'Notifiable Events in Plants for Nuclear Fuel Fission - Nuclear Power Plants and Research Reactors Whose Maximum Power Exceeds 50 kW of Continuous Thermal Power - in the Federal Republic of Germany'. Since 1975, the operators of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany have been required to report to the nuclear supervisory authorities all notifiable events in accordance with standard national reporting criteria. This official reporting system serves for monitoring the safety status of notifiable plants and use the findings derived from the events reported to improve the safety status of plants within the supervisory procedures where necessary. The reports constitute an important base for the early detection of defects and for preventing the occurrence of similar defects in other plants. In 1994, there were 161 notifiable events in nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany. None of these events is to be classified as an accident, and in none of the events were dose limits under the German Radiation Protection Ordinance exceeded. (orig.) [de

  5. Nuclear power plant design characteristics. Structure of nuclear power plant design characteristics in the IAEA Power Reactor Information System (PRIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    One of the IAEA's priorities has been to maintain the Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) database as a viable and useful source of information on nuclear reactors worldwide. To satisfy the needs of PRIS users as much as possible, the PRIS database has included also a set of nuclear power plant (NPP) design characteristics. Accordingly, the PRIS Technical Meeting, organized in Vienna 4-7 October 2004, initiated a thorough revision of the design data area of the PRIS database to establish the actual status of the data and make improvements. The revision first concentrated on a detailed review of the design data completion and the composition of the design characteristics. Based on the results of the review, a modified set and structure of the unit design characteristics for the PRIS database has been developed. The main objective of the development has been to cover all significant plant systems adequately and provide an even more comprehensive overview of NPP unit designs stored in the PRIS database

  6. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Gruber, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor with control rods in channels between fuel assemblies wherein the fuel assemblies incorporate guide rods which protrude outwardly into the control rod channels to prevent the control rods from engaging the fuel elements. The guide rods also extend back into the fuel assembly such that they are relatively rigid members. The guide rods are tied to the fuel assembly end or support plates and serve as structural members which are supported independently of the fuel element. Fuel element spacing and support means may be attached to the guide rods. 9 claims

  7. Decommissioning strategy and schedule for a multiple reactor nuclear power plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Deiglys Borges; Moreira, Joao M.L.; Maiorino, Jose Rubens, E-mail: deiglys.monteiro@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: joao.moreira@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: joserubens.maiorino@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (CECS/UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Aplicadas

    2015-07-01

    The decommissioning is an important part of every Nuclear Power Plant life cycle gaining importance when there are more than one plant at the same site due to interactions that can arise from the operational ones and a decommissioning plant. In order to prevent undesirable problems, a suitable strategy and a very rigorous schedule should implemented and carried. In this way, decommissioning tasks such as fully decontamination and dismantling of activated and contaminated systems, rooms and structures could be delayed, posing as an interesting option to multiple reactor sites. The present work aims to purpose a strategy and a schedule for the decommissioning of a multiple reactor site highlighting the benefits of delay operational tasks and constructs some auxiliary services in the site during the stand by period of the shutdown plants. As a case study, will be presented a three-reactor site which the decommissioning process actually is in planning stage and that should start in the next decade. (author)

  8. Design of reactor containment systems for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. It is a revision of the Safety Guide on Design of the Reactor Containment Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (Safety Series No. 50-Sg-D1) issued in 1985 and supplements the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. The present Safety Guide was prepared on the basis of a systematic review of the relevant publications, including the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, the Safety fundamentals publication on The Safety of Nuclear Installations, Safety Guides, INSAG Reports, a Technical Report and other publications covering the safety of nuclear power plants. 1.2. The confinement of radioactive material in a nuclear plant, including the control of discharges and the minimization of releases, is a fundamental safety function to be ensured in normal operational modes, for anticipated operational occurrences, in design basis accidents and, to the extent practicable, in selected beyond design basis accidents. In accordance with the concept of defence in depth, this fundamental safety function is achieved by means of several barriers and levels of defence. In most designs, the third and fourth levels of defence are achieved mainly by means of a strong structure enveloping the nuclear reactor. This structure is called the 'containment structure' or simply the 'containment'. This definition also applies to double wall containments. 1.3. The containment structure also protects the reactor against external events and provides radiation shielding in operational states and accident conditions. The containment structure and its associated systems with the functions of isolation, energy management, and control of radionuclides and combustible gases are referred to as the containment systems

  9. Design of reactor containment systems for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. It is a revision of the Safety Guide on Design of the Reactor Containment Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (Safety Series No. 50-Sg-D1) issued in 1985 and supplements the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. The present Safety Guide was prepared on the basis of a systematic review of the relevant publications, including the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, the Safety fundamentals publication on The Safety of Nuclear Installations, Safety Guides, INSAG Reports, a Technical Report and other publications covering the safety of nuclear power plants. 1.2. The confinement of radioactive material in a nuclear plant, including the control of discharges and the minimization of releases, is a fundamental safety function to be ensured in normal operational modes, for anticipated operational occurrences, in design basis accidents and, to the extent practicable, in selected beyond design basis accidents. In accordance with the concept of defence in depth, this fundamental safety function is achieved by means of several barriers and levels of defence. In most designs, the third and fourth levels of defence are achieved mainly by means of a strong structure enveloping the nuclear reactor. This structure is called the 'containment structure' or simply the 'containment'. This definition also applies to double wall containments. 1.3. The containment structure also protects the reactor against external events and provides radiation shielding in operational states and accident conditions. The containment structure and its associated systems with the functions of isolation, energy management, and control of radionuclides and combustible gases are referred to as the containment systems

  10. Coupling of RO-MSF hybrid desalination plants with nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sulaiman, Khalil; Al-Mutaz, Ibrahim S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text.Reverse osmosis (RO) and multistage flash (MSF) desalination are the most widely commercial available processes. MSF utilizes stream in the brine heater as a primary source of energy. RO is derived mainly by electricity that pumps the feed water against the mambranes. Steam and electricity and be produced easily by nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactors may be coupled with deslination plants (MSF, RO or combined (hybrid) RO/MSF configuration). This integrated plant will be capable of producing power and water at reasonable cost. The capital and operating cost will be reduced and the excess power can be efficiently utilized. Maintenance and operating cost will drop significantly. In this paper, a techno-economic study of hybrid reverses osmosis /multistage flash desalination will be carried. The proposed configuration (hybrid RO/MSF) coupled with nuclear reactor is considered the most appropriate candidate system for the application of dual-purpose nuclear desalination plants. the design parameters for such a desalination hybrid system will be the applied pressure and recovery for reverse osmosis plant and the number of stages and the heat transfer areas for multistage flash plant

  11. Exploitation continuation of Fessenheim nuclear plant nr 1 reactor after thirty years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    After having recalled the regulatory framework, this report indicates how the Fukushima accident has been taken into account by the French nuclear safety authority (ASN) for the decision of keeping on operating the Fessenheim nuclear plant. Then, after a general presentation of nuclear installations, the report describes some peculiarities of the Fessenheim power plant with respect to the other French nuclear plants. It comments and discusses various issues: reactor exploitation, fuel management, vessel exploitation, exploitation of the main secondary circuits, of the confinement enclosure, and of other equipment. It recalls significant events, exploitation rules, and modifications brought to the reactor. It gives a global assessment. The authors report the safety re-examination (approach, compliance examination, security re-assessment), controls performed during decennial inspection (main controls and tests, implementation of modifications foreseen by safety re-examination, significant events, monitoring by the ASN, reactor restarting after the third decennial inspection). Perspectives are then discussed for the ten following years in terms of maintenance policy, ageing management, reactor vessel serviceability, and additional actions within the frame of ageing management. The operation continuation is then discussed

  12. Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant: a building block in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormack, M.

    1979-01-01

    Interest in breeder reactors dates from the Manhatten Project to the present effort to build the Clinch River Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) demonstration plant. Seven breeder-type reactors which were built during this time are described and their technological progress assessed. The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) has been designed to demonstrate that it can be licensed, can operate on a large power grid, and can provide industry with important experience. As the next logical step in LMFBR development, the project has suffered repeated cancellation efforts with only minor modifications to its schedule. Controversies have developed over the timing of a large-scale demonstration plant, the risks of proliferation, economics, and other problems. Among the innovative developments adopted for the CRBRP is a higher thermal efficiency potential, the type of development which Senator McCormack feels justifies continuing the project. He argues that the nuclear power program can and should be revitalized by continuing the CRBRP

  13. Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant: a building block in nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormack, M.

    1979-01-01

    Interest in breeder reactors dates from the Manhatten Project to the present effort to build the Clinch River Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) demonstration plant. Seven breeder-type reactors which were built during this time are described and their technological progress assessed. The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) has been designed to demonstrate that it can be licensed, can operate on a large power grid, and can provide industry with important experience. As the next logical step in LMFBR development, the project has suffered repeated cancellation efforts with only minor modifications to its schedule. Controversies have developed over the timing of a large-scale demonstration plant, the risks of proliferation, economics, and other problems. Among the innovative developments adopted for the CRBRP is a higher thermal efficiency potential, the type of development which Senator McCormack feels justifies continuing the project. He argues that the nuclear power program can and should be revitalized by continuing the CRBRP.

  14. Rock siting of nuclear power plants from a reactor safety standpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    The study has aimed at surveying the advantages and disadvantages of a rock sited nuclear power plant from a reactor safety standpoint. The studies performed are almost entirely concentrated on the BWR alternative. The design of a nuclear power plant in rock judged most appropriate has been studied in greater detail, and a relatively extensive safety analysis has been made. It is found that the presented technical design of the rock sited alternative is sufficiently advanced to form a basis for further projecting treatment. The chosen technical design of the reactor plant demands a cavern with a 45-50 metre span. Caverns without strengthening efforts with such spans are used in mines, but have no previously been used for industrial plants. Studies of the stability of such caverns show that a safety level is attainable corresponding to the safety required for the other parts of the nuclear power plant. The conditions are that the rock is of high quality, that necessary strengthening measures are taken and that careful studies of the rock are made before and during the blasting, and also during operation of the plant. When locating a rock sited nuclear power plant, the same criteria must be considered as for an above ground plant, with additional stronger demands for rock quality. The presented rock sited nuclear power plant has been assessed to cost 20 % more in total construction costs than a corresponding above ground plant. The motivations for rock siting also depend on whether a condensing plant for only electricity production, or a plant for combined power production and district heating, is considered. The latter would under certain circumstances make rock siting look more attractive. (author)

  15. Nuclear power plants: structure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrie, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety

  16. High Efficiency Nuclear Power Plants Using Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Rarick, Richard A.; Rangarajan, Rajmohan

    2009-01-01

    An overall system analysis approach is used to propose potential conceptual designs of advanced terrestrial nuclear power plants based on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) experience and utilizing Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) thermal-to-electric energy conversion technology. In particular conceptual designs for an advanced 1 GWe power plant with turbine reheat and compressor intercooling at a 950 K turbine inlet temperature (TIT), as well as near term 100 MWe demonstration plants with TITs of 950 and 1200 K are presented. Power plant performance data were obtained for TITs ranging from 650 to 1300 K by use of a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems code which considered the interaction between major sub-systems, including the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (LFTR), heat source and heat sink heat exchangers, turbo-generator machinery, and an electric power generation and transmission system. Optional off-shore submarine installation of the power plant is a major consideration.

  17. Optimization of reload of nuclear power plants using ACO together with the GENES reactor physics code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Alan M.M. de; Freire, Fernando S.; Nicolau, Andressa S.; Schirru, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The Nuclear reload of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) occurs whenever the burning of the fuel elements can no longer maintain the criticality of the reactor, that is, it cannot maintain the Nuclear power plant operates within its nominal power. Nuclear reactor reload optimization problem consists of finding a loading pattern of fuel assemblies in the reactor core in order to minimize the cost/benefit ratio, trying to obtain maximum power generation with a minimum of cost, since in all reloads an average of one third of the new fuel elements are purchased. This loading pattern must also satisfy constraints of symmetry and security. In practice, it consists of the placing 121 fuel elements in 121 core positions, in the case of the Angra 1 Brazilian Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), making this new arrangement provide the best cost/benefit ratio. It is an extremely complex problem, since it has around 1% of great places. A core of 121 fuel elements has approximately 10 13 combinations and 10 11 great locations. With this number of possible combinations it is impossible to test all, in order to choose the best. In this work a system called ACO-GENES is proposed in order to optimization the Nuclear Reactor Reload Problem. ACO is successfully used in combination problems, and it is expected that ACO-GENES will show a robust optimization system, since in addition to optimizing ACO, it allows important prior knowledge such as K infinite, burn, etc. After optimization by ACO-GENES, the best results will be validated by a licensed reactor physics code and will be compared with the actual results of the cycle. (author)

  18. Optimization of reload of nuclear power plants using ACO together with the GENES reactor physics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Alan M.M. de; Freire, Fernando S.; Nicolau, Andressa S.; Schirru, Roberto, E-mail: alan@lmp.ufrj.br, E-mail: andressa@lmp.ufrj.br, E-mail: schirru@lmp.ufrj.br, E-mail: ffreire@eletronuclear.gov.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Eletrobras Termonuclear S.A. (ELETRONUCLEAR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The Nuclear reload of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) occurs whenever the burning of the fuel elements can no longer maintain the criticality of the reactor, that is, it cannot maintain the Nuclear power plant operates within its nominal power. Nuclear reactor reload optimization problem consists of finding a loading pattern of fuel assemblies in the reactor core in order to minimize the cost/benefit ratio, trying to obtain maximum power generation with a minimum of cost, since in all reloads an average of one third of the new fuel elements are purchased. This loading pattern must also satisfy constraints of symmetry and security. In practice, it consists of the placing 121 fuel elements in 121 core positions, in the case of the Angra 1 Brazilian Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), making this new arrangement provide the best cost/benefit ratio. It is an extremely complex problem, since it has around 1% of great places. A core of 121 fuel elements has approximately 10{sup 13} combinations and 10{sup 11} great locations. With this number of possible combinations it is impossible to test all, in order to choose the best. In this work a system called ACO-GENES is proposed in order to optimization the Nuclear Reactor Reload Problem. ACO is successfully used in combination problems, and it is expected that ACO-GENES will show a robust optimization system, since in addition to optimizing ACO, it allows important prior knowledge such as K infinite, burn, etc. After optimization by ACO-GENES, the best results will be validated by a licensed reactor physics code and will be compared with the actual results of the cycle. (author)

  19. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-01-01

    Using alternate energy sources abundant in the U.S.A. to help curb foreign oil imports is vitally important from both national security and economic standpoints. Perhaps the most forwardlooking opportunity to realize national energy goals involves the integrated use of two energy sources that have an established technology base in the U.S.A., namely nuclear energy and coal. The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc.) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported (via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)) to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers

  20. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, F.; Glahe, E.

    1976-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor of the kind which is charged with spherical reaction elements and in which control rods are arranged to be thrust directly into the charge, each control rod has at least one screw thread on its external surface so that as the rod is thrust into the charge it is caused to rotate and thus make penetration easier. The length of each control rod may have two distinct portions, a latter portion which carries a screw thread and a lead-in portion which is shorter than the latter portion and which may carry a thread of greater pitch than that on the latter portion or may have a number of axially extending ribs instead of a thread

  1. Applicability of base-isolation R and D in non-reactor facilities to a nuclear reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidensticker, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Seismic isolation is gaining increased attention worldwide for use in a wide spectrum of critical facilities, ranging from hospitals and computing centers to nuclear power plants. While the fundamental principles and technology are applicable to all of these facilities, the degree of assurance that the actual behavior of the isolation systems is as specified varies with the nature of the facility involved. Obviously, the level of effort to provide such assurance for a nuclear power plant will be much greater than that required for, say, a critical computer facility. This paper reviews the research and development (R and D) programs ongoing for seismic isolation in non-nuclear facilities and related experience and makes a preliminary assessment of the extent to which such R and D and experience can be used for nuclear power plant application. Ways are suggested to improve the usefulness of such non-nuclear R and D in providing the high level of confidence required for the use of seismic isolation in a nuclear reactor plant

  2. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin [University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor.

  3. Knowledges and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    This document catalogs roughly 5300 knowledges and abilities of reactor operators and senior reactor operators. It results from a reanalysis of much larger job-task analysis data base compiled by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Knowledges and abilities are cataloged for 45 major power plant systems and 38 emergency evolutions, grouped according to 11 fundamental safety functions (e.g., reactivity control and reactor coolant system inventory control). With appropriate sampling from this catalog, operator licensing examinations having content validity can be developed. A structured sampling procedure for this catalog is under development by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and will be published as a companion document, ''Examiners' Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Examinations'' (NUREG-1121). The examinations developed by using the catalog and handbook will cover those topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55

  4. A full scope nuclear power plant simulator for multiple reactor types with virtual control panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Hisanori; Ueda, Hiroki; Kato, Takahisa

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes a full scope nuclear power plant simulator for multiple reactor types with virtual control panels which Toshiba developed and delivered. After the Fukushima DAIICHI nuclear power plants accident, it is required that all the people who are engaged in the design, manufacturing, operation, maintenance, management and regulation for the nuclear power plant should learn the wide and deep knowledge about the nuclear power plant design including the severe accident. For this purpose, the training with a full scope simulator is one of the most suitable ways. However the existing full scope simulators which are consist of the control panels replica of the referenced plants are costly and they are hard to remodel to fit to the real plant of the latest condition. That's why Toshiba developed and delivered the new concept simulator system which covers multiple referenced plants even though they have different design like BWR and PWR. The control panels of the simulator are made by combining 69 large Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) panels with touch screen instead of a control panel replica of referenced plant. The screen size of the each panel is 42 inches and 3 displays are arranged in tandem for one unit and 23 units are connected together. Each panel displays switches, indicators, recorders and lamps with the Computer Graphics (CG) and trainees operate them with touch operations. The simulator includes a BWR and a PWR simulator model, which enable trainees to learn the wide and deep knowledge about the nuclear power plant of BWR and PWR reactor types. (author)

  5. Brazilian nuclear power plants decommissioning plan for a multiple reactor site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Deiglys B.; Moreira, Joao M.L.; Maiorino, Jose R., E-mail: deiglys.monteiro@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: joao.moreira@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: joserubens.maiorino@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (CECS/UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Aplicadas. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Energia e Engenharia da Energia

    2015-07-01

    Actually, Brazil has two operating Nuclear Power Plants and a third one under construction, all at Central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto - CNAAA. To comply with regulatory aspects the power plants operator, Eletronuclear, must present to Brazilian Nuclear Regulatory Agency, CNEN, a decommissioning plan. Brazilian experience with decommissioning is limited because none of any nuclear reactor at the country was decommissioned. In literature, decommissioning process is well described despite few nuclear power reactors have been decommissioned around the world. Some different approach is desirable for multiple reactors sites, case of CNAAA site. During the decommissioning, a great amount of wastes will be produced and have to be properly managed. Particularly, the construction of Auxiliary Services on the site could be a good choice due to the possibility of reducing costs. The present work intends to present to the Eletronuclear some aspects of the decommissioning concept and decommissioning management, storage and disposal de wastes, based on the available literature, regulatory standards of CNEN and international experience as well as to suggest some solutions to be implemented at CNAAA site before starts the decommissioning project in order to maximize the benefits. (author)

  6. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  7. Outline of construction planning on No. 2 Reactor of the Shika Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Tetsuro; Kadoki, Shuichi; Kubo, Tetsuji

    1999-01-01

    The Hokuriku Electric Co., Ltd. carries out the expansion of the Shika Nuclear Power Plant No.2 (ABWR) to start its in March 2006. It is situated in north neighboring side of No. 1 reactor under operation at present, and its main buildings are planned to position a reactor building at mountain side and a turbine building at sea side as well as those in the No. 1 reactor. And, cooling water for steam condenser was taken in from an intake opening built at north side of the lifting space situated at the front of the power plant, and discharged into seawater from a flashing opening positioned about 600 m offing. Here were described on outline of main civil engineering such as base excavation engineering, concrete caisson production, oceanic establishment engineering, and facility for steam condenser, and characteristics of the engineering. (G.K.)

  8. Pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant. Environmental characterization information report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The typical plant chosen for characterization is a 10000-MWe nameplate rating with wet-natural-draft cooling towers and modern radwaste control and processing equipment. The process, plant operating parameters, resources needed, and the environmental residuals and products associated with the power plant are presented. Annual resource usage and pollutant discharges are shown in English and metric units, assuming an annual plant capacity factor of 70%. In addition to annual quantities, the summary table gives quantities in terms of 10 12 Btu (about 293 million kWh) of electrical energy produced for comparison among energy processes. Supporting information and calculation procedures for the data are given. Thirteen environmental points of interest are discussed individually. Cost information, typical radioactive releases, and use of cooling ponds as an alternative cooling method are discussed in appendixes. A glossary and list of acronyms and abbreviations are provided

  9. Development of graphic display program of reactor operating parameters for emergency exercise at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Yasunori; Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Gotou, Kazuko

    2001-01-01

    A scenario of nuclear emergency exercise based on the result of accident progress analysis is expected to ensure effective training. Thereupon a new graphic display program for reactor operating parameters has been developed to present real-time of plant process values (parameters), released radioactivities from the plant, and dose rate data around the site calculated by using the accident analysis code MAAP4 and other codes. This system has a trend graph screen displaying reactor operating parameters, an environmental dose rate summary screen indicating dose rate distribution around the site on the map, and a plant parameters summary screen showing important plant parameters on a simplified plant system diagram. One screen can be switched to another any time. It also has a jump-function easily accessing any stage during the exercise scenario in accordance with progress of the exercise. As a result of the application of this system to a real nuclear emergency exercise, it has been verified that this system is quite useful for confirming the parameters when the nuclear emergency exercise starts and the licensee reports the plant conditions to related bodied. (author)

  10. Life time of nuclear power plants and new types of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-05-01

    This report, realized by the Evaluation Parliamentary Office of scientific and technological choices, aims to answer simple but fundamental questions for the french electric power production. What are the phenomena which may limit the exploitation time of nuclear power plants? How can we fight against the aging, at which cost and with which safety? The first chapter presents the management of the nuclear power plants life time, an essential element of the park optimization but not a sufficient element. The second chapter details the EPR and the other reactors for 2015 as a bond between the today and tomorrow parks. The last chapter deals with the necessity of efforts in the research and development to succeed in 2035 and presents other reactors in project. (A.L.B.)

  11. Knowledges and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-20

    The Knowledges and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operations: Savannah River Site (SRS) Production Reactors, provides the basis for the development of content-valid certification examinations for Senior Reactor Operators (SROs) and Central Control Room Supervisors (SUP). The position of Shift Technical Engineer (STE) has been included in the catalog for completeness. This new SRS reactor operating shift crew position is held by an individual holding a CCR Supervisor Certification who has received special engineering and technical training. Also, the STE has a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering or a related technical field. The SRS catalog contains approximately 2500 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for SROs and SUPs at heavy water moderated production reactors. Each K/A statement has been rated for its importance to the safe operation of the plant in a manner ensuring the health and safety of the public. The SRS K/A catalog is presently organized into five major sections: Plant Systems grouped by Safety Function, Plant Wide Generic K/As, Emergency Plant Evolutions, Theory and Components (to be developed).

  12. Reactor type choice and characteristics for a small nuclear heat and electricity co-generation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kukui; Li Manchang; Tang Chuanbao

    1997-01-01

    In China heat supply consumes more than 70 percent of the primary energy resource, which makes for heavy traffic and transportation and produces a lot of polluting materials such as NO x , SO x and CO 2 because of use of the fossil fuel. The utilization of nuclear power into the heat and electricity co-generation plant contributes to the global environmental protection. The basic concept of the nuclear system is an integral type reactor with three circuits. The primary circuit equipment is enclosed in and linked up directly with reactor vessel. The third circuit produces steam for heat and electricity supply. This paper presents basic requirements, reactor type choice, design characteristics, economy for a nuclear co-generation plant and its future application. The choice of the main parameters and the main technological process is the key problem of the nuclear plant design. To make this paper clearer, take for example a double-reactor plant of 450 x 2MW thermal power. There are two sorts of main technological processes. One is a water-water-steam process. Another is water-steam-steam process. Compared the two sorts, the design which adopted the water-water-steam technological process has much more advantage. The system is simplified, the operation reliability is increased, the primary pressure reduces a lot, the temperature difference between the secondary and the third circuits becomes larger, so the size and capacity of the main components will be smaller, the scale and the cost of the building will be cut down. In this design, the secondary circuit pressure is the highest among that of the three circuits. So the primary circuit radioactivity can not leak into the third circuit in case of accidents. (author)

  13. The contract of design of an atomic reactor system in Yonggwang - 5, 6 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    This is a contract of design of an atomic reactor system in Yonggwang 5, 6 nuclear power plant. It has the general contract condition. In the appendix, it indicates the detail regulations between two parties which are the coverage of division on the responsibility, schedule of the delivery, standard of the technology, guarantee, drawing and paper support of the Korea Electric Power Corporation, support of technology drill, test, regulations of code and standard and list of items and prices.

  14. Multi-stage-flash desalination plants of relative small performance with integrated pressurized water reactors as a nuclear heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, G.; Peltzer, M.

    1977-01-01

    In the Krupp-GKSS joint study MINIPLEX the requirements for seawater-desalination plants with a performance in the range of 10 000 to 80 000 m 3 distillate per day heated by a nuclear reactor are investigated. The reactor concept is similar to the Integrated Pressurized Water Reactor (IPWR) of the nuclear ship OTTO HAHN. The design study shows that IPWR systems have specific advantages up to 200 MWth compared to other reactor types at least being adapted for single- and dual-purpose desalination plants. The calculated costs of the desalinated water show that due to fuel cost advantages of reactors small and medium nuclear desalination plants are economically competetive with oil-fired plants since the steep rise of oil price in autumn 1973. (author)

  15. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to water cooled reactors and in particular to the cooling system of steam generating heavy water reactors (SGHWR). A two-coolant circuit is described for the latter. Full constructural details are given. (U.K.)

  16. CANDU nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakaria, B. K.

    1994-01-01

    AECL has over 40 years of experience in the nuclear field. Over the past 20 years, this unique Canadian nuclear technology has made a worldwide presence, In addition to 22 CANDU reactors in Canada, there are also two in India, one in Pakistan, one in Argentina, four in Korea and five in Romania. CANDU advancements are based on evolutionary plant improvements. They consist of system performance improvements, design technology improvements and research and development in support of advanced nuclear power. Given the good performance of CANOU plants, it is important that this CANDU operating experience be incorporated into new and repeat designs

  17. Nuclear power desalinating complex with IRIS reactor plant and Russian distillation desalinating unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostin, V. I.; Panov, Yu.K.; Polunichev, V. I.; Fateev, S. A.; Gureeva, L. V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper has been prepared as a result of Russian activities on the development of nuclear power desalinating complex (NPDC) with the IRIS reactor plant (RP). The purpose of the activities was to develop the conceptual design of power desalinating complex (PDC) and to evaluate technical and economical indices, commercial attractiveness and economical efficiency of PDC based on an IRIS RP with distillation desalinating plants. The paper presents the main results of studies as applied to dual-purpose PDC based on IRIS RP with different types of desalinating plants, namely: characteristics of nuclear power desalinating complex based on IRIS reactor plant using Russian distillation desalinating technologies; prospective options of interface circuits of the IRIS RP with desalinating plants; evaluations of NPDC with IRIS RP output based on selected desalinating technologies for water and electric power supplied to the grid; cost of water generated by NPDC for selected interface circuits made by the IAEA DEEP code as well as by the Russian TEO-INVEST code; cost evaluation results for desalinated water of PDC operating on fossil fuel and conditions for competitiveness of the nuclear PDC based on IRIS RP compared with analog desalinating complexes operating on fossil fuel.(author)

  18. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Executive summary: main report. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    Information is presented concerning the objectives and organization of the reactor safety study; the basic concepts of risk; the nature of nuclear power plant accidents; risk assessment methodology; reactor accident risk; and comparison of nuclear risks to other societal risks.

  19. Installation and commissioning of operation nuclear power plant reactor protection system modernization project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weiwei

    2010-01-01

    Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant is the first nuclear power plant in mainland China; it is also the first one which realizes the modernization of analog technology based Reactor Protection System in the operation nuclear power plant of China. The implementation schedule is the shortest one which use same digital technology platform (TELEPERM XS of AREVA NP) to modifying the safety class I and C system in the world, the whole project spent 28 months from equipment contract signed to putting system into operation. It open up a era for operation nuclear power plant using mature digital technology to make safety class I and C system modernization in China. The important practical significance of this successful project is very obvious. This article focus on two important project stage--equipment installation and system commissioning, it is based on a large number of engineering implementation fact, it covers the problems and solutions happened during the installation and commission. The purpose of the article is to share the experience and lessons of safety I and C system modernization for other operation nuclear power plant. (authors)

  20. Electric failure on the reactor n.3 of the nuclear power plant of Dampierre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-05-01

    This note of information resumes the progress of the electric failure on the reactor n.3 of the nuclear power plant of Dampierre, the organization during the incident, it establishes then a comparison with the incident arisen to Forsmark in 2006 and reminds that it lead in an inspection on behalf of the Asn which noticed that all the procedures had been respected by the operators and did not noticed any abnormality in the maintenance. This event was classified at the level 1 of the international nuclear event scale (INES). (N.C.)

  1. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Boiling water reactors, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Boiling-Water Reactors (BWRs) (NUREG-1123, Revision 1) provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators (ROs) and senior reactor operators (SROs). The examinations developed using the BWR Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examiner Standards (NUREG-1021) and the Examiner`s Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Written Examinations (NUREG/BR-0122), will cover the topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (10 CFR 55). The BWR Catalog contains approximately 7,000 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for ROs and SROs at BWRs. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Organization of the Catalog, Generic Knowledge and Ability Statements, Plant Systems grouped by Safety Functions, Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions, Components, and Theory. Revision 1 to the BWR Catalog represents a modification in form and content of the original catalog. The K/As were linked to their applicable 10 CFR 55 item numbers. SRO level K/As were identified by 10 CFR 55.43 item numbers. The plant-wide generic and system generic K/As were combined in one section with approximately one hundred new K/As. Component Cooling Water and Instrument Air Systems were added to the Systems Section. Finally, High Containment Hydrogen Concentration and Plant Fire On Site evolutions added to the Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions section.

  2. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the earthquake proofness and also increase the safety to a nuclear reactor container by preventing bucklings upon earthquake. Constitution: A device for absorbing the deformation exerted from nuclear reactor buildings is disposed to a suppression chamber constituting a reactor container. When a nclear power plant encounters earthquakes, the entire reactor buildings are shaken and deformations of buildings are transmitted by way of building shell walls to a container and the forcive deforming forces are absorbed in the deformation absorbing device. That is, bellows are formed at the base of the container, which are deformed by the deforming forces to absorb the forcive deforming amount to moderate the stresses resulted to the suppression chamber. Thus, the rigidity to the bending of the container can be reduced and allowable displacement to the bucklings can be increased to prevent the buckling, by which earthquake proofness is improved and the safety is increased. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Data list of nuclear power plants of pressurized-water reactor type in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Fumio; Harayama, Yasuo

    1981-08-01

    This report has collected and compiled the data concerning performances, equipments and installations for nuclear power plants of the pressurized-water reactor type in Japan. The data used in the report are based on informations that were collected before December in 1980. The report is edited by modifing changes of the data appeared after publication of 1979 edition (JAERI-M 8947), and extending the data-package to cover new plants proposed thereafter. All data have been processed and tabulated with a computer program FREP, which has been developed as an exclusive use of data processing. (author)

  4. Thirtieth anniversary of reactor accident in A-1 Nuclear Power Plant Jaslovske Bohunice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.; Matel, L.

    2007-01-01

    The facts about reactor accidents in A-1 Nuclear Power Plant Jaslovske Bohunice, Slovakia are presented. There was the reactor KS150 (HWGCR) cooled with carbon dioxide and moderated with heavy water. A-1 NPP was commissioned on December 25, 1972. The first reactor accident happened on January 5, 1976 during fuel loading. This accident has not been evaluated according to the INES scale up to the present time. The second serious accident in A-1 NPP occurred on February 22, 1977 also during fuel loading. This INES level 4 of reactor accident resulted in damaged fuel integrity with extensive corrosion damage of fuel cladding and release of radioactivity into the plant area. The A-1 NPP was consecutively shut down and is being decommissioned in the present time. Both reactor accidents are described briefly. Some radioecological and radiobiological consequences of accidents and contamination of area of A-1 NPP as well as of Manivier Canal and Dudvah River as result of flooding during the decommissioning are presented (authors)

  5. Preliminary materials selection issues for the next generation nuclear plant reactor pressure vessel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Shah, V. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-03-21

    In the coming decades, the United States and the entire world will need energy supplies to meet the growing demands due to population increase and increase in consumption due to global industrialization. One of the reactor system concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), with helium as the coolant, has been identified as uniquely suited for producing hydrogen without consumption of fossil fuels or the emission of greenhouse gases [Generation IV 2002]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected this system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, to demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity and hydrogen production within the next 15 years. The NGNP reference concepts are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactors with a design goal outlet helium temperature of {approx}1000 C [MacDonald et al. 2004]. The reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The use of molten salt coolant, especially for the transfer of heat to hydrogen production, is also being considered. The NGNP is expected to produce both electricity and hydrogen. The process heat for hydrogen production will be transferred to the hydrogen plant through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The basic technology for the NGNP has been established in the former high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and demonstration plants (DRAGON, Peach Bottom, AVR, Fort St. Vrain, and THTR). In addition, the technologies for the NGNP are being advanced in the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) project, and the South African state utility ESKOM-sponsored project to develop the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Furthermore, the Japanese HTTR and Chinese HTR-10 test reactors are demonstrating the feasibility of some of the planned components and materials. The proposed high operating temperatures in the VHTR place significant constraints on the choice of material selected for the reactor pressure vessel for

  6. Synthesis of Model Based Robust Stabilizing Reactor Power Controller for Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Habib Malik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a nominal SISO (Single Input Single Output model of PHWR (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor type nuclear power plant is developed based on normal moderator pump-up rate capturing the moderator level dynamics using system identification technique. As the plant model is not exact, therefore additive and multiplicative uncertainty modeling is required. A robust perturbed plant model is derived based on worst case model capturing slowest moderator pump-up rate dynamics and moderator control valve opening delay. Both nominal and worst case models of PHWR-type nuclear power plant have ARX (An Autoregressive Exogenous structures and the parameters of both models are estimated using recursive LMS (Least Mean Square optimization algorithm. Nominal and worst case discrete plant models are transformed into frequency domain for robust controller design purpose. The closed loop system is configured into two port model form and H? robust controller is synthesized. The H?controller is designed based on singular value loop shaping and desired magnitude of control input. The selection of desired disturbance attenuation factor and size of the largest anticipated multiplicative plant perturbation for loop shaping of H? robust controller form a constrained multi-objective optimization problem. The performance and robustness of the proposed controller is tested under transient condition of a nuclear power plant in Pakistan and found satisfactory.

  7. An integral reactor design concept for a nuclear co-generation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.J.; Kim, J.I.; Kim, K.K.; Chang, M.H.; Moon, K.S.

    1997-01-01

    An integral reactor concept for nuclear cogeneration plant is being developed at KAERI as an attempt to expand the peaceful utilization of well established commercial nuclear technology, and related industrial infrastructure such as desalination technology in Korea. Advanced technologies such as intrinsic and passive safety features are implemented in establishing the design concepts to enhance the safety and performance. Research and development including laboratory-scale tests are concurrently underway to evaluate the characteristics of various passive safety concepts and provide the proper technical data for the conceptual design. This paper describes the preliminary safety and design concepts of the advanced integral reactor. Salient features of the design are hexagonal core geometry, once-through helical steam generator, self-pressurizer, and seismic resistant fine control CEDMS, passive residual heat removal system, steam injector driven passive containment cooling system. (author)

  8. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.) [pt

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2010-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750°C, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

  10. Reliability Analysis Study of Digital Reactor Protection System in Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Xiao Ming; Liu, Tao; Tong, Jie Juan; Zhao, Jun

    2011-01-01

    The Digital I and C systems are believed to improve a plants safety and reliability generally. The reliability analysis of digital I and C system has become one research hotspot. Traditional fault tree method is one of means to quantify the digital I and C system reliability. Review of advanced nuclear power plant AP1000 digital protection system evaluation makes clear both the fault tree application and analysis process to the digital system reliability. One typical digital protection system special for advanced reactor has been developed, which reliability evaluation is necessary for design demonstration. The typical digital protection system construction is introduced in the paper, and the process of FMEA and fault tree application to the digital protection system reliability evaluation are described. Reliability data and bypass logic modeling are two points giving special attention in the paper. Because the factors about time sequence and feedback not exist in reactor protection system obviously, the dynamic feature of digital system is not discussed

  11. Medical surveillance of nuclear power plant workers during reactor shutdown using whole-body counting and excretion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux-Desmis, C.

    1987-01-01

    After a review of radioactivity basis and radiation protection principles, the various aspects of medical surveillance of nuclear power plant workers during reactor shutdown, are presented. Internal contamination incidents that happened during 1986-1987 shutdown of Paluel reactor are exposed. Internal contamination levels are evaluated using whole-body counting and radionuclide determination in feces and urine and compared with dose limits [fr

  12. Development of advanced ultrasonic inspection system for nuclear power plant reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawaragi, Kazuo; Miyake, Yoshio; Nakayama, Junji; Tachibana, Kiyoshi; Oomichi, Takao; Fukagawa, Yukio; Fujiwara, Masahiro; Honmura, Shiro

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection machine consisting of large and stiff columns and guide rails has been usually used in the pre-service inspection (PSI) and in-service inspection (ISI) of the nuclear power plant reactor vessels. However, the machine is so large-sized and heavy that maintenance and handling are degraded. To solve these problems, our robotics technology and idea obtained from experience of reactor vessel ISI have been applied to develop a new second generation machine that can dramatically reduce critical path time of reactor vessel ISI. This system is characterized by the following features. (1) It can move automatically and can set the position accurately by underwater positioning system. (2) Inspection is made by the articulated manipulator of high rigidity and high path accuracy. (3) The total weight is approx 300 kg in air (0 kg underwater). So the plant's polar crane is not required during inspection. Realization of this system, we have studied and designed all of the systems. We have also fabricated prototype machine to make the functional test using full scale mock up of reactor vessel. (author)

  13. The Research on Operation Strategy of Nuclear Power Plant with Multi-reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Maoyao; Peng, Minjun; Cheng Shouyu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the operation characteristics and control strategy of nuclear power plant (NPP) with multi-modular pressurized water reactors (PWR) were researched through simulation. The main objective of this research was to ensure the coordinated operation and satisfy the convenience of turbine-generator and reactor's load adjustment in NPP with multi-reactors (MR). According to the operation characteristics of MR-NPP, the operation and control strategy was proposed, which was 'he average allocation of load for each reactor and maintaining average temperature of coolant at a constant? The control system was designed based the operation and control strategy. In order to research the operation characteristics and control strategy of MR-NPP, the paper established the transient analysis model which included the reactors and thermal hydraulic models, turbine model, could simulate and analyze on different operating conditions such as load reducing, load rising. Based on the proposed operation and control strategy and simulation models, the paper verified and validated the operation strategy and control system through load reducing, load rising. The results of research simulation showed that the operation strategy was feasible and can make the MR-NPP running safely as well as steadily on different operating conditions

  14. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilroy, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved cover structure for liquid metal cooled fast breeder type reactors is described which it is claimed reduces the temperature differential across the intermediate grid plate of the core cover structure and thereby reduces its subjection to thermal stresses. (UK)

  15. Transportable nuclear power plant TEC-M with two reactor plants of improved safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogloblin, B.G.; Sazonov, A.G.; Svishchev, A.M.; Gromov, B.F.; Zelensky, V.N.; Komkova, O.I.; Sidorov, V.I.; Tolstopyatov, V.P.; Toshinsky, G.I.

    1993-01-01

    Liquid metals are the best to meet the requirements of inherently safety nuclear power plants among the coolants used. A great experience has been gained in lead coolant power plant development and operation as applied to transportable power set-ups. Low chemical activity of this coolant with respect to air-water interaction is a determining factor for this coolant. The transportable nuclear power plant is described. It is intended to generate electric power for populated areas placed a long distance from the main electric power supply sources where it is difficult or not economical to deliver the conventional types of fuel. There are several remote areas in Siberia, Kamchatka in need of this type of power plant

  16. Analysis of Dynamic Regimes at Nuclear Power Plants with Fast Reactors Using the JOKER Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seleznev, E.F.; Aizatulin, A.I.; Belov, A.A.; Prianichnikov, A.V.; Fedorov, I.V.; Karpenko, A.I.; Tuchkov, A.M.; Balakhnin, E.V.

