WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear power project

  1. AAEC nuclear power projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoe, G.; Fredsall, J.; Scurr, I.; Plotnikoff, W.

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear power capacity projections developed in the May-June period of 1981 by the AAEC are presented. There have been downward revisions for nearly all countries with centrally planned economies. Projections for the year 2000 for the Western World have decreased in aggregate by 4.7% (27Gw) compared to those of 1980. However, this reduction is less than the previous estimate reduction and there appears to have been a stabilisation in the projection

  2. Economics of nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, I.H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear power development in Taiwan was initiated in 1956. Now Taipower has five nuclear units in smooth operation, one unit under construction, two units under planning. The relatively short construction period, low construction costs and twin unit approach had led to the significant economical advantage of our nuclear power generation. Moreover betterment programmes have further improved the availability and reliability factors of our nuclear power plants. In Taipower, the generation cost of nuclear power was even less than half of that of oil-fired thermal power in the past years ever since the nuclear power was commissioned. This made Taipower have more earnings and power rates was even dropped down in March 1983. As Taiwan is short of energy sources and nuclear power is so well-demonstrated nuclear power will be logically the best choice for Taipower future projects

  3. Nuclear power: Financing big projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, G.

    1992-01-01

    Since the early seventies, the Dresdner Bank AG has been intensively engaged in financing nuclear power plants, e.g., the Muelheim-Kaerlich Nuclear Power Station currently down because of legal technicaltities. The bank has also been involved in other large-scale projects in the energy sector and, in addition, has conceptually accompanied the stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, such as enrichment, fuel element fabrication, and reprocessing. However, for political reasons it has not been possible to carry out these projects and finance them in the Federal Republic. With appropriate modifications, these financial models can also be transferred to international projects; after all, the enrichment sector has always been characterized by trilateral ventures. (orig.) [de

  4. Nuclear Power Project in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namwong, Ratanachai

    2011-01-01

    The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT), the main power producer in Thailand, was first interested in nuclear power as an electricity option in 1967 when the electricity demand increased considerably for the first time as a result of the economic and industrial growth. Its viability had been assessed several times during the early seventies in relation to the changing factors. Finally in the late 1970s, the proceeding with nuclear option was suspended for a variety of reasons, for instance, public opposition, economic repercussion and the uncovering of the indigenous petroleum resources. Nonetheless, EGAT continued to maintain a core of nuclear expertise. During 1980s, faced with dwindling indigenous fossil fuel resources and restrictions on the use of further hydro as an energy source, EGAT had essentially reconsidered introducing nuclear power plants to provide a significant fraction to the long term future electricity demand. The studies on feasibility, siting and environmental impacts were conducted. However, the project was never implemented due to economics crisis in 1999 and strong opposition by environmentalists and activists groups. The 1986 Chernobyl disaster was an important cause. After a long dormant period, the nuclear power is now reviewed as one part of the solution for future energy supply in the country. Thailand currently relies on natural gas for 70 percent of its electricity, with the rest coming from oil, coal and hydro-power. One-third of the natural gas consumed in Thailand is imported, mainly from neighbouring Myanmar. According to Power Development Plan (PDP) 2007 rev.2, the total installed electricity capacity will increase from 28,530.3 MW in 2007 to 44,281 MW by the end of plan in 2021. Significantly increasing energy demand, concerns over climate change and dependence on overseas supplies of fossil fuels, all turn out in a favor of nuclear power. Under the current PDP (as revised in 2009), two 1,000- megawatt nuclear

  5. Nuclear power. Volume 2. Nuclear power project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DESIGN is intended to be used as a working reference book for management, engineers and designers, and as a graduate-level text for engineering students. The book is designed to combine theory with practical nuclear power engineering and design experience, and to give the reader an up-to-date view of the status of nuclear power and a basic understanding of how nuclear power plants function. Volume 2 contains the following chapters: (1) review of nuclear power plants; (2) licensing procedures; (3) safety analysis; (4) project professional services; (5) quality assurance and project organization; (6) construction, scheduling, and operation; (7) nuclear fuel handling and fuel management; (8) plant cost management; and (9) conclusion

  6. Nuclear power. Volume 2: nuclear power project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: review of nuclear power plants; licensing procedures; safety analysis; project professional services; quality assurance and project organization; construction, scheduling and operation; construction, scheduling and operation; nuclear fuel handling and fuel management; and plant cost management. 116 references, 115 figures, 33 tables

  7. Nuclear power project management information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Lailong; Zhang Peng; Xiao Ziyan; Chun Zengjun; Huang Futong

    2001-01-01

    Project Management Information System is an important infrastructure facility for the construction and operation of Nuclear Power Station. Based on the practice of Lingao nuclear power project management information system (NPMIS), the author describes the NPMIS design goals, system architecture and software functionality, points out the outline issues during the development and deployment of NPMIS

  8. Integrated project risk management of nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaohui; Xu Yuanhui

    2001-01-01

    The concept and the features of risks in nuclear power projects are introduced, and in terms of nuclear power projects' own features, the Nuclear Power Project Integrated Risk Management Model is presented. The identification, estimation, evaluation, response plan development, control of risks and the theoretical basis of risk management are discussed. The model has feedback and control functions in order to control and manage the risks dynamically

  9. Managing the first nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-05-01

    Energy is essential for national development. Nearly every aspect of development - from reducing poverty and raising living standards to improving health care, industrial and agricultural productivity - requires reliable access to modern energy resources. States may have different reasons for considering starting a nuclear power project to achieve their national energy needs, such as: lack of available indigenous energy resources, the desire to reduce dependence upon imported energy, the need to increase the diversity of energy resources and/or mitigation of carbon emission increases. The start of a nuclear power plant project involves several complex and interrelated activities with long duration. Experience shows that the time between the initial policy decision by a State to consider nuclear power up to the start of operation of its first nuclear power plant is about 10 to 15 years and that before specific project management can proceed, several key infrastructure issues have to be in place. The proper management of the wide scope of activities to be planned and implemented during this period represents a major challenge for the involved governmental, utility, regulatory, supplier and other supportive organizations. The main focus is to ensure that the project is implemented successfully from a commercial point of view while remaining in accordance with the appropriate engineering and quality requirements, safety standards and security guides. This publication is aimed at providing guidance on the practical management of a first nuclear power project in a country. There are many other issues, related to ensuring that the infrastructure in the country has been prepared adequately to ensure that the project will be able to be completed, that are only briefly addressed in this publication. The construction of the first nuclear power plant is a major undertaking for any country developing a nuclear power programme. Worldwide experience gained in the last 50 years

  10. Past nuclear power project experiences of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutukcuoglu, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, developments in the world for utilization of nuclear energy and, in parallel to these developments, works undertaken in Turkey are summarized. Besides this, future prospects in the field of nuclear energy in the world and in Turkey, and our opinion about the action to be taken in our county, in the light of past experiences of nuclear power projects that could not be succeeded, are presented

  11. Management of delayed nuclear power plant projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    According to the available information at the IAEA PRIS (Power Reactor Information System) at the end of 1998 there were more than 40 nuclear power plant projects with delays of five or more years with respect to the originally scheduled commercial operation. The degree of conformance with original construction schedules showed large variations due to several issues, including financial, economic and public opinion factors. Taking into account the number of projects with several years delay in their original schedules, it was considered useful to identify the subject areas where exchange of experience among Member States would be mutually beneficial in identification of problems and development of guidance for successful management of the completion of these delayed projects. A joint programme of the IAEA Departments of Nuclear Energy (Nuclear Power Engineering Section) and Technical Co-operation (Europe Section, with additional support from the Latin America and West Asia Sections) was set up during the period 1997-1998. The specific aim of the programme was to provide assistance in the management of delayed nuclear power plants regarding measures to maintain readiness for resuming the project implementation schedule when the conditions permit. The integration of IAEA interdepartmental resources enabled the participation of 53 experts from 14 Member States resulting in a wider exchange of experience and dissemination of guidance. Under the framework of the joint programme, senior managers directly responsible for delayed nuclear power plant projects identified several issues or problem areas that needed to be addressed and guidance on management be provided. A work plan for the development of several working documents, addressing the different issues, was established. Subsequently these documents were merged into a single one to produce the present publication. This publication provides information and practical examples on necessary management actions to preserve

  12. Management of delayed nuclear power plant projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    According to the available information at the IAEA PRIS (Power Reactor Information System) at the end of 1998 there were more than 40 nuclear power plant projects with delays of five or more years with respect to the originally scheduled commercial operation. The degree of conformance with original construction schedules showed large variations due to several issues, including financial, economic and public opinion factors. Taking into account the number of projects with several years delay in their original schedules, it was considered useful to identify the subject areas where exchange of experience among Member States would be mutually beneficial in identification of problems and development of guidance for successful management of the completion of these delayed projects. A joint programme of the IAEA Departments of Nuclear Energy (Nuclear Power Engineering Section) and Technical Co-operation (Europe Section, with additional support from the Latin America and West Asia Sections) was set up during the period 1997-1998. The specific aim of the programme was to provide assistance in the management of delayed nuclear power plants regarding measures to maintain readiness for resuming the project implementation schedule when the conditions permit. The integration of IAEA interdepartmental resources enabled the participation of 53 experts from 14 Member States resulting in a wider exchange of experience and dissemination of guidance. Under the framework of the joint programme, senior managers directly responsible for delayed nuclear power plant projects identified several issues or problem areas that needed to be addressed and guidance on management be provided. A work plan for the development of several working documents, addressing the different issues, was established. Subsequently these documents were merged into a single one to produce the present publication. This publication provides information and practical examples on necessary management actions to preserve

  13. Project management skills for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatikar, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The E and C Division of L and T has executed several power projects in India and abroad and thus possesses the requisite wherewithal to execute nuclear power projects on a fast track basis. To achieve this L and T has set up a separate Strategic Business Unit (SBU) to have a focused attention to the nuclear power industry in the country. All the four important and necessary hallmarks for successful implementation of any project namely (i) engineering capabilities, (ii) sophisticated project management tools, (iii) ability to mobilize resources, and (iv) skilled personnel to execute the project have been adequately addressed. These could be realized either by establishing fruitful collaborations with other specialist Companies and/or creating powerful and multitasking software tools for effective implementation. The execution of nuclear power projects on a fast track basis could be implemented by following the EPC route and by minimizing the number of packages. Details of this scheme for project implementation will be highlighted during the talk

  14. Management of delayed nuclear power plant projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The IAEA assists the management of organizations responsible for Nuclear Power Plant Projects with significant delays with respect to the originally scheduled commercial operation. Several Member States have Nuclear Power Plant Projects with delays of five or more years with respect to the originally scheduled commercial operation. The degree of conformance with original construction schedules shows large variations due to several issues, including financial, economic and public opinion factors. Solving the special difficulties related with a delayed NPP project is problematic and dependent on the particular country situation. However it is not regarded as an isolated national problem but as a significant issue with a number of difficulties shared by several Member States. The IAEA collects information and supports the management of delayed NPP projects by identifying main common issues, gathering available experience and addressing specific needs. On this background the IAEA is in the position to provide unique impartial assistance based upon best international practices. This enables Member States to maintain readiness for resuming the project construction when the conditions permit and to strengthen management's abilities for the completion of the project. The IAEA's service is tailored to the needs and requirements of the requesting organization, implemented on-site by international experts and addresses areas such as project control measures, human resources, updating to technological and regulatory requirements, project data, nuclear safety review, physical protection and nuclear security and preparation to resume project construction and operation

  15. Basic infrastructure for a nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    There are several stages in the process of introducing nuclear power in a country. These include development of nuclear policies and regulations, feasibility studies, public consultations, technology evaluation, requests for proposals and evaluations, contracts and financing, supply, construction, commissioning, operation and finally decommissioning. This publication addresses the 'basic' infrastructure needs, which are adequate until the issue of the construction license. It is obvious that a fully developed nuclear infrastructure will be required for the further implementation stages of a nuclear power reactor. The officials and experts in each country will undertake the transition from a basic infrastructure to a fully developed infrastructure that covers the stages of construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning. The publication is directed to provide guidance for assessing the basic infrastructure necessary for: - A host country to consider when engaging in the implementation of nuclear power, and - A supplier country to consider when assessing whether the recipient country is in an acceptable condition to begin the implementation of a nuclear power project. The target users are decision makers, advisers and senior managers in the governmental organizations, utilities, industrial organizations and regulatory bodies in the countries adopting nuclear power programmes or exporting supplies for these programmes. The governmental organizations that may find this publication useful include: Ministries of Economy, Energy, Foreign Affairs, Finance, Mining, Internal Affairs, Academic Institutions, Nuclear Energy Agencies and Environmental Agencies. This publication was produced within the IAEA programme directed to increase the capability of Member States to plan and implement nuclear power programmes and to establish and enhance national nuclear infrastructure. This publication should be used in conjunction with the IAEA Safety Standards Series and other

  16. Measures to improve nuclear power project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinchao

    2012-01-01

    Focusing on correct application of ability level principle in setting organizational structure, the effective management system has been established, and 8 practical management regimes have been developed. Personnel training and management work shall be well done and enhanced. Experience feedback in construction management shall be well done for all systems. Exchange of construction and management techniques shall be actively carried out. All staff shall participate in safety management. KPI system is adopted for assessing stakeholders' project management method, and PDCA cycle is adopted for continued improved. Management level upgrading measures are proposed to ensure the smooth construction of nuclear power project. Setting forth and popularizing management theory can provide reference for and promote the smooth progress of various nuclear power projects. (author)

  17. Role of participants in nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polliart, A.J.

    1977-01-01

    In this article staffing requirements for nuclear projects (Turnkey Contract) and the owner's staff requirements, project planning, project implementation, and plant construction and commissioning are treated. (HK) [de

  18. Initiating a nuclear power project - client's viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieh, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    Based upon our experience in Korea, for any country that wants to effectively introduce nuclear plants, the authors recommend the following preparation for accepting the advanced nuclear technology prior to its implementation: training personnel, organizing domestic industries for the technology transfer, and establishing laws, regulations and licensing procedures related to nuclear development. Technical self-sufficiency in nuclear power plant construction and operation must be achieved step by step under a long term master plan. Localization, or internal self-sufficiency, is enhanced by repetitive construction of the same reactor type using a non-turnkey construction method. The project owner should, most of all, improve his management capability for the success of the project along with economic effectiveness. International cooperation among the developing countries who are introducing or planning to introduce nuclear power plant, is expected to play an important role in resolving unique problems which may commonly exist in their nuclear program. In this regard, Korea is prepared to share its accumulated experiences with other developing countries

  19. Financing strategy for Indonesian Nuclear Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subki, I.M.; Arbie, B.; Adiwardojo; Seotrisnanto, A.Y.

    1998-01-01

    In anticipation of the introduction in the early 2000s of a nuclear power plant, the Government of Indonesia (GOI), through the National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) , has formulated a Bid Invitation Specification (BIS) in parallel with the completion of the NPP Feasibility Study. This BIS formulation assumed an open international tender for the first unit of the NPP with project financing as a conventional loan. The GOI's recent policy is to minimize government financial support for power development. This paper summarizes a financing strategy for the Indonesian NPP project to make the NPP economically viable, and provides a general discussion on project financing using a conventional approach, Build--Own-Operate (BOO) and a counter-purchase approach. Innovative approaches for financing are still being pursued in order to obtain an optimum solution for investors and owners, to fulfill the Indonesian government's requirements. (author)

  20. Decommissioning project of commercial nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karigome, S.

    2008-01-01

    Decommissioning project of commercial nuclear power plant in Japan was outlined. It is expected that the land, after the decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants, will serve as sites for new plants. Steps will be taken to reduce the amount of wastes generated and to recycle/reuse them. Wastes with a radioactivity concentration below the 'clearance level' need not be dealt with as radioactive material, and may be handled in the same way as conventional wastes. The Tokai-1 power station, a 166 MWe carbon dioxide cooled reactor which closed down in 1998, is being decommissioned and the first ten years as 'safe storage' to allow radioactivity to decay. Non-reactor grade components such as turbines were already removed, heat exchanger dismantling started and the reactor will be dismantled, the buildings demolished and the site left ready for reuse. All radioactive wastes will be classified as low-level wastes in three categories and will be buried under the ground. The total cost will be 88.5 billion yen -34.7 billion for dismantling and 53.8 billion for waste treatment including the graphite moderator. (T. Tanaka)

  1. Technical management of difference in CEPR nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ruiting

    2014-01-01

    The Thesis dissertate the application of technical management of difference in CEPR Nuclear Power Project from EPR technical bases, condition of a nuclear power plant site, engineering and procurement, construction, quality management, schedule management and experience feedback aspects. (author)

  2. ERP project implementation and risk management of nuclear power enterprise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fei

    2008-01-01

    According to the characteristic and development trend of nuclear power enterprise informatization, combined with the general ERP implementation experience, the method is proposed to ensure the successful implementation and risk management of ERP project in nuclear power enterprise. (authors)

  3. Great expectations. Projections of nuclear power around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Alan; Rogner, Hans-Holger; Gritsevskyi, Andrii

    2009-01-01

    In its 2008 edition of Energy, Electricity and Nuclear Power Estimates for the Period to 2030, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has again revised its projections for nuclear power upwards. Every year since 1981 the IAEA has published 2 updated projections for the world's nuclear power generating capacity, a low projection and a high projection. The low projection is a down to earth, business-as-usual projection. The high projection takes into account government and corporate announcements about longer-term plans for nuclear investments as well as potential new national policies, e.g., to combat climate change. The results for the 2008 projections are presented. In the low projection, the projected nuclear power capacity in 2030 is 473 GW(e), some 27% higher than today's 372 GW(e). In the high projection, nuclear capacity in 2030 is 748 GW(e), double today's capacity. But while projections for nuclear power's future rose, its share of the world's electricity generation today dropped from 15% in 2006 to 14% in 2007. The main reason is that while total global electricity generation rose 4.8% from 2007 to 2008, nuclear electricity actually dropped slightly. The overall message from the IAEA's 2008 edition of Energy, Electricity and Nuclear Power Estimates for the Period to 2030 is that global electricity use will grow significantly, that nuclear power will have to expand more rapidly than it has done recently in order to maintain its share, and that nuclear power can meet the challenge. (orig.)

  4. Project designing of Temelin nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krychtalek, Z.; Linek, V.

    1989-01-01

    The geological and seismic parameters are listed of the Temelin nuclear power plant. The division of the site in building zones is described. The main zones consist of the power generation unit zone with the related auxiliary buildings of hot plants and of the auxiliary buildings of the nonactive part with industrial buildings. The important buildings are interconnected with communication and technology bridges. Cooling towers and spray pools and the entrance area are part of the urbanistic design. The architectonic design of the buildings uses standard building elements and materials. The design of the buildings is based on the requirements on their function and on structural load and on the demands of maximal utilization of the type of the reinforced concrete prefab structure system. The structure is made of concrete or steel cells. The project design is based on Soviet projects. The layout is shown of the main power generation units and a section is presented of a 1,000 MW unit. (J.B.). 2 figs

  5. Development of human factors engineering guide for nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Dangshi; Sheng Jufang

    1997-01-01

    'THE PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR APPLICATION OF HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING TO NUCLEAR POWER PROJECT (First Draft, in Chinese)', which was developed under a research program sponsored by National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) is described briefly. It is hoped that more conscious, more systematical and more comprehensive application of Human Factors Engineering to the nuclear power projects from the preliminary feasibility studies up to the commercial operation will benefit the safe, efficient and economical operations of nuclear power plants in China

  6. Critical path analysis in early stage of nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Ahai

    2009-01-01

    The technical program and contract model as well as project management system and preliminary design defined in the early stage of nuclear power project are the key condition impact on the quality, schedule and cost of the nuclear power project. This paper, taking the CPR1000 coastal nuclear power station as an example, analyzes the critical path in the early stage of nuclear power project for five fields, i.e. licensing, design and procurement, site preparation, tender of construction contracts and construction preparation, and organization. (authors)

  7. Financing of nuclear power projects in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This document is a summary of the ''Topical Seminar on Financing of Nuclear Power Projects in Developing Countries, held in Jakarta between 4-7 September, 1990. The seminar presentations were divided into the following sessions: Keynote session (3 papers), Perspective of Nuclear and Fossil-fired Generation Costs (9 papers), Assessment of Problems and Constraints for the Financing of Large Power Projects, with particular Attention to Nuclear Power Projects (9 papers), Mechanisms for Financing Nuclear Power Projects in Developing Countries (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs, tabs and charts

  8. Construction of special structures for nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavan, N.

    2003-01-01

    Construction is a very important stage in the course of realization of Nuclear Power Projects and as much care has be devoted to this stage as to the planning and engineering stages. While the setting up of nuclear power projects used to take over seven years in the past, the time period has now been considerably reduced to about five years with advancements in construction engineering, project management and design techniques, on the basis of new initiatives from the owner agency, Nuclear Power Corporation of India. In this article, the constructional aspects of the specialized structures for nuclear power generation are looked into. (author)

  9. Purchasing management experience of Haiyang nuclear power project construction period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yuqin

    2013-01-01

    Purchasing is one of the important aspects to ensure the safety and quality of the nuclear power plant. This paper, combining the purchasing peculiarity and purchasing process of Haiyang nuclear power project, summarizes experiences of Haiyang nuclear power project in promoting its purchasing management level in aspects of purchasing method choosing, purchasing plan management, purchasing process optimization, purchasing contract implementation and purchasing surveillance, etc. (author)

  10. Financing arrangements for nuclear power projects in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This reference book reviews the main features and problems or difficulties involved in the financing of nuclear power projects with special reference to developing countries. It provides basic information and advice to developing countries interested in nuclear power projects as part of their power sector planning. The book outlines the general characteristics of financing a nuclear power project and presents innovative approaches for power generation financing. It discusses the special conditions and requirements of nuclear power projects and their financing complexities. The focus is on the practical issues that need to be dealt with in order to successfully finance these power projects, as well as the constraints faced by most developing countries. Possible ways and means of dealing with these constraints are presented. 58 refs, figs and tabs

  11. Management of difference in a nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ruiting

    2012-01-01

    The Thesis dissertate the application of Management of Difference in a Nuclear Power Project from nuclear safety regulation requirement, selection of a nuclear power plant site, engineering and procurement, construction, operation and maintenance, quality management, schedule management and experience feedback aspects. (author)

  12. Qinshan Phase III (CANDU) nuclear power project quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lingen; Du Jinxiang

    2001-01-01

    The completion and implementation of quality assurance system of Qinshan Phase III (CANDU) nuclear power project are presented. Some comments and understanding with consideration of the project characteristics are put forward

  13. Belene Nuclear Power Plant project status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolov

    2008-01-01

    The status of the Belene project with the following main features is described: Reactor type - PWR, Russian Design Plant supplier - ASE, AREVA NP/Siemens Reactor thermal power - 2 x 3012 MW Electric output -2 x 1060 MW Net efficiency - 35 % Capacity factor - 90 % Design Life Time - 60 years

  14. Implementing national nuclear safety plan at the preliminary stage of nuclear power project development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yabin; Cui Shaozhang; Pan Fengguo; Zhang Lizhen; Shi Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    This study discusses the importance of nuclear power project design and engineering methods at the preliminary stage of its development on nuclear power plant's operational safety from the professional view. Specifically, we share our understanding of national nuclear safety plan's requirement on new reactor accident probability, technology, site selection, as well as building and improving nuclear safety culture and strengthening public participation, with a focus on plan's implications on preliminary stage of nuclear power project development. Last, we introduce China Huaneng Group's work on nuclear power project preliminary development and the experience accumulated during the process. By analyzing the siting philosophy of nuclear power plant and the necessity of building nuclear safety culture at the preliminary stage of nuclear power project development, this study explicates how to fully implement the nuclear safety plan's requirements at the preliminary stage of nuclear power project development. (authors)

  15. Projected role of nuclear power in Egypt and problems encountered in implementing the first nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effat, K.E.A.; Sirry, H.; El-Fouly, M.F.; El-Sharkawy, E.; El-Saiedi, A.F.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews the present and projected power demands in Egypt and the factors behind the decision to introduce a nuclear power generation program. Different problems encountered and anticipated in introducing the first nuclear power plant are also discussed

  16. Engineering schedule control of nuclear power project planning and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Hao

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power design is the important part of project management of nuclear power project, it is the way to control the project organization, design schedule, design progress, design quality and cost control. The good schedule system and control is the key to the success for the project. It is also analyzed the problem during the project, by using some theory and analyze the project structure, design schedule management, IED and document management and interface management propose some new idea for better improve the design management to finally better improve the management quality and efficiency. (author)

  17. Present status and future development of Qinshan nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Yu

    1987-01-01

    Qinshan 300 MWe Nuclear power Project is the first domestically designed and constructed nuclear power plant in China. Here is a brief description of its progress in design work, equipment manufacture and site construction since the first structural concrete in March 1985. In Qinshan area four units of 600 MWe each are planned to be built with collaboration of proper foreign partners. (author)

  18. Topical and working papers on nuclear power capacity projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the overall work programme of WG. 1, Sub-Group 1A/2A was formed jointly with WG. 2 and given the responsibility for estimating the growth of nuclear power up to the year 2025 and the associated demands for nuclear fuels, heavy water, enrichment and other fuel cycle services. In carrying out the first part of its task, the estimation of nuclear power capacity growth, sub-Group 1A/2A prepared 6 working papers which contain the following information: A critique of recent world energy demand forecasts; world energy demand and installed capacity to the year 2025; nuclear power growth projections 1977-2000 for developing countries; long range world nuclear power growth projections; INFCE forecasts of nuclear generating capacity 1985-2025

  19. Nuclear power project construction quality acceptance standards Implementation and discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Shifu

    2013-01-01

    Project quality construction acceptance is an important element of nuclear power project quality management. Based on characteristics of NPP construction and refer to national construction quality acceptance code and industry regulation, this paper introduces and discusses NPP construction quality acceptance regulation improvement and implementation under current situation. (authors)

  20. Current issues in nuclear power projects decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, Y.; Rogner, H.

    2011-01-01

    Concluding Comments: Firm government commitment and support - imminent; New financing approaches/models are emerging, repackaging existing methods and combination of project finance/co-operative mode; Global financial crisis will make financing for investors very challenging, especially for large scale infrastructure projects like NNP –financial regulators to impose tougher rules (Basel III, UK bank levy, US Financial Regulatory Bill, etc; Pure project finance is still challenging for nuclear projects - the availability of finance for new NPPs will depend on the initial government support. This presentation presents a “free market” view on investment in nuclear power projects; If the public sector (governments) wishes to invest in nuclear power as part of its socioeconomic development priorities, finance is not a real obstacle; It becomes an issue in the presence of other equally important development needs and private sector participation is sought

  1. Information management for nuclear power stations: project description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpin, D.W.

    1978-03-01

    A study of the information management structure required to support nuclear power plant construction was performed by a joint university-industry group under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE), formerly the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The purpose of this study was (1) to study methods for the control of information during the construction and start-up of nuclear power plants, and (2) identify those data elements intrinsic to nuclear power plants which must be maintained in a structured format for quick access and retrieval. Maintenance of the massive amount of data needed for control of a nuclear project during design, procurement, construction, start-up/testing, and operational phases requires a structuring which allows immediate update and retrieval based on a wide variety of access criteria. The objective of the research described has been to identify design concepts which support the development of an information control system responsive to these requirements. A conceptual design of a Management Information Data Base System which can meet the project control and information exchange needs of today's large nuclear power plant construction projects has been completed and an approach recommended for development and implementation of a complete operational system

  2. Planning construction of integrative schedule management for nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Zhenglin; Wang Wenying; Peng Fei

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the planning construction of integrative schedule management for Nuclear Power Project. It details schedule management system and the requirement of schedulers and the mode of three schedule management flats. And analysis it combing with the implementation of construction water and all special schedules before FCD to further propose the improving and researching direction for the integrative schedule management. (authors)

  3. Tecnatom support to new nuclear power plant projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, A. B.

    2009-10-01

    Tecnatom is a Spanish engineering company with more than 50 years of experience working for the nuclear industry all over the world. It has worked in over 30 countries in activities related to the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. Along this half century of history. Tecnatom has been providing its services to nuclear utilities, regulators, NPP vendors, NPP owners / operators and nuclear fuel manufacturers not only in Spain but also abroad. It started to work in the design of new nuclear power plants in the early 90 s and since then has continued collaborating with different suppliers in the design and licensing of new reactors especially in the areas of plant systems design, man-machine interface design, main control room simulators building, training, qualification of equipment and PSI/ISI engineering services. Some challenges to the reactivation of nuclear power plants construction are common worldwide, including: regulatory processes, workforce availability, construction project management, etc. Being some keys to success the following: apply qualified resources, enough resources for early planning, project leadership, organization and integration, establish a strong integrated management team. The goal of this paper is to inform regarding the capabilities of Tecnatom in the construction of new power plants. (Author)

  4. Technology assessment Jordan Nuclear Power Plant Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary regional analysis was carried out for identification of potential sites for NPP, followed by screening of these sites and selecting candidate sites. Aqaba sites are proposed, where it can use the sea water for cooling: i.Site 1; at the sea where it can use the sea water for direct cooling. ii.Site 2; 10 km to the east of Gulf of Aqaba shoreline at the Saudi Arabia borders. iii.Site 3, 4 km to the east of Gulf of Aqaba shoreline. Only the granitic basement in the east of the 6 km²site should be considered as a potential site for a NPP. Preliminary probabilistic seismic hazard assessment gives: Operating-Basis Earthquake-OBE (475 years return period) found to be in the range of 0.163-0.182 g; Safe Shutdown Earthquake-SSE (10,000 years return period) found to be in the range of 0.333-0.502g. The process include also setting up of nuclear company and other organizational matters. Regulations in development are: Site approval; Construction permitting; Overall licensing; Safety (design, construction, training, operations, QA); Emergency planning; Decommissioning; Spent fuel and RW management. JAEC's technology assessment strategy and evaluation methodology are presented

  5. Economical aspects of a nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meldonian, N.L.; Santos, E.M. dos

    1992-01-01

    This work describes different aspects and parameters that should be regarded as guidelines for economic evaluation of small and medium power plant projects. The main objective of an economic evaluation is to establish the plant's unitary cost and its economic figure of merit. To achieve that, a number of studies must be undertaken to compare the global competitiveness of a nuclear power plant with other energetic alternatives. These studies involve macro economy, energy generation, electricity transmission and global feasibility of the enterprise. It is concluded that the economic evaluation of a nuclear power plant should be considered as the culmination of a long process of planning at a national level. The main reasons are the investments involved, the technological developments required and political implications of the utilization of nuclear power energy. (author)

  6. Engineering for new-built nuclear power plant projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Lopez, A.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the opportunities existing in the market (electrical utilities and reactor vendors) for an engineering company with the profile of Empresarios Agrupados (EA) in new-built nuclear power plant projects. To do this, reference is made to some representative examples of projects in which EA has been participating recently. the article concludes sharing with the reader some lessons learned from this participation. (Author)

  7. Project approach study for nuclear power plants in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    The new nuclear program in the Netherlands comprises the construction of two to four nuclear power plants up to the year 2000. The main objective pursued with the implementation of the nuclear program is the supply of low-cost electricity in the future. In order to prepare the program and to provide a basis for further decisions, the Ministry of Economic Affairs has entrusted Motor-Columbus Consulting Engineers Inc., Baden, Switzerland, with a study to determine the most suitable project approach option(s) for the implementation of the future nuclear program in the Netherlands. In carrying out this study, Motor-Columbus investigated the following main project approach options: 1. turnkey contract approach; 2. split-package contract approach; 3. multi-contract approach. It is concluded that if applied in the appropriate way, the normal turnkey contract approach represents the most suitable approach under the prevailing situation in the Netherlands. (orig.)

  8. Bid Preparation and Evaluation for Nuclear Power Plant Project Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Idris Taib, Mohd Khairulezwan Abdul Manan and Nur Farizan Amadzun

    2011-01-01

    Bid preparation and evaluation is one of the main activities in Nuclear Power Plant Project management. International Atomic Energy Agency guide and Korean experience was studied for Malaysian requirement in realization of first Nuclear Power Plant. Several aspects shall be taken into consideration such as political scenario, financial capabilities, sitting, human resource, technologies, fuel supplies and decommissioning for long term exceeded hundred years. Bidding process and activities is proposed for our country requirement. The main activities included but unlimited to Bid Invitation Specification, Bid Evaluation Process, Technical Evaluation, Economic Bid Evaluation and Contracting. On the end of day, Malaysia need safe and reliable Nuclear Power Plant. Malaysian Economic Transformation Programme also get benefit from spin-off localization products and services as well as Technology Transfer Programme. (author)

  9. Data base on nuclear power plant dose reduction research projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1986-10-01

    Staff at the ALARA Center of Brookhaven National Laboratory have established a data base of information about current research that is likely to result in lower radiation doses to workers. The data base, concerned primarily with nuclear power generation, is part of a project that the ALARA Center is carrying out for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report describes its current status. A substantial amount of research on reducing occupational exposure is being done in the US and abroad. This research is beginning to have an impact on the collective dose expenditures at nuclear power plants. The collective radiation doses in Europe, Japan, and North America all show downward trends. A large part of the research in the US is either sponsored by the nuclear industry through joint industry organizations such as EPRI and ESEERCO or is done by individual corporations. There is also significant participation by smaller companies. The main emphasis of the research on dose reduction is on engineering approaches aimed at reducing radiation fields or keeping people out of high-exposure areas by using robotics. Effective ALARA programs are also underway at a large number of nuclear plants. Additional attention should be given to non-engineering approaches to dose reduction, which are potentially very useful and cost effective but require quantitative study and analysis based on data from nuclear power plants. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Application study of the project management on the nuclear power projects in China Institute of Atomic Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Cunxing

    2012-01-01

    The article introduced the actions of foreign and domestic nuclear power technical services in China Institute of Atomic Energy, the project management theory is applied to the organization, implementation and control of the nuclear power projects. It is analyzed the quality, schedule , investment etc of nuclear power projects, the improving measures and suggestions are bring forward on the project management organization, quality assurance, reduce cost etc. It will raise its nuclear power project management level in China Institute of Atomic Energy. (author)

  11. South Ukraine Nuclear Power Plant. Advanced Computer Information System Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hord, J.; Afanasiev, N.; Smith, C.; Kudinov, Yu.

    1997-01-01

    The South Ukraine upgrade is the first of many that will take place in the former eastern bloc countries over the next several years. Westron is currently developing a similar system for the Zaporozhe nuclear power plant. In addition, there are eleven other WWER type units in operation in the Ukraine, as well as twenty seven others in operation throughout Eastern and Central Europe and Russia - all potential upgrade projects. (author)

  12. Cancellation of the Kaiseraugst nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blocher, C.; Schoenenberger, J.; Stucky, G.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear power plant project at Kaiseraugst has been worked on for over 20 years. In 1985 the Swiss Parliament decided to license the plant. The cost of the work to date is about 1.2 x10 6 Swiss Franks. Continuation of the project is only sensible if it can be realized within a foreseeable space of time. It is probable that the discussions concerning future energy, environment and safety will continue for a long time. If this is clear that the Kaiseraugst project will not be realized during the next five to ten years for social, civic and political reasons. A continuation of the project is not justifiable. Kernkraftwerk Kaiseraugst AG must be adequately compensated. A motion has been presented to Parliament which charges the Government to negotiate with Kernkraftwerk Kaiseraugst AG for cancellation of the project

  13. Cash flow forecasting model for nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Guo Jilin

    2002-01-01

    Cash flow forecasting is very important for owners and contractors of nuclear power projects to arrange the capital and to decrease the capital cost. The factors related to contractor cash flow forecasting are analyzed and a cash flow forecasting model is presented which is suitable for both contractors and owners. The model is efficiently solved using a cost-schedule data integration scheme described. A program is developed based on the model and verified with real project data. The result indicates that the model is efficient and effective

  14. Financing Nuclear Power Plant Projects. A New Paradigm?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehuet Lucet, Fabienne

    2015-05-01

    There are currently 435 operable nuclear power reactors around the world, with a further 71 under construction. Two main proven financing models were applied to nuclear plants in the past: the national model, and the corporate model. The historical model of financing is the national model. It allowed for the most efficient risk allocation model in then-regulated national electricity markets: government or state-owned utilities with government guarantee assumed the risks of building nuclear power plants locally. The national model has proven to be efficient in France, Russia and the USA where it was modified to support private business initiatives. It was then replicated in Japan, Korea and China where significant nuclear programs were developed. In the corporate business model, the owner of the plant assumes most of the risk, but various schemes are used to mitigate the owner's risk by transmitting large areas of risks to others: vendors for construction risk as in Finland, government through loans guarantees etc. As projects became international, a set of common principles were approved by OECD countries concerning financing and the role of Export Credit Agencies. The objective was to provide competition rules whereby exporters compete on the basis of the price and quality of their products rather than the financial terms provided. Various combinations of these models were and still are implemented. Pure Project Finance was not implemented for nuclear power plants, but the model nurtures reflections about new financing models. The context in which nuclear power projects are now decided and financed changed drastically: it is a new paradigm. Risk allocation and financial conditions are at the forefront of competition to win new nuclear projects' tenders insofar as reducing uncertainties is a decisive competition edge. In a context of electricity market deregulation and high construction risks, investors and lenders require more and more securities to

  15. Study on nuclear power plant project construction and management mode in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kai; Chen Lian

    2009-01-01

    Project management mode plays a key role in project construction, especially in nuclear power field. From the aspects of right, responsibility and benefit, this paper discussed the differences among the common used project management modes. Also the main kinds of the construction management modes used in China's nuclear power plants were summarized. At last, considering the experience of Ningde nuclear power plant, this paper put forward several perspectives about the selection of project management mode in nuclear power plant construction. (authors)

  16. Design management of general contractor under nuclear power project EPC mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Shaojian

    2013-01-01

    Design management has not yet formed a theoretical system recognized, general contractor design managers under nuclear power project EPC Mode lack the clear theory basis. This paper aims to discuss Design management from the angle of general contractor under nuclear power project EPC mode, Gives the concept of design management Clearly, by Combining the characteristics of nuclear power project, Gives the specific content and meaning of the design management of nuclear power project. (authors)

  17. Experience of international projects implementation at Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavialov, L.A. [Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant ' Rosenergoatom' , Leningrad Region, 188540, Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    During the period of 1992-2007 more than 60 different projects of different specificity and budget have been successfully implemented in frames of Technical Assistance for the Commonwealth of Independent States (TACIS) Program, Project financed by European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), as well as in frames of Agreements on Cooperation between Leningrad NPP and Radiation and Nuclear safety Authority of Finland (STUK) and Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, International Co-operation Program SKI-ICP(SIP). All these projects were directed to the safety increasing of the Leningrad NPP reactor, type RBMK-1000. Implementation of the technical aid projects has been performed by different foreign companies such as Aarsleff Oy, (Finland), SGN (France), Nukem (Germany), Jergo AB (Sweden), SABAROS (Switzerland), Westinghouse (USA), Nordion (Canada), Bruel and Kjer (Denmark), Data System and Solutions (UK), SVT Braundshuz (Germany) WICOTEC (Sweden), Studsvik (Sweden) and etc. which has enough technical and organizational experience in implementation of such projects, as well as all necessary certificates and licenses for works performance. Selection of a Contractor/Supplier for a joined work performance has been carried out in accordance with the tender procedure, technical specification and a planned budget. Project financing was covered by foreign Consolidated Funds and Authorities interested in increasing of Leningrad NPP safety, which have valid intergovernmental agreements with Russian Federation on the technical assistance to be provided to the NPPs. At present time all joined international projects implemented at Leningrad NPP are financed jointly with LNPP. All projects can be divided into technical aid projects connected with development and turnkey implementation of systems and complexes and projects for supply of equipment which has no analogues in Russia but successfully used all over the world. Positive experience of the joined projects

  18. Experience of international projects implementation at Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavialov, L.A.

    2008-01-01

    During the period of 1992-2007 more than 60 different projects of different specificity and budget have been successfully implemented in frames of Technical Assistance for the Commonwealth of Independent States (TACIS) Program, Project financed by European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), as well as in frames of Agreements on Cooperation between Leningrad NPP and Radiation and Nuclear safety Authority of Finland (STUK) and Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, International Co-operation Program SKI-ICP(SIP). All these projects were directed to the safety increasing of the Leningrad NPP reactor, type RBMK-1000. Implementation of the technical aid projects has been performed by different foreign companies such as Aarsleff Oy, (Finland), SGN (France), Nukem (Germany), Jergo AB (Sweden), SABAROS (Switzerland), Westinghouse (USA), Nordion (Canada), Bruel and Kjer (Denmark), Data System and Solutions (UK), SVT Braundshuz (Germany) WICOTEC (Sweden), Studsvik (Sweden) and etc. which has enough technical and organizational experience in implementation of such projects, as well as all necessary certificates and licenses for works performance. Selection of a Contractor/Supplier for a joined work performance has been carried out in accordance with the tender procedure, technical specification and a planned budget. Project financing was covered by foreign Consolidated Funds and Authorities interested in increasing of Leningrad NPP safety, which have valid intergovernmental agreements with Russian Federation on the technical assistance to be provided to the NPPs. At present time all joined international projects implemented at Leningrad NPP are financed jointly with LNPP. All projects can be divided into technical aid projects connected with development and turnkey implementation of systems and complexes and projects for supply of equipment which has no analogues in Russia but successfully used all over the world. Positive experience of the joined projects

  19. Data base on nuclear power plant dose reduction research projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report contains project information on the research and development activities of the nuclear power industry in the area of dose reduction. It is based on a data base of information set up at the ALARA Center of Brookhaven National Laboratory. One purpose of this report is to draw attention to work in progress and to enable researchers and subscribers to obtain further information from the investigators and project managers. Information is provided on 180 projects, divided according to whether they are oriented to Engineering Research or to Health Physics Technology. The report contains indices on main category, project manager, principal investigator, sponsoring organization, contracting organization, and subject. This is an initial report. It is intended that periodic updates be issued whenever sufficient material has been accumulated.

  20. Data base on nuclear power plant dose reduction research projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report contains project information on the research and development activities of the nuclear power industry in the area of dose reduction. It is based on a data base of information set up at the ALARA Center of Brookhaven National Laboratory. One purpose of this report is to draw attention to work in progress and to enable researchers and subscribers to obtain further information from the investigators and project managers. Information is provided on 180 projects, divided according to whether they are oriented to Engineering Research or to Health Physics Technology. The report contains indices on main category, project manager, principal investigator, sponsoring organization, contracting organization, and subject. This is an initial report. It is intended that periodic updates be issued whenever sufficient material has been accumulated

  1. Point Lepreau nuclear project unlocks power future of New Brunswick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, E J [New Brunswick Electric Power Commission, Fredericton (Canada)

    1976-08-01

    Projects under development will increase the generating capacity of New Brunswick Electric Power Commission from 1.47 to 3.14 GW. Of these projects, the most significant is the 0.63 GW Point Lepreau CANDU reactor. Progress in the construction of the power reactor is summarized. The concrete reactor building was slipformed in April 1976. A second nuclear unit at Point Lepreau is being considered. Information is also provided on the new oil-fired station at Coleson Cove, a new oil- or coal-fired unit at Dalhousie and further hydro units at Mactaquac. A 0.16 GW pumped storage hydro unit at Green River is being considered. Information on transmission (Including the HVDC system), substations, and connection with Hydro Quebec is included.