    2008-01-01

    To analyze safety of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) with fast reactors, including studying of different NPP operational modes ranging from normal operation up to hypothetical accidents, a software complex - the JOKER Code [1] - was created simulating the behavior of parameters at BN-type fast reactor under steady-state and transient processes therein through the use of: -reactor core model; and -models of equipment and pipelines of primary, secondary and third circuits of the reactor. The core model contains: a neutron-physical model; a thermal-hydraulics model; and a core thermo-mechanics model. The neutron-physical model is based on the use of spatially distributed kinetics of the core. One-dimensional thermal-hydraulic model with regimes 'before' and 'after' the onset of coolant boiling serves as the thermal-hydraulics model. The thermo-mechanics model includes examination of the behavior of fuel and cladding for the cases of fuel burnup, cracking and melting of both cladding and fuel. The Codes GEFEST (Russia) [2] and SAS-4? (USA) [3] are the JOKER Code's analogues. The GEFEST Code is used at NPP with BN-600 fast reactors to justify safe operation of real fuel loads into reactor installations - mainly for calculations of neutron-physical parameters of the core under steady-state regime; the code has a license of the Russian Supervisory Authority and has been used over many years at Beloyarskaya NPP. The SAS-4? Code developed at ANL (USA) is well known throughout the world as a software complex for analysis of fast reactor projects. (authors)

  17. Nuclear reactors for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, P.K.; Kamble, M.T.; Dulera, I.V.

    2013-01-01

    For the sustainable development of nuclear power plants with enhanced safety features, economic competitiveness, proliferation resistance and physical protection, several advanced reactor developments have been initiated world-wide. The major advanced reactor initiatives and the proposed advanced reactor concepts have been briefly reviewed along with their advantages and challenges. Various advanced reactor designs being pursued in India have also been briefly described in the paper. (author)

  18. Cutting Technology for Decommissioning of the Reactor Pressure Vessels in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwan Seong; Kim, Geun Ho; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Byung Seon

    2012-01-01

    Lots of nuclear power plants have been decommissioned during the last 2 decades. An essential part of this work is the dismantling of the Reactor Pressure Vessel and its Internals. For this purpose a wide variety of different cutting technologies have been developed, adapted and applied. A detailed introduction to Plasma Arc cutting, Contact Arc Metal cutting and Abrasive Water Suspension Jet cutting is given, as it turned out that these cutting technologies are particularly suitable for these type of segmentation work. A comparison of these technologies including gaseous emissions, cutting power, manipulator requirements as well as selected design approaches are given. Process limits as well as actual limits of application are presented

  19. On the reliability of steam generator performance at nuclear power plants with WWER type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styrikovich, M.A.; Margulova, T.Kh.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of ensuring reliable operation of steam generators in a nuclear power plant with a water-cooled, water-moderated reactor (WWER) was studied. At a nuclear power plant with a vertical steam generator (specifically, a Westinghouse product) the steam generator tubes were found to have been penetrated. Shutdown was due to corrosion disintegration of the austenitic stainless steel, type 18/8, used as pipe material for the heater surface. The corrosion was the result of the action of chlorine ions concentrated in the moisture contained in the iron oxide films deposited in low parts of the tube bundle, directly at the tube plate. Blowing through did not ensure complete removal of the film, and in some cases the construction features of the steam generator made removal of the film practically impossible. Replacement of type 18/8 stainless steel by other construction material, e.g., Inconel, did not give good results. To ensure reliable operation of vertical steam generators in domestic practice, the generators are designed without a low tube plate (a variant diagram of the vertical steam generator of such construction for the water-cooled, water-moderated reactor 1000 is presented). When low tube plates are used the film deposition is intolerable. For organization of a non-film regime a complex treatment of the feed water is used, in which the amount of complexion is calculated from the stoichmetric ratios with the composition of the feed water. It is noted that, if 100% condensate purification is used with complexon processing of the feed water to the generator, we can calculate the surface of the steam-generator heater without considering the outer placement on the tubes. In this the cost of the steam generator and all the nuclear power plants with WWER type reactors is decreased even with installation of a 100% condensate purification. It is concluded that only simultaneous solution of construction and water-regime problems will ensure relaible operation of

  20. Analysis of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in an A BWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escorcia O, D.; Salazar S, E.

    2016-09-01

    The present work aims to recreate the accident occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan on March 11, 2011, making use of an academic simulator of forced circulation of the A BWR reactor provided by the IAEA to know the scope of this simulator. The simulator was developed and distributed by the IAEA for academic purposes and contains the characteristics and general elements of this reactor to be able to simulate transients and failures of different types, allowing also to observe the general behavior of the reactor, as well as several phenomena and present systems in the same. Is an educational tool of great value, but it does not have a scope that allows the training of plant operators. To recreate the conditions of the Fukushima accident in the simulator, we first have to know what events led to this accident, as well as the actions taken by operators and managers to reduce the consequences of this accident; and the sequence of events that occurred during the course of the accident. Differences in the nuclear power plant behavior are observed and interpreted throughout the simulation, since the Fukushima plant technology and the simulator technology are not the same, although they have several elements in common. The Fukushima plant had an event that by far exceeded the design basis, which triggered in an accident that occurred in the first place by a total loss of power supply, followed by the loss of cooling systems, causing a level too high in temperature, melting the core and damaging the containment accordingly, allowing the escape of hydrogen and radioactive material. As a result of the simulation, was determined that the scope of the IAEA academic simulator reaches the entrance of the emergency equipment, so is able to simulate almost all the events occurred at the time of the earthquake and the arrival of the tsunami in the nuclear power plant of Fukushima Daiichi. However, due to its characteristics, is not able to simulate later

  1. Topics to be covered in safety analysis reports for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors or boiling water reactors in the F.R.G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, H.A.G.

    1977-01-01

    This manual aims at defining the standards to be used in Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants with Pressurized Water Reactors or Boiling Water Reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany. The topics to be covered are: Information about the site (geographic situation, settlement, industrial and military facilities, transport and communications, meteorological conditions, geological, hydrological and seismic conditions, radiological background), description of the power plant (building structures, safety vessel, reactor core, cooling system, ventilation systems, steam power plant, electrical facilities, systems for measurement and control), indication of operation (commissioning, operation, safety measures, radiation monitoring, organization), incident analysis (reactivity incidents, loss-of-coolant incidents, external impacts). (HP) [de

  2. Nuclear reactors; graphical symbols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This standard contains graphical symbols that reveal the type of nuclear reactor and is used to design graphical and technical presentations. Distinguishing features for nuclear reactors are laid down in graphical symbols. (orig.) [de

  3. Training simulator for nuclear power plant reactor control model and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerbuejewski, F.R.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a method and system for the real-time dynamic simulation of a nuclear power plant for training purposes, wherein a control console has a plurality of manual and automatic remote control devices for operating simulated control rods and has indicating devices for monitoring the physical operation of a simulated reactor. Digital computer means are connected to the control console to calculate data values for operating the monitoring devices in accordance with the control devices. The simulation of the reactor control rod mechanism is disclosed whereby the digital computer means operates the rod position monitoring devices in a real-time that is a fraction of the computer time steps and simulates the quick response of a control rod remote control lever together with the delayed response upon a change of direction

  4. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Toshihisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent cladding tube injuries due to thermal expansion of each of the pellets by successively extracting each of the control rods loaded in the reactor core from those having less number of notches, as well as facilitate the handling work for the control rods. Constitution: A recycle flow control device is provided to a circulation pump for forcibly circulating coolants in the reactor container and an operational device is provided for receiving each of the signals concerning number of notches for each of the control rods and flow control depending on the xenon poisoning effect obtained from the signals derived from the in-core instrument system connected to the reactor core. The operational device is connected with a control rod drive for moving each of the control rods up and down and a recycle flow control device. The operational device is set with a pattern for the aimed control rod power and the sequence of extraction. Upon extraction of the control rods, they are extracted successively from those having less notch numbers. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. Questions to the reactors power upgrade of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas M, B.

    2014-08-01

    The two reactors of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) were subjected to power upgrade labors with the purpose of achieving 20% upgrade on the original power; these labors concluded in August 24, 2010 for the Reactor 1 and in January 16, 2011 for the Reactor 2, however in January of 2014, the NNP-L V has not received by part of the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) the new Operation License to be able to work with the new power, because it does not fulfill all the necessary requirements of safety. In this work is presented and analyzed the information obtained in this respect, with data provided by the Instituto Federal de Acceso a la Informacion Publica y Proteccion de Datos (IFAI) and the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) in Mexico, as well as the opinion of some workers of the NPP-L V. The Governing Board of the CFE announcement that will give special continuation to the behavior on the operation and reliability of the NPP-L V, because the frequency of not announced interruptions was increased 7 times more in the last three years. (Author)

  6. Technical and economic proposal for the extension of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant with an additional nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal C, C.D.; Francois L, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The increment of the human activities in the industrial environments and of generation of electric power, through it burns it of fossil fuels, has brought as consequence an increase in the atmospheric concentrations of the calls greenhouse effect gases and, these in turn, serious repercussions about the environment and the quality of the alive beings life. The recent concern for the environment has provoked that industrialized countries and not industrialized carry out international agreements to mitigate the emission from these gases to the atmosphere. Our country, like part of the international community, not is exempt of this problem for what is necessary that programs begin guided toward the preservation of the environment. As for the electric power generation, it is indispensable to diversify the sources of primary energy; first, to knock down the dependence of the hydrocarbons and, second, to reduce the emission of polluting gases to the atmosphere. In this item, the nucleo electric energy not only has proven to be safe and competitive technical and economically, able to generate big quantities of electric power with a high plant factor and a considerable cost, but rather also, it is one of the energy sources that less pollutants it emits to the atmosphere. The main object of this work is to carry out a technical and economic proposal of the extension of the Laguna Verde Nuclear power plant (CNLV) with a new nuclear reactor of type A BWR (Advanced Boiling Water Reactor), evolutionary design of the BWR technology to which belong the two reactors installed at the moment in the plant, with the purpose of increasing the installed capacity of generation of the CNLV and of the Federal Commission of Electricity (CFE) with foundation in the sustainable development and guaranteeing the protection of the environment by means of the exploitation of a clean and sure technology that counts at the moment with around 12,000 year-reactor of operational experience in more of

  7. Nuclear reactor operator licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursey, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, which was amended in 1974 by the Energy Reorganization Act, established the requirement that individuals who had the responsibility of operating the reactors in nuclear power plants must be licensed. Section 107 of the act states ''the Commission shall (1) prescribe uniform conditions for licensing individuals; (2) determine the qualifications of such individuals; and (3) issue licenses to such individuals in such form as the Commission may prescribe.'' The article discusses the types of licenses, the selection and training of individuals, and the administration of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing examinations

  8. Researching and improving the reliability of reactor protection system of Qinshan nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zuyue; Sheng Jiannan

    1997-01-01

    Due to the original design defects of the Reactor Protection System (RPS) of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, this system has brought about a number of reactor shutdown accidents and Engineered Safety Features (ESF) mis-activation events which have seriously endangered safe and steady operation of the nuclear power plant. So over three years have been spent on research on the reform of the original design on the premise that the general wiring of the system should remain the same and that the system size should also remain small to be contained in the original cabinets. The following improvements were made: (1) Increase the system's anti-disturbance capability. The system's zero volt bus floating designs were modified to surmount the disturbance resulting from the bad isolation performance of impedance-isolated amplifier; Double grounds have been added to logical modules to surmount the disturbance resulting from zero volt floating bus during the replacement of single module with two connectors; The opto-coupling circuit in its oscillation input stage of Engineered Safety Features have been improved to increase its reliability. (2)Modify to output activation part of the system. The new type of output relays were selected and the relay activation circuits were redesigned in which switcher activation mode is used instead of amplifier activation mode so as to increase the reliability of relay operation and reduce the power consumption; CMOS buffer gates in the input and output stage of the circuit were used to match TTL circuits to CMOS circuits of the system

  9. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Weber, R.; Bauer, A.

    1975-01-01

    The refuelling of a PWR power reactor of about 1,200 MWe is performed by a transport pipe in the containment leading from an external to an internal fuel pit. A wagon to transport the fuel elements can go from a vertical loading position to an also vertical deloading position in the inner fuel pit via guide rollers. The necessary horizontal movement is effected by means of a cable line through the transport pipe which is inclined at least 10 0 . Gravity thus helps in the movement to the deloading position. The cable line with winch is fastened outside the containment. Swivelling devices tip the wagon from the horizontal to the vertical position or vice versa. Loading and deloading are done laterally. (TK/LH) [de

  10. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S. Blaine

    2009-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In

  11. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  12. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  13. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reactor coolant channel is described that is suitable for sub-cooled reactors as in pressurised water reactors as well as for bulk boiling, as in boiling water reactors and steam generating nuclear reactors. The arrangement aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel elements and the coolant. Full constructional details are given. See also other similar patents by the author. (U.K.)

  14. Separation review program for reactor protection system and engineered safeguard systems in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, F.J.; Walrod, B.E.

    1980-01-01

    This review program is utilized during the design of a nuclear power plant to insure separation between interdiscipline design for the Reactor Protection System (RPS) and Engineered Safeguard Systems (ESS). Color coded transparent drawings of the RPS and ESS are produced by each discipline. The separation is then reviewed by overlaying drawings of different disciplines on a light table. When this inspection shows that RPS or ESS elements have less than the established minimum separation, an analysis is performed to determine what, if any, design revision is necessary to insure proper separation. ''Hazard'' drawings are also made for determination of each type of potential hazard in each area of the plant. The review is a continuing process as the design progresses and is revised by any discipline. 5 refs

  15. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irion, L.; Tautz, J.; Ulrych, G.

    1976-01-01

    This additional patent complements the arrangement of non-return valves to prevent loss of cooling water on fracture of external tubes in the main coolant circuit (according to PS 24 24 427.7) by ensuring that the easily movable valves only operate in case of a fault, but do not flutter in operation, because the direction of flow is not the same at each location where they are installed. The remedy for this undesirable effect consists of allocating 1 non-return valve unit with 5 to 10 valves to each (of several) ducts for the cooling water intake. These units are installed in the annular space between the reactor vessel and the pressure vessel below the inlet of the ducts. Due to flow guidance surfaces in the same space, the incoming cooling water is deflected downwards and as the guiding surfaces are closed at the sides, must pass parallel to the valves of the non-return valve unit. On fracture of the external cooling water inlet pipe concerned, all valves of this unit close due to reversal of flow on the outlet side. (TK) [de

  16. Development of nuclear power plant simulators for Soviet-designed nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, P.; Tutu, N.K.; Cleary, E.J.; Erickson, K.G.; Yoder, J.; Kroshilin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (US DOE), under the US government's International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP), is implementing a program of developing and providing simulators for many of the Russian and Ukrainian Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) manage and provide technical oversight of the various INSP simulator projects for DOE. The program also includes a simulator technology transfer process to simulator design organizations in Russia and Ukraine. Training programs, installation of new simulators, and enhancements in existing simulators, are viewed as providing a relatively fast and cost-effective technology transfer that will result in measurable improvement in the safety culture and operation of NPPs. A review of this program, its present status, and its accomplishments are provided in this paper

  17. Separation Requirements for a Hydrogen Production Plant and High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Smith; Scott Beck; Bill Galyean

    2005-09-01

    This report provides the methods, models, and results of an evaluation for locating a hydrogen production facility near a nuclear power plant. In order to answer the risk-related questions for this combined nuclear and chemical facility, we utilized standard probabilistic safety assessment methodologies to answer three questions: what can happen, how likely is it, and what are the consequences? As part of answering these questions, we developed a model suitable to determine separation distances for hydrogen process structures and the nuclear plant structures. Our objective of the model-development and analysis is to answer key safety questions related to the placement of one or more hydrogen production plants in the vicinity of a high-temperature nuclear reactor. From a thermal-hydraulic standpoint we would like the two facilities to be quite close. However, safety and regulatory implications force the separation distance to be increased, perhaps substantially. Without answering these safety questions, the likelihood for obtaining a permit to construct and build such as facility in the U.S. would be questionable. The quantitative analysis performed for this report provides us with a scoping mechanism to determine key parameters related to the development of a nuclear-based hydrogen production facility. From our calculations, we estimate that when the separation distance is less than 100m, the core damage frequency is large enough (greater than 1E-6/yr) to become problematic in a risk-informed environment. However, a variety of design modifications, for example blast-deflection barriers, were explored to determine the impact of potential mitigating strategies. We found that these mitigating cases may significantly reduce risk and should be explored as the design for the hydrogen production facility evolves.

  18. Decommissioning a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The process of decommissioning a facility such as a nuclear reactor or reprocessing plant presents many waste management options and concerns. Waste minimization is a primary consideration, along with protecting a personnel and the environment. Waste management is complicated in that both radioactive and chemical hazardous wastes must be dealt with. This paper presents the general decommissioning approach of a recent project at Los Alamos. Included are the following technical objectives: site characterization work that provided a thorough physical, chemical, and radiological assessment of the contamination at the site; demonstration of the safe and cost-effective dismantlement of a highly contaminated and activated nuclear-fuelded reactor; and techniques used in minimizing radioactive and hazardous waste. 12 figs

  19. Qualification of safety-critical software for digital reactor safety system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kee-Choon; Park, Gee-Yong; Kim, Jang-Yeol; Lee, Jang-Soo

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the software qualification activities for the safety-critical software of the digital reactor safety system in nuclear power plants. The main activities of the software qualification processes are the preparation of software planning documentations, verification and validation (V and V) of the software requirements specifications (SRS), software design specifications (SDS) and codes, and the testing of the integrated software and integrated system. Moreover, the software safety analysis and software configuration management are involved in the software qualification processes. The V and V procedure for SRS and SDS contains a technical evaluation, licensing suitability evaluation, inspection and traceability analysis, formal verification, software safety analysis, and an evaluation of the software configuration management. The V and V processes for the code are a traceability analysis, source code inspection, test case and test procedure generation. Testing is the major V and V activity of the software integration and system integration phases. The software safety analysis employs a hazard operability method and software fault tree analysis. The software configuration management in each software life cycle is performed by the use of a nuclear software configuration management tool. Through these activities, we can achieve the functionality, performance, reliability, and safety that are the major V and V objectives of the safety-critical software in nuclear power plants. (author)

  20. The failure diagnoses of nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Huanxing.

    1986-01-01

    The earlier period failure diagnoses can raise the safety and efficiency of nuclear reactors. This paper first describes the process abnormality monitoring of core barrel vibration in PWR, inherent noise sources in BWR, sodium boiling in LMFBR and nuclear reactor stability. And then, describes the plant failure diagnoses of primary coolant pumps, loose parts in nuclear reactors, coolant leakage and relief valve location

  1. Multimedia on nuclear reactors physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dies, Javier; Puig, Francesc

    2010-01-01

    The paper present an example of measures that have been found to be effective in the development of innovative educational and training technology. A multimedia course on nuclear reactor physics is presented. This material has been used for courses at master level at the universities; training for engineers at nuclear power plant as modular 2 weeks course; and training operators of nuclear power plant. The multimedia has about 785 slides and the text is in English, Spanish and French. (authors)

  2. Nuclear power plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaziz Yunus

    1986-01-01

    A number of issues have to be taken into account before the introduction of any nuclear power plant in any country. These issues include reactor safety (site and operational), waste disposal and, lastly, the decommissioning of the reactor inself. Because of the radioactive nature of the components, nuclear power plants require a different approach to decommission compared to other plants. Until recently, issues on reactor safety and waste disposal were the main topics discussed. As for reactor decommissioning, the debates have been academic until now. Although reactors have operated for 25 years, decommissioning of retired reactors has simply not been fully planned. But the Shippingport Atomic Power Plant in Pennysylvania, the first large scale power reactor to be retired, is now being decommissioned. The work has rekindled the debate in the light of reality. Outside the United States, decommissioning is also being confronted on a new plane. (author)

  3. United States Department of Energy`s reactor core protection evaluation methodology for fires at RBMK and VVER nuclear power plants. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    This document provides operators of Soviet-designed RBMK (graphite moderated light water boiling water reactor) and VVER (pressurized light water reactor) nuclear power plants with a systematic Methodology to qualitatively evaluate plant response to fires and to identify remedies to protect the reactor core from fire-initiated damage.

  4. United States Department of Energy's reactor core protection evaluation methodology for fires at RBMK and VVER nuclear power plants. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    This document provides operators of Soviet-designed RBMK (graphite moderated light water boiling water reactor) and VVER (pressurized light water reactor) nuclear power plants with a systematic Methodology to qualitatively evaluate plant response to fires and to identify remedies to protect the reactor core from fire-initiated damage

  5. Guidelines for Application of the Master Curve Approach to Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyssakov, V.N.; Kang, K.S.

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines have been developed under an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) titled ''Surveillance Programme Results Application to Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity Assessment.'' The IAEA has sponsored a series of five CRPs that have led to a focus on measuring the best irradiation fracture parameters using relatively small test specimens for assuring structural integrity of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs)

  6. Design Study of Modular Nuclear Power Plant with Small Long Life Gas Cooled Fast Reactors Utilizing MOX Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilham, Muhammad; Su'ud, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    Growing energy needed due to increasing of the world’s population encourages development of technology and science of nuclear power plant in its safety and security. In this research, it will be explained about design study of modular fast reactor with helium gas cooling (GCFR) small long life reactor, which can be operated over 20 years. It had been conducted about neutronic design GCFR with Mixed Oxide (UO2-PuO2) fuel in range of 100-200 MWth NPPs of power and 50-60% of fuel fraction variation with cylindrical pin cell and cylindrical balance of reactor core geometry. Calculation method used SRAC-CITATION code. The obtained results are the effective multiplication factor and density value of core reactor power (with geometry optimalization) to obtain optimum design core reactor power, whereas the obtained of optimum core reactor power is 200 MWth with 55% of fuel fraction and 9-13% of percentages.

  7. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Pressurized water reactors. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The examinations developed using the PWR catalog will cover those topics listed under Title 10, (ode of Federal Regulations Part 55. The PWR catalog contains approximately 5100 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Catalog Organization; Generic Knowledge and Abilities; Plant Systems; Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions; Components and Theory.

  8. The software safety analysis based on SFTA for reactor power regulating system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhaohui; Yang Xiaohua; Liao Longtao; Wu Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The digitalized Instrumentation and Control (I and C) system of Nuclear power plants can provide many advantages. However, digital control systems induce new failure modes that differ from those of analog control systems. While the cost effectiveness and flexibility of software is widely recognized, it is very difficult to achieve and prove high levels of dependability and safety assurance for the functions performed by process control software, due to the very flexibility and potential complexity of the software itself. Software safety analysis (SSA) was one way to improve the software safety by identify the system hazards caused by software failure. This paper describes the application of a software fault tree analysis (SFTA) at the software design phase. At first, we evaluate all the software modules of the reactor power regulating system in nuclear power plant and identify various hazards. The SFTA was applied to some critical modules selected from the previous step. At last, we get some new hazards that had not been identified in the prior processes of the document evaluation which were helpful for our design. (author)

  9. Status and Trends of Thermal-Hydraulic System Codes for Nuclear Power Plants With Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhitao; Wang Binghua; Qin Benke; Xie Heng

    2009-01-01

    Research and development of thermal-hydraulic system codes for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors were analyzed on their history, status and application ranges. The important roles of best-estimate methodology, codes coupling and codes qualification were pointed out. The development models of thermal-hydraulic system codes around the world provide references to China's self-innovation. (authors)

  10. A multi-stage-flash desalination plant of relative small performance with an integrated pressurized water reactor as a nuclear heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltzer, M.; Petersen, G.

    1976-01-01

    In the Krupp-GKSS joint study MINIPLEX the requirements for seawater-desalination-plants with a performance in the range of 10,000 to 80,000 m 3 /d heated by a nuclear reactor are investigated. The reactor concept is similar to the integrated pressurized water reactor (IPWR) of the nuclear ship OTTO HAHN. The calculated costs of the desalinated water show, that due to the fuel cost advantages of reactors small and medium nuclear desalination plants are economically competetive with oil-fired plants since the steep rise of oil price in autumn 1973. (orig.) [de

  11. Study, analysis, assess and compare the nuclear engineering systems of nuclear power plant with different reactor types VVER-1000, namely AES-91, AES-92 and AES-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Van Hong; Tran Chi Thanh; Hoang Minh Giang; Le Dai Dien; Nguyen Nhi Dien; Nguyen Minh Tuan

    2015-01-01

    On November 25, 2009, in Hanoi, the National Assembly had been approved the resolution about policy for investment of nuclear power project in Ninh Thuan province which include two sites, each site has two units with power around 1000 MWe. For the nuclear power project at Ninh Thuan 1, Vietnam Government signed the Joint-Governmental Agreement with Russian Government for building the nuclear power plant with reactor type VVER. At present time, the Russian Consultant proposed four reactor technologies can be used for Ninh Thuan 1 project, namely: AES-91, AES-92, AES-2006/V491 and AES-2006/V392M. This report presents the main reactor engineering systems of nuclear power plants with VVER-1000/1200. The results from analysis, comparison and assessment between the designs of AES-91, AES-92 and AES-2006 are also presented. The obtained results show that the type AES-2006 is appropriate selection for Vietnam. (author)

  12. A reactor-level analysis of busbar costs for US nuclear plants, 1970-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koomey, Jonathan; Hultman, Nathan E.

    2007-01-01

    We present a reactor-by-reactor analysis of historical busbar costs for 99 nuclear reactors in the United States, and compare those costs with recent projections for next-generation US reactors. We argue that cost projections far different from median historical costs require more justification than estimates that lie close to those medians. Our analysis suggests that some recent projections of capital costs, construction duration, and total operations and maintenance costs are quite low-far enough from the historical medians that additional scrutiny may be required to justify using such estimates in current policy discussions and planning

  13. Fracture toughness requirements of reactor vessel material in evaluation of the safety analysis report of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widia Lastana Istanto

    2011-01-01

    Fracture toughness requirements of reactor vessel material that must be met by applicants for nuclear power plants construction permit has been investigated in this paper. The fracture toughness should be described in the Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) document that will be evaluated by the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN). Because BAPETEN does not have a regulations or standards/codes regarding the material used for the reactor vessel, especially in the fracture toughness requirements, then the acceptance criteria that applied to evaluate the fracture toughness of reactor vessel material refers to the regulations/provisions from the countries that have been experienced in the operation of nuclear power plants, such as from the United States, Japan and Korea. Regulations and standards used are 10 CFR Part 50, ASME and ASTM. Fracture toughness of reactor vessel materials are evaluated to ensure compliance of the requirements and provisions of the Regulatory Body and the applicable standards, such as ASME or ASTM, in order to assure a reliability and integrity of the reactor vessels as well as providing an adequate safety margin during the operation, testing, maintenance, and postulated accident conditions over the reactor vessel lifetime. (author)

  14. Database structure and file layout of Nuclear Power Plant Database. Database for design information on Light Water Reactors in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Izumi, Fumio

    1995-12-01

    The Nuclear Power Plant Database (PPD) has been developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) to provide plant design information on domestic Light Water Reactors (LWRs) to be used for nuclear safety research and so forth. This database can run on the main frame computer in the JAERI Tokai Establishment. The PPD contains the information on the plant design concepts, the numbers, capacities, materials, structures and types of equipment and components, etc, based on the safety analysis reports of the domestic LWRs. This report describes the details of the PPD focusing on the database structure and layout of data files so that the users can utilize it efficiently. (author).

  15. Database structure and file layout of Nuclear Power Plant Database. Database for design information on Light Water Reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Nobuo; Izumi, Fumio.

    1995-12-01

    The Nuclear Power Plant Database (PPD) has been developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) to provide plant design information on domestic Light Water Reactors (LWRs) to be used for nuclear safety research and so forth. This database can run on the main frame computer in the JAERI Tokai Establishment. The PPD contains the information on the plant design concepts, the numbers, capacities, materials, structures and types of equipment and components, etc, based on the safety analysis reports of the domestic LWRs. This report describes the details of the PPD focusing on the database structure and layout of data files so that the users can utilize it efficiently. (author)

  16. Reliability study: digital reactor protection system of Korean standard nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H. G.; Jang, S. C.; Eom, H. S.; Jeong, H. S.

    2003-02-01

    Digital safety-critical systems which are now installed in Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants (KSNPP) would be quantitatively evaluated in order to prove the safety. In this study, we quantify the safety of the digital reactor protection system in KSNPPs using PSA technology. This study also includes the detailed investigation of the target system operation. The Fault Tree (FT) models were constructed for 15 reactor trip parameters. For digital parts, because the operation data for the same type PWR was unavailable, we used the data provided by vendors. On the other hand, for the conventional analog/mechanical parts, we used experience data presented in KAERI/TR-2164/2002.The result of quantification shows that the system unavailability varies from 4.36E-5 to 8.96E-4 according to the trip parameter. Main contributor to the difference from the conventional analysis would be the difference in human failure probability estimation. Generally, the system unavailability depends on several important factors: Human failure probability, software failure probability, watchdog timer coverage, and common cause failure estimation

  17. Nuclear reactor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2007-09-01

    This textbook is composed of two parts. Part 1 'Elements of Nuclear Reactor Theory' is composed of only elements but the main resource for the lecture of nuclear reactor theory, and should be studied as common knowledge. Much space is therefore devoted to the history of nuclear energy production and to nuclear physics, and the material focuses on the principles of energy production in nuclear reactors. However, considering the heavy workload of students, these subjects are presented concisely, allowing students to read quickly through this textbook. (J.P.N.)

  18. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The results of nuclear fusion researches in JAERI are summarized. In this report, following themes are collected: the concept of fusion reactor (including ITER), fusion reactor safety, plasma confinement, fusion reactor equipment, and so on. Includes glossary. (J.P.N.)

  19. Refuelling nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, J.; Webb, J.; White, W.P.; McLaren, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor refuelling machine is described which can be left in the reactor vault to reduce the off-load refuelling time for the reactor. The system comprises a gripper device rangeable within a tubular chute, the gripper device being movable by a pantograph. (U.K.)

  20. An investigation of temperature measurement methods in nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acton, R.U.; Gill, W.; Sais, D.J.; Schulze, D.H.; Nakos, J.T.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this project was to provide an assessment of several methods by which the temperature of a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel (RPV) could be measured during an annealing process. This project was a coordinated effort between DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology; DOE's Light Water Reactor Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories; and the Electric Power Research Institute's Non- Destructive Evaluation Center. Ball- thermocouple probes similar to those described in NUREG/CR-5760, spring-loaded, metal- sheathed thermocouple probes, and 1778 air- suspended thermocouples were investigated in experiments that heated a section of an RPV wall to simulate a thermal annealing treatment. A parametric study of ball material, emissivity, thermal conductivity, and thermocouple function locations was conducted. Also investigated was a sheathed thermocouple failure mode known as shunting (electrical breakdown of insulation separating the thermocouple wires). Large errors were found between the temperature as measured by the probes and the true RPV wall temperature during heat-up and cool-down. At the annealing soak temperature, in this case 454 degrees C [850'F], all sensors measured the same temperature within about ±5% (23.6 degrees C [42.5 degrees F]). Because of these errors, actual RPV wall heating and cooling rates differed from those prescribed (by up to 29%). Shunting does not appear to be a problem under these conditions. The large temperature measurement errors led to the development of a thermal model that predicts the RPV wall temperature from the temperature of a ball- probe. Comparisons between the model and the experimental data for ball-probes indicate that the model could be a useful tool in predicting the actual RPV temperature based on the indicated ball- probe temperature. The model does not predict the temperature as well for the spring-loaded and air suspended probes

  1. Underground collocation of nuclear power plant reactors and repository to facilitate the post-renaissance expansion of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Carl W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elkins, Ned Z [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Underground collocation of nuclear power reactors and the nuclear waste management facilities supporting those reactors, termed an underground nuclear park (UNP), appears to have several advantages compared to the conventional approach to siting reactors and waste management facilities. These advantages include the potential to lower reactor capital and operating cost, lower nuclear waste management cost, and increase margins of physical security and safety. Envirorunental impacts related to worker health, facility accidents, waste transportation, and sabotage and terrorism appear to be lower for UNPs compared to the current approach. In-place decommissioning ofUNP reactors appears to have cost, safety, envirorunental and waste disposal advantages. The UNP approach has the potential to lead to greater public acceptance for the deployment of new power reactors. Use of the UNP during the post-nuclear renaissance time frame has the potential to enable a greater expansion of U.S. nuclear power generation than might otherwise result. Technical and economic aspects of the UNP concept need more study to determine the viability of the concept.

  2. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, Ryuhei; Yamaki, Rika.

    1989-01-01

    Aerosol filters considered so far for nuclear reactor containers in conventional BWR type nuclear power plants make the facility larger and involve a risk of clogging. In view of the above, in the present invention, the diameter of a flow channel of gases entering from a bent pipe to a suppression pool is made smaller thereby decreasing the diameter of gas bubbles in the supperssional pool. Since this reduces the force of surface tension, the diameter of resulted gas bubbles is made remarkably smaller as compared with the case where the gases are released from the lower end of the bent pipe. Since the absorption velocity of bubble-entrained aerosols into water is in proportion to the square of the bubble diameter, the absorption efficiency can be increased remarkably by reducing the diameter of the gas bubbles. Accordingly, it is possible to improve the efficiency of eliminating radioactivity of released gases. (K.M.)

  3. Nuclear Power Plants. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell, Walter, III

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Why Use Nuclear Power?; From Atoms to Electricity; Reactor Types; Typical Plant Design Features; The Cost of Nuclear Power; Plants in the United States; Developments in Foreign…

  4. Fuel Management of WWER-1000 Reactors of Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Y.; Chauhan, A.

    2008-01-01

    Two units of WWER-1000 reactors of Russian design are under construction at Kudankulam site in India. These reactors are expected to be commissioned in 2008. The fuel management services for these reactors shall be carried out using Russian Computer codes. This paper includes a brief description of the core, fuel assembly lattice and physics modeling of the lattice and core for these reactors. Presented in this paper are the salient features of the core load pattern designs and fuel performance for 8 operating cycles of these reactors. The paper describes key improvements in the core load pattern designs to enhance the fuel utilization and its thermal behaviour. Presented in the paper are also the on site fuel management strategies with regard to fuel inventory and nuclear material accounting. A computer code for Fuel Inventory and Nuclear Material Accounting (FINMAC) has been developed for this purpose. The code FINMAC takes care of receipt of fresh fuel, flow between various accounting sub areas (ASAs), burnup or production of nuclear isotopes in the reactor cores and discharge from the reactor core. The code generates Material Balance Reports (MBRs) and Composition of Ending Inventory Reports (COEIs) as per the IAEA standards. (authors)

  5. Thermal Parameters of Ultra-High-Temperature Reactors for Closed-Cycle Nuclear MHD Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilli, P.V.

    1968-01-01

    Thermal parameters of ultra-high temperature reactors for closed-cycle MHD power plants are investigated. The 'pressure dilemma' (core and heat exchangers requiring highworking pressures for high performance; the MHD duct requiring low working pressures for strong non-equilibrium ionization and high power density) turns out to be less serious than is often assumed because: the core power density of present-day high temperature reactors is determined by nuclear considerations rather than thermal ones; higher plant efficiency reduces thermal power; larger temperature rise and higher efficiency lead to reduced mass flow rate; for the same ratio of pumping power to net output, core pressure loss ratio may be higher than in a conventional HTR; the cost of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel is considerably reduced at lower gas pressure. Dimensional and dimensionless equations are deduced that show the dependence of core dimensions and coolant flow data on thermodynamic parameters, and on thermal properties and state of the coolant. Helium, neon, and argon are compared, as are mixtures of them, showing advantages. Film and fuel temperature differences are small in comparison with gas temperature rise, particularly for the combined MHD/steam cycle. Maximum fuel element temperature - the crucial parameter - therefore occurs at the hot end of the channel. A worked example demonstrates that power densities only slightly lower than in conventional HTR's should be achievable with helium at a pressure of 5 to 10 bar and moderate pressure losses, even if the difference between maximum fuel temperature and mixed mean gas outlet temperature is only 150 to 250°C. There may be some penalty for fuel manufacturing and fuel inventory cost. Fuel cycle cost will, however, benefit from increased plant efficiency. Radial power and temperature flattening is of paramount importance; it requires a low age factor and thus a fuel management scheme with fuel reprocessing, relatively low

  6. Nuclear reactor shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangus, J.D.; Cooper, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shutdown system is described comprising a temperature sensitive device connected to control the electric power supply to a magnetic latch holding a body of a neutron absorbing material. The temperature sensitive device is exposed to the reactor coolant so that when the reactor coolant temperature rises above a specific level, the temperature sensitive device will cause deenergization of the magnetic latch to allow the body of neutron absorbing material to enter the reactor core. (author)

  7. The Design of a Nuclear Reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    ninsk Nuclear Power Plant [4] became the world's first to generate around 5 MW of electric power. At present,. India has 21 NRs that are operated with various reactor technologies which produce 5780 MW of electric power. Reactors are categorized broadly into two types: ther- mal and fast reactors. Fast reactor technology ...

  8. Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos Chavez-Mercado; Jaime B. Morales-Sandoval; Benjamin E. Zayas-Perez

    1998-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory (NREAL) is a sophisticated computer system with state-of-the-art analytical tools and technology for analysis of light water reactors. Multiple application software tools can be activated to carry out different analyses and studies such as nuclear fuel reload evaluation, safety operation margin measurement, transient and severe accident analysis, nuclear reactor instability, operator training, normal and emergency procedures optimization, and human factors engineering studies. An advanced graphic interface, driven through touch-sensitive screens, provides the means to interact with specialized software and nuclear codes. The interface allows the visualization and control of all observable variables in a nuclear power plant (NPP), as well as a selected set of nonobservable or not directly controllable variables from conventional control panels

  9. Generic safety issues for nuclear power plants with pressurized heavy water reactors and measures for their resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    be used in reassessing the safety of individual operating plants. In 1998, the IAEA completed IAEA-TECDOC-1044 entitled Generic Safety Issues for Nuclear Power Plants with Light Water Reactors and Measures Taken for their Resolution and established the associated LWRGSIDB database (Computer Manual Series No. 13). The present compilation, which is based on broad international experience, is an extension of this work to cover pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). As in the case of LWRs, it is one element in the framework of IAEA activities to assist Member States in reassessing the safety of operating nuclear power plants. It addresses generic safety issues identified in nuclear power plants using PHWRs. In most cases, the measures taken or planned to resolve these issues are also identified. The work on this report was initiated by the Senior Regulators of Countries Operating CANDU-Type Nuclear Power Plants at one of their annual meetings. It was carried out within the framework of the IAEA's programme on National Regulatory Infrastructure for Nuclear Installation Safety and serves to enhance regulatory effectiveness through the exchange of safety related information

  10. Fast breeder reactors insertion in a D2O - natural U nuclear power plants park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gho, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    A model for the evolution of Argentine's installed nuclear power for the next 40 years is presented. The consequences of fast breeder reactors' introduction are studied in both autarchic Pu cycle and a limited reprocessing system. The passage of a reactor park like the national, of natural U - heavy water to one of fast breeder reactors, can only be obtained in a very long term due, fundamentally, to the need of Pu produced for those to feed the last ones. (M.E.L.) [es

  11. The fuel of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This booklet is a presentation of the different steps of the preparation of nuclear fuels performed by Cogema. The documents starts with a presentation of the different French reactor types: graphite moderated reactors, PWRs using MOX fuel, fast breeder reactors and research reactors. The second part describes the fuel manufacturing process: conditioning of nuclear materials and fabrication of fuel assemblies. The third part lists the different companies involved in the French nuclear fuel industry while part 4 gives a short presentation of the two Cogema's fuel fabrication plants at Cadarache and Marcoule. Part 5 and 6 concern the quality assurance, the safety and reliability aspects of fuel elements and the R and D programs. The last part presents some aspects of the environmental and personnel protection performed by Cogema. (J.S.)

  12. Nuclear reactor internals arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, E.; Andrews, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor internals arrangement is disclosed which facilitates reactor refueling. A reactor vessel and a nuclear core is utilized in conjunction with an upper core support arrangement having means for storing withdrawn control rods therein. The upper core support is mounted to the underside of the reactor vessel closure head so that upon withdrawal of the control rods into the upper core support, the closure head, the upper core support and the control rods are removed as a single unit thereby directly exposing the core for purposes of refueling

  13. Radioactive waste treatment in nuclear power plants with VVER reactors using Balakovo NPP (Russia) as an example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutscher, U.; Hoelker, G.; Chrubasik, A.; Ipatov, P.L.; Ignatov, V.I.

    1993-01-01

    In nuclear power plants with VVER reactors, located in the states of the former USSR, the treatment of solid and liquid radioactive waste represents a problem which--besides measures concerning the increase of reactor safety--requires a quick solution at a high technical level. To help address this problem, Nukem GmbH jointly with Balakovo NPP and the Nuclear Power Project Institute AEP Nizhni Novgorod, has developed a waste Treatment Center (WTC) for the Balakowo NPP. This center possesses all the necessary technological installations to transform liquid low-level, medium-level and solid low-level radioactive waste accumulated to date and waste arising during the futures operation of Balakovo NPP (4 reactors VVER-1000) in a way which allows a safe long-time storage

  14. Results of research and development for nuclear power plants with WWER-1000 type light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The conference met in three sessions: 1. Project designing and construction of nuclear power plants; 2. Materials, technologies and applied mechanics; 3. Physics, thermal physics and control. The proceedings contains 82 papers of which only two have not been inputted in INIS. The final resolutions of session 1 related to the reduction of capital costs for newly built units, processing of project documentation, the introduction of step motors manufactured in Czechoslovakia, in-service diagnostics of nuclear power plants, etc. The final recommendations of session 2 dealt with the centralization of the management of research into the reliability, safety and residual life of nuclear installations, with radiation stability of weld metals, repairs of nuclear power plants by patch welding, with welding in nuclear power plants and stress calculations using mathematical methods. Session 3 centred on questions of the safety, reliability and economy of nuclear power plant operation. It was recommended to make a comparison of the results of theoretical calculations with experiments, to concentrate on the automation of measurement, to extend international division of labour and cooperation of CMEA countries, to extend publishing activities in the field of thermal physics, etc. General recommendations were related to the conception of the construction of nuclear power plants in Czechoslovakia, the implementation of original scientific, research and development work, to the question of personnel for nuclear research, the experimental base of the Czechoslovak nuclear programme and to planning and management of technical development. (E.S.)

  15. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2006-01-01

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  16. Space and Terrestrial Power System Integration Optimization Code BRMAPS for Gas Turbine Space Power Plants With Nuclear Reactor Heat Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    In view of the difficult times the US and global economies are experiencing today, funds for the development of advanced fission reactors nuclear power systems for space propulsion and planetary surface applications are currently not available. However, according to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 the U.S. needs to invest in developing fission reactor technology for ground based terrestrial power plants. Such plants would make a significant contribution toward drastic reduction of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions and associated global warming. To accomplish this goal the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project (NGNP) has been established by DOE under the Generation IV Nuclear Systems Initiative. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was designated as the lead in the development of VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) and HTGR (High Temperature Gas Reactor) technology to be integrated with MMW (multi-megawatt) helium gas turbine driven electric power AC generators. However, the advantages of transmitting power in high voltage DC form over large distances are also explored in the seminar lecture series. As an attractive alternate heat source the Liquid Fluoride Reactor (LFR), pioneered at ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) in the mid 1960's, would offer much higher energy yields than current nuclear plants by using an inherently safe energy conversion scheme based on the Thorium --> U233 fuel cycle and a fission process with a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity. The power plants are to be sized to meet electric power demand during peak periods and also for providing thermal energy for hydrogen (H2) production during "off peak" periods. This approach will both supply electric power by using environmentally clean nuclear heat which does not generate green house gases, and also provide a clean fuel H2 for the future, when, due to increased global demand and the decline in discovering new deposits, our supply of liquid fossil fuels will have been used up. This is

  17. Special lecture on nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Nam Jin

    1993-08-01

    This book gives a special lecture on nuclear reactor, which is divided into two parts. The first part has explanation on nuclear design of nuclear reactor and analysis of core with theories of integral transports, diffusion Nodal, transports Nodal and Monte Carlo skill parallel computer and nuclear calculation and speciality of transmutation reactor. The second part deals with speciality of nuclear reactor and control with nonlinear stabilization of nuclear reactor, nonlinear control of nuclear reactor, neural network and control of nuclear reactor, control theory of observer and analysis method of Adomian.

  18. Pressure test at the reactor building of the Embalse Nuclear Power Plant (CNE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutsiers, E.E.; Perrino, J.; Moreno, C.; Batistic, J.A.; Lolis, R.R.; Aviles, A.

    1991-01-01

    Upon request by the Licensing Authority, the reactor building (RB) in a nuclear power plant must be submitted to pressure tests. One of these tests is to be performed before startup and, then, a test must be carried out every 5 years in operation. The pre-operational tests took place in August 1981, under two values of relative pressure: 1.266 kg/cm 2 and 0.422 kg/cm 2 . Operational tests must only be made at the lower pressure and their objective is to verify that the loss speed remains within the range indicated in the corresponding technical specification. The first operational test was performed in August 1989. The personnel of the CNE took care of the preparation of the Work Plan, of aligning the various systems contained in the RB, of pressurization, of monitoring localized tightedness, of depressurization and of the general and quality control of the test. The measurements were carried out by the CISME (Center of Metrology Research and Service) of the National Institute of Industrial Technology (INTI) , which did also supply the necesary instruments and the data collection system. There is also a description of the work performed before the test, of the calculation method used for assessing the loss rate, of the test sequencies and of the results obtained. (Author) [es

  19. High-temperature nuclear reactor power plant cycle for hydrogen and electricity production – numerical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudek Michał

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (called HTR or HTGR for both electricity generation and hydrogen production is analysed. The HTR reactor because of the relatively high temperature of coolant could be combined with a steam or gas turbine, as well as with the system for heat delivery for high-temperature hydrogen production. However, the current development of HTR’s allows us to consider achievable working temperature up to 750°C. Due to this fact, industrial-scale hydrogen production using copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle is considered and compared with high-temperature electrolysis. Presented calculations show and confirm the potential of HTR’s as a future solution for hydrogen production without CO2 emission. Furthermore, integration of a hightemperature nuclear reactor with a combined cycle for electricity and hydrogen production may reach very high efficiency and could possibly lead to a significant decrease of hydrogen production costs.

  20. A small floating seawater desalination plant by using a nuclear heating reactor coupled with the MED process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Dazhi; Zhang Dafang; Dong Duo [Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2000-03-01

    Based on the experience of development of nuclear district heating reactor (NHR) a seawater desalination plant using NHR coupled with the multi-effect distillation (MED) process is being designed. With the same technology a floating desalination plant was proposed to supply potable water to remote areas or islands. With a 10 MWth NHR the floating plant could produce 4000 m{sup 3}/d of potable water and 750 kW of electricity. The design of NHR-10 and the safety features are described. The coupling scheme and parameters are given. Some special considerations for using in ship condition are also presented in this paper. (author)

  1. Trend analysis of nuclear reactor automatic trip events subjected to operator's human error at United States nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagawa, Kenichi

    2009-01-01

    Trends in nuclear reactor automatic trip events due to human errors during plant operating mode have been analyzed by extracting 20 events which took place in the United States during the period of seven years from 2002 to 2008, cited in the LERs (Licensee Event Reports) submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). It was shown that the yearly number of events was relatively large before 2005, and thereafter the number decreased. A period of stable operation, in which the yearly number was kept very small, continued for about three years, and then the yearly number turned to increase again. Before 2005, automatic trip events occurred more frequently during periodic inspections or start-up/shut-down operations. The recent trends, however, indicate that trip events became more frequent due to human errors during daily operations. Human errors were mostly caused by the self-conceit and carelessness of operators through the whole period. The before mentioned trends in the yearly number of events might be explained as follows. The decrease in the automatic trip events is attributed to sharing trouble information, leading as a consequence to improvement of the manual and training for the operations which have a higher potential risk of automatic trip. Then, while the period of stable operation continued, some operators came to pay less attention to preventing human errors and not interest in the training, leading to automatic trip events in reality due to miss-operation. From these analyses on trouble experiences in the US, we learnt the followings to prevent the occurrence similar troubles in Japan: Operators should be thoroughly skilled in basic actions to prevent human errors as persons concerned. And it should be further emphasized that they should elaborate by imaging actual plant operations even though the simulator training gives them successful experiences. (author)

  2. Analysis of the documents about the core envelopment of nuclear reactor at the Laguna Verde U-1 power plant; Analisis de documentos de los materiales de la envolvente del nucleo del reactor nuclear de la CLV U-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora R, L.; Medina F, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The degradation of internal components at BWR type reactors is an important subject to consider in the performance availability of the power plant. The Wuergassen nuclear reactor license was confiscated due to the presence of cracking in the core envelopment. In consequence it is necessary carrying out a detailed study with the purpose to avoid these problems in the future. This report presents a review and analysis of documents and technical information referring to the core envelopment of a BWR/5/6 and the Laguna Verde Unit 1 nuclear reactor in Mexico. In this document are presented design data, documents about fabrication processes, and manufacturing of core envelopment. (Author)

  3. Neutronic calculations for the reactor pressure vessel of Atucha I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, Ana M.; Madariaga, Marcelo R.

    1999-01-01

    In 1974 a surveillance program for the Atucha I nuclear power plant pressure vessel was initiated which included the construction of different types of specimens, distributed in 30 irradiation capsules located under the core at the lower part of some of the fuel channels. The capsules containing the irradiated specimens were withdrawn in two stages; the first set (SET 1) of 15 specimens in 1980 and the second one (SET 2) of the remaining 15, in 1987. Both fracture mechanic tests and dosimetry analysis were carried out by the designer (KWU) for SET1 and by the owner National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) for SET2. The calculations performed in the case of SET1 showed that there was a significant spectrum difference between the position where the specimens had been and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) - inner surface (IS). It was established that the ratio of thermal flux (E 1 MeV) varied, approximately, from 1000 to 10 from the irradiation position to the RPV- IS. The purpose of this report is to show the calculations recently performed at the Nuclear Regulatory Authority, with particular emphasis on the difference in the results generated by the modification to sightly enriched fuel. A simplified 1-D calculations show that there is a slight increase (4% approximately) in the flux along the whole energy range. As it has already been mentioned, this is due, more than to the isotopic composition of the new fuel, to the difference in power density spatial distribution, which is a consequence of a different fuel management, necessary to preserve operational limits below their maximum allowed values with the same total thermal power generated. More detailed calculations are nevertheless foreseen in order to verify these first results. (author)

  4. Environmental and health consequences in Japan due to the accident at Chernobyl nuclear reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Masafumi; Nakamura, Yuji; Kankura, Takako; Iwasaki, Tamiko; Fujimoto, Kenzo; Kobayashi, Sadayoshi.

    1988-03-01

    A comprehensive review was made on the results of national monitoring program for environmental radioactivity in Japan resulting from the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in USSR. Period of monitoring efforts covered by the present review is from 30th of April 1986 to 31st of May 1987. A radioactive cloud released from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor initially arrived in Japan on 30th of April 1986 as indicated by the elevated level of 131 I, 137 Cs and 134 Cs activity in the total deposition on 30th of April and also by the increased 137 Cs body burden noted on 1st of May. Almost all the radioactive nuclides detected in the European countries were also identified in Japan. For example, the observed nuclides were: 95 Zr, 95 Nb, 99m Tc, 103 Ru, 106 Ru, 110m Ag, 111 Ag, 125 Sb, 127 Sb, 129m Te, 131 I, 132 Te, 132 I, 133 I, 134 Cs, 136 Cs, 137 Cs, 140 Ba, 140 La, 141 Ce and 144 Ce. Among the above radionuclides, the country average concentration was determined for 131 I, 137 Cs and 134 Cs in various environmental materials such as air, fresh water, soil, milk, leafy and root vegetables, cereals, marine products and other foodstuffs. In contrast to the sharp decline of 131 I which was negligible after a few months, 137 Cs showed a tendency to maintain its activity in foodstuffs at an appreciable level one year later. Collective effective dose equivalent and dose equivalent to thyroid in Japanese population due to 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 131 I were estimated to be around 590 man Sv and 4760 man Sv, respectively. Corresponding values for the per caput dose equivalent are 5 μSv for whole body and 40 μSv for thyroid, respectively. (author)

  5. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this invention is the provision of improved seals for reactor vessels in which fuel assemblies are located together with inlets and outlets for the circulation of a coolant. The object is to provide a seal arrangement for the rotatable plugs of nuclear reactor closure heads which has good sealing capacities over a wide gap during operation of the reactor but which also permits uninhibited rotation of the plugs for maintenance. (U.K.)

  6. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    An array of rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurised water reactor is claimed. The helium gas pressure within each rod differs substantially from that of its closest neighbours

  7. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    The fuel elements for a pressurised water reactor comprise arrays of rods of zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets. The helium gas pressure within each rod differs substantially from that of its closest neighbours

  8. Nuclear reactor core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core catcher is described for containing debris resulting from an accident causing core meltdown and which incorporates a method of cooling the debris by the circulation of a liquid coolant. (U.K.)

  9. CAREM 25 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossini, A.A.; Ordonez, J.P.; Rajoy, J.E.; Durione, C.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes the CAREM project reactor, its design philosophy, its main characteristics and its advantages with respect to similar reactors. The main objective is to use the nuclear energy at lower costs than those applied up to now. (Author) [es

  10. Space Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    We needed to find a space reactor concept that could be attractive to NASA for flight and proven with a rapid turnaround, low-cost nuclear test. Heat-pipe-cooled reactors coupled to Stirling engines long identified as the easiest path to near-term, low-cost concept.

  11. Generic safety issues for nuclear power plants with light water reactors and measures taken for their resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    The IAEA Conference on 'The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future' in 1991 was a milestone in nuclear safety. Two of the important items addressed by this conference were ensuring and enhancing safety of operating plants and treatment of nuclear power plants built to earlier safety standards. A number of publications related to these two items issued subsequent to this conference were: A Common Basis for Judging the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants Built to Earlier Standards, INSAG-9 (1995), the IAEA Safety Guide 50-SG-O12, periodic Safety Review of Operational Nuclear Power Plants (1994) and an IAEA publication on the Safety Evaluation of Operating Nuclear Power Plants Built to Earlier Standards - A Common Basis for Judgement (1997). Some of the findings of the 1991 Conference have not yet been fully addressed. An IAEA Symposium on reviewing the Safety of Existing Nuclear Power Plants in 1996 showed that there is an urgent need for operating organizations and national authorities to review operating nuclear power plants which do not meet the high safety levels of the vast majority of plants and to undertake improvements with assistance from the international community if required. Safety reviews of operating nuclear power plants take on added importance in the context of the Convention on Nuclear safety and its implementation. The purpose of this TECDOC compilation based on broad international experience, is to assist the Member States in the reassessment of operating plants by providing a list of generic safety issues identified in nuclear power plants together with measures taken to resolve these issues. These safety issues are generic in nature with regard to light water reactors and the measures for their resolution are for use as a reference for the safety reassessment of operating plants. The TECDOC covers issues thought to be significant to Member States based on consensus process. It provides an introduction to the use of generic safety issues for

  12. Fuel Fabrication and Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    The uranium from the enrichment plant is still in the form of UF6. UF6 is not suitable for use in a reactor due to its highly corrosive chemistry as well as its phase diagram. UF6 is converted into UO2 fuel pellets, which are in turn placed in fuel rods and assemblies. Reactor designs are variable in moderators, coolants, fuel, performance etc.The dream of energy ‘too-cheap to meter’ is no more, and now the nuclear power industry is pushing ahead with advanced reactor designs.

  13. Fuel Fabrication and Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The uranium from the enrichment plant is still in the form of UF 6 . UF 6 is not suitable for use in a reactor due to its highly corrosive chemistry as well as its phase diagram. UF 6 is converted into UO 2 fuel pellets, which are in turn placed in fuel rods and assemblies. Reactor designs are variable in moderators, coolants, fuel, performance etc.The dream of energy ''too-cheap to meter'' is no more, and now the nuclear power industry is pushing ahead with advanced reactor designs.

  14. Safety reassessment of nuclear installations: consequences for the 900 MWe-PWR type reactors. Safety reassessment of laboratories and nuclear industrial plant, application to a nuclear laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dousson, D.; Guillard, M.; Charles, Th.

    2002-10-01

    In 1987 EDF (Electricite de France) launched the first campaign of the reassessment of safety of 6 operating nuclear reactors (2 Fessenheim units and the 4 reactors of the Bugey plant). This reassessment was requested by the Safety Authority in order to: - check that the safety studies led by EDF are consistent with the real state of the reactors and - be sure that the feedback experience cumulated over years of operating life has been profitable. This work ended in 1995. In 1990 EDF launched the second campaign involving the remaining 28 units of the 900 MWe-PWR type reactors. The aim was the same as previously but this time the procedure has included the use of probabilistic studies of safety. This second campaign has now entered its final stage and has led to several measures concerning fire protection, seismic resistance, and protection against deep cold weather. The probabilistic studies have shown that the reliability of some systems important for safety might be improved, so some modifications have been proposed. These modifications concern the emergency feedwater supply of steam generators, the ventilation systems and the emergency turbine generator set. The second part of the document presents the reassessment of safety that has been performed on a CEA laboratory dedicated to the study of irradiated fuel rods. (A.C.)

  15. Aspects of PWR nuclear power plant secondary cycle relating to reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.E.F.; Leal, M.R.L.V.; Dominguez, D.

    1981-01-01

    A safety study of the main steam system, condensate and feedwater systems and water treatment system that belong to the secondary cooling circuits of a PWR nuclear power plant is presented. (E.G.) [pt

  16. Installation modification of the reactor No.2 of Ikata nuclear power plant of Shikoku Electric Power Company, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The application was made on August 25, 1979, from the president of the Shikoku Electric Power Company, Inc., to the Minister of International Trade and Industry, relating to the installation modification of the reactor No. 2 in the Ikata nuclear power plant. The inquiry was submitted on September 28, 1979, from the Minister of International Trade and Industry to the Nuclear Safety Commission, after the safety evaluation in the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, and the investigation and deliberation were started on October 1, 1979, in the Nuclear Safety Commission. The content of the modification is to add the circuit actuated by the abnormal low pressure signal of the reactor to the actuating circuit of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) and to increase the new fuel storage capacity from about 1/3 core to about 2/3 core. The additional signal circuit is composed of the logic circuit of ''2 out of 4'' and is multichannel design. The circuit is independent from the reactor control system and the conventional signal circuit of the concurrence of low pressure in the reactor and low level in the pressurizer. With the addition of the circuit of abnormal low pressure signal of the reactor, the countermeasures for preventing ECCS start by mistake are also added. These modifications give no influence to the functions of the reactor control system and reactor protection system. The function and the performance of ECCS were analyzed and evaluated accompanying these modifications assuming the loss of coolant accident. Concerning the new fuel storage capacity, the type of racks is modified from angle type to can type, and the subcriticality is kept even at the time of water flood. (Nakai, Y.)

  17. Nuclear reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    A safety system for shutting down a nuclear reactor under overload conditions is described. The system includes a series of parallel-connected computer memory type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular reactor parameter and in each of which a precalculated functional value for that parameter is stored indicative of the percentage of maximum reactor load that the parameter contributes. The various functional values corresponding to the actual measured parameters are added together to provide a control signal used to shut down the reactor under overload conditions. (U.K.)

  18. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    The Reactor Safety Study was sponsored by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission to estimate the public risks that could be involved in potential accidents in commercial nuclear power plants of the type now in use. It was performed under the independent direction of Professor Norman C. Rasmussen of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The risks had to be estimated, rather than measured, because although there are about 50 such plants now operating, there have been no nuclear accidents to date resulting in significant releases of radioactivity in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. The objective of the study was to make a realistic estimate of these risks and, to provide perspective, to compare them with non-nuclear risks to which our society and its individuals are already exposed. This information may be of help in determining the future reliance by society on nuclear power as a source of electricity. The results from this study suggest that the risks to the public from potential accidents in nuclear power plants are comparatively small

  19. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Center (CCN) of IPEN produces nuclear fuel for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN. The serial production started in 1988, when the first nuclear fuel element was delivered for IEA-R1. In 2011, CCN proudly presents the 100 th nuclear fuel element produced. Besides routine production, development of new technologies is also a permanent concern at CCN. In 2005, U 3 O 8 were replaced by U 3 Si 2 -based fuels, and the research of U Mo is currently under investigation. Additionally, the Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), whose project will rely on the CCN for supplying fuel and uranium targets. Evolving from an annual production from 10 to 70 nuclear fuel elements, plus a thousand uranium targets, is a huge and challenging task. To accomplish it, a new and modern Nuclear Fuel Factory is being concluded, and it will provide not only structure for scaling up, but also a safer and greener production. The Nuclear Engineering Center has shown, along several years, expertise in the field of nuclear, energy systems and correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained during decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program, personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. Along the last two decades, numerous specialized services of engineering for the Brazilian nuclear power plants Angra 1 and Angra 2 have been carried out. The contribution in service, research, training, and teaching in addition to the development of many related technologies applied to nuclear engineering and correlated areas enable the institution to fulfill its mission that is

  20. Light water cooled, high temperature and high performance nuclear power plants concept of once-through coolant cycle, supercritical-pressure, light water cooled nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi [Tokyo Univ.,Tokai Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    2002-08-01

    Supercritical-pressure, light water cooled nuclear reactors corresponding to nuclear reactors of once-through boilers, are of theoretical development from LWR. Under supercritical pressure, a steam turbine can be driven directly with cooled water with high enthalpy, as not seen boiling and required for recycling. The reactor has no steam-water separation and recycling systems on comparison with the boiling water type LWR, and is the same once-through type as supercritical-pressure thermal power generation plants. Then, all of cooling water at reactor core are sent to turbine. The reactor has no steam generator, and pressurizer, on comparison with PWR. As it requires no steam-water separator, steam drier, and recycling system on comparison with BWR, it becomes of smaller size and has shape and size nearly equal to those of PWR. And, its control bars can be inserted from upper direction like PWR, and can use its driving system. Here was introduced some concepts on high-temperature and high-performance light water reactor, nuclear power generation using a technology on supercritical-pressure thermal power generation. (G.K.)

  1. Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design

  2. Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S. Blaine

    2009-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain seven separate stacks of graphite specimens. Six of the specimen stacks will have half of their graphite specimens under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will be organized into pairs with a different compressive load being applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks. The seventh stack will not have a compressive load on the graphite specimens during irradiation. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or

  3. Summary of experimental tests of elastomeric seismic isolation bearings for use in nuclear reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidensticker, R.W.; Chang, Y.W.; Kulak, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental test program for isolator bearings which was developed to help establish the viability of using laminated elastomer bearings for base isolation of nuclear reactor plants. The goal of the test program is to determine the performance characteristics of laminated seismic isolation bearings under a wide range of loadings. Tests were performed on scale-size laminated seismic isolators both within the design shear strain range to determine the response of the bearing under expected earthquake loading conditions, and beyond the design range to determine failure modes and to establish safety margins. Three types of bearings, each produced from a different manufacturer, have been tested: (1) high shape factor-high damping-high shear modulus bearings; (2) medium shape factor-high damping-high shear modulus bearings; and (3) medium shape factor-high damping-low shear modulus bearings. All of these tests described in this report were performed at the Earthquake Engineering Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley, with technical assistance from ANL. The tests performed on the three types of bearings have confirmed the high performance characteristics of the high damping-high and low shear modulus elastomeric bearings. The bearings have shown that they are capable of having extremely large shear strains before failure occurs. The most common failure mechanism was the debonding of the top steel plate from the isolators. This failure mechanism can be virtually eliminated by improved manufacturing quality control. The most important result of the failure test of the isolators is the fact that bearings can sustain large horizontal displacement, several times larger than the design value, with failure. Their performance in moderate and strong earthquakes will be far superior to conventional structures

  4. The Impact of Climate Changes on the Thermal Performance of a Proposed Pressurized Water Reactor: Nuclear-Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Said M. A. Ibrahim; Mohamed M. A. Ibrahim; Sami. I. Attia

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for studying the impact of the cooling water temperature on the thermal performance of a proposed pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant (PWR NPP) through the thermodynamic analysis based on the thermodynamic laws to gain some new aspects into the plant performance. The main findings of this study are that an increase of one degree Celsius in temperature of the coolant extracted from environment is forecasted to decrease by 0.39293 and 0.16% in the pow...

  5. Water cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    In order to reduce any loss of primary water coolant from around a reactor core of a water cooled nuclear reactor caused by any failure of a pressure vessel, an inner vessel is positioned within and spaced from the pressure vessel. The reactor core and main portion of the primary water coolant circuit and a heat exchanger are positioned within the inner vessel to maintain some primary water coolant around the reactor core and to allow residual decay heat to be removed from the reactor core by the heat exchanger. In the embodiment shown an aperture at the upper region of the inner vessel is dimensioned configured and arranged to prevent steam from a steam space of an integral pressurised water cooled nuclear reactor for a ship entering the main portion of the primary water coolant circuit in the inner vessel if the longitudinal axis of the nuclear reactor is displaced from its normal substantially vertical position to an abnormal position at an angle to the vertical direction. Shields are integral with the inner vessel. (author)

  6. Nuclear reactors to come

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, M.

    2002-01-01

    The demand for nuclear energy will continue to grow at least till 2050 because of mainly 6 reasons: 1) the steady increase of the world population, 2) China, India and Indonesia will reach higher social standard and their energy consumption will consequently grow, 3) fossil energy resources are dwindling, 4) coal will be little by little banned because of its major contribution to the emission of green house effect gas, 5) renewable energies need important technological jumps to be really efficient and to take the lead, and 6) fusion energy is not yet ready to take over. All these reasons draw a promising future for nuclear energy. Today 450 nuclear reactors are operating throughout the world producing 17% of the total electrical power demand. In order to benefit fully of this future, nuclear industry has to improve some characteristics of reactors: 1) a more efficient use of uranium (it means higher burnups), 2) a simplification and automation of reprocessing-recycling chain of processes, 3) efficient measures against proliferation and against any misuse for terrorist purposes, and 4) an enhancement of safety for the next generation of reactors. The characteristics of fast reactors and of high-temperature reactors will likely make these kinds of reactors the best tools for energy production in the second half of this century. (A.C.)

  7. Control room conceptual design of nuclear power plant with multiple modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Qianqian; Qu Ronghong; Zhang Liangju

    2014-01-01

    A conceptual design of the control room layout for the nuclear power plant with multiple modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors has been developed. The modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors may need to be grouped to produce as much energy as a utility demands to realize the economic efficiency. There are many differences between the multi-modular plant and the current NPPs in the control room. These differences may include the staffing level, the human-machine interface design, the operation mode, etc. The potential challenges of the human factor engineering (HFE) in the control room of the multi-modular plant are analyzed, including the operation workload of the multi-modular tasks, how to help the crew to keep situation awareness of all modules, and how to support team work, the control of shared system between modules, etc. A concept design of control room for the multi-modular plant is presented based on the design aspect of HTR-PM (High temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble bed module). HFE issues are considered in the conceptual design of control room for the multi-modular plant and some design strategies are presented. As a novel conceptual design, verifications and validations are needed, and focus of further work is sketch out. (author)

  8. Problems of nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shal'nov, A.V.

    1995-01-01

    Proceedings of the 9. Topical Meeting 'Problems of nuclear reactor safety' are presented. Papers include results of studies and developments associated with methods of calculation and complex computerized simulation for stationary and transient processes in nuclear power plants. Main problems of reactor safety are discussed as well as rector accidents on operating NPP's are analyzed

  9. Computerized reactor protection and safety related systems in nuclear power plants. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Though the majority of existing control and protection systems in nuclear power plants use old analogue technology and design philosophy, the use of computers in safety and safety related systems is becoming a current practice. The Specialists Meeting on ''Computerized Reactor Protection and Safety Related Systems in Nuclear Power Plants'' was organized by IAEA (jointly by the Division of Nuclear Power and the Fuel Cycle and the Division of Nuclear Installation Safety), in co-operation with Paks Nuclear Power Plant in Hungary and was held from 27-29 October 1997 in Budapest, Hungary. The meeting focused on computerized safety systems under refurbishment, software reliability issues, licensing experiences and experiences in implemented computerized safety and safety related systems. Within a meeting programme a technical visit to Paks NPP was organized. The objective of the meeting was to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion on R and D, in-plant experiences in I and C important to safety, backfits and arguments for and reservations against the digital safety systems. The meeting was attended by 70 participants from 16 countries representing NPPs and utility organizations, design/engineering, research and development, and regulatory organizations. In the course of 4 sessions 25 technical presentations were made. The present volume contains the papers presented by national delegates and the conclusions drawn from the final general discussion

  10. Market potential of small and medium-size nuclear reactors as combined heat and power plants in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candeli, R.; Leuchs, D.; Garribba, S.F.; Hansen, U.; Lefevre, J.C.; Schoen, R.; Vivante, C.

    1988-01-01

    The preliminary results are presented concerning a study launched by the Commission of the European Communities to assess the potential market of small and medium-size nuclear reactors through EC member countries. The study was aimed at identifying those factors that may have a role in shaping the eventual deployment and diffusion of this class of nuclear reactors. In a first phase, attention focused on modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors that would be installed to produce low-temperature heat and power. Federal Republic of Germany, Italy and France are the countries for which the investigation has been completed. The time span of interest is up to the year 2020. Referring to this horizon, an appraisal has been made of the number of nuclear units which could come on line to cope with energy demand and their timing. Through the study a distinction is made between technical potential, economic potential, and effective market potential. It is understood indeed that both economic competitiveness towards other energy sources and also institutional or organizational factors may restrict the market which could become accessible and would be covered by the new nuclear plants. (orig.)

  11. Emergency cooling system for a nuclear reactor in a closed gas turbine plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frutschi, H.U.

    1974-01-01

    In undisturbed operation of the closed gas turbine plant with compressor stages, reactor, and turbine, a compressor stage driven by a separate motor is following with reduced power. The power input this way is so small that the working medium is just blown through without pressure increase. The compressor stage is connected with the reactor by means of a reactor feedback pipe with an additional cooler and with the other compressor stages by means of a recuperator in the pipe between these and the turbine. In case of emergency cooling, e.g. after the rupture of a pipe with decreasing pressure of the working medium, the feedback pipe is closed short and the additional compressor stage is brought to higher power. It serves as a coolant blower and transfers the necessary amount of working medium to the reactor. The compressor stage is controlled at a constant torque, so that the heat removal from the reactor is adapted to the conditions of the accident. (DG) [de

  12. Research and engineering application of coordinated instrumentation control and protection technology between reactor and steam turbine generator on nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xingdong

    2014-01-01

    The coordinated instrumentation control and protection technology between reactor and steam turbine generator (TG) usually is very significant and complicated for a new construction of nuclear power plant, because it carries the safety, economy and availability of nuclear power plant. Based on successful practice of a nuclear power plant, the experience on interface design and hardware architecture of coordinated instrumentation control and protection technology between reactor and steam turbine generator was abstracted and researched. In this paper, the key points and engineering experience were introduced to give the helpful instructions for the new project. (author)

  13. In reactor performance of advanced fuel, 16ACE7TM, for Kori 2 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Young Ki; Jeon, Kyeong Lak; Kim, Jae Ik; Kim, Yong Hwan; Park, Jong Ryul

    2008-01-01

    An advanced nuclear fuel, 16ACE7 T M , for 16x16 Westinghouse type plant is being verified in the Kori 2 plant, Korea. This fuel developed with the Westinghouse in USA and the INB in Brazil jointly has the following several outstanding benefits in comparison of the existing fuel: Batch average burnup of 55 GWD/MTU, 10% overpower margin increase, Neutron economy, failure free induced by debris or grid fretting, Prevention of incomplete control rod insertion, Integral top nozzle to solve spring screw failure. Out of pile performances had been verified through the extensive test program during the development period. After manufacturing four lead test assemblies (LTAs), in reactor performances are being verified successfully. This paper describes the inreactor performances of the advanced fuel resulted in the batch implementation starting from the middle of 2008. While the fuel is being irradiated, the coolant activity for the fuel integrity and the power history of LTAs for the design prediction of the power distribution were measured and evaluated periodically. During the refueling outage period after each cycle, the poolside examinations (PSEs) have been performed. Burnup dependent parameters, which are irradiation induced growth of fuel assembly length, fuel rod length and grid width, fuel assembly and fuel rod bow, fuel assembly twist, and fuel rod diameter decrease and fuel cladding oxide thickness, were measured and evaluated to confirm if they were within their design limits and if they have enough margins for next cycle. The parameters were measured using four examination devices: A device for dimensional measurement, an LVDT device for the rod diameter measurement, another LVDT device for the grid width measurement, and an ECT device for the cladding oxide thickness measurement. All parameters on the LTAs were within their expected values after two cycle irradiation and were evaluated to be within their expected design limits after three cycle irradiation

  14. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterfield, C.E.; Waite, E.

    1982-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising a column of vibration compacted fuel which is retained in consolidated condition by a thimble shaped plug. The plug is wedged into gripping engagement with the wall of the sheath by a wedge. The wedge material has a lower coefficient of expansion than the sheath material so that at reactor operating temperature the retainer can relax sufficient to accommodate thermal expansion of the column of fuel. (author)

  15. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: CANDU reactor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (e.g. caused by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance, design or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must therefore be effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling within acceptable limits the ageing degradation and wearout of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers, and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness for service) and the inspection, monitoring, and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of Canada deuterium-uranium (CANDU) reactors, boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs) including the Soviet designed water moderated and water cooled energy reactors (WWERs), are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs and also to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age-related licensing issues. Since the reports are written from a safety perspective, they do not address life or life-cycle management of the plant components, which

  16. Nuclear reactor PBMR and cogeneration; Reactor nuclear PBMR y cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In recent years the nuclear reactor designs for the electricity generation have increased their costs, so that at the moment costs are managed of around the 5000 US D for installed kw, reason for which a big nuclear plant requires of investments of the order of billions of dollars, the designed reactors as modular of low power seek to lighten the initial investment of a big reactor dividing the power in parts and dividing in modules the components to lower the production costs, this way it can begin to build a module and finished this to build other, differing the long term investment, getting less risk therefore in the investment. On the other hand the reactors of low power can be very useful in regions where is difficult to have access to the electric net being able to take advantage of the thermal energy of the reactor to feed other processes like the water desalination or the vapor generation for the processes industry like the petrochemical, or even more the possible hydrogen production to be used as fuel. In this work the possibility to generate vapor of high quality for the petrochemical industry is described using a spheres bed reactor of high temperature. (Author)

  17. Report of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Buildings and Nuclear Safety (BMUB) on the topical peer review aging management in nuclear power plants and research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The report of the Federal Environmental Ministry (BMUB) on the topical peer review aging management in nuclear power plants and research reactors covers the following issues: comprehensive requirements for aging management and its implementation, electric cables, non accessible pipes, reactor pressure vessel, calandria/pressure tubes (CANDU), concrete containment, pre-stressed concrete reactor pressure vessel (AGR).

  18. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The invention provides a safety system for a nuclear reactor which uses a parallel combination of computer type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular parameter (from transducers located in the reactor system) and each of which produces the functional counterpart of that particular parameter. The various functional counterparts are then added together to form a control signal for shutting down the reactor. The functional counterparts are developed by analysis of experimental thermal and hydraulic data, which are used to form expressions that define safe conditions

  19. Nuclear reactor control column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachovchin, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest crosssectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor

  20. Generalities about nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaouen, C.; Beroux, P.

    2012-01-01

    From Zoe, the first nuclear reactor, till the current EPR, the French nuclear industry has always advanced by profiting from the feedback from dozens of years of experience and operations, in particular by drawing lessons from the most significant events in its history, such as the Fukushima accident. The new generations of reactors must improve safety and economic performance so that the industry maintain its legitimacy and its share in the production of electricity. This article draws the history of nuclear power in France, gives a brief description of the pressurized water reactor design, lists the technical features of the different versions of PWR that operate in France and compares them with other types of reactors. The feedback experience concerning safety, learnt from the major nuclear accidents Three Miles Island (1979), Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011) is also detailed. Today there are 26 third generation reactors being built in the world: 4 EPR (1 in Finland, 1 in France and 2 in China); 2 VVER-1200 in Russia, 8 AP-1000 (4 in China and 4 in the Usa), 8 APR-1400 (4 in Korea and 4 in UAE), and 4 ABWR (2 in Japan and 2 in Taiwan)

  1. The obscure factor analysis on the vibration reliability of the internals of nuclear power plant reactor and anti-vibration measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Geyan; Zhu Qirong

    1998-11-01

    It is pointed out that the main reason making nuclear power plants reactors leak is the vibration of internals of reactors. The factors which lead the vibration all have randomness and obscureness. The obscure reliability theory is introduced to the vibration system of internals of nuclear power reactor. Based on a quantity of designing and moving data, the obscure factors effecting the vibration reliability of the internals of nuclear power plant reactor are analyzed and the anti-vibration reliability criteria and the evaluating model are given. And the anti-vibration reliability measures are advanced from different quarters of the machine design and building, the thermohydraulics design, the control of reactivity, etc.. They may benefit the theory and practice for building and perfecting the vibration obscure reliability model of the reactor internals

  2. Nuclear reactor (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, M.L.

    1960-01-01

    The first French plutonium-making reactors G1, G2 and G3 built at Marcoule research center are linked to a power plant. The G1 electrical output does not offset the energy needed for operating this reactor. On the contrary, reactors G2 and G3 will each generate a net power of 25 to 30 MW, which will go into the EDF grid. This power is relatively small, but the information obtained from operation is great and will be helpful for starting up the power reactor EDF1, EDF2 and EDF3. The paper describes how, previous to any starting-up operation, the tests performed, especially those concerned with the power plant and the pressure vessel, have helped to bring the commissioning date closer. (author) [fr

  3. Economic analysis of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, P.S.; Parker, M.B.; Omberg, R.P.

    1979-05-01

    The report presents several methods for estimating the power costs of nuclear reactors. When based on a consistent set of economic assumptions, total power costs may be useful in comparing reactor alternatives. The principal items contributing to the total power costs of a nuclear power plant are: (1) capital costs, (2) fuel cycle costs, (3) operation and maintenance costs, and (4) income taxes and fixed charges. There is a large variation in capital costs and fuel expenses among different reactor types. For example, the standard once-through LWR has relatively low capital costs; however, the fuel costs may be very high if U 3 O 8 is expensive. In contrast, the FBR has relatively high capital costs but low fuel expenses. Thus, the distribution of expenses varies significantly between these two reactors. In order to compare power costs, expenses and revenues associated with each reactor may be spread over the lifetime of the plant. A single annual cost, often called a levelized cost, may be obtained by the methods described. Levelized power costs may then be used as a basis for economic comparisons. The paper discusses each of the power cost components. An exact expression for total levelized power costs is derived. Approximate techniques of estimating power costs will be presented

  4. Gasification with nuclear reactor heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisbrodt, I.A.

    1977-01-01

    The energy-political ultimate aims for the introduction of nuclear coal gasification and the present state of technology concerning the HTR reactor, concerning gasification and heat exchanging components are outlined. Presented on the plans a) for hydro-gasification of lignite and for steam gasification of pit coal for the production of synthetic natural gas, and b) for the introduction of a nuclear heat system. The safety and environmental problems to be expected are portrayed. The main points of development, the planned prototype plant and the schedule of the project Pototype plant Nuclear Process heat (PNP) are specified. In a market and economic viability study of nuclear coal gasification, the application potential of SNG, the possible construction programme for the FRG, as well as costs and rentability of SNG production are estimated. (GG) [de

  5. Reactor use in nuclear engineering programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    Nuclear reactors for dual use in training and research were established at about 50 universities in the period since 1950, with assistance by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission and the National Science Foundation. Most of the reactors are in active use for a variety of educational functions--laboratory teaching of undergraduates and graduate students, graduate research, orientation of visitors, and nuclear power plant reactor operator training, along with service to the technical community. As expected, the higher power reactors enjoy a larger average weekly use. Among special programs are reactor sharing and high-school teachers' workshops

  6. Survey of Regulations Applicable to the Finned Containment in Korean Nuclear Power Plant for Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyung Gyun [Pohang University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hie Chan [Kunsan University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In severe accident, the molten corium would discharge into the reactor cavity and interact with water and concrete of cavity. Molten corium includes non-oxidation metals such as Zr, Fe and Cr. These metal species reacted with water emit hydrogen gas. In addition to this, a mount of steam can be emitted to the containment such as steam line break accident. As a result, steam and hydrogen gas can pressurize containment over the design pressure and threaten its integrity. For this reasons, a concept equipped with finned on the containment building was proposed for coping with prolonged accident. Finned containment can enhance heat transfer to the ambient, and the building itself is working as a heat sink. Multiple metal fins and metal rod are penetrated into containment wall, and the rods are working as an additional path of heat removal. To be accepted in the nuclear power plants, this configuration should satisfy the requirement of heat removal and follow all regulations related with containment also. For applying to Korean nuclear power plants, the finned containment should follow all regulations specialized in Korea such as Nuclear regulatory criteria for light water reactor and Guidelines of nuclear safety examination for light water reactor. A concept of containment as a passive cooling system has been proposed. Furthermore, the new containment concept can be applied on the real containment which satisfies the various regulations. Finned containment would be expected positive effects on heat removal from the containment. If the fins are properly welded to the liner, finned containment could satisfy the leak tightness and prevention of external influences. Finned containment could be favorable to protect external impact like aircraft crash because of the additional structural integrity by the fins.

  7. Survey of Regulations Applicable to the Finned Containment in Korean Nuclear Power Plant for Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Hyung Gyun; Kang, Hie Chan

    2016-01-01

    In severe accident, the molten corium would discharge into the reactor cavity and interact with water and concrete of cavity. Molten corium includes non-oxidation metals such as Zr, Fe and Cr. These metal species reacted with water emit hydrogen gas. In addition to this, a mount of steam can be emitted to the containment such as steam line break accident. As a result, steam and hydrogen gas can pressurize containment over the design pressure and threaten its integrity. For this reasons, a concept equipped with finned on the containment building was proposed for coping with prolonged accident. Finned containment can enhance heat transfer to the ambient, and the building itself is working as a heat sink. Multiple metal fins and metal rod are penetrated into containment wall, and the rods are working as an additional path of heat removal. To be accepted in the nuclear power plants, this configuration should satisfy the requirement of heat removal and follow all regulations related with containment also. For applying to Korean nuclear power plants, the finned containment should follow all regulations specialized in Korea such as Nuclear regulatory criteria for light water reactor and Guidelines of nuclear safety examination for light water reactor. A concept of containment as a passive cooling system has been proposed. Furthermore, the new containment concept can be applied on the real containment which satisfies the various regulations. Finned containment would be expected positive effects on heat removal from the containment. If the fins are properly welded to the liner, finned containment could satisfy the leak tightness and prevention of external influences. Finned containment could be favorable to protect external impact like aircraft crash because of the additional structural integrity by the fins

  8. Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  9. Materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.; Kamath, H.S.

    2005-01-01

    The improved performance of present generation nuclear reactors and the realization of advanced reactor concepts, both, require development of better materials. Physical metallurgy/materials science principles which have been exploited in meeting the exacting requirements of nuclear reactor materials (fuels and structural materials), are outlined citing a few specific examples. While the incentive for improvement of traditional fuels (e.g., UO 2 fuel) is primarily for increasing the average core burn up, the development of advanced fuels (e.g., MOX, mixed carbide, nitride, silicide and dispersion fuels) are directed towards better utilization of fissile and fertile inventories through adaptation of innovative fuel cycles. As the burn up of UO 2 fuel reaches higher levels, a more detailed and quantitative understanding of the phenomena such as fission gas release, fuel restructuring induced by radiation and thermal gradients and pellet-clad interaction is being achieved. Development of zirconium based alloys for both cladding and pressure tube applications is discussed with reference to their physical metallurgy, fabrication techniques and in-reactor degradation mechanisms. The issue of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is covered drawing a comparison between the western and eastern specifications of RPV steels. The search for new materials which can stand higher rates of atomic displacement due to radiation has led to the development of swelling resistant austenitic and ferritic stainless steels for fast reactor applications as exemplified by the development of the D-9 steel for Indian fast breeder reactor. The presentation will conclude by listing various materials related phenomena, which have a strong bearing on the successful development of future nuclear energy systems. (author)

  10. Artificial intelligence applications to nuclear reactor diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.C.; Hassberger, J.A.; Wehe, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    The authors research into applications of artificial intelligence to nuclear reactor diagnostics involves three main areas. In the first area, the authors combine reactor simulation models and expert systems to diagnose the state of the plant. The second area examines ways in which the rule or knowledge base of an intelligent controller can be generated systematically from either fault trees or acquired plant data. Third, efforts are described to develop the capabilities to validate these techniques in a realistic reactor setting. The techniques are applicable to all reactor types, including fast reactors

  11. Internal exposure monitoring of personnel of a nuclear power plant with pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, F.W.; Poulheim, K.F.; Rueger, G.; Schreiter, W.D.