  2. Siting and early-stage project management of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kai; Li Guojin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, difficulties and challenges facing in siting of nuclear power plant after Fukushima nuclear accident is introduced. The key points for siting are analyzed. The site characteristics related to nuclear safety and the evaluated methods are discussed. From project management perspective, main procedures and key points for the early-stage of a nuclear power project are described. (authors)

  3. The Philippine nuclear power project, its past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovellanos, J.U.

    1993-01-01

    The article discussed the historical background of the nuclear power plants; how it operates; the government opinion on the operation of the nuclear power plant; the application of power resources to industry; the implementation of PNPP-1 particularly the economic aspects of energy in the near future. (IMA)

  4. Application of ABWR construction database to nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Atsushi; Katsube, Yasuhiko

    1999-01-01

    Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) completed the construction of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station Unit No. 6 and No. 7 (K-6/7) as the first advanced boiling water reactors (ABWR) in the world successfully. K-6 and K-7 started their commercial operations in November, 1996 and in July, 1997 respectively. We consider ABWR as a standard BWR in the world as well as in Japan because ABWR is highly reputed. However, because the interval of our nuclear power plant construction is going to be longer, our engineering level on plant construction will be declining. Hence it is necessary for us to maintain our engineering level. In addition to this circumstance, we are planning to wide application of separated purchase orders for further cost reduction. Also there is an expectation for our contribution to ABWR plant constructions overseas. As facing these circumstances, we have developed a construction database based on our experience for ABWR construction. As the first step of developing the database for these use, we analyzed our own activities in the previous ABWR construction. Through this analysis, we could define activity units of which the project consists. As the second step, we clarified the data which are treated in each activity unit and the interface among them. By taking these steps, we could develop our database efficiently. (author)

  5. Development and application of project management computer system in nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Junpu

    2000-01-01

    According to the experiences in the construction of Daya Bay and Lingao nuclear power plants presents, the necessity to use the computers for management and their application in the nuclear power engineering project are explained

  6. Compiling Utility Requirements For New Nuclear Power Plant Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrakka, Eero

    2002-01-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) submitted in November 2000 to the Finnish Government an application for a Decision-in-Principle concerning the construction of a new nuclear power plant in Finland. The actual investment decision can be made first after a positive decision has been made by the Government and the Parliament. Parallel to the licensing process, technical preparedness has been upheld so that the procurement process can be commenced without delay, when needed. This includes the definition of requirements for the plant and preliminary preparation of bid inquiry specifications. The core of the technical requirements corresponds to the specifications presented in the European Utility Requirement (EUR) document, compiled by major European electricity producers. Quite naturally, an amount of modifications to the EUR document are needed that take into account the country- and site-specific conditions as well as the experiences gained in the operation of the existing NPP units. Along with the EUR-related requirements concerning the nuclear island and power generation plant, requirements are specified for scope of supply as well as for a variety of issues related to project implementation. (author)

  7. Project quality management under EPC mode by the owner of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hui; Hu Miao

    2014-01-01

    As the first completely independent nuclear power project in China, Fangjiashan nuclear power project is constructed under EPC mode of general project contracting. This paper, taking the project as an example, aims to explore how the project owners carry out quality management for the installation project during the construction of the nuclear power plant based on EPC mode. It has certain reference value for the management of following nuclear power projects which adopting the EPC construction mode. It will play a positive role in improving China's overall self-management abilities in the nuclear power construction, and lay a solid foundation for follow-up nuclear power construction in China. (authors)

  8. Design interface management system for nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun

    2012-01-01

    Design interfaces exist between different participants and during the whole course of a nuclear power project, and include different disciplinary requirements. The purpose of interface management is to establish a procedure, which can be efficiently used to control the complex design interfaces and ensure its compliance with NPP design requirements. To this end, a complete work procedures and relationship will be defined and classified, so as to set up the structure of interface management system. The system consists of three levels, i.e. working procedure level, management tool level and technical document level. Two management routes, i.e. administration route and technical route, are adopted so as to conduct management efficiently. (author)

  9. Schedule control in Ling Ao nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Ahai

    2007-01-01

    Ling Ao Nuclear Power Station (LANP) is first one built up by self-reliance in China with power capacity 990x2 MWe. The results of quality control, schedule control and cost control are satisfactory. The commercial operation days of Unit 1 and Unit 2 were 28th May 2002 and 8th Jan. 2003 respectively, which were 48 days and 66 days in advance of the project schedule. This paper presents the practices of self-reliance schedule control system in LANP. The paper includes 10 sections: schedule control system; targets of schedule control; schedule control at early stage of project; construction schedule; scheduling practice; Point curves; schedule control of design and procurement; a good practice of construction schedule control on site; commissioning and startup schedule; schedule control culture. Three figures are attached. The main contents of the self-reliance schedule control system are as follows: to draw up reasonable schedules and targets; to setup management mechanism and procedures; to organize powerful project management team; to establish close monitoring system; to provide timely progress reports and statistics information. Five kinds of schedule control targets are introduced, i.e. bar-chart schedule; milesones; Point curves; interface management; hydraulic test schedule of auxiliary piping loops; EMR/EMC/EESR issuance schedules. Six levels of bar-chart schedules were adopted in LANP, but the bar-chart schedules were not satisfactory for complicated erection condition on site, even using six levels of schedules. So a kind of Point curves was developed and their advantages are explained. Scheduling method of three elements: activity, duration, logic, which was adopted in LANP, is introduced. The duration of each piping activities in LANP level 2 project schedule was calculated based on the relevant working Point quantities. The analysis and adjustment of Point curves are illustrated, i.e. balance of monthly quantities; possible production in the peakload

  10. Research on quality assurance classification methodology for domestic AP1000 nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Jinhua; Jiang Huijie; Li Jingyan

    2012-01-01

    To meet the quality assurance classification requirements of domestic nuclear safety codes and standards, this paper analyzes the quality assurance classification methodology of domestic AP1000 nuclear power projects at present, and proposes the quality assurance classification methodology for subsequent AP1000 nuclear power projects. (authors)

  11. Projected role of nuclear power in Egypt and problems encountered in implementing the first nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effat, K.E.A.; Sirry, H.; El-Sharkawy, E.

    1977-01-01

    The increasing rise in fossil-fuel prices has favourably affected the economics of nuclear power generation bringing down the economically competitive size of nuclear units closer to small sizes compatible with grid capacities in developing countries. This encouraged Egypt to turn to nuclear power to fulfil its future power needs. In implementing its first nuclear power plant, Egypt is facing various problems. The capacity of the national electric power system and its inherent characteristics pose certain restrictions on the size and design of the nuclear plant required. The availability of sufficient local qualified management, engineering and technical personnel to participate in both precontractual and construction phases of the plant is quite a major problem. Lack of local developed industry to back up the construction phase implies the dependence to a large extent on imported equipment, materials and technology. The paper reviews the present and projected power demands in Egypt and the factors behind the decision to introduce a nuclear power generation programme. Various problems encountered and anticipated in introducing the first nuclear power plant are also discussed. (author)

  12. Study on the maturity model of nuclear power project management in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changbing; Li Huiqiang; Zheng Yanguo

    2009-01-01

    Based on the general project management maturity model, this paper discussed the establishment of nuclear power engineering project management maturity model in China, and proposed a basic framework in order to provide a way for improving and evaluating the ability of nuclear power project management in China. (authors)

  13. Discussion on organization structure system of nuclear power projects in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhi

    2011-01-01

    With the development of the nuclear power industry in China, several AE companies were born and now play a major role in building nuclear power projects in China and overseas. After studying current organization structure systems of all nuclear power AE companies in China and comparing with successful foreign ones, this paper proposes some approaches to optimize the structure. (author)

  14. Completion of Mochovce 1 and 2 nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valach, J.

    2000-01-01

    Commissioning of the Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant unit 2 fully completed the Mochovce unit 1 and 2 project. The power plant construction passed through a complicated evolution since early 80's. The genesis started with the change of the plant location due to a seismic resistance requirement raised by the former Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission, change of the design and contractor of the Instrumentation and Control system in early 90's, halt of construction in 1993 till 1996 due to a lack of funding, as well as a series of international reviews of safety aspects. All the obstacles had been overcome in the end, and completion works were re-started in 1996. Looking back to the unit 1 and 2 completion project, I would like to highlight some aspects of the project, particularly the level of safety, technical and organisational conditions, and terms of funding. The most important argument for completion of the plant was that VVER 440/213 reactor units were distinguished with very high level of passive safety, even overcoming Western-type PWR's in some aspects. The replacement of the original I and C system was another important contribution to the initial level of safety. International safety reviews performed at Mochovce NPP between 1990 and 1995 (Siemens, EdF, IAEA, RlSKAUDIT) confirmed the high level of safety of VVER 440/213 reactors, however, pointed out at some safety issues which had not been dealt with in the design. Those included e.g. the 'external risks', primary-to-secondary leaks, qualification of pressurizer safety valves, and others. It is necessary to stress that the Safety Improvement Programme defined for Mochovce NPP to comply with international standards did not become the most important part of the completion project due to external pressures, but based on natural requirements on nuclear power plant safety level generally accepted in 90's. The good example could be the seismic resistance of the plant which, though designed as seismic resistant

  15. Engineering for new-built nuclear power plant projects; Ingenieria para proyectos de nuevas centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Lopez, A.

    2012-11-01

    This article reviews the opportunities existing in the market (electrical utilities and reactor vendors) for an engineering company with the profile of Empresarios Agrupados (EA) in new-built nuclear power plant projects. To do this, reference is made to some representative examples of projects in which EA has been participating recently. the article concludes sharing with the reader some lessons learned from this participation. (Author)

  16. Probabilistic cost estimating of nuclear power plant construction projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, W.C.; Perry, L.W.; Postula, F.D.

    1978-01-01

    This paper shows how to identify and isolate cost accounts by developing probability trees down to component levels as justified by value and cost uncertainty. Examples are given of the procedure for assessing uncertainty in all areas contributing to cost: design, factory equipment pricing, and field labor and materials. The method of combining these individual uncertainties is presented so that the cost risk can be developed for components, systems and the total plant construction project. Formats which enable management to use the probabilistic cost estimate information for business planning and risk control are illustrated. Topics considered include code estimate performance, cost allocation, uncertainty encoding, probabilistic cost distributions, and interpretation. Effective cost control of nuclear power plant construction projects requires insight into areas of greatest cost uncertainty and a knowledge of the factors which can cause costs to vary from the single value estimates. It is concluded that probabilistic cost estimating can provide the necessary assessment of uncertainties both as to the cause and the consequences

  17. Support services for new nuclear power plant projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, Alberto B.; Cazorla, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    TECNATOM is a spanish engineering company with more than 50 years of experience working for the nuclear industry all over the world. TECNATOM has worked in over 30 countries in activities related to the Operation and Maintenance of Nuclear Power Plants. It started to work in the design of new Nuclear Power Plants in the early 90s and since then has continued collaborating with different suppliers in the design and licensing of new reactors specially in the areas of plant systems design, Man-Machine Interface design, Main Control Room simulators building, training, qualification of equipment and PSI/ISI engineering services. (author)

  18. Practice and innovation on safety management of Haiyang Nuclear Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Guohu

    2011-01-01

    From the perspective of owner, this article has introduced the safety management model and practice of Haiyang Nuclear Power Project, one of AP1000 Self-reliance Program supporting projects of China. And the article has summarized characteristics of the safety management of Haiyang Project for reference and communication with nuclear or other projects. (author)

  19. Method for assigning sites to projected generic nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holter, G.M.; Purcell, W.L.; Shutz, M.E.; Young, J.R.

    1986-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed a method for forecasting potential locations and startup sequences of nuclear power plants that will be required in the future but have not yet been specifically identified by electric utilities. Use of the method results in numerical ratings for potential nuclear power plant sites located in each of the 10 federal energy regions. The rating for each potential site is obtained from numerical factors assigned to each of 5 primary siting characteristics: (1) cooling water availability, (2) site land area, (3) power transmission land area, (4) proximity to metropolitan areas, and (5) utility plans for the site. The sequence of plant startups in each federal energy region is obtained by use of the numerical ratings and the forecasts of generic nuclear power plant startups obtained from the EIA Middle Case electricity forecast. Sites are assigned to generic plants in chronological order according to startup date.

  20. Method for assigning sites to projected generic nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holter, G.M.; Purcell, W.L.; Shutz, M.E.; Young, J.R.

    1986-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed a method for forecasting potential locations and startup sequences of nuclear power plants that will be required in the future but have not yet been specifically identified by electric utilities. Use of the method results in numerical ratings for potential nuclear power plant sites located in each of the 10 federal energy regions. The rating for each potential site is obtained from numerical factors assigned to each of 5 primary siting characteristics: (1) cooling water availability, (2) site land area, (3) power transmission land area, (4) proximity to metropolitan areas, and (5) utility plans for the site. The sequence of plant startups in each federal energy region is obtained by use of the numerical ratings and the forecasts of generic nuclear power plant startups obtained from the EIA Middle Case electricity forecast. Sites are assigned to generic plants in chronological order according to startup date

  1. Methodology for cost estimate in projects for nuclear power plants decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salij, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    The conceptual approaches to cost estimating of nuclear power plants units decommissioning projects were determined. The international experience and national legislative and regulatory basis were analyzed. The possible decommissioning project cost classification was given. It was shown the role of project costs of nuclear power plant units decommissioning as the most important criterion for the main project decisions. The technical and economic estimation of deductions to common-branch fund of decommissioning projects financing was substantiated

  2. The role of instrumentation and control systems in power uprating projects for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The IAEA's activities in nuclear power plant operating performance and life cycle management are aimed at increasing Member State capabilities in utilizing good engineering and management practices developed and transferred by the IAEA. In particular, the IAEA supports activities focusing on the improvement of nuclear power plant (NPP) performance, plant life management, training, power uprating, operational licence renewal, and the modernization of instrumentation and control (I and C) systems of NPPs in Member States. The subject of the I and C systems' role in power uprating projects in NPPs was suggested by the Technical Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation in 2003. The subject was then approved by the IAEA and included in the programmes for 2004-2007. The increasing importance of power uprating projects can be attributed to the general worldwide tendency to the deregulation of the electricity market. The greater demand for electricity and the available capacity and safety margins, as well as the pressure from several operating NPPs resulted in requests for licence modification to enable operation at a higher power level, beyond the original licence provisions. A number of nuclear utilities have already gone through the uprating process for their nuclear reactors, and many more are planning to go through this modification process. In addition to mechanical and process equipment changes, parts of the electrical and I and C systems and components may also need to be altered to accommodate the new operating conditions and safety limits. This report addresses the role of I and C systems in NPP power uprating projects. The objective of the report is to provide guidance to utilities, safety analysts, regulators and others involved in the preparation, implementation and licensing of power uprating projects, with particular emphasis on the I and C aspects of these projects. As the average age of NPPs is increasing, it is becoming common for

  3. Angra 1 nuclear power plant full scope simulator development project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvatici, Edmundo; Castanheira, Luiz Carlos C.; Silva Junior, Nilo Garcia da, E-mail: edsel@eletronuclear.gov.br, E-mail: lccast@eletronuclear.gov.br, E-mail: nilogar@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobras Termonuclear S.A. (SCO/ELETRONUCLEAR), Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil). Superintendencia de Coordenacao da Operacao; Zazo, Francisco Javier Lopez; Ruiz, Jose Antonio, E-mail: jlopez@tecnatom.es, E-mail: jaruiz@tecnatom.es [Tecnatom S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    Specific Full Scope Simulators are an essential tool for training NPP control room operators, in the formation phase as well as for maintaining their qualifications. In the last years availability of a Plant specific simulator has also become a Regulator requirement for Nuclear Power Plant operation. By providing real-time practical training for the operators, the use of a simulator allows improving the operator's performance, reducing the number of unplanned shutdowns and more effective response to abnormal and emergency operating conditions. It can also be used, among other uses, to validate procedures, test proposed plant modifications, perform engineering studies and to provide operation training for the technical support staff of the plant. The NPP site, in Angra dos Reis-RJ, Brazil, comprises the two units in operation, Unit 1, 640 MWe, Westinghouse PWR and Unit 2, 1350 MWe, KWU/Areva PWR and one unit in construction, Unit 3, 1405 MWe, KWU/Areva PWR, of the same design of Angra 2. Angra 2 has had its full scope simulator from the beginning, however this was not the case of Angra 1, that had to train its operators abroad, due to lack of a specific simulator. Eletronuclear participated in all the phases of the project, from data supply to commissioning and validation. The Angra 1 full scope simulator encompasses more than 80 systems of the plant including the Primary system, reactor core and associated auxiliary systems, the secondary system and turbo generator as well as all the Plant operational and safety I and C. The Angra 1 Main Control Room panels were reproduced in the simulator control room as well as the remote shutdown panels that are outside the control room. This paper describes the project for development of the Angra 1 NPP Full Scope Simulator, supplied by Tecnatom S.A., in the period of Feb.2012 to Feb.2015. (author)

  4. Angra 1 nuclear power plant full scope simulator development project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvatici, Edmundo; Castanheira, Luiz Carlos C.; Silva Junior, Nilo Garcia da

    2015-01-01

    Specific Full Scope Simulators are an essential tool for training NPP control room operators, in the formation phase as well as for maintaining their qualifications. In the last years availability of a Plant specific simulator has also become a Regulator requirement for Nuclear Power Plant operation. By providing real-time practical training for the operators, the use of a simulator allows improving the operator's performance, reducing the number of unplanned shutdowns and more effective response to abnormal and emergency operating conditions. It can also be used, among other uses, to validate procedures, test proposed plant modifications, perform engineering studies and to provide operation training for the technical support staff of the plant. The NPP site, in Angra dos Reis-RJ, Brazil, comprises the two units in operation, Unit 1, 640 MWe, Westinghouse PWR and Unit 2, 1350 MWe, KWU/Areva PWR and one unit in construction, Unit 3, 1405 MWe, KWU/Areva PWR, of the same design of Angra 2. Angra 2 has had its full scope simulator from the beginning, however this was not the case of Angra 1, that had to train its operators abroad, due to lack of a specific simulator. Eletronuclear participated in all the phases of the project, from data supply to commissioning and validation. The Angra 1 full scope simulator encompasses more than 80 systems of the plant including the Primary system, reactor core and associated auxiliary systems, the secondary system and turbo generator as well as all the Plant operational and safety I and C. The Angra 1 Main Control Room panels were reproduced in the simulator control room as well as the remote shutdown panels that are outside the control room. This paper describes the project for development of the Angra 1 NPP Full Scope Simulator, supplied by Tecnatom S.A., in the period of Feb.2012 to Feb.2015. (author)

  5. Bulk material management mode of general contractors in nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jinyong; Zhao Xiaobo

    2011-01-01

    The paper introduces the characteristics of bulk material management mode in construction project, and the advantages and disadvantages of bulk material management mode of general contractors in nuclear power project. In combination with the bulk material management mode of China Nuclear Power Engineering Co., Ltd, some improvement measures have been put forward as well. (authors)

  6. The appliction of project management in operations preparation of nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zhengrong; Zhang Zhixiong

    2001-01-01

    Concept, history, characteristics of the project management is introduced. Analysis is performed on the suitability of application of project management approach in nuclear power station operations preparation. Then the application of project management is detailed in order to present the readers our study and practice. Theory and practice indicate that the project management is a useful management tool for operations preparation of nuclear power station to achieve a good performance

  7. The application of project management in operations preparation of nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhixiong; Tang Zhengrong

    2000-01-01

    The author first presents a brief introduction of the concept, history, characteristics of project management. Analysis is performed on the suitability of application of project management approach in nuclear power station operations preparation. Then the application of project management is detailed in order to present the readers authors' study and practice. Theory and practice indicate that the project management is a useful management tool for operations preparation of nuclear power station to achieve a good performance

  8. General consideration of domestic participation in nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    1975-01-01

    No nuclear power plant can be supplied entirely by outside sources. Some degree of domestic participation is always required and this can be increased if desired. There is no general rule as to what can and should be supplied locally; different countries have different characteristics, conditions and possibilities, and these define the scope of what is to be done. (orig./FW) [de

  9. Know Nukes: A Nuclear Power Issues Curriculum Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Charlie; McCandless, Marjorie

    Classroom activities are presented to help teachers introduce general controversial issues and specific issues on nuclear power in their high school science, social studies, and English classes. Objectives are to help students understand the various techniques of persuasion; the relationship between bias, persuasion, and fact; how these techniques…

  10. Joint Arab project for building of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosbah, D.S.

    2010-01-01

    Recently many Arab countries have expressed their interest in adopting nuclear power for electricity generation and seawater desalination in their energy strategies and hence sought assistance from IAEA and Arab Atomic Energy Agency. The Council of the League of Arab States at the summit level encouraged member states to develop peaceful use of atomic energy in different aspects of development, especially in energy generation and to establish a cooperative Arab program in this field. The burden of infrastructure can be reduced significantly if an Arab country forms a sharing partnership with other Arab countries. The sharing can be between two or more Arab states. It can include physical facilities, common programmes and knowledge, which will reflect in economic benefits. The sharing can also contribute in a significant manner to harmonization of codes and standards in general and regulatory framework in particular. This article outlines the major direct benefits of joint nuclear Arab programme to build a Nuclear Power Plants. (author)

  11. Regional projections of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolen, G.R.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

    1983-12-01

    The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 1995. A complete data set is supplied which specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results. When the comparison is based on reference cost parameters, nuclear- and coal-fired generation costs are found to be very close in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is favored in the South Atlantic region where coal must be transported over long distances, while coal-fired generation is favored in the Central and North Central regions where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. The reference data set reflects recent electric utility construction experience. Significantly lower nuclear capital investment costs would result if regulatory reform and improved construction practices were instituted. The electric power generation costs for base load oil- and natural gas-fired plants were also estimated. These plants were found to be noncompetitive in all regions for those scenarios most likely to develop. Generation cost sensitivity to changes in various parameters was examined at a reference location. The sensitivity parameters included capital investment costs, lead times, capacity factors, costs of money, and coal and uranium prices. In addition to the levelized lifetime costs, year-by-year cash flows and revenue requirements are presented. The report concludes with an analysis of the economic merits of recycling spent fuel in light-water reactors

  12. Educational project for the nuclear power and nuclear waste public acceptance fostering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, M.; Diaconu, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Until now, public acceptance of nuclear power in Romania can be assessed as good. The main motivations could be: the primacy effect of the information, the poverty, the absence of the interest, the relative low informing level. However we expect important changes in the near future: more active NGOs with anti-nuclear opinion, the public's awareness will be more important, serious opposition against the continuation of the nuclear development may appear followed by a reformulation of the Romanian ecologists ideas. The problem of radioactive nuclear wastes (RNW) is the most sensitive and, related to the public opinion, we expect it will become crucial in 10-15 years. The main assumption of our project is that children who are now in schools will be tomorrow's decision makers on 'nuclear energy and RNW. Thus, we intend to prepare the young generation for the future participation in the decision making process related to RNW. The paper shows the main ideas (initial conditions obtained by actual knowledge level measurements, constraints, methods, information contents, evaluation methods and produced outputs) of the educational proposed programme. The work is part of the Romanian contribution to COWAM FP6 project. (authors)

  13. Identifying Issues in Applying Integrated Project Delivery to Domestic Nuclear Power Plant Construction Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Joo [Korean Nuclear Society, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) is defined as that people, systems, business structures, and practices of key stakeholders are incorporated into a single-team, with a single process, which executes a project in a way of optimizing the project's outcome, increasing values delivered to the end user, reducing waste, and maximizing efficiency throughout the phases of engineering to construction. The researcher had carried out literature review in terms of IPD to identify major characteristics of IPD which are presented in the following section and had compared such characteristics against peculiarities of nuclear power plant (NPP) construction projects in order to shed light on obstacles in possible application of IPD method to domestic NPP construction projects in the coming days. In this research, three (3) major characteristics of IPD were identified: 1) key stakeholders signing one balanced contract, forming de facto one body, sharing risk and reward 2) an integrated project team being formed in the early stage of a project and providing input to minimize time and cost loss from rework downstream 3) team members co-locating, having open and direct communication, making decisions on time, and pursuing the success of the project itself.

  14. Brief introduction to project management of full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jie

    1996-01-01

    The key points in development and engineering project management of full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit are briefly introduced. The Gantt chart, some project management methods and experience are presented. The key points analysis along with the project procedure will be useful to the similar project

  15. SRT project: tele-robotics maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Santamaria, J.; Calleja, J.M.; Carmena, P.; Avello, A.; Rubio, Y.A.

    2001-01-01

    The main aim of the SRT project was to develop a family of robots to help in the operation of nuclear power plants. Four robotic systems were developed and this paper focuses on three of them: ANAES -a steam leak detector through noise analysis-, MALIBA -a master-slave tele-operation system with force feedback- and ROBICEN -a compact pneumatic wall climbing robot-. ANAES (the Spanish acronym of spectrum analysis) consists of a set of sensor heads attached to a computer. Each head has two microphones and a video camera installed on it, and a DC motor that rotates the head. The heads are shielded with lead and boron steel, especially near the video camera. The noise generated by the plant is recorded every day at the same time and the software compares the recorded noise with the mean values of past records. The system can discern whether the noise has remarkably changed and, through phase analysis of the sound recorded by both microphones, identifies the direction of arrival (DOA) of the new noise, probably a steam leak. Using several heads, the new noise source can be identified. The video camera can be used to ease the location of the steam leaks. The stationariness of the measured noise has been tested in C.N. Cofrentes -a Spanish BWR-6 reactor-. A finished system with six heads has recently been installed in the MSR (moisture separator reheater) of the same plant. MALIBA is a master-slave tele-operated system with force feedback. It consists of two robots: a Stewart platform used as master robot and an open chain robot used as slave. The slave robot follows faithfully the movements of the master, and the master robot can reflect a force proportional to the force exerted by the slave on the environment. Three tools have been developed for the slave robot: a robot hand that includes a small video camera, a pneumatic drill and a rectifier. The results obtained have shown its effectiveness for the designed operations. ROBICEN is a lightweight pneumatic robot

  16. SRT project: tele-robotics maintenance of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Santamaria, J. [Iberdrola SA, Madrid (Spain); Calleja, J.M.; Carmena, P. [Endesa, Madrid (Spain); Avello, A.; Rubio, Y.A. [CEIT-Centro de Estudias e Investigaciones Tecnicas de Guipuzcoa, San Sebastian (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    The main aim of the SRT project was to develop a family of robots to help in the operation of nuclear power plants. Four robotic systems were developed and this paper focuses on three of them: ANAES -a steam leak detector through noise analysis-, MALIBA -a master-slave tele-operation system with force feedback- and ROBICEN -a compact pneumatic wall climbing robot-. ANAES (the Spanish acronym of spectrum analysis) consists of a set of sensor heads attached to a computer. Each head has two microphones and a video camera installed on it, and a DC motor that rotates the head. The heads are shielded with lead and boron steel, especially near the video camera. The noise generated by the plant is recorded every day at the same time and the software compares the recorded noise with the mean values of past records. The system can discern whether the noise has remarkably changed and, through phase analysis of the sound recorded by both microphones, identifies the direction of arrival (DOA) of the new noise, probably a steam leak. Using several heads, the new noise source can be identified. The video camera can be used to ease the location of the steam leaks. The stationariness of the measured noise has been tested in C.N. Cofrentes -a Spanish BWR-6 reactor-. A finished system with six heads has recently been installed in the MSR (moisture separator reheater) of the same plant. MALIBA is a master-slave tele-operated system with force feedback. It consists of two robots: a Stewart platform used as master robot and an open chain robot used as slave. The slave robot follows faithfully the movements of the master, and the master robot can reflect a force proportional to the force exerted by the slave on the environment. Three tools have been developed for the slave robot: a robot hand that includes a small video camera, a pneumatic drill and a rectifier. The results obtained have shown its effectiveness for the designed operations. ROBICEN is a lightweight pneumatic robot

  17. Quality management in an international nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brion, J.; Crustin, J.

    1975-01-01

    SNR (Schneller Natriumgekuehlter Reaktor) is the fast reactor power plant being erected at Kalkar, Federal German Republic. Quality management in this project is a contractual obligation. Quality management is subdivided into quality engineering, set of actions performed before manufacturing, and quality control, set of material controls performed during fabrication. The two successive phases of the quality management are presented. The difficulties and improvment possibilities are discussed [fr

  18. Methodology for projecting the limits of nuclear power growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, J.M.; Omberg, R.P.

    1981-06-01

    A scenario using only the most conservative, and yet reasonable, assumptions on GNP growth is constructed, and from this, electrical growth is inferred. Implicit in this technique is the assumption that most new energy demand will arise from the industrial sector. Thus, in the commercial and residential sectors, increasing demand by consumers is offset by new conservation techniques for little net change in energy demand. Consequently, this approach emphasizes the need for conservation as well as the need for new generating capability. The emphasis on coal and nuclear power is described

  19. Project of mechanical components for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, J.A.R. do; Farias Brito David, D. de

    1984-01-01

    The equipment foreseen to be part of a nuclear power plant must show high quality and safety due to the presence of radioactivity. Besides the perfect functioning during the rigid operating conditions, some postulated loadings are foreseen, like earthquake and loss of coolant accidents, which must be also considered in the design of the components. The design and calculation's concept and development, the interactions with the piping and civil designs, as well as their influences in the licensing process with the authorities are described. (Author) [pt

  20. Nuclear Power Plant project site selection geotechnical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katti, V.J.; Banerjee, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    During the selection of a site for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) and Radioactive Waste Plant (RWP), geotechnical investigations play a significant role in deciding merits and demerits of the sites. Any accidents in these units can play havoc on mankind and may leave bitter imprints on generations to come. Hence proper care has to be taken at the early stage for selecting the sites. Site selection procedure is a complicated one, because it involves experts from various disciplines like geology, geophysics, civil, mechanical electrical engineering, health-physics and other fields

  1. The Heysham 2 and Torness nuclear power station projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    At the beginning of the design of the Heysham 2 and Torness Nuclear Power Stations in the UK, it was agreed that the Hinkley Point B/Hunterston B Advanced Gas Cooled reactor design would be repeated. However, the Hinkley Point B/Hunterston B designs dated from 1964, and inevitably safety requirements had escalated in the intervening years. Furthermore, operating experience gained from Hinkley Point B/Hunterston B showed that it was desirable to make changes to particular features. Design changes were therefore included where it was considered essential to improve performance, to improve safety and to improve engineering. The resulting station designs are described. (author)

  2. National project : advanced robot for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunemi, T.; Takehara, K.; Hayashi, T.; Okano, H.; Sugiyama, S.

    1993-01-01

    The national project 'Advanced Robot' has been promoted by the Agency of Industrial science and Technology, MITI for eight years since 1983. The robot for a nuclear plant is one of the projects, and is a prototype intelligent one that also has a three dimensional vision system to generate an environmental model, a quadrupedal walking mechanism to work on stairs and four fingered manipulators to disassemble a valve with a hand tool. Many basic technologies such as an actuator, a tactile sensor, autonomous control and so on progress to high level. The prototype robot succeeded functionally in official demonstration in 1990. More refining such as downsizing and higher intelligence is necessary to realize a commercial robot, while basic technologies are useful to improve conventional robots and systems. This paper presents application studies on the advanced robot technologies. (author)

  3. Completion of Belene Nuclear Power Plant: Project perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, D.

    2006-01-01

    The development of Belene NPP began with site selection in the 1970s, site characterisation in 1980-1981, and a decision to proceed in 1981. Construction was suspended for financial reasons in 1991. Now the state authorities have taken steps to continue the project. Despite the lengthy study period and the subsequent legislative changes, the evaluations indicate that Belene is a suitable NPP site. Studies of the Belene site have been completed and the conclusion is that the site is suitable and eligible for licensing for the construction of a NPP. In order to estimate the different options for completion of the project, different aspects of the plant were estimated. The information for different reactors was analysed, and quantitative assessment was performed by ranking the proposed facilities in different aspects of rated power, technology, safety, operation, licenseability (compliance to local regulations), etc. (author)

  4. Completion of Belene Nuclear Power Plant: Project perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanov, D. [Risk Engineering Ltd., CREFID, 34 Totleben Blvd., Sofia 1606 (Bulgaria)]. E-mail: bogdanov@riskeng.bg

    2006-07-01

    The development of Belene NPP began with site selection in the 1970s, site characterisation in 1980-1981, and a decision to proceed in 1981. Construction was suspended for financial reasons in 1991. Now the state authorities have taken steps to continue the project. Despite the lengthy study period and the subsequent legislative changes, the evaluations indicate that Belene is a suitable NPP site. Studies of the Belene site have been completed and the conclusion is that the site is suitable and eligible for licensing for the construction of a NPP. In order to estimate the different options for completion of the project, different aspects of the plant were estimated. The information for different reactors was analysed, and quantitative assessment was performed by ranking the proposed facilities in different aspects of rated power, technology, safety, operation, licenseability (compliance to local regulations), etc. (author)

  5. Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas-Hamilton, J.; Home Robertson, J.; Beith, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this debate the Government's policy on nuclear power is discussed. Government policy is that nuclear power is the safest and cleanest way of generating electricity and is cheap. Other political parties who do not endorse a nuclear energy policy are considered not to be acting in the people's best interests. The debate ranged over the risks from nuclear power, the UK safety record, safety regulations, and the environmental effects of nuclear power. The Torness nuclear power plant was mentioned specifically. The energy policy of the opposition parties is strongly criticised. The debate lasted just over an hour and is reported verbatim. (UK)

  6. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2005-01-01

    This chapter discussed the following topics related to the nuclear power: nuclear reactions, nuclear reactors and its components - reactor fuel, fuel assembly, moderator, control system, coolants. The topics titled nuclear fuel cycle following subtopics are covered: , mining and milling, tailings, enrichment, fuel fabrication, reactor operations, radioactive waste and fuel reprocessing. Special topic on types of nuclear reactor highlighted the reactors for research, training, production, material testing and quite detail on reactors for electricity generation. Other related topics are also discussed: sustainability of nuclear power, renewable nuclear fuel, human capital, environmental friendly, emission free, impacts on global warming and air pollution, conservation and preservation, and future prospect of nuclear power

  7. Prioritizing the countries for BOT nuclear power project using Analytic Hierarchy Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Woo; Roh, Myung Sub

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes factors influencing the success of BOT nuclear power projects and their weighting method using Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) to find the optimal country which developer intends to develop. To summarize, this analytic method enable the developer to select and focus on the country which has preferable circumstance so that it enhances the efficiency of the project promotion by minimizing the opportunity cost. Also, it enables the developer to quantify the qualitative factors so that it diversifies the project success strategy and policy for the targeted country. Although the performance of this study is insufficient due to the limitation of time, small sampling and security of materials, it still has the possibility to improve the analytic model more systematically through further study with more data. Developing Build-Own(or Operate)-Transfer (BOT) nuclear power project carrying large capital in the long term requires initially well-made multi-decision which it prevents sorts of risks from unexpected situation of targeted countries. Moreover, the nuclear power project in most case is practically implemented by Government to Government cooperation, so the key concern for such nuclear power project would be naturally focused on the country situation rather than project viability at planning stage. In this regard, it requires the evaluation of targeted countries before involving the project, comprehensive and proper decision making for complex judgment factors, and efficient integration of expert's opinions, etc. Therefore, prioritizing and evaluating the feasibility of country for identification of optimal project region is very meaningful study

  8. Current situation of the project of 3. and 4. block of nuclear power plant Mochovce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchy, L.

    2006-01-01

    The contribution shows the basic information about the crucial milestone of 3. building and the current situation of the project of 3. and 4. block of the nuclear power plant Mochovce. Contribution also shows what activities were realized and what material in area of designation of the technical and safety standard of the project was elaborated in the past, the main activities planned for 2006 have been described, support for Feasibility Study elaborated by ENEL and description of the integrated management system. The basic thesis crucial for the next steps on the project of 3. and 4. block of Nuclear Power Plant Mochovce is presented in the conclusion

  9. Management information system for cost-schedule integration control for nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Wang Yongqing; Tian Li

    2001-01-01

    Based on the project management experience abroad and at home, a cost-schedule integration control model was developed to improve nuclear power project management. The model integrates cost data with the scheduling data by unity coding to efficiently implement cost-schedule integration control on line. The software system architecture and database is designed and implemented. The system functions include estimating and forecasting dynamically cash flow, scheduling and evaluating deviation from the cost-schedule plan, etc. The research and development of the system should improve the architecture of computer integrated management information systems for nuclear power projects in China

  10. Projecting labor demand and worker immigration at nuclear power plant construction sites: an evaluation of methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, H.W. Jr; Schlottmann, A.M.; Schriver, W.R.

    1981-12-01

    The study evaluates methodology employed for the projection of labor demand at, and worker migration to, nuclear power plant construction sites. In addition, suggestions are offered as to how this projection methodology might be improved. The study focuses on projection methodologies which forecast either construction worker migration or labor requirements of alternative types of construction activity. Suggested methodological improvements relate both to institutional factors within the nuclear power plant construction industry, and to a better use of craft-specific data on construction worker demand/supply. In addition, the timeliness and availability of the regional occupational data required to support, or implement these suggestions are examined

  11. Nuclear power in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Association believes that the CANDU nuclear power generation system can play a major role in achieving energy self-sufficiency in Canada. The benefits of nuclear power, factors affecting projections of electric power demand, risks and benefits relative to other conventional and non-conventional energy sources, power economics, and uranium supply are discussed from a Canadian perspective. (LL)

  12. A combined hydro-nuclear-solar project for electric power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiftah, S.

    1985-01-01

    Some of the main, general-perspective themes of Dr. Alvin Weinberg's leadership and long and varied work are: the effect of present and future nuclear energy projects on society, not only in the United States but throughout the world; analysis, comparison, and combination of various sources of energy; extensive multiple use of nuclear energy complexes (so-called NUPLEX, for nuclear complex) for various areas of the world; and use of ''Big Technology'' and ''Big Science'' for solving, or helping to solve, political problems. A combined hydro-nuclear-solar project for electric power production is discussed, as well as two other energy-related engineering projects. Some of the projects originated or were inspired by work done at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the leadership of Dr. Alvin Weinberg. Also reported are the technical characteristics and interrelationships of the three components of the envisaged hydronuclear-solar project

  13. The Sydvaerme project: District heating from the Barsebeck nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josefsson, L.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents a summary report of a study on district heating from Barsebeck Nuclear Power Plant in Sweden, prepared cooperatively by the cities of Malmoe, Lund, Helsingborg, Landskrona and the electric power company Sydkraft. A future number 3 generating set at the Barsebeck nuclear power station could be designed for combined production of heat and electric power. The generating set could be completed after 1983, and could then supply about 65% of total district heating requirements. The first stage of the investigation includes a proposal for a technically feasible solution, sufficiently detailed to permit both technical and economic evaluation of the project. (author)

  14. Nuclear power programmes and medium term projections in the OECD area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miida, J.; Haeussermann, W.; Mankin, S.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes nuclear power growth forecasts up to 1985 on an individual country basis for the OECD area, based on present nuclear programmes. For the period between 1985 and the year 2000, no individual countries' estimates are given. The projections for this period are subdivided into three main areas: OECD Europe, North America and OECD Pacific Region. These projections are derived from the presently prevailing estimates concerning total energy growth, the increasing share of electricity requirements in total energy requirements and the growth of the nuclear share in electrical installed capacity. The basic assumptions are discussed and the combination of various possibilities results in upper and lower growth limits, which should include the most likely development. An attempt is also made to describe probable scenarios of nuclear reactor strategies, taking into account developments under way in the OECD area. Finally, the factors liable to influence nuclear power growth in a positive or negative way are briefly analysed

  15. Strategically oriented project management of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemmeter, Sascha; Woempener, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Due to the politically induced change of the energy sector in Germany, the operators of nuclear power plants had to react and to deal with completely new conditions concerning the decommissioning of their plants on short notice. Therefore the operators have to devise new strategies for controlling their decommissioning and dismantling projects in a short amount of time and most often similarly for several plants. Two fundamental procedures are possible for the successful controlling of these dismantling projects: a centralized or a decentralized management organization. How these project control processes can be realized in an optimal way, is, next to other economic specifications of the dismantling of nuclear power plants, the topic of a new research project of the Chair of Management Accounting at the University Duisburg-Essen. In that process, results and experiences from other research and practical projects concerning general large-scale projects are being used. Selected findings have been compiled and are being discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  16. Summary of developments and future projects in nuclear power plant control and instrumentation in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plas, Y. van der

    1990-01-01

    A general view is given on the developments and trends due to instrumentation and control of the two nuclear power plants in the Netherlands around the year 1989. Several projects, under which for classification of systems and components and for emergency operating procedures, are executed in both plants. An OSART mission initiated a project to make possible the periodic test of safety commands during operation. An other large project concerned the replacement of the process presentation system in Nuclear Power Plant Borssele. In the article several other developments due to the application of I and C in existing plants are outlined generally. Since 1974, no new nuclear power plants have been constructed in the Netherlands. (author). 2 figs

  17. Economic-financial analysis of 'Angra 3 Nuclear Power Plant' project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Ronaldo Barata de

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an economic-financial evaluation of 'Angra 3 Nuclear Power Plant' project and estimates the lowest power tariff value at which power potentially made available may be commercialized and yet ensure the project a profitability level agreeable to the interests of economic agents and shareholders. According to the 'project evaluation' practice, Angra 3 power generation was considered separately from ELETRONUCLEAR's operating plants (Angra 1 and Angra 2), thus preventing result distortions bound to occur if the economic-financial variables of the new project were analyzed associated with financial commitments and commercialization conditions resulting from the project implementation process and the generated power commercialization conditions, respectively. For this evaluation different technical and economic scenarios were devised, and the theory of Capital Asset Pricing Model for Own Capital cost and that of Weighted Average Cost of Capital were used in addition to the forecast of the Statement of Results and Free Cash flow of Shareholders throughout the power plant life, which is the estimate basis for the lowest power tariff value and the Internal Return Rate of the project. The evaluation conclusion is that Angra 3 project is technically and economically feasible and competitive as compared to the new large power generation projects planned for power supply in Brazil in the next decade, mainly in the Southeast. (author)

  18. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, Arthur.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter of the final report of the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning in Ontario updates its interim report on nuclear power in Ontario (1978) in the light of the Three Mile Island accident and presents the commission's general conclusions and recommendations relating to nuclear power. The risks of nuclear power, reactor safety with special reference to Three Mile Island and incidents at the Bruce generating station, the environmental effects of uranium mining and milling, waste management, nuclear power economics, uranium supplies, socio-political issues, and the regulation of nuclear power are discussed. Specific recommendations are made concerning the organization and public control of Ontario Hydro, but the commission concluded that nuclear power is acceptable in Ontario as long as satisfactory progress is made in the disposal of uranium mill tailings and spent fuel wastes. (LL)

  19. The Study on quality control of nuclear power installation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jie

    2008-01-01

    The quality planning, quality assurance and quality control are discussed by applying the quality control (QC) theory and combining the real situation of the Qinshan II project. This paper is practical and plays an active role in instruction of project quality control by applying the above QC theory and control techniques. (authors)

  20. Factors Causing Delay of Modification Projects at Koeberg Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ntoyanto, S.

    2017-01-01

    Modification project delays could lead to: disrupting the maintenance shutdown (outage) projects' schedule, affecting electricity capacity of the national grid., possible load-shedding restricting electricity supply to domestic, commercial, and industrial consumers; and detrimental consequences to the country's economic activities. To address proficiency of a project manager by improving: Understanding of the organizational processes, High-level technical knowledge of a nuclear power plant technology

  1. 18-months fuel cycle engineering and its project management of the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Xiangang; Jiao Ping; Liu Yong; Wu Zhiming

    2002-01-01

    The author introduces aspects related to the performing of 18-months fuel cycle engineering evaluation to the Daya Bay nuclear power plant, including the assessment on proposed technical solutions, appointment to the contractors, breaking down and implementation of project, experience on the project management and risk control, and etc. And it also briefs the prompting to the localization of the long fuel cycle engineering technology and AFA 3G fuel manufacturing and design technology via adequate technology transferring of this project

  2. A simulation of 'schedule-cost' progress monitoring system in nuclear power project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Haitao; Huang Zhongping; Zhang Zemin; Wang Zikai

    2010-01-01

    The objective of project management is to find the optimal balance between progress and cost according to the project requirements. Traditional method always manages progress and cost separately. However, domestic and international experience indicated that the interactions between these two factors are crucial in the project implementation. Modern project managers have to manage and maintain a 'Progress - Cost' joint control framework. Such a model is applied into a sub-project of a nuclear power project using Simulink in this paper. It helps to identify and correct the deviations of the project. Earned Value Management is used by the project manager to quantify the cost of the project and progress of implementation. The budget plan value, actual value, earned value are three important parameters to measure cost and progress of the project. The experimental results illustrated that the method gives a more comprehensive performance evaluation of the project. (authors)

  3. Building the feedback system of project experience,and expediting the scientific development of nuclear power construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Hai

    2009-01-01

    In accord with the status of the energy structure and electric power demand in China, the Chinese government has made the strategy of developing nuclear power actively. Confronting the good chance for nuclear power development, the writer takes the Fangjiashan nuclear power project as an example, puts forward a viewpoint that establishing the nuclear power project experience summarization and feedback system is an urgent need for expediting the scientific development of nuclear power. It also demonstrates the necessity, feasibility, and detailed measures, etc. (authors)

  4. Case study: Proposed application of project management techniques for construction of nuclear power plant in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syahirah Abdul Rahman; Phongsakorn Prak Tom; Wan Abd Hadi Wan Abu Bakar; Shaharum Ramli

    2010-01-01

    This study discusses the techniques of project management for the construction of nuclear power plants that can be used in Malaysia. Nuclear power reactors are expected to apply is the categories of Gen III + reactor where it is safer and more modern than the first generation of reactors built in the 1970s. The objective of this study is that the construction of this reactor to be completed by the stipulated time and not exceed the cost estimates. In addition, project management is also able to meet all the specifications and achieve the quality standard. In this study, the techniques used in project management to ensure the success of construction projects of nuclear power plants are a Gantt Chart, CPM/ PERT and Microsoft Project. From the study, found that these techniques can assist in facilitating the management of the project for the construction of nuclear power plants to ensure that the estimated time and cost can be managed more effectively as well as quality of care. (author)

  5. Projections of spent fuel to be discharged by the U.S. nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, C.W.; Kee, C.W.; Croff, A.G.; Blomeke, J.O.

    1977-10-01

    Calculated properties of spent fuel projected to be discharged and accumulated by the U.S. nuclear power industry through the year 2031 A.D. are presented. The projections are based on installed nuclear capacities of 380 and 543 GW(e) in the year 2000 and 2030, respectively. They include compilations of the grams of the elements, curies of radioactivity, thermal decay power, photon and neutron emission rates, and radiotoxicities of the assemblies that are accumulated at a Spent Unreprocessed Fuel Facility (SURFF), allowing for delays of 5 and 10 years before shipment to SURFF

  6. Different regulatory strategies in regulation of nuclear power projects: An Indian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Sohail Ahmad

    2002-01-01

    Regulatory strategy needed for management of safety and safety culture involves careful planning and use of engineering concepts keeping in mind feasibility to implement certain safety requirements. It also requires adequate attention on working environment and mental conditions of designers, operating and maintenance staff and regulators. Different strategies followed during safety review and regulatory inspection of nuclear power projects for improving status of safety management and safety cultures have given certain results. The present paper brings out certain experience gained during regulation of Indian Nuclear Power Projects by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board of India in the area of management of safety and safety culture. (author)

  7. Projections of spent fuel to be discharged by the U. S. nuclear power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, C.W.; Kee, C.W.; Croff, A.G.; Blomeke, J.O.