    1982-01-01

    In the GDR a programme for monitoring the internal radiation exposure of personnel has been established in the Bruno Leuschner Nuclear Power Plant, Greifswald, which allows one to estimate the effective dose equivalent in the way recommended by the ICRP. The measuring equipment used, and the methods of calibration and of evaluation of results are described. At present about 400 persons are monthly monitored with a thorax monitor in the nuclear power plant. If an investigation level - corresponding to an effective dose equivalent of 0.3mSv/month - is exceeded, a more exact measurement is made in the whole-body counter at the National Board for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection of the GDR. In addition, a selected group of 50 persons is measured twice yearly in the whole-body counter. The measurements show the high effectiveness of the protective measures against radionuclide intake by workers in the nuclear power plant, resulting in a contribution of less than 1% to the collective dose of the personnel. A correlation has been found between external and internal exposure indicating that, in general, there will be a higher intake only under conditions resulting also in higher external exposures. The highest individual values of internal exposure found are below 0.5mSv/month and thus within the range of the lower detection limit of dosimeter films used for monitoring the external exposure. (author)

  12. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  13. Seismic analysis of the reactor coolant system of PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsoi, L.; Sollogoub, P.

    1986-01-01

    For safety considerations, seismic analyses are performed of the Reactor Coolant System (R.C.S.) of PWR Plants. After a brief description of the R.C.S. and R.C.S. operation, the paper presents the two types of analysis used to determine the effect of earthquake on the R.C.S.: modal spectral analysis and nonlinear time history analysis. The paper finally shows how seismic loadings are combined with other types of loadings and illustrates how the consideration of seismic loads affects R.C.S. design [fr

  14. Nuclear reactor instrumentation at research reactor renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baers, B.; Pellionisz, P.

    1981-10-01

    The paper overviews the state-of-the-art of research reactor renewals. As a case study the instrumentation reconstruction of the Finnish 250 kW TRIGA reactor is described, with particular emphasis on the nuclear control instrumentation and equipment which has been developed and manufactured by the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest. Beside the presentation of the nuclear instrument family developed primarily for research reactor reconstructions, the quality assurance policy conducted during the manufacturing process is also discussed. (author)

  15. Moderator for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgram, M.S.; Dunn, J.T.; Hart, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a moderator for a nuclear reactor and more specifically, to a composite moderator. A moderator is designed to slow down, or thermalize, neutrons which are released during nuclear reactions in the reactor fuel. Pure or almost pure materials like light water, heavy water, beryllium or graphite are used singly as moderators at present. All these materials, are used widely. Graphite has a good mechanical strength at high temperatures encountered in the nuclear core and therefore is used as both the moderator and core structural material. It also exhibits a low neutron-capture cross section and high neutron scattering cross section. However, graphite is susceptible to attach by carbon dioxide and/or oxygen where applicable, and releases stress energy under certain circumstances, although under normal operating conditions these reactions can be controlled. (author). 1 tab

  16. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This small folder presents a digest of some useful information concerning the nuclear power plants worldwide and the situation of nuclear industry at the end of 1997: power production of nuclear origin, distribution of reactor types, number of installed units, evolution and prediction of reactor orders, connections to the grid and decommissioning, worldwide development of nuclear power, evolution of power production of nuclear origin, the installed power per reactor type, market shares and exports of the main nuclear engineering companies, power plants constructions and orders situation, evolution of reactors performances during the last 10 years, know-how and development of nuclear safety, the remarkable facts of 1997, the future of nuclear power and the energy policy trends. (J.S.)

  17. Air filtration plants of wall-type for separation of fission iodine in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiehl, H.H.; Neumann, M.; Sinhuber, D.

    1976-01-01

    The increasing density of nuclear power stations and increased safety requirements will lead in future to higher flow rates and longer residence times in the adsorption filter layer of the iodine sorption filter plants of nuclear power stations. The safety requirements in the Federal Republic of Germany have been complied with so far in the conventional way by means of duct-type filter constructions. For the higher flow rates and longer residence times necessary in future, we propose a filter construction of wall-type, which complies with the safety regulations of the Federal Republic of Germany. The economic and technical advantages are discussed

  18. The supply contract of nuclear fuel and replacement of nuclear reactor core in Yonggwang - 3. 4 nuclear power plant in 1995 - 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document is supply contract of replacement of nuclear reactor core and nuclear fuel. It consists of 28 clauses which are definition of the terms, price-fixing, payment, schedule, guarantee, exchange and extra service, cancellation of a contract, insurance, sanction, tax, grievance mediation, responsibility, notice and down payment. It has 5 appendixes that lists additional supply contract of extra service and procedures.

  19. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor construction comprising a reactor core submerged in a pool of liquid metal coolant in a primary vessel which is suspended from the roof structure of a containment vault. Control rods supported from the roof structure are insertable in the core which is carried on a support structure from the wall of the primary vessel. To prevent excessive relaxation of the support structure whereby the control rods would be displaced relative to the core, the support structure incorporates a normally inactive secondary structure designed to become effective in bracing the primary structure against further relaxation beyond a predetermined limit. (author)

  20. Australia's new nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.

    2007-01-01

    On 19 and 20 April 2007, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) celebrated the recent commissioning of its new, world-class, OPAL (Open Pool Australian Lightwater) research reactor at the Lucas Heights. On the 19th, scientists, business leaders and academics were introduced to the reactor and its technical capacity for the manufacture of radiopharmaceuticals, its material science applications, its environmental services and its neutron scattering facilities for business applications. The formal OPAL opening function took place that evening and, on the 20th, Prime Minister John Howard visited ANSTO to be briefed about OPAL and to be shown the work being carried out at Lucas Heights

  1. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, B.N.

    1976-01-01

    In nuclear power reactor systems which have a reactor core inside a pressure vessel, the feedwater inlet pipe and steam discharge nozzle usually require separate pressure vessel penetrations. This requirement involves a great deal of expensive high quality special machining, welding and weld joint testing. The invention overcomes most of these problems by nestling the feedwater inlet pipe inside the steam discharge nozzle. At the same time the individual heat exchanger modules are supported from the pressure vessel at the same location as the nested feedwater inlet pipe and steam discharge nozzle combination, thus eliminating the need to accomodate troublesome differential thermal expansion problems through special structures within the pressure vessel

  2. Introduction to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Tyror, J G; Grant, P J

    2013-01-01

    An Introduction to the Neutron Kinetics of Nuclear Power Reactors introduces the reader to the neutron kinetics of nuclear power reactors. Topics covered include the neutron physics of reactor kinetics, feedback effects, water-moderated reactors, fast reactors, and methods of plant control. The reactor transients following faults are also discussed, along with the use of computers in the study of power reactor kinetics. This book is comprised of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the reactor physics characteristics of a nuclear power reactor and their influence on system design and

  3. Licensing of nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    Recommendations are presented for the licensing of nuclear reactor operators in units licensed according to the legislation in effect. They apply to all physical persons designated by the Operating Organization of the nuclear reactor or reactors to execute any of the following functional activities: a) to manipulate the controls of a definite reactor b) to direct the authorized activities of the reactor operators licesed according to the present recommendations. (F.E.) [pt

  4. Nuclear Plant Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, C.P.; Turner, M.R.; Spore, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Data Bank (NPDB) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to assist analysts in the rapid and accurate creation of input decks for reactor transient analysis. The NPDB will reduce the time and cost of the creation or modification of a typical input deck. This data bank will be an invaluable tool in the timely investigation of recent and ongoing nuclear reactor safety analysis. This paper discusses the status and plans for the NPDB development and describes its anticipated structure and capabilities

  5. Upgrading Planning and Executive Strategy for Reactor Protection System and Relative Equipment in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zuyue

    2010-01-01

    Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant (QNPP) is the first nuclear power plant in China which completed the reactor protection system (RPS) upgrading with new digital safety instrumentation and control (I and C) platform instead of original analog system. At the same time,the nuclear instrumentation system (NIS) was upgraded with the same digital I and C platform. For adapting QNPP's actual engineering situation,the upgrading planning was taken by comprehensively investigating current development and application of digital safety I and C platform in the worldwide scope and by reviewing plant's original systems operation history. The project executive strategy-QNPP's leading role with necessary overseas cooperation and internal technical supports as great as possible, was determined. Some significant factors might influence and restrict the RPS and relative equipment upgrading executive actions in an operating NPP were analyzed.Finally, the engineering feasibility was briefly assessed to recognize the anticipated issues and difficulties and to prepare the relative solutions in advance for the purpose of ensuring the RPS upgrading objectives completely realized. (authors)

  6. Gas Turbine Energy Conversion Systems for Nuclear Power Plants Applicable to LiFTR Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    This panel plans to cover thermal energy and electric power production issues facing our nation and the world over the next decades, with relevant technologies ranging from near term to mid-and far term.Although the main focus will be on ground based plants to provide baseload electric power, energy conversion systems (ECS) for space are also included, with solar- or nuclear energy sources for output power levels ranging tens of Watts to kilo-Watts for unmanned spacecraft, and eventual mega-Watts for lunar outposts and planetary surface colonies. Implications of these technologies on future terrestrial energy systems, combined with advanced fracking, are touched upon.Thorium based reactors, and nuclear fusion along with suitable gas turbine energy conversion systems (ECS) will also be considered by the panelists. The characteristics of the above mentioned ECS will be described, both in terms of their overall energy utilization effectiveness and also with regard to climactic effects due to exhaust emissions.

  7. Suggestion on the safety classification of spent fuel dry storage in China’s pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Qu, Yunhuan; Meng, De; Zhang, Qiaoer; Lu, Xinhua

    2018-01-01

    China’s spent fuel storage in the pressurized water reactors(PWR) is stored with wet storage way. With the rapid development of nuclear power industry, China’s NPPs(NPPs) will not be able to meet the problem of the production of spent fuel. Currently the world’s major nuclear power countries use dry storage as a way of spent fuel storage, so in recent years, China study on additional spent fuel dry storage system mainly. Part of the PWR NPP is ready to apply for additional spent fuel dry storage system. It also need to safety classificate to spent fuel dry storage facilities in PWR, but there is no standard for safety classification of spent fuel dry storage facilities in China. Because the storage facilities of the spent fuel dry storage are not part of the NPP, the classification standard of China’s NPPs is not applicable. This paper proposes the safety classification suggestion of the spent fuel dry storage for China’s PWR NPP, through to the study on China’s safety classification principles of PWR NPP in “Classification for the items of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plants (GB/T 17569-2013)”, and safety classification about spent fuel dry storage system in NUREG/CR - 6407 in the United States.

  8. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  9. Refueling of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuschke, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes the unrodded refueling of a nuclear reactor having fuel assemblies and upper internals with apparatus including a lifting rig and a lift plate. The upper internals of the reactor are secured to the lifting rig. A method is given of reinserting in the fuel assemblies of the reactor the rods which penetrate into the fuel assemblies, such as control rods and/or coolant-displacement rods. The penetrating rods are connected to drive rods, the drive rods and penetrating rods being suspended from the lift plate, the lift plate and the drive rods and penetrating rods suspended therefrom being supported on a removable support in an upper position on the lifting rig

  10. Nuclear reactor safety device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Ernest

    1986-01-01

    A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

  11. The nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the various nuclear reactor systems, starting with the Generation II, then the present development of the Generation III and the stakes and challenges of the future Generation IV. Some have found appropriate to oppose reactor systems or generations one to another, especially by minimizing the enhancements of generation III compared to generation II or by expecting the earth from generation IV (meaning that generation III is already obsolete). In the first part of the document (chapter 2), some keys are given to the reader to develop its proper opinion. Chapter 3 describes more precisely the various reactor systems and generations. Chapter 4 discusses the large industrial manoeuvres around the generation III, and the last chapter gives some economical references, taking into account, for the various means of power generation, the impediments linked to climate protection

  12. Nuclear reactor risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Experience has shown that reactors can be operated safely. Accidents have occurred, but the probability of physical health detriment to members of the public has been negligible. Methods for the quantitative evaluation of the probabilities of serious accidents are described, and some results are quoted which show that the estimated frequency of harmful effects is small when compared with other risks already accepted by society. Attempts have been made to justify the acceptance of nuclear reactor risks by relating them to the benefits which are derived from reactor operation and comparing them quantitatively with the risks from alternative methods of deriving the same benefits. This approach takes no account of the perceptions which people have of risk

  13. Nuclear reactor containment device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the volume of a containment shell and decrease the size of a containment equipment for BWR type reactors by connecting the containment shell and a suppression pool with slanted vent tubes to thereby shorten the vent tubes. Constitution: A pressure vessel containing a reactor core is installed at the center of a building and a containment vessel for the nuclear reactor that contains the pressure vessel forms a cabin. To a building situated below the containment shell, is provided a suppression chamber in which cooling water is charged to form a suppression pool. The suppression pool is communicated with vent tubes that pass through the partition wall of the containment vessel. The vent tubes are slanted and their lower openings are immersed in coolants. Therefore, if accident is resulted and fluid at high temperature and high pressure is jetted from the pressure vessel, the jetting fluid is injected and condensated in the cooling water. (Moriyama, K.)

  14. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  15. Nuclear power reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barjon, Robert

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to explain the physical working conditions of nuclear reactors for the benefit of non-specialized engineers and engineering students. One of the leading ideas of this course is to distinguish between two fundamentally different concepts: - a science which could be called neutrodynamics (as distinct from neutron physics which covers the knowledge of the neutron considered as an elementary particle and the study of its interactions with nuclei); the aim of this science is to study the interaction of the neutron gas with real material media; the introduction will however be restricted to its simplified expression, the theory and equation of diffusion; - a special application: reactor physics, which is introduced when the diffusing and absorbing material medium is also multiplying. For this reason the chapter on fission is used to introduce this section. In practice the section on reactor physics is much longer than that devoted to neutrodynamics and it is developed in what seemed to be the most relevant direction: nuclear power reactors. Every effort was made to meet the following three requirements: to define the physical bases of neutron interaction with different materials, to give a correct mathematical treatment within the limit of necessary simplifying hypotheses clearly explained; to propose, whenever possible, numerical applications in order to fix orders of magnitude [fr

  16. Interactions of radionuclides in water, particulates, and oysters in the discharge canal of a nuclear power plant. [Humboldt Bay reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, F.L.; Wong, K.M.; Heft, R.E.

    1976-08-19

    This study was designed to provide data for dynamic modeling of radioactive pollutants in marine ecosystems adjacent to nuclear power plants. The data are relevant to the dynamics of radionuclide transfer among seawater, suspended particulates, sediments, and biota. Gamma-emitting radionuclides (/sup 54/Mn, /sup 60/Co, /sup 65/Zn, and /sup 137/Cs) were followed in the water and particulates, as well as in oysters introduced into the discharge canal of the boiling water reactor of the Humboldt Bay Power Plant near Eureka, California. The liquid waste was introduced into the canal at irregular intervals and contained radionuclides at extremely low but variable concentrations. Radionuclides were determined in the oysters, water, and particulates after single releases (over about 6 hr) and over a long series of releases (18 months).

  17. Complete automation of nuclear reactors control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weill, J.

    1955-01-01

    The use of nuclear reactor for energy production induces the installation of automatic control systems which need to be safe enough and can adapt to the industrial scale of energy production. These automatic control systems have to insure the constancy of power level and adjust the power produced to the energy demand. Two functioning modes are considered: nuclear plant connected up to other electric production systems as hydraulic or thermic plants or nuclear plants functioning on an independent network. For nuclear plants connected up with other production plants, xenon poisoning and operating cost lead to keep working at maximum power the nuclear reactors. Thus, the power modulation control system will not be considered and only start-up control, safety control, and control systems will be automated. For nuclear power plants working on an independent network, the power modulation control system is needed to economize fuel. It described the automated control system for reactors functioning with constant power: a power measurement system constituted of an ionization chamber and a direct-current amplifier will control the steadfastness of the power produced. For reactors functioning with variable power, the automated power control system will allow to change the power and maintain it steady with all the necessary safety and will control that working conditions under P max and R max (maximum power and maximum reactivity). The effects of temperature and xenon poisoning will also be discussed. Safety systems will be added to stop completely the functioning of the reactor if P max is reached. (M.P.)

  18. Crack of reactor vessel upper head penetration nozzles in Korean nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doh, E.; Lee, T-S.; Kim, J-Y.; Lee, C-H.

    2014-01-01

    Since the first CRDM nozzles of reactor vessel head at Kori unit 1 in Korea were inspected in 2003, no CRDM nozzle cracks had been revealed prior to the inspection at Hanbit unit 3 in October 2012, even though many foreign plants had been reporting PWSCC cracks. In October 2012, seven axial cracks from 6 CRDM nozzles at Hanbit unit 3, and in November 2013, six axial cracks from 6 CRDM nozzles at Hanbit unit 4 were detected by TOFD Ultrasonic testing from ID of nozzles. There were confirmed to be PWSCC by Dye penetrant testing and Replica on the surface of J-groove weld of CRDM nozzles. Both plants are OPR-1000 types. All flaws started from the surface of J-groove weld at interface with OD of nozzle, but did not grow up to the top of J-groove weld, and did not make any Leak path up to head outside. The Performance Demonstration Initiative (PDI) system of CRDM nozzle inspection for Westinghouse type plants has been applied in Korea since July 2011. However, its application for OPR-1000 is still under development in Korea. The experience of PDI inspection for Westinghouse type plant contributed greatly to the detection and evaluation of PWSCC of CRDM nozzles at OPR- 1000 of Hanbit unit 3 & 4. The experimentally based procedure of flaw detection and the enhanced detection technique of examiners made it possible to detect and to determine the PWSCC indications. Embedded Flaw Repair process was approved by government authority, and the repair of the 6 CRDM nozzles in each plant was conducted by a consortium of Westinghouse and KPS. (author)

  19. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Lessons Learned Applicable to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Beck; L. F. Pincock

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify possible issues highlighted by these lessons learned that could apply to the NGNP in reducing technical risks commensurate with the current phase of design. Some of the lessons learned have been applied to the NGNP and documented in the Preconceptual Design Report. These are addressed in the background section of this document and include, for example, the decision to use TRISO fuel rather than BISO fuel used in the Peach Bottom reactor; the use of a reactor pressure vessel rather than prestressed concrete found in Fort St. Vrain; and the use of helium as a primary coolant rather than CO2. Other lessons learned, 68 in total, are documented in Sections 2 through 6 and will be applied, as appropriate, in advancing phases of design. The lessons learned are derived from both negative and positive outcomes from prior HTGR experiences. Lessons learned are grouped according to the plant, areas, systems, subsystems, and components defined in the NGNP Preconceptual Design Report, and subsequent NGNP project documents.

  20. Contamination of occupational radiation exposure in nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Sebastian; Bruhn, Gerd; Artmann, Andreas; Sentuc, Florence-Nathalie; Tiessen, Olga

    2017-12-01

    In the precursor project of this study a simulation procedure was developed, consisting of a 3D-CAD model, a mathematical method for coordinate transformation, the software MicroShield and an empiric job model, to calculate the occupational exposure for definable jobs at the primary circuit. It was validated for inspection and maintenance jobs at PWRs of the second and third KWU/Siemens generation. With that the aptitude of this tool for prognosis of radiation exposure was demonstrated. Adhering contaminations within the primary circuit are considered as relevant sources, whereas activated core-near components are neglected. In this study, the model was extended by PWR of the so-called Convoy generation, which differ from older plants in the material composition and consequently in the relevant nuclide vectors. With information from a visit at a nuclear power plant and conversation with the staff, the model could be adjusted appropriately. The radionuclide Cobalt-60 is indeed less important compared to older plant-types, but it is still the dominant nuclide in facilities of the fourth KWU/Siemens generation, so that it is used as reference nuclide. Due to the contemporary planned final shut-down of the three Convoy plants (besides other), dismantling work was set into focus of simulation. Simulation was conducted and results compared for Convoy plants and for plants of the older generations two and three. Furthermore, by comparative simulations the question was answered if full system decontamination in Convoy plants before dismantling lead to benefits that justify this measure. The determined dose saving during unmounting works at the steam generators caused by the decontamination is remarkable. An abdication of decontamination at this location would lead to doses much higher than the occupational job dose during steam generator dismantling in a decontaminated generation 2 facility.

  1. AREVA's nuclear reactors portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marincic, A.

    2009-01-01

    A reasonable assumption for the estimated new build market for the next 25 years is over 340 GWe net. The number of prospect countries is growing almost each day. To address this new build market, AREVA is developing a comprehensive portfolio of reactors intended to meet a wide range of power requirements and of technology choices. The EPR reactor is the flagship of the fleet. Intended for large power requirements, the four first EPRs are being built in Finland, France and China. Other countries and customers are in view, citing just two examples: the Usa where the U.S. EPR has been selected as the technology of choice by several U.S utilities; and the United Kingdom where the Generic Design Acceptance process of the EPR design submitted by AREVA and EDF is well under way, and where there is a strong will to have a plant on line in 2017. For medium power ranges, the AREVA portfolio includes a boiling water reactor and a pressurized water reactor which both offer all of the advantages of an advanced plant design, with excellent safety performance and competitive power generation cost: -) KERENA (1250+ MWe), developed in collaboration with several European utilities, and in particular with Eon; -) ATMEA 1 (1100+ MWe), a 3-loop evolutionary PWR which is being developed by AREVA and Mitsubishi. AREVA is also preparing the future and is deeply involved into Gen IV concepts. It has developed the ANTARES modular HTR reactor (pre-conceptual design completed) and is building upon its vast Sodium Fast Reactor experience to take part into the development of the next prototype. (author)

  2. CLASSIFICATION OF SYSTEMS FOR PASSIVE AFTERHEAT REMOVAL FROM REACTOR CONTAINMENT OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT WITH WATER-COOLED POWER REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Khaled

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A classification on systems for passive afterheat removal from reactor containment has been developed in the paper.  The classification permits to make a detailed analysis of various concepts pertaining to systems for passive afterheat removal from reactor containment of new generation. The paper considers main classification features of the given systems.

  3. Design and testing of remote handling systems for reprocessing plant maintenance and for nuclear reactor dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baier, J.; Blaseck, K.; Krieger, F.; Kuhn, R.; Leister, P.

    1986-01-01

    In 1986 two important milestones will be reached in the field of remote handling technology in Germany: 1. The prototype of the manipulator carrier system with power manipulator (MTS) for the reprocessing plant in Wackersdorf will be completed and cold test operation will be started. 2. The dismantling manipulator with all special tools for the demolition of the Niederaichbach nuclear power station will be completed and cold test under mockup conditions. Both system were designed, constructed, and tested by Noell GmbH in Wuerzburg. The report describes main features of the design, the problems in fabrication and the first test results

  4. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias, E-mail: aplc@cdtn.b, E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  5. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias

    2011-01-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  6. Once-through reactor with smooth hollow fuel elements for a manoeuvrable nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolin, V.N.; Esikov, V.I.; Mityaev, Yu.I.; Vasil'ev, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    Studied are results of experimental investigation of the top capacity of hollow fuel element imitators, which has been carried out to substantiate possibilities of creation of nuclear energetic once-through type installation with subcritical parameters of heat carrier and smooth hollow fuel elements designed for operation in the regulatory regime of loading. Principal technological scheme of such NPP and approximate calculation characteristics of the reactor are presented. The investigation has been made using closed circular installation. Electro-heated tubes out of corrosion-resistant steel with the wall thickness variable as to the length are used as fuel element imitators. The experiments have been conducted using imitators with inner diameter of 14.6; 18 and 22 mm and the length of 6000 mm under the pressure (P) from 7.85 to 15.7 MPa, mass rate from 250 to 2000 kg/(m 2 xs); heat-carrier temperature at the entrance from 80 deg C up to the temperature 10-15 deg C lower than saturation temperature under the given pressure. The experiments have shown that under the pressure of 7.85-9.8 MPa in the heat carrier mass rates of 250-350 kg/(cm 2 xs) deteriorated regime of heat output appears only balance mass vapor content somewhat exceeding 1. It follows from the analysis of experimental data that the following parameters of heat-carrier are optimum: (from the viewpoint of maximum capacity in crisis-free regime of fuel element work) the pressure of 6-9 MPa; mass rate - 250-300 kg/(m 2 xs) at fuel element inner diameter of 25-20 mm respectively. Conclusion is made, that the investigations conducted create precondition for manoeuvrable NPP with once-through reactor

  7. International Experts’ Meeting on Reactor and Spent Fuel Safety in the Light of the Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The primary objectives of this International Experts’ Meeting (IEM) were: to analyse relevant technical aspects of reactor and spent nuclear fuel management safety and performance related to severe accidents; to review what is known to date about the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in order to understand more fully its root causes; and to share the lessons learned from the accident. The meeting identified the necessary priorities for further actions in these areas in different power reactor types, focusing in particular on boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The meeting provided a forum for discussions and exchange of information among technical experts from Member States on reactor and spent nuclear fuel safety and performance under severe conditions. The meeting was of particular interest to technical experts from utilities, research and design organizations, regulatory bodies, manufacturing and service companies and other stakeholders. In particular, the objectives of the meeting was to: • Identify and analyse reactor and spent nuclear fuel safety and performance issues; • Consider the design, engineering and analysis of current and new systems for accident prevention and mitigation; • Exchange information on national assessments of reactor and spent nuclear fuel safety and performance; and • Identify potential priority areas for research and development, technology development and management

  8. On alteration of reactor installation (additional installation of No.3 and No.4 plants in the Genkai Nuclear Power Station, Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Safty Commission sent the reply to the Minister of International Trade and Industry on October 4, 1984, on this matter after having received the report from the Committee on Examination of Nuclear Reactor Safety and carried out the deliberation. It was judged that the applicant has the technical capability required for installing and operating these reactor facilities. Also it was judged that on the safety after these reactor plants are installed, there is no obstacle in the prevention of disaster due to contaminated substances and reactors. The policy of the investigation and deliberation is reported. The contents of the investigation and deliberation are the condition of location such as site, geological features and ground, earthquake, weather, hydraulic problem and social environments, the safety design of reactor facilities, the evaluation of radiation exposure dose in normal operation, the analysis of abnormal transient change in operation, accident analysis and the evaluation of location. (Kako, I.)

  9. Nuclear reactor sealing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEdwards, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor sealing system is disclosed. The nuclear reactor includes a vessel sealed at its upper end by a closure head. The closure head comprises at least two components, one of which is rotatable; and the two components define an annulus therebetween. The sealing system includes at least a first and second inflatable seal disposed in series in an upper portion of the annulus. The system further includes a dip seal extending into a body of insulation located adjacent a bottom portion of the closure head. The dip seal comprises a trough formed by a lower portion of one of the components, and a seal blade pendently supported from the other component and extending downwardly into the trough. A body of liquid metal is contained in the trough which submerges a portion of the seal blade. The seal blade is provided with at least one aperture located above the body of liquid metal for providing fluid communication between the annulus intermediate the dip seal and the inflatable seals, and a body of cover gas located inside the vessel. There also is provided means for introducing a purge gas into the annulus intermediate the inflatable seals and the seal blade. The purge gas is introduced in an amount sufficient to substantially reduce diffusion of radioactive cover gas or sodium vapor up to the inflatable seals. The purge gas mixes with the cover gas in the reactor vessel where it can be withdrawn from the vessel for treatment and recycle to the vessel

  10. Nuclear Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) is licensed to operate at a maximum power level of 500 kW. A pool-type reactor using flat-plate, low enriched fuel elements, the OSURR provides several experimental facilities including two 6-inch i.d. beam ports, a graphite thermal column, several graphite-isotope-irradiation elements, a pneumatic transfer system (Rabbit), various dry tubes, and a Central Irradiation Facility (CIF). The core arrangement and accessibility facilitates research programs involving material activation or core parameter studies. The OSURR control room is large enough to accommodate laboratory groups which can use control instrumentation for monitoring of experiments. The control instrumentation is relatively simple, without a large amount of duplication. This facilitates opportunities for hands-on experience in reactor operation by nuclear engineering students making reactor parameter measurements. For neutron activation analysis and analyses of natural environmental radioactivity, the NRL maintains the gamma ray spectroscopy system (GRSS). It is comprised of two PC-based 8192-channel multichannel analyzers (MCAs) with all the required software for quantitative analysis. A 3 double-prime x 3 double-prime NaI(Tl), a 14 percent Ge(Li), and a High Purity Germanium detector are currently available for use with the spectroscopy system

  11. Nuclear Power Plants (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell III, Walter [Southern Nuclear Engineering, Inc.

    1973-01-01

    Projected energy requirements for the future suggest that we must employ atomic energy to generate electric power or face depletion of our fossil-fuel resources—coal, oil, and gas. In short, both conservation and economic considerations will require us to use nuclear energy to generate the electricity that supports our civilization. Until we reach the time when nuclear power plants are as common as fossil-fueled or hydroelectric plants, many people will wonder how the nuclear plants work, how much they cost, where they are located, and what kinds of reactors they use. The purpose of this booklet is to answer these questions. In doing so, it will consider only central station plants, which are those that provide electric power for established utility systems.

  12. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Masaru; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Mogi, Toshihiko; Kanazawa, Nobuhiro.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor core, a fuel inventory at an outer peripheral region is made smaller than that at a central region. Fuel assemblies comprising a small number of large-diameter fuel rods are used at the central region and fuel assemblies comprising a great number of smalldiameter fuel rods are used at the outer peripheral region. Since a burning degradation rate of the fuels at the outer peripheral region can be increased, the burning degradation rate at the infinite multiplication factor of fuels at the outer region can substantially be made identical with that of the fuels in the inner region. As a result, the power distribution in the direction of the reactor core can be flattened throughout the entire period of the burning cycle. Further, it is also possible to make the degradation rate of fuels at the outer region substantially identical with that of fuels at the inner side. A power peak formed at the outer circumferential portion of the reactor core of advanced burning can be lowered to improve the fuel integrity, and also improve the reactor safety and operation efficiency. (N.H.)

  13. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Computer-Based Procedures for Field Activities: Results from Three Evaluations at Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Le Blanc, Katya [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bly, Aaron [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The Computer-Based Procedure (CBP) research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. One area that could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety is in improving procedure use. Nearly all activities in the nuclear power industry are guided by procedures, which today are printed and executed on paper. This paper-based procedure process has proven to ensure safety; however, there are improvements to be gained. Due to its inherent dynamic nature, a CBP provides the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, and just-in-time training. Compared to the static state of paper-based procedures (PBPs), the presentation of information in CBPs can be much more flexible and tailored to the task, actual plant condition, and operation mode. The dynamic presentation of the procedure will guide the user down the path of relevant steps, thus minimizing time spent by the field worker to evaluate plant conditions and decisions related to the applicability of each step. This dynamic presentation of the procedure also minimizes the risk of conducting steps out of order and/or incorrectly assessed applicability of steps.

  14. Fundamentals of nuclear power plants with light water reactors. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieselt, R.

    1976-01-01

    The authors give a comprehensive picture (in two parts) of modern LWR reactors. All technical, constructive and physical details of BWR and PWR reactors are described and compared. The first part describes the different cooling systems and their components, including control systems. In the second part, the layout of the reactor core, fuel assemblies, instrumentation and thermohydraulic aspects are reported on. (TK) [de

  15. Concerning installation of reactor at Noto nuclear power plant of Hokuriku Electric Power Co., Inc. (reply to inquiry)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In response to an inquiry on the conformity of the title issue to the applicable law concerning nuclear material, nuclear fuel and nuclear reactor, the Nuclear Safety Commission ordered the Nuclear Reactor Safety Expert Group to make a study, made an examination after receiving a report from the Group, and submit the findings to the Minister of International Trade and Industry. The study on the site conditions covered the site location, geology, effects or earthquakes, meteorology, hydrology and social environment. The study on the safety design of the reactor covered the design of the facilities as a whole, anti-earthquake design, reactor, instrumentation, reactor shutdown system, reactivity control, protection, cooling system, reactor vessel, fuel handling, fuel storage, and radiation control. The study also included exposure evaluation, abnormal transient state analysis and accident analysis. It is concluded that the relevant company has a technical capability required for the installation and proper operation of the reactor in question, and that the reactor will have adequate safety with no possibility of causing a disaster. (Nogami, K.)

  16. A simplified Probabilistic Safety Assesment of a Steam-Methane Reforming Hydrogen Production Plant coupled to a High-Temperature Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson Edelstein, Pamela; Flores Flores, Alain; Francois Lacouture, Juan Luis

    2005-01-01

    A Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is being developed for a steam-methane reforming hydrogen production plant linked to a High-Temperature Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor (HTGR). This work is based on the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute’s (JAERI) High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR) prototype in Japan. This study has two major objectives: calculate the risk to onsite and offsite individuals, and calculate the frequency of different types of damage to the complex. A simplified HAZOP...

  17. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The seals described are for use in a nuclear reactor where there are fuel assemblies in a vessel, an inlet and an outlet for circulating a coolant in heat transfer relationship with the fuel assemblies and a closure head on the vessel in a tight fluid relationship. The closure head comprises rotatable plugs which have mechanical seals disposed in the annulus around each plug while allowing free rotation of the plug when the seal is not actuated. The seal is usually an elastomer or copper. A means of actuating the seal is attached for drawing it vertically into the annulus for sealing. When the reactor coolant is liquid sodium, contact with oxygen must be avoided and argon cover gas fills the space between the bottom of the closure head and the coolant liquid level and the annuli in the closure head. (U.K.)

  18. Water cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a cooling water intake collector for a nuclear reactor. It includes multiple sub-collectors extending out in a generally parallel manner to each other, each one having a first end and a second one separated along their length, and multiple water outlets for connecting each one to a corresponding pressure tube of the reactor. A first end tube and a second one connect the sub-collector tubes together to their first and second ends respectively. It also includes multiple collector tubes extending transversely by crossing over the sub-collector tubes and separated from each other in the direction of these tubes. Each collector tubes has a water intake for connecting to a water pump and multiple connecting tubes separated over its length and connecting each one to the corresponding sub-collector [fr

  19. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising a cluster of fuel elements supported by transversal grids so that their axes are parallel to and at a distance from each other, in order to establish interstices for the axial flow of a coolant. At least one of the interstices is occupied by an axial duct reserved for an auxiliary cooling fluid and is fitted with side holes through which the auxiliary cooling fluid is sprayed into the cluster. Deflectors extend as from a transversal grid in a position opposite the holes to deflect the cooling fluid jet towards those parts of the fuel elements that are not accessible to the auxiliary coolant. This assembly is intended for reactors cooled by light or heavy water [fr

  20. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, R.P.; Busey, H.M.

    1959-02-17

    Nuclear reactors of the homogeneous liquid fuel type are discussed. The reactor is comprised of an elongated closed vessel, vertically oriented, having a critical region at the bottom, a lower chimney structure extending from the critical region vertically upwardly and surrounded by heat exchanger coils, to a baffle region above which is located an upper chimney structure containing a catalyst functioning to recombine radiolyticallydissociated moderator gages. In operation the liquid fuel circulates solely by convection from the critical region upwardly through the lower chimney and then downwardly through the heat exchanger to return to the critical region. The gases formed by radiolytic- dissociation of the moderator are carried upwardly with the circulating liquid fuel and past the baffle into the region of the upper chimney where they are recombined by the catalyst and condensed, thence returning through the heat exchanger to the critical region.

  1. Designed and operational safety of nuclear power plants equipped with WWER and RMBK type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonov, B.V.

    1999-01-01

    Presented information demonstrates the actual status of activity on safety assurance at operating NPPs in Russia having WWER and RBMK reactors as well as directions of the Utility and of the supporting enterprises to improve safety of these NPPs. Nuclear power plays an important role in the country's economics, the share of electricity generated being approximately 13%, and in the European part of the country amounting up to 27%. NPPs operate in the base load mode and ensure stable and reliable functioning of the power system and industry as a whole. This is the main reason why Russia is interested in safe and reliable performance of NPPs. Statistics of unscheduled disconnections from the grid for emergency reasons, because of failures important for safety or radiation protection allows to evaluate operating safety as acceptable. Improvement of operation safety issues of Russian NPPs which is one of the outstanding permanent tasks. Cooperation with international organizations and foreign companies plays special role in improving safety of Russian NPPs

  2. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Zohuri, Bahman

    2015-01-01

    This text covers the fundamentals of thermodynamics required to understand electrical power generation systems and the application of these principles to nuclear reactor power plant systems. It is not a traditional general thermodynamics text, per se, but a practical thermodynamics volume intended to explain the fundamentals and apply them to the challenges facing actual nuclear power plants systems, where thermal hydraulics comes to play.  Written in a lucid, straight-forward style while retaining scientific rigor, the content is accessible to upper division undergraduate students and aimed at practicing engineers in nuclear power facilities and engineering scientists and technicians in industry, academic research groups, and national laboratories. The book is also a valuable resource for students and faculty in various engineering programs concerned with nuclear reactors. This book also: Provides extensive coverage of thermal hydraulics with thermodynamics in nuclear reactors, beginning with fundamental ...

  3. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E. D.

    1984-01-01

    An array of rods is assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurized water reactor, the rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets and containing helium. The helium gas pressure is selected for each rod so that it differs substantially from the helium gas pressure in its closest neighbors. In a preferred arrangement the rods are arranged in a square lattice and the helium gas pressure alternates between a relatively high value and a relatively low value so that each rod has as its closest neighbors up to four rods containing helium gas at the other pressure value

  4. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindle, E. D.

    1984-10-16

    An array of rods is assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurized water reactor, the rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets and containing helium. The helium gas pressure is selected for each rod so that it differs substantially from the helium gas pressure in its closest neighbors. In a preferred arrangement the rods are arranged in a square lattice and the helium gas pressure alternates between a relatively high value and a relatively low value so that each rod has as its closest neighbors up to four rods containing helium gas at the other pressure value.

  5. Nuclear Reactor Safety; (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    This publication announces on an monthly basis the current worldwide information available on all safety-related aspects of reactors, including: accident analysis, safety systems, radiation protection, decommissioning and dismantling, and security measures. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are other US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Technology Data Exchange, the International Atomic Energy Agency's International Nuclear Information System, or government-to-government agreements.

  6. Nuclear reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wampole, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of manitenance and inspections it is proposed for a nuclear reactor facility with a primary circuit containing liquid metal to provide a thermally insulated chamber, within which are placed a number of components of the primary circuit, as e.g. valves, recirculation pump, heat exchangers. The isolated placement permit controlled preheating on one hand, but prevents undesirable heating of adjacent load-bearing elements on the other. The chamber is provided with heating devices and, on the outside, with cooling devices; it is of advantage to fill it with an inert gas. (UWI) 891 HP [de

  7. Preliminary results of calculations for heavy-water nuclear-power-plant reactors employing 235U, 233U, and 232Th as a fuel and meeting requirements of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioffe, B. L.; Kochurov, B. P.

    2012-02-01

    A physical design is developed for a gas-cooled heavy-water nuclear reactor intended for a project of a nuclear power plant. As a fuel, the reactor would employ thorium with a small admixture of enriched uranium that contains not more than 20% of 235U. It operates in the open-cycle mode involving 233U production from thorium and its subsequent burnup. The reactor meets the conditions of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons: the content of fissionable isotopes in uranium at all stages of the process, including the final one, is below the threshold for constructing an atomic bomb, the amount of product plutonium being extremely small.

  8. Comprehensive research on sealing behaviour of reactor vessel of 300 MWe nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Jiadi; Sheng Xianke; Dou Yikang

    1989-11-01

    The general conception of a special research on sealing behaviour of PWR vessel is described and the major results centering on the establishment of sealing analysis program system and its experimental verification, along with the description on the development and measurement of sealing ring, the thermal sealing test and the relevant analysis are given. On the basis of the above approach, the vessel sealing behaviours of 300 MWe Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant are evaluated. A concept on the classification of pressure vessels and their sealing criteria are proposed. Two viewpoints on the analysis are suggested, which are that the vessel sealing deformation analysis should be regarded as a basis of the general stress analysis and that bolt loading increment caused by the bolt temperature lag should be taken as a key point when considering the thermo-contact coupling in transient sealing analysis. The understanding about the sealing mechanism are expounded and the thermal equivalent of hydrostatic test is discussed

  9. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Data concerning the existing nuclear power plants in the world are presented. The data was retrieved from the SIEN (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: nuclear plants, its status and type; installed nuclear power plants by country; nuclear power plants under construction by country; planned nuclear power plants by country; cancelled nuclear power plants by country; shut-down nuclear power plants by country. (E.G.) [pt

  10. Near term feasibility of nuclear reactor for sea-water desalting: coupling of standard condensing nuclear power stations to low grade heat multieffect distillation plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adar, J.; Manor, S.; Schaal, M.

    1977-01-01

    Commercial nuclear power reactors exist only in standard sizes and designs. No large nuclear back-pressure turbines are available today. Therefore, near term large scale nuclear desalination plants must be tailored to the NSSS sizes and available turbines and not the contrary. Standard condensing nuclear turbines could operate continuously with a back-presure of up to 5-7'' Hg (depending on the supplier). It means that they can exhaust huge amounts of steam at 56 0 C - 64 0 C with a loss of electricity production of 6% - 10% when compared to 2 1/2'' Hg normal condensing pressure. The horizontal aluminium tube multi-effect distillation process developed by ''Israel Desalination Engineering'' Ltd. is very suitable for the use of such low-grade heat: 4 to 9 effects can operate within these temperature ranges. A special flash-chamber constitutes a positive barrier against any possible contamination being carried over by the steam exhausted from the turbine to the desalination plant. Flow sheets, heat and mass balances have been prepared for two standard sizes of NSSS and turbines (1882sup(Mwth) and 2785sup(Mwth)), two ''back-pressures'' (5 1/2'' and 7'' Hg), and corresponding desalination plants. Only standard equipment is being used in the steam and electricity producing plant. The desalination plant consists of 6 to 12 parallel double lines, each of them similar to a large prototype now being designed and which is going to be coupled to an old fossil power station. Water production varies between 50 and 123 sup(us MGD) and water cost between 23 and 36 sup(cents)/M 3 . Total energy requirements of the desalination plant represent only 19 to 50% of the total water cost as against 75% for a single purpose plant. Costs are based on actual bids for the power plant and actual estimates for the desalination prototype. The operation is designed to be flexible so that the power plant can be operated either in conjunction with the desalination plant, or as a single purpose

  11. The test nuclear power plant of the AVR (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor AVR) - important results of a different reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marnet, C.; Wimmers, M.; Ziermann, E.

    1993-01-01

    The test reactor of the AVR is not only the beginning of a technical innovation, but also a safe/solid basis for the design of future high temperature reactors of low power, as e.g. the HTR module of Siemens and ABB. This completely new way of using the nuclear energy with its indisputable safety advantages has got the potential of a nuclear revolution. (orig./DG) [de

  12. Experiences on reduction of reactor water silica and fresh resin leaching organics for Kuo-Sheng Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, T-J.; Wang, C-H.

    2010-01-01

    The silica level in reactor water of Kuo-Sheng nuclear power plants has been slowly increased from 200 ppb to the high level above 500 ppb in recent years. The results obtained from steam/liquid mass balance calculation indicated that an increase of reactor water silica was mainly caused by continuing equilibrium leakage from deep bed condensate demineralizers, where the ion exchange zone was periodically disturbed by resin backwashing - scrubbing operation. The fastest and the most effective way to reduce the silica inventory in reactor system is to operate by continuously precoating of two sets of the reactor water clean up filter demineralizers to a lower effluent silica end point, and perhaps as frequently as three or four days. Leaching organic contaminants into feed water from the ion exchange resin becomes a key greater problem of current concern for the stable water quality promotion of condensate demineralizer. The presence of those impurities have practically been difficult to analyze by simple quality testing of the resin, and may result in as much as a hundred fold increase in chloride and sulfate in reactor water. As resin displacement with high leachable TOC, a repeated continuous soaking and effectively rinsing is required so that steady state TOC content less than 150 ppb should be achieved in an acceptably short period of time before put in-service. It is clear that cation resin containing high leachables generates high level of sulfates and sometimes also gives unexpected level of chlorides. The current TOC limits in condensate demineralizer effluent with 0.1 ppb become a significant experience to maintain reactor water soluble impurity in low levels. New resin should be subjected to TOC quality control testing prior to acceptance especially when first placed into service. TOC and organic chloride leachables for as-received virgin cation resin that are to be used in condensate polisher should be limited to be less than 100 mg-TOC and 0.5 mg-Cl per

  13. Application of the LBB concept to nuclear power plants with WWER 440 and WWER 1000 reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zdarek, J.; Pecinka, L. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez (Czech Republic)

    1997-04-01

    Leak-before-break (LBB) analysis of WWER type reactors in the Czech and Sloval Republics is summarized in this paper. Legislative bases, required procedures, and validation and verification of procedures are discussed. A list of significant issues identified during the application of LBB analysis is presented. The results of statistical evaluation of crack length characteristics are presented and compared for the WWER 440 Type 230 and 213 reactors and for the WWER 1000 Type 302, 320 and 338 reactors.

  14. Visual examination in nuclear reactor inservice inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornvik, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Visual examination is an important inspection method for nuclear reactors. New developments in TV technology give new possibilities for inspections that contribute to the economic and safe operation of nuclear power plants. As a supplier of nuclear boiling water reactors, ASEA-ATOM is constantly following-up its delivered plants by inspecting different parts of the reactor system after various periods of service. Inspections include both standard NDT-methods and different visual examination methods. TV inspection often offers advantages over other methods. Special developments such as the use of color TV, miniature TV cameras, development of stereo TV and the use of miniature remote controlled vehicles greatly enhance the usefulness and applicability of visual examination. This will for example, make it possible to make more adequate evaluation of indications and to take direct in-picture measurements. It will also give added possibilities to inspect reactor internals with respect to possible cracking or other defects

  15. Nuclear reactor building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Nobuaki.

    1991-08-09

    The secondary container in a nuclear reactor building is made of a transparent structure having a shielding performance such as lead glass, by which the inside of the secondary container can be seen without undergoing radiation exposure. In addition, an operator transportation facility capable of carrying about 5 to 10 operators at one time is disposed, and the side of the facility on the secondary container is constituted with a transparent material such as glass, to provide a structure capable of observing the inside of the secondary container. The ventilation and air conditioning in the operator's transportation facility is in communication with the atmosphere of a not-controlled area. Accordingly, operators at the outside of the reactor building can reach the operator's transportation facility without taking and procedures for entering the controlled area and without undergoing radiation exposure. The inside of the secondary container in the reactor building can be seen from various directions through the transparent structure having the shielding performance. (N.H.).

  16. Small reactors and the 'second nuclear era'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Predictions of the nuclear industry's demise are premature and distort both history and politics. The industry is reemerging in a form commensurate with the priorities of those people and nations controlling the global forces of production. The current lull in plant orders is due primarily to the world recession and to factors related specifically to reactor size. Traditional economies of scale for nuclear plants have been greatly exaggerated. Reactor vendors and governments in Great Britain, France, West Germany, Japan, the United States, Sweden, Canada, and the Soviet Union are developing small reactors for both domestic applications and export to the Third World. The prefabricated, factory-assembled plants under 500 MWe may alleviate many of the existing socioeconomic constraints on nuclear manufacturing, construction, and operation. In the industrialized world, small reactors could furnish a qualitatively new energy option for utilities. But developing nations hold the largest potential market for small reactors due to the modest size of their electrical systems. These units could double or triple the market potential for nuclear power in this century. Small reactors will both qualitatively and quantitatively change the nature of nuclear technology transfers, offering unique advantages and problems vis-a-vis conventional arrangements. (author)

  17. Virtual nuclear reactor for education of nuclear reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Masashi; Narabayashi, Takashi; Shimazu, Youichiro

    2008-01-01

    As one of projects that were programmed in the cultivation program for human resources in nuclear engineering sponsored by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, the development of a virtual reactor for education of nuclear reactor physics started in 2007. The purpose of the virtual nuclear reactor is to make nuclear reactor physics easily understood with aid of visualization. In the first year of this project, the neutron slowing down process was visualized. The data needed for visualization are provided by Monte Carlo calculations; The flights of the respective neutrons generated by nuclear fissions are traced through a reactor core until they disappear by neutron absorption or slow down to a thermal energy. With this visualization and an attached supplement textbook, it is expected that the learners can learn more clearly the physical implication of neutron slowing process that is mathematically described by the Boltzmann neutron transport equation. (author)

  18. Nuclear reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Yuji; Sakata, Akira; Karatsu, Hiroyuki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To control abrupt changes in neutron fluxes by feeding back a correction signal obtained from a deviation between neutron fluxes and heat fluxes for changing the reactor core flow rate to a recycling flow rate control system upon abrupt power change of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: In addition to important systems, that is, a reactor pressure control system and a recycling control system in the power control device of a BWR type power plant, a control circuit for feeding back a deviation between neutron fluxes and heat fluxes to a recycling flow rate control system is disposed. In the suppression circuit, a deviation signal is prepared in an adder from neutron flux and heat flux signals obtained through a primary delay filter. The deviation signal is passed through a dead band and an advance/delay filter into a correction signal, which is adapted to be fed back to the recycling flow rate control system. As a result, the reactor power control can be conducted smoothly and it is possible to effectively suppress the abrupt change or over shoot of the neutron fluxes and abrupt power change. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Small nuclear reactors for desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, K.

    1978-01-01

    Small nuclear reactors are considered to have an output of not more than 400MW thermal. Since they can produce steam at much higher conditions than needed by the brine heater of a multi-flash desalination unit, it may be economically advantageous to use small reactors for a dual-purpose installation of appropriate size, producing both electricity and desalted water, rather than for a single-purpose desalination plant only. Different combinations of dual-purpose arrangements are possible depending principally on the ratio of electricity to water output required. The costs of the installation as well as of the products are critically dependent on this ratio. For minimum investment costs, the components of the dual-purpose installation should be of a standardised design based on normal commercial power plant practice. This then imposes some restrictions on the plant arrangement but, on the other hand, it facilitates selection of the components. Depending on the electricity to water ratio to be achieved, the conventional part of the installation - essentially the turbines - will form a combination of back-pressure and condensing machines. Each ratio will probably lead to an optimum combination. In the economic evaluation of this arrangement, a distinction must be made between single-purpose and dual-purpose installations. The relationship between output and unit costs of electricity and water will be different for the two cases, but the relation can be expressed in general terms to provide guidelines for selecting the best dimensions for the plant. (author)

  20. Nuclear plant scram reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegle, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Utility Management and Human Resources Committee (NUMARC) is a confederation of all 55 utilities with nuclear plants either in operation or under construction. NUMARC was formed in April 1984 by senior nuclear executives with hundreds of man-years of plant experience to improve (plant) performance and resolve NRC concerns. NUMARC has adopted 10 commitments in the areas of management, training, staffing and performance. One of these commitments is to strive to reduce automatic trips to 3 per year per unit for calendar year 1985 for plants in commercial operation greater than 3 years (with greater than 25% capacity factor). This goal applies to any unplanned automatic protection system trips at any time when the reactor is critical. Each utility has committed to develop methods to thoroughly evaluate all unplanned automatic trips to identify the root causes and formulate plans to correct the root causes thus reducing future unplanned scrams. As part of this program, the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) collects and evaluates information on automatic reactor trips. It publishes the results of these evaluations to aid the industry to identify root causes and corrective actions

  1. Technical evaluation of the proposed deletion of a reactor trip on a turbine trip below 50-percent power for the Beaver Valley nuclear power plant, Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, W.E.

    1979-12-01

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the Duquesne Light Company's proposed license amendment for the deletion of a reactor trip on a turbine trip below 50% power for the Beaver Valley nuclear power plant, Unit 1. This report is supplied as part of the Selected Electrical, Instrumentation, and Control Systems Issues Program being conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

  2. Historical civilian nuclear accident based Nuclear Reactor Condition Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Kaylyn Marie

    There are significant challenges to successfully monitoring multiple processes within a nuclear reactor facility. The evidence for this observation can be seen in the historical civilian nuclear incidents that have occurred with similar initiating conditions and sequences of events. Because there is a current lack within the nuclear industry, with regards to the monitoring of internal sensors across multiple processes for patterns of failure, this study has developed a program that is directed at accomplishing that charge through an innovation that monitors these systems simultaneously. The inclusion of digital sensor technology within the nuclear industry has appreciably increased computer systems' capabilities to manipulate sensor signals, thus making the satisfaction of these monitoring challenges possible. One such manipulation to signal data has been explored in this study. The Nuclear Reactor Condition Analyzer (NRCA) program that has been developed for this research, with the assistance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Graduate Fellowship, utilizes one-norm distance and kernel weighting equations to normalize all nuclear reactor parameters under the program's analysis. This normalization allows the program to set more consistent parameter value thresholds for a more simplified approach to analyzing the condition of the nuclear reactor under its scrutiny. The product of this research provides a means for the nuclear industry to implement a safety and monitoring program that can oversee the system parameters of a nuclear power reactor facility, like that of a nuclear power plant.

  3. Nuclear power plant exports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degot, D.

    1987-01-01

    Framatome export expertise is discussed. Framatome can accept different types of contracts - for the supply of nuclear steam supply systems or for nuclear islands (both of which can be produced solely by Framatome) or for complete plants. Cooperation with the local industry is possible -this can involve technology transfer. Examples of exports in the following countries are given; Belgium (where there is close cooperation between Framatome and two major companies), South Africa (where Framatome has been involved in the building of a two-992 MWe unit at Koeberg), South Korea (where Framatome is building two-900 MWe nuclear islands in cooperation with Korean industry, Knu 9 and Knu 10) and China (where Framatome is to build two-1000 MWe class pressurized water reactors at Daya Bay). As well as supplying the French domestic nuclear market Framatome is a major force in the future of nuclear power in the world. (UK)

  4. Advanced designs of VVER reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhov, V.A.

    2010-01-01

    The history of VVER reactors, current challenges and approaches to the challenges are highlighted. The VVER-1200 reactor of 3+ generation for AES-2006 units are under construction at the Leningrad 2 nuclear power plant (LNPP-2). The main parameters are listed and details are presented of the vessel, steam generator, and improved fuel. The issue of the NPP safety is discussed. Additional topics include the MIR-1200 reactor unit, VVER-600, and VVER-SCP (Generation 4). (P.A.)

  5. Materials for generation-IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Materials science and materials development are key issues for the implementation of innovative reactor systems such as those defined in the framework of the Generation IV. Six systems have been selected for Generation IV consideration: gas-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, molten salt-cooled reactor, sodium-cooled fast reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and very high temperature reactor. The structural materials need to resist much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses and extremely corrosive environment, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. For this reason, the first consideration in the development of Generation-IV concepts is selection and deployment of materials that operate successfully in the aggressive operating environments expected in the Gen-IV concepts. This paper summarizes the Gen-IV operating environments and describes the various candidate materials under consideration for use in different structural applications. (author)

  6. A model for the release, dispersion and environmental impact of a postulated reactor accident from a submerged commercial nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertch, Timothy Creston

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear power plants are inherently suitable for submerged applications and could provide power to the shore power grid or support future underwater applications. The technology exists today and the construction of a submerged commercial nuclear power plant may become desirable. A submerged reactor is safer to humans because the infinite supply of water for heat removal, particulate retention in the water column, sedimentation to the ocean floor and inherent shielding of the aquatic environment would significantly mitigate the effects of a reactor accident. A better understanding of reactor operation in this new environment is required to quantify the radioecological impact and to determine the suitability of this concept. The impact of release to the environment from a severe reactor accident is a new aspect of the field of marine radioecology. Current efforts have been centered on radioecological impacts of nuclear waste disposal, nuclear weapons testing fallout and shore nuclear plant discharges. This dissertation examines the environmental impact of a severe reactor accident in a submerged commercial nuclear power plant, modeling a postulated site on the Atlantic continental shelf adjacent to the United States. This effort models the effects of geography, decay, particle transport/dispersion, bioaccumulation and elimination with associated dose commitment. The use of a source term equivalent to the release from Chernobyl allows comparison between the impacts of that accident and the postulated submerged commercial reactor plant accident. All input parameters are evaluated using sensitivity analysis. The effect of the release on marine biota is determined. Study of the pathways to humans from gaseous radionuclides, consumption of contaminated marine biota and direct exposure as contaminated water reaches the shoreline is conducted. The model developed by this effort predicts a significant mitigation of the radioecological impact of the reactor accident release

  7. Reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, W.; Richter, G.

    1976-01-01

    The invention deals with disengaging the coupling of a reactor coolant pump of a nuclear reactor feeding pressurized coolant. The disengaging coupling has two parts joined by bolts, at least one of them containing a driving agent within a bore. This is provided with a speed-depending ignition device in such manner that, if the critical speed is reached, the driving charge is ignited and the coupling is disengaged by destroying the bolts. (UWI) [de

  8. Nuclear reactors safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Francois; Seiler, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Since the seventies, economic incentives have led the utilities to drive a permanent evolution of the light water reactor (LWR). The evolution deals with the reactor designs as well as the way to operate them in a more flexible manner. It is for instance related to the fuel technologies and management. On the one hand, the technologies are in continuous evolution, such as the fuel pellets (MOX, Gd fuel, or Cr doped fuels..) as well as advanced cladding materials (M5 TM , MDA or ZIRLO). On the other hand, the fuel management is also subject to continuous evolution in particular in terms of increasing the level of burn-up, the reactor (core) power, the enrichment, as well as the duration of reactor cycles. For instance, in a few years in France, the burn-up has raised beyond the value of 39 GWj/t, initially authorized up to 52 GWj/t for the UO 2 fuel. In the near future, utilities foreseen to reach fuel burn-up of 60 GWj/t for MOX fuel and 70 GWj/t for UO 2 fuel. Furthermore, the future reactor of fourth generation will use new fuels of advanced conception. Furthermore with the objective of improving the safety margins, methods and calculation tools used by the utilities in the elaboration of their safety demonstrations submitted to the Safety Authority, are in movement. The margin evaluation methodologies often consist of a calculation chain of best-estimate multi-field simulations (e.g. various codes being coupled to simulate in a realistic way the evolution of the thermohydraulic, neutronic and mechanic state of the reactor). The statistical methods are more and more sophisticated and the computer codes are integrating ever-complex physical models (e.g. three-dimensional at fine scale). Following this evolution, the Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), whose one of the roles is to examine the safety records and to rend a technical expertise, considers the necessity of reevaluating the safety issues for advanced

  9. Nuclear power plants and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agudo, E.G.; Penteado Filho, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    The question of nuclear power plants is analysed in details. The fundamental principles of reactors are described as well as the problems of safety involved with the reactor operation and the quantity and type of radioactive released to the environment. It shows that the amount of radioactive is very long. The reactor accidents has occurred, as three mile island, are also analysed. (M.I.A.)

  10. High accuracy geodesic works in the reactor site of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specziar, Attila

    1984-01-01

    The geodesic works for marking the basic points and baselines of the Paks-1 reactor building are summarized. Some marked points were destroyed during the construction works at the reactor site, thus some measurements had to be repeated. The final documentation of the building was finished only during the geodesic works. In spite of the difficulties considering the high accuracy required, the geodesic problems were solved successfully. (D.Gy.)

  11. Nuclear power plant life management processes: Guidelines and practices for heavy water reactors. Report prepared within the framework of the Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for Heavy Water Reactors and on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    The time is right to address nuclear power plant life management and ageing management issues in terms of processes and refurbishments for long term operation and license renewal aspects of heavy water reactors (HWRs) because some HWRs are close to the design life. In general, HWR nuclear power plant (NPP) owners would like to keep their NPPs in service as long as they can be operated safely and economically. This involves the consideration of a number of factors, such as the material condition of the plant, comparison with current safety standards, the socio-political climate and asset management/ business planning considerations. This TECDOC deals with organizational and managerial means to implement effective plan life management (PLiM) into existing plant in operating HWR NPPs. This TECDOC discusses the current trend of PLiM observed in NPPs to date and an overview of PLiM programmes and considerations. This includes key objectives of such programs, regulatory considerations, an overall integrated approach, organizational and technology infrastructure considerations, importance of effective plant data management and finally, human issues related to ageing and finally integration of PLiM with economic planning. Also general approach to HWR PLiM, including the key PLiM processes, life assessment for critical structures and components, conditions assessment of structures and components and obsolescence is mentioned. Technical aspects are described on component specific technology considerations for condition assessment, example of a proactive ageing management programme, and Ontario power generation experiences in appendices. Also country reports from Argentina, Canada, India, the Republic of Korea and Romania are attached in the annex to share practices and experiences to PLiM programme. This TECDOC is primarily addressed to both the management (decision makers) and technical staff (engineers and scientists) of NPP owners/operators and technical support

  12. Nuclear reactor power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    The redundant signals from the sensor assemblies measuring the process parameters of a nuclear reactor power supply are transmitted each in its turn to a protection system which operates to actuate the protection apparatus for signals indicating off-process conditions. Each sensor assembly includes a number of like sensors measuring the same parameters. The protection system has a number of separate protection units, each unit receiving the process signals from the like sensors of each assembly in its turn. The sets of process signals derived from the sensor parameter assemblies are each in its turn transmitted from the protection system to the control system which impresses control signals on the reactor or its components to counteract the tendency for conditions to drift off-normal status requiring operation of the protection system. A parameter signal selector is interposed between the protection system and the control system. This selector prevents a parameter signal of a set of signals, which differs from the other parameter signals of the set by more than twice the allowable variation of the sensors which produce the set, from passing to the control system. The connection between the protection units and the selector is four separate fiber optic channels so that electrical interaction between the protection units and the selector or control system is precluded. The selectors include a pair of signal selection units, one unit sending selected process signals to primary control channels and the other sending selected process signals to back-up control channels. Test signals are periodically impressed on a selected pair of a selected unit and control channels. When test signals are so impressed the selected control channel is disabled from transmitting control signals to the reactor and/or its associated components

  13. Nuclear reactor spacer assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Groves, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    A fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed wherein the fuel element receiving and supporting grid is comprised of a first metal, the guide tubes which pass through the grid assembly are comprised of a second metal and the grid is supported on the guide tubes by means of expanded sleeves located intermediate the grid and guide tubes. The fuel assembly is fabricated by inserting the sleeves, of initial outer diameter commensurate with the guide tube outer diameters, through the holes in the grid assembly provided for the guide tubes and thereafter expanding the sleeves radially outwardly along their entire length such that the guide tubes can subsequently be passed through the sleeves. The step of radial expansion, as a result of windows provided in the sleeves having dimensions commensurate with the geometry of the grid, mechanically captures the grid and simultaneously preloads the sleeve against the grid whereby relative motion between the grid and guide tube will be precluded

  14. Nuclear reactor decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, John.

    1982-01-01

    A new method for decontaminating and removing corrosion products from nuclear reactors was developed which involves first oxidizing insoluble metal oxides on the contaminated surfaces with ozone to make them more soluble in water or acid solutions. The method is effective on chromium (III) oxide and can be used to decontaminate iron-, chromium-, and nickel-containing alloys such as are used in PWRs. The solubilized metal oxides are then dissolved in ozone-saturated water. Mild acidic decontamination reagents in low concentrations in water are used to remove the remaining surface oxides. Insoluble material is filtered from the aqueous solution, and both dissolved metals and the decontamination reagent are removed with cation and anion-exchange resins

  15. Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics for Coupling A Hydrogen Production Plant to a High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. B. Davis; C. H. Oh; R. B. Barner; D. F. Wilson

    2005-06-01

    The Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the hightemperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant, may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. Seven possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermalhydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermalhydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The

  16. Design of an organic simplified nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvan, Koroush [Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Forrest, Eric [Primary Standards Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Numerous advanced reactor concepts have been proposed to replace light water reactors ever since their establishment as the dominant technology for nuclear energy production. While most designs seek to improve cost competitiveness and safety, the implausibility of doing so with affordable materials or existing nuclear fuel infrastructure reduces the possibility of near-term deployment, especially in developing countries. The organic nuclear concept, first explored in the 1950s, offers an attractive alternative to advanced reactor designs being considered. The advent of high temperature fluids, along with advances in hydrocracking and reforming technologies driven by the oil and gas industries, make the organic concept even more viable today. We present a simple, cost-effective, and safe small modular nuclear reactor for offshore underwater deployment. The core is moderated by graphite, zirconium hydride, and organic fluid while cooled by the organic fluid. The organic coolant enables operation near atmospheric pressure and use of plain carbon steel for the reactor tank and primary coolant piping system. The core is designed to mitigate the coolant degradation seen in early organic reactors. Overall, the design provides a power density of 40 kW/L, while reducing the reactor hull size by 40% compared with a pressurized water reactor while significantly reducing capital plant costs.

  17. Design of an Organic Simplified Nuclear Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Shirvan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous advanced reactor concepts have been proposed to replace light water reactors ever since their establishment as the dominant technology for nuclear energy production. While most designs seek to improve cost competitiveness and safety, the implausibility of doing so with affordable materials or existing nuclear fuel infrastructure reduces the possibility of near-term deployment, especially in developing countries. The organic nuclear concept, first explored in the 1950s, offers an attractive alternative to advanced reactor designs being considered. The advent of high temperature fluids, along with advances in hydrocracking and reforming technologies driven by the oil and gas industries, make the organic concept even more viable today. We present a simple, cost-effective, and safe small modular nuclear reactor for offshore underwater deployment. The core is moderated by graphite, zirconium hydride, and organic fluid while cooled by the organic fluid. The organic coolant enables operation near atmospheric pressure and use of plain carbon steel for the reactor tank and primary coolant piping system. The core is designed to mitigate the coolant degradation seen in early organic reactors. Overall, the design provides a power density of 40 kW/L, while reducing the reactor hull size by 40% compared with a pressurized water reactor while significantly reducing capital plant costs.

  18. Building of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Takashi.

    1997-01-01

    A first nuclear plant and a second nuclear power plant are disposed in adjacent with each other in a building for a nuclear reactor. A reactor container is disposed in each of the plants, and each reactor container is surrounded by a second containing facility. A repairing chamber capable of communicating with the secondary containing facilities for both of the secondary containing facilities is disposed being in contact with the second containing facility of each plant for repairing control rod driving mechanisms or reactor incorporated-type recycling pumps. Namely, the repairing chamber is in adjacent with the reactor containers of both plants, and situated between both of the plants as a repairing chamber to be used in common for both plants. Air tight inlet/exit doors are formed to the inlets/exits of both plants of the repairing chamber. Space for the repairing chamber can be reduced to about one half compared with a case where the repairing chamber is formed independently on each plant. (I.N.)

  19. Sodium-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthoud, Georges; Ducros, Gerard; Feron, Damien; Guerin, Yannick; Latge, Christian; Limoge, Yves; Santarini, Gerard; Seiler, Jean-Marie; Vernaz, Etienne; Guidez, Joel; Andrieux, Catherine; Baque, Francois; Bonin, Bernard; Boullis, Bernard; Cabet, Celine; Carre, Frank; Dufour, Philippe; Gauche, Francois; Grouiller, Jean-Paul; Jeannot, Jean-Philippe; Le Flem, Marion; Le Coz, Pierre; Martin, Laurent; Masson, Michel; Mathonniere, Gilles; Nokhamzon, Jean-Guy; Pelletier, Michel; Rodriguez, Gilles; Saez, Manuel; Seran, Jean-Louis; Varaine, Frederic; Zaetta, Alain; Behar, Christophe; Provitina, Olivier; Lecomte, Michael; Forestier, Alain; Bender, Alexandra; Parisot, Jean-Francois; Finot, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    This book first explains the choice of sodium-cooled reactors by outlining the reasons of the choice of fast neutron reactors (fast neutrons instead of thermal neutrons, recycling opportunity for plutonium, full use of natural uranium, nuclear waste optimization, flexibility of fast neutron reactors in nuclear material management, fast neutron reactors as complements of water-cooled reactors), and by outlining the reasons for the choice of sodium as heat-transfer material. Physical, chemical, and neutron properties of sodium are presented. The second part of the book first presents the main design principles for sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors and their core. The third part proposes an historical overview and an assessment of previously operated sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors (French reactors from Rapsodie to Superphenix, other reactors in the world), and an assessment of the main incidents which occurred in these reactors. It also reports the experience and lessons learned from the dismantling of various sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors in the world. The next chapter addresses safety issues (technical and safety aspects related to the use of sodium) and environmental issues (dosimetry, gaseous and liquid releases, solid wastes, and cooling water). Then, various technological aspects of these reactors are addressed: the energy conversion system, main components, sodium chemistry, sodium-related technology, advances in in-service inspection, materials used in reactors and their behaviour, and fuel system. The next chapter addresses the fuel cycle in these reactors: its integrated specific character, report of the French experience in fast neutron reactor fuel processing, description of the transmutation of minor actinides in these reactors. The last chapter proposes an overview of reactors currently projected or under construction in the world, presents the Astrid project, and gives an assessment of the economy of these reactors. A glossary and an index

  20. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruma, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    In the first embodiment of the present invention, elements less activated by neutrons are used as reactor core structural materials placed under high neutron irradiation. In the second embodiment of the present invention, materials less activated by neutrons when corrosive materials intrude to a reactor core are used as structural materials constituting portions where corrosion products are generated. In the third embodiment, chemical species comprising elements less activated by neutrons are used as chemical species to be added to reactor water with an aim of controlling water quality. A nuclear power plant causing less radioactivity can be provided by using structural materials comprising a group of specific elements hardly forming radioactivity by activation of neutrons or by controlling isotope ratios. (N.H.)

  1. Criteria for safety-related nuclear-power-plant operator actions: 1982 pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) simulator exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, D.S.; Beare, A.N.; Kozinsky, E.J.; Haas, P.M.

    1983-06-01

    The primary objective of the Safety-Related Operator Action (SROA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is to provide a data base to support development of criteria for safety-related actions by nuclear power plant operators. When compared to field data collected on similar events, a base of operator performance data developed from the simulator experiments can then be used to establish safety-related operator action design evaluation criteria, evaluate the effects of performance shaping factors, and support safety/risk assessment analyses. This report presents data obtained from refresher training exercises conducted in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant control room simulator. The 14 exercises were performed by 24 teams of licensed operators from one utility, and operator performance was recorded by an automatic Performance Measurement System. Data tapes were analyzed to extract operator response times (RTs) and error rate information. Demographic and subjective data were collected by means of brief questionnaires and analyzed in an attempt to evaluate the effects of selected performance shaping factors on operator performance

  2. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  3. Simulation of a marine nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Kyouya, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Hideo; Ochiai, Masaaki

    1995-01-01

    A Nuclear-powered ship Engineering Simulation SYstem (NESSY) has been developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute as an advanced design tool for research and development of future marine reactors. A marine reactor must respond to changing loads and to the ship's motions because of the ship's maneuvering and its presence in a marine environment. The NESSY has combined programs for the reactor plant behavior calculations and the ship's motion calculations. Thus, it can simulate reactor power fluctuations caused by changing loads and the ship's motions. It can also simulate the behavior of water in the pressurizer and steam generators. This water sloshes in response to the ship's motions. The performance of NESSY has been verified by comparing the simulation calculations with the measured data obtained by experiments performed using the nuclear ship Mutsu. The effects of changing loads and the ship's motions on the reactor behavior can be accurately simulated by NESSY

  4. Nuclear Security for Floating Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiba, James M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Scherer, Carolynn P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a lot of interest in small modular reactors. A specific type of these small modular reactors (SMR,) are marine based power plants called floating nuclear power plants (FNPP). These FNPPs are typically built by countries with extensive knowledge of nuclear energy, such as Russia, France, China and the US. These FNPPs are built in one country and then sent to countries in need of power and/or seawater desalination. Fifteen countries have expressed interest in acquiring such power stations. Some designs for such power stations are briefly summarized. Several different avenues for cooperation in FNPP technology are proposed, including IAEA nuclear security (i.e. safeguards), multilateral or bilateral agreements, and working with Russian design that incorporates nuclear safeguards for IAEA inspections in non-nuclear weapons states

  5. Evaluation of the applicability of existing nuclear power plant regulatory requirements in the U.S. to advanced small modular reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wheeler, Timothy A.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Middleton, Bobby D.; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Duran, Felicia Angelica; Baum, Gregory A.

    2013-05-01

    The current wave of small modular reactor (SMR) designs all have the goal of reducing the cost of management and operations. By optimizing the system, the goal is to make these power plants safer, cheaper to operate and maintain, and more secure. In particular, the reduction in plant staffing can result in significant cost savings. The introduction of advanced reactor designs and increased use of advanced automation technologies in existing nuclear power plants will likely change the roles, responsibilities, composition, and size of the crews required to control plant operations. Similarly, certain security staffing requirements for traditional operational nuclear power plants may not be appropriate or necessary for SMRs due to the simpler, safer and more automated design characteristics of SMRs. As a first step in a process to identify where regulatory requirements may be met with reduced staffing and therefore lower cost, this report identifies the regulatory requirements and associated guidance utilized in the licensing of existing reactors. The potential applicability of these regulations to advanced SMR designs is identified taking into account the unique features of these types of reactors.

  6. Safety of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    Safety is the major public issue to be resolved or accommodated if nuclear power is to have a future. Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) of accidental releases of low-level radiation, the spread and activity of radiation in populated areas, and the impacts on public health from exposure evolved from the earlier Rasmussen Reactor Safety Study. Applications of the PRA technique have identified design peculiarities in specific reactors, thus increasing reactor safety and establishing a quide for evaluating reactor regulations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and reactor vendors must share with utilities the responsibility for reactor safety in the US and for providing reasonable assurance to the public. This entails persuasive public education and information that with safety a top priority, changes now being made in light water reactor hardware and operations will be adequate. 17 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  7. Nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otway, H.J.

    1974-01-01

    Action at the international level will assume greater importance as the number of nuclear power plants increases, especially in the more densely populated parts of the world. Predictions of growth made prior to October 1973 [9] indicated that, by 1980, 14% of the electricity would be supplied by nuclear plants and by the year 2000 this figure would be about 50%. This will make the topic of international co-operation and standards of even greater importance. The IAEA has long been active in providing assistance to Member States in the siting design and operation of nuclear reactors. These activities have been pursued through advisory missions, the publication of codes of practice, guide books, technical reports and in arranging meetings to promote information exchange. During the early development of nuclear power, there was no well-established body of experience which would allow formulation of internationally acceptable safety criteria, except in a few special cases. Hence, nuclear power plant safety and reliability matters often received an ad hoc approach which necessarily entailed a lack of consistency in the criteria used and in the levels of safety required. It is clear that the continuation of an ad hoc approach to safety will prove inadequate in the context of a world-wide nuclear power industry, and the international trade which this implies. As in several other fields, the establishment of internationally acceptable safety standards and appropriate guides for use by regulatory bodies, utilities, designers and constructors, is becoming a necessity. The IAEA is presently planning the development of a comprehensive set of basic requirements for nuclear power plant safety, and the associated reliability requirements, which would be internationally acceptable, and could serve as a standard frame of reference for nuclear plant safety and reliability analyses

  8. Nuclear power reactors: reactor safety and military and civil defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hvinden, T.

    1976-01-01

    The formation of fission products and plutonium in reactors is briefly described, followed by a short general discussion of reactor safety. The interaction of reactor safety and radioactive release considerations with military and civil defence is thereafter discussed. Reactors and other nuclear plants are factors which must be taken into account in the defence of the district around the site, and as potential targets of both conventional and guerilla attacks and sabotage, requiring special defence. The radiological hazards arising from serious damage to a power reactor by conventional weapons are briefly discussed, and the benefits of underground siting evaluated. Finally the author discusses the significance of the IAEA safeguards work as a preventive factor. (JIW)

  9. Nuclear reactor safety in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear reactor safety in the USA has emphasized a defense-in-depth approach to protecting the public from reactor accidents. This approach was severely tested by the Three Mile Island accident and was found to be effective in safeguarding the public health and safety. However, the economic impact of the TMI accident was very large. Consequently, more attention is now being given to plant protection as well as public-health protection in reactor-safety studies. Sophisticated computer simulations at Los Alamos are making major contributions in this area. In terms of public risk, nuclear power plants compare favorably with other large-scale alternatives to electricity generation. Unfortunately, there is a large gulf between the real risks of nuclear power and the present public perception of these risks

  10. Modernization for safety purposes of Russian nuclear power plants with channel-type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riakhin, V.M.

    1999-01-01

    The nineties have crucially changed the Russian policy towards channel-type reactors known as RBMK. After the period of intensive commissioning the new Units (Kursk NPP: 1976, 1979, 1983,1985; Smolensk NPP 1982, 1985, 1990), the main financial flow was directed into reconstruction of these units. Safety upgrade of the units of Kursk NPP is presented in more details

  11. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Computer-based procedure for field activities: results from three evaluations at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with the systems of a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by industry have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety. One potential way to improve procedure-based activities is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). Computer-based procedures provide the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, just-in-time training, etc into CBP system. One obvious advantage of this capability is reducing the time spent tracking down the applicable documentation. Additionally, human performance tools can be integrated in the CBP system in such way that helps the worker focus on the task rather than the tools. Some tools can be completely incorporated into the CBP system, such as pre-job briefs, placekeeping, correct component verification, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduces the time and labor required, such as concurrent and independent verification. Another benefit of CBPs compared to PBPs is dynamic procedure presentation. PBPs are static documents which limits the degree to which the information presented can be tailored to the task and conditions when the procedure is executed. The CBP system could be configured to display only the relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the user down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the user's workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Light Water Reactors Sustainability Program

  12. Questions to the reactors power upgrade of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde; Cuestionamientos al aumento de potencia de los reactores de la Central Nuclear de Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas M, B., E-mail: salasmarb@yahoo.com.mx [UNAM, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Fisica, Circuito exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    The two reactors of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) were subjected to power upgrade labors with the purpose of achieving 20% upgrade on the original power; these labors concluded in August 24, 2010 for the Reactor 1 and in January 16, 2011 for the Reactor 2, however in January of 2014, the NNP-L V has not received by part of the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) the new Operation License to be able to work with the new power, because it does not fulfill all the necessary requirements of safety. In this work is presented and analyzed the information obtained in this respect, with data provided by the Instituto Federal de Acceso a la Informacion Publica y Proteccion de Datos (IFAI) and the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) in Mexico, as well as the opinion of some workers of the NPP-L V. The Governing Board of the CFE announcement that will give special continuation to the behavior on the operation and reliability of the NPP-L V, because the frequency of not announced interruptions was increased 7 times more in the last three years. (Author)

  13. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This 2003 version of Elecnuc contents information, data and charts on the nuclear power plants in the world and general information on the national perspectives concerning the electric power industry. The following topics are presented: 2002 highlights; characteristics of main reactor types and on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; the worldwide status of nuclear power plants on 2002/12/3; units distributed by countries; nuclear power plants connected to the Grid by reactor type groups; nuclear power plants under construction; capacity of the nuclear power plants on the grid; first electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit; electrical generation from nuclear plants by country at the end 2002; performance indicator of french PWR units; trends of the generation indicator worldwide from 1960 to 2002; 2002 cumulative Load Factor by owners; nuclear power plants connected to the grid by countries; status of license renewal applications in Usa; nuclear power plants under construction; Shutdown nuclear power plants; exported nuclear power plants by type; exported nuclear power plants by countries; nuclear power plants under construction or order; steam generator replacements; recycling of Plutonium in LWR; projects of MOX fuel use in reactors; electricity needs of Germany, Belgium, Spain, Finland, United Kingdom; electricity indicators of the five countries. (A.L.B.)

  14. Nuclear reactor kinetics and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewins, J.

    1978-01-01

    A consistent, integrated account of modern developments in the study of nuclear reactor kinetics and the problem of their efficient and safe control. It aims to prepare the student for advanced study and research or practical work in the field. Special features include treatments of noise theory, reliability theory and safety related studies. It covers all aspects of the operation and control of nuclear reactors, power and research and is complete in providing physical data methods of calculation and solution including questions of equipment reliability. The work uses illustrations of the main types of reactors in use in the UK, USA and Europe. Each chapter contains problems and worked examples suitable for course work and study. The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introductory review; neutron and precursor equations; elementary solutions at low power; linear reactor process dynamics with feedback; power reactor control systems; fluctuations and reactor noise; safety and reliability; nonlinear systems (safety and control); analogue computing. (author)

  15. Control rod drive of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuchkov, I.I.; Gorjunov, V.S.; Zaitsev, B.I.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to nuclear reactors and, more particularly, to a drive of a control rod of a nuclear reactor and allows power control, excess reactivity compensation, and emergency shut-down of a reactor. (author)

  16. Nuclear reactor control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cearley, J.E.; Izzo, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a vertically oriented bottom entry control rod from a nuclear reactor: a frame including an elongated central spine of cruciform cross section connected between an upper support member and a lower support member both of cruciform shape having four laterally extending arms. The arms are in alignment with the arms of the lower support member and each aligned upper and lower support members has a sheath extending between; absorber plates of neutron absorber material, different from the material of the frame, one of the absorber plates is positioned within a sheath beneath each of the arms; attachment means suspends the absorber plates from the arms of the upper support member within a sheath; elongated absorber members positioned within a sheath between each of the suspended absorber plates and an arm of the lower support member; and joint means between the upper ends of the absorber members and the lower ends of the suspended absorber plates for minimizing gaps; the sheath means encloses the suspended absorber plates and the absorber members extending between aligned arms of the upper and lower support members and secured

  17. Reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, W.; Richter, G.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement is proposed concerning the easier disengagement of the coupling at the reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor transporting a pressurized coolant. According to the invention the disengaging coupling consists of two parts separated by screws. At least one of the screws contains a propellent charge ananged within a bore and provided with a speed-dependent ignition device in such a way that by separation of the screws at overspeeds the coupling is disengaged. The sub-claims are concerned with the kind of ignition ot the propellent charge. (UWI) [de

  18. Occupational exposure to the personnel in nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors built by Kraftwerk Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Untervossbeck, H.; Weber, H.