    1977-10-01

    Calculated properties of spent fuel projected to be discharged and accumulated by the U.S. nuclear power industry through the year 2031 A.D. are presented. The projections are based on installed nuclear capacities of 380 and 543 GW(e) in the year 2000 and 2030, respectively. They include compilations of the grams of the elements, curies of radioactivity, thermal decay power, photon and neutron emission rates, and radiotoxicities of the assemblies that are accumulated at a Spent Unreprocessed Fuel Facility (SURFF), allowing for delays of 5 and 10 years before shipment to SURFF.

  8. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    ''Nuclear Power'' describes how a reactor works and examines the different designs including Magnox, AGR, RBMK and PWR. It charts the growth of nuclear generation in the world and its contributions to world energy resources. (author)

  9. KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Godfroy, Thomas [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, AL (United States); Mcclure, Patrick Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sanchez, Rene Gerardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-20

    This PowerPoint presentation covers the following topics: Reference Kilopower configuration; Reference KRUSTY configuration; KRUSTY design sensitivities; KRUSTY reactivity coefficients; KRUSTY criticality safety and control; KRUSTY core activation/dose; and KRUSTY shielding, room activation/dose.

  10. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, P.

    1990-01-01

    Written from the basis of neutrality, neither for nor against nuclear power this book considers whether there are special features of nuclear power which mean that its development should be either promoted or restrained by the State. The author makes it dear that there are no easy answers to the questions raised by the intervention of nuclear power but calls for openness in the nuclear decision making process. First, the need for energy is considered; most people agree that energy is the power to progress. Then the historicalzed background to the current position of nuclear power is given. Further chapters consider the fuel cycle, environmental impacts including carbon dioxide emission and the greenhouse effect, the costs, safety and risks and waste disposal. No conclusion either for or against nuclear power is made. The various shades of opinion are outlined and the arguments presented so that readers can come to their own conclusions. (UK)

  11. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The committee concludes that the nature of the proliferation problem is such that even stopping nuclear power completely could not stop proliferation completely. Countries can acquire nuclear weapons by means independent of commercial nuclear power. It is reasonable to suppose if a country is strongly motivated to acquire nuclear weapons, it will have them by 2010, or soon thereafter, no matter how nuclear power is managed in the meantime. Unilateral and international diplomatic measures to reduce the motivations that lead to proliferation should be high on the foreign policy agenda of the United States. A mimimum antiproliferation prescription for the management of nuclear power is to try to raise the political barriers against proliferation through misuse of nuclear power by strengthening the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and to seek to raise the technological barriers by placing fuel-cycle operations involving weapons-usable material under international control. Any such measures should be considered tactics to slow the spread of nuclear weapons and thus earn time for the exercise of statesmanship. The committee concludes the following about technical factors that should be considered in formulating nuclear policy: (1) rate of growth of electricity use is a primary factor; (2) growth of conventional nuclear power will be limited by producibility of domestic uranium sources; (3) greater contribution of nuclear power beyond 400 GWe past the year 2000 can only be supported by advanced reactor systems; and (4) several different breeder reactors could serve in principle as candidates for an indefinitely sustainable source of energy

  12. Installation and commissioning of operation nuclear power plant reactor protection system modernization project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weiwei

    2010-01-01

    Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant is the first nuclear power plant in mainland China; it is also the first one which realizes the modernization of analog technology based Reactor Protection System in the operation nuclear power plant of China. The implementation schedule is the shortest one which use same digital technology platform (TELEPERM XS of AREVA NP) to modifying the safety class I and C system in the world, the whole project spent 28 months from equipment contract signed to putting system into operation. It open up a era for operation nuclear power plant using mature digital technology to make safety class I and C system modernization in China. The important practical significance of this successful project is very obvious. This article focus on two important project stage--equipment installation and system commissioning, it is based on a large number of engineering implementation fact, it covers the problems and solutions happened during the installation and commission. The purpose of the article is to share the experience and lessons of safety I and C system modernization for other operation nuclear power plant. (authors)

  13. Seminar on the organization and management of a commercial nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peddicord, K.L.; Alvis, J.M.; Chitkara, K.K.

    1986-01-01

    A main function of student branches of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) is to identify activities that contribute to the professional development and growth of its student members. Over the past several years, the ANS student branch at Texas A and M University has toured the construction site of the South Texas Nuclear Project (STNP), which is jointly owned by the Houston Lighting and Power Company (HL and P), the City of San Antonio, the Central Power and Light Company, and the City of Austin. This year, student branch organizers recognized that another aspect of a commercial nuclear power plant was not being covered either in the academic course work or the plant tours. This facet includes the organization and management required to undertake a major nuclear power project. To fill this gap, HL and P sponsored a one-day seminar that covered the various managerial functions for STNP. The seminar on the Organization and Management at a Commercial Nuclear Power Project was very interesting and beneficial. Other ANS branches and utilities may find this to be a useful model for future activities

  14. Nuclear power of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun Bee-Ho

    2011-01-01

    National nuclear is presented. Nuclear energy safety after Fukushima, international cooperation in nuclear energy is discussed. Nuclear projects with the United Arab Emirates have been developed to build 4 nuclear power plants in the UAE - APR 1400. At the Korea-Bulgaria Industrial Committee Meeting in Sofia (March 2011) Korean side proposed Nuclear Safety Training Program in Korea for Bulgarian government officials and experts transfer of know-how and profound expertise on world-class nuclear technology and nuclear safety

  15. Study and Proposal of the Nuclear Power Plant Technology for the Ninh Thuan 2 Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Chi Thanh; Le Van Hong; Hoang Sy Than; Nguyen Van De; Mai Dinh Trung; Nguyen Nhi Dien; Nguyen Minh Tuan; Pham Van Lam; Phan Ngoc Tuyen; Do Chi Dung; Hoang Minh Giang; Le Dai Dien

    2015-01-01

    The Ninh Thuan 1&2 Nuclear Power Plant Projects were approved on November 25th, 2009. At present, the task of NPP technology selection of these projects is an important and complex task. This report will show the acceptable method to create a set of criterion for selecting technology for Ninh Thuan 2 NPP project. The result of evaluation of three NPP technologies, such as ATMEA1, AP1000 and MPWR+ introduced in the Feasibility Study Reports of this project, will be discussed. In conclusion, the AP1000 technology is the first candidate for the Ninh Thuan 2 NPP Project. (author)

  16. Prevented Mortality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Historical and Projected Nuclear Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharecha, Pushker A.; Hansen, James E.

    2013-01-01

    In the aftermath of the March 2011 accident at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the future contribution of nuclear power to the global energy supply has become somewhat uncertain. Because nuclear power is an abundant, low-carbon source of base-load power, it could make a large contribution to mitigation of global climate change and air pollution. Using historical production data, we calculate that global nuclear power has prevented an average of 1.84 million air pollution-related deaths and 64 gigatonnes of CO2-equivalent (GtCO2-eq) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that would have resulted from fossil fuel burning. On the basis of global projection data that take into account the effects of the Fukushima accident, we find that nuclear power could additionally prevent an average of 420 000-7.04 million deaths and 80-240 GtCO2-eq emissions due to fossil fuels by midcentury, depending on which fuel it replaces. By contrast, we assess that large-scale expansion of unconstrained natural gas use would not mitigate the climate problem and would cause far more deaths than expansion of nuclear power.

  17. The TACIS Nuclear Programme: Assistance in Upgrading Russian Nuclear Power Stations - An Overview of the Individual Projects in the Internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieth, Michel; Schoels, Hubert

    2006-01-01

    The European Union' TACIS1 programme has been established for the New Independent States (NIS), among them in the Russian Federation since 1991. One priority of TACIS funding is Nuclear Safety. The European Commission has made available a total of 944 Million Euros for nuclear safety programmes covering the period 1991-2003. The TACIS nuclear safety programme is devoted to the improvement of the safety of Soviet designed nuclear installations in providing technology and safety culture transfer. JRC is carrying out works in the following areas: On-Site Assistance for TACIS operating Nuclear Power Plants; Design Safety and Dissemination of TACIS results; Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement for VVER; Regulatory Assistance; Industrial Waste Management; Nuclear Safeguards; All TACIS projects, dealing with these areas of activity are now available in so called Project Description Sheets (PDS) or Project Results Sheets (PRS) in the Internet for everybody. JRC has created in the Internet an easy to open and to browse database which contains the result of works in relation to the above mentioned nuclear activities. This presentation gives an on-line overview of the app. 430 projects which have been implemented so far since the outset of the TACIS Nuclear Programme in the Russian Federation, which is representative to the other CIS countries, benefiting from the TACIS. The presentation will mainly consist of an on-line-demonstration of the TACIS Nuclear WEB Page, created by JRC. (authors)

  18. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants: Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1989-05-01

    This is the third volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose-reduction research and health physics technology for nuclear power plants. The information is taken from data base maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory's ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report presents information on 80 new projects, covering a wide area of activities. Projects on steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvement in reactor materials, and inspection techniques, among others, are described in the research section. The section on health physics technology includes some simple and very cost-effective projects to reduce radiation exposures. Collective dose data from the United States and other countries are also presented. In the conclusion, we suggest that although new advanced reactor design technology will eventually reduce radiation exposures at nuclear power plants to levels below serious concern, in the interim an aggressive approach to dose reduction remains necessary. 20 refs.

  19. Environmental awareness - a spinoff success of public awareness outreach around Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jashi, K.B.; Sathish, A.V.; Vijayakumar, B.; Pandaram, P.; Kalirajan, S.

    2014-01-01

    The significance of public awareness (PA) programme at Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KKNPP) was well recognised since the inception stage itself and several PA programme were organised around Kudankulam through different means of communication. In its chequered progress, the Kudankulam project has seen ups and downs from the initial stage and in the year 2011, the site witnessed an impasse due to public interest and concerns on nuclear projects. Subsequently PA programmes were taken up on a war footing with persistent efforts, public fear on nuclear energy and safety concerns were allayed among local public in the villages in and around Kudankulam and also far and wide in Tamil Nadu and Kerala. This paper discusses the various measures initiated to disseminate the right information and educating public on nuclear energy as a clean energy option for environmental safety. In addition, it is a requirement of the country in the face of impending climate change concerns and warming of the earth's surface

  20. CORR Guidelines. Preparing and Conducting Review Missions of Construction Project Readiness for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The construction readiness review (CORR) mission for nuclear power plant projects has been established with the aim of conducting peer reviews of construction projects related to nuclear power plants. Such a mission provides a detailed assessment of readiness for construction, construction progress, readiness for turnover, as well as recommendations for improvement. Organizations in Member States, such as nuclear utilities, owners, regulators and technical support organizations, can benefit from such reviews. A team of international experts with complementing specialities will conduct the CORR mission. The review is based on appropriate IAEA publications, such as IAEA Safety Standards Series Guides and IAEA Nuclear Energy Series publications, as well as on internationally recognized project and construction management guides. Mission findings are summarized in a mission report, which includes a list of recommendations, suggestions and identified good practices. The review is not intended to be a regulatory inspection or an audit against international codes and standards. Rather, it is a peer review aimed at improving implementation processes and procedures through an exchange of technical experiences and practices at the working level. The mission is applicable at any stage of a nuclear power plant construction project, although two specific phases are targeted: (1) start of construction mission (Phase 1 mission) and (2) an in-progress mission (Phase 2 mission). Missions are initiated when official requests are submitted by Member States through the appropriate IAEA channels

  1. Evaluating The Financial Consequences of Different Financing Structure for Nuclear Power Project under Malaysian Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammed Zulfakar Zolkaffly; Faisal Izwan Abdul Rashid; Siti Syarina Mat Sali; Fairuz Suzana Mohd Chachuli; Mohd Azmi Sidid Omar

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In 2010, Malaysia through the Economic Transformation Programme (ETP) has initiated an effort to explore nuclear energy as an option for electricity generation post-2020 in order to meet country's growing energy demand and diversify its energy mix. To date, Malaysia is focusing its efforts on the preparatory activities, pending to make decision to embark on nuclear power project. The development of nuclear power plants is a major undertaking for any country which that requires huge financial implications and commitments. On this note, this paper aims at evaluating the financial consequences of different financing structure for nuclear power project under Malaysian market condition, based on two key financial indicators, namely, Net Present Value (NPV) and Internal Rate of Return (IRR). The computer model FINPLAN developed by the IAEA was used to perform this study. The result shows that different financing structure significantly affect the sensitivity of NPV and IRR, that may be of interest to the investors in exploring viable financing structure for nuclear power project development. (author)

  2. Summary of a reference book on financing arrangements for nuclear power projects in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The IAEA has recently published a reference book entitled Financing Arrangements for Nuclear Power Projects in Developing Countries (Technical Reports Series No. 353). The book reviews comprehensively the main features and problems concerning the financing of such projects in developing countries and presents innovative approaches for power generation financing. It also discusses the special conditions and requirements of nuclear power projects and the complexities of their financing, focusing on the practical issues to be dealt with to achieve successful financing, as well as the constraints encountered by most developing countries. This booklet summarizes the important features of the financing arrangements discussed in the reference book and was prepared with the aim of widely disseminating the results

  3. Schedule and staffing of a nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polliart, A.J.; Csik, B.

    1977-01-01

    Establishment of construction schedule: a) preliminary construction schedule; b) PERT (Program Evaluation Review Techniques) analytical method; c) identify key milestone target dates; d) inter-action by participants and contribution to support revised construction schedule. - Construction schedule control: a) ability to update and modify construction schedule; b) alternate plans to circumvent restraints (problems); c) critical path activity-controls; d) continuous review and report system. - Updating construction site reports to include: 1) progress, 2) accomplishments, 3) potential problems and alternate plans; b) progress reports on related support services; c) total assessment of participating groups on schedule; d) information required by management for decisions. - Typical causes for delays in project schedule. (orig.) [de

  4. Analysis of floor technology scheme in open-top construction of nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shuxia; Lu Qinwu; Han Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Open-top construction is general technology in Ⅲ generation in nuclear power project. Because traditional floor structure and its form board upholding doesn't meet open-top construction, four floor scheme are presented, whose characters, advantages and disadvantages, and its application are summarized. The research results will help to the application of open-top construction. (authors)

  5. Solution and implementation of project ''Simulator of WWER-440 nuclear power plant''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koukal, V.

    1985-01-01

    The time data are given of the development and construction of the simulator of a WWER-440 nuclear power plant unit. The individual tasks are summed up which are related to the project implementation, and cooperating institutions and enterprises are listed. (J.C.)

  6. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2003-01-01

    This chapter discuss on nuclear power and its advantages. The concept of nucleus fission, fusion, electric generation are discussed in this chapter. Nuclear power has big potential to become alternative energy to substitute current conventional energy from coal, oil and gas

  7. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bupp, I.C.

    1991-01-01

    Is a nuclear power renaissance likely to occur in the United States? This paper investigates the many driving forces that will determine the answer to that question. This analysis reveals some frequently overlooked truths about the current state of nuclear technology: An examination of the issues also produces some noteworthy insights concerning government regulations and related technologies. Public opinion will play a major role in the unfolding story of the nuclear power renaissance. Some observers are betting that psychological, sociological, and political considerations will hod sway over public attitudes. Others wager that economic and technical concerns will prevail. The implications for the nuclear power renaissance are striking

  8. Analysis of critical paths for schedule control of nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Liangmin; Ma Limin; Fan Kai

    2005-01-01

    Study on the critical paths for the schedule control of nuclear power projects has been performed for reactor M310, based on the experiences from Daya Bay project and Ling Ao project. The study shows that the critical paths for the nuclear power project are from NI civil work, NI erection, commissioning of single systems directly serving the CFT to the joint-test. For NI civil work, the critical path is the main civil work of the reactor building, pre-stressing, handover of rooms for important areas, and key CW-erection interfaces; there are four critical paths for NI erection; For startup, two stages can be identified: commissioning of 16 single systems directly serving the CFT and joint-test. (authors)

  9. Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

    1987-06-01

    The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive

  10. Development of Export Control Comprehensive Management Model for Nuclear Power Plants and Others Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chansuh; Seo, Hana; Choi, Sundo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation And Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    It is required that there are lots of managements of care and concern if the project contains strategic items such as NPPs. The Korean nuclear industry and its related companies, such as the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP), are promoting greater exports of NPPs. It is likely that Korea will export more this technology to newcomer states in the future. As a result, the ROK has been improving its export control management system for NPPs. In keeping with this national effort, Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation And Control (KINAC) developed comprehensive export control management model for NPPs and other projects, in preparation for this projected growth in the industry. This model also applies to the nuclear export case of the UAE, aims to manage the project from bidding to the end of the contract. The recent Export Licensing of Nuclear Facility Technology was reflected in the Notice on Export and Import of Strategic Items in January 2014. Through this license, the large-scale project legislation framework was established. It can also minimize nonproliferation concerns of the international community through strict management. It is expected that the Korea will be able to enhance transparency and secure the nuclear use, while meeting nonproliferation purpose.

  11. Development of Export Control Comprehensive Management Model for Nuclear Power Plants and Others Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chansuh; Seo, Hana; Choi, Sundo

    2014-01-01

    It is required that there are lots of managements of care and concern if the project contains strategic items such as NPPs. The Korean nuclear industry and its related companies, such as the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP), are promoting greater exports of NPPs. It is likely that Korea will export more this technology to newcomer states in the future. As a result, the ROK has been improving its export control management system for NPPs. In keeping with this national effort, Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation And Control (KINAC) developed comprehensive export control management model for NPPs and other projects, in preparation for this projected growth in the industry. This model also applies to the nuclear export case of the UAE, aims to manage the project from bidding to the end of the contract. The recent Export Licensing of Nuclear Facility Technology was reflected in the Notice on Export and Import of Strategic Items in January 2014. Through this license, the large-scale project legislation framework was established. It can also minimize nonproliferation concerns of the international community through strict management. It is expected that the Korea will be able to enhance transparency and secure the nuclear use, while meeting nonproliferation purpose

  12. Evaluation model based on FAHP for nuclear power project contract performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bohang; Cheng Jing

    2012-01-01

    Fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation is a common tool to analyze comprehensive integration. Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process is an improvement for Analytic Hierarchy Process. Firstly the paper pointed out the concept of FAHP, and then used FAHP to setup an evaluation system model for nuclear power project contract performance. Based on this model, all the evaluation factors were assigned to different weightiness. By weighting the score of each factor, output would be the result which could evaluate the contract performance. On the basis of the research, the paper gave the principle of evaluating contract performance of nuclear power suppliers, which can assure the procurement process. (authors)

  13. Establishing the quality assurance programme for a nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides requirements, recommendations and illustrative examples for establishing the overall quality assurance programme, and its constituent programmes, for a nuclear power plant project. It also provides guidance on the planning and documenting of programme plans and actions that are intended to ensure the achievement of the appropriate quality throughout the design, procurement, manufacture, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of the nuclear power plant. The provisions of this Safety Guide are applicable to all organizations performing activities affecting the quality of items important to safety, such as designing, purchasing, fabricating, manufacturing, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, erecting, installing, testing, commissioning, operating, inspecting, maintaining, repairing, refuelling, modifying and decommissioning

  14. Purposes and related aspects of the nuclear power plant aging Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaud, J.; Reynes, L.; Montardy, A. de

    1989-01-01

    The purposes and some aspects of the nuclear power plant Lifetime project is presented. The work is focused on the study of the aging of the PWR type power plant components. The project consists in two phases. The first one involves: the status reports and the analysis of the lifetime data of the most sensitive units, as well as the applied actions and proposals, the influence of the exploitation modes, the safety and the cost prospectives. The second phase includes: the definition, the contracts, the complementary actions and their achievement, the reasons and the surveyance improvements, the development of the decision supporting means, the summary and the conclusions. The selected units for the project first step and the project of actions, are listed. The first conclusions of the project show that most of the 900 MW PWR reactor components will have about 40 years of service life [fr

  15. Energy, electricity and nuclear power: Developments and projections - 25 years past and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-12-01

    This report is based on the annual IAEA publication, Energy, Electricity and Nuclear Power Estimates for the Period up to 2030, Reference Data Series No. 1 (RDS-1). The IAEA has been publishing RDS-1 since 1981. It reports on the current status and estimates of energy use, electricity generation and nuclear power generation in various regions of the world for the medium to long term. The estimates are prepared in close collaboration and consultation with several international, regional and national organizations dealing with energy related statistics, such as the United Nations Department of Economic Affairs, the International Energy Agency (IEA), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), the World Bank, the World Nuclear Agency (WNA), the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), as well as several international energy experts. The latest issue is the 27th edition, reporting estimates for the next 24 years using 2006 as the base year. During its 26 years of regular publication, several adjustments were made to the definitions and methodology for compiling the energy data, in order to improve the quality of the data. These adjustments were in line with the overall efforts at the international level to harmonize energy statistics. For example, the United Nations Statistical Commission has been making efforts to synchronize its data series under various programmes. For RDS-1, one such adjustment was made in 2005 when the average thermal efficiency method was adopted to convert electricity produced by nuclear power plants from kilowatt-hours to joules. This had a significant impact on the values of total energy use. At this stage, the entire historical data series was also adjusted. This report provides these harmonized data series on energy use, electricity generation and nuclear power generation for the 25 year period (1980-2005). The report also compares the nuclear power projections made in the past with the projections made in

  16. Baltic nuclear projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adlys, Gediminas; Adliene, Diana

    2009-01-01

    The Authors discuss the Baltic energy policy with respect to new nuclear power plants for Lithuania, Belarus and the Kaliningrad region. The construction of a new nuclear power plant in Lithuania would threaten Russian interests in the region. Therefore Lithuania is looking to Russian plans to build a new nuclear power plant in the Kaliningrad region as an attempt to subvert Lithuania's foreign partners and potential investors from participating in the Visaginas NPP project. However, the authors conclude, that the Visaginas NPP project is and must be the preferential project for the EU and NATO member states.

  17. Discussions and projections about the future demand for nuclear power in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Fabio Branco Vaz de, E-mail: fabio@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Nuclear and Engineering Center; Imakuma, Kengo, E-mail: kimakuma@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Information Technology Development Dept.

    2011-07-01

    This paper aims mainly to discuss the current scenarios of power consumption, nuclear power and conventional and uranium resources and, based on that, present projections about the future demand for power generated through atomic fissions in Brazil, showing that there may be differences in estimates of future projections, depending on the indexes considered: global or domestic. The time horizon for the analysis was studied up to the maximum for the national population, for some of the world and Brazil's governmental data in terms of population growth, energy consumption and energy consumption per capita. To introduce the importance of the methodology adopted, data and some problems presented about the current world energy and Brazilian scenarios are discussed. Calculations show that the power consumption projections for Brazil, when using global indexes, are very high. According to our methodology, power consumption in Brazil is nearly 4.5 times below the estimates presented by the global indexes. The conclusion is that applying global indexes and their extension to domestic scenarios lead to errors of orders of magnitudes, due to the specific particularities of each country, and must be avoided if accurate projections about energy and nuclear scenarios must be considered. (author)

  18. Discussions and projections about the future demand for nuclear power in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Fabio Branco Vaz de; Imakuma, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims mainly to discuss the current scenarios of power consumption, nuclear power and conventional and uranium resources and, based on that, present projections about the future demand for power generated through atomic fissions in Brazil, showing that there may be differences in estimates of future projections, depending on the indexes considered: global or domestic. The time horizon for the analysis was studied up to the maximum for the national population, for some of the world and Brazil's governmental data in terms of population growth, energy consumption and energy consumption per capita. To introduce the importance of the methodology adopted, data and some problems presented about the current world energy and Brazilian scenarios are discussed. Calculations show that the power consumption projections for Brazil, when using global indexes, are very high. According to our methodology, power consumption in Brazil is nearly 4.5 times below the estimates presented by the global indexes. The conclusion is that applying global indexes and their extension to domestic scenarios lead to errors of orders of magnitudes, due to the specific particularities of each country, and must be avoided if accurate projections about energy and nuclear scenarios must be considered. (author)

  19. Methods of projecting operations and maintenance costs for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Operations and maintenance cost (OMC) had increased its relative importance to the total generation cost for future nuclear power stations, according to the latest update of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) study on Projected Costs of Generating Electricity (EGC studies). OMC is some 20 to 30% of total generation cost for future nuclear power stations in most NEA member countries. However, nuclear OMC that countries projected in the latest EGC study are spread over a wide range, from 5 to 16 US mills/kWh. In order to understand better the reasons for this wide diversity in nuclear OMC projections, the NEA set up an Expert Group. The focus of this study was on projected OMC that were reported in the past EGC studies, but the Group studied actual OMC experienced from existing units, because knowledge or experience concerning actual OMC certainly influences the choice of assumptions or calculation procedure for estimating OMC for future plants. Cost informations from 14 NEA countries have been analysed on the basis of a standardized framework of detailed components of OMC costs. The rationale for different OMC cost projections reported in previous NEA studies on generation cost is discussed and suggestions are made for future studies on both generation cost and OMC cost. Despite the methodological approach and the reduced extent of differences when excluding exceptional figures, it was not possible fully to clarify the origins and to understand the remaining differences in OMC figures. Several countries which have a long and a good experience of operating nuclear units did not provide sufficient detailed data or did not provide any quantitative data at all. (J.S.). 14 refs., 5 figs., 19 tabs., 4 annexes

  20. International outage coding system for nuclear power plants. Results of a co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-05-01

    The experience obtained in each individual plant constitutes the most relevant source of information for improving its performance. However, experience of the level of the utility, country and worldwide is also extremely valuable, because there are limitations to what can be learned from in-house experience. But learning from the experience of others is admittedly difficult, if the information is not harmonized. Therefore, such systems should be standardized and applicable to all types of reactors satisfying the needs of the broad set of nuclear power plant operators worldwide and allowing experience to be shared internationally. To cope with the considerable amount of information gathered from nuclear power plants worldwide, it is necessary to codify the information facilitating the identification of causes of outages, systems or component failures. Therefore, the IAEA established a sponsored Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the International Outage Coding System to develop a general, internationally applicable system of coding nuclear power plant outages, providing worldwide nuclear utilities with a standardized tool for reporting outage information. This TECDOC summarizes the results of this CRP and provides information for transformation of the historical outage data into the new coding system, taking into consideration the existing systems for coding nuclear power plant events (WANO, IAEA-IRS and IAEA PRIS) but avoiding duplication of efforts to the maximum possible extent

  1. Financing arrangements for nuclear power projects - past and present experience and future expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ispas, G.

    2004-01-01

    The intent of the author of the present paper is to demonstrate, in a practical manner, the role of the past experience and the new approaches of the nuclear projects financing, especially as nuclear generation financing in developing countries involves complex issues that need to be fully understood and dealt with by all the parties involved, namely: high investment costs, generally long construction periods, a high degree of uncertainty with respect to costs and schedule and to public acceptance, particularly because of safety, waste disposal and non-proliferation issues. Moreover, as many associations whose activities consist of ensuring and facilitating at different levels the exchange of knowledge between generations, i.e.: European Nuclear Society (ENS) Young Generation, North American Young Generation in Nuclear (NA-YGN), the goal of the paper is also to outline the importance of the education in nuclear field, i.e. training a young team of specialists to be ready to take over the movement and responsibility in continuing the further development of nuclear program in Romania, mainly with view to the Financing Arrangements for Nuclear Power Projects. The first part of the paper is referring to general financing procedures, while the second part is focusing on a case study related to the: past experience the financing scheme of Cernavoda NPP Unit 1, present or actual experience ongoing financing issues for Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 and potential future shared contribution to the financing of the next Cernavoda NPP units.(author)

  2. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs

  3. Specifications, tests, and installation of wires and cables for the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, F.J.

    1977-01-01

    The process of selecting wires and cables for the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Project is described. The criteria for the fire and environmental tests, the basis for the specifications, and the reasons for the final choice and acceptance are outlined. A short section is dedicated to the installation of cables in raceways with reference to separation and color coding. Also covered are the selection and testing of fire stops and the selection of seismic supports

  4. Dose-projection considerations for emergency conditions at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Poeton, R.W.; Powell, D.C.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to review the problems and issues associated with making environmental radiation-dose projections during emergencies at nuclear power plants. The review is divided into three areas: source-term development, characterization of atmospheric dispersion and selection of appropriate dispersion models, and development of dosimetry calculations for determining thyroid dose and whole-body dose for ground-level and elevated releases. A discussion of uncertainties associated with these areas is also provided

  5. Human errors in test and maintenance of nuclear power plants. Nordic project work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, H.; Liwaang, B.

    1985-08-01

    The present report is a summary of the NKA/LIT-1 project performed for the period 1981-1985. The report summarizes work on human error influence in test and calibration activities in nuclear power plants, reviews problems regarding optimization of the test intervals, organization of test and maintenance activities, and the analysis of human error contribution to the overall risk in test and mainenace tasks. (author)

  6. Dose-projection considerations for emergency conditions at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Poeton, R.W.; Powell, D.C.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to review the problems and issues associated with making environmental radiation-dose projections during emergencies at nuclear power plants. The review is divided into three areas: source-term development, characterization of atmospheric dispersion and selection of appropriate dispersion models, and development of dosimetry calculations for determining thyroid dose and whole-body dose for ground-level and elevated releases. A discussion of uncertainties associated with these areas is also provided.

  7. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Yu, C.K.; Roecklein, A.K.

    1994-05-01

    This is the fifth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology or nuclear power plants. The information is taken from two of several databases maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory's ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The research section of the report covers dose reduction projects that are in the experimental or developmental phase. It includes topics such as steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvements in reactor materials, and inspection techniques. The section on health physics technology discusses dose reduction efforts that are in place or in the process of being implemented at nuclear power plants. A total of 105 new or updated projects are described. All project abstracts from this report are available to nuclear industry professionals with access to a fax machine through the ACEFAX system or a computer with a modem and the proper communications software through the ACE system. Detailed descriptions of how to access all the databases electronically are in the appendices of the report

  8. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Yu, C.K.; Roecklein, A.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-05-01

    This is the fifth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology or nuclear power plants. The information is taken from two of several databases maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory`s ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The research section of the report covers dose reduction projects that are in the experimental or developmental phase. It includes topics such as steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvements in reactor materials, and inspection techniques. The section on health physics technology discusses dose reduction efforts that are in place or in the process of being implemented at nuclear power plants. A total of 105 new or updated projects are described. All project abstracts from this report are available to nuclear industry professionals with access to a fax machine through the ACEFAX system or a computer with a modem and the proper communications software through the ACE system. Detailed descriptions of how to access all the databases electronically are in the appendices of the report.

  9. 3D digital dynamic management of maintenance projects for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baizhong; Luo Yalin; Fang Hao; Ma Li; Zhang Jie; Wang Ruobing; Xie Min

    2005-01-01

    The whole process for the application of digital plant technique in the equipment transport in reactor building and the dynamic management of the spatial arrangement in Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station was introduced in the paper. The establishment of 3D digital Daya Bay plant, and the method and procedure to apply it in the nuclear power plant maintenance project have been discussed. This project utilizes the outer database to preserve the maintenance status of equipments, and avoids the damage or changing of the original 3D final model. Based on the maintenance procedure, the spatial arrangement and schedule for the maintenance of nuclear power station have been simulated and optimized for the whole process. This technique can simulate and optimize the arrangement and spatial arrangement for maintenance in limited space. It has been applied successfully in the reactor vessel head replacement for Unit 2 of Daya Bay NPP to shorten the time for key routes and the total time of this project by 16 hours and 92.5 hours, respectively. (author)

  10. Implementation of the project of equipment reliability in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios O, J. E.; Martinez L, A. G.

    2008-01-01

    A equipment is reliable if it fulfills the function for which was designed and when it is required. To implement a project of reliability in a nuclear power plant this associate to a process of continuous analysis of the operation, of the conditions and faults of the equipment. The analysis of the operation of a system, of the equipment of the same faults and the parts that integrate to equipment take to identify the potential causes of faults. The predictive analysis on components and equipment allow to rectify and to establish guides to optimize the maintenance and to guarantee the reliability and function of the same ones. The reliability in the equipment is without place to doubts a wide project that embraces from the more small component of the equipment going by the proof of the parts of reserve, the operation conditions until the operative techniques of analysis. Without place of doubt for a nuclear power plant the taking of decisions based on the reliability of their systems and equipment will be the appropriate for to assure the operation and reliability of the same one. In this work would appear the project of reliability its processes, criteria, indicators action of improvement and the interaction of the different disciplines from the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde like a fundamental point for it put in operation. (Author)

  11. Manpower development for nuclear power programme. China. Project findings and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) project was conceived in April 1985, implementation was started on preliminary authorization by summer 1986, and it was approved and signed in early 1987. The duration was originally planned for three years with a UNDP input of US$ 1,657.500 (including Government cost sharing of US$ 280,000). The project is now essentially completed with a few items still pending, though committed as firmly planned, and the current cost estimate is US$ 1,707.617. The objective of the project was to assist in establishing long-term training programmes in two training centres in the People's Republic of China (Qinshan and Suzhou) and strengthen the training capabilities at these centres. The two centres are intended to provide specialized comprehensive training in basic and applied nuclear power engineering disciplines as well as in construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants to technical personnel assigned to the nuclear power plants in the People's Republic of China

  12. Uranium from German nuclear power projects of the 1940s - a nuclear forensic investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Klaus; Wallenius, Maria; Luetzenkirchen, Klaus; Horta, Joan; Nicholl, Adrian; Rasmussen, Gert; Belle, Pieter van; Varga, Zsolt [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Buda, Razvan; Erdmann, Nicole [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Kratz, Jens-Volker; Trautmann, Norbert [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Fifield, L. Keith; Tims, Stephen G. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Froehlich, Michaela B. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Universitaet Wien, Fakultaet fuer Chemie, Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Vienna (Austria); Steier, Peter [Universitaet Wien, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Isotopenforschung und Kernphysik, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-11-02

    Here we present a nuclear forensic study of uranium from German nuclear projects which used different geometries of metallic uranium fuel. Through measurement of the {sup 230}Th/{sup 234}U ratio, we could determine that the material had been produced in the period from 1940 to 1943. To determine the geographical origin of the uranium, the rare-earth-element content and the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio were measured. The results provide evidence that the uranium was mined in the Czech Republic. Trace amounts of {sup 236}U and {sup 239}Pu were detected at the level of their natural abundance, which indicates that the uranium fuel was not exposed to any major neutron fluence. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Uranium from German nuclear power projects of the 1940s - a nuclear forensic investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, Klaus; Wallenius, Maria; Luetzenkirchen, Klaus; Horta, Joan; Nicholl, Adrian; Rasmussen, Gert; Belle, Pieter van; Varga, Zsolt; Buda, Razvan; Erdmann, Nicole; Kratz, Jens-Volker; Trautmann, Norbert; Fifield, L. Keith; Tims, Stephen G.; Froehlich, Michaela B.; Steier, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a nuclear forensic study of uranium from German nuclear projects which used different geometries of metallic uranium fuel. Through measurement of the 230 Th/ 234 U ratio, we could determine that the material had been produced in the period from 1940 to 1943. To determine the geographical origin of the uranium, the rare-earth-element content and the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio were measured. The results provide evidence that the uranium was mined in the Czech Republic. Trace amounts of 236 U and 239 Pu were detected at the level of their natural abundance, which indicates that the uranium fuel was not exposed to any major neutron fluence. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. The research and development of module 3D designing system for nuclear power project based on the PDMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qinwu; Li Yi; Wu Xiangyong

    2012-01-01

    In order to meet the demand of implementing Modularization design in CPR1000 nuclear power projects, this study aims to develop, relying on CPR1000 nuclear power project, the self-reliant module 3D design system based on the PDMS. so as to offer a convenient and effective module 3D design tool for the designers. Satisfactory results have been achieved through the test and application of two design projects. The research and application have entered the domestic advanced level. (authors)

  15. Considerations on safety against seismic excitations in the project of reactor auxiliary building and control building in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, S.H.C.; Castro Monteiro, I. de

    1986-01-01

    The seismic requests to be considered in the project of main buildings of a nuclear power plant are discussed. The models for global seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures, as well as models for global strength distribution are presented. The models for analysing reactor auxiliary building and control building, which together with the reactor building and turbine building form the main energy generation complex in a nuclear power plant, are described. (M.C.K.) [pt

  16. Controlling engineering project changes for multi-unit, multi-site standardized nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, E.; Boddeker, G.; McGugin, H.; Strother, E.; Waggoner, G.

    1978-01-01

    Multibillioin dollar multiple nuclear power plant projects have numerous potential sources of engineering changes. The majority of these are internally generated changes, client generated changes, and changes from construction, procurement, other engineering organizations, and regulatory organizations. For multiunit, multisite projects, the use of a standardized design is cost effective. Engineering changes can then be controlled for a single standardized design, and the unit or site unique changes can be treated as deviations. Once an effective change procedure is established for change control of the standardized design, the same procedures can be used for control of unit or site unique changes

  17. Projections of US GHG reductions from nuclear power new capacity based on historic levels of investment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besmann, Theodore M.

    2010-01-01

    Historical rates of capital investment in nuclear plant construction were used as a guide to estimate the potential rate of future capacity introduction. The total linear rate of capital expenditure over the entire period of historical construction from 1964 to 1990 was determined to equal $11.5 billion/yr, and that for the period of peak construction from 1973 to 1985 was computed as $17.9 billion/yr, all in 2004$. These values were used with a variety of current capital cost estimates for nuclear construction to obtain several scenarios for possible future nuclear capacity additions. These values were used to obtain the effect of projected nuclear generating capacity on GHG emissions assuming nuclear would directly replace coal-fired generation. It was concluded that actual reductions in emissions would not be experienced until 2038, yet growth in emissions from electrical production would be slowed through that period. Due to the significant time to introduce large-scale changes in the utility sector, nuclear energy cannot have a dramatic short-term effect on emissions. Nuclear power, however, can have a major positive longer term impact, particularly under more favorable cost and investment conditions.

  18. Rehabilitation and modernization project of units 1 and 2 of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant. A strengthening project to 120%. (2nd phase)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebana, B.; Merino, A.; Garcia, J. L.; Gomez, M.; Martinez, I.; Ruiz, L.

    2010-01-01

    The power increase of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant is a project for the rehabilitation and modernization of the turbo and associated equipment to get an increase of its power and of its service life. The project scope includes the design, the engineering, the equipment supply, the installation, the testing and the commissioning. This article presents the work of the second phase.

  19. Decommissioning of nuclear power stations in community countries carried out and projected

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cregut, A.; Gregory, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    The decommissioning of large plants such as nuclear power stations merits an approach requiring the introduction of measures and procedures allowing them to be dealt with efficiently; this efficiency would imply concern for optimum economy of operations while respecting the safety and protection rules inherent in nuclear energy. Consequently, plant owners require: the tactical and policy elements to guide them in their decisions and choices; efficient tools, equipment and processes which meet their needs; information gained from experience of decommissioning already carried out which would provide them with a verified background knowledge when dealing with problems. Since decommissioning experience to date has not made it possible to draw up codes and guidelines, it is important to review the work carried out by Community countries in particular on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants. The following paper does not claim to be exhaustive or to make value judgements. Its aim is to list the nuclear power stations shut down in Community countries, to outline the decommissioning levels selected in each case and to underline some interesting aspects of the technical options. In conclusion it will review what appeared to be the difficulties common to the various projects. (author)

  20. International Remote Monitoring Project Embalse Nuclear Power Station, Argentina Embalse Remote Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Sigfried L.; Glidewell, Donnie D.; Bonino, Anibal; Bosler, Gene; Mercer, David; Maxey, Curt; Vones, Jaromir; Martelle, Guy; Busse, James; Kadner, Steve; White, Mike; Rovere, Luis

    1999-01-01

    The Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear of Argentina (ARN), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), ABACC, the US Department of Energy, and the US Support Program POTAS, cooperated in the development of a Remote Monitoring System for nuclear nonproliferation efforts. This system was installed at the Embalse Nuclear Power Station last year to evaluate the feasibility of using radiation sensors in monitoring the transfer of spent fuel from the spent fuel pond to dry storage. The key element in this process is to maintain continuity of knowledge throughout the entire transfer process. This project evaluated the fundamental design and implementation of the Remote Monitoring System in its application to regional and international safeguard efficiency. New technology has been developed to enhance the design of the system to include storage capability on board sensor platforms. This evaluation has led to design enhancements that will assure that no data loss will occur during loss of RF transmission of the sensors

  1. Pre operational background radiation monitoring around Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project site - a decade long experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, B.; George, Thomas; Sundara Rajan, P.; Selvi, B.S.; Balamurugan, M.; Pandit, G.G.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-operational environmental background radiation monitoring around nuclear power plants is very important to understand baseline values existing in the site and also to identify any hot spots of naturally occurring high background radiation areas and their sources. These baseline measurements will act as a benchmark for future comparison after the reactors go into operation. The radiation measurements are continued during the operational phase of the plant and the results are compared to see whether there is any impact of the operation of the plant on the environment. A comprehensive background radiation monitoring plan has been in vogue at site from 2004 to meet this objective. This paper describes the different monitoring strategies adopted around Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project site and throws light on the pre operational background radiation levels in the environment

  2. Quality and Safety Assurance - Priority Task at Nuclear Power Projects Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenkova, B.; Manchev, B.; Tomov, E.

    2010-01-01

    Quality and safety assurance at implementation of nuclear power engineering projects is important and difficult task for realization. Many problems arise during this process, when many companies from different countries participate, with various kinds of activities and services provided. The scope of activities necessary for quality and safety assurance is therefore quite expanded and diverse. In order to increase the safety and reliability of Kozloduy NPP Plc (KNPP) Units 5 and 6, as well as to bring the units in conformity with the newest international requirements for quality and safety in the field of nuclear energy, a program for their modernization on the basis of different technical studies and assessments was implemented. The Units 5 and 6 Modernization Program of Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant was composed of 212 modifications aimed to improve the safety, operability, and reliability of the Units. The Program was realized by stages during yearly planned outages since year 2002 to 2007, without additional outages. A major Program Objective was to extend the Units Life Time in at least 15 Years, under a continuous, safe, and reliable operation. The Modernization Program of Units 5 and 6 of the Bulgarian Nuclear Power Plant in Kozloduy was the first and for the time being the only one in the world, program in the field of nuclear power engineering, by which the full scope of recommendations for improvement of the Kozloduy NPP units was applied. The main goal of the National Electric Company, which is the Employer for the construction of new nuclear facility in Bulgaria, is after completion of all activities regarding construction of Belene NPP the plant to meet or exceed the requirements of the respective national and international quality and safety codes and standards, as well as the IAEA guidelines, as they are established. The objective of this report is to describe different aspects of the quality assurance according to the requirements of quality and

  3. Specific safety aspects of the water-steam cycle important to nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, C.G.

    1986-01-01

    The water-steam cycle in a nuclear power plant is similar to that used in conventional power plants. Some systems and components are required for the safe nuclear power plant operation and therefore are designed according to the safety criteria, rules and regulations applied in nuclear installations. The aim of this report is to present the safety characteristics of the water-steam cycle of a nuclear power plant with pressurized water reactor, as applied for the design of the nuclear power plants Angra 2 and Angra 3. (Author) [pt

  4. Commercial nuclear power 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents historical data on commercial nuclear power in the United States, with projections of domestic nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2020. The report also gives country-specific projections of nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2010 for other countries in the world outside centrally planned economic areas (WOCA). Information is also presented regarding operable reactors and those under construction in countries with centrally planned economies. 39 tabs

  5. RIBA Project - Risk-Informed approach for In-Service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components. Project summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidbury, D.; Smith, G.