    1978-01-01

    The radiation exposure to the personnel in nuclear power stations has moved more and more to the forefront of interest. As operational data show, the radiation exposure to the personnel in pressurized water reactors built by Kraftwerk Union has been considerably reduced if one compares older power stations with newer ones. With further improvements in the plant design and in the construction of components some more reductions are to be expected. The associated doses were ascertained for numerous work procedures from which conclusions can be drawn on the dose distribution in different fields of work (operation, refuelling, inservice inspection, repairs etc.). Criteria are deduced from this to obtain further reductions in the radiation exposure. The actual operation, including refuelling, contributes relatively little to the total dose. During the last years, however, the extent of inservice inspections, demanded by the authorities, has steadily increased. A remarkable amount of the total radiation exposure at present is due to such work, and more attention has to be paid to this fact. Finally repairs also considerably contribute to the total personnel dose. Annual doses expected from repairs can not be predicted, but some examples of repairs will be discussed with regard to the doses thus delivered. (author)

  19. Nuclear reactor philosophy and criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchison, R.J.

    1979-07-01

    Nuclear power plant safety criteria and principles developed in Canada are directed towards minimizing the chance of failure of the fuel and preventing or reducing to an acceptably low level the escape of fission products should fuel failure occur. Safety criteria and practices are set forth in the Reactor Siting Guide, which is based upon the concept of defence in depth. The Guide specifies that design and construction shall follow the best applicable code, standard or practice; the total of all serious process system failures shall not exceed one in three years; special safety systems are to be physically and functionally separate from process systems and each other; and safety systems shall be testable, with unavailability less than 10 - 3 . Doses to the most exposed member of the public due to normal operation, serious process failures, and dual failures are specified. Licensees are also required to consider the effects of extreme conditions due to airplane crashes, explosions, turbine disintegration, pipe burst, and natural disasters. Safety requirements are changing as nuclear power plant designs evolve and in response to social and economic pressures

  20. Nuclear reactor operation control process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, T.; Hiranuma, H.; Nishida, C.; Suematsu, S.

    1981-01-01

    A process for controlling operation of a nuclear reactor is described in which first control means is operated to cause reactor power to rise to a level at which a pellet-clad-mechanical-interaction begins to take place between a cladding and pellets of a fuel element. After interrupting the operation of the first control means, second control means is operated to cause the reactor power to rise to a preset level, the second control means being capable of effecting finer control of the reactor power than the first control means. When the reactor power deviates from the preset level with the progress of the reactor operation in the preset level, the second control means is operated so as to maintain the reactor power at the preset level

  1. Nuclear reactors: physics and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadigaroglu, G

    2005-07-01

    In the form of a tutorial addressed to non-specialists, the article provides an introduction to nuclear reactor technology and more specifically to Light Water Reactors (LWR); it also shows where materials and chemistry problems are encountered in reactor technology. The basics of reactor physics are reviewed, as well as the various strategies in reactor design and the corresponding choices of materials (fuel, coolant, structural materials, etc.). A brief description of the various types of commercial power reactors follows. The design of LWRs is discussed in greater detail; the properties of light water as coolant and moderator are put in perspective. The physicochemical and metallurgical properties of the materials impose thermal limits that determine the performance and the maximum power a reactor can deliver. (author)

  2. On estimation of reliability of a nuclear power plant with tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemin, A.I.; Smetannikov, V.P.; Shiverskij, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    The results of the analysis of INTOR plant reliability are presented. The first stage of the analysis consists in the calculation of the INTOR plant structural reliability factors (15 ibs main systems have been considered). For each system the failure flow parameter (W(1/h)) and operational readiness Ksub(r) have been determined which for the plant as a whole besides these factors-technological utilization coefficient Ksub(TU) and mean-cycles-between failures Tsub(o). The second stage of the reliability analysis consists in investigating methods of improving its reliability factors reratively to the one calculated at the first level stage. It is shown that the reliability of the whole plant to the most essential extent is determined by the power supply system reliability. The following as to the influence extent on the INTOR plant reliability is the cryogenic system. Calculations of the INTOR plant reliability factors have given the following values: W=4,5x10 -3 1/h. Tsub(o)=152 h, Ksub(r)=0,71, Ksub(TU)=o,4 g

  3. Development and implementation of monitoring for the reactor core of unit No. 5 of the Novovoronezh nuclear plant by local parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prytkov, A. N.; Tereshchenko, A. B.; Kravchenko, Yu. N.; Boldyrev, N. V.; Pozychaniuk, I. V.; Lisitsyn, D. I.; Golubev, E. I.

    2014-04-01

    In the course of upgrading the unit no. 5 reactor core of the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant, operational limits by local parameters, which limit the admissible linear power density and the relative power of fuel elements, were established. Due to applying modern computer technologies in systems of the in-core monitoring, the calculation of power density for all fuel elements in the real-time mode is implemented. To monitor the power density of fuel elements, the algorithm for determining the limiting linear power density is developed depending on the reactor core height and on the average nuclear fuel burnup. The admissible relative power of fuel elements is determined. In the course of the performed work, the excessive conservative limitations on nonuniformity of the reactor power density are excluded. The monitoring of power density by local parameters instead of indirect K q (fuel-assembly relative power) and K v (relative power of the fuel assembly section) made it possible to increase the fuel efficiency and to improve the economic parameters of fuel cycles of the unit no. 5 reactor core of the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant.

  4. South Africa's nuclear model: A small and innovative reactor is seen as the model for new electricity plants. The project is nearing the starting blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Although nuclear power generation has by far the best safety and environmental record of any technology in general use, it has for many years been unable to make any meaningful inroads into the wall of negative perceptions that have arisen against it. But sentiments are changing rapidly on a global scale. The flare-up of oil prices is a sobering reminder of the volatility in the energy market, the exhaustibility of fossil fuels and the urgent need for stable, reliable, non-polluting sources of electrical power that are indispensable to a modern industrial economy. Today, new types of nuclear plants are prized, and South Africa is moving ahead. The State energy provider, Eskom, is internationally regarded as the leader in the field of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) technology, a 'new generation' nuclear power plant. A decision on the PBMR project's future is on the near horizon. Should approvals be received in the coming months to proceed to the project's next phase, construction of the PBMR demonstration plant will start in 2006, in which case the reactor will start in 2010 and handed over to the client, Eskom, in 2011. Eskom has conditionally undertaken to purchase the first commercial units. Pebble bed reactors are small, about one-sixth the size of most current nuclear plants. Multiple PBMRs can share a common control center and occupy an area of no more than three football fields. More specifically, the PBMR is a helium-cooled, graphite moderated high temperature reactor (HTR). The concept is based on experience in the UK, United States and particularly Germany where prototype reactors were operated successfully between the late 1960s and 1980s. Although it is not the only high-temperature, gas-cooled nuclear reactor being developed in the world, the South African project is internationally regarded as a front-runner. The South African PBMR includes unique and patented technological innovations which make it particularly competitive. The Chief Executive

  5. Life time of nuclear power plants and new types of reactors; La duree de vie des centrales nucleaires et les nouveaux types de reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    This report, realized by the Evaluation Parliamentary Office of scientific and technological choices, aims to answer simple but fundamental questions for the french electric power production. What are the phenomena which may limit the exploitation time of nuclear power plants? How can we fight against the aging, at which cost and with which safety? The first chapter presents the management of the nuclear power plants life time, an essential element of the park optimization but not a sufficient element. The second chapter details the EPR and the other reactors for 2015 as a bond between the today and tomorrow parks. The last chapter deals with the necessity of efforts in the research and development to succeed in 2035 and presents other reactors in project. (A.L.B.)

  6. Preliminary risk analysis of an Hydrogen production plant using the reformed process of methane with vapor coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores y Flores, A.; Nelson E, P.F.; Francois L, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    It is necessary to identify the different types of dangers, as well as their causes, probabilities and consequences of the same ones, inside plants, industries and any process to classify the risks. This work is focused in particular to a study using the technical HAZOP (Hazard and Operability) for a plant of reformed of methane with vapor coupled to a nuclear reactor of the type HTTR (High Temperature Test Reactor), which is designed to be built in Japan. In particular in this study the interaction is analyzed between the nuclear reactor and the plant of reformed of methane with vapor. After knowing the possible causes of risk one it is built chart of results of HAZOP to have a better vision of the consequences of this faults toward the buildings and constructions, to people and the influence of the fault on each plant; for what there are proposed solutions to mitigate these consequences or to avoid them. The work is divided in three sections: a brief introduction about the technique of HAZOP; some important aspects of the plant of reformed of methane with vapor; and the construction of the chart of results of HAZOP. (Author)

  7. Random processes in nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, M M R

    1974-01-01

    Random Processes in Nuclear Reactors describes the problems that a nuclear engineer may meet which involve random fluctuations and sets out in detail how they may be interpreted in terms of various models of the reactor system. Chapters set out to discuss topics on the origins of random processes and sources; the general technique to zero-power problems and bring out the basic effect of fission, and fluctuations in the lifetime of neutrons, on the measured response; the interpretation of power reactor noise; and associated problems connected with mechanical, hydraulic and thermal noise sources

  8. Radioactive nuclides in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatsu, Eiko

    1982-12-01

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also chemical subject materials. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry was considered for students of the school in the previous report (JAERI-M 9827), where the first part of the plan, ''Fundamentals of Reactor Chemistry'', was reviewed. This report is a review of the second part of the plan containing fission products chemistry, actinoids elements chemistry and activated reactor materials chemistry. (author)

  9. Reactor building for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidlen, F.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the improvement of the design of a liner, supported by a latticed steel girder structure and destined for guaranteeing a gastight closure for the plant compartments in the reactor building of a pressurized water reactor. It is intended to provide the steel girder structure on their top side with grates, being suited for walking upon, and to hang on their lower side diaphragms in modular construction as a liner. At the edges they may be sealed with bellows in order to avoid thermal stresses. The steel girder structure may at the same time serve as supports for parts of the steam pipe. (RW) [de

  10. Recirculation system for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H. E.; Dollard, W. J.; Tower, S. N.

    1980-01-01

    A recirculation system for use in pressurized water nuclear reactors to increase the output temperature of the reactor coolant, thereby achieving a significant improvement in plant efficiency without exceeding current core design limits. A portion of the hot outlet coolant is recirculated to the inlets of the peripheral fuel assemblies which operate at relatively low power levels. The outlet temperature from these peripheral fuel assemblies is increased to a temperature above that of the average core outlet. The recirculation system uses external pumps and introduces the hot recirculation coolant to the free space between the core barrel and the core baffle, where it flows downward and inward to the inlets of the peripheral fuel assemblies. In the unlikely event of a loss of coolant accident, the recirculation system flow path through the free space and to the inlets of the fuel assemblies is utilized for the injection of emergency coolant to the lower vessel and core. During emergency coolant injection, the emergency coolant is prevented from bypassing the core through the recirculation system by check valves inserted into the recirculation system piping

  11. Technique of nuclear reactors controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weill, J.

    1953-12-01

    This report deal about 'Techniques of control of the nuclear reactors' in the goal to achieve the control of natural uranium reactors and especially the one of Saclay. This work is mainly about the measurement into nuclear parameters and go further in the measurement of thermodynamic variables,etc... putting in relief the new features required on behalf of the detectors because of their use in the thermal neutrons flux. In the domain of nuclear measurement, we indicate the realizations and the results obtained with thermal neutron detectors and for the measurement of ionizations currents. We also treat the technical problem of the start-up of a reactor and of the reactivity measurement. We give the necessary details for the comprehension of all essential diagrams and plans put on, in particular, for the reactor of Saclay. (author) [fr

  12. How power is generated in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminathan, V.

    1978-01-01

    Power generation by nuclear fission as a result of chain reaction caused by neutrons interacting with fissile material such as 235 U, 233 U and 239 Pu is explained. Electric power production by reactor is schematically illustrated. Materials used in thermal reactor and breeder reactor are compared. Fuel reprocessing and disposal of radioactive waste coming from reprocessing plant is briefly described. Nuclear activities in India are reviewed. Four heavy water plants and two power reactors are under construction and will be operative in the near future. Two power reactors are already in operation. Nuclear Fuel Complex at Hyderabad supplies fuel element to the reactors. Fuel reprocessing and waste management facility has been set up at Tarapur. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre at Bombay and Reactor Research Centre at Kalpakkam near Madras are engaged in applied and basic research in nuclear science and engineering. (B.G.W.)

  13. Determination of uranium traces in nuclear cans of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta L, E.; Benavides M, A.M.; Sanchez P, L.

    1996-01-01

    To quantify the uranium content as impurity can be found in zirconium alloys and zircaloy, utilized to construct the sheaths containing fuels of the reactors of nuclear plants. The determination by fluorescence spectroscopy was employed as quality control measurement, at once the corrosion resistance, diminish with the increase of the uranium content in the alloys. (Author)

  14. Ultrasonic meters in the feedwater flow to recover thermal power in the reactor of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde U1 and U2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tijerina S, F.

    2008-01-01

    The engineers in nuclear power plants BWRs and PWRs based on the development of the ultrasonic technology for the measurement of the mass, volumetric flow, density and temperature in fluids, have applied this technology in two primary targets approved by the NRC: the use for the recovery of thermal power in the reactor and/or to be able to realize an increase of thermal power licensed in a 2% (MUR) by 1OCFR50 Appendix K. The present article mentions the current problem in the measurement of the feedwater flow with Venturi meters, which affects that the thermal balance of reactor BWRs or PWRs this underestimated. One in broad strokes describes the application of the ultrasonic technology for the ultrasonic measurement in the flow of the feedwater system of the reactor and power to recover thermal power of the reactor. One is to the methodology developed in CFE for a calibration of the temperature transmitters of RTD's and the methodology for a calibration of the venturi flow transmitters using ultrasonic measurement. Are show the measurements in the feedwater of reactor of the temperature with RTD's and ultrasonic measurement, as well as the flow with the venturi and the ultrasonic measurement operating the reactor to the 100% of nominal thermal power, before and after the calibration of the temperature transmitters and flow. Finally, is a plan to be able to realize a recovery of thermal power of the reactor, showing as carrying out their estimations. As a result of the application of ultrasonic technology in the feedwater of reactor BWR-5 in Laguna Verde, in the Unit 1 cycle 13 it was recover an equivalent energy to a thermal power of 25 MWt in the reactor and an exit electrical power of 6 M We in the turbogenerator. Also in the Unit 2 cycle 10 it was recover an equivalent energy to a thermal power of 40 MWt in the reactor and an exit electrical power of 16 M We in the turbogenerator. (Author)

  15. A nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrman, B.E.; Broden, P.; Lundin, N.

    1979-12-01

    The invention consists of shock absorbing support beams fastened to the underside of the reactor tank lid of a BWR type reactor, whose purpose is to provide support to the steam separator and dryer unit against accelerations due to earthquakes, without causing undue thermal stresses in the unit due to differential expansion. (J.I.W.)

  16. Nuclear reactor instrumentation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Katsumi; Nemesawa, Shigeki; Nemoto, Yuji; Ohashi, Masahisa.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention can appropriately monitor the state of a reactor core in an FBR type reactor which has a system of storing spent fuel assemblies in a reactor container while reducing the weight and making the structure compact in the reactor. That is, a fuel assembly having a shield lacking portion in upper axial shields is disposed. The shield lacking portion defines neutrons' leaking path from the reactor core. The leakage of neutrons from the path is detected by a neutron monitor disposed just above the fuel assembly. With such a constitution, influence of neutrons from stored spent fuel assemblies disposed to the out side of the radial shields can be reduced by a shielding effect of the existent radial shields around the reactor core. Further, if a shield lacking portion is locally disposed in the region of the upper axial shields just below the neutron monitor, neutrons from the reactor core can be monitored while suppressing excessive neutron leakage. As a result, it is unnecessary to dispose shields on the outer side of the spent fuel assembly disposed in the reactor core. (I.S.)

  17. Pre-project study on a demonstration plant for seawater desalination using a nuclear heating reactor in Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achour, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper gives in the first part detailed information on the pre-project study on a demonstration plant for seawater desalination using heating reactor implemented by both Moroccan and Chinese sides. The main findings of the pre-project study are given in the second part. (author)

  18. Non-electric applications of pool-type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Cherkashov, Yu.M.; Romenkov, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper recommends the use of pool-type light water reactors for thermal energy production. Safety and reliability of these reactors were already demonstrated to the public by the long-term operation of swimming pool research reactors. The paper presents the design experience of two projects: Apatity Underground Nuclear Heating Plant and Nuclear Sea-Water Desalination Plant. The simplicity of pool-type reactors, the ease of their manufacturing and maintenance make this type of a heat source attractive to the countries without a developed nuclear industry. (author). 6 figs, 1 tab

  19. Daddy, What's a Nuclear Reactor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisenweaver, Dennis W.

    2008-01-01

    No matter what we think of the nuclear industry, it is part of mankind's heritage. The decommissioning process is slowly making facilities associated with this industry disappear and not enough is being done to preserve the information for future generations. This paper provides some food for thought and provides a possible way forward. Industrial archaeology is an ever expanding branch of archaeology that is dedicated to preserving, interpreting and documenting our industrial past and heritage. Normally it begins with analyzing an old building or ruins and trying to determine what was done, how it was done and what changes might have occurred during its operation. We have a unique opportunity to document all of these issues and provide them before the nuclear facility disappears. Entombment is an acceptable decommissioning strategy; however we would have to change our concept of entombment. It is proposed that a number of nuclear facilities be entombed or preserved for future generations to appreciate. This would include a number of different types of facilities such as different types of nuclear power and research reactors, a reprocessing plant, part of an enrichment plant and a fuel manufacturing plant. One of the main issues that would require resolution would be that of maintaining information of the location of the buried facility and the information about its operation and structure, and passing this information on to future generations. This can be done, but a system would have to be established prior to burial of the facility so that no information would be lost. In general, our current set of requirements and laws may need to be re-examined and modified to take into account these new situations. As an alternative, and to compliment the above proposal, it is recommended that a study and documentation of the nuclear industry be considered as part of twentieth century industrial archaeology. This study should not only include the power and fuel cycle

  20. Fundamentals of Nuclear Reactor Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, E E

    2008-01-01

    This new streamlined text offers a one-semester treatment of the essentials of how the fission nuclear reactor works, the various approaches to the design of reactors, and their safe and efficient operation. The book includes numerous worked-out examples and end-of-chapter questions to help reinforce the knowledge presented. This textbook offers an engineering-oriented introduction to nuclear physics, with a particular focus on how those physics are put to work in the service of generating nuclear-based power, particularly the importance of neutron reactions and neutron behavior. Engin

  1. Borate compound content reduction in liquid radioactive waste from nuclear power plants with VVER reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szalo, A.; Zatkulak, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the current status of liquid waste (evaporator concentrates) inventory at V-1 and V-2 NPPs in Jaslovske Bohunice and the intention to separate boron from them with respect to waste minimisation and improvement of physical and chemical properties for further waste treatment and conditioning. Preliminary results of laboratory experiments concerned to borate crystallisation after pH adjustment with nitric or formic acid performed in the 1998 are given. At the present time laboratory experiments continuing - next acids, coagulation with carbon oxide, electrolytic process, ion exchange resin, study of decontamination factors, immobilization of boric acid, decrease radioactivity, purification of boron-contained compounds. Slovenske Elektrarne have accumulated 7,000 m 3 of evaporator concentrates containing 100-180 g/l borate. In order to make more storage space available, it is proposed to remove some of the borate in the liquor by precipitation as sodium tetraborate and immobilise in either cement of bitumen. The supernate can be further volume reduced by evaporation and returned to the tanks. Slovenske Elektrarne are currently evaluating acid addition to the pH 12-13 concentrate to reduce the borate solubility. However, this adds to the salt burden of the waste through this chemical addition -thus creating future increases in conditioning and disposal costs. Boric acid is used in pressurized water as a soluble neutron poison to control reactivity and also to assure a safety margin in the spent fuel pool and during refuelling operations. Boric acid is also present in the water reserved for injection into the reactor in the event of postulated accidents. (author)

  2. Nuclear reactor containing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Masataka; Murase, Michio.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor containing facility, a condensation means is disposed above the water level of a cooling water pool to condensate steams of the cooling water pool, and return the condensated water to the cooling water pool. Upon occurrence of a pipeline rupture accident, steams generated by after-heat of a reactor core are caused to flow into a bent tube, blown from the exit of the bent tube into a suppression pool and condensated in a suppression pool water, thereby suppressing the pressure in the reactor container. Cooling water in the cooling water pool is boiled by heat conduction due to the condensation of steams, then the steams are exhausted to the outside of the reactor container to remove the heat of the reactor container to the outside of the reactor. In addition, since cooling water is supplied to the cooling water pool quasi-permanently by gravity as a natural force, the reactor container can be cooled by the cooling water pool for a long period of time. Since the condensation means is constituted with a closed loop and interrupted from the outside, radioactive materials are never released to the outside. (N.H.)

  3. A new advanced safe nuclear reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, Farhang

    1999-01-01

    The reactor design is based on fluidized bed concept and utilizes pressurized water reactor technology. The fuel is automatically removed from the reactor by gravity under any accident condition. The reactor demonstrates the characteristics of inherent safety and passive cooling. Here two options for modification to the original design are proposed in order to increase the stability and thermal efficiency of the reactor. A modified version of the reactor involves the choice of supercritical steam as the coolant to produce a plant thermal efficiency of about 40%. Another is to modify the shape of the reactor core to produce a non-fluctuating bed and consequently guarantee the dynamic stability of the reactor. The mixing of Tantalum in the fuel is also proposed as an additional inhibition to power excursion. The spent fuel pellets may not be considered nuclear waste since they are in the shape and size that can easily be used as a a radioactive source for food irradiation and industrial applications. The reactor can easily operate with any desired spectrum by varying the porosity in order to be a plutonium burner or utilize a thorium fuel cycle. (author)

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamer, B.J.; Bidwell, R.M.; Hammond, R.P.

    1959-09-15

    Homogeneous reactor fuel solutions are reported which provide automatic recombination of radiolytic gases and exhibit large thermal expansion characteristics, thereby providing stability at high temperatures and enabling reactor operation without the necessity of apparatus to recombine gases formed by the radiolytic dissociation of water in the fuel and without the necessity of liquid fuel handling outside the reactor vessel except for recovery processes. The fuels consist of phosphoric acid and water solutions of enriched uranium, wherein the uranium is in either the hexavalent or tetravalent state.

  5. Pressurized water reactor nuclear power training center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshiro, Toshimasa; Maezawa, Yoshikazu; Tokuda, Kazuho; Takashima, Osao; Kido, Katsu.

    1976-01-01

    In spite of the necessity of training nuclear power plant operators so as to carry out proper operation, it is almost impossible to utilize real plants for training. Under such condition, Nuclear Power Training Center, Ltd. has been established in Tsuruga City, Fukui Prefecture. The introduced simulator simulates the No.1 unit of Zion Nuclear Power Plant, Illinois, U.S.A. The simulator is placed in a computer room and a control room, and consists of three digital computers, an analog electrohydraulic controller panel, an instructor console, a reactor panel, a safety protecting panel, an alarm panel and others. The features of this simulator are the functions of initial conditions, snap shot, back track, freeze, local operation, malfunction, operation record and others. The main object of training is the operators who are on duty in the central control rooms of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors. Training program includes the beginner course and retraining course. Anyone, who possesses the scholarly attainments equal to or higher than those of senior high school graduates and the experiences in a thermal power plant as the qualification, is allowed to receive the training. The training period is 22 weeks, but 10 days for the retraining course. In addition, the general training course for those concerned with nuclear power generation is prepared, and curricula for these courses are briefly described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Fuel assemblies, grapples therefor and fuel transport apparatus for nuclear reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.R.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear fuel assembly in which vertically disposed fuel elements are spaced within a housing generally of a rectanguloid configuration. Each fuel element includes an upper end plug and lower end plug. Vertically spaced support plates are disposed in the housing with suitable openings to receive the upper and lower end plugs of the fuel elements for supporting the fuel elements with the housing. The upper plate is removable from the housing and the lower fuel plug is detachably connected to the lower plate. Other spacer plates are secured to the housing walls to reinforce same. A grapple having lifting plates with pins enters recesses formed in the housing for enabling the housing to be raised. After the fuel assembly is raised by the grapple, leaf spring retainers of the upper plate are dislodged for removing the upper plate from the housing. Now, the fuel elements can be removed selectively and individually from the fuel assembly by a removal tool. Aligned with and disposed above the removal tool is a transfer casing for housing the selectively removed fuel element while the selectively removed fuel element is transported to and from a fuel reprocessor

  7. Reactor safety in industrial nuclear power plants. Developments in a political and technical environment as it prevails in the German Federal Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laufs, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The present book describes the development of reactor safety in German light-water nuclear power plants from the beginnings with its multifarious links to model solutions seen in other countries, national and international research projects and accidents in conventional and nuclear power plants. It contains detailed, richly illustrated articles on specific safety techniques such as rupture safety of the pressurised envelope, safeguarding of emergency cooling in the event of accidents involving coolant loss, control technology and protection of the surroundings through containment. The results of national and international risk studies are discussed. It is shown how efforts on the part of industry, government and science to enhance safety resources and improve safety culture have been driven by a civic environment in which the use of nuclear energy has become a central issue of political debate. The book is written in readily comprehensible language and offers a wealth of material for further study.

  8. Integrated nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pales, I.; Hasko, V.

    1984-01-01

    The reactor is provided with an integrated circuit of primary medium circulation with hydraulic pump drive. The pump drive which is a blade hydraulic facility is placed in the reactor vessel together with the pump. The primary medium flows through the core and enters the inter-tube space of the secondary circuit heat exchanger. The secondary circuit medium is supplied under the bottom tube plate with a supply pipe. From it the flow of secondary medium is directed to the blades of the hydraulic facility, e.g. the turbine. The turbine drives the pump which transports the primary medium to the reactor core. The secondary medium enters the heat exchanger tubes and through their walls receives the heat from the primary medium. This design reduces capital costs of the reactor and increases its safety. (E.S.)

  9. World nuclear power plant capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report provides the background information for statistics and analysis developed by NUKEM in its monthly Market Report on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The assessments in this Special Report are based on the continuous review of individual nuclear power plant projects. This Special Report begins with tables summarizing a variety of nuclear power generating capacity statistics for 1990. It continues with a brief review of the year's major events regarding each country's nuclear power program. The standard NUKEM Market Report tables on nuclear plant capacity are given on pages 24 and 25. Owing to space limitations, the first year shown is 1988. Please refer to previous Special Reports for data covering earlier years. Detailed tables for each country list all existing plants as well as those expected by NUKEM to be in commercial operation by the end of 2005. An Appendix containing a list of abbreviations can be found starting on page 56. Only nuclear power plants intended for civilian use are included in this Special Report. Reactor lifetimes are assumed to be 35 years for all light water reactors and 30 years for all other reactor types, unless other data or definite decommissioning dates have been published by the operators. (orig./UA) [de

  10. Problems and prospects connected with development of high-temperature filtration technology at nuclear power plants equipped with VVER-1000 reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchelik, S. V.; Pavlov, A. S.

    2013-07-01

    Results of work on restoring the service properties of filtering material used in the high-temperature reactor coolant purification system of a VVER-1000 reactor are presented. A quantitative assessment is given to the effect from subjecting a high-temperature sorbent to backwashing operations carried out with the use of regular capacities available in the design process circuit in the first years of operation of Unit 3 at the Kalinin nuclear power plant. Approaches to optimizing this process are suggested. A conceptual idea about comprehensively solving the problem of achieving more efficient and safe operation of the high-temperature active water treatment system (AWT-1) on a nuclear power industry-wide scale is outlined.

  11. An introduction to nuclear reactor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliffe, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    The book is intended primarily for those who go into the design, development and operation of nuclear power plants from other industries. Thus no prior knowledge of nuclear power or its underlying physical principles is assumed. The aim is to complement existing text books on reactor theory. The 23 chapters start with the earliest concepts of atomic structure and trace an historical sequence of theoretical and practical achievement to the realisation of nuclear power. In doing this some original references not previously published in books are used. (U.K.)

  12. New generation of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chwaszczewski, S.

    2000-01-01

    The development trends of the construction of nuclear reactors has been performed on the background of worldwide electricity demand for now and predicted for future. The social acceptance, political and economical circumstances has been also taken into account. Seems to Electric Power Research Institute (US) and other national authorities the advanced light water reactors have the best features and chances for further development and commercial applications in future

  13. Mobile nuclear reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.E.; Spurrier, F.R.; Jones, A.R.

    1978-01-01

    A containment vessel for use in mobile nuclear reactor installations is described. The containment vessel completely surrounds the entire primary system, and is located as close to the reactor primary system components as is possible in order to minimize weight. In addition to being designed to withstand a specified internal pressure, the containment vessel is also designed to maintain integrity as a containment vessel in case of a possible collision accident

  14. Medium-size nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelweith, L.; Lavergne, J.C.; Martinot, G.; Weiss, A.

    1977-01-01

    CEA (TECHNICATOME) has developed a range of pressurized water reactors of the type ''CAS compact'' which are adapted to civil ship propulsion, or to electric power production, combined possibly with heat production, up to outputs equivalent to 125 MWe. Nuclear plants equipped with these reactors are suitable to medium-size electric networks. Among the possible realizations, two types of plants are mentioned as examples: 1) Floating electron-nuclear plants; and 2) Combined electric power and desalting plants. The report describes the design characteristics of the different parts of a 125 MWe unit floating electro-nuclear plant: nuclear steam system CAS 3 G, power generating plant, floating platform for the whole plant. The report gives attention to the different possibilities according to site conditions (the plant can be kept floating, in a natural or artificial basin, it can be put aground, ...) and to safety and environment factors. Such unit can be used in places where there is a growing demand in electric power and fresh water. The report describes how the reactor, the power generating plant and multiflash distillation units of an electric power-desalting plant can be combined: choice of the ratio water output/electric power output, thermal cycle combination, choice of the gain ratio, according to economic considerations, and to desired goal of water output. The report analyses also some technical options, such as: choice of the extraction point of steam used as heat supply of the desalting station (bleeding a condensation turbine, or recovering steam at the exhaust of a backpressure turbine), design making the system safe. Lastly, economic considerations are dealt with: combining the production of fresh water and electric power provides usually a much better energy balance and a lower cost for both products. Examples are given of some types of installations which combine medium-size reactors with fresh water stations yielding from 10000 to 120000 m 3 per day

  15. RADIATION FACILITY FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1961-12-12

    A radiation facility is designed for irradiating samples in close proximity to the core of a nuclear reactor. The facility comprises essentially a tubular member extending through the biological shield of the reactor and containing a manipulatable rod having the sample carrier at its inner end, the carrier being longitudinally movable from a position in close proximity to the reactor core to a position between the inner and outer faces of the shield. Shield plugs are provided within the tubular member to prevent direct radiation from the core emanating therethrough. In this device, samples may be inserted or removed during normal operation of the reactor without exposing personnel to direct radiation from the reactor core. A storage chamber is also provided within the radiation facility to contain an irradiated sample during the period of time required to reduce the radioactivity enough to permit removal of the sample for external handling. (AEC)

  16. Nuclear reactor apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H.E.; Bonnet, H.P.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor and its containment, instead of being supported on a solid concrete pad, are supported on a truss formed of upper and lower reinforced horizontal plates and vertical walls integrated into a rigid structure. The plates and walls from chambers within which the auxiliary components of the reactor, such as valves, pumping equipment and various tanks, are disposed. Certain of the chambers are also access passages for personnel, pipe chases, valve chambers and the like. In particular the truss includes an annular chamber. This chamber is lined and sealed by a corrosion-resistant liner and contains coolant and serves as a refueling cooling storage tank. This tank is directly below the primary-coolant conductor loops which extend from the reactor above the upper plate. The upper plate includes a sump connected to the tank through which coolant flows into the tank in the event of the occurrence of a loss-of-coolant accident. The truss extends beyond the containment and has chambers in the extending annulus. Pumps for circulating the coolant between the refueling coolant storage tank and the reactor are provided in certain of these chambers. The pumps are connected to the reactor by relatively short coolant conductors. Access to these pumps is readily afforded through hatches in the extending annulus

  17. Communication and computer technologies for teaching physics in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murua, C; Chautemps, A; Odetto, J; Keil, W; Trivino, S; Rossi, F; Perez Lucero, A

    2012-01-01

    In order to train personnel inn order to train personnel in Embalse Nuclear Power Plant, and provided that such training given primarily on the location of such a facility, we designed a pedagogical strategy that combined the use of conventional resources with new information technologies. Since the Nuclear Reactor RA-0 is an ideal tool for teaching Reactor Physics, priority was the use of it, both locally remotely. The teaching strategy is based on four pillar: -Lectures on the Power Plant (using a virtual classroom to support); -Remote monitoring of Ra-0 Nuclear Reactor parameters while operating (RA0REMOTO); -Use, through the Internet, of the Ra-0 Nuclear Reactor Simulator (RA0SIMUL); -Made in the Nuclear Reactor RA-0 of Reactor Physics practical. The work emphasizes RA0REMOTO and RA0SIMUL systems. The RA0REMOTO system is an appendix of the Electronic Data Acquisition System (SEAD) of the Nuclear Reactor RA-0. This system acquires signals from Reactor instrumentation and sends them to a server running the software that 'publish' the reactor parameters on the internet. Students may, during the lectures, monitor any parameter of the reactor while it operates, which allows teachers to compare theory with reality. RA0SIMUL is a simulator on the RA-0, which allows students to 'operate' a reactor analyzing the underlying physics concepts (author)

  18. Nuclear reactor with control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obermeyer, F.D.; Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    A liquid-cooled nuclear reactor including fuel assemblies mounted within a reactor vessel having linearly movable control rods passing through control rod guide tubes into respective aligned fuel assemblies is described. Reactor coolant circulates through the assemblies. Guide tubes and other vessel internals structures located above the assemblies and is discharged through an outlet nozzle positioned above the elevation of primary flow openings in the guide tube walls. The guide tube includes internal horizontal supports and a length limited continuous control rod guide which, in conjunction with the flow openings, alleviate detrimental coolant cross flows and frictional restraints imposed upon the control rods

  19. Partner of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribi, M.; Lauer, F.; Pauli, W.; Ruzek, W.

    1992-01-01

    Sulzer, the Swiss technology group, is a supplier of components and systems for nuclear power plants. Important parts of Swiss nuclear power stations, such as containments, reactor pressure vessels, primary pipings, are made in Winterthur. Sulzer Thermtec AG and some divisions of Sulzer Innotec focus their activities on servicing and backfitting nuclear power plants. The European market enjoys priority. New types of valves or systems are developed as economic solutions meeting more stringent criteria imposed by public authorities or arising from operating conditions. (orig.) [de

  20. Nuclear reactor core assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.

    1978-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to provide a fast reactor core assembly design for use with a fluid coolant such as liquid sodium or carbon monoxide incorporating a method of increasing the percentage of coolant flow though the blanket elements relative to the total coolant flow through the blanket and fuel elements during shutdown conditions without using moving parts. It is claimed that deterioration due to reactor radiation or temperature conditions is avoided and ready modification or replacement is possible. (U.K.)

  1. Design of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    The criteria of design and safety, applied internationally to systems and components of PWR type reactors, are described. The main criteria of the design analysed are: thermohydraulic optimization; optimized arrangement of buildings and components; low costs of energy generation; high level of standardization; application of specific safety criteria for nuclear power plants. The safety criteria aim to: assure the safe reactor shutdown; remove the residual heat and; avoid the release of radioactive elements for environment. Some exemples of safety criteria are given for Angra-2 and Angra-3 reactors. (M.C.K.) [pt

  2. A nuclear reactor for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bancroft, A.R.; Fenton, N.

    1989-07-01

    Global energy requirements are expected to double over the next 40 years. In the northern hemisphere, many countries consume in excess of 25 percent of their primary energy supply for building heating. Satisfying this need, within the constraints now being acknowledged for sustainable global development, provides an important opportunity for district heating. Fuel-use flexibility, energy and resource conservation, and reduced atmospheric pollution from acid gases and greenhouse gases, are important features offered by district heating systems. Among the major fuel options, only hydro-electricity and nuclear heat completely avoid emissions of combustion gases. To fill the need for an economical nuclear heat source, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited has designed a 10 MW plant that is suitable as a heat source within a network or as the main supply to large individual users. Producing hot water at temperatures below 100 degrees C, it incorporates a small pool-type reactor based on AECL's successful SLOWPOKE Research Reactor. A 2 MW prototype for the commercial unit is now being tested at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment in Manitoba. With capital costs of $7 million (Canadian), unit energy costs are projected to be $0.02/kWh for a 10 MW unit operating in a heating grid over a 30-year period. By keeping the reactor power low and the water temperature below 100 degrees C, much of the complexity of the large nuclear power plants can be avoided, thus allowing these small, safe nuclear heating systems to be economically viable

  3. Rotating safety drum nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, R.T.

    1978-01-01

    A gas cooled nuclear fission reactor employing spherical fuel elements which are held in a critical assembly configuration by centrifugal forces. This is accomplished by inserting the spherical fuel elements in a rotating drum of a shape suitable to ensure that a nuclear critical configuration of the total entity of fuel elements can only be achieved if the centrifugal forces are present. This has the effect that in case of a loss of load, a loss of coolant or other adverse occurrences, the critical part of the reactor will disassemble itself, by gravitational forces exclusively, into a non-critical configuration

  4. Nuclear reactor core cooling arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redding, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    A core cooling system for a nuclear reactor having a plurality of primary fluid flow systems is described. The reactor coolant flow from the primary systems is joined upon entering the pressure vessel. Jointure is accomplished in a common chamber causing high coolant flow velocities at low static pressures. If a pipe ruptures in one of the primary fluid flow systems, the low pressure in the common chamber minimizes leakage from the intact flow systems. This allows continuation of coolant flow through the nuclear core for a sufficient length of time to effectively eliminate the possibility of thermal damage

  5. Technical feasibility and costs of the retention of radionuclides during accidents in nuclear power plants demonstrated by the example of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H.; Grigull, R.; Lahner, K.; Gutowski, H.; Weber, J.

    1985-01-01

    The maximum allowable radiation doses during accidents in nuclear power plants, i.e., 5 rem whole-body dose and 15 rem thyroid dose, have been laid down in the German Radiation Protection Act. In order to ensure that these limits are not exceeded for all exposure paths including the ingestion path or, if possible, to remain far below them, the Federal Ministry of the Interior has initiated a study on the effectiveness and cost of additional safety features for reducing the release of activity and the dose exposure during accidents in nuclear power plants. Detailed investigations were carried out for the following three radiologically representative types of accidents: break of a reactor coolant line, break of an instrument line in one of the outer ring rooms, and break of a main stream line outside the containment. The technical basis of the study was a BBR-type nuclear power plant with pressurized water reactor and once-through steam generator. I-131 was chosen for determining the activity release as this is the critical nuclide for the ingestion path. Altogether 33 feasible technical measures were investigated and their potential improvement was assessed

  6. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baddley, A.H.

    1981-01-01

    A method of constructing a radiation shielding plug for use in the roof of the coolant containment vault of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described. The construction allows relative movement of that part of service cables and pipes which are carried by the fixed roof and that part which is carried by the rotatable plug. (U.K.)

  7. Nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yoshimi; Fukuda, Yoshio.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the strength and reliability by moderating thermal stresses produced to the furnace walls of a reactor vessel by the thermal shocks upon reactor shutdown and tripping and reducing the generation of developing thermal ratchet strains produced upon repeating thermal shocks. Constitution: Upon occurrence of reactor shutdown or tripping, the temperature is detected and the pressure of the cover gas is controlled such that the axial temperature slope is decreased to displace the liquid surface in an annular vessel. Then, for attaining the stress reducing temperature, control is so conducted that the temperature of the lower portion is not higher than the upper portion in the axial temperature distribution of the reactor vessel. By controlling the pressure of the cover gas in the annular vessel in this way, the liquid level can be raised to a cover gas portion remaining at a high temperature state. Further, the temperature of the furnace wall can always be decreased to a temperature of the high temperature plenum thereby enabling to moderate the thermal stresses. (Yoshihara, H.)

  8. Improvements in or relating to nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeev, A.V.; Batjukov, V.I.; Fadeev, A.I.; Shapkin, A.F.; Shikhiyan, T.G.; Ordynsky, G.V.; Drachev, V.P.; Pogodin, E.N.

    1980-01-01

    A refuelling installation for nuclear reactor complexes is described for recharging the reactor vessels of such complexes with new fuel assemblies and for removing spent fuel assemblies from the reactor vessel. (U.K.)

  9. Status and perspectives of developing the fuel elements for nuclear power plants with thermal and fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reshetnikov, F.G.

    1981-01-01

    The attained level of fabrication of fuel and fuel elements for thermal and fast reactors is considered. A brief estimation of the fuel element quality is given. New requirements to fuel elements under development and the ways of increasing the thermal reactor fuel element operating life are discussed. The methods of the mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel fabrication and perspective carbide and metal fuels are considered in conformity with the fast reactors. The quality of steels, used while fabricating fuel elements and hexahedral fuel assembly shrouds is estimated. It is noted that for the last years new success is achieved in increasing the quality of fuel rods: fuel pellet density is increased and their spread in density is descrised, the content of such unwanted impurities, as fluorine and moisture is essentially reduced. The methods of fuel element sealing are reliably developed. The welding process is automated. Technological process and finished product quality control ensures fabrication of high-quality fuel elements. Premature fuel element tightness failure becomes an occasional phenomenon and the number of such fuel elements is reduced to 0.01%. Two principally different methods for fabricating the mixed fuel - codeposition and mechanical mixing, giving a rather uniform uranium and plutonium distribution in the fuel rod are developed and adopted. The conclusion is made that by common efforts of scientists and designers in collaboration with production workers modern mechanized and automated industrial production of fuel elements for thermal and fast reactors, meeting increasing requirements of the country, nuclear power engineering is created [ru

  10. Nuclear plant analyzer desktop workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beelman, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    In 1983 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) commissioned the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA). The NPA was envisioned as a graphical aid to assist reactor safety analysts in comprehending the results of thermal-hydraulic code calculations. The development was to proceed in three distinct phases culminating in a desktop reactor safety workstation. The desktop NPA is now complete. The desktop NPA is a microcomputer based reactor transient simulation, visualization and analysis tool developed at INEL to assist an analyst in evaluating the transient behavior of nuclear power plants by means of graphic displays. The NPA desktop workstation integrates advanced reactor simulation codes with online computer graphics allowing reactor plant transient simulation and graphical presentation of results. The graphics software, written exclusively in ANSI standard C and FORTRAN 77 and implemented over the UNIX/X-windows operating environment, is modular and is designed to interface to the NRC's suite of advanced thermal-hydraulic codes to the extent allowed by that code. Currently, full, interactive, desktop NPA capabilities are realized only with RELAP5

  11. Concerning modification of plan for installation of reactors (addition of No.4 reactor and modification of No.1, No.2 and No.3 reactor facilities) at Hamaoka nuclear power plant of Chubu Electric Power Co., Ltd. (reply to inquiry)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission on Oct. 22, 1987 directed the Nuclear Reactor Safety Expert Group to carry out a study on it, made deliberations after receiving a report from the Group on Jun. 28, and submitted the findings to the Minister of International Trade and Industry on Jul. 14. The study and deliberations were intended to determine the conformity of the modifications to the applicable laws relating to control of nuclear material, nuclear fuel and nuclear reactor. The investigation on the location covered the site conditions, geology, seismic environment, meteorology, hydrology, and social environment. The investigations on the safety design of the reactor facilities addressed the design of the overall reactor facilities, anti-earthquake design, and design of other equipment including reactor core, fuel equipment, monitors, reactivity controllers, safety protection equipment, and emergency core cooler. Other investigations included exposure evaluation and accident analysis. It was concluded that the modifications would not have adverse effects on the safety of the reactor facilities. (Nogami, K.)

  12. Inherently safe characteristics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report is based on a detailed study which was carried out by Colenco (a company of the Motor-Columbus Group) on behalf of the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). It presents a summary of this study and concentrates more on the generic issues involved in the subject of inherent safety in nuclear power plants. It is assumed that the reader is reasonably familiar with the design outline of the systems included in the report. The report examines the role of inherent design features in achieving the safety of nuclear power plants as an alternative to the practice, which is largely followed in current reactors, of achieving safety by the addition of engineered safety features. The report examines current reactor systems to identify the extent to which their characteristics are either already inherently safe or, on the other hand, have inherent characteristics that require protective action to be taken. It then considers the advantages of introducing design changes to improve their inherent safety characteristics. Next, it looks at some new reactor types for which claims of inherent safety are made to see to what extent these claims are justified. The general question is then considered whether adoption of the inherently safe reactors would give advantages (by reducing risk in real terms or by improving the public acceptability of nuclear power) which are sufficient to offset the expected high costs and the technical risks associated with any new technology

  13. Nuclear instrumentation for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, Carlos G.; Pita, Antonio; Verrastro, Claudio A.; Maino, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear instrumentation for research reactors in Argentina was developed in 70'. A gradual modernization of all the nuclear instrumentation is planned. It includes start-up and power range instrumentation, as well as field monitors, clamp, scram and rod movement control logic. The new instrumentation is linked to a computer network, based on real time operating system for data acquisition, display and logging. This paper describes the modules and whole system aspects. (author). 2 refs

  14. Health requirements for nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    The health prerequisites established for the qualification of nuclear reactor operators according to CNEN-NE-1.01 Guidelines Licensing of nuclear reactor operators, CNEN-12/79 Resolution, are described. (M.A.) [pt

  15. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushijima, Susumu.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to prevent the degradation in the quality of condensated water in a case where sea water leakage should occur in a steam condenser of a BWR type nuclear power plant. Constitution: Increase in the ion concentration in condensated water is detected by an ion concentration detector and the leaking factor of sea water is calculated in a leaking factor calculator. If the sea water leaking factor exceeds a predetermined value, a leak generation signal is sent from a judging device to a reactor power control device to reduce the reactor power. At ehe same tiem, the leak generation signal is also sent to a steam condenser selection and isolation device to interrupt the sea water pump of a specified steam condenser based on the signal from the ion concentration detector, as well as close the inlet and outlet valves while open vent and drain valves to thereby forcively discharge the sea water in the cooling water pipes. This can keep the condensate desalting device from ion breaking and prevent the degradation in the quality of the reactor water. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. Neutron noise in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaquiere, A.; Pachowska, R.

    1961-06-01

    The power of a nuclear reactor, in the operating conditions, presents fluctuations due to various causes. This random behaviour can be included in the study of 'noises'. Among other sources of noise, we analyse hereafter the fluctuations due: a) to the discontinuous emissions of neutrons from an independent source; b) to the multiplication of neutrons inside the reactor. The method which we present makes use of the analogies between the rules governing a nuclear reactor in operation and a number of radio-electrical systems, in particular the feed-back loops. The reactor can be characterized by its 'passing band' and is described as a system submitted to a sequence of random pulses. In non linear operating condition, the effect of neutron noise is defined by means of a non-linear functional, this theory is thus related to previous works the references of which are given at the end of the present report. This leads us in particular in the case of nuclear reactors to some results given by A. Blaquiere in the case of radio-electrical loops. (author) [fr

  17. Design analysis of the molten core confinement within the reactor vessel in the case of severe accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with a reactor of the VVER type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvonaryov, Yu. A.; Budaev, M. A.; Volchek, A. M.; Gorbaev, V. A.; Zagryazkin, V. N.; Kiselyov, N. P.; Kobzar', V. L.; Konobeev, A. V.; Tsurikov, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    The present paper reports the results of the preliminary design estimate of the behavior of the core melt in vessels of reactors of the VVER-600 and VVER-1300 types (a standard optimized and informative nuclear power unit based on VVER technology—VVER TOI) in the case of beyond-design-basis severe accidents. The basic processes determining the state of the core melt in the reactor vessel are analyzed. The concept of molten core confinement within the vessel based on the idea of outside cooling is discussed. Basic assumptions and models, as well as the results of calculation of the interaction between molten materials of the core and the wall of the reactor vessel performed by means of the SOCRAT severe accident code, are presented and discussed. On the basis of the data obtained, the requirements on the operation of the safety systems are determined, upon the fulfillment of which there will appear potential prerequisites for implementing the concept of the confinement of the core melt within the reactor in cases of severe accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors.

  18. Nuclear Power: Outlook for New U.S. Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, Larry; Holt, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Nearly three decades after the most recent order was placed for a new nuclear power plant in the United States, several utilities are now expressing interest in building a total of up to 30 new reactors...

  19. Nuclear Power: Outlook for New U.S. Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, Larry; Holt, Mark

    2007-01-01

    ...) are also likely to improve the economic viability of qualifying new reactors. New nuclear plant applications can also take advantage of amendments to the Atomic Energy Act made in the early 1990s to reduce licensing delays...

  20. Neutrinos oscillations researches near a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiman, M.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis deals with the research of neutrinos oscillations near the Chooz B nuclear power plant in the Ardennes. The first part presents the framework of the researches and the chosen detector. The second part details the antineutrinos flux calculus from the reactors and the calculus of the expected events. The analysis procedure is detailed in the last part from the calibration to the events selection. (A.L.B.)

  1. Nuclear reactors and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagro, J.C.; Estrada Oyuela, M.E.; Garcia Moritan, R.

    1987-01-01

    From a brief analysis of the perspectives of nuclear weapons arsenals reduction, a rational use of the energetic potential of the ogives and the authentic destruction of its warlike power is proposed. The fissionable material conversion contained in the nuclear fuel ogives for peaceful uses should be part of the disarmament agreements. This paper pretends to give an approximate idea on the resources re assignation implicancies. (Author)

  2. Application of the SPA in the design of a hydrogen producer plant coupled to a nuclear reactor; Aplicacion del APS en el diseno de una planta productora de hidrogeno acoplada a un reactor nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz S, T.; Nelson, P. F.; Francois, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac No. 8532, Col. Progreso, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Cruz G, M. J., E-mail: truizsmx@yahoo.com.mx [UNAM, Facultad de Quimica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    At the present time, one of the processes that is broadly investigated and that, theoretically demonstrates to be one of the most efficient for the hydrogen production, is the thermal-chemistry cycle Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) coupled to a nuclear reactor of very high temperature (VHTR). Because this chemical process of hydrogen production requires of a great inventory of toxic materials (sulphide compounds, hydriodic acid and iodine), is necessary the design of emergency systems with the purpose of protecting the facilities and the equipment s, the environment, as well as the near population. Given the impact of an accidental liberation of the process materials, as well as the proximity with the nuclear plant, is necessary that these emergency systems are the most reliable possible. This way, the results of the consequences analysis are utilized for the optimal localization of the gas sensors that activate the emergency systems, and the flows of the substances that are used for the leakage control. For all this, the use of the Safety Probabilistic Analysis methodology, as well as some standards of the nuclear industry, can be applied to the chemical installation to determine the fault sequences that can take to final states of not controlled leakage. This way, the use of methodologies of Event Tree Analysis and Fault Trees show in their results the components that but contribute in fault of such systems. In this work, is presented the evaluation of the joined models of event and fault trees and like with the obtained results, some proposals to increase the safety of the facilities are exposed. Also, the results of the evaluations of these proposals, and their impact of the probability of the not controlled fault sequences in a plant that is still in design stage are showed. (Author)

  3. Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

  4. Nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement is described wherein a plurality of actuators, disposed in a pattern laterally surrounding a group of elongated fuel assemblies, press against respective contiguous fuel assemblies on the periphery of the group to reduce the clearance between adjacent fuel assemblies thereby forming a more compacted, vibration resistant core structure. 7 claims, 4 drawing figures

  5. Information system of corrosion and mechanical properties for steels used in nuclear power plants with PWR reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahodova, M.; Novotny, R.; Sajdl, P. [Inst. of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Power Engineering

    1998-11-01

    This paper gives information about a new developed database system which contains information about chemical constitution of steels used in nuclear power plants. It enables to hold data from corrosion tests and allows to insert graphs and pictures into the form. This system is an application of MS Access. (orig.)

  6. Information system of corrosion and mechanical properties for steels used in nuclear power plants with PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahodova, M.; Novotny, R.; Sajdl, P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives information about a new developed database system which contains information about chemical constitution of steels used in nuclear power plants. It enables to hold data from corrosion tests and allows to insert graphs and pictures into the form. This system is an application of MS Access. (orig.)

  7. Programme and activities on nuclear desalination in Morocco. Pre-project study on demonstration plant for seawater desalination using nuclear heating reactor in Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Righi, M.

    1998-01-01

    The first part of this paper gives the general information on the pre-project study of a demonstration plant for seawater desalination using a heating reactor being assessed jointly by Morocco and China. The progress of the pre-project study is elaborated in the second part. (author)

  8. Coupling of high temperature nuclear reactor with chemical plant by means of steam loop with heat pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopeć Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature nuclear reactors (HTR can be used as an excellent, emission-free source of technological heat for various industrial applications. Their outlet helium temperature (700°-900°C allows not only for heat supply to all processes below 600°C (referred to as “steam class”, but also enables development of clean nuclear-assisted hydrogen production or coal liquefaction technologies with required temperatures up to 900°C (referred to as “chemical class”. This paper presents the results of analyses done for various configurations of the steam transport loop coupled with the high-temperature heat pump designed for “chemical class” applications. The advantages and disadvantages as well as the key issues are discussed in comparison with alternative solutions, trying to answer the question whether the system with the steam loop and the hightemperature heat pump is viable and economically justified.

  9. Environmental hazards from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockelmann, D.

    1973-04-01

    The article discusses the radiation exposure due to nuclear power stations in normal operation and after reactor incidents. Also mentioned is the radiation exposure to the emissions from fuel reprocessing plants and radioactive waste facilities. (RW/AK) [de

  10. Fuzzy optimization approach for the reliability of various schemes and fuzzy identification of weights in multicriteria optimization in control systems of nuclear reactors and power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuchkov, A.A.; Al'masri, Kh.F.

    2015-01-01

    An implementation of fuzzy optimization in the reliability of multicriteria selections in control schemes of nuclear reactors and power plants has been presented. In particular, optimization based on the theory of fuzzy sets has been proposed for the majority schemes, taking into account various reasons of failures. Set of fuzzy algorithms has been suggested as a basic technology for ranking process according to standard criterion, which includes steps of construction of the rules, initial estimation, fuzzification, and defuzzification. Software implementations have been presented for the fuzzy approach using the MatLab package [ru

  11. Analysis of the accident in the second power-generating unit of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant caused by inadequate makeup of the reactor cooling loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'chenko, V.N.; Kramerov, A.Ya.; Mikhailov, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The accident in the second power-generating unit of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant on October 11, 1991 was the result of unauthorized connection of the TG-4 turbogenerator, which was shut down for repairs, into the grid (in the off-design asynchronous engine mode), and this resulted in a serious fire in the machine room and subsequent failure of systems which are important for safety and which ensure the design mode of reactor cooling: These were primarily failures of the feed and emergency feed pumps and failure of the BRU-B control valve, which regulates steam release during cooling

  12. Nuclear reactor instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncombe, E.; McGonigal, G.

    1976-01-01

    Reference is made to the instrumentation of liquid metal cooled fast reactors. In order to ensure the safe operation of such reactors it is necessary to constantly monitor the coolant flowing through the fuel assemblies for temperature and rate of flow, requiring a large number of sensors. An improved and simplified arrangement is claimed in which the fuel assemblies feed a fraction of coolant to three instrument units arranged to sense the temperature and rate of flow of samples of coolant. Each instrument unit comprises a sleeve housing a sensing unit and has a number of inlet ducts arranged for receiving coolant from a fuel assembly together with a single outlet. The sensing unit has three thermocouple hot junctions connected in series, the hot junctions and inlet ducts being arranged in pairs. Electromagnetic windings around an inductive core are arranged to sense variation in flow of liquid metal by flux distortion. Fission product sensing means may also be provided. Full constructional details are given. (U.K.)

  13. Utilization of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Full text: Report on an IAEA interregional training course, Budapest, Hungary, 5-30 November 1979. The course was attended by 19 participants from 16 Member States. Among the 28 training courses which the International Atomic Energy Agency organized within its 1979 programme of technical assistance was the Interregional Training Course on the Utilization of Nuclear Research Reactors. This course was held at the Nuclear Training Reactor (a low-power pool-type reactor) of the Technical University, Budapest, Hungary, from 5 to 30 November 1979 and it was complemented by a one-week Study Tour to the Nuclear Research Centre in Rossendorf near Dresden, German Democratic Republic. The training course was very successful, with 19 participants attending from 16 Member States - Bangladesh, Bolivia, Czechoslovakia, Ecuador, Egypt, India, Iraq, Korean Democratic People's Republic, Morocco, Peru, Philippines, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, Vietnam and Yugoslavia. Selected invited lecturers were recruited from the USA and Finland, as well as local scientists from Hungarian institutions. During the past two decades or so, many research reactors have been put into operation around the world, and the demand for well qualified personnel to run and fully utilize these facilities has increased accordingly. Several developing countries have already acquired small- and medium-size research reactors mainly for isotope production, research in various fields, and training, while others are presently at different stages of planning and installation. Through different sources of information, such as requests to the IAEA for fellowship awards and experts, it became apparent that many research reactors and their associated facilities are not being utilized to their full potential in many of the developing countries. One reason for this is the lack of a sufficient number of trained professionals who are well acquainted with all the capabilities that a research reactor can offer, both in research and

  14. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear power plant is described which includes a steam generator supplied via an input inlet with feedwater heated by reactor coolant to generate steam, the steam being conducted to a steam engine having a high pressure stage to which the steam is supplied, and which exhausts the steam through a reheater to a low pressure stage. The reheater is a heat exchanger requiring a supply of hot fluid. To avoid the extra load that would be placed on the steam generator by using a portion of its steam output as such heating fluid, a portion of the water in the steam generator is removed and passed through the reheater, this water having received at least adequate heating in the steam generator to make the reheater effective, but not at the time of its removal being in a boiling condition

  15. Wuergassen nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The decision of the Federal Court of Administration concerns an application for immediate decommissioning of a nuclear power plant (Wuergassen reactor): The repeal of the permit granted. The decision dismisses the appeal for non-admission lodged by the plaintiffs against the ruling of the Higher Court of Administration (OVG) of North-Rhine Westphalia of December 19th 1988 (File no. 21 AK 8/88). As to the matter in dispute, the Federal Court of Administration confirms the opinion of the Higher Court of Administration. As to the headnotes, reference can be made to that decision. Federal Court of Administration, decision of April 5th 1989 - 7 B 47.89. Lower instance: OVG NW, Az.: 21 AK 8/88. (orig./RST) [de

  16. Report of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Buildings and Nuclear Safety (BMUB) on the topical peer review aging management in nuclear power plants and research reactors; Bericht des Bundesministeriums fuer Umwelt, Naturschutz, Bau und Reaktorsicherheit (BMUB) zum Topical Peer Review Alterungsmanagement in Kernkraftwerken und Forschungsreaktoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-12-28

    The report of the Federal Environmental Ministry (BMUB) on the topical peer review aging management in nuclear power plants and research reactors covers the following issues: comprehensive requirements for aging management and its implementation, electric cables, non accessible pipes, reactor pressure vessel, calandria/pressure tubes (CANDU), concrete containment, pre-stressed concrete reactor pressure vessel (AGR).

  17. An investigation on unintended reactor trip events in terms of human error hazards of Korean nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sa Kil; Lee, Yong Hee; Jang, Tong Il; Oh, Yeon Ju; Shin, Kwang Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A methodology to identify human error hazards has been established. • The proposed methodology is a preventive approach to identify not only human error causes but also its hazards. • Using the HFACS framework we tried to find out not causations but all of the hazards and relationships among them. • We determined countermeasures against human errors through dealing with latent factors such as organizational influences. - Abstract: A new approach for finding the hazards of human errors, and not just their causes, in the nuclear industry is currently required. This is because finding causes of human errors is really impossible owing to the multiplicity of causes in each case. Thus, this study aims at identifying the relationships among human error hazards and determining the strategies for preventing human error events by means of a reanalysis of the reactor trip events in Korea NPPs. We investigated human errors to find latent factors such as decisions and conditions in all of the unintended reactor trip events during the last dozen years. In this study, we applied the HFACS (Human Factors Analysis and Classification System), which is a commonly utilized tool for investigating human contributions to aviation accidents under a widespread evaluation scheme. Using the HFACS framework, we tried to find out not the causations but all of the hazards and their relationships in terms of organizational factors. Through the trial, we proposed not only meaningful frequencies of each hazards also correlations of them. Also, considering the correlations of each hazards, we suggested useful strategies to prevent human error event. A method to investigate unintended nuclear reactor trips by human errors and the results will be discussed in more detail

  18. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. David A. Petti

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a demonstration of the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology for the production of process heat, electricity, and hydrogen. This nuclear- based technology can provide high-temperature process heat (up to 950°C) that can be used as a substitute for the burning of fossil fuels for a wide range of commercial applications (see Figure 1). The substitution of the HTGR for burning fossil fuels conserves these hydrocarbon resources for other uses, reduces uncertainty in the cost and supply of natural gas and oil, and eliminates the emissions of greenhouse gases attendant with the burning of these fuels. The HTGR is a passively safe nuclear reactor concept with an easily understood safety basis that permits substantially reduced emergency planning requirements and improved siting flexibility compared to other nuclear technologies.

  19. Databases on safety issues for WWER and RBMK reactors. Users' manual. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    At the beginning of the IAEA Extrabudgetary Programme on the safety of WWER reactors a great number of findings and recommendations (safety items) were collected as a result of design review and safety review missions of the WWER-440/230 type reactors. On the basis of these findings a technical database containing more than 1300 records was established to support the consolidation of the information obtained and to help in identification of safety issues. After the scope of the WWER extrabudgetary programme was extended similar data sets were prepared for the WWER-440/213, WWER-1000 and RBMK nuclear power plants. This publication describes the structure of the databases on safety issues of WWER and RBMK NPPs, the information sources used in the databases and interrogation capabilities for users to obtain the necessary information. 14 refs, 9 figs, 5 tabs

  20. Technical update on pressure suppression type containments in use in U.S. light water reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    In 1972, Dr. S. H. Hanauer (Technical Advisor to the NRC's Executive Director for Operations) wrote a memorandum that raised several questions on the viability of pressure suppression containment concepts. The concerns raised by Dr. Hanauer have recently become the subject of considerable discussion by several members of the U.S. Congress and public. The report provides a response to these expressed concerns and a status summary for various technical matters that relate to the safety of pressure suppression type containments for light water cooled reactor plants

  1. Subcriticality determination of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, V.I.; Goranchuk, V.V.; Sidoruk, N.M.; Volokh, A.F.

    2014-01-01

    In this article the subcriticality determination of nuclear reactor is considered. Emphasized that, despite the requirements of regulatory documents on the subcriticality determination of WWER from the beginning of their operation, so far, this problem has not been solved. The results of subcriticality determination of Rossi-α method of the WWER-M is presented. The possibility of subcriticality determination of WWER is considered. The possibility of subcriticality determination of Rossi-α method with time resolution is of about 100 microseconds is also considered. The possible reasons for the error in subcriticality determination of the reactor are indicated

  2. Nuclear reactor fuelling machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peberdy, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The refuelling machine described comprises a rotatable support structure having a guide tube attached to it by a parellel linkage mechanism, whereby the guide tube can be displaced sideways from the support structure. A gripper unit is housed within the guide tube for gripping the end of a fuel assembly or other reactor component and has means for maintenance in the engaging condition during travel of the unit along the guide tube, except for a small portion of the travel at one end of the guide tube, where the inner surface of the guide tube is shaped so as to maintain the gripper unit in a disengaging condition. The gripper unit has a rotatable head, means for moving it linearly within the guide tube so that a component carried by the unit can be housed in the guide tube, and means for rotating the head of the unit through 180 0 relative to its body, to effect rotation of a component carried by the unit. The means for rotating the head of the gripper unit comprises ring and pinion gearing, operable through a series of rotatable shafts interconnected by universal couplings. The reason for provision for 180 0 rotation is that due to the variation in the neutron flux across the reactor core the side of a fuel assembly towards the outside of the core will be subjected to a lower neutron flux and therefore will grow less than the side of the fuel assembly towards the inside of the core. This can lead to bowing and possible jamming of the fuel assemblies. Full constructional details are given. See also BP 1112384. (U.K.)

  3. Fast Reactors and Nuclear Nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avrorina, E.N.; Chebeskovb, A.N.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion remarks: 1. Fast reactor start-up with U-Pu fuel: – dependent on thermal reactors, – no needs in U enrichment, – needs in SNF reprocessing, – Pu is a little suitable for NED, – practically impossible gun-type NED, – difficulties for implosion-type NED: necessary tests, advanced technologies, etc. – Pu in blankets is similar to WPu by isotopic composition, – Use of blanket for production isotopes (e.g. 233 U), – Combined reprocessing of SNF: altogether blanket and core, – Blanket elimination: decrease in Pu production – No pure Pu separation. 2. Fast reactor start-up with U fuel: - Needs in both U enrichment and SNF reprocessing, - Independent of thermal reactors, - Good Pu bred in the core let alone blankets, - NED of simple gun-type design, - Increase of needs in SWU, - Increased demands in U supply. 3. Fast reactors for export: - Uranium shortage, - To replace thermal reactors in future, - No blankets (depends on the country, though), - Fuel supply and SNF take back, - International centers for rendering services of NFC. Time has come to remove from FRs and their NFC the label unfairly identifying them as the most dangerous installations of nuclear power from the standpoint of being a proliferation problem

  4. Independent assessment for new nuclear reactor safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Auria Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A rigorous framework for safety assessment is established in all countries where nuclear technology is used for the production of electricity. On the one side, industry, i.e. reactor designers, vendors and utilities perform safety analysis and demonstrate consistency between results of safety analyses and requirements. On the other side, regulatory authorities perform independent assessment of safety and confirm the acceptability of safety of individual reactor units. The process of comparing results from analyses by reactor utilities and regulators is very complex. The process is also highly dependent upon mandatory approaches pursued for the analysis and from very many details which required the knowledge of sensitive proprietary data (e.g. spacer designs. Furthermore, all data available for the design, construction and operation of reactors produced by the nuclear industry are available to regulators. Two areas for improving the process of safety assessment for individual Nuclear Power Plant Units are identified: New details introduced by industry are not always and systematically requested by regulators for the independent assessment; New analytical techniques and capabilities are not necessarily used in the analyses by regulators (and by the industry. The established concept of independent assessment constitutes the way for improving the process of safety assessment. This is possible, or is largely facilitated, by the recent availability of the so-called Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty approach.

  5. Thermal coupling system analysis of a nuclear desalination plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adak, A.K.; Srivastava, V.K.; Tewari, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    When a nuclear reactor is used to supply steam for desalination plant, the method of coupling has a significant technical and economic impact. The exact method of coupling depends upon the type of reactor and type of desalination plant. As a part of Nuclear Desalination Demonstration Project (NDDP), BARC has successfully commissioned a 4500 m 3 /day MSF desalination plant coupled to Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS) at Kalpakkam. Desalination plant coupled to nuclear power plant of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) type is a good example of dual-purpose nuclear desalination plant. This paper presents the thermal coupling system analysis of this plant along with technical and safety aspects. (author)

  6. Multiple microprocessor based nuclear reactor power monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, P.S.; Ethridge, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    The reactor power monitor is a portable multiple-microprocessor controlled data acquisition device being built for the International Atomic Energy Association. Its function is to measure and record the hourly integrated operating thermal power level of a nuclear reactor for the purpose of detecting unannounced plutonium production. The monitor consists of a 3 He proportional neutron detector, a write-only cassette tape drive and control electronics based on two INTEL 8748 microprocessors. The reactor power monitor operates from house power supplied by the plant operator, but has eight hours of battery backup to cover power interruptions. Both the hourly power levels and any line power interruptions are recorded on tape and in memory. Intermediate dumps from the memory to a data terminal or strip chart recorder can be performed without interrupting data collection

  7. Production of radionuclides in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucina, J.; Vuksanovic, Lj.; Dobrijevic, R.

    1998-01-01

    Given is a short review on the production of radionuclides which was performed in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences by using the nuclear reactor RA. Regarding the considerations of the possible re-starting of this reactor its use for the production of medical radionuclides should be taken into account. Listed are some of the important medical radionuclides routinely produced in nuclear reactors in the world and discussed the conditions for their obtaining in the reactor RA. (author)

  8. LWR nuclear power plant component failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W.H.

    1980-10-01

    An analysis of the most significant light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant component failures, from information in the computerized Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) data bank, shows that for both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) plants the component category most responsible for reactor shutdowns is valves. Next in importance for PWR shutdowns is steam generators followed by seals of all kinds. For BWR plants, seals, and pipes and pipe fittings are the second and third most important component failure categories which lead to reactor shutdown. The data are for records extending from early 1972 through September 1978. A list of the most significant component categories and a breakdown of the number of component citations for both PWR and BWR reactor types are presented

  9. Obrigheim nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    The gross output of the 345MWe pressurized water nuclear power station at Obrigheim, operation on base load, amounted to about 2.57TWh in 1974, the net power fed to the grid being about 2.44TWh. The core was used to its full capacity until 10 May 1974. Thereafter, the reactor was on stretch-out operation with steadily decreasing load until refuelled in August 1974. Plant availability in 1974 amounted to 92.1%. Of the 7.9% non-availability, 7.87% was attributable to the refuelling operation carried out from 16 August to 14 September and to the inspection, overhaul and repair work and the routine tests performed during this period. The plant was in good condition. Only two brief shutdowns occurred in 1974, the total outage time being 21/2 hours. From the beginning of trial operation in March 1969 to the end of 1974, the plant achieved an availability factor of 85.2%. The mean core burnup at the end of the fifth cycle was 19600 MWd/tonne U, with one fuel element that had been used for four cycles achieving a mean burnup of 39000 MWd/tonne U. The sipping test on the fuel elements revealed defective fuel-rods in a prototype plutonium fuel element, a high-efficiency uranium fuel element and a uranium fuel element. The quantities of radioactive substances released to the environment in 1974 were far below the officially permitted values. In july 1974, a reference preparation made up in the nuclear power station in October 1973 was discovered by outsiders on the Obrigheim municipality rubbish tip. The investigations revealed that this reference preparation had very probably been abstracted from the plant in October 1973 and arrived at the rubbish tip in a most irregular manner shortly before its discovery

  10. Nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhl, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    Dr. Buhl feels that nuclear-energy issues are too complex to be understood as single topics, and can only be understood in relationship to broader issues. In fact, goals and risks associated with all energy options must be seen as interrelated with other broad issues, and it should be understood that there are presently no clearcut criteria to ensure that the best decisions are made. The technical community is responsible for helping the public to understand the basic incompatibility of hard and soft technologies and that there is no risk-free energy source. Four principles are outlined for assessing the risks of various energy technologies: (1) take a holistic view; (2) compare the risk with the unit energy output; (3) compare the risk with those of everyday activities; and (4) identify unusual risks associated with a particular option. Dr. Buhl refers to the study conducted by Dr. Inhaber of Canada who used this approach and concluded that nuclear power and natural gas have the lowest overall risk

  11. Statistical estimation of nuclear reactor dynamic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, J.D.

    1962-02-01

    This report discusses the study of the noise in nuclear reactors and associated power plant. The report is divided into three distinct parts. In the first part parameters which influence the dynamic behaviour of some reactors will be specified and their effect on dynamic performance described. Methods of estimating dynamic parameters using statistical signals will be described in detail together with descriptions of the usefulness of the results, the accuracy and related topics. Some experiments which have been and which might be performed on nuclear reactors will be described. In the second part of the report a digital computer programme will be described. The computer programme derives the correlation functions and the spectra of signals. The programme will compute the frequency response both gain and phase for physical items of plant for which simultaneous recordings of input and output signal variations have been made. Estimations of the accuracy of the correlation functions and the spectra may be computed using the programme and the amplitude distribution of signals may also b computed. The programme is written in autocode for the Ferranti Mercury computer. In the third part of the report a practical example of the use of the method and the digital programme is presented. In order to eliminate difficulties of interpretation a very simple plant model was chosen i.e. a simple first order lag. Several interesting properties of statistical signals were measured and will be discussed. (author)

  12. Actinide transmutation in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultman, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    This report has also been published as a PhD thesis. It discusses the reduction of the transuranics part of nuclear waste. Requirements and criteria for efficient burning of transuranics are developed. It is found that a large reduction of transuranics produced per unit of energy is possible when the losses in reprocessing are small and when special transuranics burner reactors are used at the end of the nuclear era to reduce the transuranics inventory. Two special burner reactors have been studied in this thesis. In chapter 3, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor is discussed. A method has been developed to optimize the burning capability while complying to constraints imposed on the design for safety, reliability, and economics. An oxide fueled and metallic fueled ALMR have been compared for safety and transuranics burning. Concluded is that the burning capability is the same, but that the higher thermal conductivity of the metallic fuel has a positive effect on safety. In search for a more effective waste transmuter, a modified Molten Salt Reactor was designed for this study. The continuous refueling capability and the molten salt fuel make a safe design possible without uranium as fuel. A four times faster reduction of the transuranics is possible with this reactor type. The amount of transuranics can be halved every 10 years. The most important conclusion of this work is that it is of utmost importance in the study of waste transmutation that a high burning is obtained with a safe design. In future work, safety should be the highest priority in the design process of burner reactors. (orig.)

  13. Nuclear plant simulation using the Nuclear Plant Analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beelman, R.J.; Laats, E.T.; Wagner, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA), a state-of-the-art computerized safety analysis and engineering tool, was employed to simulate nuclear plant response to an abnormal transient during a training exercise at the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) in Washington, DC. Information relative to plant status was taken from a computer animated color graphics display depicting the course of the transient and was transmitted to the NRC Operations Center in a manner identical to that employed during an actual event. Recommendations from the Operations Center were implemented during on-line, interactive execution of the RELAP5 reactor systems code through the NPA allowing a degree of flexibility in training exercises not realized previously. When the debriefing was conducted, the RELAP5 calculations were replayed by way of the color graphics display, adding a new dimension to the debriefing and greatly enhancing the critique of the exercise

  14. Nuclear Reactor Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Ropers, J.

    1976-01-01

    A pressurized-water reactor pressure vessel connects via a main coolant pipe loop including a main coolant pump, with the lower portion of at least one vertical steam generator horizontally offset from the pressure vessel. This equipment is contained by a concrete structure entirely enclosing the pressure vessel and forming a generator room horizontally enclosing the generator and the loop and extending upwardly to an open top closed by a horizontal ceiling. The concrete structure is completely surrounded by a spherical steel containment shell designed to withstand any internal fluid pressure which might result from an accidental release of the coolant inside of this shell, and the shell forms a large space above the entire concrete structure. The ceiling above the generator room is a horizontal steel gridlike construction defining a plurality of vertical openings which are normally closed by horizontal sheet metal plates which are hinged to the gridlike construction and are light enough in weight to be forced upwardly, to open the openings, when the plates receive upward force from fluid pressure below them resulting from the loop, or other equipment in the generator room, accidentally permitting a sudden release of the pressurized-water coolant. The high fluid pressure that would otherwise develop within the concrete generator room, is in this way almost immediately relieved via the openings of the grid-like construction, by the plates being forced upwardly, the pressure being then dissipated upwardly in the large space above the top of the concrete structure, provided by the steel containment shell. This prevents the upstanding wall portions of the generator room from being stressed, and possibly damaged, by any sudden release of coolant in the generator room. Other features are disclosed

  15. Nuclear reactor strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, H.; Srinivasan, T.N.

    1975-01-01

    Reference is made to a linear programming model considered by Hafele and Manne ('Strategies for a Transition from Fossil to Nuclear Fuels'. 11ASA Research Report RR-74-7) in which the sum of discounted costs of meeting demand for electrical and non-electrical energy over a horizon of 75 years divided into 25 periods of 3 years is minimised subject to constraints, inter alia, on the total availability of fossil fuel and low cost ($15/lb) natural uranium. The sensitivity of the Hafele-Manne results are explored with respect to changes in some crucial parameters and assumptions namely; variation in discount rate, variation in current costs of operation of HTRB, variation in costs and availability of natural uranium, market penetration constraints, changing capital costs, price responsive demands, petroleum prices, and minimisation of PETG consumption with constraints on the sum of discounted costs. (U.K.)

  16. Reactors for nuclear electric propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Propulsion is the key to space exploitation and power is the key to propulsion. This paper examines the role of nuclear fission reactors as the primary power source for high specific impulse electric propulsion systems for space missions of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular mission applications include transfer to and a reusable orbital transfer vehicle from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit, outer planet exploration and reconnaissance missions, and as a versatile space tug supporting lunar resource development. Nuclear electric propulsion is examined as an indispensable component in space activities of the next two decades.

  17. Reactors for nuclear electric propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Propulsion is the key to space exploitation and power is the key to propulsion. This paper examines the role of nuclear fission reactors as the primary power source for high specific impulse electric propulsion systems for space missions of the 1980s and 1990s. Particular mission applications include transfer to and a reusable orbital transfer vehicle from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit, outer planet exploration and reconnaissance missions, and as a versatile space tug supporting lunar resource development. Nuclear electric propulsion is examined as an indispensable component in space activities of the next two decades

  18. SECURE nuclear district heating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson; Hannus, M.

    1978-01-01

    The role foreseen for the SECURE (Safe Environmentally Clean Urban REactor) nuclear district heating plant is to provide the baseload heating needs of primarily the larger and medium size urban centers that are outside the range of waste heat supply from conventional nuclear power stations. The rationale of the SECURE concept is that the simplicity in design and the inherent safety advantages due to the use of low temperatures and pressures should make such reactors economically feasible in much smaller unit sizes than nuclear power reactors and should make their urban location possible. It is felt that the present design should be safe enough to make urban underground location possible without restriction according to any criteria based on actual risk evaluation. From the environmental point of view, this is a municipal heat supply plant with negligible pollution. Waste heat is negligible, gaseous radioactivity release is negligible, and there is no liquid radwaste release. Economic comparisons show that the SECURE plant is competitive with current fossil-fueled alternatives. Expected future increase in energy raw material prices will lead to additional energy cost advantages to the SECURE plant

  19. Anticipated transients without scram for WWER reactors. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    Anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) are anticipated operational occurrences followed by the failure of one reactor scram function. Current international practice requires that the capability of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) to cope with ATWS be demonstrated following a systematic evaluation of plants' defence in depth. Countries operating PWRs require design consideration of ATWS events on a deterministic basis. The regulatory requirements may concern either specific mitigating systems or acceptable plant performance during these events. The prevailing international practice for performing transient analysis of ATWS for licensing is the best estimate approach. Available transient analyses of ATWS events indicate that WWER reactors, like PWRs, have the tendency to shut themselves down if the inherent nuclear feedback is sufficiently negative. Various control and limitation functions of the WWER plants also provide a degree of defence against ATWS. However, for most WWER plants, complete and systematic ATWS analyses have yet to be submitted for rigorous review by the regulatory authorities and preventive or mitigative measures have not been established. In addition, it has also been recognized that plant behaviour in case of ATWS also relies on certain system functions (use of pressurizer safety valves for liquid discharge, availability of steam dump valve to both the condenser (BRU-K) and the atmosphere (BRU-A) for secondary side pressure control, and others) which have been identified as safety issues and need to be qualified for accident conditions. In all countries operating WWERs, the need for ATWS investigations is recognized and reflected in the safety improvement programmes. ATWS analysis for WWERs is not required for the licensing process in Bulgaria, the Czech Republic (with the exception of the Temelin nuclear power plant) and Russia. Design consideration of ATWS is required if expert assessments of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) results

  20. Submarine nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The submarine nuclear power plant has revolutionised the strategy and tactics of under-sea warfare. Present day submarine nuclear power plants are discussed, as well as future developments. The endurance, speed, noise and diving depth of nuclear submarines are also outlined. (U.K.)

  1. Nuclear reactor core flow baffling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    A flow baffling arrangement is disclosed for the core of a nuclear reactor. A plurality of core formers are aligned with the grids of the core fuel assemblies such that the high pressure drop areas in the core are at the same elevations as the high pressure drop areas about the core periphery. The arrangement minimizes core bypass flow, maintains cooling of the structure surrounding the core, and allows the utilization of alternative beneficial components such as neutron reflectors positioned near the core

  2. Optical Fibers in Nuclear Reactor Radiation Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, David Eugene

    1992-01-01

    A performance evaluation of fiber optics under radiation conditions similar to those encountered in nuclear power plants is reported. The evaluation was accomplished by the creation of an analytical model for atomic scale radiation damage in silica glass and by the execution of an extensive fiber performance measurement program. The analytic model calculates displacement and electronic damage rates for silica glass subjected to a specified nuclear reactor radiation environment. It accomplishes this by first generating the primary charged particle spectrum produced in silica irradiated in a nuclear reactor. The resultant spectra are then applied to the integral equations describing radiation damage in polyatomic solids. The experimental measurements were selected to span the range of fiber types, radiation environments, temperatures, and light powers expected to be used in nuclear power plants. The basic experimental protocol was to expose the optical fibers to either a nuclear reactor or a ^{60}Co radiation environment while simultaneously monitoring fiber light transmission. Experimental temperatures were either ~23 ^circC or ~100 ^circC and light powers were either -30 dBm or -60 dBm. Measurements were made at each of the three standard communications wavelengths (850 nm, 1300 nm, and 1550 nm). Several conclusions are made based on these performance measurements. First, even near the core of a nuclear reactor the vast majority of the dose to silica glass is due to gamma rays. Even with the much lower doses (factor of roughly 40) neutrons cause much more displacement damage than gamma rays (35 times the oxygen displacement rate and 500 times the silicon displacement rate). Even with neutrons having many times the displacement rate as compared with gamma rays, little if any difference is observed in the transmission losses for gamma only as compared to mixed neutron/gamma transmission losses. Therefore, atomic displacement is not a significant damage mechanism for

  3. Proceedings of the 9. National Seminar on Technology and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antariksawan, Anhar R.; Soetrisnanto, Arnold Y; Aziz, Ferhat; Untoro, Pudji; Su'ud, Zaki; Zarkasi, Amin Santoso; Lasman, As Natio

    2003-08-01

    The ninth proceedings of seminar safety and technology of nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities held by National Nuclear Energy Agency and PLN-JTK. The aims of seminar is to exchange and disseminate information about Safety and Nuclear Power Plant Technology and Nuclear Facilities consist of Technology High Temperature Reactor and Application for National Development Sustainable and High Technology. This seminar cover all aspects Technology, Power Reactor, Research Reactor High Temperature Reactor and Nuclear Facilities. There are 20 articles have separated index

  4. Ceramics as nuclear reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    Ceramics are widely accepted as nuclear reactor fuel materials, for both metal clad ceramic and all-ceramic fuel designs. Metal clad UO 2 is used commercially in large tonnages in five different power reactor designs. UO 2 pellets are made by familiar ceramic techniques but in a reactor they undergo complex thermal and chemical changes which must be thoroughly understood. Metal clad uranium-plutonium dioxide is used in present day fast breeder reactors, but may eventually be replaced by uranium-plutonium carbide or nitride. All-ceramic fuels, which are necessary for reactors operating above about 750 0 C, must incorporate one or more fission product retentive ceramic coatings. BeO-coated BeO matrix dispersion fuels and silicate glaze coated UO 2 -SiO 2 have been studied for specialised applications, but the only commercial high temperature fuel is based on graphite in which small fuel particles, each coated with vapour deposited carbon and silicon carbide, are dispersed. Ceramists have much to contribute to many aspects of fuel science and technology. (author)

  5. Equipment and materials for coupling interfaces of a nuclear reactor with desalination and heating plants based on floating NHPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panov, Yu.K.; Polunichev, V.I.