    2001-12-01

    The need for a European review of a Risk-Informed Approach for In-Service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components (RIBA) was identified in 1998. This was as a priority item in the programme of activities conducted in the framework of the Council Resolutions of 22 July 1975 and of 18 June 1992 on the Technological Problems of Nuclear Safety. The RIBA Project was established in November 1999 as a 24-month Study Contract funded by the European Commission within the frame of the former DG XI WGCS (Working Group on Codes and Standards). The Study Contract was subsequently managed for the EC by DG TREN. The participants in RIBA were Serco Assurance (project coordinator), Ringhals AB, EDF, Tecnatom SA and Westinghouse Electric Europe. The work is presented in a summary report with the detailed results contained in three companion reports as follows: main conclusions and recommendations, Review of Existing Risk-Informed Methodologies, A Comparative Study of Risk-Informed In-Service Inspection Applications, Conclusions and Recommendations for Risk-Informed in-service inspection methodology applied to Nuclear Power Plants in Europe. (author)

  6. Application of point system in the project control of Ling'ao Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie ahai

    2005-01-01

    Schedule control and cost control are very complicated issues even we set up the detail schedules and engineering measurements requirements for erection of a nuclear power project. In order to solve these problems, a Point System is used in Ling Ao (LA) Nuclear Power Project. This paper introduces the method. The Point System is a measurement system of workload. The measurement unit of any erection works is a Point only. A Point of workload is defined as the equivalent measurement quantities, which could be completed by a relevant skill worker within an hour. A set of procedure manuals for different installations has been set up. The calculation models of equipment installation, piping, cabling are addressed for example in the paper. The application of the Point System in the schedule control is shown in the paper. The following issues are highlighted: to define the duration of a piping activity in the Project Level 2 Schedule, to draught the curves of Point Schedules for different erection fields, to analyze the productive efficiency, to define erection quota of each month for different erection teams, to follow up the erection progress on site. The application of the Point System in the payment of erection contract is outlined. The calculation formula of a monthly payment is given. The advantage of the payment calculation method is discussed, for example, more accurate, very easy and clearly to check the measurement quantities completed on site, to control lump-sum cost. (authors)

  7. Nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, P.

    1985-01-01

    The question 'Do we really need nuclear power' is tackled within the context of Christian beliefs. First, an estimate is made of the energy requirements in the future and whether it can be got in conventional ways. The dangers of all the ways of supplying energy (eg coal mining, oil and gas production) are considered scientifically. Also the cost of each source and its environmental effects are debated. The consequences of developing a new energy source, as well as the consequences of not developing it, are considered. Decisions must also take into account a belief about the ultimate purpose of life, the relation of men to each other and to nature. Each issue is raised and questions for discussion are posed. On the whole the book comes down in favour of nuclear power.

  8. IAEA TC Project 'Strengthening safety and reliability of fuel and materials in nuclear power plants'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makihara, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The Regional TC Project in Europe RER9076 'Strengthening Safety and Reliability of Fuel and Materials in Nuclear Power Plants' was launched in 2003 as a four-year project and was subsequently extended in 2006 to run through 2008. The purpose of the Project is to support the Central and Eastern European countries with the necessary tools to fulfill their own fuel and material licensing needs. The main objective will be to provide quality data on fuel and materials irradiated in power reactors and in dedicated experiments carried out in material test reactors (MTRs). Within the framework of the Project, ten tasks were implemented. These included experiments performed at the test facilities in the region, training courses and workshops related to fuel safety. While several tasks are expected to be completed by the end of RER9076, some remain. It would be desirable to initiate a new RER Project from the next TC cycle (2009-2011) in order to take over RER9076 and to implement new tasks required for enhancing fuel safety in the region. (author)

  9. The quality control for biological-shield heavy concrete construction of nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hongjun; Ma Xinchao

    2012-01-01

    The paper introduces the function and characteristics of biological protective heavy-concrete, and its main application scope and role in Fangjiashan nuclear power project. From the aspects of raw material selection, mixing ratio test, heavy concrete production, the paper discusses the main control points of heavy concrete construction process, points out the basic characteristics of heavy concrete construction, and put forward measures to prevent density non-uniformity during heavy concrete construction and to control slump during transportation. Results prove that reasonable construction process control can assure the engineering quality. (authors)

  10. MOCAT project: innovation applied to the improvement of emergency management in the nuclear power Garona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callejo, J. L.; Caro, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    With the aim of improving the Emergency Management, the Nuclear Power Station of Santa Maria de Garona has undertaken Technical Support Centre (TSC) Modernization Project MOCAT. Developed by Tecnatom, it applies the new Information Technologies to the management of the information available in the TSC and computerizes the procedures associated to the different areas from the TSC. First stage structures the relevant information in two sheets for Operation and Radiation control Areas and mechanizes the Radiological control Area Manager guideline, the Event Management and the emergency Direct Screen. (Author)

  11. Blind test results - measure of incessant progress in personnel monitoring services at Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jashi, K.B.; Ashok Kumar, A.; Pandaram, P.

    2018-01-01

    Personnel Monitoring Services (PMS) at Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) laboratory, Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KKNPP) involve monitoring of about 1500 radiation workers of KKNPP for external radiation exposure on monthly basis. Quality assurance in PMS provides an overall estimate of accuracy which depends not only upon the dosimeter quality and reader performance but also on data interpretation, applicable software and the system. Therefore it measures the effectiveness of quality control mechanism. Blind test is an effective tool to check the performance of the processor without their knowledge during routine processing of the service cards

  12. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants. Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Vulin, D.S.; Liang, H.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-08-01

    This is the fourth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology for nuclear power plants. The information is taken from a data base maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory`s ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report presents information on 118 new or updated projects, covering a wide range of activities. Projects including steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvement in reactor materials, and inspection techniques, among others, are described in the research section of the report. The section on health physics technology includes some simple and very cost-effective projects to reduce radiation exposures. Included in this volume is a detailed description of how to access the BNL data bases which store this information. All project abstracts from this report, as well as many other useful documents, can be accessed, with permission, through our on-line system, ACE. A computer equipped with a modem, or a fax machine is all that is required to connect to ACE. Many features of ACE, including software, hardware, and communications specifics, are explained in this report.

  13. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, T.A.; Vulin, D.S.; Liang, H.; Baum, J.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-08-01

    This is the fourth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology for nuclear power plants. The information is taken from a data base maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory's ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report presents information on 118 new or updated projects, covering a wide range of activities. Projects including steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvement in reactor materials, and inspection techniques, among others, are described in the research section of the report. The section on health physics technology includes some simple and very cost-effective projects to reduce radiation exposures. Included in this volume is a detailed description of how to access the BNL data bases which store this information. All project abstracts from this report, as well as many other useful documents, can be accessed, with permission, through our on-line system, ACE. A computer equipped with a modem, or a fax machine is all that is required to connect to ACE. Many features of ACE, including software, hardware, and communications specifics, are explained in this report.

  14. Nuclear power training courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The training of technical manpower for nuclear power projects in developing countries is now a significant part of the IAEA Technical Assistance Programme. Two basic courses are the cornerstones of the Agency's training programme for nuclear power: a course in planning and implementation, and a course in construction and operation management. These two courses are independent of each other. They are designed to train personnel for two distinct phases of project implementation. The nuclear power project training programme has proven to be successful. A considerable number of highly qualified professionals from developing countries have been given the opportunity to learn through direct contact with experts who have had first-hand experience. It is recognized that the courses are not a substitute for on-the-job training, but their purpose is achieved if they have resulted in the transfer of practical, reliable information and have helped developing countries to prepare themselves for the planning, construction and operation management of nuclear power stations

  15. Comparative assessment of nuclear power and other options: the DECADES project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladu, I. F.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained in constructing and implementing a general framework for performing comprehensive assessment within the inter-agency joint project on Databases and Methodologies for Comparative Assessment of Different Energy Sources for electricity generation. The project was established in 1992 by nine international organizations. A short description of the DECADES project objectives, structure and main components is given. The technology inventory databases, which are a major part of the project, address all the levels of different energy chains, from fuel extraction through electricity generation to waste disposal. These databases support comparative assessment in the power sector, by providing generic information as well as country or region specific information on existing technologies and on those expected to enter the market in the next two to three decades. The paper further touches on the types of assessment that can be carried out using the methodology and databases developed. It point out in this regard the possibilities and limitations of comparative assessments performed at the level of power plant, full electricity supply chain and country or region electricity generation system. Illustrative results are presented for comparisons performed at all these levels. Case studies and workshops and seminars are one of the main activities carried out until now for validation and dissemination of the DECADES Computer Tools. In those studies where it was considered, nuclear power appeared to be cost effective for reducing emissions of CO 2 , SO 2 , NO x and other greenhouse gases. Finally, the paper briefly introduce the activities envisaged for the phase II of the DECADES project which will focus on disseminating the current computer tools, providing training in the use of the tools, and supporting country studies, and on development of new analytical capabilities. The paper concludes with some findings and remarks pointing out the

  16. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects. Status report. Humboldt Bay Power Plant Unit 3, SAFSTOR decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, B.L.; Haffner, D.R.; Miller, R.L.; Scotti, K.S.

    1986-06-01

    This document explains the purpose of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Projects (ENFDP) program and summarizes information concerning the decommissioning of the Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 facility. Preparations to put this facility into a custodial safe storage (SAFSTOR) mode are currently scheduled for completion by June 30, 1986. This report gives the status of activities as of June 1985. A final summary report will be issued after completion of this SAFSTOR decommissioning activity. Information included in this status report has been collected from the facility decommissioning plan, environmental report, and other sources made available by the licensee. This data has been placed in a computerized data base system which permits data manipulation and summarization. A description of the computer reports that can be generated by the decommissioning data system (DDS) for Humboldt Bay and samples of those reports are included in this document

  17. Nuclear Power in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Duk-Sang

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Korea's nuclear power program has been promoted by step-by-step approach; the first stage was 1970's when it depended on the foreign contractors' technology and the second was 1980's when it accumulated lots of technology and experience by jointly implementing the project. Lastly in the third stage in 1990's, Korea successfully achieved the nuclear power technological self-reliance and developed its standard nuclear power plant, so-called Optimized Power Reactor 1000 (OPR 1000). Following the development of OPR 1000, Korea has continued to upgrade the design, known as the Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR 1400) and APR+. Korea is one of the countries which continuously developed the nuclear power plant projects during the last 30 years while the other advanced countries ceased the project, and therefore, significant reduction of project cost and construction schedule were possible which benefits from the repetition of construction project. And now, its nuclear industry infrastructure possesses the strong competitiveness in this field.The electricity produced from the nuclear power is 150,958 MWh in 2008, which covers approximately 36% of the total electricity demand in Korea, while the installed capacity of nuclear power is 17,716 MW which is 24% of the total installed capacity. We are currently operating 20 units of nuclear power plants in Korea, and also are constructing 8 additional units (9,600 MW). Korea's nuclear power plants have displayed their excellent operating performance; the average plant capacity factor was 93.4% in 2008, which are about 15% higher than the world average of 77.8%. Moreover, the number of unplanned trips per unit was only 0.35 in 2008, which is the world top class performance. Also currently we are operating four CANDU nuclear units in Korea which are the same reactor type and capacity as the Cernavoda Units. They have been showing the excellent operating performance, of which capacity in 2008 is 92.8%. All the Korean

  18. The Bruce nuclear project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    This case study assesses the industrial relations impact of the construction of the Bruce Nuclear Power Development. It examines the labour relations system in the Ontario electric power sector and in major building construction. Industrial relations problems and practices at the Bruce project are reviewed. The focus of the study is on the relationship between the project and the rest of the Ontario industrial construction industry

  19. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  20. Nuclear power in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghaie, S.

    2007-01-01

    The development of space nuclear power and propulsion in the United States started in 1955 with the initiation of the ROVER project. The first step in the ROVER program was the KIWI project that included the development and testing of 8 non-flyable ultrahigh temperature nuclear test reactors during 1955-1964. The KIWI project was precursor to the PHOEBUS carbon-based fuel reactor project that resulted in ground testing of three high power reactors during 1965-1968 with the last reactor operated at 4,100 MW. During the same time period a parallel program was pursued to develop a nuclear thermal rocket based on cermet fuel technology. The third component of the ROVER program was the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) that was initiated in 1961 with the primary goal of designing the first generation of nuclear rocket engine based on the KIWI project experience. The fourth component of the ROVER program was the Reactor In-Flight Test (RIFT) project that was intended to design, fabricate, and flight test a NERVA powered upper stage engine for the Saturn-class lunch vehicle. During the ROVER program era, the Unites States ventured in a comprehensive space nuclear program that included design and testing of several compact reactors and space suitable power conversion systems, and the development of a few light weight heat rejection systems. Contrary to its sister ROVER program, the space nuclear power program resulted in the first ever deployment and in-space operation of the nuclear powered SNAP-10A in 1965. The USSR space nuclear program started in early 70's and resulted in deployment of two 6 kWe TOPAZ reactors into space and ground testing of the prototype of a relatively small nuclear rocket engine in 1984. The US ambition for the development and deployment of space nuclear powered systems was resurrected in mid 1980's and intermittently continued to date with the initiation of several research programs that included the SP-100, Space Exploration

  1. Multicriteria choice of a nuclear reactor and nuclear power project application in Tunisian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rihane, Mehdi

    2009-01-01

    qualitative choice of a nuclear reactor affects multiple domain, technological, industrial, economic and even political. The evaluation criteria for nuclear reactor are multiple, in this study we will cite the most important : technicoeconomique competitiveness, security at large, intrinsic and extrinsic impact on the environment, sustainable development, the impact on domestic industry and resistance nuclear proliferation. from each of these criteria, a classification has been proposed.

  2. MITI project on advanced man-machine system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kanji; Watanabe, Takao; Hayakawa, Hiroyasu; Naito, Norio; Masui, Takao; Ogino, Takamichi.

    1988-01-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) against abnormal plant conditions was developed as a five-year project from 1980 to 1984, under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. The main purpose of the COSS development was to implement the lessons learned from the Three Mile Island accident. The main nuclear industries in Japan participated in the project. The design concept of the operator support functions and the method to implement it were established, and the prototype systems of the COSS for BWR and PWR plants were developed. After the completion of the COSS development, the above participant group once again joined for the work on an advanced man-machine system for nuclear power plants (MMS-NPP). This eight-year project aims at realizing an advanced operator support system by applying artificial intelligence, especially knowledge engineering, and sophisticated man-machine interface devices. Its main objectives are shown. This system configuration, operating method decision system, man-machine communication system, operation and maintenance support functions and so on are described. (Kako, I.)

  3. Country Report Summary: Japan [Project Management in Nuclear Power Plant Construction: Guidelines and Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The Hokkaido Electric Power Company (HEPCO) is the owner of the Tomari NPP comprising three operating PWR units. The latest unit to be connected to the grid, Tomari Unit 3, is a 3-loop PWR power plant with an electric output of 912 MW(e) supplied by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI). This is the newest unit in HEPCO and it is the newest PWR unit in Japan as well. The first concrete at Tomari Unit 3 was poured at the end of summer in 2004. The unit entered into commercial operation in December 2009. The Tomari site is located on a northern Japanese island. It is battered by strong winds and receives much snow in the winter. Therefore, civil works and building construction were temporarily suspended every year from the beginning of December until the end of March. This increased construction duration by one year compared to other sites. Consequently from first concrete to the start of commercial operation construction at Tomari lasted 64 months. There are specific factors in the approach to construction of nuclear power plants in Japan. (1) Japanese legislation defines that the sole licensee must be the electric power company. This implies that the electric power company is responsible for the safety of the plant and in that capacity it must submit for approval the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) but it is also responsible for the design and reliability of the plant; hence it must also submit for approval the Construction Plan (CP), containing all necessary detailed design information. Consequently, the electric power company becomes the sole counterpart to the regulatory body on all aspects of the project. (2) All Japanese electric power companies are considerably large and have the tradition to do the engineering of their power plant themselves, and this not only for nuclear but also for conventional power plant. Therefore, the owner/utilities in Japan carry themselves the burden of major portions of the engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) of their NPPs

  4. Reactivation of nuclear power plant construction projects. Plant status, policy issues and regulatory options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangler, M.B.

    1986-07-01

    Prior to the TMI-2 accident on March 28, 1979, four nuclear power plant units that had previously been issued a construction permit were cancelled, principally because of reduced projections of regional power demand. Since that time, an additional 31 units with CPs have been cancelled and eight units deferred. On December 23, 1985 one of the deferred units (Limerick-2) was reactivated and construction resumed. The primary objective of this policy study is to identify the principal issues requiring office-level consideration in the event of reactivation of the construction of one or more of the nuclear power plants falling into two categories: (1) LWR units issued a construction permit whose construction has been cancelled, and (2) LWR units whose construction has been deferred. The study scope is limited to identifying regulatory issues or questions deserving analysis rather than providing, at this time, answers or recommended actions. Five tasks are addressed: a tabulation and discussion of the status of all cancelled and deferred LWR units; and identification of potential safety and environmental issues; an identification of regulatory or policy issues and needed information to determine the desirability of revising certain rules and policies; and identification of regulatory options and decision criteria; and an identification of decision considerations in determining staff requirements and organizational coordination of LWR reactivation policy and implementation efforts. 41 refs

  5. Finance structure and public enlightenment program of the first Turkish nuclear power plant project (a case study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutfi Sarici, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with four closely related subjects. These are: the positioning of nuclear energy in Turkey's energy planning by presenting supply and demand figures of electricity, giving emphasis to resource availability, pointing out the necessity of diversification of resources; the ongoing situation for realization of the Akkuyu Project with its updated milestones, alternative offers requested for the Akkuyu Nuclear Power Plant and member companies of the consortiums who already have submitted the three bids; the financing of big-scale energy investment projects in developing countries by giving special emphasis to the Akkuyu Nuclear Power Plant Project including the financing requirements in the Bid Specifications, OECD rules for financing, the requirements of financial agents, and financing means of domestic participation; public enlightenment during establishment of nuclear power in Turkey. (author)

  6. Future-oriented computerized information system for power plant process control in a pilot project at Philippsburg nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woehrle, G.; Kraft, M.

    1988-01-01

    The motivation for the pilot project at Philippsburg nuclear power plant resulted from the Three Mile Island accident in 1979. The primary task embraces an efficient computer-aided reduction of information when a fault occurs based on a process engineering analysis of the information accrued. Accompanying this are a consolidation and evaluation of the information available in the control room. In this pilot project the new tasks of status monitoring, information reduction and operationalcontrol have been realized for the first time using a computer-aided process information system. In addition to the existing control computer, an information computer with approximately 1200 analogue and about 10000 binary signals has been installed. The installation of the system was completed in 1984 and in the meantime initial operational experience has become available. (orig.) [de

  7. Solid-State Thermionic Nuclear Power for Megawatt Propulsion, Planetary Surface and Commercial Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermionic (TI) power conversion is a promising technology first investigated for power conversion in the 1960’s, and of renewed interest due to modern...

  8. The nuclear power decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear power has now become highly controversial and there is violent disagreement about how far this technology can and should contribute to the Western energy economy. More so than any other energy resource, nuclear power has the capacity to provide much of our energy needs but the risk is now seen to be very large indeed. This book discusses the major British decisions in the civil nuclear field, and the way they were made, between 1953 and 1978. That is, it spans the period between the decision to construct Calder Hall - claimed as the world's first nuclear power station - and the Windscale Inquiry - claimed as the world's most thorough study of a nuclear project. For the period up to 1974 this involves a study of the internal processes of British central government - what the author terms 'private' politics to distinguish them from the very 'public' or open politics which have characterised the period since 1974. The private issues include the technical selection of nuclear reactors, the economic arguments about nuclear power and the political clashes between institutions and individuals. The public issues concern nuclear safety and the environment and the rights and opportunities for individuals and groups to protest about nuclear development. The book demonstrates that British civil nuclear power decision making has had many shortcomings and concludes that it was hampered by outdated political and administrative attitudes and machinery and that some of the central issues in the nuclear debate were misunderstood by the decision makers themselves. (author)

  9. Development of a strategic plan for an international R and D project on innovative nuclear fuel cycles and power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.; Choi, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    The long-term outlook for nuclear energy should be considered in a broader perspective of future energy needs, operational safety, proliferation and environmental impacts. An Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) on Development of a Strategic Plan for an International R and D Project on Innovative Nuclear Fuel Cycles and Power Plants was convened in Vienna in October 1999 to assess the criteria, the needs for international cooperation, and to formulate a strategic plan for project integration. (author)

  10. Control room modernization at Finnish nuclear power plants - Two projects compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laarni, J.; Norros, L.

    2006-01-01

    The modernization of automation systems and human-machine interfaces is a current issue at both of the two nuclear power plants (i.e., Fortum's Loviisa plant and TVO's Olkiluoto plant) in Finland. Since the plants have been launched in the 1970's or 1980's, technology is in part old-fashioned and needs to be renewed. At Olkiluoto upgrades of the turbine operator systems have already been conducted; at Loviisa the first phase of the modernization project has just started. Basically, there is a question of the complete digitalization of the information streams at the two plants, and transition from a conventional hard-wired or hybrid control room to a screen-based one. The new human-machine interfaces will comprise new technology, such as PC workstations, soft control, touch screens and large-screen overall displays. The modernization of human-system interfaces is carried out in a stepwise manner at both plants. At both plants the main driver has not been the need to renew the user interfaces of the control room, but the need to upgrade the automation systems. In part because of this, there is a lack of a systematic top-down approach in which different aspects of human factors (HF) engineering are considered in relationship to higher level goals. Our aim here is to give an overview description of the control room modernization projects at the two plants and provide a preliminary evaluation of their progress to date. The projects are also compared, for example, in terms of duration, scope and phasing, and who is responsible for the realization of the project. In addition, we also compare experiences from the Finnish projects to experiences from similar projects abroad. The main part of the data used in this study is based on designers' and project members' interviews. (authors)

  11. Challenges faced by engineering services group in meeting nuclear power project targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phanse, N.R.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd. (NPCIL) is an organisation building and operating nuclear power stations for which a number of different types of engineering services/activities are necessary. All these services are provided by Engineering Services Group of NPCIL. The activities and responsibilities of the group are discussed

  12. International remote monitoring project Argentina Nuclear Power Station Spent Fuel Transfer Remote Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, S.; Lucero, R.; Glidewell, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Autoridad Regulataria Nuclear (ARN) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) are cooperating on the development of a Remote Monitoring System for nuclear nonproliferation efforts. A Remote Monitoring System for spent fuel transfer will be installed at the Argentina Nuclear Power Station in Embalse, Argentina. The system has been designed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) providing gamma and neutron sensors. This project will test and evaluate the fundamental design and implementation of the Remote Monitoring System in its application to regional and international safeguards efficiency. This paper provides a description of the monitoring system and its functions. The Remote Monitoring System consists of gamma and neutron radiation sensors, RF systems, and video systems integrated into a coherent functioning whole. All sensor data communicate over an Echelon LonWorks Network to a single data logger. The Neumann DCM 14 video module is integrated into the Remote Monitoring System. All sensor and image data are stored on a Data Acquisition System (DAS) and archived and reviewed on a Data and Image Review Station (DIRS). Conventional phone lines are used as the telecommunications link to transmit on-site collected data and images to remote locations. The data and images are authenticated before transmission. Data review stations will be installed at ARN in Buenos Aires, Argentina, ABACC in Rio De Janeiro, IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, and Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 2 refs., 2 figs

  13. Lessons learned in digital upgrade projects digital control system implementation at US nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, S.; Bolian, T. W.

    2006-01-01

    AREVA NP has gained significant experience during the past five years in digital upgrades at operating nuclear power stations in the US. Plants are seeking modernization with digital technology to address obsolescence, spare parts availability, vendor support, increasing age-related failures and diminished reliability. New systems offer improved reliability and functionality, and decreased maintenance requirements. Significant lessons learned have been identified relating to the areas of licensing, equipment qualification, software quality assurance and other topics specific to digital controls. Digital control systems have been installed in non safety-related control applications at many utilities within the last 15 years. There have also been a few replacements of small safety-related systems with digital technology. Digital control systems are proving to be reliable, accurate, and easy to maintain. Digital technology is gaining acceptance and momentum with both utilities and regulatory agencies based upon the successes of these installations. Also, new plants are being designed with integrated digital control systems. To support plant life extension and address obsolescence of critical components, utilities are beginning to install digital technology for primary safety-system replacement. AREVA NP analyzed operating experience and lessons learned from its own digital upgrade projects as well as industry-wide experience to identify key issues that should be considered when implementing digital controls in nuclear power stations

  14. The Hungarian model project: Strengthening training for operational safety at Paks nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mautner Markhof, F.

    1998-01-01

    The Hungarian Model project (HMP) reflects the commitment to constant increase of safety and reliability of the NPP Paks, the Government of Hungary and the IAEA. It includes some of the most important nuclear power objectives of Paks NPP, namely the strengthening of NPP personnel training and competence through the application of international best practice, the systematic approach to training (SAT), for training operation and maintenance personnel; setting up a state of-the-art maintenance training center (MTC) at Paks and enhancing safety culture at Paks NPP. The IAEA supported implementation of the HMP through fellowships and scientific visits, expert missions, provision of hardware and software for SAT application, and supply od major new uncontaminated items of actual WWER equipment for the MTC

  15. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described

  16. Physics and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttery, N E

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear power owes its origin to physicists. Fission was demonstrated by physicists and chemists and the first nuclear reactor project was led by physicists. However as nuclear power was harnessed to produce electricity the role of the engineer became stronger. Modern nuclear power reactors bring together the skills of physicists, chemists, chemical engineers, electrical engineers, mechanical engineers and civil engineers. The paper illustrates this by considering the Sizewell B project and the role played by physicists in this. This covers not only the roles in design and analysis but in problem solving during the commissioning of first of a kind plant. Looking forward to the challenges to provide sustainable and environmentally acceptable energy sources for the future illustrates the need for a continuing synergy between physics and engineering. This will be discussed in the context of the challenges posed by Generation IV reactors

  17. Strategically oriented project management of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants; Strategieorientiertes Projektmanagement der Stilllegung von Kernkraftwerken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemmeter, Sascha [Conscore GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany); Woempener, Andreas [Duisburg-Essen Univ., Duisburg (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer ABWL und Controlling

    2013-12-15

    Due to the politically induced change of the energy sector in Germany, the operators of nuclear power plants had to react and to deal with completely new conditions concerning the decommissioning of their plants on short notice. Therefore the operators have to devise new strategies for controlling their decommissioning and dismantling projects in a short amount of time and most often similarly for several plants. Two fundamental procedures are possible for the successful controlling of these dismantling projects: a centralized or a decentralized management organization. How these project control processes can be realized in an optimal way, is, next to other economic specifications of the dismantling of nuclear power plants, the topic of a new research project of the Chair of Management Accounting at the University Duisburg-Essen. In that process, results and experiences from other research and practical projects concerning general large-scale projects are being used. Selected findings have been compiled and are being discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  18. CARA Project: development of the advanced ULE fuel element for heavy water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasnarof, Daniel O.; Marino, Armando C.; Florido, Pablo C.; Munoz, C.; Bianchi, Daniel R.; Giorgis, Miguel A.

    2006-01-01

    The CARA Project (Spanish acronym of Combustible Avanzado para Reactores Argentinos) is a national fuel element technology development, compatible with our nuclear power plants (Atucha I, Embalse and Atucha II). It takes into account the experience obtained in our nuclear organisations (CNEA-CONUAR-NASA). The goal of the CARA fuel element is the performance improvement for those reactors and the enhancing of their normal operative conditions. The CARA design allows the burnup extension by using 52 rods of the same diameter. Likewise it keeps good thermo-hydraulic behaviour. The fuel bundle can be directly used in nuclear power plants with horizontal channels. By using an additional system it can be installed in the PHWR with vertical channels. The expected profits, by the use of the CARA in our reactors, broadly guaranty the recovery of the fund for its development, due to a reduction of the NPP fuels and back end cost. We estimate a reduction in the generation cost between 20 or 25 % in relation to the present one if we use 0.85 or 0.90% SEU (Slightly Enriched Uranium). The use of the CARA fuel in our reactors will also reduce the amount of spent fuel to be treated. The shortening could be between 17 to 27 % in Atucha I in relation to the present ULE (0.85%), between 38 to 46% for Embalse, and 45 to 53% for Atucha II. The mechanical behaviour and hydraulic compatibility have been verified. Several CARA prototypes were fabricated with a new design of the end plate and with new processes for the welding for the rods. We present in this paper the current status of the CARA fuel element development. (author) [es

  19. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Data concerning the existing nuclear power plants in the world are presented. The data was retrieved from the SIEN (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: nuclear plants, its status and type; installed nuclear power plants by country; nuclear power plants under construction by country; planned nuclear power plants by country; cancelled nuclear power plants by country; shut-down nuclear power plants by country. (E.G.) [pt

  20. Nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This press dossier presented in Shanghai (China) in April 1999, describes first the activities of the Framatome group in the people's republic of China with a short presentation of the Daya Bay power plant and of the future Ling Ao project, and with a description of the technological cooperation with China in the nuclear domain (technology transfers, nuclear fuels) and in other industrial domains (mechanics, oil and gas, connectors, food and agriculture, paper industry etc..). The general activities of the Framatome group in the domain of energy (nuclear realizations in France, EPR project, export activities, nuclear services, nuclear fuels, nuclear equipments, industrial equipments) and of connectors engineering are presented in a second and third part with the 1998 performances. (J.S.)

  1. Advantages of using 3D design tools in the nuclear power plants projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roldan, P.; Melendro, J.; Gomez, A.; Hermana, I.

    2011-01-01

    It there is anything that distinguished Iberdrola Ingeneria y Construccion, as part of the Iberdrola Group, it is its firm commitment to innovation and continuous improvement. This is the philosophy that led the company to its interest in three-dimensional design tools back when they were in an early stage of development : very little international implementation, lack of integration with other applications, absence of previous experiences to understand the best possible configuration for each case, etc. Nevertheless, the company was able to see the tremendous advantage of having a construction program in the early months of a project- a detailed program that could predict, and therefore avoid, the problems that, if not anticipated, would arise in the construction phase when they result in higher costs, longer timeframes and a multitude of complications. This is precisely what 3D design tools offer prediction and this has been proven in the latest combined cycle projects executed with these tools. A project executed without errors not only decreases cost and time overruns, but also necessarily increases the quality of the end result. Efficiency and quality: these are both basic goals of Iberdrola Ingenieria y Construccion. The knowledge of and skill in the use of these tools have grown at the same time that their development has reached increasingly higher levels. As a result, Iberdrola Ingenieria y Conctruccion now has extensive experience in the use of 3D design tools and is prepared for the future challenges posed by these tools, the capabilities of which have attained such heights that it is possible to take on one of the most technically challenging projects that exists a nuclear power plant. And we are ready. (Author)

  2. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    d'Easum, Lille.

    1976-03-01

    An environmentalist's criticism of nuclear energy is given, on a layman's level. Such subjects as conflict of interest in controlling bodies, low-level radiation, reactor safety, liability insurance, thermal pollution, economics, heavy water production, export of nuclear technology, and the history of the anti-nuclear movement are discussed in a sensationalistic tone. (E.C.B.)

  3. Outline of nuclear power plant project of fast breeder reactor (FBR) 'Monju'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Fumio; Higashide, Noboru

    1982-01-01

    The first step of the construction of the fast breeder prototype reactor ''Monju'' in Japan was taken by the declaration of agreement of Fukui Prefecture governor in May, 1982, and the succeeding approval by the cabinet council. In this paper, the outline of the project is described. The paper first introduces the development status of FBRs in the world, and next, describes the progress of planning the ''Monju'' project. Initially, ''Monju'' was invited by Shiraki region of Tsuruga City, but the move of village was not agreed. Thus, the center of the site was moved to ''Haseda'' about 1 km north-east. In addition, there were some limitations, and the layout of the facility and the design of public work structures including harbour construction were done under many limiting conditions. However, the site is rather in good conditions, and the design rationalization was attempted as far as possible within a range which does not affect the safety of the nuclear power plant. The outline of the examination related to public works and the siting conditions are reported, dividing them into topographic features, geology, meteorology, sea conditions, and natural environment. As the public works plan, site preparation, roads, harbour installations and water intake and discharge facility are also described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. A new nuclear power project in the United States: Reality or fantasy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redding, J.R.; Veitch, C.

    1996-01-01

    There is a way to go before a new nuclear project in the US is a reality. On the other hand, the prospects are not so remote that it is in the realm of fantasy. The authors think that if US companies have the opportunity to supply and build Advanced Nuclear Plants of US design outside the US, then the first US nuclear project has a chance to be economically competitive in the US. If these are built on budget and schedule, it will demonstrate to potential lenders that financing nuclear projects in the US does not represent an undue risk. The support of the US government in the export market is vital. Without the concerted effort of the government, including Department of Commerce, Department of State and the US ExIm bank, US suppliers will be at a significant disadvantage when facing international competition for orders. The authors think it is in the best interest of the government to supply such support. Nuclear projects outside the US sustains and creates high tech jobs in the US. It maintains the health of US nuclear technology which generates over 20% of the electricity in the US. Finally, it gives the US influence over the direction of nuclear programs in other countries, particularly developing countries which are intent upon increasing their use of nuclear energy. Those opposed to nuclear energy articulate a future that does not include its use. It is vital that nuclear professionals articulate a future that does include nuclear energy and its many socioeconomic benefits

  5. Factors affecting economic performance of nuclear power projects in the USA and abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, C.

    1988-01-01

    Trends in nuclear power economics in the USA, as well as in other large power programmes, are reviewed in this paper. The current US coal/nuclear economic situation, the implications for operating cost improvements and the potential for the introduction of new low-cost nuclear units are discussed. The average economic advantage of nuclear over coal plants has been significantly eroded over the last four years, though the rate of decline has recently slowed. Discussion of an average plant's performance indices is always imprecise, given the wide distribution of the costs data. However, several nuclear power plants can be identified whose total generation costs in 1985 were less than coal units' variable costs or total generation expenses. It is concluded that the impact of new, low-cost plants on improving the overall US nuclear/coal economics will require a long time to make itself felt. In the near term the most cost effective methods for improving US nuclear power economics are a reduction in operating expenses and an increase in average plant capacity factors. (author). 9 refs, 9 figs

  6. Projected Eastern Slovakia nuclear power plant and its effect on the area settlement structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uvirova, E.

    1986-01-01

    The current situation of and expected changes in the settlement of the Kecerovce locality, where the Eastern Slovakia nuclear power plant will be sited, are discussed. The estimated requisition of agricultural soil and of forests is considered and the questions are outlined of the resettlement of the population in the power plant protective zone. (M.D.). 6 tabs., 4 refs

  7. Nuclear power costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    A report prepared by the IAEA Secretariat and presented to the seventh session of the Agency's General Conference says that information on nuclear power costs is now rapidly moving from the domain of uncertain estimates to that of tested factual data. As more and more nuclear power stations are being built and put into operation, more information on the actual costs incurred is becoming available. This is the fourth report on nuclear power costs to be submitted to the IAEA General Conference. The report last year gave cost information on 38 nuclear power projects, 17 of which have already gone into operation. Certain significant changes in the data given last year are included-in the present report; besides, information is given on seven new plants. The report is divided into two parts, the first on recent developments and current trends in nuclear power costs and the second on the use of the cost data for economic comparisons. Both stress the fact that the margin of uncertainty in the basic data has lately been drastically reduced. At the same time, it is pointed out, some degree of uncertainty is inherent in the assumptions made in arriving at over-all generating cost figures, especially when - as is usually the case - a nuclear plant is part of an integrated power system

  8. Nuclear Power Today and Tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, with 437 nuclear power reactors in operation and 68 new reactors under construction, nuclear power's global generating capacity reached 372.5 GW(e) at the end of 2012. Despite public scepticism, and in some cases fear, which arose following the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, two years later the demand for nuclear power continues to grow steadily, albeit at a slower pace. A significant number of countries are pressing ahead with plans to implement or expand their nuclear power programmes because the drivers toward nuclear power that were present before Fukushima have not changed. These drivers include climate change, limited fossil fuel supply, and concerns about energy security. Globally, nuclear power looks set to continue to grow steadily, although more slowly than was expected before the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. The IAEA's latest projections show a steady rise in the number of nuclear power plants in the world in the next 20 years. They project a growth in nuclear power capacity by 23% by 2030 in the low projection and by 100% in the high projection. Most new nuclear power reactors planned or under construction are in Asia. In 2012 construction began on seven nuclear power plants: Fuqing 4, Shidaowan 1, Tianwan 3 and Yangjiang 4 in China; Shin Ulchin 1 in Korea; Baltiisk 1 in Russia; and Barakah 1 in the United Arab Emirates. This increase from the previous year's figures indicates an on-going interest and commitment to nuclear power and demonstrates that nuclear power is resilient. Countries are demanding new, innovative reactor designs from vendors to meet strict requirements for safety, national grid capacity, size and construction time, which is a sign that nuclear power is set to keep growing over the next few decades.

  9. Economic-financial analysis of 'Angra 3 Nuclear Power Plant' project; Analise economico-financeira do empreendimento 'Usina Nuclear Angra 3'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Ronaldo Barata de [ELETROBRAS Termonuclear S.A. (ELETRONUCLEAR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: rbarata@eletronuclear.gov.br

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents an economic-financial evaluation of 'Angra 3 Nuclear Power Plant' project and estimates the lowest power tariff value at which power potentially made available may be commercialized and yet ensure the project a profitability level agreeable to the interests of economic agents and shareholders. According to the 'project evaluation' practice, Angra 3 power generation was considered separately from ELETRONUCLEAR's operating plants (Angra 1 and Angra 2), thus preventing result distortions bound to occur if the economic-financial variables of the new project were analyzed associated with financial commitments and commercialization conditions resulting from the project implementation process and the generated power commercialization conditions, respectively. For this evaluation different technical and economic scenarios were devised, and the theory of Capital Asset Pricing Model for Own Capital cost and that of Weighted Average Cost of Capital were used in addition to the forecast of the Statement of Results and Free Cash flow of Shareholders throughout the power plant life, which is the estimate basis for the lowest power tariff value and the Internal Return Rate of the project. The evaluation conclusion is that Angra 3 project is technically and economically feasible and competitive as compared to the new large power generation projects planned for power supply in Brazil in the next decade, mainly in the Southeast. (author)

  10. Nuclear power economic database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Xiaoming; Li Lin; Zhao Shiping

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear power economic database (NPEDB), based on ORACLE V6.0, consists of three parts, i.e., economic data base of nuclear power station, economic data base of nuclear fuel cycle and economic database of nuclear power planning and nuclear environment. Economic database of nuclear power station includes data of general economics, technique, capital cost and benefit, etc. Economic database of nuclear fuel cycle includes data of technique and nuclear fuel price. Economic database of nuclear power planning and nuclear environment includes data of energy history, forecast, energy balance, electric power and energy facilities

  11. Nuclear power in Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, Ronald E.

    1998-08-01

    Contains Executive Summary and Chapters on: Nuclear Energy in the Asian context; Types of nuclear power reactors used in Asia; A survey of nuclear power by country; The economics of nuclear power; Fuels, fuel cycles and reprocessing; Environmental issues and waste disposal; The weapons issues and nuclear power; Conclusions. (Author)

  12. Nuclear power for tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.; Konstantinov, L.V.; Dastidar, P.

    1989-09-01

    The evolution of nuclear power has established this energy source as a viable mature technology, producing at comparative costs more than 16% of the electricity generated world-wide. After outlining the current status of nuclear power, extreme future scenarios are presented, corresponding respectively to maximum penetration limited by technical-economic characteristics, and nuclear phase-out at medium term. The situation is complex and country specific. The relative perception of the importance of different factors and the compensation of advantages vs. disadvantages, or risk vs. benefits, has predominant influence. In order to proceed with an objective and realistic estimate of the future role of nuclear power worldwide, the fundamental factors indicated below pro nuclear power and against are assessed, including expected trends regarding their evolution: Nuclear safety risk; reduction to levels of high improbability but not zero risk. Reliable source of energy; improvements towards uniform standards of excellence. Economic competitiveness vs. alternatives; stabilization and possible reduction of costs. Financing needs and constraints; availability according to requirements. Environmental effects; comparative analysis with alternatives. Public and political acceptance; emphasis on reason and facts over emotions. Conservation of fossil energy resources; gradual deterioration but no dramatic crisis. Energy supply assurance; continuing concerns. Infrastructure requirements and availability; improvements in many countries due to overall development. Non-proliferation in military uses; separation of issues from nuclear power. IAEA forecasts to the year 2005 are based on current projects, national plans and policies and on prevailing trends. Nuclear electricity generation is expected to reach about 18% of total worldwide electricity generation, with 500 to 580 GW(e) installed capacity. On a longer term, to 2030, a stabilized role and place among available viable

  13. Economics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwah, O.S.

    1982-01-01

    There can be no precise economic measures, in the abstract, of the costs of nuclear power production in the less-developed countries (LDCs). The conditions that affect the calculations have to be evaluated specifically for each country and individually for each nuclear-related project in that country. These conditions are a combination of internal and external factors, and their mix for one project can change during the course of construction. The author lists 21 factors that may vary according to individual national costs. 6 references, 4 tables

  14. Atmospheric release advisory capability pilot project at two nuclear power plants and associated state offices of emergency preparedness. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    A project to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) limited service with commercial nuclear power plants and their associated state offices of emergency preparedness is discussed. Preliminary planning, installation and testing of the ARAC site facilities at Indian Point Nucler Power Station, New York State; at New York State Office of Emergency Preparedness, Albany, New York; at Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, California; and at the State of California Office of Emergency Services, Sacramento, California, are summarized. ARAC participation in the Robert E. Ginna nuclear generating plant accident in New York on January 25, 1982, is discussed. The ARAC system is evaluated with emphasis on communications, the suite of models contained within the ARAC system, and the staff. The implications of this project in designing the next-generation ARAC system to service federal and state needs are assessed

  15. Nuclear Power Plants (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell III, Walter [Southern Nuclear Engineering, Inc.

    1973-01-01

    Projected energy requirements for the future suggest that we must employ atomic energy to generate electric power or face depletion of our fossil-fuel resources—coal, oil, and gas. In short, both conservation and economic considerations will require us to use nuclear energy to generate the electricity that supports our civilization. Until we reach the time when nuclear power plants are as common as fossil-fueled or hydroelectric plants, many people will wonder how the nuclear plants work, how much they cost, where they are located, and what kinds of reactors they use. The purpose of this booklet is to answer these questions. In doing so, it will consider only central station plants, which are those that provide electric power for established utility systems.

  16. Financing arrangements for nuclear power projects - Past and present experience, future expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troncuta, Mariana; Vatamanu, Maria; Ispas, Gheorghe

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear energy is a clean, safe, and economical industrial electricity source, with many environmental benefits. It does not emit greenhouse gases that contribute to climate change, or combustion by-products and acid gases that cause air, water resource and land pollution. Nuclear energy has also many benefits in the areas of medicine, industry, agriculture, and research. Moreover, the results are revealing. Over the past 12 years, from 1900 to 2002, the global 'energy availability factor' - representing the percentage of time that nuclear power plants worldwide were up and running - increased from 72.9% to 83.4%. At the same time, based on statistics gathered by the World Association of Nuclear Operators - WANO, the number of industrial accidents has gone down, radiation exposure has dropped sharply and the annual volume of radioactive waste produced has been reduced substantially. In other words, the safety, performance and economic competitiveness of the nuclear industry are at an all time high, reflecting a mature and vibrant enterprise. These are several reasons why a prospective host nation and other nations around the world may be attracted by nuclear power generation. Nuclear power can be and has been financed by world capital markets. The crucial question is whether host governments and interested utilities are willing to take the steps required to attract investment with reasonable assurance of success, and whether the nuclear industry is willing and able to become competitive in increasingly deregulated financial and electricity markets. The present paper will have the following structure: the first part will refer to general financing guidelines, and the second part will present a case study. The latter will treat the past experience as provided by the financing scheme of Cernavoda NPP Unit 1, the present experience, i.e. ongoing financing issues for Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 and potential future shared contribution to financing Cernavoda NPP Unit 3, 4 and 5

  17. Nuclear power in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, A.

    1990-01-01

    I want to give some ideas on the situation of public and utility acceptance of nuclear power in the Federal Republic of Germany and perhaps a little bit on Europe. Let me start with public perception. I think in Germany we have a general trend in the public perception of technology during the last decade that has been investigated in a systematic manner in a recent study. It is clear that the general acceptance of technology decreased substantially during the last twenty years. We can also observe during this time that aspects of the benefits of technology are much less reported in the media, that most reporting by the media now is related to the consequences of technologies, such as negative environmental consequences. hat development has led to a general opposition against new technological projects, in particular unusual and large. That trend is related not only to nuclear power, we see it also for new airports, trains, coal-fired plants. here is almost no new technological project in Germany where there is not very strong opposition against it, at least locally. What is the current public opinion concerning nuclear power? Nuclear power certainly received a big shock after Chernobyl, but actually, about two thirds of the German population wants to keep the operating plants running. Some people want to phase the plants out as they reach the end-of-life, some want to substitute newer nuclear technology, and a smaller part want to increase the use of nuclear power. But only a minority of the German public would really like to abandon nuclear energy

  18. Reviewing nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Colin

    1990-01-01

    The UK government has proposed a review of the prospects for nuclear power as the Sizewell B pressurized water reactor project nears completion in 1994. However, a delay in the completion of Sizewell B or a change of government could put off the review for some years beyond the mid 1990s. Anticipating, though, that such a review will eventually take place, issues which it should consider are addressed. Three broad categories of possible benefit claimed for nuclear power are examined. These are that nuclear power contributes to the security of energy supply, that it provides protection against long run fossil fuel price increases and that it is a means of mitigating the greenhouse effect. Arguments are presented which cost doubt over the reality of these benefits. Even if these benefits could be demonstrated, they would have to be set against the financial, health and accident costs attendant on nuclear power. It is concluded that the case may be made that nuclear power imposes net costs on society that are not justified by the net benefits conferred. Some comments are made on how a government review, if and when it takes place, should be conducted. (UK)

  19. Advance: research project on aging electrical wiring in nuclear power plants; Advance: proyecto de investigacion de envejecimiento en cableado electrico en centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano, J. C.; Ruiz, S.

    2013-07-01

    As Nuclear Power Plants get older it is more important to know the real condition of low voltage, instrumentation, power and control cables. Additionally, as new plants are being built, the election of cables and the use of in-situ monitoring techniques to get reliable aging indicators, can be very useful during the plant life. The goal of this Project is to adapt, optimize and asses Condition Monitoring techniques for Nuclear Power Plants cables. These techniques, together with the appropriate acceptance criteria, would allow specialists to know the state of the cable over its entire length and estimate its residual life. In the Project, accelerated ageing is used in cables installed in European NPPs in order to evaluate different techniques to detect local and global ageing. Results are compared with accepted tests to validate its use for the estimation of cables residual life. This paper describes the main stages of the Project and some results. (Author)

  20. Nuclear Power after Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, B.

    2011-01-01

    On 11 March 2011 Japan suffered an earthquake of very high magnitude, followed by a tsunami that left thousands dead in the Sendai region, the main consequence of which was a major nuclear disaster at the Fukushima power station. The accident ranked at the highest level of severity on the international scale of nuclear events, making it the biggest since Chernobyl in 1986. It is still impossible to gauge the precise scope of the consequences of the disaster, but it has clearly given rise to the most intense renewed debates on the nuclear issue. Futuribles echoes this in the 'Forum' feature of this summer issue which is entirely devoted to energy questions. Bernard Bigot, chief executive officer of the technological research organization CEA, looks back on the Fukushima disaster and what it changes (or does not change) so far as the use of nuclear power is concerned, particularly in France. After recalling the lessons of earlier nuclear disasters, which led to the development of the third generation of power stations, he reminds us of the currently uncontested need to free ourselves from dependence on fossil fuels, which admittedly involves increased use of renewables, but can scarcely be envisaged without nuclear power. Lastly, where the Fukushima disaster is concerned, Bernard Bigot shows how it was, in his view, predominantly the product of a management error, from which lessons must be drawn to improve the safety conditions of existing or projected power stations and enable the staff responsible to deliver the right response as quickly as possible when an accident occurs. In this context and given France's high level of dependence on nuclear power, the level of use of this energy source ought not to be reduced on account of the events of March 2011. (author)

  1. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The Single Channel Trip System for the Dungeness B AGRs in the United Kingdom has enabled Nuclear Electric to enhance the performance of each of the twin reactors progressively towards the design figure of 660MW. The unique self-testing dynamic nature of the microprocessor-based ISAT system was one of the key factors in satisfying the UK Regulator that the system met the demanding requirements of the Dungeness B application, and current operational and maintenance experience is very encouraging. Systems based on the ISAT principle have application in reactor protection systems throughout the world. (Author)

  2. Nuclear power. Europe report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    Last year, 2001, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, respectively, in 18 countries all over Europe. In 8 of the 15 member countries of the European Union nuclear power plants have been in operation. In 7 of the 13 EU Candidate Countries nuclear energy was used for power production. A total of 216 plants with an aggregate net capacity of 171 802 MWe and an aggregate gross capacity of 181 212 MWe were in operation. One unit, i.e. Volgodonsk-1 in Russia went critical for the first time and started test operation after having been connected to the grid. Volgodonsk-1 adds about 1 000 MWe (gross) nd 953 MWe (net) to the electricity production capacity. The operator of the Muehlheim-Kaerlich NPP field an application to decommission and dismantle the plant; this plant was only 13 months in operation and has been shut down since 1988 for legal reasons. Last year, 10 plants were under construction in Romania (1), Russia (4), Slovakia (2), the Czech Republic (1) and the Ukraine (2), that is only in East European Countries. In eight countries of the European Union 143 nuclear power plants have been operated with an aggregate gross capacity of 128 758 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 122 601 MWe. Net electricity production in 2001 in the EU amounts to approx. 880.3 TWh gross, which means a share of 33,1 per cent of the total production in the whole EU. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. The reach 75.6% in France, 74.2% in Lithuania, 58.2% in Belgium, 53.2% in the Slovak Republic, and 47.4% in the Ukraine. Nuclear power also provides a noticeable share in the electricity supply of countries, which operate no own nuclear power plants, e.g. Italy, Portugal, and Austria. On May 24th, 2002 the Finnish Parliament voted for the decision in principle to build a fifth nuclear power plant in the country. This launches the next stage in the nuclear power plant project. The electric output of the plant unit will be 1000-1600 MW

  3. Nuclear reactor power for a space-based radar. SP-100 project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Harvey; Heller, Jack; Jaffe, Leonard; Beatty, Richard; Bhandari, Pradeep; Chow, Edwin; Deininger, William; Ewell, Richard; Fujita, Toshio; Grossman, Merlin

    1986-01-01

    A space-based radar mission and spacecraft, using a 300 kWe nuclear reactor power system, has been examined, with emphasis on aspects affecting the power system. The radar antenna is a horizontal planar array, 32 X 64 m. The orbit is at 61 deg, 1088 km. The mass of the antenna with support structure is 42,000 kg; of the nuclear reactor power system, 8,300 kg; of the whole spacecraft about 51,000 kg, necessitating multiple launches and orbital assembly. The assembly orbit is at 57 deg, 400 km, high enough to provide the orbital lifetime needed for orbital assembly. The selected scenario uses six Shuttle launches to bring the spacecraft and a Centaur G upper-stage vehicle to assembly orbit. After assembly, the Centaur places the spacecraft in operational orbit, where it is deployed on radio command, the power system started, and the spacecraft becomes operational. Electric propulsion is an alternative and allows deployment in assembly orbit, but introduces a question of nuclear safety.

  4. Coupling analysis on the soft ground settlement laws in Qinshan nuclear power phase I sea wall project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Feng; Pan Rong; Zhu Xiuyun; Zhang Dingli

    2011-01-01

    Qinshan Nuclear Power Phase I sea wall project is a barrier engineering in defending the design basis flooding, which is of importance to the safety of NPP. The geological condition has the feature of high compressibility and low penetration, such as the soft ground of 1 + 450 section of Qinshan Nuclear Power Phase I sea wall. Based on parameters acquired from the site experiment, 3-D finite difference analysis is put forward to study the feature of consolidation settlement laws, which can embody the fluid-solid coupling interaction. The conclusions of numerical analysis agree well with the in-site measured data, and it, can contribute to the design and construction of raising sea wall project. (authors)

  5. Pulsed nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, C.V.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear power plant. This power plant consists of: 1.) a cavity; 2.) a detonatable nuclear device in a central region of the cavity; 3.) a working fluid inside of the cavity; 4.) a method to denote a nuclear device inside of the cavity; 5.) a mechanical projection from an interior wall of the cavity for recoiling to absorb a shock wave produced by the detonation of the nuclear device and thereby protecting the cavity from damage. A plurality of segments defines a shell within the cavity and a plurality of shock absorbers, each connecting a corresponding segment to a corresponding location on the wall of the cavity. Each of these shock absorbers regulate the recoil action of the segments; and 6.) means for permitting controlled extraction of a quantity of hot gases from the cavity produced by the vaporization of the working fluid upon detonation of the nuclear device. A method of generating power is also described. This method consists of: 1.) introducing a quantity of water in an underground cavity; 2.) heating the water in the cavity to form saturated steam; 3.) detonating a nuclear device at a central location inside the cavity; 4.) recoiling plate-like elements inside the cavity away from the central location in a mechanically regulated and controlled manner to absorb a shock wave produced by the nuclear device detonation and thereby protect the underground cavity against damage; 5.) extracting a quantity of superheated steam produced by the detonation of the nuclear device; and 6.) Converting the energy in the extracted superheated steam into electrical power

  6. Competitive economics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellman, R.

    1981-01-01

    Some 12 components of a valid study of the competitive economics of a newly ordered nuclear power plant are identified and explicated. These are then used to adjust the original cost projections of four authoritative studies of nuclear and coal power economics

  7. Nuclear power in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judson, Tim

    2018-01-01

    The Trump government promotes the further operation of aging nuclear power plants in the US by governmental support although several operators close their nuclear power plants due to economic reasons. The Trump government is also repowering the Yucca-Mountain-Project for radioactive waste disposal that was stopped by the Obama government based on geological problems in the region.

  8. Reasons for the nuclear power option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, I.; Glodeanu, F.; Mauna, T.

    1994-01-01

    Technical, economical and social reasons, strongly supporting the nuclear power option are reviewed. The history of Romanian nuclear power program is outlined with a particular focus on the Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant project. Finally the prospective of nuclear power in Romania are assessed

  9. The importance of Probabilistic Safety Assessment in the careful study of risks involved to new nuclear power plant projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, Jônatas F.C. da; Mesquita, Amir Z.

    2017-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in Japan in 2011 has raised public fears about the actual safety of nuclear power plants in several countries. The response to this concern by government agencies and private companies has been objective and pragmatic in order to guarantee best practices in the design, construction, operation and decommissioning phases of nuclear reactors. In countries where the nucleo-electric matrix is consolidated, such as the United States, France and the United Kingdom, the safety assessment is carried out considering deterministic and probabilistic criteria. In the licensing stages of new projects, it is necessary to analyze and simulate the behavior of the nuclear power plant, when subjected to conditions that can lead to sequences of accidents. Each initiator event is studied and simulated through computational models, which allow the description and estimation of possible physical phenomena occurring in nuclear reactors. Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is fundamental in this process, as it studies in depth the sequences of events that can lead to the fusion of the nucleus of the nuclear reactor. Such sequences should be quantified in terms of probability of occurrence and your possible consequences, and organized through techniques such as Fault Tree Analysis and Event Tree Analysis. For these simulations, specialized computer codes for each type of phenomenon should be used, as well as databases based on experience gained in the operation of similar nuclear reactors. The present work will describe, in an objective way, the procedures for the realization of PSA and its applicability to the assurance of the operational reliability of the nuclear reactors, as well as a brief comparative between the approaches used in some countries traditionally users of thermonuclear energy and Brazil. By means of this analysis, it can be concluded that nuclear power is increasingly reliable and safe, being able to provide the necessary

  10. The importance of Probabilistic Safety Assessment in the careful study of risks involved to new nuclear power plant projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mata, Jônatas F.C. da, E-mail: jonatasfmata@yahoo.com.br [Universidade do Estado de Minas Gerais (UEMG), João Monlevade, MG (Brazil); Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in Japan in 2011 has raised public fears about the actual safety of nuclear power plants in several countries. The response to this concern by government agencies and private companies has been objective and pragmatic in order to guarantee best practices in the design, construction, operation and decommissioning phases of nuclear reactors. In countries where the nucleo-electric matrix is consolidated, such as the United States, France and the United Kingdom, the safety assessment is carried out considering deterministic and probabilistic criteria. In the licensing stages of new projects, it is necessary to analyze and simulate the behavior of the nuclear power plant, when subjected to conditions that can lead to sequences of accidents. Each initiator event is studied and simulated through computational models, which allow the description and estimation of possible physical phenomena occurring in nuclear reactors. Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is fundamental in this process, as it studies in depth the sequences of events that can lead to the fusion of the nucleus of the nuclear reactor. Such sequences should be quantified in terms of probability of occurrence and your possible consequences, and organized through techniques such as Fault Tree Analysis and Event Tree Analysis. For these simulations, specialized computer codes for each type of phenomenon should be used, as well as databases based on experience gained in the operation of similar nuclear reactors. The present work will describe, in an objective way, the procedures for the realization of PSA and its applicability to the assurance of the operational reliability of the nuclear reactors, as well as a brief comparative between the approaches used in some countries traditionally users of thermonuclear energy and Brazil. By means of this analysis, it can be concluded that nuclear power is increasingly reliable and safe, being able to provide the necessary

  11. Consigned regulatory control and effect of the owner's welding quality under the EPC mode in Fangjiashan nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qun; Gu Tao; Wei Lianfeng; Li Hongjun

    2012-01-01

    Under EPC management mode, how to optimize resources allocation and realize effective management and control over key control points is a big difficulty facing the owner. From the owner's point of view, and through summary of practices, the paper introduces and analyses the mode and effect of consigned regulatory control over the weld quality of Fangjiashan nuclear power project. And some recognitions and point of views on popularization of specialized and consigned regulatory control are put forward. (authors)

  12. Nuclear power: Year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper offers a contrary view on the future of nuclear power in the U.S. Contrarian, in that it argues that it is quite possible that the installed U.S. nuclear capacity in the year 2000 will be in the range of 250GWe. This projection is based on the longer view - a 20-30 year picture - of the price trends of the fuels commercially available to make electricity. And on the belief that other projections of nuclear capacity for the year 2000, while generally acknowledging the need to add significant amounts of new electricity capacity, are essentially discounting nuclear power. And thus, are ignoring fundamental economics. The logic for the projected 250 GWe follows: The demand for electricity is continuing to grow, albeit at a slower rate than that experienced prior to 1973; The excess generating capacity in the construction pipeline, which developed during the 1970s as economic growth rates came in at half the projections made in 1973, has been worked off; in fact, the pendulum has swung past the mid-point; U.S. utilities need to order an additional 200-350 GWe of capacity for service between 1992 and 2000; The real capital costs of plants, particularly nuclear plants, ordered in the 1980s will be less than that being completed today, as this new plant will be completed on a more expedient basis for reliability reasons, and built in an improved financial climate for utilities; Owing primarily to more favorable economics, but also to environmental considerations, at least half of new generating capacity will be nuclear

  13. Safety Culture in Pre-operational Phases of Nuclear Power Plant Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-15

    An abundance of information exists on safety culture related to the operational phases of nuclear power plants; however, pre-operational phases present unique challenges. This publication focuses on safety culture during pre-operational phases that span the interval from before a decision to launch a nuclear power programme to first fuel load. It provides safety culture insights and focuses on eight generic issues: safety culture understanding; multicultural aspects; leadership; competencies and resource competition; management systems; learning and feedback; cultural assessments; and communication. Each issue is discussed in terms of: specific challenges; desired state; approaches and methods; and examples and resources. This publication will be of interest to newcomers and experienced individuals faced with the opportunities and challenges inherent in safety culture programmes aimed at pre-operational activities.

  14. Safety Culture in Pre-operational Phases of Nuclear Power Plant Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    An abundance of information exists on safety culture related to the operational phases of nuclear power plants; however, pre-operational phases present unique challenges. This publication focuses on safety culture during pre-operational phases that span the interval from before a decision to launch a nuclear power programme to first fuel load. It provides safety culture insights and focuses on eight generic issues: safety culture understanding; multicultural aspects; leadership; competencies and resource competition; management systems; learning and feedback; cultural assessments; and communication. Each issue is discussed in terms of: specific challenges; desired state; approaches and methods; and examples and resources. This publication will be of interest to newcomers and experienced individuals faced with the opportunities and challenges inherent in safety culture programmes aimed at pre-operational activities.

  15. Nuclear power. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    Lay language brings an understanding of nuclear technology and nuclear politics to the non-specialist reader. The author notes that there has been little change in the technology during the four decades of the nuclear age, but mankind has still to learn how to live with it. Part One explains how reactors work, identifies different reactor types, and describes the fuel cycle. Part two follows research developments during the pre-Manhatten Project days, the war effort, and the decision to pursue commercial nuclear power. He traces the development of policies to secure fission materials and international efforts to prevent the proliferation of weapons grade material and the safe handling of radioactive wastes on a global as well as national scale. There are four appendices, including an annotated reference to other publications. 9 figures.

  16. The experience gained at various stages of the Atucha nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosentino, J.O.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes the experience gained in Argentina at the successive stages of planning, feasibility study, decision-making, awarding of contracts, construction and operation of the first nuclear power plant in Latin America. In particular, the operating experience accumulated so far is summarized together with the requirements for preparing operating tables for the plant. The role of the Atucha plant is also described in connection with the second plant under construction and the third in the planning stage [es

  17. Quality Assurance in the Vandellos 1 Nuclear Power Plant Dismantling and Decommissioning Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto Lanuza, A.

    2000-01-01

    General description of the Quality Assurance System established and implemented for the efficient development of the current activities specified in the Dismantling and Decommissioning Plan for Vandellos I Nuclear Power Plant. Aspects related to the Quality organization, scope and applicability on the established Quality Assurance Manual, availability of requirements and recommendations on quality as well as actions to be taken for the correct verification on the quality and practical application of the Manual should be described. (Author)

  18. Thai Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namwong, Ratanachai

    2011-01-01

    The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT), the main power producer in Thailand, was first interested in nuclear power as an electricity option in 1967 when the electricity demand increased considerably for the first time as a result of the economic and industrial growth. Its viability had been assessed several times during the early seventies in relation to the changing factors. Finally in the late 1970s, the proceeding with nuclear option was suspended for a variety of reasons, for instance, public opposition, economic repercussion and the uncovering of the indigenous petroleum resources. Nonetheless, EGAT continued to maintain a core of nuclear expertise. During 1980s, faced with dwindling indigenous fossil fuel resources and restrictions on the use of further hydro as an energy source, EGAT had essentially reconsidered introducing nuclear power plants to provide a significant fraction to the long term future electricity demand. The studies on feasibility, siting and environmental impacts were conducted. However, the project was never implemented due to economics crisis in 1999 and strong opposition by environmentalists and activists groups. The 1986 Chernobyl disaster was an important cause. After a long dormant period, the nuclear power is now reviewed as one part of the solution for future energy supply in the country. Thailand currently relies on natural gas for 70 percent of its electricity, with the rest coming from oil, coal and hydro-power. One-third of the natural gas consumed in Thailand is imported, mainly from neighbouring Myanmar. According to Power Development Plan (PDP) 2007 rev.2, the total installed electricity capacity will increase from 28,530.3 MW in 2007 to 44,281 MW by the end of plan in 2021. Significantly increasing energy demand, concerns over climate change and dependence on overseas supplies of fossil fuels, all turn out in a favor of nuclear power. Under the current PDP (as revised in 2009), two 1,000- megawatt nuclear

  19. The raw material and waste activity balance in the projected nuclear power of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Ganev, I.Kh.; Lopatkin, A.V.; Muratov, V.G.; Orlov, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    Under discussion is the management of long-lived high-level wastes in the nuclear energy sector of Russia, the development of which on a large scale in the next century is motivated by the need for arresting the increasing consumption of fossil fuels. The prerequisites for the nuclear power growth consists in the design of naturally safe reactors and development of a transmutational nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) technology. The choice of operations in such a cycle and of their quantitative characteristics, is aimed at minimizing the wastes to approach the radiation balance with the natural uranium extracted and put to use. The paper discusses the way the approximation to the balance between the raw material and waste activity is influenced by introduction of the transmutational NFC (in case 2), inclusion of transmutation reactors into the energy mix (case 1), partial disposal of actinide wastes into outer space, and by recycling of protactinium (case 3). It is shown that such a balance can be sustained for a considerable time in cases 2 and 3 or throughout the operation stage of the future nuclear power (case 1). (orig.)

  20. The preliminary analysis of establishing the cost control system of AP1000 for the Haiyang nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jing; Li Xiaobing

    2012-01-01

    The AP1000 technology has been first applied to Nuclear Power Plant construction in China. Haiyang Project is the second plant which applies the new technology, and it is the key to the success of the project, that how to control the cost. The cost control of AP1000 is to manage and monitor all the cost of the project, including the cost of project management, design, procurement, construction, and startup/commissioning. For the Haiyang Project, the cost control system should be established to ensure that the evaluation of the procurement order should be covered in the original budget, and all potential commitments are evaluated and approved within the confinement of cost control, and reduce the risk of the first reactor and get the most profit. (authors)

  1. The CIDEM project for integrating availability, operating experience and maintenance in the design of future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrave, C.; Martin-Onraet, M.

    1998-01-01

    To minimize the kWh cost of future nuclear plants EDF has decided to implement the CIDEM project (French acronym for Design Integrating Availability, Operating Experience and Maintenance), an analytic and systematic process for studying new projects. The first CIDEM application is centered on the future French nuclear unit construction program, known as the REP 2000 Program but the approach could be applied to other Reactor type. The CIDEM studies at the beginning, were oriented to the issues strongly impacting the availability. They have concerned: planned outages, forced outages and preventive maintenance. The studies were carried out by a team grouping engineers from the 3 EDF's Divisions (Engineering-Generation-Research), and working together in a Concurrent Engineering-Mode. This team works in close collaboration with the vendors and the German Utilities involved in the REP 2000 EPR program. The implementation of the CIDEM process constitutes for EDF a new approach to the study of the new Nuclear Power Plant projects. The studies conducted in the availability field have already highlighted a number of critical points and have made it possible to establish a series of specifications for the REP 2000/EPR project. The integration in the design process of Preventive Maintenance and Logistic Support studies will allow a better control of the maintenance cost. The competitiveness of nuclear energy greatly depends on the success of such an approach. (author)

  2. Structuring and financing new nuclear power plant projects in Europe: selected remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belchev, A.

    2004-01-01

    Project financing in the field of nuclear energy is discussed taking into account the changes and new challenges in Europe. Bringing a project to maturity under 'revised' assumptions is likely to be a complex task for all parties involved, but there is a real potential for an enhanced role for stake holders from the private sector. There is a more realistic understanding about how the public and the private sectors can work together. Successfully combining public and private, national and foreign stake holders is likely to be a critical factor of success. The alignment of interest over the long term best serves a projects business case. In that context, a Governments policies are increasingly under the spotlight

  3. Nuclear power 1984: Progressive normalisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popp, M.

    1984-01-01

    The peaceful use of nuclear power is being integrated into the overall concept of a safe long-term power supply in West Germany. The progress of normalisation is shown particularly in the takeover of all stations of the nuclear fuel circuit by the economy, with the exception of the final storage of radioactive waste, which is the responsibility of the West German Government. Normalisation also means the withdrawal of the state from financing projects after completion of the two prototypes SNR-300 and THTR-300 and the German uranium enrichment plant. The state will, however, support future research and development projects in the nuclear field. The expansion of nuclear power capacity is at present being slowed down by the state of the economy, i.e. only nuclear power projects being built are proceeding. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Experiences in the implementation of the Coaching project in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez M, H. I.

    2012-10-01

    This document has the purpose of to share acquired experiences during the implementation of the Coaching project focused the training of supervisors and directive personnel of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V). Derived of the improvement areas identified by the supervisor organization of the nuclear power stations WANO (World Association Nuclear of Operators) and of the auto-evaluations realized by the expert personnel of the same power station that based on external experiences carried out through the Benchmarking (comparison with other power stations) they have reflected the necessity to activate a training process in Coaching with a practical focus toward the directive and supervisor personnel in the power station. By means of the observation of the personnel's acting so much in the control rooms like in different areas, three focus areas have been identified for the training in Coaching, these are the personnel's motivation, the organizational communication so much in vertical form as horizontal and the perception of confidence lack among directive, supervisors, operators and technicians. The plan focused in the abilities training of Coaching with practical sense was development, supported with an evaluation of 360 grades as tool of competitions development through a computer application e-Coaching. The use of application and Coaching following techniques facilitated the conformation of the practical focus, same that are of continuous use starting from the training of the supervisor and directive personnel. (Author)

  5. Power program and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernilin, Yu.F.

    1990-01-01

    Main points of the USSR power program and the role of nuclear power in fuel and power complex of the country are considered. Data on dynamics of economic indices of electric power generation at nuclear power plants during 1980-1988 and forecasts till 2000 are presented. It is shown that real cost of 1 kW/h of electric power is equal to 1.3-1.8 cop., and total reduced cost is equal to 1.8-2.4 cop

  6. Economics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichle, L.F.C.

    1977-01-01

    Mr. Reichle feels that the economic advantages of pursuing nuclear power should prompt Congress and the administration to seek ways of eliminating undue delays and enabling industry to proceed with the design, construction, and management of nuclear plants and facilities. Abundant, low-cost energy, which can only be supplied by coal and nuclear, is vital to growth in our gross national product, he states. While conservation efforts are commendable, we must have more energy if we are to maintain our standard of living. Current energy resources projections into the next century indicate an energy gap of 42 quads with a 3 percent growth and 72 quads with a 4 percent growth. Comparisons of fuel prices, plant capital investment, and electric generation costs are developed for both coal and nuclear energy; these show that nuclear energy has a clear advantage economically as long as light water reactors are supplemented by breeder reactor development and the nuclear industry can demonstrate that these reactors are safe, reliable, and compatible with the environment. Mr. Reichle says excessive regulation and legal challenges combined with public apathy toward developing nuclear energy are delaying decisions and actions that should be taken now

  7. Summary of project to develop handbook of human reliability analysis for nuclear power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, A.D.

    1978-01-01

    For the past two years Alan Swain and Henry E. Guttmann, of the Statistics, Computing, and Human Factors Division, Sandia Laboratories, have been developing a handbook to aid qualified persons to evaluate the effect of human error on the availability of engineered safety systems and features in nuclear power plants. The handbook includes a mathematical model, procedures, derived human failure data, and principles of human behavior and ergonomics. The handbook is expanding the human error analyses which were presented in WASH--1400. The work, under the sponsorship of Probabilistic Analysis Staff, NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (Dr. M.C. Cullingford, NRC Program Manager), is about half completed. An outline of the handbook contents is given in copies of vugraphs (attached), followed by copies of human performance model abstractors (also attached). A first draft of the handbook is scheduled for NRC review by July 1, 1979

  8. An Extreme Meteorological Events Analysis For Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Siting Project at Bangka Island, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septiadi, Deni; S, Yarianto Sugeng B.; Sriyana; Anzhar, Kurnia; Suntoko, Hadi

    2018-03-01

    The potential sources of meteorological phenomena in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) area of interest are identified and the extreme values of the possible resulting hazards associated which such phenomena are evaluated to derive the appropriate design bases for the NPP. The appropriate design bases shall be determined according to the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (Bapeten) applicable regulations, which presently do not indicate quantitative criteria for purposes of determining the design bases for meteorological hazards. These meteorological investigations are also carried out to evaluate the regional and site specific meteorological parameters which affect the transport and dispersion of radioactive effluents on the environment of the region around the NPP site. The meteorological hazards are to be monitored and assessed periodically over the lifetime of the plant to ensure that consistency with the design assumptions is maintained throughout the full lifetime of the facility.

  9. Greenfield nuclear power for Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarenpaa, Tapio

    2010-09-15

    In Finland, licensing for new nuclear power is ongoing. The political approval is to be completed in 2010. Fennovoima's project is unique in various ways: (i) the company was established only in 2007, (ii) its ownership includes a mixture of local energy companies, electricity-intensive industries and international nuclear competence through E.ON, and (iii) it has two alternative greenfield sites. There are five prerequisites for a successful nuclear power project in a transparent democracy of today: (1) need for additional power capacity, (2) actor prepared to invest, (3) established competence, (4) available site, (5) open communications, and (6) favorable public opinion.

  10. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  11. Analogue to digital upgrade project-boiler feedwater control system for Bruce Power nuclear units 1 & 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, R.

    2012-01-01

    Bruce Power Nuclear Generating Station A, “Bruce A” is in the final stages of its Restart Project. This capital project will see a large scale rehabilitation of Units 1 and 2 resulting in addition of 1500MW of safe, reliable, clean electricity to the Ontario grid. Restart Project Scope 375, Boiler Feedwater Controls Upgrade was sanctioned to replace obsolete analog devices with a modern digital control system. This project replaced the existing Foxboro H Line analog controls which comprised of 81 individual control modules and support instrumentation. The replacement system was a Triconex Triple Modular Redundant PLC which interfaces with two redundant touch screen monitors. The upgraded digital system incorporates the following controls: 1. Boiler Level Control Loops 2. Dearator Level Control Loops 3. Dearator Pressure Control Loops 4. Boiler Feedwater Recirculation Flow Control Loops A number of technical challenges were addressed when installing a new digital system within the existing plant configuration. Interfaces to new, old and refurbished field devices must be understood as well as implications of connecting to the plant’s Digital Control Computers (DCC’s) and newly installed Steam Generators. The overall project involved many stakeholders to address various requirements from conceptual / design stage through procurement, construction, commissioning and return to service. In addition, the project highlighted the unique requirements found in Nuclear Industry with respect to Human Factors and Software Quality Assurance. (author)

  12. China and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouquoire-Brillet, E.

    1999-01-01

    This book presents the history of nuclear power development in China from the first research works started in the 1950's for the manufacturing of nuclear weapons to the recent development of nuclear power plants. This study tries to answer the main questions raised by the attitude of China with respect to the civil and military nuclear programs. (J.S.)

  13. Nuclear power revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grear, B.

    2008-01-01

    Modern development of nuclear power technology and the established framework of international agreements and conventions are responding to the major political, economic and environmental issues - high capital costs, the risks posed by nuclear wastes and accidents, and the proliferation of nuclear weaponry - that until recently hindered the expansion of nuclear power.

  14. Nuclear power for desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Siddhanth; Lanjekar, Sanket; Jagdale, Bhushan; Srivastava, V.K.

    2015-01-01

    Water is one of the most important assets to mankind and without which the human race would cease to exist. Water is required by us right from domestic to industrial levels. As notified by the 'American Nuclear Society' and 'World Nuclear Association' about 1/5 th of the world population does not access to portable water especially in the Asian and African subcontinent. The situation is becoming adverse day by day due to rise in population and industrialization. The need of alternative water resource is thus becoming vital. About 97.5% of Earth is covered by oceans. Desalination of saline water to generate potable water is thus an important topic of research. Currently about 12,500 desalination plants are operating worldwide with a capacity of about 35 million m 3 /day using mainly fossil fuels for generation of large amount of energy required for processing water. These thermal power station release large amount of carbon dioxide and other green house gases. Nuclear reactors are capable of delivering energy to the high energy-intensive processes without any environmental concerns for climate change etc., giving a vision to sustainable growth of desalination process. These projects are currently employed in Kazakhstan, India, Japan, and Pakistan and are coupled to the nuclear reactor for generating electricity and potable water as well. The current climatic scenario favors the need for expanding dual purpose nuclear power plants producing energy and water at the same location. (author)

  15. Nuclear Power 2010 Program Dominion Virginia Power Cooperative Project U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-05ID14635 Construction and Operating License Demonstration Project Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecheck, Eugene S.; Batalo, David P.

    2010-01-01

    This report serves to summarize the major activities completed as part of Virginia Electric and Power Company's North Anna construction and operating license demonstration project with DOE. Project successes, lessons learned, and suggestions for improvement are discussed. Objectives of the North Anna COL project included preparation and submittal of a COLA to the USNRC incorporating ESBWR technology for a third unit a the North Anna Power Station site, support for the NRC review process and mandatory hearing, obtaining NRC approval of the COLA and issuance of a COL, and development of a business case necessary to support a decision on building a new nuclear power plant at the North Anna site.

  16. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-07-01

    The IAEA is organizing a major conference on nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle, which is to be held from 2 to 13 May 1977 in Salzburg, Austria. The programme for the conference was published in the preceding issue of the IAEA Bulletin (Vol.18, No. 3/4). Topics to be covered at the conference include: world energy supply and demand, supply of nuclear fuel and fuel cycle services, radioactivity management (including transport), nuclear safety, public acceptance of nuclear power, safeguarding of nuclear materials, and nuclear power prospects in developing countries. The articles in the section that follows are intended to serve as an introduction to the topics to be discussed at the Salzburg Conference. They deal with the demand for uranium and nuclear fuel cycle services, uranium supplies, a computer simulation of regional fuel cycle centres, nuclear safety codes, management of radioactive wastes, and a pioneering research project on factors that determine public attitudes toward nuclear power. It is planned to present additional background articles, including a review of the world nuclear fuel reprocessing situation and developments in the uranium enrichment industry, in future issues of the Bulletin. (author)

  17. Nuclear power in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addinall, E.; Ellington, H.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters: (the nature of nuclear power) the atomic nucleus - a potential source of energy; how nuclear reactors work; the nuclear fuel cycle; radioactivity - its nature and biological effects; (why we need nuclear power) use of energy in the non-communist world -the changing pattern since 1950; use of energy - possible future scenarios; how our future energy needs might be met; (a possible long term nuclear strategy) the history of nuclear power; a possible nuclear power strategy for the Western World; (social and environmental considerations) the hazards to workers in the nuclear power industry; the hazards to the general public (nuclear power industry; reactor operation; transport of radioactive materials; fuel reprocessing; radioactive waste disposal; genetic hazards); the threat to democratic freedom and world peace. (U.K.)

  18. Intelligent and interactive computer image of a nuclear power plant: The ImagIn project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubensack, D.; Malvache, P.; Valleix, P.

    1998-01-01

    The ImagIn project consists in a method and a set of computer tools apt to bring perceptible and assessable improvements in the operational safety of a nuclear plant. Its aim is to design an information system that would maintain a highly detailed computerized representation of a nuclear plant in its initial state and throughout its in-service life. It is not a tool to drive or help driving the nuclear plant, but a tool that manages concurrent operations that modify the plant configuration in a very general was (maintenance for example). The configuration of the plant, as well as rules and constraints about it, are described in a object-oriented knowledge database, which is built using a generic ImagIn meta-model based on the semantical network theory. An inference engine works on this database and is connected to reality through interfaces to operators and captors on the installation; it verifies constantly in real-time the consistency of the database according to its inner rules, and reports eventual problems to concerned operators. A special effort is made on interfaces to provide natural and intuitive tools (using virtual reality, natural language, voice recognition and synthesis). A laboratory application on a fictive but realistic installation already exists and is used to simulate various tests and scenarii. A real application is being constructed on Siloe, an experimental reactor of the CEA. (author)

  19. Experience in the use of teleoperated robotic equipment in the Spanish Nuclear Power Plants (S.R.T. Project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielza, M.; Gomez, J.; Izquierdo, J.A.; Bercedo, A.; Espallardo, J.A.; Martinez, A.; Carmena, P.; Pascual, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of the Teleoperated Robotic Systems project (SRT) is the development of teleoperated robotic systems for use in the inspection, surveillance and maintenance operations in nuclear and radioactive installations. These systems make possible the reduction of the individual and collective doses of the workers that undertake these operations, as well as an increase of plant availability as it is possible to carry out specific tasks of inspection and surveillance in high radiation dose areas without to reduce the power of the installation. This project started in 1995 deciding to priorize the inspection equipment in a first phase. As a result of this work currently several semi-industrial products are available: ROBCAR, ROBICEN y ANAES. These have been installed for testing and commercial operation in Spanish nuclear installations. In this paper the experience of using these prototypes in the S.M. de Garona and Cofrentes nuclear power plants is described, as well as the improvements in the design of these systems derived from these experiences that have been incorporated to the industrial prototypes that are currently in the last phase of development. (Author)

  20. Factors determining nuclear expansion in Poland till 2020, their analysis and projected nuclear power expansion as a consequence of these factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerner, Andrzej; Kumanowski, Marek

    1999-01-01

    Coal plays a dominant role in Polish economy. The share of hard coal and lignite in Poland's total primary energy supply and in portfolio of public electricity/heat production in 1996 amounted to 73% and 97%, respectively. So high shares result: - low energy security index connected with very low fuel diversity; - high level of environmental pollution i.e. air emissions (dusts, SO 2 , NO x and CO 2 ) as well as solid wastes dumping. Electricity demand forecasts performed by different organizations show that in the time horizon 2020 a considerable growth of electricity consumption is projected, estimated within a range of 60-120% in comparison with the 1996 level. In the case of continuation of the present energy policy Poland will not be able to meet international obligations in the field of environmental protection, in particular the Kyoto Protocol. Practically there are two energy carries that might present improve the fuel structure for electricity generation: natural gas and nuclear fuel. Now, with very high discount rate, natural gas has an significant advantage over all other fuels as much less capital and time consuming in power plant investments. The advantage of nuclear power is total reduction of CO 2 emissions. Analyses of electricity generation strategies, under condition that energy policy is kept as it is now, show that nuclear power is not competitive against other sources. With an environmental coal tax or external costs in electricity production modelled, nuclear power plants become competitive since 2015. (author)

  1. Projected costs of generating electricity from nuclear and coal-fired power stations for commissioning in 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report updates and extends the previous NEA study, ''The Costs of Generating Electricity in Nuclear and Coal-fired Power Stations'', published by the OECD in late 1983. Despite the changed expectations concerning coal prices and the considerable movements in exchange rates since the first study was completed, the conclusions remain essentially the same. Nuclear Power is projected to be economically superior by a significant margin to coal-fired plants for base load electricity production in Europe, Japan and some regions of North America. In areas of North America in close proximity to supplies of cheap coal, this would be the more economic fuel, unless future nuclear investment costs can be reduced to match the best US and Canadian experience. In all regions considered, the economic advantage of both coal and nuclear over oil and gas-fired plants for commissioning in the mid-1990s is expected to be substantial. These conclusions are based on an analysis of cost projections for 900 MWe to 1400 MWe Light Water Reactors to be commissioned in 1995, operating at a levelised load factor of about 72 per cent over an assumed 25 years economic life and calculated with a 5 per cent (real) discount rate. This parallels the reference reactor selected for the NEA report ''The Economics of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle'', which was published by the OECD in June 1985, though it deviates somewhat from the reference conditions of the previous generation cost study. Contemporary coal-fired stations ranging in capacity from 330 MWe to 700 MWe with the same assumed economic life and load factor provide the basis for comparison. Some data are included on CANDU Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors, and a brief comment is annexed on the relevance of the comparisons for the smaller plants that may be of interest to countries with smaller electricity networks or where special circumstances apply

  2. Review of the Norwegian-Russian Cooperation on Safety Projects at Kola and Leningrad Nuclear Power Plants 2005 - 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattsson, H.; Tishakov, P.

    2010-11-01

    In this report, Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) has reviewed the Norwegian funded projects on nuclear safety performed in the period 2005-2009 under the Norwegian Action Plan. NRPA has evaluated the progress of eight projects implemented by the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) at Kola Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) and Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (LNPP). NRPA has visited the plants, inspected delivered equipment and discussed the projects implementation with relevant personnel at the plants. One of NRPA findings is that the equipment has been delivered to KNPP and LNPP, it is in regular use by competent personnel, and the equipment contributes to safety of both plants. Furthermore, the cooperation between three main project partners - IFE, LNPP and KNPP, seems to be very productive. NRPA's main conclusion is therefore that the projects have been implemented as described in IFE's project reports and that the goals are met. Furthermore, this report reviews safety levels at the KNPP and LNPP. Safety parameters at the plants indicate that the safety level has been significantly improved since early 1990s when the cooperation between Norway and Russia was initiated. Probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) values and number of INES (International Nuclear Event Scale) events, two internationally acknowledged safety parameters, indicate that the safety level has been much improved since the early 1990s when the cooperation between Norway and Russia started. Although it is clear that the Norwegian-funded projects have contributed positively to this development it is difficult to quantify the contribution. Moreover, the report also reviews the planned life-time of and the decommissioning plans for the reactors at KNPP and LNPP. Construction of new LNPP reactors has started and it is estimated that they will be operational in 2013- 2015. The license of the oldest reactor at LNPP expires in 2018 and if the new reactors are in operation by that time, it is

  3. Nuclear power prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-09-15

    A survey of the nuclear power needs of the less-developed countries and a study of the technology and economics of small and medium scale power reactors are envisioned by the General Conference. Agency makes its services available to Member States to assist them for their future nuclear power plans, and in particular in studying the technical and economic aspects of their power programs. The Agency also undertakes general studies on the economics of nuclear power, including the collection and analysis of cost data, in order to assist Member States in comparing and forecasting nuclear power costs in relation to their specific situations

  4. Dictionary of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    2012-06-01

    The actualized version (June 2012) of the dictionary on nuclear power includes all actualizations and new inputs since the last version of 2001. The original publication dates from 1980. The dictionary includes definitions, terms, measuring units and helpful information on the actual knowledge concerning nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear facilities, radioactive waste management, nuclear physics, reactor physics, isotope production, biological radiation effects, and radiation protection.

  5. Selected natural and fallout radionuclides in plant foods around the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, E Mahiban; Raj, Y Lenin; Wesley, S Godwin; Rajan, M P

    2013-01-01

    The activity concentrations of certain radionuclides were quantified in some plant foods cultivated around Kudankulam, where a mega-nuclear power plant is being established. The activity concentrations were found more in the 'pulses' group and were the lowest in 'other vegetable' category. The annual effective dose was computed based on the activity concentration of radionuclides and it was found to be higher due to the consumption of cereals and pulses. Other vegetables, cereals, pulses and nuts recorded high transfer factors for the radionuclide (228)Ra. Fruits, leafy vegetables, tubers and roots, and palm embryo registered high transfer factors for (226)Ra. Group-wise activity concentration, radiation dose to the public and soil-plant-to-transfer factor are discussed in detail. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Current situation of the project finishing of the building of 3 and 4 block of the nuclear power plant Mochovce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niznan, S.

    2005-01-01

    In the contribution there is the basic information mentioned about history of building and the current situation at the finishing of the building of 3 and 4 block of the Nuclear Power Plant Mochovce with the use of project digitization. Further on the contribution shows what kinds of supporting material has been elaborated, what kind of decisions have been issued to the finishing of the building, way of financing and also the assumption of investment return under the defined conditions. An orientation time schedule of the finishing of the building and the crucial steps for its security are presented in the conclusion

  7. The International Remote Monitoring Project: Results of the Swedish Nuclear Power Facility field trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.S.; af Ekenstam, G.; Sallstrom, M.

    1995-01-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored work on a Remote Monitoring System (RMS) that was installed in August 1994 at the Barseback Works north of Malmo, Sweden. The RMS was designed to test the front end detection concept that would be used for unattended remote monitoring activities. Front end detection reduces the number of video images recorded and provides additional sensor verification of facility operations. The function of any safeguards Containment and Surveillance (C/S) system is to collect information which primarily is images that verify the operations at a nuclear facility. Barseback is ideal to test the concept of front end detection since most activities of safeguards interest is movement of spent fuel which occurs once a year. The RMS at Barseback uses a network of nodes to collect data from microwave motion detectors placed to detect the entrance and exit of spent fuel casks through a hatch. A video system using digital compression collects digital images and stores them on a hard drive and a digital optical disk. Data and images from the storage area are remotely monitored via telephone from Stockholm, Sweden and Albuquerque, NM, USA. These remote monitoring stations operated by SKI and SNL respectively, can retrieve data and images from the RMS computer at the Barseback Facility. The data and images are encrypted before transmission. This paper presents details of the RMS and test results of this approach to front end detection of safeguard activities

  8. Nuclear power proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear industry is experiencing a multiple crisis in which economic, technical and ethical aspects are blended inextricably. Nuclear hardware costs have everywhere soared far beyond inflation in the last five years, largely as a result of delays in programme completion arising from problems of reactor and fuel cycle. Meanwhile, partly as a result of this cost escalation, there is widespread and growing doubt as to whether capital will be available to finance the electricity generating levels projected by the industry and by governments for the 1990s. The nuclear industry is now in trouble at every stage of the fuel cycle. The industry's difficulties have also revealed a lack of overall - but particularly nuclear - energy strategy at either national or international levels, and a lack of will to create regulations and institutional machinery at either of these levels which might reassure both concerned publics and the energy industries themselves. This paper appraises some of the present limitations of international institutions in achieving control and management of nuclear power. (author)

  9. Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the South Texas Project nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumgardner, J.D.; Nickolaus, J.R.; Moffitt, N.E.; Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.

    1993-12-01

    In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. This information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. South Texas Project was selected as a plant for study. The product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by the NRC inspectors in preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk important components at the South Texas Project plant

  10. Nuclear power in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarossa, G.

    1990-01-01

    As is known to most of this audience in November of 1987 a referendum determined a rejection of nuclear power in Italy. The referendum may be taken into consideration here as a large scale experiment which offers points of interest to this conference and problems to be aware of, in approaching a severe confrontation with the public. To give a synopsis of the Italian perspective I will examine: first the public acceptance in the situation before Chernobyl, then the most disturbing and sensitive factors of Chernobyl's consequences; how the opposition to nuclear energy worked with the support of most media and the strong pressures of an anti-nuclear political party, the syllogism of the opponents and the arguments used, the causes of major weakness of the defenders and how a new perception of nuclear risk was generated in the public. I will come to the topic of utility acceptance by mentioning that ENEL, as the National Utility, in its role is bound to a policy of compliance with Government decisions. It is oriented today to performance of feasibility studies and development of requirements for the next generation of reactors in order to maintain an updated proposal for a future recovery of the nuclear option. I will then try to identify in general terms the factors determining the future acceptance of nuclear power. They will be determined in the interdisciplinary area of politics, media and public interactions with the utilities the uses of the technology are forced to follow, by political constraints, two main directives: working only in new projects to achieve, if possible, new safety goals

  11. Nuclear power in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santarossa, G [ENEA, Rome (Italy)

    1990-07-01

    As is known to most of this audience in November of 1987 a referendum determined a rejection of nuclear power in Italy. The referendum may be taken into consideration here as a large scale experiment which offers points of interest to this conference and problems to be aware of, in approaching a severe confrontation with the public. To give a synopsis of the Italian perspective I will examine: first the public acceptance in the situation before Chernobyl, then the most disturbing and sensitive factors of Chernobyl's consequences; how the opposition to nuclear energy worked with the support of most media and the strong pressures of an anti-nuclear political party, the syllogism of the opponents and the arguments used, the causes of major weakness of the defenders and how a new perception of nuclear risk was generated in the public. I will come to the topic of utility acceptance by mentioning that ENEL, as the National Utility, in its role is bound to a policy of compliance with Government decisions. It is oriented today to performance of feasibility studies and development of requirements for the next generation of reactors in order to maintain an updated proposal for a future recovery of the nuclear option. I will then try to identify in general terms the factors determining the future acceptance of nuclear power. They will be determined in the interdisciplinary area of politics, media and public interactions with the utilities the uses of the technology are forced to follow, by political constraints, two main directives: working only in new projects to achieve, if possible, new safety goals.