    1998-01-01

    Intensive design activity is currently underway in Russia on floating nuclear installations, relying on proven marine NSSSs of KLT-40-type, which are capable of generating electricity, producing potable water and heat for industrial and district heating purposes. In particular, design work of the first floating power unit for a pilot nuclear co-generation station, which is due to be situated at the Pevek port area in the Chukotsky national district (extreme north-east of Russia), is approaching completion, and preparatory work is being carried out for fabrication of its most labour-intensive components. Work is also in progress together with 'CANDESAL Inc. (Canada)' on the conceptual design of a floating power-desalination complex. Most suitable options of floating power-desalination complexes are being sought, addressing requirements of potential customers. Earlier, at the IAEA technical committee meeting (1993) it was shown that a complex, which combines a highly effective condensation turbine and a modem reverse-osmosis desalination facility, could be considered as most preferable from the view point of efficient utilisation of thermal energy generated by nuclear reactors for co-production of potable water and electricity. The prospective technology for sea water desalination by a reverse-osmosis method is being developed in particular by 'CANDESAL Inc.'. It was also pointed out that another sufficiently efficient installation for potable water and electricity co-production is a dual-purpose complex which integrates both condensation and back-pressure turbines and a distillation desalination facility. Similar flow configurations were adopted for the nuclear desalination complex at Aktau (Kazakhstan) which has been in operation since 1972. 'SverdNIIKhimMash' institute (Ekaterinburg) is a Russian leading designer of modem distillation desalination facilities. This paper presents heat and fluid diagrams of floating complexes, brief description of their key

  6. Control rod for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Kaoru; Kawano, Shohei

    1998-01-01

    A guide roller is prepared by forming an oxide membrane on the surface of a molded roller product comprising, as a material, a deposition-reinforced type nickel-based alloy reinforced by deposition of fine particles by applying a heat treatment to a nickel-based alloy. When the guide roller is used in reactor water, since the roller has an oxide membrane on the surface, leaching of nickel to reactor water is reduced, and radioactive corrosive products including cobalt 58 are reduced to decrease an operator's exposure dose upon periodical inspections of a plant. The oxide membrane is formed by applying heat treatment under an oxidative atmosphere. Then, the amount of abrasion of pins and rollers in association with start-up or shut down of a reactor and control of the power can be reduced thereby enabling to suppress increase of radiation dose due to cobalt 60 and cobalt 58. (N.H.)

  7. Nuclear characteristic simulation device for reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Akio; Kobayashi, Yuji.

    1994-01-01

    In a simulation device for nuclear characteristic of a PWR type reactor, there are provided a one-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic model for simulating one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core and average reactor power based on each of inputted signals of control rod pattern, a reactor core flow rate, reactor core pressure and reactor core inlet enthalphy, and a three-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic mode for simulating three-dimensional power distribution of the reactor core, and a nuclear instrumentation model for calculating read value of the nuclear instrumentation disposed in the reactor based on the average reactor core power and the reactor core three-dimensional power distribution. A one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core, a reactor core average power, a reactor core three-dimensional power distribution and a nuclear instrumentation read value are calculated. As a result, the three-dimensional power distribution and the power level are continuously calculated. Further, since the transient change of the three-dimensional neutron flux distribution is calculated accurately on real time, more actual response relative to a power monitoring device of the reactor core and operation performance can be simulated. (N.H.)

  8. Analysis of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in an A BWR reactor; Analisis del accidente de la planta nucleoelectrica de Fukushima Daiichi en un reactor tipo ABWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escorcia O, D. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Salazar S, E., E-mail: daniel.escorcia.ortiz@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Laboratorio de Analisis en Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, 62250 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    The present work aims to recreate the accident occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan on March 11, 2011, making use of an academic simulator of forced circulation of the A BWR reactor provided by the IAEA to know the scope of this simulator. The simulator was developed and distributed by the IAEA for academic purposes and contains the characteristics and general elements of this reactor to be able to simulate transients and failures of different types, allowing also to observe the general behavior of the reactor, as well as several phenomena and present systems in the same. Is an educational tool of great value, but it does not have a scope that allows the training of plant operators. To recreate the conditions of the Fukushima accident in the simulator, we first have to know what events led to this accident, as well as the actions taken by operators and managers to reduce the consequences of this accident; and the sequence of events that occurred during the course of the accident. Differences in the nuclear power plant behavior are observed and interpreted throughout the simulation, since the Fukushima plant technology and the simulator technology are not the same, although they have several elements in common. The Fukushima plant had an event that by far exceeded the design basis, which triggered in an accident that occurred in the first place by a total loss of power supply, followed by the loss of cooling systems, causing a level too high in temperature, melting the core and damaging the containment accordingly, allowing the escape of hydrogen and radioactive material. As a result of the simulation, was determined that the scope of the IAEA academic simulator reaches the entrance of the emergency equipment, so is able to simulate almost all the events occurred at the time of the earthquake and the arrival of the tsunami in the nuclear power plant of Fukushima Daiichi. However, due to its characteristics, is not able to simulate later

  9. Nuclear reactor scram suppression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Hisamitsu.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention suppresses reactor scram due to increase of neutrons caused by pressure elevation in the reactor even when a portion of main steam pipes is closed by some or other causes such as closure of a main steam isolation valve in a BWR type power plant. That is, when a flow channel is closed, such as upon closure of a main steam isolation valve, a flow rate signal sent from each of main steam flow rate detection means is inputted to a selective circuit of a pressure control device, from which a normal value is obtained. A deviation value for each of the main steam flow rate values is determined from the value described above and a flow rate average value obtained in an averaging circuit. Abnormality in the main steam pipelines is judged if a level for each of the deviation values is greater than a predetermined value. Further, the insertion of selective control rods and trip and run back instructions for recycling pumps are controlled by output signals of the deviation value detection circuit, to decrease the reactor power and prevent elevation in the reactor. As a result, reactor scram due to increase of neutron fluxes is suppressed. (I.S.)

  10. Role of nuclear reactors in future military satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Future military capabilities will be profoundly influenced by emerging Shuttle Era space technology. Regardless of the specific direction or content of tomorrow's military space program, it is clear that advanced space transportation systems, orbital support facilities, and large-capacity power subsystems will be needed to create the generally larger, more sophisticated military space systems of the future. This paper explores the critical role that space nuclear reactors should play in America's future space program and reviews the current state of nuclear reactor power plant technology. Space nuclear reactor technologies have the potential of satisfying power requirements ranging from 10 kW/sub (e)/ to 100 MW/sub (e)/

  11. Operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, P.

    1988-04-01

    The textbook for training nuclear power plant personnel is centred on the most important aspects of operating modes of WWER-440 reactors. Attention is devoted to the steady state operation of the unit, shutdown, overhaul with refuelling, physical and power start-up. Also given are the regulations of shift operation and the duties of individual categories of personnel during the shift and during the change of shifts. (Z.M.). 3 figs., 1 tab

  12. Decision no. 2011-DC-0216 of the French nuclear safety authority from May 5, 2011, ordering the Laue Langevin Institute to proceed to a complementary safety evaluation of its basic nuclear facility (high flux reactor - INB no. 67) in the eyes of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (Japan), the French Prime Minister entrusted the French nuclear safety authority (ASN) with the mission to carry out a safety analysis re-evaluation of the French nuclear facilities, and in particular the nuclear power plants. A decision has been addressed by the ASN to each nuclear operator with the specifications of this safety re-evaluation analysis and the list of facilities in concern. This document is the decision addressed to the Laue Langevin Institute, operator of the high flux research reactor (RHF) of Grenoble (France). (J.S.)

  13. Nuclear Power Plants in the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2002 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from 65 electric power companies and other nuclear organizations in 28 countries and regions around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 19 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities; and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  14. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2007/2008 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from electric power companies and other nuclear organizations around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 18 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; effect of the Niigata-ken chuetsu-oki earthquake; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  15. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2005 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from electric power companies and other nuclear organizations around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 18 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  16. Nuclear Power Plants in the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2003 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from 81 electric power companies and other nuclear organizations in 33 countries and regions around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 19 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities; and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  17. Nuclear power plant outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) controls nuclear power plant safety in Finland. In addition to controlling the design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants, STUK also controls refuelling and repair outages at the plants. According to section 9 of the Nuclear Energy Act (990/87), it shall be the licence-holder's obligation to ensure the safety of the use of nuclear energy. Requirements applicable to the licence-holder as regards the assurance of outage safety are presented in this guide. STUK's regulatory control activities pertaining to outages are also described

  18. Research in nuclear reactor theory and experimental reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the possibilities of using experimental reactors for scientific research in nuclear power with a stress on problems in nuclear reactor theory. The stationary and nonstationary neutron fields, burnup prediction and analyses as well as fuel element development and the corresponding role of test-reactors were dealt with. It was shown that the investigations in nuclear reactor theory in Yugoslavia were developing continuously and in a useful interaction with experiments on research reactors. The needs for continuing the work on fundamental problems in neutron transport theory and on improving the calculation methods for thermal power reactors, together with the improvement of performances of existing research systems, were pointed out. A new quality in scientific work could be obtained dealing with the problems connected to a possible introduction of test-reactors, and fast systems later on. It was also pleaded for the corresponding orientations in fundamental sciences. (author) [sr

  19. Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Lawrence R.

    1984-01-01

    Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

  20. Research nuclear reactor operation management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preda, M.; Carabulea, A.

    2008-01-01

    Some aspects of reactor operation management are highlighted. The main mission of the operational staff at a testing reactor is to operate it safely and efficiently, to ensure proper conditions for different research programs implying the use of the reactor. For reaching this aim, there were settled down operating plans for every objective, and procedure and working instructions for staff training were established, both for the start-up and for the safe operation of the reactor. Damages during operation or special situations which can arise, at stop, start-up, maintenance procedures were thoroughly considered. While the technical skill is considered to be the most important quality of the staff, the organising capacity is a must in the operation of any nuclear facility. Staff training aims at gaining both theoretical and practical experience based on standards about staff quality at each work level. 'Plow' sheet has to be carefully done, setting clear the decision responsibility for each person so that everyone's own technical level to be coupled to the problems which implies his responsibility. Possible events which may arise in operation, e.g., criticality, irradiation, contamination, and which do not arise in other fields, have to be carefully studied. One stresses that the management based on technical and scientific arguments have to cover through technical, economical and nuclear safety requirements a series of interlinked subprograms. Every such subprograms is subject to some peculiar demands by the help of which the entire activity field is coordinated. Hence for any subprogram there are established the objectives to be achieved, the applicable regulations, well-defined responsibilities, training of the personnel involved, the material and documentation basis required and activity planning. The following up of positive or negative responses generated by experiments and the information synthesis close the management scope. Important management aspects

  1. Two super plumes of radioactive geopollution due to melt down of the reactor of Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirei, Hisashi; Kimura, Kazuya; Uesuna, Shoichi

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we can show the two points as the following: Radioactive emission materials from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant melt down were distributed widely as two plumes in the north east Japan: FukuToGun Plume and ChibaRakiTo Plume, the former shape is the same type as reverse L character and the later is S. Vales of Cs134 and Cs137 show high in convex side of Tone river bed and low in concave side respectively and radioisotope-ratio vales (Cs134/Cs137) show high in convex of river and low in concave respectively. (author)

  2. Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analia Bonelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A description of the results for a Station Black-Out analysis for Atucha 2 Nuclear Power Plant is presented here. Calculations were performed with MELCOR 1.8.6 YV3165 Code. Atucha 2 is a pressurized heavy water reactor, cooled and moderated with heavy water, by two separate systems, presently under final construction in Argentina. The initiating event is loss of power, accompanied by the failure of four out of four diesel generators. All remaining plant safety systems are supposed to be available. It is assumed that during the Station Black-Out sequence the first pressurizer safety valve fails stuck open after 3 cycles of water release, respectively, 17 cycles in total. During the transient, the water in the fuel channels evaporates first while the moderator tank is still partially full. The moderator tank inventory acts as a temporary heat sink for the decay heat, which is evacuated through conduction and radiation heat transfer, delaying core degradation. This feature, together with the large volume of the steel filler pieces in the lower plenum and a high primary system volume to thermal power ratio, derives in a very slow transient in which RPV failure time is four to five times larger than that of other German PWRs.

  3. Improvements in streaking nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrick, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    In this type of reactor atomic nuclei are stripped of their electron shells by heating to form a very high temperature plasma which is passed at high speed through a chamber in which they are forced into contact with a 'wall' formed by a unidirectional stream of photons from continuous laser beams. In this way it should be possible to brush off from the surface of the nuclei protons and neutrons, with release of their binding energy. The energy thus produced can be subjected to much more gentle control than with a fission or fusion reactor. Furthermore, if this concept can be successfully applied to elements of high atomic number which are normally regarded as stable and unfissionable, a vast new source of nuclear energy release will have been made available. It also seems possible that an atomic nucleus might be spun sufficiently in such a reactor to disintegrate it completely into nucleons by simple centrifugal action, with great release of binding energy. The reactor described has a central body with radial ducts through which the nuclei are passed, and a number of lasers are provided whose beams are arranged so that the nuclei are discharged at the cross-over point of two or more laser beams which form a corner at the junction of two or more photon walls. (U.K.)

  4. Exporting apocalypse: CANDU reactors and nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, Paul.

    The author believes that the peaceful use of nuclear technology leads inevitably to the production of nuclear weapons, and that CANDU reactors are being bought by countries that are likely to build bombs. He states that exports of reactors and nuclear materials cannot be defended and must be stopped

  5. Near-term feasibility of nuclear reactors for seawater desalting. Coupling of standard condensing nuclear power stations to low-grade heat multieffect distillation plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adar, J.; Manor, S.; Schaal, M.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes the horizontal aluminium tube, multieffect distillation process developed by Israel Desalination Engineering Ltd., which is very suitable for the use of low-grade heat from standard condensing nuclear turbines operating at increased back-pressure. A special flash-chamber constitutes a positive barrier against any possible contamination being carried over by the steam exhausted from the turbine to the desalination plant. Flow sheets, heat and mass balances have been prepared for two standard sizes of NSSS and turbines, two back-pressures, and corresponding desalination plants. Only standard equipment is being used in the steam and electricity-producing plant. The desalination plant consists of 6 to 12 parallel double lines, each of them similar to a large prototype now being designed and which will be coupled to an old fossil-fuel power station. Total energy requirements of the desalination plant represent only 19 to 50% of the total water cost as against 75% for a single-purpose plant. Costs are based on actual bids for the power plant and actual estimates for the desalination prototype. The operation is designed to be flexible so that the power plant can be operated either in conjunction with the desalination plant, or as a single-purpose plant. (author)

  6. Analysis of the micro-structural damages by neutronic irradiation of the steel of reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde. Characterization of the design steel; Analisis de los danos micro-estructurales por irradiacion neutronica del acero de la vasija de los reactores de la Central Nuclear de Laguna Verde. Caracterizacion del acero de diseno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moranchel y Rodriguez, M.; Garcia B, A. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Luis Enrique Erro s/n, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Longoria G, L. C., E-mail: mmoranchel@ipn.m [ININ, Direccion de Investigacion Cientifica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    The vessel of a nuclear reactor is one of the safety barriers more important in the design, construction and operation of the reactor. If the vessel results affected to the grade of to have fracture and/or cracks it is very probable the conclusion of their useful life in order to guarantee the nuclear safety and the radiological protection of the exposure occupational personnel, of the public and the environment avoiding the exposition to radioactive sources. The materials of the vessel of a nuclear reactor are exposed continually to the neutronic irradiation that generates the same nuclear reactor. The neutrons that impact to the vessel have the sufficient energy to penetrate certain depth in function of the energy of the incident neutron until reaching the repose or to be absorbed by some nucleus. In the course of their penetration, the neutrons interact with the nuclei, atoms, molecules and with the same crystalline nets of the vessel material producing vacuums, interstitial, precipitate and segregations among other defects that can modify the mechanical properties of the steel. The steel A533-B is the material with which is manufactured the vessel of the nuclear reactors of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, is an alloy that, among other components, it contains atoms of Ni that if they are segregated by the neutrons impact this would favor to the cracking of the same vessel. This work is part of an investigation to analyze the micro-structural damages of the reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde due to the neutronic irradiation which is exposed in a continuous way. We will show the characterization of the design steel of the vessel, what offers a comprehension about their chemical composition, the superficial topography and the crystalline nets of the steel A533-B. It will also allow analyze the existence of precipitates, segregates, the type of crystalline net and the distances inter-plains of the design steel of the vessel. (Author)

  7. Composition and concentration of soluble and particulate matter in the coolant of the reactor primary cooling system of the Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocron, Mauricio; Garcia Rodenas, Luis; La Gamma, Ana M.; Villegas, Marina; Fernandez, Alberto N.; Allemandi, Walter; Manera, Raul; Rosales, Hugo

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power plants type PWR and PHWR (pressurized water reactor and pressurized heavy water reactor) have three coolant circuits which only exchange energy among them. The primary circuit, whose coolant extracts the reactor energy, the secondary circuit or water-steam cycle and the tertiary circuit which could be lake, river or sea water. The chemistry of the primary and secondary coolants is carefully controlled with the aim of minimizing the corrosion of structural materials. However, very low rates of corrosion are inevitable and one of the consequences of the corrosion processes is the presence of soluble and particulate matter in the coolant from where several problems associated with mass transfer arisen. In this way radioactive nuclides are transported out of the core to the steam generators, hydraulic resistance increases and heat transfer capability degrades. In the present paper some alternative techniques are proposed for the quantification of both, the particulate and soluble matter present in the coolant and their correspondent composition. Some results are also included and discussed. (author)

  8. Comments on nuclear reactor safety in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The Chalk River Technicians and Technologists Union representing 500 technical employees at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories of AECL submit comments on nuclear reactor safety to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review. Issues identified by the Review Commissioner are addressed from the perspective of both a labour organization and experience in the nuclear R and D field. In general, Local 1568 believes Ontario's CANDU nuclear reactors are not only safe but also essential to the continued economic prosperity of the province

  9. Subchannel analysis in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninokata, H.; Aritomi, M.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains 10 informative papers, presented at the International Seminar on Subchannel Analysis 1992 (ISSCA '92), organized by the Institute of Applied Energy, in collaboration with Atomic Energy Society of Japan, Tokyo Electric Power Company, Kansai Electric Power Company, Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and held at the TIS-Green Forum, Tokyo, Japan, 30 October 1992. The seminar ISSCA '92 was intended to review the current state-of-the-arts of the method being applied to advanced nuclear reactors including Advanced BWRs, Advanced PWRs and LMRs, and to identify the problems to be solved, improvements to be made, and the needs of R and Ds that were required from the new fuel bundles design. The critical review was to focus on the performances of currently available subchannel analysis codes with regard to heat transfer and fluid flows in various types of nuclear reactor bundles under both steady-state and transient operating conditions, CHF, boiling transition (BT) or dryout behaviors and post BT. The behaviors of physical modeling and numerical methods in these extreme conditions were discussed and the methods critically evaluated in comparison with experiments. (author) (J.P.N.)

  10. Seismic Design of Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tatsuya

    1995-01-01

    In case the requirement of design is against natural phenomena, it is important to grasp the detailed characteristics of the natural phenomena for the proper design, and as the grasp is more strict and accurate, the design of high adaptability or durability to the requirement can be done. The aseismatic design of nuclear reactors is similar to it, and the decision of the magnitude of supposed earthquakes is important. The aseismatic design of nuclear power stations in Japan has been carried out in conformity with the national guideline for examining the aseismatic design. The aseismatic design of nuclear reactors is carried out in the order of the survey of geological features, ground and earthquakes, the determination of the input magnitude and characteristics of earthquakes, the formation of simulated earthquake waves, the analysis of the response of buildings and structures to earthquakes, and structural analysis. The decision of input earthquakes is done by the detailed historical earthquake data based on local features and the survey of geological features and ground. The determination of earthquake input, the analysis of earthquake response and structural analysis, and the other features of the aseismatic design are explained. (K.I.)

  11. Artificial intelligence in nuclear reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Ruan; Benitez-Read, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of four real fuzzy control applications at the MIT research reactor in the US, the FUGEN heavy water reactor in Japan, the BR1 research reactor in Belgium, and a TRIGA Mark III reactor in Mexico will be examined through a SWOT analysis (strengths, weakness, opportunities, and threats). Special attention will be paid to the current cooperation between the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK·CEN) and the Mexican Nuclear Centre (ININ) on AI-based intelligent control for nuclear reactor operation under the partial support of the National Council for Science and Technology of Mexico (CONACYT). (authors)

  12. Requirements for a reactor simulator of the konvoi generation of nuclear power plants according to training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinartz, S.J.; Reinartz, G.

    1984-01-01

    This report is based an a review of the literature published on simulator training and on discussions with representatives from the German nuclear power plant operator training schools. A brief description of the organisation and content of the simulator training of control room operators in a number of countries, together with a categorisation of the various types of simulators which are used. The concepts of the systems approach to training and simulator fidelity are discussed. Some general training principles which are considered important for simulator training are summarised. From the available descriptions and analyses of control room operator tasks, the skills (in most general terms) which can be trained on simulators have been identified. Methods for training these skills which are used in the simulator training programmes in various industries and which have been developed in research work in the area of training psychology have been summarised. Using these methods as a basis, the necessary instructor facilities which should be included in the design of a full simulator for the Konvoi generation of nuclear power plants have been derived. (orig.) [de

  13. Nuclear reactor development in China for non-electrical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yuliang; Zhong Daxin; Dong Duo; Xu Yuanhui

    1998-01-01

    In parallel to its vigorous program of nuclear power generation, China has attached great importance to the development of nuclear reactors for non-electrical applications. The Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) in Beijing has been developing technologies of the water-cooled heating reactor and the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor. In 1989, a 5 MW water cooled test reactor was erected. Currently, an industrial demonstration nuclear heating plant is being projected. Feasibility studies are being made of sea-water desalination using the INET developed nuclear heating reactor as heat source. Also, a 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor is being constructed at INET in the framework of China's national high-tech program. The paper gives an overview of China's energy market situation. With respect to China's technology development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors and water cooled heating reactors, the paper describes some general requirements on the technical development, reviews the national programs and activities, describes briefly the design and safety features of the reactor concepts, discusses aspects of application potentials. (author)

  14. STEAM STIRRED HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busey, H.M.

    1958-06-01

    A homogeneous nuclear reactor utilizing a selfcirculating liquid fuel is described. The reactor vessel is in the form of a vertically disposed tubular member having the lower end closed by the tube walls and the upper end closed by a removal fianged assembly. A spherical reaction shell is located in the lower end of the vessel and spaced from the inside walls. The reaction shell is perforated on its lower surface and is provided with a bundle of small-diameter tubes extending vertically upward from its top central portion. The reactor vessel is surrounded in the region of the reaction shell by a neutron reflector. The liquid fuel, which may be a solution of enriched uranyl sulfate in ordinary or heavy water, is mainiained at a level within the reactor vessel of approximately the top of the tubes. The heat of the reaction which is created in the critical region within the spherical reaction shell forms steam bubbles which more upwardly through the tubes. The upward movement of these bubbles results in the forcing of the liquid fuel out of the top of these tubes, from where the fuel passes downwardly in the space between the tubes and the vessel wall where it is cooled by heat exchangers. The fuel then re-enters the critical region in the reaction shell through the perforations in the bottom. The upper portion of the reactor vessel is provided with baffles to prevent the liquid fuel from splashing into this region which is also provided with a recombiner apparatus for recombining the radiolytically dissociated moderator vapor and a control means.

  15. Nuclear power plants in the world - 2010 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the IAEA's PRIS and AREVA-CEA's GAIA databases. The following aspects are reviewed: 2009 highlights, Main characteristics of reactor types, Map of the French nuclear power plants on 2010/01/01, Worldwide status of nuclear power plants (12/31/2009), Units distributed by countries, Nuclear power plants connected to the Grid- by reactor type groups, Nuclear power plants under construction on 2009, Evolution of nuclear power plants capacities connected to the grid, First electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit in each country, Electrical generation from nuclear power plants by country at the end 2009, Performance indicator of french PWR units, Evolution of the generation indicators worldwide by type, Nuclear operator ranking according to their installed capacity, Units connected to the grid by countries at 12/31/2009, Status of licence renewal applications in USA, Nuclear power plants under construction at 12/31/2009, Shutdown reactors, Exported nuclear capacity in net MWe, Exported and national nuclear capacity connected to the grid, Exported nuclear power plants under construction, Exported and national nuclear capacity under construction, Nuclear power plants ordered at 12/31/2009, Long term shutdown units at 12/31/2009, COL applications in the USA, Recycling of Plutonium in reactors and experiences, Mox licence plants projects, Appendix - historical development, Meaning of the used acronyms, Glossary

  16. Generic small modular reactor plant design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Baum, Gregory A.

    2012-12-01

    This report gives an overview of expected design characteristics, concepts, and procedures for small modular reactors. The purpose of this report is to provide those who are interested in reducing the cost and improving the safety of advanced nuclear power plants with a generic design that possesses enough detail in a non-sensitive manner to give merit to their conclusions. The report is focused on light water reactor technology, but does add details on what could be different in a more advanced design (see Appendix). Numerous reactor and facility concepts were used for inspiration (documented in the bibliography). The final design described here is conceptual and does not reflect any proposed concept or sub-systems, thus any details given here are only relevant within this report. This report does not include any design or engineering calculations.

  17. Reactor calculations and nuclear information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, D.W.

    1977-12-01

    The relationship of sets of nuclear parameters and the macroscopic reactor quantities that can be calculated from them is examined. The framework of the study is similar to that of Usachev and Bobkov. The analysis is generalised and some properties required by common sense are demonstrated. The form of calculation permits revision of the parameter set. It is argued that any discrepancy between a calculation and measurement of a macroscopic quantity is more useful when applied directly to prediction of other macroscopic quantities than to revision of the parameter set. The mathematical technique outlined is seen to describe common engineering practice. (Author)

  18. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidez, Joel; Jarriand, Paul.

    1975-01-01

    The invention concerns a fast neutron nuclear reactor cooled by a liquid metal driven through by a primary pump of the vertical drive shaft type fitted at its lower end with a blade wheel. To each pump is associated an exchanger, annular in shape, fitted with a central bore through which passes the vertical drive shaft of the pump, its wheel being mounted under the exchanger. A collector placed under the wheel comprises an open upward suction bell for the liquid metal. A hydrostatic bearing is located above the wheel to guide the drive shaft and a non detachable diffuser into which at least one delivery pipe gives, envelopes the wheel [fr

  19. Autonomous Control of Space Nuclear Reactors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nuclear reactors to support future robotic and manned missions impose new and innovative technological requirements for their control and protection instrumentation....

  20. Boiler systems for nuclear powered reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.K.; George, B.V.

    1979-01-01

    A power generating plant which comprises a heat source, at least one main steam turbine and at least one main boiler heated by heat from the heat source and providing the steam to drive the turbine, comprises additionally at least one further steam turbine, smaller than the main turbine, and at least one further boiler, of lower capacity than the main boiler, and heated from the same heat source and providing steam for the further turbine. Particularly advantageous in nuclear power stations, where the heat source is a nuclear reactor, the invention enables peak loads, above the normal continuous rating of the main generators driven by the main turbines, to be met by the further turbine(s) and one or more further generators driven thereby. This enables the main turbines to be freed from the thermal stresses of rapid load changes, which stresses are more easily accommodated by the smaller and thus more tolerant further turbine(s). Thus auxiliary diesel-driven or other independent power plant may be made partly or wholly unnecessary. Further, low-load running which would be inefficient if achieved by means of the main turbine(s), can be more efficiently effected by shutting them down and using the smaller further turbine(s) instead. These latter may also be used to provide independent power for servicing the generating plant during normal operation or during emergency or other shutdown, and in this latter case may also serve as a heat sink for the shutdown reactor

  1. Decision aid systems for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evrard, J.M.; Martinez, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The development of new techniques, especially in the field of artificial intelligence, makes it possible to design more powerful computerized systems, supporting tasks related to the design and operation of nuclear power plants. The potential contribution and perspectives for the integration of such systems depend upon whether the improvement of existing plants, the design of next generation reactors or future projects are concerned. We present four systems which show the state-of-the-art as regards knowledge-based systems. The first system is related to the automatic generation of procedures dealing with loss of electrical sources. The second one aims at assisting the power plant utility in following the technical specifications during maintenance operations. Finally, the last two are designed to help an emergency team evaluate and forecast the evolution of an accidental situation in a nuclear reactor. Perspectives for on-line operator assistance are then discussed, as well as the main technical themes which will make it possible to design such systems. We conclude with the difficulties which are encountered upon the integration of these tools: their validation and task sharing between man and machine

  2. Nuclear reactor built, being built, or planned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1990. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE, from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations, from US and foreign embassies, and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly

  3. Neutron measurements at nuclear power reactors [55

    CERN Document Server

    Scherpelz, R I

    2002-01-01

    Staff from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (operated by Battelle Memorial Institute), have performed neutron measurements at a number of commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Neutron radiation fields at light water reactor (LWR) power plants are typically characterized by low-energy distributions due to the presence of large amounts of scattering material such as water and concrete. These low-energy distributions make it difficult to accurately monitor personnel exposures, since most survey meters and dosimeters are calibrated to higher-energy fields such as those produced by bare or D sub 2 O-moderated sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf sources. Commercial plants typically use thermoluminescent dosimeters in an albedo configuration for personnel dosimetry and survey meters based on a thermal-neutron detector inside a cylindrical or spherical moderator for dose rate assessment, so their methods of routine monitoring are highly dependent on the energy of the neutron fields. Battelle has participate...

  4. Signal processing systems for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Kazuo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To carry out the works signal processing, in a nuclear power plant, automatically. Constitution: Neutron flux signal from reactor instruments is inputted into a reactivity meter, and processes in accordance with reactor characteristic equations and, as the result, outputted as a reactivity signal rho. The signal rho, as well as the neutron flux signal and temperature signal are inputted together to a pen recorder and recorded on a record chart. While on the other hand, these signals are inputted into a signal processor, together with a range-switching signal from the reactivity meter and with a control-rod-position signal n from other instrument. In the signal processor, the differentiation and integration values such as Δrho/(n 1 -n 2 ) and ΣΔrho of the control element are conducted automatically. The results are indicated on a graphic display. (J.P.N.)

  5. Nuclear reactor insulation and preheat system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wampole, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    An insulation and preheat system is disclosed for preselected components of a fluid cooled nuclear reactor. A gas tight barrier or compartment of thermal insulation surrounds the selected components and includes devices to heat the internal atmosphere of the ocmpartment. An external surface of the compartment of enclosure is cooled, such as by a circulating fluid. The heating devices provide for preheating of the components, as well as maintenance of a temperature sufficient to ensure that the reactor coolant fluid will not solidify during shutdown. The external cooling limits the heat transferred to other plant structures, such as supporting concrete and steel. The barrier is spaced far enough from the surrounded components so as to allow access for remote or manual inspection, maintenance, and repair

  6. Core catchers for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, Micheal; Gardner, I.P.

    1991-01-01

    A core catcher for containing nuclear core debris in the event of a breach in the reactor pressure vessel caused by a core meltdown is described. It has a multilayer sandwich construction comprising a middle layer of interlocking tongue-and-groove jointed refractory (e.g. zirconia) tiles or bricks sandwiched between inner and outer steel plates in the form of domes. The refractory bricks are fixed against movement relative to each other and the inner and outer steel plates by means of refractory cement. The inner steel plate is sacrificial in the event that it comes into contact with molten nuclear material but gives the sandwich construction greater shock resistance during normal operational service. The outer steel plate provides the main structural support for the core catcher. (author)

  7. Extending the Candu Nuclear Reactor Concept: The Multi-Spectrum Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Francis; Bonin, Hugues

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to examine the multi-spectrum nuclear reactor concept as an alternative to fast reactors and accelerator-driven systems for breeding fissile material and reducing the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel. The design characteristics of the CANDU TM nuclear power reactor are shown to provide a basis for a novel approach to this concept. (authors)

  8. Directory of Nuclear Research Reactors 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The Directory of Nuclear Research Reactors is an output of the Agency's computerized Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB). It contains administrative, technical and utilization information on research reactors known to the Agency at the end of December 1994. The data base converted from mainframe to PC is written in Clipper 5.0 and the publication generation system uses Excel 4. The information was collected by the Agency through questionnaires sent to research reactor owners. All data on research reactors, training reactors, test reactors, prototype reactors and critical assemblies are stored in the RRDB. This system contains all the information and data previously published in the Agency's publication, Directory of Nuclear Research Reactor, as well as updated information

  9. Fuel assemblies for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Akihito.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To control power-up rate at the initial burning stage of new fuel assemblies due to fuel exchange in a pressure tube type power reactor. Constitution: Burnable poisons are disposed to a most portion of fuel pellets in a fuel assembly to such a low concentration as the burn-up rate changes with time at the initial stage of the burning. The most portion means substantially more than one-half part of the pellets and gadolinia is used as burn-up poisons to be dispersed and the concentration is set to less than about 0.2 %. Upon elapse of about 15 days after the charging, the burnable poisons are eliminated and the infinite multiplication factors are about at 1.2 to attain a predetermined power state. Since the power-up rate of the nuclear reactor fuel assembly is about 0.1 % power/hour and the power-up rate of the fuel assembly around the exchanged channel is lower than that, it can be lowered sufficiently than the limit for the power-up rate practiced upon reactor start-up thereby enabling to replace fuels during power operation. (Horiuchi, T.)

  10. Seismic detectors for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumida, Susumu; Matsumoto, Takuji; Gunyasu, Kenzo; Tanabe, Akira.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the safety of a nuclear power plant by placing seismic detectors in the periphery of the nuclear power plant at the position capable of sensing the seismic waves at least 2 seconds before they arrive at the power plant, and reducing the reactor power by a scram setter upon reception of the seismic waves. Constitution: Seismic detectors are plated on a same circle around the nuclear power plant at a distance capable of detecting seismic waves before they arrive at the power plant, and they are connected to a scram setter. When the detectors detect the seismic waves, which exceeds a predetermined set value for the scram, the scram setter actuated control rod drives, by which control rods are inserted in the nuclear reactor to reduce its output power, as well as prevents external disturbances such as turbine trips. (Yoshino, Y.)

  11. Maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migaud, D.; Hutin, J.P.; Jouette, I.; Eymond, P.; Devie, P.; Cudelou, C.; Magnier, S.; Frydman, M.

    2016-01-01

    This document gathers different articles concerning the maintenance of the French nuclear power plants. The first article analyses the impact of the recent law on the energetic transition that sets the share of nuclear power at 50% of the electricity produced by 2025. A consequence may be the decommissioning of 17 to 20 reactors by 2025 and the huge maintenance program called 'Grand Carenage' whose aim is to extend operating life over 40 years will have to be re-considered in order to avoid useless expenses. The second article shows that in 2015 the French nuclear reactor fleet got very good results in terms of availability and safety. There were 49 scheduled outages and among them some ended ahead of time. The third article describes the specificities of the maintenance of a nuclear power plant, for instance the redundancy of some systems implies that maintenance has to deal with systems that have never functioned but must be ready to operate at any moment. Another specificity is the complexity of a nuclear power plant that implies an essential phase of preparation for maintenance operations. Because of safety requirements any maintenance operation has to be controlled, checked and may provide feedback. The fourth article presents the 'Grand Carenage' maintenance program that involves the following operations: the replacement of steam generators, the re-tubing of condensers, the replacement of the filtering drums used for cooling water, the testing of the reactor building, the hydraulic test of the primary circuit and the inspection of the reactor vessel. The fifth article focuses on the organization of the work-site for maintenance operations and the example of the Belleville-sur-Loire is described in the sixth article. Important maintenance operations like 'Grand Carenage' requires a strong collaboration with a network of specialized enterprises and as no reactor (except Flamanville EPR) is being built in France, maintenance

  12. Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berta, V.T.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end

  13. Nuclear reactor core servicing apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, C.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved core servicing apparatus for a nuclear reactor of the type having a reactor vessel, a vessel head having a head penetration therethrough, a removable plug adapted to fit in the head penetration, and a core of the type having an array of elongated assemblies. The improved core servicing apparatus comprises a plurality of support columns suspended from the removable plug and extending downward toward the nuclear core, rigid support means carried by each of the support columns, and a plurality of servicing means for each of the support columns for servicing a plurality of assemblies. Each of the plurality of servicing means for each of the support columns is fixedly supported in a fixed array from the rigid support means. Means are provided for rotating the rigid support means and servicing means between condensed and expanded positions. When in the condensed position, the rigid support means and servicing means lie completely within the coextensive boundaries of the plug, and when in the expanded position, some of the rigid support means and servicing means lie without the coextensive boundaries of the plug

  14. The physics of nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Marguet, Serge

    2017-01-01

    This comprehensive volume offers readers a progressive and highly detailed introduction to the complex behavior of neutrons in general, and in the context of nuclear power generation. A compendium and handbook for nuclear engineers, a source of teaching material for academic lecturers as well as a graduate text for advanced students and other non-experts wishing to enter this field, it is based on the author’s teaching and research experience and his recognized expertise in nuclear safety. After recapping a number of points in nuclear physics, placing the theoretical notions in their historical context, the book successively reveals the latest quantitative theories concerning: •   The slowing-down of neutrons in matter •   The charged particles and electromagnetic rays •   The calculation scheme, especially the simplification hypothesis •   The concept of criticality based on chain reactions •   The theory of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactors •   The problem of self-shielding �...

  15. Next generation advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgut, M. H.

    2009-01-01

    Growing energy demand by technological developments and the increase of the world population and gradually diminishing energy resources made nuclear power an indispensable option. The renewable energy sources like solar, wind and geothermal may be suited to meet some local needs. Environment friendly nuclear energy which is a suitable solution to large scale demands tends to develop highly economical, advanced next generation reactors by incorporating technological developments and years of operating experience. The enhancement of safety and reliability, facilitation of maintainability, impeccable compatibility with the environment are the goals of the new generation reactors. The protection of the investment and property is considered as well as the protection of the environment and mankind. They became economically attractive compared to fossil-fired units by the use of standard designs, replacing some active systems by passive, reducing construction time and increasing the operation lifetime. The evolutionary designs were introduced at first by ameliorating the conventional plants, than revolutionary systems which are denoted as generation IV were verged to meet future needs. The investigations on the advanced, proliferation resistant fuel cycle technologies were initiated to minimize the radioactive waste burden by using new generation fast reactors and ADS transmuters.

  16. Energy from nuclear reactors. Pt. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hospe, J.

    1977-01-01

    The future development of nuclear engineering also includes the fusion reactor. One of the reasons for the great interest in nuclear fusion is the fact that no radioactive fission products are produced in nuclear fusion. The only substance produced is the noble gas helium. The construction of a fusion reactor would be technically even more complex than the construction of a fast breeder, if nuclear fusion can be controlled at all in an experiment. (orig.) [de

  17. Overview of Nuclear Reactor Technologies Portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connor, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Office of Nuclear Energy Roadmap R&D Objectives: • Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; • Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; • Develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; • Develop capabilities to reduce the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism

  18. Electrochemistry of Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dgiby Macdonald; Mirna Urquidi-Macdonald; John Mahaffy; Amit Jain Han Sang Kim; Vishisht Gupta; Jonathan Pitt

    2006-01-01

    This project developed a comprehensive mathematical and simulation model for calculating thermal hydraulic, electrochemical, and corrosion parameters, viz. temperature, fluid flow velocity, pH, corrosion potential, hydrogen injection, oxygen contamination, stress corrosion cracking, crack growth rate, and other important quantities in the coolant circuits of water-cooled nuclear power plants, including both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The model is being used to assess the three major operational problems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), which include mass transport, activity transport, and the axial offset anomaly, and provide a powerful tool for predicting the accumulation of SCC damage in BWR primary coolant circuits as a function of operating history. Another achievement of the project is the development of a simulation tool to serve both as a training tool for plant operators and as an engineering test-bed to evaluate new equipment and operating strategies (normal operation, cold shut down and others). The development and implementation of the model allows us to estimate the activity transport or ''radiation fields'' around the primary loop and the vessel, as a function of the operating parameters and the water chemistry

  19. Electrochemistry of Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, Dgiby; Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna; Pitt, Jonathan

    2006-08-08

    This project developed a comprehensive mathematical and simulation model for calculating thermal hydraulic, electrochemical, and corrosion parameters, viz. temperature, fluid flow velocity, pH, corrosion potential, hydrogen injection, oxygen contamination, stress corrosion cracking, crack growth rate, and other important quantities in the coolant circuits of water-cooled nuclear power plants, including both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The model is being used to assess the three major operational problems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), which include mass transport, activity transport, and the axial offset anomaly, and provide a powerful tool for predicting the accumulation of SCC damage in BWR primary coolant circuits as a function of operating history. Another achievement of the project is the development of a simulation tool to serve both as a training tool for plant operators and as an engineering test-bed to evaluate new equipment and operating strategies (normal operation, cold shut down and others). The development and implementation of the model allows us to estimate the activity transport or "radiation fields" around the primary loop and the vessel, as a function of the operating parameters and the water chemistry.

  20. Nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulkiewicz, M.; Navratil, J.

    The construction of a nuclear power plant is conditioned on territorial requirements and is accompanied by the disturbance of the environment, land occupation, population migration, the emission of radioactive wastes, thermal pollution, etc. On the other hand, a nuclear power plant makes possible the introduction of district heating and increases the economic and civilization activity of the population. Due to the construction of a nuclear power plant the set limits of negative impacts must not be exceeded. The locality should be selected such as to reduce the unfavourable effects of the plant and to fully use its benefits. The decision on the siting of the nuclear power plant is preceded by the processing of a number of surveys and a wide range of documentation to which the given criteria are strictly applied. (B.H.)