  12. Nuclear power in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The first United Nations project of its kind, where the prospects of using nuclear power in a developing country are being analysed, is being carried out in the Philippines. It is entitled, 'Pre-Investment Study on Power, including Nuclear Power, in Luzon'; it is a United Nations Special Fund project, for which the International Atomic Energy Agency is acting as the executing body. Although directed specifically at the situation of the Luzon grid, the approach and the methods evolved should be useful in other countries also. The project was initiated in early 1964 and is expected to be completed by the end of 1965. The Philippines have substantial reserves of hydro capacity, but very little of fossil fuels. The country has been interested for quite some time in the possibility of using nuclear power. In 1956 a study was made of a small nuclear power plant for the Manila area, but such a plant would not have been able to compete with the fossil fuel-fired station. The Philippine Government had in mind the development of Luzon Island, which is the largest and most industrialized part of the Philippines, accounting for 50 per cent of the population and 80 per cent of the power demand. In 1960, the Government invited an Agency mission, whose report entitled, 'The Prospects of Nuclear Power for the Philippines', indicated that the possibilities of using a reasonably large nuclear plant in the Luzon grid deserved serious consideration

  13. Dictionary of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    2012-04-01

    The actualized version (April 2012) of the dictionary on nuclear power includes all actualizations and new inputs since the last version of 2001. The original publication dates from 1980. The dictionary includes definitions, terms, measuring units and helpful information on the actual knowledge concerning nuclear power, nuclear facilities, and radiation protection.

  14. Nuclear power status 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document gives statistical information on nuclear power plants status in the world in 1999, including the number of reactors in operation or under construction, the electricity supplied by nuclear power reactors and the respective percentage of electricity produced by nuclear energy in 1999, and the total operating experience to 31 December 1999, by country

  15. Reliability Data for Piping Components in Nordic Nuclear Power Plants 'R-Book'. Project Phase 1. Rev 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lydell, Bengt; Olsson, Anders

    2008-01-01

    This report constitutes a planning document for a new RandD project to develop a piping component reliability parameter handbook for use in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) and related activities. The Swedish acronym for this handbook is 'R-Book.' The objective of the project is to utilize the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency 'OECD Pipe Failure Data Exchange Project' (OPDE) database to derive piping component failure rates and rupture probabilities for input to internal flooding probabilistic safety assessment, high-energy line break' (HELB) analysis, risk-informed in-service inspection (RI-ISI) program development, and other activities related to PSA. This new RandD project is funded by member organizations of the Nordic PSA Group (NPSAG) - Forsmark AB, OKG AB, Ringhals AB, and the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI). The history behind the current effort to produce a handbook of piping reliability parameters goes back to 1994 when SKI funded a 5-year RandD project to explore the viability of establishing an international database on the service experience with piping system components in commercial nuclear power plants. An underlying objective behind this 5-year program was to investigate the different options and possibilities for deriving pipe failure rates and rupture probabilities directly from service experience data as an alternative to probabilistic fracture mechanics. The RandD project culminated in an international piping reliability seminar held in the fall of 1997 in Sigtuna (Sweden) and a pilot project to demonstrate an application of the pipe failure database to the estimation of loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) frequency (SKI Report 98:30). A particularly important outcome of the 5-year project was a decision by SKI to transfer the pipe failure database including the lessons learned to an international cooperative effort under the auspices of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. Following on information exchange and planning meetings that were

  16. Reliability Data for Piping Components in Nordic Nuclear Power Plants 'R-Book'. Project Phase 1. Rev 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lydell, Bengt (Scandpower Risk Management Inc., Houston, TX (US)); Olsson, Anders (Relcon Scandpower AB, Stockholm (SE))

    2008-01-15

    This report constitutes a planning document for a new RandD project to develop a piping component reliability parameter handbook for use in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) and related activities. The Swedish acronym for this handbook is 'R-Book.' The objective of the project is to utilize the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency 'OECD Pipe Failure Data Exchange Project' (OPDE) database to derive piping component failure rates and rupture probabilities for input to internal flooding probabilistic safety assessment, high-energy line break' (HELB) analysis, risk-informed in-service inspection (RI-ISI) program development, and other activities related to PSA. This new RandD project is funded by member organizations of the Nordic PSA Group (NPSAG) - Forsmark AB, OKG AB, Ringhals AB, and the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI). The history behind the current effort to produce a handbook of piping reliability parameters goes back to 1994 when SKI funded a 5-year RandD project to explore the viability of establishing an international database on the service experience with piping system components in commercial nuclear power plants. An underlying objective behind this 5-year program was to investigate the different options and possibilities for deriving pipe failure rates and rupture probabilities directly from service experience data as an alternative to probabilistic fracture mechanics. The RandD project culminated in an international piping reliability seminar held in the fall of 1997 in Sigtuna (Sweden) and a pilot project to demonstrate an application of the pipe failure database to the estimation of loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) frequency (SKI Report 98:30). A particularly important outcome of the 5-year project was a decision by SKI to transfer the pipe failure database including the lessons learned to an international cooperative effort under the auspices of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. Following on information exchange and planning

  17. Nuclear power publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This booklet lists 69 publications on nuclear energy available free from some of the main organisations concerned with its development and operation in the UK. Headings are: general information; the need for nuclear energy; the nuclear industry; nuclear power stations; fuel cycle; safety; waste management. (U.K.)

  18. Nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nealey, S.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine factors and prospects for a resumption in growth of nuclear power in the United States over the next decade. The focus of analysis on the likelihood that current efforts in the United States to develop improved and safer nuclear power reactors will provide a sound technical basis for improved acceptance of nuclear power, and contribute to a social/political climate more conducive to a resumption of nuclear power growth. The acceptability of nuclear power and advanced reactors to five social/political sectors in the U.S. is examined. Three sectors highly relevant to the prospects for a restart of nuclear power plant construction are the financial sector involved in financing nuclear power plant construction, the federal nuclear regulatory sector, and the national political sector. For this analysis, the general public are divided into two groups: those who are knowledgeable about and involved in nuclear power issues, the involved public, and the much larger body of the general public that is relatively uninvolved in the controversy over nuclear power

  19. Climate change and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.

    2000-04-01

    The nuclear industry has increased its efforts to have nuclear power plants integrated into the post- Kyoto negotiating process of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) states: ''For many reasons, current and future nuclear energy projects are a superior method of generating emission credits that must be considered as the US expands the use of market- based mechanisms designed around emission credit creation and trading to achieve environmental goals ''. The NEI considers that nuclear energy should be allowed to enter all stages of the Kyoto ''flexibility Mechanisms'': emissions trading, joint implementation and the Clean Development Mechanism. The industry sees the operation of nuclear reactors as emission ''avoidance actions'' and believes that increasing the generation of nuclear power above the 1990 baseline year either through extension and renewal of operating licenses or new nuclear plant should be accepted under the flexibility mechanisms in the same way as wind, solar and hydro power. For the time being, there is no clear definition of the framework conditions for operating the flexibility mechanisms. However, eligible mechanisms must contribute to the ultimate objective of the Climate Convention of preventing ''dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system''. The information presented in the following sections of this report underlines that nuclear power is not a sustainable source of energy, for many reasons. In conclusion, an efficient greenhouse gas abatement strategy will be based on energy efficiency and not on the use of nuclear power. (author)

  20. Nuclear power flies high

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear power in aircraft, rockets and satellites is discussed. No nuclear-powered rockets or aircraft have ever flown, but ground tests were successful. Nuclear reactors are used in the Soviet Cosmos serles of satellites, but only one American satellite, the SNAP-10A, contained a reactor. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators, many of which use plutonium 238, have powered more than 20 satellites launched into deep space by the U.S.A

  1. Worldwide nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royen, J.

    1981-01-01

    Worldwide nuclear power (WNP) is a companion volume to UPDATE. Our objective in the publication of WNP is to provide factual information on nuclear power programs and policies in foreign countries to U.S. policymakers in the Federal Government who are instrumental in defining the direction of nuclear power in the U.S. WNP is prepared by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy from reports obtained from foreign Embassies in Washington, U.S. Embassies overseas, foreign and domestic publications, participation in international studies, and personal communications. Domestic nuclear data is included only where its presence is needed to provide easy and immediate comparisons with foreign data

  2. Nuclear power controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, A.W.

    1976-01-01

    Arthur W. Murphy in the introductory chapter cites the issues, pro and con, concerning nuclear power. In assessing the present stance, he first looks back to the last American Assembly on nuclear power, held October 1957 and notes its accomplishments. He summarizes the six papers of this book, which focus on nuclear power to the end of this century. Chapter I, Safety Aspects of Nuclear Energy, by David Bodansky and Fred Schmidt, deals with the technical aspects of reactor safety as well as waste storage and plutonium diversion. Chapter 2, The Economics of Electric Power Generation--1975-2000, by R. Michael Murray, Jr., focuses specifically on coal-fired and nuclear plants. Chapter 3, How Can We Get the Nuclear Job Done, by Fritz Heimann, identifies actions that must take place to develop nuclear power in the U.S. and who should build the reprocessing plants. Chapter 4, by Arthur Murphy, Nuclear Power Plant Regulation, discusses the USNRC operation and the Price-Anderson Act specifically. Chapter 5, Nuclear Exports and Nonproliferation Strategy, by John G. Palfrey, treats the international aspects of the problem with primary emphasis upon the situation of the U.S. as an exporter of technology. Chapter 6, by George Kistiakowsky, Nuclear Power: How Much Is Too Much, expresses doubt about the nuclear effort, at least in the short run

  3. Selected natural and fallout radionuclides in plant foods around the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, E. Mahiban; Raj, Y. Lenin; Wesley, S. Godwin; Rajan, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    The activity concentrations of certain radionuclides were quantified in some plant foods cultivated around Kudankulam, where a mega-nuclear power plant is being established. The activity concentrations were found more in the ‘pulses’ group and were the lowest in ‘other vegetable’ category. The annual effective dose was computed based on the activity concentration of radionuclides and it was found to be higher due to the consumption of cereals and pulses. Other vegetables, cereals, pulses and nuts recorded high transfer factors for the radionuclide 228 Ra. Fruits, leafy vegetables, tubers and roots, and palm embryo registered high transfer factors for 226 Ra. Group-wise activity concentration, radiation dose to the public and soil-plant-to-transfer factor are discussed in detail. Highlights: ► Fallout radionuclides ( 90 Sr and 137 Cs) were below the limit of detection. ► 228 Ra activities were higher than 226 Ra activity concentrations. ► ‘Pulses’ group (leguminous grains) was the highest accumulator of radium nuclides. ► 228 Ra transfer factor was higher in few groups while 226 Ra was higher in others.

  4. The decommissioning of WWER type nuclear power plants. Final report on an IAEA regional technical co-operation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Numerous WWER-440 nuclear power plants are in operation in central and eastern Europe and a small number have already been shut down. In addition to reactors already shut down, many other reactors will reach the end of their design lifetime in a few years and become candidates for decommissioning. It is unfortunate that little consideration was devoted to decommissioning of WWER-440 reactors at the plant design and construction stage, and little emphasis was placed on planning for decommissioning. It is within this context that the IAEA launched a regional technical co-operation project in 1994 with the aim of providing guidance on planning and management of decommissioning for WWERs. The project, which had a duration of four years (1995-1998), included the organization of workshops and scientific visits to countries having WWERs and other countries where active decommissioning projects were under way. Eventually, participants suggested the consolidation of expert guidance and collective opinions into a TECDOC, which was drafted by both designated participants from project recipient countries and invited experts. The TECDOC has the aim of serving as a stimulus for all concerned parties in central and eastern European countries to initiate concrete decommissioning planning, including assessment of existing and required resources for the eventual implementation of decommissioning plans. In addition, the regional technical co-operation project has managed to bring together in this TECDOC a number of good practices that could be useful in WWER-440 decommissioning

  5. Nuclear power in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rim, C.S.

    1990-01-01

    Before addressing the issue of public and utility acceptance of nuclear power in Korea, let me briefly explain the Korean nuclear power program and development plan for a passively safe nuclear power plant in Korea. At present, there are eight PWRs and one CANDU in operation; two PWRs are under construction, and contract negotiations are underway for one more CANDU and two more PWRs, which are scheduled to be completed by 1997,1998 and 1999, respectively. According to a recent forecast for electricity demand in Korea, about fifty additional nuclear power plants with a generating capacity of 1000MWe are required by the year 2030. Until around 2006, Korean standardized nuclear power plants with evolutionary features such as those in the ALWR program are to be built, and a new type of nuclear power plant with passive safety features is expected to be constructed after 2006. The Korean government is making a serious effort to increase public understanding of the safety of nuclear power plants and radioactive waste storage and disposal. In addition, the Korean government has recently introduced a program of benefits for residents near nuclear power plants. By this program, common facilities such as community centers and new roads are constructed, and scholarships are given to the local students. Nuclear power is accepted positively by the utility and reasonably well by the public in Korea

  6. Role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklund, S.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of world nuclear installations, the operating experiences of power reactors, and estimates of future nuclear growth leads to the conclusion that nuclear power's share of world electric power supply will grow slowly, but steadily during this decade. This growth will lead advanced countries to use the commercial breeder by the end of the century. Nuclear power is economically viable for most industrialized and many developing countries if public acceptance problems can be resolved. A restructuring of operational safety and regulations must occur first, as well as a resolution of the safeguards and technology transfer issue. 7 figures, 7 tables

  7. Nuclear power in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Australian Uranium Association reports that Asia is the only region in the world where electricity generating capacity and specifically nuclear power is growing significantly. In East and South Asia, there are over 109 nuclear power reactors in operation, 18 under construction and plans to build about a further 100. The greatest growth in nuclear generation is expected in China, Japan, South Korea and India. As a member of the SE Asian community, Australia cannot afford to ignore the existence and growth of nuclear power generation on its door step, even if it has not, up to now, needed to utilise this power source

  8. Nuclear power in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, C S [Radioactive Waste Management Centre, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon, Choong-Nam (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-01

    Before addressing the issue of public and utility acceptance of nuclear power in Korea, let me briefly explain the Korean nuclear power program and development plan for a passively safe nuclear power plant in Korea. At present, there are eight PWRs and one CANDU in operation; two PWRs are under construction, and contract negotiations are underway for one more CANDU and two more PWRs, which are scheduled to be completed by 1997,1998 and 1999, respectively. According to a recent forecast for electricity demand in Korea, about fifty additional nuclear power plants with a generating capacity of 1000MWe are required by the year 2030. Until around 2006, Korean standardized nuclear power plants with evolutionary features such as those in the ALWR program are to be built, and a new type of nuclear power plant with passive safety features is expected to be constructed after 2006. The Korean government is making a serious effort to increase public understanding of the safety of nuclear power plants and radioactive waste storage and disposal. In addition, the Korean government has recently introduced a program of benefits for residents near nuclear power plants. By this program, common facilities such as community centers and new roads are constructed, and scholarships are given to the local students. Nuclear power is accepted positively by the utility and reasonably well by the public in Korea.

  9. Report on the first two IAEA-courses on nuclear power project planning and implementation in Karlsruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, H.H.

    1977-01-01

    There is no more doubt about the necessity of utilizing nuclear energy to cover the world energy requirements. A growing number of developing countries find themselves compelled to use nuclear energy in order to meet their rising energy demands and, hence, to improve their conditions of life. On the other hand, the lack of suitable experts having gathered experience is particularly perceptible in these countries. For this reason, IAEA has organized training courses on an international level, which are held in Karlsruhe (Federal Republic of Germany), Saclay (France), and Argonne (USA). Taking into account the situation in the respective developing country, independent courses are being offered on ''Nuclear Power Project Planning and Implementation'' and on ''Construction and Operation Management.'' The first course of this type was held at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center from September 8 until December 17, 1975. It was attended by 35 participants from 20 countries. In cooperation with industry and national as well as international authorities the syllabus proposed by IAEA was translated into a training program including all essential questions on the introduction of nuclear energy in developing countries. The next course will take place from September 6 until November 30, 1976. A detailed analysis is presented of the extent to which the expectations of participants have been fulfilled. The status of nuclear technology and the number of candidates having sufficient knowledge is of particular importance in this context. A very significant aspect consists in teaching not only theoretical knowledge but integrating practical application in such training courses, which is demonstrated by examples

  10. Seawater desalination with nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear power helps reduce costs for energy-intensive processes such as seawater desalination. A new generation of innovative small and medium nuclear power plants could co-generate electricity and potable water from seawater, both safely and at competitive prices in today's market. The IAEA provides technical support to Member States facing water shortage problems, on assessing the viability of nuclear power in seawater desalination. The support, usually channelled through national Technical Cooperation (TC) projects, can take several forms, ranging from educational training and technical advice on feasibility studies to design and safety review of demonstration projects. The IAEA offers a software tool (DEEP) that can be used to evaluate the economics of the different desalination and heat source configurations, including nuclear and fossil options

  11. Nuclear power: A competitive option? Annex 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertel, E.; Wilmer, P.

    2002-01-01

    Because the future development of nuclear power will depend largely on its economic performance compared to alternatives, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) investigates continuously the economic aspects of nuclear power. This paper provides key findings from a series of OECD studies on projected costs of generating electricity and other related NEA activities. It addresses the cost economics necessary for nuclear units to be competitive, and discusses the challenges and opportunities currently faced by nuclear power. (author)

  12. Development of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    The discussion on the development of nuclear power took place on 28 September 1960 in Vienna. In his opening remarks, Director General Cole referred to the widespread opinion that 'the prospect of cheap electricity derived from nuclear energy offers the most exciting prospect for improving the lot of mankind of all of the opportunities for uses of atomic energy'. He then introduced the four speakers and the moderator of the discussion, Mr. H. de Laboulaye, IAEA Deputy Director General for Technical Operations. n the first part of the discussion the experts addressed themselves in turn to four topics put forward by the moderator. These were: the present technical status of nuclear power, the present costs of nuclear power, prospects for future reductions in the cost of nuclear power, and applications of nuclear power in less-developed areas

  13. TVA's nuclear power plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews TVA's nuclear power plant design and construction experience in terms of schedule and capital costs. The completed plant in commercial operation at Browns Ferry and six additional plants currently under construction represent the nation's largest single commitment to nuclear power and an ultimate investment of $12 billion by 1986. The presentation is made in three separate phases. Phase one will recapitulate the status of the nuclear power industry in 1966 and set forth the assumptions used for estimating capital costs and projecting project schedules for the first TVA units. Phase two describes what happened to the program in the hectic early 1979's in terms of expansion of scope (particularly for safety features), the dramatic increase in regulatory requirements, vendor problems, stretchout of project schedules, and unprecedented inflation. Phase three addresses the assumptions used today in estimating schedules and plant costs for the next ten-year period

  14. Research projects into the safety of nuclear power plants. Period cover 01. January - 30. June 2017. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Within its competence for energy research the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) sponsors research projects on the safety of nuclear power plants currently in operation. The objective of these projects is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such research projects by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work. The progress reports are published by the Project Management Agency/ Authority Support Division of GRS. The reports as of the year 2000 are available in the internet-based information system on results and data of reactor safety research (https://www.grs-fbw.de). The compilation of the reports is classified according to the topic areas of reactor safety research. The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. Ilt has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties.

  15. Nuclear power debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunwick, Richard

    2005-01-01

    A recent resurgence of interest in Australia in the nuclear power option has been largely attributed to growing concerns over climate change. But what are the real pros and cons of nuclear power? Have advances in technology solved the sector's key challenges? Do the economics stack up for Australia where there is so much coal, gas and renewable resources? Is the greenhouse footprint' of nuclear power low enough to justify its use? During May and June, the AIE hosted a series of Branch events on nuclear power across Sydney, Adelaide and Perth. In the interest of balance, and at risk of being a little bit repetitive, here we draw together four items that resulted from these events and that reflect the opposing views on nuclear power in Australia. Nuclear Power for Australia: Irrelevant or Inevitable? - a summary of the presentations to the symposium held by Sydney Branch on 8 June 2005. Nuclear Reactors Waste the Planet - text from the flyer distributed by The Greens at their protest gathering outside the symposium venue on 8 June 2005. The Case For Nuclear Power - an edited transcript of Ian Hore-Lacy's presentation to Adelaide Branch on 19 May 2005 and to Perth Branch on 28 June 2005. The Case Against Nuclear Power - an article submitted to Energy News by Robin Chappie subsequent to Mr Hore-Lacy's presentation to Perth Branch

  16. The Role of Export Credit Agencies in the Financing of Nuclear Power Projects. Appendix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear new build projects are very particular investment proposals, which are unlikely to be undertaken on a straightforward economic basis by equity shareholders and by lenders. This is due to, inter alia, their extended life cycles, their very long term underlying commitments vis-à-vis waste management and decommissioning, the evolving nature of their risk management and the magnitude of their financing requirements. In addition, other factors also apply, all implying a degree of political involvement that makes the investment case even more complicated. As a result of the recent financial and economic crisis, the availability of sizable budgets from public sector players for long term investments in NPPs has been under stress in various parts of the world for a number of years now, and the situation is unlikely to change dramatically in the near future with many State budgets in need of rebalancing, particularly in Europe. The capacity of private sector stakeholders to take over the responsibility for funding such investments has also been challenged following the impact of, inter alia, the liquidity crunch on banks’ funding strategies in Europe during summer 2011, the recent macroeconomic policies on leverage, or the latest regulation that, ultimately, tends to re-direct the banks’ debt lending activities towards transactions requiring financing with shorter maturities. Within this context and among the range of financing instruments that are available and that offer long term maturities, export finance remains a tool of reference for various stakeholders, including the providers (e.g. sellers) of equipment and services and the lending banks. Furthermore, the characteristics of this product make it also perfectly compatible with the requirements of the financing plans typically put in place to fund large, capital intensive investments in infrastructure, such as NPPs.

  17. U.S. Forward Operating Base Applications of Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, George W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a high level overview of current nuclear power technology and the potential use of nuclear power at military bases. The size, power ranges, and applicability of nuclear power units for military base power are reviewed. Previous and current reactor projects are described to further define the potential for nuclear power for military power.

  18. Project 2019 of Garona Nuclear power plant. First project to licensing renew more than 40 years in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, R. A.; Torralbo, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    NUCLENOR has been developing lifetime management and modernisation activities at Santa Maria de Garona NPP since the end of the 80's and the plant is now in optimum technical conditions to continue in operation beyond its original lifetime planned in the design (40 years). In the USA, the country of origin of the project, a good number of power plants with a similar design, age and history to SMG are in the process of obtaining or have already obtained, a licensing extension of up to 60 years from the NRC. In Spain, the activities required for requesting a long-term operating licensing extension include the Ageing Assessment and Management of the plant systems, structures and components, in accordance with the american regulation 10CFR54, a Radiological Impact Study for the new operating period, and an Analysis of New Legislation, not included in the licensing bases and considered to be important to safety by the CSN. With a view to obtaining a renewal of the current operating permit for the period 2009-2019, NUCLENOR has launched the Proyecto 2019, which extends to technical and licensing aspects, as it involves all the company's personnel. (Author)

  19. Feasibility of a joint nuclear project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, C.T.

    1980-01-01

    To meet the growing power demand in the late eighties, the People's Republic of China will cooperate with Hong Kong to develop nuclear power. In this paper, the energy policy of China and her nuclear capabilities are reviewed, and some of the foreseeable problems of the China and Hong Kong joint nuclear project are discussed. (author)

  20. Nuclear safety project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    The Annual Report 1981 is a detailed description (in German language) of work within the Nuclear Safety Project performed in 1981 in the nuclear safety field by KfK institutes and departments and by external institutes on behalf of KfK. It includes for each individual research activity short summaries in English language on - work completed - results obtained - plans for future work. This report was compiled by the project management. (orig.) [de

  1. Project Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    The semiannual progress report 1981/1 is a description of work within the Nuclear Safety Project performed in the first six month of 1981 in the nuclear safety field by KfK institutes and departments and by external institutions on behalf of KfK. The chosen kind of this report is that of short summaries, containing the topics, work performed, results obtained, plans for future work. This report was compiled by the project management. (orig.) [de

  2. Nuclear safety project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    The semiannual progress report 1984/1 is a description of work within the Nuclear Safety Project performed in the first six month of 1984 in the nuclear safety field by KfK institutes and departements and by external institutions on behalf of KfK. The chosen kind of this report is that of short summaries, containing the topics work performed, results obtained and plans for future work. This report was compiled by the project management. (orig./RW) [de

  3. The UK nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, J. G.

    1995-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, nuclear power plants are operated by three companies: Nuclear Electric (NE), Scottish Nuclear (SN), and British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL). The state-operated power industry was privatized in 1989 with the exception of nuclear power generation activities, which were made part of the newly founded (state-owned) NE and SN. At the same time, a moratorium on the construction of new nuclear power plants was agreed. Only Sizewell B, the first plant in the UK to be equipped with a pressurized water reactor, was to be completed. That unit was first synchronized with the power grid on February 14, 1995. Another decision in 1989 provided for a review to be conducted in 1994 of the future of the peaceful uses of nuclear power in the country. The results of the review were presented by the government in a white paper on May 9, 1995. Accordingly, NE and SN will be merged and privatized in 1996; the headquarters of the new holding company will be in Scotland. The review does not foresee the construction of more nuclear power plants. However, NE hopes to gain a competitive edge over other sources of primary energy as a result of this privatization, and advocates construction of a dual-unit plant identical with Sizewell B so as to avoid recurrent design and development costs. Outside the UK, the company plans to act jointly with the reactor vendor, Westinghouse, especially in the Pacific region; a bid submitted by the consortium has been shortisted by the future operator of the Lungmen nuclear power plant project in Taiwan. In upgrading the safety of nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe, the new company will be able to work through existing contacts of SN. (orig.) [de

  4. Vitrified radwaste from reprocessing. Material concerning the examination by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate of the supplementary geology report from the KBS-project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate was designated by the Swedish Government to examine the supplementary geologic investigations performed by the utilities' KBS-project and to judge wheather the area investigated, Sternoe in southern Sweden, could be used for constructing a safe repository for radioactive wastes or not. This report contains material that was ordered by or sent to the Nuclear Power Inspectorate as well as the report by the Inspectorate to the Government. (L.E.)

  5. Financing nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheriffah Noor Khamseah Al-Idid Syed Ahmad Idid

    2009-01-01

    Global energy security and climate change concerns sparked by escalating oil prices, high population growth and the rapid pace of industrialization are fueling the current interest and investments in nuclear power. Globally, a significant number policy makers and energy industry leaders have identified nuclear power as a favorable alternative energy option, and are presently evaluating either a new or an expanded role for nuclear power. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has reported that as of October 2008, 14 countries have plans to construct 38 new nuclear reactors and about 100 more nuclear power plants have been written into the development plans of governments for the next three decades. Hence as new build is expected to escalate, issues of financing will become increasingly significant. Energy supply, including nuclear power, considered as a premium by government from the socio-economic and strategic perspective has traditionally been a sector financed and owned by the government. In the case for nuclear power, the conventional methods of financing include financing by the government or energy entity (utility or oil company) providing part of the funds from its own resources with support from the government. As national financing is, as in many cases, insufficient to fully finance the nuclear power plants, additional financing is sourced from international sources of financing including, amongst others, Export Credit Agencies (ECAs) and Multilateral Development Institutions. However, arising from the changing dynamics of economics, financing and business model as well as increasing concerns regarding environmental degradation , transformations in methods of financing this energy sector has been observed. This paper aims to briefly present on financing aspects of nuclear power as well as offer some examples of the changing dynamics of financing nuclear power which is reflected by the evolution of ownership and management of nuclear power plants

  6. Fast reactors in nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazachkovskii, O

    1981-02-01

    The possible applications are discussed of fast reactor nuclear power plants. Basic differences are explained in fast and thermal reactors, mainly with a view to nuclear fuel utilization. Discussed in more detail are the problems of nuclear fuel reproduction and the nost important technical problems of fast reactors. Flow charts are shown of heat transfer for fast reactors BN-350 (loop design) and BN-600 (integral coolant circuit design). Main specifications are given for demonstration and power fast reactors in operation, under construction and in project-stage.

  7. Nuclear power status 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document gives general statistical information (by country) about electricity produced by nuclear power plants in the world in 1998, and in a table the number of nuclear reactors in operation, under construction, nuclear electricity supplied in 1998, and total operating experience as of 31 December 1998

  8. Financing of nuclear projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diel, R.

    1983-01-01

    Delays in the completion of nuclear power plants aggravate the financing of such ventures because the contractual sums to be paid for interest and amortization are not generated. Moreover, economic feasibility analyses by the banks are rendered ineffective by changes in the underlying data, such as the structure of electricity rates and the supply monopoly held by utilities. The German nuclear power plants at present in operation or under construction were financed mainly through subsidiares of the participating utilities outside the balance sheets of the parent companies. The banks have developed a number of financing concepts to adapt funding to the specific needs of practice. Future nuclear power plants make-up one third of the present capacity of the participating utilities. However, they will require three to four times the previous volume of capital investments. Yet it is certain that the expansion of nuclear power in the Federal Republic of Germany will not be hampered by financial problems. The funding models developed for nuclear power plants have already proved their qualities. However, the problems of nuclear power have not become less. Attention must also be drawn to some weak spots in the financial sector. (orig.) [de

  9. Nuclear Power Plants. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell, Walter, III

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Why Use Nuclear Power?; From Atoms to Electricity; Reactor Types; Typical Plant Design Features; The Cost of Nuclear Power; Plants in the United States; Developments in Foreign…

  10. Balakovo nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    A key means of improving the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants is through effective training of plant personnel. The goal of this paper is to show the progress of the training at the Balakovo Nuclear Power Plant, and the important role that international cooperation programs have played in that progress

  11. Nuclear power economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moynet, G.

    1987-01-01

    The economical comparison of nuclear power plants with coal-fired plants in some countries or areas are analyzed. It is not difficult to show that nuclear power will have a significant and expanding role to play in providing economic electricity in the coming decades. (Liu)

  12. Nuclear power: Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Wyk, A.

    1985-01-01

    The use of nuclear power in warfare is viewed from the point of use usefullness, essentiality and demolition. The effects of a H-bomb explosion are discussed as well as the use of nuclear power in warfare, with a Christian ethical background

  13. Consideration of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, I.

    1982-01-01

    Mr. Smart notes that the optimistic promise of nuclear energy for developing countries has not been met, but feels that nuclear power can still provide a growing share of energy during the transition from oil dependence. He observes that cost-benefit analyses vary for each country, but good planning and management can give nuclear power a positive future for those developing countries which can establish a need for it; have access to the economic, technological, and human resources necessary to develop and operate it; and can make nuclear power compatible with the social, economic, and cultural structure. 11 references

  14. Nuclear power in crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blowers, Andrew.; Pepper, David.

    1987-01-01

    Six themes run through this book: nuclear decision making and democratic accountability, nuclear bias and a narrow-based energy policy, scientific discredit and popular expertise, fusing science with social values, managerial competence and the geography of nuclear power. These are covered in thirteen chapters (all indexed separately) grouped into four parts -the political and planning context, nuclear waste, risk and impact - the social dimension and the future of nuclear power. It considers aspects in France, the United States and the United Kingdom with particular references to the Sizewell-B inquiry and the Sellafield reprocessing plant. (UK)

  15. Nuclear power plant outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) controls nuclear power plant safety in Finland. In addition to controlling the design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants, STUK also controls refuelling and repair outages at the plants. According to section 9 of the Nuclear Energy Act (990/87), it shall be the licence-holder's obligation to ensure the safety of the use of nuclear energy. Requirements applicable to the licence-holder as regards the assurance of outage safety are presented in this guide. STUK's regulatory control activities pertaining to outages are also described

  16. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulova, T.Ch.

    1976-01-01

    The textbook focuses on the technology and the operating characteristics of nuclear power plants equiped with pressurized water or boiling water reactors, which are in operation all over the world at present. The following topics are dealt with in relation to the complete plant and to economics: distribution and consumption of electric and thermal energy, types and equipment of nuclear power plants, chemical processes and material balance, economical characteristics concerning heat and energy, regenerative preheating of feed water, degassing and condenser systems, water supply, evaporators, district heating systems, steam generating systems and turbines, coolant loops and pipes, plant siting, ventilation and decontamination systems, reactor operation and management, heat transfer including its calculation, design of reactor buildings, and nuclear power plants with gas or sodium cooled reactors. Numerous technical data of modern Soviet nuclear power plants are included. The book is of interest to graduate and post-graduate students in the field of nuclear engineering as well as to nuclear engineers

  17. Nuclear power in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, J.

    2000-01-01

    Currently nuclear power accounts for more than 25% of total electricity production in Europe (including Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union) However, significant new construction is planned in Central and Eastern Europe only, apart from some in France and, possibly in Finland. Many countries in Western Europe have put nuclear construction plans on hold and several have cancelled their nuclear programs. This report looks at the history of nuclear power and its current status in both Eastern and Western Europe. It provides an outline of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, from uranium procurement to final waste disposal. Economic and environmental issues are discussed, as well as the prospect of increased East-West trade and cooperation in the new poso-cold war world. Detailed profiles are provided of all the countries in Western Europe with significant nuclear power programs, as well as profiles of major energy and nuclear companies

  18. Mobile nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.

    1988-11-01

    This report is meant to present a general survey of the mobile nuclear power systems and not a detailed review of their technical accomplishments. It is based in published material mainly up to 1987. Mobile nuclear power systems are of two fundamentally different kinds: nuclear reactors and isotopic generators. In the reactors the energy comes from nuclear fission and in the isotopic generators from the radioactive decay of suitable isotopes. The reactors are primarily used as power sourves on board nuclear submarines and other warships but have also been used in the space and in remote places. Their thermal power has ranged from 30 kWth (in a satellite) to 175 MWth (on board an aircraft carrier). Isotopic generators are suitable only for small power demands and have been used on board satellites and spaceprobes, automatic weatherstations, lighthouses and marine installations for navigation and observation. (author)

  19. Nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povolny, M.

    1980-01-01

    The development and uses of nuclear power in Czechoslovakia and other countries are briefly outlined. In the first stage, the Czechoslovak nuclear programme was oriented to the WWER 440 type reactor while the second stage of the nuclear power plant construction is oriented to the WWER 10O0 type reactor. It is envisaged that 12 WWER 440 type reactors and four to five WWER 1000 type reactors will be commissioned till 1990. (J.P.)

  20. The nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plettner, B.

    1987-04-01

    The processes taking place in a nuclear power plant and the dangers arising from a nuclear power station are described. The means and methods of controlling, monitoring, and protecting the plant and things that can go wrong are presented. There is also a short discourse on the research carried out in the USA and Germany, aimed at assessing the risks of utilising nuclear energy by means of the incident tree analysis and probability calculations. (DG) [de

  1. Nuclear power in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    the plans of the Spanish Government to reduce their dependence on oil over the next ten years by a considerable increase in nuclear generating capacity are outlined. Data on the type, generating power, location and commissioning data of a number of nuclear power stations in Spain are tabulated. The use of foreign companies for the design and construction of the nuclear stations and the national organisations responsible for different aspects of the programme are considered. (UK)

  2. Nuclear power in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aftergood, S.; Hafemeister, D.W.; Prilutsky, O.F.; Rodionov, S.N.; Primack, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear reactors have provided energy for satellites-with nearly disastrous results. Now the US government is proposing to build nuclear-powered boosters to launch Star Wars defenses. These authors represent scientific groups that are opposed to the use of nuclear power in near space. The authors feel that the best course for space-borne reactors is to ban them from Earth orbit and use them in deep space

  3. Nuclear power experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daglish, J.

    1982-01-01

    A report is given of a recent international conference convened by the IAEA to consider the technical and economic experience acquired by the nuclear industry during the past 30 years. Quotations are given from a number of contributors. Most authors shared the opinion that nuclear power should play a major role in meeting future energy needs and it was considered that the conference had contributed to make nuclear power more viable. (U.K.)

  4. Governance of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, G.; Carnesale, A.; Zigman, P.; DeRosa, F.

    1981-01-01

    Utility decisions on whether to invest in nuclear power plants are complicated by uncertainties over future power demand, regulatory changes, public perceptions of nuclear power, and capital costs. A review of the issues and obstacles confronting nuclear power also covers the factors affecting national policies, focusing on three institutional questions: regulating the industry, regulating the regulators, and regulatory procedures. The specific recommendations made to improve safety, cost, and public acceptance will still not eliminate uncertainties unless the suggested fundamental changes are made. 29 references

  5. 2006 nuclear power world report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2007-01-01

    At the turn of 2006/2007, 437 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, or were being commissioned, in 31 countries of the world. This is seven plants less than at the turn of 2005/2006. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 389.5 GWe, the aggregate net power, to 370.5 GWe. This indicates a slight decrease of gross power by some 0.15 GWe compared to the level the year before, while the available net power increased, also slightly, by approx. 0.2 GWe. The Tarapur 3 nuclear generating unit in India, a D 2 O PWR of 540 MWe gross power, was newly commissioned. In 2006, 8 nuclear power plants in Europe (4 in the United Kingdom, 2 in Bulgaria, 1 each in the Slovak Republic and in Spain) discontinued power operation for good. 29 nuclear generating units, i.e. 6 plants more than at the end of 2005, were under construction in late 2006 in 9 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 25.5 GWe. Worldwide, some 40 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases, contracts have already been signed. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2006 achieved another top ranking level of approx. 2,660 billion kWh (2005: approx. 2,750 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-1 fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated gross production has reached approx. 56,875 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 12,399 reactor years. (orig.)

  6. NASA's Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Mitchell, Doyce P.; Kim, Tony; Emrich, William J.; Hickman, Robert R.; Gerrish, Harold P.; Doughty, Glen; Belvin, Anthony; Clement, Steven; Borowski, Stanley K.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation NTP system could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of a first generation NTP in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC- 3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NTP project could also help enable high performance fission power systems and Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP).

  7. Current status of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnke, W.B.

    1984-01-01

    The decision to devote the 1984 conference to nuclear power is timely and appropriate. Illinois has a long, and distinguished history in the development of civilian nuclear power. The concept was born at the University of Chicago, developed at Argonne National Laboratory and demonstrated on the Commonwealth Edison system at our pioneer Dresden Nuclear Station. Today, Illinois ranks number one in the nation in nuclear generation. With over a quarter century of commercial operating experience, nuclear power has proven its worth and become a significant and growing component of electric power supply domestically and throughout the world. Despite its initial acceptance, however, the nuclear power industry in the U.S. is now in the midst of a difficult period of readjustment stemming largely from the economic and regulatory problems of the past decade. As a result, the costs of plants under construction have increased dramatically, causing serious financial difficulties for several projects and their owners. At the same time, the U.S. is facing hard choices concerning its future energy supplies. Conferences such as this have an important role in clarifying the issues and helping to find solutions to today's pressing energy problems. This paper summarizes the status of nuclear power both here and abroad, discussing the implications of current events in the context of national energy policy and economic development here in Illinois

  8. Nuclear power under strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-08-01

    The German citizen faces the complex problem of nuclear power industry with slight feeling of uncertainty. The topics in question can only be briefly dealt with in this context, e.g.: 1. Only nuclear energy can compensate the energy shortage. 2. Coal and nuclear energy. 3. Keeping the risk small. 4. Safety test series. 5. Status and tendencies of nuclear energy planning in the East and West. (GL) [de

  9. Qinshan phase II extension nuclear power project thermal stratification and fatigue stress analysis for pressurizer surge line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xiaofei; Zhang Yixiong; Ai Honglei

    2010-01-01

    Thermal stratification of pressurizer surge line induced by the inside fluid brings on global bending moments, local thermal stresses, unexpected displacements and support loadings of the pipe system. In order to avoid a costly three-dimensional computation, a combined 1D/2D technique has been developed and implemented to analyze the thermal stratification and fatigue stress of pressurize surge line of QINSHAN Phase II Extension Nuclear Power Project in this paper, using the computer codes SYSTUS and ROCOCO. According to the mechanical analysis results of stratification, the maximum stress and cumulative usage factor, the loadings at connections of surge line to main pipe and RCP and the displacements of surge line at supports are obtained. (authors)

  10. Nuclear Power 2010 Program Dominion Virginia Power Cooperative Project U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-05ID14635 Construction and Operating License Demonstration Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eugene S. Grecheck

    2010-11-30

    This report serves to summarize the major activities completed as part of Virginia Electric and Power Company's North Anna construction and operating license demonstration project with DOE. Project successes, lessons learned, and suggestions for improvement are discussed. Objectives of the North Anna COL project included preparation and submittal of a COLA to the USNRC incorporating ESBWR technology for a third unit a the North Anna Power Station site, support for the NRC review process and mandatory hearing, obtaining NRC approval of the COLA and issuance of a COL, and development of a business case necessary to support a decision on building a new nuclear power plant at the North Anna site.

  11. A Study on the Economic Analysis for Overseas Project of New Nuclear Power Plant Using Binomial Option Pricing Model and Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Beong Gwon; Roh, Myung Sub [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Real options approach is suitable for evaluation of large-scale investment project with great uncertainties. Takizawa and Omori (2001) introduced a real option approach to calculate electricity price for economic feasibility. Rothwell (2006) modeled the net present value (NPV) of building an ABWR in Texas using ROA to determine the risk premium associated with net revenue uncertainty. W.C Yoon (2006) evaluated nuclear power plant construction value using DCF and ROA with sensitivity analysis. The value evaluations involved with nuclear power are very uncertain. This is because of a long period of construction as well as the cost uncertainties of decommissioning and nuclear waste management. Even more elements should be considered in new nuclear power valuation, including the uncertainty from the technology, operating costs, the potential risk of radiation, electricity mechanism and climate policy. In this respect, a traditional method such as discounted cash flow (DCF) can't fully catch the impacts of these uncertainties on nuclear power investment. So it is necessary to develop a proper method to handle such kinds of uncertainties to evaluate the new deployment of nuclear power plants. Meanwhile, overseas construction projects which are required capital investment, localization by target countries are increasing in these days. These elements may influence the uncertainty of project too.

  12. Environmental aspects of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear power provides the world with an important option for generating electricity. To successfully and safely utilize this power, engineering and environmental factors should be carefully considered throughout a nuclear power plant project, especially during the planning stages. This paper discusses the major environmental aspects of a nuclear power plant project from site selection to retirement. During the site selection process, both engineering and environmental resources must be identified and evaluated. Environmental resources include areas that support agricultural or aquatic commercial activities, habitats for commercial or endangered species, population centers, transportation systems, and recreational areas. Also, during the site selection process, the potential impacts of both construction and operating activities must be considered. In addition to the area actually disturbed by construction, construction activities also affect local services, such as transportation systems, housing, school systems, and other social services. Since nuclear power plants use a 'clean fuel,' generally the most significant operating activity having a potential environmental impact is the discharge of cooling water. The potential effect of this discharge on commercial activities and sensitive habitats should be thoroughly evaluated. Lastly, the method of decommissioning can affect long-range land use planning and should therefore be considered during the planning process. With appropriate planning, nuclear power plants can be constructed and operated with minimum environmental impact. (author)

  13. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This 2003 version of Elecnuc contents information, data and charts on the nuclear power plants in the world and general information on the national perspectives concerning the electric power industry. The following topics are presented: 2002 highlights; characteristics of main reactor types and on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; the worldwide status of nuclear power plants on 2002/12/3; units distributed by countries; nuclear power plants connected to the Grid by reactor type groups; nuclear power plants under construction; capacity of the nuclear power plants on the grid; first electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit; electrical generation from nuclear plants by country at the end 2002; performance indicator of french PWR units; trends of the generation indicator worldwide from 1960 to 2002; 2002 cumulative Load Factor by owners; nuclear power plants connected to the grid by countries; status of license renewal applications in Usa; nuclear power plants under construction; Shutdown nuclear power plants; exported nuclear power plants by type; exported nuclear power plants by countries; nuclear power plants under construction or order; steam generator replacements; recycling of Plutonium in LWR; projects of MOX fuel use in reactors; electricity needs of Germany, Belgium, Spain, Finland, United Kingdom; electricity indicators of the five countries. (A.L.B.)

  14. Worldwide nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Worldwide Nuclear Power (WNP) is a companion volume to Update. Our objective in the publication of WNP is to provide factual information on nuclear power programs and policies in foreign countries to U.S. policymakers in the Federal Government. Facts about the status of nuclear activities abroad should be available to those who are instrumental in defining the direction of nuclear power in the U.S. WNP is prepared by the Office of Nuclear Energy from reports obtained from foreign embassies in Washington, U.S. Embassies overseas, foreign and domestic publications, participation in international studies, and personal communications. It consists of two types of information, tabular and narrative. Domestic nuclear data is included only where its presence is needed to provide easy and immediate comparisons with foreign data. In general, complete U.S. information will be found in Update

  15. Nuclear power plants - Quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This International Standard defines principles for the establishment and implementation of quality assurance programmes during all phases of design, procurement, fabrication, construction, commissioning, operation, maintenance and decommissioning of structures, systems and components of nuclear power plants. These principles apply to activities affecting the quality of items, such as designing, purchasing, fabricating, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, erecting, installing, testing, commissioning, operating, inspecting, maintaining, repairing, refuelling and modifying and eventually decommissioning. The manner in which the principles described in this document will be implemented in different organizations involved in a specific nuclear power project will depend on regulatory and contractual requirements, the form of management applied to a nuclear power project, and the nature and scope of the work to be performed by different organizations

  16. Nuclear power statistics 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelgaard, P.L.

    1986-06-01

    In this report an attempt is made to collect literature data on nuclear power production and to present it on graphical form. Data is given not only for 1985, but for a number of years so that the trends in the development of nuclear power can be seen. The global capacity of nuclear power plants in operation and those in operation, under construction, or on order is considered. Further the average capacity factor for nuclear plants of a specific type and for various geographical areas is given. The contribution of nuclear power to the total electricity production is considered for a number of countries and areas. Finally, the accumulated years of commercial operation for the various reactor types up to the end of 1985 is presented. (author)

  17. Outage planning in nuclear power plants. A paradigm shift from an external towards an integrated project planning tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosemann, Andreas [Gesellschaft fuer integrierte Systemplanung (GiS) mbH, Weinheim (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    In nuclear power plants it is common to carry out the technical planning of the annual outage work orders in an Enterprise Application Management (EAM) system and to schedule the outage tasks in a project planning tool. The reason for this is historical: Former EAM systems did not (or just to some extend) offer the necessary functionalities to realise the scheduling of the outage; graphical support for the planning was not provided at all. Consequently, scheduling the annual outage was performed in a separate planning tool. Modern Enterprise Application Management (EAM) software builds on established project planning tools with respect to the functionalities and timing of work orders. As a standard they provide editable charts as well as a lot of functionalities which are required for scheduling the annual outage. The functional gap between the demanded planning functionalities and the functionalities provided by the EAM system has been significantly reduced. Depending on the deployed software itself it is possible to extend the EAM system with little effort (in comparison to the promising advantages) so that external project timing planning tools are not required any more. By shifting towards an integrated planning tool, efficiency in planning an outage as well as the quality of communication of the current planning status increases. Furthermore, the basis of information for work orders by the control room staff and therefore safety can be enhanced. (orig.)

  18. Comparative analysis of structural concrete quality assurance practices on nine nuclear power plant construction projects. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willenbrock, J.H.; Thomas, H.R. Jr.; Burati, J.L. Jr.

    1978-06-01

    The basic objective of this research effort was to perform a comparative analysis of the Quality Assurance practices related to the structural concrete phase on nine nuclear power plant projects which are (or have been) under construction in the United States in the past ten years. This analysis identified the response of each Quality Assurance program to the applicable criteria of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix B as well as to the pertinent regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major emphasis was placed on the construction aspects of the structural concrete phase of each project. The engineering and design aspects were examined whenever they interfaced with the construction aspects. For those aspects of the Quality Assurance system which can be considered managerial in nature (i.e., organizational relationships, types of Quality Assurance programs, corrective action procedures, etc.) an attempt has been made to present the alternative approaches that were identified. For those aspects of the Quality Assurance system which are technical in nature (i.e., the frequency of testing for slump, compressive strength, etc.) an attempt has been made to present a comparative analysis between projects and in relation to the recommended or mandated practices presented in the appropriate industry codes and standards.

  19. Comparative analysis of structural concrete quality assurance practices on nine nuclear power plant construction projects. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willenbrock, J.H.; Thomas, H.R. Jr.; Burati, J.L. Jr.

    1978-06-01

    The basic objective of this research effort was to perform a comparative analysis of the Quality Assurance practices related to the structural concrete phase on nine nuclear power plant projects which are (or have been) under construction in the United States in the past ten years. This analysis identified the response of each Quality Assurance program to the applicable criteria of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix B as well as to the pertinent regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major emphasis was placed on the construction aspects of the structural concrete phase of each project. The engineering and design aspects were examined whenever they interfaced with the construction aspects. For those aspects of the Quality Assurance system which can be considered managerial in nature (i.e., organizational relationships, types of Quality Assurance programs, corrective action procedures, etc.) an attempt has been made to present the alternative approaches that were identified. For those aspects of the Quality Assurance system which are technical in nature (i.e., the frequency of testing for slump, compressive strength, etc.) an attempt has been made to present a comparative analysis between projects and in relation to the recommended or mandated practices presented in the appropriate industry codes and standards

  20. Outage planning in nuclear power plants. A paradigm shift from an external towards an integrated project planning tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosemann, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    In nuclear power plants it is common to carry out the technical planning of the annual outage work orders in an Enterprise Application Management (EAM) system and to schedule the outage tasks in a project planning tool. The reason for this is historical: Former EAM systems did not (or just to some extend) offer the necessary functionalities to realise the scheduling of the outage; graphical support for the planning was not provided at all. Consequently, scheduling the annual outage was performed in a separate planning tool. Modern Enterprise Application Management (EAM) software builds on established project planning tools with respect to the functionalities and timing of work orders. As a standard they provide editable charts as well as a lot of functionalities which are required for scheduling the annual outage. The functional gap between the demanded planning functionalities and the functionalities provided by the EAM system has been significantly reduced. Depending on the deployed software itself it is possible to extend the EAM system with little effort (in comparison to the promising advantages) so that external project timing planning tools are not required any more. By shifting towards an integrated planning tool, efficiency in planning an outage as well as the quality of communication of the current planning status increases. Furthermore, the basis of information for work orders by the control room staff and therefore safety can be enhanced. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear power: European report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, nuclear power plants were operated and/or built in eighteen European countries. Thirteen of these countries are members of EU-25. Five of the ten countries joining the European Union on May 1, 2004 operate nuclear power stations. A total of 206 power reactors with a gross power of 181,941 MWe and a net power of 172,699 MWe were in operation at the end of the year. In 2004, one nuclear power plant was commissioned in Russia (Kalinin 3), two (Kmelnitzki 2 and Rowno 4) in Ukraine. Five nuclear power plants were decommissioned in Europe in the course of 2004. As announced in 2000, the Chapelcross 1 to Chapelcross 4 plants in Britain were shut down for economic reasons. In Lithuania, the Ignalina 1 unit was disconnected from the power grid, as had been demanded by the EU Commission within the framework of the negotiations about the country's accession to the EU. As a result of ongoing technical optimization in some plants, involving increases in reactor power or generator power as well as commissioning of plants of higher capacity, nuclear generating capacity increased by approx. 1.5 GW. In late 2004, four nuclear generating units were under construction in Finland (1), Romania (1), and Russia (2). 150 nuclear power plants were operated in thirteen states of the European Union (EU-25), which is sixteen more than the year before as a consequence of the accession of new countries. They had an aggregate gross power of 137,943 MWe and a net power of 131,267 MWe, generating approx. 983 billion gross kWh of electricity in 2003, thus again contributing some 32% to the public electricity supply in the EU-25. In largest share of nuclear power in electricity generation is found in Lithuania (80%), followed by 78% in France, 57% in the Slovak Republic, 56% in Belgium, and 46% in Ukraine. In several countries not operating nuclear power plants of their own, such as Italy, Portugal, and Austria, nuclear power makes considerable contributions to public electricity supply as

  2. The nuclear power cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Fifty years after the first nuclear reactor come on-line, nuclear power is fourth among the world's primary energy sources, after oil, coal and gas. In 2002, there were 441 reactors in operation worldwide. The United States led the world with 104 reactors and an installed capacity of 100,000 MWe, or more than one fourth of global capacity. Electricity from nuclear energy represents 78% of the production in France, 57% in Belgium, 46% in Sweden, 40% in Switzerland, 39% in South Korea, 34% in Japan, 30% in Germany, 30% in Finland, 26% in Spain, 22% in Great Britain, 20% in the United States and 16% in Russia. Worldwide, 32 reactors are under construction, including 21 in Asia. This information document presents the Areva activities in the nuclear power cycle: the nuclear fuel, the nuclear reactors, the spent fuel reprocessing and recycling and nuclear cleanup and dismantling. (A.L.B.)

  3. Nuclear power in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    India has now nine years of experience with her in nuclear power generation. The system has been acclaimed on various grounds by the authority concerned with its organization in the country. The present paper intends to examine critically the claim for economic superiority of the nuclear power over the thermal power which is asserted often by the spokesmen for the former. Information about the cost of nuclear power that is available to researchers in India is very meagre. Whatever appears in official publications is hardly adequate for working out reasonable estimates for scrutiny. One is therefore left to depend on the public statements made by dignitaries from time to time to form an idea about the economics of nuclear power. Due to gaps in information we are constrained to rely on the foreign literature and make careful guesses about possible costs applicable to India

  4. LDC nuclear power: Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, V.

    1982-01-01

    Brazil has been expanding its nuclear power since 1975, following the Bonn-Brasilia sales agreement and the 1974 denial of US enriched uranium, in an effort to develop an energy mix that will reduce dependence and vulnerability to a single energy source or supplier. An overview of the nuclear program goes on to describe domestic non-nuclear alternatives, none of which has an adequate base. The country's need for transfers of capital, technology, and raw materials raises questions about the advisability of an aggressive nuclear program in pursuit of great power status. 33 references

  5. Nuclear power - the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hann, J.

    1991-01-01

    It is asserted by the author that nuclear power is the only available resource - indeed the only solution to an ever-increasing demand for energy in the United Kingdom over the next 50-100 years. It must be the cornerstone of a practical integrated energy policy, covering that sort of time-scale. In fact, it is going to be a strategic necessity. In this paper the background to establishing a policy is sketched. An explanation is given of what the nuclear industry is doing so as to ensure that the nuclear option is very definitely retained as a result of the 1994 Review of nuclear power in the UK. (author)

  6. Annx IV. Delayed nuclear power plant project management experience Cernavoda 2 NPP, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Cernavoda Unit 2 NPP work was originally started in 1982 with work coming to a halt in 1989, and a preservation program implemented in 1991 while work continued on Unit 1. In 1995 attention turned to the completion of Unit 2 and status verification reports were commissioned. Work proceeded, as funds were available, up until 2002 when an interim contract was signed. Subsequently a Contract Completion Effective Date (CCED) was signed in March 2003 with completion duration of 48 months. A project schedule is a necessity for any project whether it is a new build or a restart to a delayed project. There are 5 major elements that are included in all CANDU project schedules, Engineering, Procurement, Construction, Commissioning and the conversion from Construction to Commissioning. The Engineering schedule of deliverables was not fully defined at CCED. Design changes defined prior to CCED were not fully defined and the scope of work associated with these only became known during the actual construction program. A significant number of new design changes were introduced after CCED, which compounded the impact to the construction program. All projects require their budgets to be built up within a defined structure. Delayed projects are no different from other projects in that respect. The standard Work Brakout Structure (WBS), which is applicable to most CANDU projects, is equally applicable for a delayed project. On Cernavoda Unit 2 we used a Budget Breakdown Structure, which was a combination of a traditional WBS and an Organization Structure. This structure was adopted in order to have consistency with the structure, which had been used prior to the delay on the project and also it was a requirement of the three party agreements with funding from different sources and in different currencies. All major construction projects normally carry a contingency allowance for undefined work and a risk allowance for the possibility of major changes. Delayed projects require

  7. Delays help German utilities maintain self-financing ratios. [Financing nuclear power projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, G [Dresden Bank, AG (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-05-01

    Estimates of electricity consumption have been substantially reduced and nuclear plant is now expected to be 22% of total generating capacity in 1985 instead of the earlier forecast of 36%. The decline in the ordering of new plant has benefited the financial position of the electricity utilities and the expected fall in self-financing ratios has not occurred.

  8. The CNA-1 (Nuclear Power Plant Atucha-1) QK-01 repairing project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzaferri, J.C.; Cabot, P.

    1997-01-01

    The repair/maintenance of the CNA-1 QK-01 Moderator Cooler will be a leading case of the repair of a class 1 nuclear component in a high radiation environment; utilizing for the work, sophisticated remotely operated equipment. This paper describes the component, the repair-maintenance objective, and the equipment-procedures developed for the intervention. (author) [es

  9. Investor perceptions of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewlett, J.G.

    1984-05-01

    Evidence is provided that investor concerns about nuclear power have recently been reflected in the common stock returns of all utilities with such facilities and have resulted in a risk premium. In particular, over the 1978-1982 period, three nuclear-related events occurred at the same time as, and therefore appear to have caused, significant drops in the market values of nuclear utilities relative to their non-nuclear counterparts. The three events were as follows: the accident at TMI, which occurred in March 1979; the realization in the summer of 1980 that an accident of the magnitude of TMI could result in cleanup costs of over $1 billion, which are not completely insurable and could therefore result in substantial losses; and the summer 1982 decision by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) to cancel some if its nuclear power plant construction projects, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) decision to stop work on the construction of the Zimmer reactor, followed by a warning that it might close the Indian Point 2 and 3 reactors. If an individual had invested $100 in an average nuclear utility on the day before the TMI accident and reinvested all dividends, the value of this investment would have fallen by 10% relative to an identical investment in the average non-nuclear utility. The risk of investments in nuclear power versus conventional generating technologies shows nuclear power to be a relatively risky investment. However, relative to all investments, nuclear power was less risky in terms of the type of risk that would cause investors to require a premium before purchasing their securities. 6 figures, 6 tables

  10. Nuclear Safety Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The semiannual progress report 1983/1 is a description of work within the Nuclear Safety Project performed in the first six month of 1983 in the nuclear safety field by KfK institutes and departments and by external institutions on behalf of KfK. The chosen kind of this report is that of short summaries, containing the topics work performed, results obtained and plans for future work. (orig./RW) [de

  11. Nuclear safety project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-11-01

    The 17th semi-annual report 1980/1 is a description of work within the Nuclear Safety Project performed in the first six months of 1980 in the nuclear safety field by KfK institutes and departments and by external institutions on behalf of KfK. The chosen kind of this report is that of short summaries, containing the topics - work performed, results obtained, plans for future work. (orig.) [de

  12. Nuclear Safety Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    The 13th semi-annual report 1/78 is a description of work within the Nuclear Safety Project performed in the first six months of 1978 in the nuclear safety field by KFK institutes and departments and by external institutions on behalf of KfK. It includes for each individual research activity short summaries on - work completed, - essential results, - plans for the near future. (orig./RW) [de

  13. Transition to an operating reactor environment: implications for NRC quality assurance programs based on nuclear power industry and regulatory projections through 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, J.A.; Schuller, C.R.; Harty, H.; Patrick, M.G.

    1986-03-01

    This report develops projections for nuclear power plant regulatory needs in general, and those relating to quality assurance in particular, for the time period 1985 to 1995. This required an assessment of future prospects for the nuclear power industry and its primary segments. Electric power demand projections and their relationship to estimated schedules for nuclear plant construction and operations were evaluated, and estimates of anticipated business volume and long-term economic viability were made for each of the major segments of the US nuclear industry (utilities, NSSS vendors, AEs, constructors, component suppliers, and service vendors). These estimates were made for two, five and ten year intervals through 1995. Other significant factors that are not specific to any one industry segment were also reviewed. These included: (1) the expanding foreign presence in US markets; (2) pending legislations; (3) trends in personnel availability; (4) new institutional arrangements for nuclear power generation; (5) nuclear plant aging, life extension, and decommissioning; (6) reactivation of mothballed projects; (7) advanced and standardized plant designs; and (8) likely technological development in computer applications and inspections methods

  14. Nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Katumi; Sato, Akira; Kaimori, Kimihiro; Kumano, Tetsuji

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power generation for commercial use in Japan has passed 35 years since beginning of operation in the Tokai Nuclear Power Station in 1966, and has 51 machines of reactor and about 44.92 MW of total output of equipment scale in the 21st century. However, an environment around nuclear energy becomes severer at present, and then so many subjects to be overcome are remained such as increased unreliability of the public on nuclear energy at a chance of critical accident of the JCO uranium processing facility, delay of pull-thermal plan, requirement for power generation cost down against liberalization of electric power, highly aging countermeasure of power plant begun its operation as its Genesis, and so on. Under such conditions, in order that nuclear power generation in Japan survives as one of basic electric source in future, it is necessary not only to pursue safety and reliability of the plant reliable to the public, but also to intend to upgrade its operation and maintenance by positively adopting good examples on operational management method on abroad and to endeavor further upgrading of application ratio of equipments and reduction of generation cost. Here were outlined on operation conditions of nuclear power stations in Japan, and introduced on upgrading of their operational management and maintenance management. (G.K.)

  15. Development of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    An extensive discussion of problems concerning the development of nuclear power took place at the fifth regular session of the IAEA General Conference in September-October 1961. Not only were there many references in plenary meetings to the nuclear power plans of Member States, but there was also a more specific and detailed debate on the subject, especially on nuclear power costs, in the Program, Technical and Budget Committee of the Conference. The Conference had before it a report from the Board of Governors on the studies made by the Agency on the economics of nuclear power. In addition, it had been presented with two detailed documents, one containing a review of present-day costs of nuclear power and the other containing technical and economic information on several small and medium-sized power reactors in the United States. The Conference was also informed of the report on methods of estimating nuclear power costs, prepared with the assistance of a panel of experts convened by the Agency, which was reviewed in the July 1961 issue of this Bulletin

  16. Development of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1962-01-15

    An extensive discussion of problems concerning the development of nuclear power took place at the fifth regular session of the IAEA General Conference in September-October 1961. Not only were there many references in plenary meetings to the nuclear power plans of Member States, but there was also a more specific and detailed debate on the subject, especially on nuclear power costs, in the Program, Technical and Budget Committee of the Conference. The Conference had before it a report from the Board of Governors on the studies made by the Agency on the economics of nuclear power. In addition, it had been presented with two detailed documents, one containing a review of present-day costs of nuclear power and the other containing technical and economic information on several small and medium-sized power reactors in the United States. The Conference was also informed of the report on methods of estimating nuclear power costs, prepared with the assistance of a panel of experts convened by the Agency, which was reviewed in the July 1961 issue of this Bulletin

  17. 600 MW nuclear power database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Ruiding; Chen Guorong; Chen Xianfeng; Zhang Yishu

    1996-01-01

    600 MW Nuclear power database, based on ORACLE 6.0, consists of three parts, i.e. nuclear power plant database, nuclear power position database and nuclear power equipment database. In the database, there are a great deal of technique data and picture of nuclear power, provided by engineering designing units and individual. The database can give help to the designers of nuclear power

  18. Nuclear power world report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2014-01-01

    At the end of 2013, 435 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 31 countries of the world. This means that the number decreased by 2 units compared to the previous year's number on 31 December 2012. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 398,861 MWe, the aggregate net power, to 378,070 MWe (gross: 392,793 MWe, net: 372,572 MWe, new data base as of 2013: nameplate capacities). Four units were commissioned in 2014; three units in China and one in India. Eight units were shut down permanently in 2013; 2 units in Japan, and four units in the USA. Two units in Canada were declared permanently shut-down after a long-term shutdown. 70 nuclear generating units - 2 more than at the end of 2012 - were under construction in late 2013 in 15 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 73,814 MWe and net power of approx. 69,279 MWe. Six new projects have been started in 2013 in four countries (Belarus, China, the Republic of Korea, and the United Arab Emirates). Worldwide, some 125 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 100 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2013 achieved a level of approx. 2,364.15 billion (109) kWh (2012: approx. 2,350.80 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 70,310 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 15,400 reactor years. (orig.)

  19. Nuclear power world report 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2014-07-15

    At the end of 2013, 435 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 31 countries of the world. This means that the number decreased by 2 units compared to the previous year's number on 31 December 2012. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 398,861 MWe, the aggregate net power, to 378,070 MWe (gross: 392,793 MWe, net: 372,572 MWe, new data base as of 2013: nameplate capacities). Four units were commissioned in 2014; three units in China and one in India. Eight units were shut down permanently in 2013; 2 units in Japan, and four units in the USA. Two units in Canada were declared permanently shut-down after a long-term shutdown. 70 nuclear generating units - 2 more than at the end of 2012 - were under construction in late 2013 in 15 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 73,814 MWe and net power of approx. 69,279 MWe. Six new projects have been started in 2013 in four countries (Belarus, China, the Republic of Korea, and the United Arab Emirates). Worldwide, some 125 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 100 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2013 achieved a level of approx. 2,364.15 billion (109) kWh (2012: approx. 2,350.80 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 70,310 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 15,400 reactor years. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear power experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The International Conference on Nuclear Power Experience, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency, was held at the Hofburg Conference Center, Vienna, Austria, from 13 to 17 September 1982. Almost 1200 participants and observers from 63 countries and 20 organizations attended the conference. The 239 papers presented were grouped under the following seven main topics: planning and development of nuclear power programmes; technical and economic experience of nuclear power production; the nuclear fuel cycle; nuclear safety experience; advanced systems; international safeguards; international co-operation. The proceedings are published in six volumes. The sixth volume contains a complete Contents of Volume 1 to 5, a List of Participants, Authors and Transliteration Indexes, a Subject Index and an Index of Papers by Number

  1. The nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serres, R.

    1999-01-01

    The French nuclear generating industry is highly competitive. The installations have an average age of fifteen years and are half way through their expected life. Nuclear power accounts for 70% of the profits of the French generating company, EDF. Nuclear generation has a minimal effect on the atmosphere and France has a level of CO 2 emissions, thought to be the main cause of the greenhouse effect, half that of Europe as a whole. The air in France is purer than in neighbouring countries, mainly because 75% of all electrical power is generated in nuclear plants and 15% in hydroelectric stations. The operations and maintenance of French nuclear power plants in the service and distribution companies out of a total of 100 000 employees in all, 90 % of whom are based in mainland France. (authors)

  2. Canada's nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peden, W.

    1976-01-01

    Although Canada has developed the CANDU type reactor, and has an ambitious programme of nuclear power plant construction, there has been virtually no nuclear controversy. This progress was seen as a means to bring Canada out of the 'resource cow' era, and onto a more equal footing with technologically elite nations. However the Indian nuclear explosion test, waste storage problems, contamination problems arising from use of uranium ore processing waste as land fill and subsidised sale of nuclear power plants to Argentina and South Korea have initiated public and parliamentary interest. Some economists have also maintained that Canada is approaching over-supply of nuclear power and over-investment in plant. Canada has no official overall energy production plan and alternative sources have not been evaluated. (JIW)

  3. Without nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The arguments put forward by the SPD point to the following: Backing out of nuclear power is a must, because of the awful quality of the hazards involved; because there can be no real separation guaranteed between civil and military utilisation of nuclear energy; for reasons of international responsibility; because we must not pass the buck on to the next generation; because social compatibility must be achieved; because the story of the 'cheap' nuclear generation of electricity is a fairy tale; because nuclear power pushes back coal as an energy source; because current ecological conditions call for abandonment of nuclear power, and economic arguments do not really contradict them. A reform of our energy system has to fulfill four requirements: Conserve energy; reduce and avoid environmental pollution; use renewable energy sources as the main sources; leave to the next generation the chance of choosing their own way of life. (HSCH) [de

  4. Nuclear power and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.; Tasker, A.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power currently provides about a fifth of both Britain's and the world's electricity. It is the largest single source of electricity in Western Europe; in France three quarters of electricity is generated by nuclear power stations. This booklet is about the safety of those plants. It approaches the subject by outlining the basic principles and approaches behind nuclear safety, describing the protective barriers and safety systems that are designed to prevent the escape of radioactive material, and summarising the regulations that govern the construction and operation of nuclear power stations. The aim is to provide a general understanding of the subject by explaining the general principles of the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor and setting out the UKAEA strategy for nuclear safety, the objective being always to minimize risk. (author)

  5. The future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeile, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    Present conditions and future prospects for the nuclear power industry in the United States are discussed. The presentation includes a review of trends in electrical production, the safety of coal as compared to nuclear generating plants, the dangers of radiation, the economics of nuclear power, the high cost of nuclear power in the United States, and the public fear of nuclear power. 20 refs

  6. Thermal Pollution by Nuclear Power Plants. A Learning Experience for Coastal and Oceanic Awareness Studies, No. 320. [Project COAST].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Coll. of Education.

    This publication includes several activities regarding the use of nuclear power plants and possible effects on the environment. The materials are designed for secondary school students and include reference materials and masters for transparencies. (RH)

  7. Nuclear power industry, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    The intent of this publication is to provide a single volume of resource material that offers a timely, comprehensive view of the nuclear option. Chapter 1 discusses the development of commercial nuclear power from a historical perspective, reviewing the factors and events that have and will influence its progress. Chapters 2 through 5 discuss in detail the nuclear powerplant and its supporting fuel cycle, including various aspects of each element from fuel supply to waste management. Additional dimension is brought to the discussion by Chapters 6 and 7, which cover the Federal regulation of nuclear power and the nuclear export industry. This vast body of thoroughly documented information offers the reader a useful tool in evaluating the record and potential of nuclear energy in the United States

  8. Safety and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, John; Gunning, Angela.

    1988-01-01

    Representatives of the supporters and opponents of civil nuclear power put forward the arguments they feel the public should consider when making up their mind about the nuclear industry. The main argument in favour of nuclear power is about the low risk in comparison with other risks and the amount of radiation received on average by the population in the United Kingdom from different sources. The aim is to show that the nuclear industry is fully committed to the cause of safety and this has resulted in a healthy workforce and a safe environment for the public. The arguments against are that the nuclear industry is deceitful, secretive and politically motivated and thus its arguments about safety, risks, etc, cannot be trusted. The question of safety is considered further - in particular the perceptions, definitions and responsibility. The economic case for nuclear electricity is not accepted. (U.K.)

  9. Nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Moreira, Y.M. de.

    1979-01-01

    The legal aspects of nuclear power plant construction in Brazil, derived from governamental political guidelines, are presented. Their evolution, as a consequence of tecnology development is related. (A.L.S.L.) [pt

  10. Nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulkiewicz, M.; Navratil, J.

    The construction of a nuclear power plant is conditioned on territorial requirements and is accompanied by the disturbance of the environment, land occupation, population migration, the emission of radioactive wastes, thermal pollution, etc. On the other hand, a nuclear power plant makes possible the introduction of district heating and increases the economic and civilization activity of the population. Due to the construction of a nuclear power plant the set limits of negative impacts must not be exceeded. The locality should be selected such as to reduce the unfavourable effects of the plant and to fully use its benefits. The decision on the siting of the nuclear power plant is preceded by the processing of a number of surveys and a wide range of documentation to which the given criteria are strictly applied. (B.H.)

  11. 2009 nuclear power world report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    At the end of 2009, 437 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 30 countries of the world. This is 1 plant less than at the end of 2008. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 391.5 GWe, the aggregate net power, to 371.3 GWe. This capacity numbers are a little bit less than one year before (gross: 392.6 GWe, net: 372.2 GWe). Two units were commissioned in 2009; 1 unit in India (Rajasthan 5) and 1 unit in Japan (Tomari 3). Three nuclear power plant were shut down permanently in 2009 in Japan (Hamaoka 1 and Hamaoka 2) and in Lithuania (Ignalina 2). 52 nuclear generating units, i.e. 9 plants more than at the end of 2008, were under construction in late 2009 in 14 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 51.2 GWe. Worldwide, some 80 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 130 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2009 achieved another reasonable ranking level of approx. 2,558 billion kWh (2008: approx. 2,628 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 60,500 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 13,950 reactor years. (orig.)

  12. 2010 nuclear power world report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    At the end of 2010, 443 nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 30 countries of the world. This are 6 plants more than at the end of 2009. The aggregate gross power of the plants amounted to approx. 396,118 MWe, the aggregate net power, to 375,947 MWe. This capacity numbers are a little bit more than one year before (gross: 391,551 MWe, net: 371,331 MWe). Six unites were commissioned in 2010; 2 units in China and India each and one unit in the Republic of Korea and Russia each. One unit, the Fast Breeder Pilot Reactor Monju in Japan, was connected to the grid after a long-term shutdown. One nuclear power plant, the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor Phenix in France, was shut down permanently in 2010. 62 nuclear generating units, i.e. 9 plants more than at the end of 2009, were under construction in late 2010 in 15 countries with an aggregate gross power of approx. 63,998 MWe. Worldwide, some 90 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning, and licensing phases; in some of these cases license applications have been submitted or contracts have already been signed. Some 120 further projects are planned. Net electricity generation in nuclear power plants worldwide in 2010 achieved another reasonable ranking level of approx. 2,627.5 billion kWh (2009: approx. 2,558 billion kWh). Since the first generation of electricity in a nuclear power plant in the EBR-I fast breeder (USA) on December 20, 1951, cumulated net production has reached approx. 63,100 billion kWh, and operating experience has grown to some 14,400 reactor years. (orig.)

  13. Nuclear power in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, Z.H.; Qureshi, I.H.

    2005-01-01

    Pakistan started its nuclear power program by installing a 137 M We Canadian Deuterium Reactor (Candu) at Karachi in 1971 which became operational in 1972. The post-contract technical support for the Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP) was withdrawn by Canada in 196 as a consequence of Indian nuclear device test in 1974. In spite of various difficulties PAEC resolved to continue to operate KANUPP and started a process for the indigenous fabrication of spare parts and nuclear fuel. The first fuel bundle fabricated in Pakistan was loaded in the core in 1980. Since then KANUPP has been operating on the indigenously fabricated fuel. The plant computer systems and the most critical instrumentation and Control system were also replaced with up-to date technology. In 2002 KANUPP completed its original design life of 30 year. A program for the life extension of the plant had already been started. The second nuclear power plant of 300 M We pressurized water reactor purchased from China was installed in Chashma in 1997, which started commercial operations in 2001. Another unit of 300 M We will be installed at Chashma in near future. These nuclear power plants have been operating under IAEA safeguards agreements. PAEC through the long-term performance of the two power plants has demonstrated its competence to safely and successfully operate and maintain nuclear power plants. Pakistan foresees an increasingly important and significant share of nuclear power in the energy sector. The Government has recently allocated a share of 8000 MWe for nuclear energy in the total energy scenario of Pakistan by the year 2025. (author)

  14. Contract types for nuclear power projects, non-turnkey type contracts in particular

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyte'n, T.

    1975-01-01

    A non-turnkey contract differs from a turnkey contract in no special formal way. The way the buyer chooses to exercise his project leadership must be concretized in the contract. The way and extent he wishes to exercise technical checking must be laid down in the form of clear rules. The way information has to flow from one contractor over buyer to others and vice versa has to be laid down in detail and the consequences of non conformance fixed in such a manner that optimum project performance is reached. (orig./FW) [de

  15. Expert report of ENSI on the request of KKN AG for a general license - Project 'New nuclear power plant Niederamt'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    The 'Kernkraftwerk Niederamt AG' (KKN) Company submitted to the Swiss Federal Inspectorate of Nuclear Safety (ENSI) a request for a general license for a new power plant to be built near to the Goesgen power plant. According to the law, all damage risks with a probability higher than 10 -4 /a must be taken into account through protection measures. The considered risks concern the power plant itself as well as the population in the neighbourhood and the environment. The purpose of the general license is to demonstrate that the site chosen for the foreseen power plant is acceptable and that the risks can be counteracted through adequate measures. The buildings of the power plant and their partition over the two banks of the Aare River are briefly described. The reactor is a Light Water Reactor of third generation with a maximum thermal power of 5.8 GW th . The main cooling is provided by a hybrid system of water evaporation and air heating, what reduces the plume at the exit of the cooling tower. First, it is demonstrated that, in the case of a very unlikely severe accident in the power plant, the people in the neighbourhood can be evacuated quickly. Then, numerous types of possible accidents in the neighbourhood of the power plant are analyzed in order to settle their possible negative influence on the operation of the power plant: bursting of gas containers on the neighbouring roads and railways, fires of all types of hydrocarbons, air pollution through chloride gas, etc. The check by ENSI of the KKN studies on the potential danger for the power plant through neighbouring industrial plants, roads or railways demonstrated that none of the considered accidents presents an unacceptable risk for the power plant: on the one hand, these plants are located too far from the power plant, so that a sensible injury to the power plant safety can be excluded; on the other, the protection of the power plant can be guaranteed through appropriate technical measures. The power

  16. The Korean nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Tong

    1996-01-01

    Although the world nuclear power industry may appear to be in decline, continued nuclear power demand in Korea indicates future opportunities for growth and prosperity in this country. Korea has one of the world's most vigorous nuclear power programs. Korea has been an active promoter of nuclear power generation since 1978, when the country introduced nuclear power as a source of electricity. Korea now takes pride in the outstanding performance of its nuclear power plants, and has established a grand nuclear power scheme. This paper is aimed at introducing the nuclear power program of Korea, including technological development, international cooperation, and CANDU status in Korea. (author). 2 tabs

  17. Solving some socio-economic relations in the area of the projected site of the Blahutovice nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uvirova, E.; Grosikova, B.

    1988-01-01

    Blahutovice nuclear power plant personnel will be accommodated in hostels and newly built appartments in Novy Jicin and in Hranice. Commuting of personnel to the plant from the two towns is discussed. A works health centre will be built in the nuclear power plant area delivering primary health care. A radiation medicine unit is also envisaged. The Beskydy Mts. in Northern Moravia are considered for recreation-rehabilitation facilities. (E.S.). 2 tabs., 5 refs

  18. Water and nuclear power cogeneration with desalination: the U.S. projects and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faibish, Ron S.

    2004-01-01

    Recent dramatic increases in water shortages across the globe necessitate exploring innovative and practical methods for increasing the world's ever-depleting water and energy supplies. One proposed solution to alleviate water shortage, which is gaining popularity around the world, is to desalt seawater and produce potable water, i.e., via seawater desalination. Indeed, the basic technological know-how is readily available from extensive previous experience, especially in the Middle East and Arabian Gulf regions. However, new proposals for coupling desalination plants with power plants for the convenient cogeneration of water and power are rapidly emerging and requiring re-evaluation of process technology and economics

  19. [Nuclear News -- Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The topics discussed in this section are: (1) NU(Northeast Utilities) receives largest court fine levied for false records. (2) ComEd nuclear fleet has best-ever performance. (3) Perry and Beaver Valley now run by First Energy Nuclear. (4) Slight reactor power increases may save dollars; (5) Nuclear plants shares to change hands. (6) Y2K nonsafety-related work scheduled for completion. (7) New NRC plan for reviewing plant license transfers with foreign ownership.

  20. Nuclear power and acceptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speelman, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    In 1989 a workshop was held organized by the IAEA and the Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose was to investigate under which circumstances a large-scale extension of nuclear power can be accepted. Besides the important technical information, the care for the environment determined the atmosphere during the workshop. The opinion dominated that nuclear power can contribute in tackling the environment problems, but that the social and political climate this almost makes impossible. (author). 7 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  1. Discounting and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1984-01-01

    The paper describes the practice of discounting and its applicability to nuclear power, and the choice of discount rates. Opportunity cost of capital; risk; social time preference; intergenerational equity; non-monetary aspects; and discounting and nuclear energy; are all discussed. (U.K.)

  2. Nuclear power and leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimston, M.

    1991-03-01

    This booklet describes the nature of leukaemia, disease incidence in the UK and the possible causes. Epidemiological studies observing rates of leukaemia near nuclear power stations in the UK and other parts of the world are discussed. Possible causes of leukaemia excesses near nuclear establishments include radioactive discharges into the environment, paternal radiation exposure and viral causes. (UK)

  3. No to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Kim Beazley has again stated a Labor Government would not pursue nuclear power because the economics 'simply don't stack up'. 'We have significant gas, coal and renewable energy reserves and do not have a solution for the disposal of low-level nuclear waste, let alone waste from nuclear power stations.' The Opposition Leader said developing nuclear power now would have ramifications for Australia's security. 'Such a move could result in our regional neighbours fearing we will use it militarily.' Instead, Labor would focus on the practical measures that 'deliver economic and environmental stability while protecting our national security'. Mr Beazley's comments on nuclear power came in the same week as Prime Minister John Howard declined the request of Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh for uranium exports, although seemingly not ruling out a policy change at some stage. The Prime Ministers held talks in New Delhi over whether Australia would sell uranium to India without it signing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. An agreement reached during a visit by US President George W. Bush gives India access to long-denied nuclear technology and guaranteed fuel in exchange for allowing international inspection of some civilian nuclear facilities. Copyright (2006) Crown Content Pty Ltd

  4. Nuclear Power Plant Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, George A.

    1975-01-01

    The author recognizes a body of basic knowledge in nuclear power plant technoogy that can be taught in school programs, and lists the various courses, aiming to fill the anticipated need for nuclear-trained manpower--persons holding an associate degree in engineering technology. (Author/BP)

  5. Nuclear power for beginners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croall, S.; Sempler, K.

    1978-01-01

    A 'comic strip' account of nuclear power, covering weapons and weapons proliferation, reactor accidents involving human errors, radiation hazards, radioactive waste management and the fuel cycle, fast breeder reactors and plutonium, security, public relations and sociological aspects, energy consumption patterns, energy conservation and alternative energy sources, environmental aspects and anti-nuclear activities. (U.K.)

  6. Progress by nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creamer, A.

    1980-01-01

    United States scientist Petr Beckmann predicts that there will eventually be nuclear power stations in the Transvaal in South Africa. This will take place for two reasons: to decrease pollution problems and to ensure economic advancement. He also refers to the the toxicity of nuclear wastes and coal wastes

  7. World status - nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of nuclear power are not so much anti-nuclear public opinion, but more the decrease of electricity consumption growth rate and the high cost of building reactors. Because of these factors, forecasts of world nuclear capacity have had to be reduced considerably over the last three years. The performance of reactors is considered. The CANDU reactor remains the world's best performer and overall tends to out-perform larger reactors. The nuclear plant due to come on line in 1984 are listed by country; this shows that nuclear capacity will increase substantially over a short period. At a time of stagnant demand this will make nuclear energy an important factor in the world energy balance. Nuclear power stations in operation and under construction in 1983 are listed and major developments in commercial nuclear power in 1983 are taken country by country. In most, the report is the same; national reactor ordering cut back because the expected increase in energy demand has not happened. Also the cost-benefit of nuclear over other forms of energy is no longer as favourable. The export opportunities have also declined as many of the less developed countries are unable to afford reactors. (U.K.)

  8. Climate change and nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M

    2000-04-01

    The nuclear industry has increased its efforts to have nuclear power plants integrated into the post- Kyoto negotiating process of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) states: ''For many reasons, current and future nuclear energy projects are a superior method of generating emission credits that must be considered as the US expands the use of market- based mechanisms designed around emission credit creation and trading to achieve environmental goals ''. The NEI considers that nuclear energy should be allowed to enter all stages of the Kyoto ''flexibility Mechanisms'': emissions trading, joint implementation and the Clean Development Mechanism. The industry sees the operation of nuclear reactors as emission ''avoidance actions'' and believes that increasing the generation of nuclear power above the 1990 baseline year either through extension and renewal of operating licenses or new nuclear plant should be accepted under the flexibility mechanisms in the same way as wind, solar and hydro power. For the time being, there is no clear definition of the framework conditions for operating the flexibility mechanisms. However, eligible mechanisms must contribute to the ultimate objective of the Climate Convention of preventing ''dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system''. The information presented in the following sections of this report underlines that nuclear power is not a sustainable source of energy, for many reasons. In conclusion, an efficient greenhouse gas abatement strategy will be based on energy efficiency and not on the use of nuclear power. (author)

  9. Nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.; Bennett, L.L.; Skjoeldebrand, R.

    1984-01-01

    Experience clearly indicates that most developing countries actively planning and implementing nuclear power require broad-scope assistance if their use of nuclear technology is to be safe, economic, and reliable. The IAEA's assistance is directed both to general planning, and to the development of supporting structures and is based on an assessment of needs which cannot be satisfied by other means. The Agency's Division of Nuclear Power has the technical background and tools to support a comprehensive programme of assistance in nuclear power assessment, planning, and implementation. The overall objective of such a programme is to help strengthen national capabilities of executing the following tasks: Analysis of overall energy and electricity demand and supply projections; planning the possible role of nuclear power in electricity supply, through determining the economically optimal extent and schedule for the introduction of nuclear power plants; assessing the available infrastructures and the need, constraints, and possibilities for their development; and developing master schedules, programmes, and recommendations for action. Proposed programmes must be reviewed periodically, and one of the Agency's aims is to ensure that national competence to carry out such reviews exists or can be developed. Training of local staff is therefore one of the most important objectives

  10. Nuclear power for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.; Kupitz, J.; Rogner, H. H.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power is a proven technology which currently makes a large contribution to the electricity supply in a number of countries and, to a much less extent, to heat supply in some countries. Nuclear power is economically competitive with fossil fuels for base load electricity generation in many countries, and is one of the commercially proven energy supply options that could be expanded in the future to reduce environmental burdens, especially greenhouse gas emissions, from the electricity sector. Over the past five decades, nearly ten thousand reactor-years of operating experience have been accumulated with current nuclear power plants. Building upon this background of success and applying lessons learned from the experience of operating plants, new generations of nuclear power plants have been, or are being developed. Improvements incorporated into these advance designs include features that will allow operators more time to perform equipment protection and safety actions in response to equipment failures and other off normal operating conditions, and that will reduce and simplify the actions required. Great attention is also paid to making new plants simpler to operate, inspect, maintain and repair, thus increasing their overall cost efficiency and their compatibility with the infrastructure of developing countries. The paper provides a discussion of future world energy supply and demand projections, current status and prospects for nuclear power, a short summary of advanced reactor concepts and non-electrical applications of nuclear energy for developing countries, and a review of the role of the IAEA. (author)

  11. Nuclear power infrastructure and planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    There are several stages in the process of introducing nuclear power in a country. These include feasibility studies; technology evaluation; request for proposals and proposal evaluation; project and contracts development and financing; supply, construction, and commissioning; and finally operation. The IAEA is developing guidance directed to provide criteria for assessing the minimum infrastructure necessary for: a) a host country to consider when engaging in the implementation of nuclear power, or b) a supplier country to consider when assessing that the recipient country would be in an acceptable condition to begin the implementation of nuclear power. There are Member States that may be denied the benefits of nuclear energy if the infrastructure requirements are too large or onerous for the national economy. However if co-operation could be achieved, the infrastructure burden could be shared and economic benefits gained by several countries acting jointly. The IAEA is developing guidance on the potential for sharing of nuclear power infrastructure among countries adopting or extending nuclear power programme

  12. Assessment of biofouling community development on test panels submerged in Kudankulam coast with special reference to the Nuclear Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satheesh, S.; Wesley, S. Godwin

    2008-01-01

    Biofouling is known to be one of the common problems in cooling water systems of power plants and several incidents of plant shutdown have been reported from various parts of the world. The settlement of marine organisms on an exposed hard surface depends obviously on the species, which are naturally present at a given site as well as their ability to attach and grow on that surface. Information on the organisms forming the fouling complex is necessary in view of the damages they cause to various marine structures and for devising protective measures. The present paper reports the results of the investigations of biofouling carried out for a period of two years from November 2003 to October 2004 at Kudankulam coast where a mega nuclear power project is under construction. Wooden test panels (10x10x3 cm) were fitted to a raft and submerged in the coastal waters. Total fouling biomass, thickness, coverage and community composition were analysed from the panels. Barnacles, mussels, ascidians, polychaetes, amphipods and seaweeds were the common fouling groups settled on the test panels. The total biomass reached to a maximum of 69.9 g.dm -2 (dry weight) after 330 days of exposure. The fouling thickness reached a maximum of 42.3 mm after 225 days of exposure. Results also showed a strong temporal variation in the fouling community recruitment. Based on the observations, Kudankulam coast could be categorized as a moderate fouling station mainly due to the low abundance of mussels in this region. (author)

  13. Method of levelized discounted costs applied in economic evaluation of nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Li; Wang Yongqing; Liu Jingquan; Guo Jilin; Liu Wei

    2000-01-01

    The main methods of economic evaluation of bid which are in common use are introduced. The characteristics of levelized discounted cost method and its application are presented. The method of levelized discounted cost is applied to the cost calculation of a 200 MW nuclear heating reactor economic evaluation. The results indicate that the method of levelized discounted costs is simple, feasible and which is considered most suitable for the economic evaluation of various case. The method is suggested which is used in the national economic evaluation

  14. Nuclear power for beginners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croall, S.; Sempler, K.

    1979-01-01

    Witty, critically, and with expert knowledge, 'Atomic power for beginners' describes the development of nuclear power for military purposes and its 'peaceful uses' against the will of the population. Atomic power, the civil baby of the bomb is not only a danger to our lives - it is enemy to all life as all hard technologies are on which economic systems preoccupied with growth put their hopes. Therefore, 'Atomic power for beginners' does not stop at nuclear engineering but proceeds to investigate its consequences, nationally and with a view to the Third World. And since the consequences are so fatal and it is not enough to say no to nuclear power, it gives some thoughts to a better future - with soft technology and alternative production. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 MKO [de

  15. Touchstone for Japan's Export of nuclear power plant system. Vinh Hai unit 1 and 2 project in the Ninh Thuan province in Viet Nam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsumata, Hiroki; Takekuro, Ichiro; Kaneko, Kumao; Suzuki, Hideaki; Saito, Shinzo

    2011-01-01

    'Japan-Viet Nam Joint Statement on the Strategic Partnership for Peace and Prosperity in Asia' issued after the meeting between Japan-Viet Nam Prime Ministers on October 31, affirmed that the Vietnamese Government had decided to choose Japan as the cooperation partner for building Vinh Hai Unit 1 and 2 Project in the Ninh Thuan Province, southern Viet Nam, which showed substantially an order of Japan was arranged informally. 'International Nuclear Energy Development of Japan Co., Ltd. (JINED)' set up by industry and government, would negotiate to decide fundamental parameters such as type and power of nuclear power plants with the start of operation scheduled in 2021. This special issue consisted of six articles on significance of the project of Japan's first export, feasibility studies and future perspective and regional effects with introduction of nuclear power station in Viet Nam. (T. Tanaka)

  16. Comparative assessment of nuclear power and other energy sources: the DECADES project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    The environmental and health related impacts of different energy systems are emerging as significant issues. To promote international cooperation in this field, the inter-agency project on databases and methodologies for comparative assessment of different energy sources for electricity generation, called DECADES, was established at the end of 1992. In October 1995 was held the International Symposium on ''Electricity, Health and the Environment - Comparative Assessment in Support of Decision Making''. Through its programs and activities, the IAEA plays a leading role, in cooperation with other organizations, in the DECADES project, to examine areas in which international expertise and support can best be applied to assist national policy and decision makers in objectively and comprehensively assessing their energy systems and strategies

  17. Country nuclear power profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles was initiated within the framework of the IAEA`s programme for nuclear power plant performance assessment and feedback. It responded to a need for a database and a technical document containing a description of the energy and economic situation and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. The task was included in the IAEA`s programmes for 1993/1994 and 1995/1996. In March 1993, the IAEA organized a Technical Committee meeting to discuss the establishment of country data ``profiles``, to define the information to be included in the profiles and to review the information already available in the IAEA. Two expert meetings were convened in November 1994 to provide guidance to the IAEA on the establishment of the country nuclear profiles, on the structure and content of the profiles, and on the preparation of the publication and the electronic database. In June 1995, an Advisory Group meeting provided the IAEA with comprehensive guidance on the establishment and dissemination of an information package on industrial and organizational aspects of nuclear power to be included in the profiles. The group of experts recommended that the profiles focus on the overall economic, energy and electricity situation in the country and on its nuclear power industrial structure and organizational framework. In its first release, the compilation would cover all countries with operating power plants by the end of 1995. It was also recommended to further promote information exchange on the lessons learned from the countries engaged in nuclear programmes. For the preparation of this publication, the IAEA received contributions from the 29 countries operating nuclear power plants and Italy. A database has been implemented and the profiles are supporting programmatic needs within the IAEA; it is expected that the database will be publicly accessible in the future. Refs, figs, tabs.

  18. Country nuclear power profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles was initiated within the framework of the IAEA's programme for nuclear power plant performance assessment and feedback. It responded to a need for a database and a technical document containing a description of the energy and economic situation and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. The task was included in the IAEA's programmes for 1993/1994 and 1995/1996. In March 1993, the IAEA organized a Technical Committee meeting to discuss the establishment of country data ''profiles'', to define the information to be included in the profiles and to review the information already available in the IAEA. Two expert meetings were convened in November 1994 to provide guidance to the IAEA on the establishment of the country nuclear profiles, on the structure and content of the profiles, and on the preparation of the publication and the electronic database. In June 1995, an Advisory Group meeting provided the IAEA with comprehensive guidance on the establishment and dissemination of an information package on industrial and organizational aspects of nuclear power to be included in the profiles. The group of experts recommended that the profiles focus on the overall economic, energy and electricity situation in the country and on its nuclear power industrial structure and organizational framework. In its first release, the compilation would cover all countries with operating power plants by the end of 1995. It was also recommended to further promote information exchange on the lessons learned from the countries engaged in nuclear programmes. For the preparation of this publication, the IAEA received contributions from the 29 countries operating nuclear power plants and Italy. A database has been implemented and the profiles are supporting programmatic needs within the IAEA; it is expected that the database will be publicly accessible in the future

  19. Nuclear safeguards project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mache, H.R.

    1978-10-01

    The present report describes the major activities carried out in 1977 in the framework of the Nuclear Safeguards Project by the institutes of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Kernforschungsanlage Juelich, the European Institute of Transuranium Elements and some industrial firms. (orig.) 891 HP 892 AP [de

  20. Economics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bupp, I.C.; Derian, J.C.; Donsimoni, M.P.; Treitel, R.

    1975-01-01

    Present trends in nuclear reactor costs are interpreted as the economic result of a fundamental debate regarding the social acceptability of nuclear power. Rising capital costs for nuclear power plants are evaluated through statistical analysis of time-related factors, characteristics of licensing and construction costs, physical characteristics of reactors, and geographic and site-related factors. Conclusions are drawn regarding the impact of social acceptability on reactor costs, engineering estimates of future costs, and the possibility of increased potential relative competitiveness for coal-fueled plants. 7 references. (U.S.)

  1. The reality of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, D.

    1979-01-01

    The following matters are discussed in relation to the nuclear power programmes in USA and elsewhere: siting of nuclear power plants in relation to a major geological fault; public attitudes to nuclear power; plutonium, radioactive wastes and transfrontier contamination; radiation and other hazards; economics of nuclear power; uranium supply; fast breeder reactors; insurance of nuclear facilities; diversion of nuclear materials and weapons proliferation; possibility of manufacture of nuclear weapons by developing countries; possibility of accidents on nuclear power plants in developing countries; radiation hazards from use of uranium ore tailings; sociological alternative to use of nuclear power. (U.K.)

  2. Strategy of nuclear power in Korea, non-nuclear-weapon state and peaceful use of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, Takao

    2005-01-01

    The nuclear power plant started at Kori in Korea in April, 1978. Korea has carried out development of nuclear power as a national policy. The present capacity of nuclear power plants takes the sixes place in the world. It supplies 42% total power generation. The present state of nuclear power plant, nuclear fuel cycle facility, strategy of domestic production of nuclear power generation, development of next generation reactor and SMART, strategy of export in corporation with industry, government and research organization, export of nuclear power generation in Japan, nuclear power improvement project with Japan, Korea and Asia, development of nuclear power system with nuclear diffusion resistance, Hybrid Power Extraction Reactor System, radioactive waste management and construction of joint management and treatment system of spent fuel in Asia are stated. (S.Y.)

  3. The realism project reconciling nuclear power and radiation policies with the real world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodore Rockwell

    2006-01-01

    Let's get real. It is crazy to fear that one's health and life are threatened by entities known to be harmless, whether those entities are goblins under the bed or trivial levels of radiation from non-existent radiological catastrophes. The nuclear community is in that paranoid state, and no advice from public relations experts can cure it. Some people claim that overstating risk is a prudent thing to do, but in practice it may do harm. Let us recall what we have said and done to create this situation. Then let us look at what the real world tells us about those risks. And then we will consider what might be done to return to reason. (author)

  4. NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

    1963-05-14

    A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

  5. Nuclear power prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, K.

    1994-01-01

    The technical, economic and political prospects of nuclear power are described with regard to ecological aspects. The consensus talks, which failed in spite of the fact that they were stripped of emotional elements and in spite of major concessions on the part of the power industry, are discussed with a view to the political and social conditions. (orig.) [de

  6. The nuclear power alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1989-04-01

    The Director General of the IAEA stressed the need for energy policies and other measures which would help to slow and eventually halt the present build-up of carbon dioxide, methane and other so-called greenhouse gases, which are held to cause global warming. He urged that nuclear power and various other sources of energy, none of which contribute to global warming, should not be seen as alternatives, but should all be used to counteract the greenhouse effect. He pointed out that the commercially used renewable energies, apart from hydropower, currently represent only 0.3% of the world's energy consumption and, by contrast, the 5% of the world's energy consumption coming from nuclear power is not insignificant. Dr. Blix noted that opposition for nuclear power stems from fear of accidents and concern about the nuclear wastes. But no generation of electricity, whether by coal, hydro, gas or nuclear power, is without some risk. He emphasized that safety can never be a static concept, and that many new measures are being taken by governments and by the IAEA to further strengthen the safety of nuclear power

  7. Future nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosbah, D.S.; Nasreddine, M.

    2006-01-01

    The book includes an introduction then it speaks about the options to secure sources of energy, nuclear power option, nuclear plants to generate energy including light-water reactors (LWR), heavy-water reactors (HWR), advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGR), fast breeder reactors (FBR), development in the manufacture of reactors, fuel, uranium in the world, current status of nuclear power generation, economics of nuclear power, nuclear power and the environment and nuclear power in the Arab world. A conclusion at the end of the book suggests the increasing demand for energy in the industrialized countries and in a number of countries that enjoy special and economic growth such as China and India pushes the world to search for different energy sources to insure the urgent need for current and anticipated demand in the near and long-term future in light of pessimistic and optimistic outlook for energy in the future. This means that states do a scientific and objective analysis of the currently available data for the springboard to future plans to secure the energy required to support economy and welfare insurance.

  8. Nuclear power in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringwood, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    The nuclear power debate hinges upon three major issues: radioactive waste disposal, reactor safety and proliferation. An alternative strategy for waste disposal is advocated which involves disposing of the radwaste (immobilized in SYNROC, a titanate ceramic waste form) in deep (4 km) drill-holes widely dispersed throughout the entire country. It is demonstrated that this strategy possesses major technical (safety) advantages over centralized, mined repositories. The comparative risks associated with coal-fired power generation and with the nuclear fuel cycle have been evaluated by many scientists, who conclude that nuclear power is far less hazardous. Considerable improvements in reactor design and safety are readily attainable. The nuclear industry should be obliged to meet these higher standards. The most hopeful means of limiting proliferation lies in international agreements, possibly combined with international monitoring and control of key segments of the fuel cycle, such as reprocessing

  9. Nuclear power and environmental policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershing, J.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power, which presently accounts for approximately 20% of global electricity generation is still beset with environmental problems. Such problems are found throughout the fuel cycle - from mining and milling to processing, to plant operation and finally to waste disposal. While projected radioactive releases for normal operation is extremely low, much of the environmental risk comes from the potential for accidents. A list of the most significant nuclear accidents that occurred between 1966 and 1999 is given. On the other hand nuclear power offers great environmental benefits particularly when compared to other energy sources: all along the fuel cycle comparatively very few wastes are produced. In a world becoming more and more aware of environmental problems, it seems that there is no definitive conclusion about nuclear energy. (A.C.)

  10. LDC nuclear power: Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selim, M.E.S.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter reviews the evolution of Egypt's nuclear program, the major factors that influenced the successive series of nuclear decisions, and the public debate over the far-reaching program attempted by the late President Anwar El-Sadat. Egypt's program is important, not only because it was the first Arab country to enter the nuclear age, but because it is an ambitious program that includes the installation of eight reactors at a time when many countries are reducing their commitment to nuclear power. Major obstacles remain in terms of human, organizational, and natural resource constraints. 68 references, 1 table

  11. Nuclear power economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emsley, Ian; Cobb, Jonathan [World Nuclear Association, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    Many countries recognize the substantial role which nuclear power has played in providing energy security of supply, reducing import dependence and reducing greenhouse gas and polluting emissions. Nevertheless, as such considerations are far from being fully accounted for in liberalized or deregulated power markets, nuclear plants must demonstrate their viability in these markets on commercial criteria as well as their lifecycle advantages. Nuclear plants are operating more efficiently than in the past and unit operating costs are low relative to those of alternative generating technologies. The political risk facing the economic functioning of nuclear in a number of countries has increased with the imposition of nuclear-specific taxes that in some cases have deprived operators of the economic incentive to continue to operate existing plants.

  12. Nuclear power economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emsley, Ian; Cobb, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Many countries recognize the substantial role which nuclear power has played in providing energy security of supply, reducing import dependence and reducing greenhouse gas and polluting emissions. Nevertheless, as such considerations are far from being fully accounted for in liberalized or deregulated power markets, nuclear plants must demonstrate their viability in these markets on commercial criteria as well as their lifecycle advantages. Nuclear plants are operating more efficiently than in the past and unit operating costs are low relative to those of alternative generating technologies. The political risk facing the economic functioning of nuclear in a number of countries has increased with the imposition of nuclear-specific taxes that in some cases have deprived operators of the economic incentive to continue to operate existing plants.

  13. Environmental aspects of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.P.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power provides the world with an important option for generating electricity. To successfully and safely utilize this power, engineering and environmental factors should be carefully considered throughout a nuclear power plant project, especially during the planning stages. This paper discusses the major environmental aspects of a nuclear power plant project from site selection to retirement. During the site selection process, both engineering and environmental resources must be identified and evaluated. Environmental resources include areas that support agricultural or aquatic commercial activities, habitats for commercial or endangered species, population centers, transportation systems, and recreational areas. Also during the site selection process, the potential impacts of both construction and operating activities must be considered. In addition to the area actually disturbed by construction, construction activities also affect local services, such as transportation systems, housing, school systems, and other social services. Since nuclear power plants use a ''clean fuel,'' generally the most significant operating activity having a potential environmental impact is the discharge of cooling water. The potential effect of this discharge on commercial activities and sensitive habitats should be thoroughly evaluated. Lastly, the method of decommissioning can affect long-range land use planning and should therefore be considered during the planning process

  14. Nuclear power in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishida, J.

    1990-01-01

    The Japanese movement against nuclear energy reached a climax in its upsurge in 1988 two years after the Chernobyl accident. At the outset of that year, this trend was triggered by the government acknowledgement that the Tokyo market was open to foods contaminated by the fallout from Chernobyl. Anti-nuclear activists played an agitating role and many housewives were persuaded to join them. Among many public opinion surveys conducted at that time by newspapers and broadcasting networks, I would like to give you some figures of results from the poll carried out by NHK: Sixty percent of respondents said that nuclear power 'should be promoted', either 'vigorously' 7 or 'carefully' 53%). Sixty-six percent doubted the 'safety of nuclear power', describing it as either 'very dangerous' 20%) or 'rather dangerous' (46%). Only 27% said it was 'safe'. In other words, those who acknowledged the need for nuclear power were almost equal in number with those who found it dangerous. What should these figures be taken to mean? I would take note of the fact that nearly two-thirds of valid responses were in favor of nuclear power even at the time when public opinion reacted most strongly to the impact of the Chernobyl accident. This apparently indicates that the majority of the Japanese people are of the opinion that they would 'promote nuclear power though it is dangerous' or that they would 'promote it, but with the understanding that it is dangerous'. But the anti-nuclear movement is continuing. It remains a headache for both the government and the electric utilities. But we can regard the anti-nuclear movement in Japan as not so serious as that faced by other industrial nations

  15. Nuclear power in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishida, J [Japan Research Institute, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1990-07-01

    The Japanese movement against nuclear energy reached a climax in its upsurge in 1988 two years after the Chernobyl accident. At the outset of that year, this trend was triggered by the government acknowledgement that the Tokyo market was open to foods contaminated by the fallout from Chernobyl. Anti-nuclear activists played an agitating role and many housewives were persuaded to join them. Among many public opinion surveys conducted at that time by newspapers and broadcasting networks, I would like to give you some figures of results from the poll carried out by NHK: Sixty percent of respondents said that nuclear power 'should be promoted', either 'vigorously' 7 or 'carefully' 53%). Sixty-six percent doubted the 'safety of nuclear power', describing it as either 'very dangerous' 20%) or 'rather dangerous' (46%). Only 27% said it was 'safe'. In other words, those who acknowledged the need for nuclear power were almost equal in number with those who found it dangerous. What should these figures be taken to mean? I would take note of the fact that nearly two-thirds of valid responses were in favor of nuclear power even at the time when public opinion reacted most strongly to the impact of the Chernobyl accident. This apparently indicates that the majority of the Japanese people are of the opinion that they would 'promote nuclear power though it is dangerous' or that they would 'promote it, but with the understanding that it is dangerous'. But the anti-nuclear movement is continuing. It remains a headache for both the government and the electric utilities. But we can regard the anti-nuclear movement in Japan as not so serious as that faced by other industrial nations.

  16. R and D on robots for nuclear power plants in 'advanced robot technology' project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Hiroaki

    1987-01-01

    The project aims at developing a safe man-robot system of high mobility and workability, highly adaptable to the working environment, and readily and reliably remote-controlled. The plan is to develop 'multi-purpose robots' that can do monitoring, inspection and light work quickly and correctly in areas where access of humans is difficult (e.g. hot spots and the inner space of the primary containment vessel), and 'robots used exclusively for valves, pumps, and other equipment, multi-functional to be used only for specific purposes'. This can be expected to be completed on the basis of results in research and development for the multi-purpose robots. R and D on the total system means manufacturing an optimum system with sufficient functions and performance required for the robot by combining existing technologies most adequately on the basis of the results of research and development on the project. After conceptual drawing and conceptual design, the system will be manufactured and demonstration tests will be completed by fiscal 1987 or 1988. This report describes the total image of the robots concerning the shape, locomotion, manipulation, perception, communication, control management, reliability and environmental durability, and then outlines the research and development activities regarding locomotion, manipulator, tectile sensor, actuator, single-eye three-dimensional measurement, visual data processing, optical spacial transmission, failure repair controller, functional reduction, robot health care and radiation resistance. (Nogami, K.)

  17. Steps to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The recent increase in oil prices will undoubtedly cause the pace at which nuclear power is introduced in developing countries to quicken in the next decade, with many new countries beginning to plan nuclear power programmes. The guidebook is intended for senior government officials, policy makers, economic and power planners, educationalists and economists. It assumes that the reader has relatively little knowledge of nuclear power systems or of nuclear physics but does have a general technical or management background. Nuclear power is described functionally from the point of view of an alternative energy source in power system expansion. The guidebook is based on an idealized approach. Variations on it are naturally possible and will doubtless be necessary in view of the different organizational structures that already exist in different countries. In particular, some countries may prefer an approach with a stronger involvement of their Atomic Energy Commission or Authority, for which this guidebook has foreseen mainly a regulatory and licensing role. It is intended to update this booklet as more experience becomes available. Supplementary guidebooks will be prepared on certain major topics, such as contracting for fuel supply and fuel cycle requirements, which the present book does not go into very deeply

  18. Nuclear power generating costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.R.; Kati, S.L.; Raman, R.; Nanjundeswaran, K.; Nadkarny, G.V.; Verma, R.S.; Mahadeva Rao, K.V.

    1983-01-01

    Indian experience pertaining to investment and generation costs of nuclear power stations is reviewed. The causes of investment cost increases are analysed and the increases are apportioned to escalation, design improvements and safety related adders. The paper brings out the fact that PHWR investment costs in India compare favourably with those experienced in developed countries in spite of the fact that the programme and the unit size are relatively much smaller in India. It brings out that in India at current prices a nuclear power station located over 800 km from coal reserves and operating at 75% capacity factor is competitive with thermal power at 60% capacity factor. (author)

  19. Comparative analysis of structural concrete Quality Assurance practices on nine nuclear and three fossil fuel power plant construction projects. Final summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willenbrock, J.H.; Thomas, H.R. Jr.; Burati, J.J. Jr.

    1978-12-01

    A summary of two reports, COO/4120-1 and COO/4120-2, is given. A comparative analysis was made of the Quality Assurance practices related to the structural concrete phase on nine nuclear and three fossil fuel power plant projects which are (or have been) under construction in the United States in the past ten years. For the nuclear projects the analysis identified the response of each Quality Assurance program to the applicable criteria of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix B as well as to the pertinent regulatory requirements and industry standards. For the fossil projects the analysis identified the response of each Quality Assurance program to criteria similar to those which were applicable in the nuclear situation. The major emphasis was placed on the construction aspects of the structural concrete phase of each project. The engineering and design aspects were examined whenever they interfaced with the construction aspects

  20. An overview of background environmental radiological surveillance around Kudankulam nuclear power project site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, M.P.; Vijayakumar, B.; George, Thomas; Rajan, P.S.; Rana, B.K.; Kumar, M.; Hegde, A.G.; Chougaonkar, M.P.

    2005-01-01

    A modern Environmental Survey Laboratory (ESL) equipped with state-of-art nuclear counting, chemical and ecological equipment's has been set up at Kudankulam at the very beginning of construction activities to carry out pre operational and baseline radioactivity measurements. Construction activities for the two VVER type 1000 MWe reactors at the site are progressing ahead of schedule and the first unit is slated to be critical in the year 2007. This paper presents the results of environmental radiological surveillance carried out for the last one year in Kudankulam environs. General radiation background in the area varies in the range of 0.1 - 0.7 μGy/h and elevated levels as high as 20 μGy/h are noticed in beach areas. The major contribution to the background radiation in high background areas comes from 232 Th and its daughter products. The concentrations of 40 K are of normal order and comparable to other NPP sites and normal background areas. The concentrations of fallout nuclides are very low and are at global fallout levels. (author)

  1. World nuclear power plant capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report provides the background information for statistics and analysis developed by NUKEM in its monthly Market Report on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The assessments in this Special Report are based on the continuous review of individual nuclear power plant projects. This Special Report begins with tables summarizing a variety of nuclear power generating capacity statistics for 1990. It continues with a brief review of the year's major events regarding each country's nuclear power program. The standard NUKEM Market Report tables on nuclear plant capacity are given on pages 24 and 25. Owing to space limitations, the first year shown is 1988. Please refer to previous Special Reports for data covering earlier years. Detailed tables for each country list all existing plants as well as those expected by NUKEM to be in commercial operation by the end of 2005. An Appendix containing a list of abbreviations can be found starting on page 56. Only nuclear power plants intended for civilian use are included in this Special Report. Reactor lifetimes are assumed to be 35 years for all light water reactors and 30 years for all other reactor types, unless other data or definite decommissioning dates have been published by the operators. (orig./UA) [de

  2. The Texts of the Instruments Concerning the Agency's Assistance to Pakistan in connection with the Establishment of a Nuclear Power Reactor Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    The terms of the Supply Agreement between the Agency and the Governments of Pakistan and the United States of America, and of the Project Agreement between the Agency and the Government of Pakistan concerning the Agency's assistance to that Government in connection with the establishment of a nuclear power reactor project, are reproduced herein for the information of all Members. Both Agreements entered into force on 17 June 1968

  3. The Texts of the Instruments Concerning the Agency's Assistance to Pakistan in connection with the Establishment of a Nuclear Power Reactor Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1968-09-06

    The terms of the Supply Agreement between the Agency and the Governments of Pakistan and the United States of America, and of the Project Agreement between the Agency and the Government of Pakistan concerning the Agency's assistance to that Government in connection with the establishment of a nuclear power reactor project, are reproduced herein for the information of all Members. Both Agreements entered into force on 17 June 1968.

  4. Nuclear power - assures the energy future. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Papers presented at the conference surveyed the present status of nuclear projects and future nuclear power plans, the export of electricity and technology, Canada's nuclear industry, and innovative nuclear opportunities

  5. Development of Czechoslovak nuclear power complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajci, T.

    1986-01-01

    The research project ''Development of the Czechoslovak nuclear power complex'' was undertaken by several Czechoslovak institutions and was coordinated by the Research Institute of the Fuel and Power Complex in Bratislava. Involved in the project was a staff of 170 people. 274 reports were pulished and the cost approached 70 mill. Czechoslovak crowns. The results are characterized of all six partial tasks. Basic information was prepared for the forecast of the solution of fuel and power problems in Czechoslovakia up to the year 2000 and their prospects up to the year 2020. Program MORNAP was written for the development of nuclear power, which models the operation of a power generation and transmission system with a selectable number of nuclear power plants. Another partial task related to the fuel cycle of nuclear power plants with respect to long-term provision and management of nuclear fuel. Nuclear safety was split into three problem groups, viz.: system safety of nuclear power plant operation; radiation problems of nuclear power plant safety; quality assurance of nuclear power plant components. The two remaining tasks were devoted to nuclear power engineering and to civil engineering. (Z.M.). 3 tabs., 1 refs

  6. Abuse of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, J [UKAEA

    1976-09-01

    This paper reproduces an address by Sir John Hill, Chairman of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, at a conference in London organised by the Financial Times in July 1976. Actions that, in the author's view, could be regarded as constituting abuse of nuclear power are first summarised, and the various aspects of the use and abuse of nuclear power are discussed. The author considers that achieving the maximum degree of acceptance of the Non-Proliferation Treaty is the most important political objective in nuclear power, but considers that nuclear terrorism would be abortive and that, so far as the UK is concerned, the present precautions are adequate and will remain so. It is considered that much abuse of nuclear power arises from the prevalence of its critics, particularly with reference to Pu hazards, the health of nuclear employees, and possible damage to the health of the public. The Pu problem is considered to be far more emotive than rational. The possibility of lung cancer and leukaemia is discussed. It is concluded that atomic energy is one of the best of industries in which to work, both from the health and interest points of view.

  7. Nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otway, H.J.

    1974-01-01

    Action at the international level will assume greater importance as the number of nuclear power plants increases, especially in the more densely populated parts of the world. Predictions of growth made prior to October 1973 [9] indicated that, by 1980, 14% of the electricity would be supplied by nuclear plants and by the year 2000 this figure would be about 50%. This will make the topic of international co-operation and standards of even greater importance. The IAEA has long been active in providing assistance to Member States in the siting design and operation of nuclear reactors. These activities have been pursued through advisory missions, the publication of codes of practice, guide books, technical reports and in arranging meetings to promote information exchange. During the early development of nuclear power, there was no well-established body of experience which would allow formulation of internationally acceptable safety criteria, except in a few special cases. Hence, nuclear power plant safety and reliability matters often received an ad hoc approach which necessarily entailed a lack of consistency in the criteria used and in the levels of safety required. It is clear that the continuation of an ad hoc approach to safety will prove inadequate in the context of a world-wide nuclear power industry, and the international trade which this implies. As in several other fields, the establishment of internationally acceptable safety standards and appropriate guides for use by regulatory bodies, utilities, designers and constructors, is becoming a necessity. The IAEA is presently planning the development of a comprehensive set of basic requirements for nuclear power plant safety, and the associated reliability requirements, which would be internationally acceptable, and could serve as a standard frame of reference for nuclear plant safety and reliability analyses

  8. Nuclear power in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckurts, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    On the occasion of the retirement of the Editor-in-chief of 'atomwirtschaft', the author gave a keynote speech on the development of nuclear power in the Federal Republic of Germany at the headquarters of the Handelsblatt Verlag in Duesseldorf on October 30, 1984. He subdivided the period under discussion into five phases, the first of which comprises the 'founding years' of 1955 to 1960. This was the time when activities in nuclear research and nuclear technology in Germany, which were permitted again in mid-1955, began with the establishment of the national research centers, the first Atomic Power Program, the promulgation of the Atomic Energy Act, the foundation of government organizations, including the Federal Ministry for Atomic Energy, etc. In the second phase, between 1960 and 1970, a solid foundation was laid for the industrial peaceful uses of nuclear power in the construction of the first LWR experimental nuclear power stations, the first successful export contracts, the beginnings of the first nuclear fuel cycle plants, such as the WAK reprocessing plant, the Asse experimental repository, the Almelo agreement on centrifuge enrichment. The third phase, between 1970 and 1975, was a period of euphoria, full of programs and forecasts of a tremendous boom in nuclear generating capacities, which were further enhanced by the 1973 oil squeeze. In 1973 and 1974, construction permits for ten nuclear power plants were applied for. The fourth phase, between 1975 and 1980, became a period of crisis. The fifth phase, the eighties, give rise to hope for a return to reason. (orig./UA) [de

  9. Nuclear power safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports that since the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident in 1986, over 70 of the International Atomic Energy Agency's 112 member states have adopted two conventions to enhance international cooperation by providing timely notification of an accident and emergency assistance. The Agency and other international organizations also developed programs to improve nuclear power plant safety and minimize dangers from radioactive contamination. Despite meaningful improvements, some of the measures have limitations, and serious nuclear safety problems remain in the design and operation of the older, Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. The Agency's ability to select reactors under its operational safety review program is limited. Also, information on the extent and seriousness of safety-related incidents at reactors in foreign countries is not publicly available. No agreements exist among nuclear power countries to make compliance with an nuclear safety standards or principles mandatory. Currently, adherence to international safety standards or principles is voluntary and nonbinding. Some states support the concept of mandatory compliance, but others, including the United States, believe that mandatory compliance infringes on national sovereignty and that the responsibility for nuclear reactor safety remains with each nation

  10. Nuclear power's burdened future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavin, C.

    1987-01-01

    Although governments of the world's leading nations are reiterating their faith in nuclear power, Chernobyl has brought into focus the public's overwhelming feeling that the current generation of nuclear technology is simple not working. Despite the drastic slowdown, however, the global nuclear enterprise is large. As of mid-1986, the world had 366 nuclear power plants in operation, with a generating capacity of 255,670 MW. These facilities generate about 15% of the world's electricity, ranging from 65% in France to 31% in West Germany, 23% in Japan, 16% in the United States, 10% in the Soviet Union, and non in most developing nations. Nuclear development is clearly dominated by the most economically powerful and technologically advanced nations. The United States, France, the Soviet Union, Japan, and West Germany has 72% of the world's generating capacity and set the international nuclear pace. The reasons for scaling back nuclear programs are almost as diverse as the countries themselves. High costs, slowing electricity demand growth, technical problems, mismanagement, and political opposition have all had an effect. Yet these various factors actually form a complex web of inter-related problems. For example, rising costs usually represent some combination of technical problems and mismanagement, and political opposition often occurs because of safety concerns or rising costs. 13 references

  11. Nuclear power: Europa report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    Last year, 2003, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, respectively, in 18 countries all over Europe. In 8 of the 15 member countries of the European Union (EU-15) nuclear power plants have been operation. In 7 of the 13 EU Candidate Countries (incl. Turkey) nuclear energy was used for power production. A total of 208 plants with an aggregate net capacity of 171 031 MWe and an aggregate gross capacity of 180 263 MWe were in operation at the end of 2003. No unit reached first criticality in 2003 or was connected to the grid. The unit Calder Hall 1 to Calder Hall 4 have been permanently shut down in Great Britain due to economical reasons and an earlier decision. In Germany the NPP Stade was closed. The utility E.ON has decided to shut down the plant due to the efforts of the liberalisation of the electricity markets. Last year, 8 plants were under construction in Romania (1), Russia (3), Slovakia (2 - suspended), and the Ukraine (2), that is only in East European Countries. The Finnish parliament approved plans for the construction of the country's fifth nuclear power reactor by a majority of 107 votes to 92. The consortium led by Framatome ANP was awarded the contract to build the new nuclear power plant (EPR, 1 600 MW) in Olkiluoto. In eight countries of the European Union 136 nuclear power plants have been operated with an aggregate gross capacity of 127 708 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 121 709 MWe. Net electricity production in 2003 in the EU amounts to approx. 905 TWh gross, which means a share of about 33 per cent of the total production in the whole EU. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. They reach 80% in Lithuania, 78% in France, 57% in the Slovak Republic, 57% in Belgium, and 46% in the Ukraine. Nuclear power also provides a noticeable share in the electricity supply of countries, which operate no own nuclear power plants, e.g. Italy, Portugal, and Austria. (orig.)

  12. France without nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, B.; Charmant, A.; Devezeaux, J.G.; Ladoux, N.; Vielle, M.

    1995-01-01

    As environmental issues (particularly questions associated with the greenhouse effect) become a matter of increasing current concern, the French nuclear power programme can, in retrospect, be seen to have had a highly positive impact upon emissions of atmospheric pollutants. The most spectacular effect of this programme was the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions from 530 million tonnes per annum in 1973 to 387 million tonnes per annum today. Obviously, this result cannot be considered in isolation from the economic consequences of the nuclear power programme, which have been highly significant.The most obvious consequence of nuclear power has been the production of cheap electricity, while a further consequence has been the stability of electricity prices resulting from the increasing self-sufficiency of France in energy supplies (from 22% in 1973 to 49.% in 1992). Moreover, French nuclear industry exports. In 1993, 61.7 TW·h from nuclear production were exported, which contributed F.Fr. 14.2 billion to the credit side of the balance of payment. For the same year, Framatome exports are assessed at about F.Fr. 2 billion, corresponding to manufacturing and erection of heavy components, and maintenance services. Cogema, the French nuclear fuel operator, sold nuclear materials and services for F.Fr. 9.3 billion. Thus, nuclear activities contributed more than F.Fr. 25 billion to the balance of payment. Therefore, a numerical assessment of the macroeconomic impact of the nuclear power programme is essential for any accurate evaluation of the environmental consequences of that programme. For this assessment, which is presented in the paper, the Micro-Melodie macroeconomic and energy supply model developed by the Commissariat a l'energie atomique has been used. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  13. Similarities and differences between conventional power and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yingrong

    2011-01-01

    As the implementation of the national guideline of 'proactively promoting nuclear power development', especially after China decided in 2006 to introduce Westinghouse's AP1000 technology, some of the power groups specialized in conventional power generation, have been participating in the preliminary work and construction of nuclear power projects in certain degrees. Meanwhile, such traditional nuclear power corporations as China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) and China Guangdong Nuclear Power Corporation (CGNPC) have also employed some employees with conventional power generation experience. How can these employees who have long been engaged in conventional power generation successfully adapt to the new work pattern, ideology, knowledge, thinking mode and proficiency of nuclear power, so that they can fit in with the work requirements of nuclear power and become qualified as soon as possible? By analyzing the technological, managerial and cultural features of nuclear power, as well as some issues to be kept in mind when engaged in nuclear power, this paper intends to make some contribution to the nuclear power development in the specific period. (author)

  14. France without nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charmant, A.; Devezeaux, J.G.; Ladoux, N.; Vielle, M.

    1991-01-01

    As coal production declined and France found herself in a condition of energy dependency, the country decided to turn to nuclear power and a major construction program was undertaken in 1970. The consequences of this step are examined in this article, by imagining where France would be without its nuclear power. At the end of the sixties, fuel-oil incontestably offered the cheapest way of producing electricity; but the first petroleum crisis was to upset the order of economic performance, and coal then became the more attractive fuel. The first part of this article therefore presents coal as an alternative to nuclear power, describing the coal scenario first and then comparing the relative costs of nuclear and coal investment strategies and operating costs (the item that differs most is the price of the fuel). The second part of the article analyzes the consequences this would have on the electrical power market, from the supply and demand point of view, and in terms of prices. The third part of the article discusses the macro-economic consequences of such a step: the drop in the level of energy dependency, increased costs and the disappearance of electricity exports. The article ends with an analysis of the environmental consequences, which are of greater and greater concern today. The advantage here falls very much in favor of nuclear power, if we judge by the lesser emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and especially carbon dioxide. 22 refs.; 13 figs.; 10 tabs

  15. 1999 Nuclear power world report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesselmann, C.

    2000-01-01

    Last year, 1999, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply and under construction, respectively, in 33 countries. A total of 436 nuclear power plants with an aggregate net power of 350.228 MWe and an aggregate gross power of 366.988 MWe were in operation in 31 countries. Four units with an aggregate of 2.900 MWe, i.e. Civaux 2 in France, Kaiga 2 and Rajasthan 3 in India, and Wolsung-4 in the Republic of Korea, went critical for the first time or started commercial operation after having been synchronized with the power grid. After 26 years of operation, the BN 350 sodium cooled fast breeder was permanently decommissioned in Kazakhstan. The plant not only generated electricity (its capacity was 135 MWe) but also supplied process heat to a seawater desalination plant. In 1999, however, it did not contribute to the supply of electricity. In Sweden, unit 1 of the Barsebaeck nuclear power station (600 Mwe net) was decommissioned because of political decisions. This step entails financial compensation payments and substitute electricity generating capacity made available to the power plant operators. Net electricity generation in 1999 amounts to approx. 2.395 Twh, which marks a 100 TWh increase over the preceding year. Since the first generation of electricity from nuclear power in 1951, the cumulated world generation amounts to nearly 37.200 TWh of electricity, and experience in the operation of nuclear power plants has increased to 9414 years. Last year, 38 plants were under construction. This slight increase is due to the start of construction of a total of seven projects: Two each in Japan, the Republic of Korea and Taiwan, and one in China. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. They reach 75 per cent in France, 73 per cent in Lithuania, and 58 per cent in Belgium. With a share of approx. 20 per cent and more than 720 TWh, the US is the largest producer worldwide of electricity from nuclear power. As far as the aggregate

  16. Development of Czechoslovak nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keher, J.

    1985-01-01

    The output of Czechoslovak nuclear power plants is envisaged at 2200 MW by 1985, 4400 MW by 1990 and 10,280 MW by the year 2000. The operation so far is assessed of Bohunice V-1 and Bohunice V-2 power plants as is the construction of the Dukovany nuclear power plant. International cooperation in the fulfilment of the nuclear power programme is based on the General Agreement on Cooperation in the Prospective Development and Interlinkage of CMEA Power Systems to the year 1990, the Agreement on Multilateral International Specialization and Cooperation of Production and on Mutual Deliveries of Nuclear Power Plant Equipment. The most important factor in international cooperation is the Programme of Cooperation between the CSSR and the USSR. The primary target in the coming period is the Temelin nuclear power plant project and the establishment of unified control of the nuclear power complex. (M.D.)

  17. Research projects into the safety of nuclear power plants. Period covered: 01. July - 31. December 2004. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Within its competence for energy research, the Bundesministerium fuer Wirtschaft und Technology (BMWi) (Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology) sponsors investigations into the safety of nuclear power plants. The objective of these investigations is to provide fundamental knowledge, procedures and methods to contribute to realistic safety assessments of nuclear installations, to the further development of safety technology and to make use of the potential of innovative safety-related approaches. The Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, by order of the BMWi, continuously issues information on the status of such investigations by publishing semi-annual and annual progress reports within the series of GRS-F-Fortschrittsberichte (GRS-F-Progress Reports). Each progress report represents a compilation of individual reports about the objectives, work performed, results achieved, next steps of the work etc. The individual reports are prepared in a standard form by the research organisations themselves as documentation of their progress in work and are published by the Research Management Division of GRS within the framework of general information on the progress in reactor safety research. The compilation of the reports is classified according to general topics related to reactor safety research. Further, use is made of the classification system 'Joint Safety Research Index' of the CEC (Commission of the European Communities). The reports are arranged in sequence of their project numbers. It has to be pointed out that the authors of the reports are responsible for the contents of this compilation. The BMWi does not take any responsibility for the correctness, exactness and completeness of the information nor for the observance of private claims of third parties. (orig.)

  18. The politics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, D.

    1978-01-01

    The contents of the book are: introduction; (part 1, the economy of nuclear power) nuclear power and the growth of state corporatism, ownership and control - the power of the multi-nationals, economic and political goals - profit or control, trade union policy and nuclear power; (part 2, nuclear power and employment) nuclear power and workers' health and safety, employment and trade union rights, jobs, energy and industrial strategy, the alternative energy option; (part 3, political strategies) the anti-nuclear movement, trade unions and nuclear power; further reading; UK organisations. (U.K.)

  19. Recent space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, Takakazu; Yasuda, Hideshi; Hishida, Makoto

    1991-01-01

    For the advance of mankind into the space, the power sources of large output are indispensable, and it has been considered that atomic energy is promising as compared with solar energy and others. Accordingly in USA and USSR, the development of the nuclear power generation systems for space use has been carried out since considerable years ago. In this report, the general features of space nuclear reactors are shown, and by taking the system for the SP-100 project being carried out in USA as the example, the contents of the recent design regarding the safety as an important factor are discussed. Moreover, as the examples of utilizing space nuclear reactors, the concepts of the power source for the base on the moon, the sources of propulsive power for the rockets used for Mars exploration and others, the remote power transmission system by laser in the space and so on are explained. In September, 1988, the launching of a space shuttle of USA was resumed, and the Jupiter explorer 'Galileo' and the space telescope 'Hubble' were successfully launched. The space station 'Mir' of USSR has been used since February, 1986. The history of the development of the nuclear power generation systems for space use is described. (K.I.)

  20. Nuclear power programme planning: An integrated approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has published material on different policy considerations in the introduction of nuclear power, primarily addressed to top level decision makers in government and industry in Member States. Several Member States and experts recommended to the IAEA to address the aspects of an integrated approach to nuclear power programme planning and to serve as guidance to those countries wishing to embark on a nuclear power programme. As a follow-up, the present publication is primarily intended to serve as guidance for executives and managers in Member States in planning for possible introduction of nuclear power plants in their electricity generating systems. Nuclear power programme planning, as dealt with in this publication, includes all activities that need to be carried out up to a well-founded decision to proceed with a project feasibility study. Project implementation beyond this decision is not in the scope of this publication. Although it is possible to use nuclear energy as a heat source for industrial processes, desalination and other heat applications, it is assumed in this publication that the planning is aimed towards nuclear power for electricity generation. Much of the information given would, however, also be relevant for planning of nuclear reactors for heat production. The publication was prepared within the framework of the IAEA programme on nuclear power planning, implementation and performance as a joint activity of the Nuclear Power Engineering Section and the Planning and Economic Studies Section (Division of Nuclear Power)

  1. Nuclear power and other energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doederlein, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison is made between nuclear power plants, gas-fuelled thermal power plants and oil-fired thermal power plants with respect to health factors, economy, environment and resource exploitation, with special reference to the choice of power source to supplement Norwegian hydroelectric power. Resource considerations point clearly to nuclear power, but, while nuclear power has an overall economic advantage, the present economic situation makes its heavy capital investment a disadvantage. It is maintained that nuclear power represents a smaller environmental threat than oil or gas power. Finally, statistics are given showing that nuclear power involves smaller fatality risks for the population than many other hazards accepted without question. (JIW)

  2. Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident and the project of prefectural health management survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Shunichi; Yasumura, Seiji; Suzuki, Shinichi; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Fujimori, Keiya; Ohtsuru, Akira; Sakai, Akira; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    The Project in the title after the Accident (Mar. 11, 2011) formally started in September in Fukushima Medical University in contract with the Prefecture on the national fund, of which progress and future aspect are reported. Based on a preliminary study in June, the subsequent fundamental investigation was conducted on all prefectural residents from August with questionnaire to see individual's health state and to estimate their accumulated maximal dose (mSv/4 months after the Accident). The preliminary study above was conducted for 29 thousands residents having been supposedly exposed to high dose at regions of Yamakiya, Namie and Iitate, 15 thousands (52%) of whom replied, where 99.3% were exposed to <10 mSv with the maximum of 23.0 mSv. In the fundamental study, until the end of May, 2012, 440 thousands replies (22%) were obtained from 2.05 million postal questionnaire mails sent, whose analysis was not finished, yet the results were retuned to individuals in due order of analysis completion. Another detailed investigation started almost simultaneously, which contained examinations of ultrasonic (US) thyroid testing for residents younger than age 18 y, of detailed health and mental state/life habit of 21 thousands people in the evacuation area, and of expectant/nursing mothers. Preliminarily, the internal exposure dose rate of thyroid was found to be 0.1 mcSv/h in one subject and <0.04 in 99% of 1,080 children in the Prefecture (Mar. 24-30), and US test of 38 thousands in the evacuation area revealed 0.5% of children were necessary for secondary examination due to benign lesions in the organ. To expectant/nursing mothers, questionnaire was performed asking about the health state during pregnancy, childbirth, mental health, etc. Reply was obtained in 55% within 2011 and follow-up has been conducted when judged to be necessary. Tasks derived from all matters described above include various things, of which continued long term follow-up supports are necessary. (T.T.)

  3. Nuclear power production costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erramuspe, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The economic competitiveness of nuclear power in different highly developed countries is shown, by reviewing various international studies made on the subject. Generation costs (historical values) of Atucha I and Embalse Nuclear Power Plants, which are of the type used in those countries, are also included. The results of an international study on the economic aspects of the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle are also reviewed. This study shows its relatively low incidence in the generation costs. The conclusion is that if in Argentina the same principles of economic racionality were followed, nuclear energy would be economically competitive in the future, as it is today. This is of great importance in view of its almost unavoidable character of alternative source of energy, and specially since we have to expect an important growth in the consumption of electricity, due to its low share in the total consumption of energy, and the low energy consumption per capita in Argentina. (Author) [es

  4. Environment and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Aimed at the general public this leaflet, one of a series prepared by AEA Technology, on behalf of the British Nuclear Industry Forum, seeks to put the case for generating electricity to meet United Kingdom and world demand using nuclear power. It examines the environmental problems linked to the use of fossil-fuels in power stations and other uses, such as the Greenhouse Effect. Problems associated with excess carbon dioxide emissions are also discussed, such as acid rain, the effects of deforestation and lead in petrol. The role of renewable energy sources is mentioned briefly. The leaflet also seeks to reassure on issues such as nuclear waste managements and the likelihood and effects of nuclear accidents. (UK)

  5. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This 2005 edition of the Elecnuc booklet summarizes in tables all numerical data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the PRIS database managed by the IAEA. The following aspects are reviewed: 2004 highlights; main characteristics of reactor types; map of the French nuclear power plants on 2005/01/01; worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 2004; units distributed by countries; nuclear power plants connected to the grid by reactor-type group; nuclear power plants under construction on 2004; evolution of nuclear power plant capacities connected to the grid; first electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit; electrical generation from nuclear power plants by country at the end 2004; performance indicator of PWR units in France; trend of the generation indicator worldwide; 2004 load factor by owners; units connected to the grid by countries at 12/31/2004; status of licence renewal applications in USA; nuclear power plants under construction at 12/31/2004; shutdown reactors; exported nuclear capacity in net MWe; exported and national nuclear capacity connected to the grid; exported nuclear power plants under construction or order; exported and national nuclear capacity under construction or order; recycling of plutonium in LWR; Mox licence plant projects; Appendix - historical development; acronyms, glossary

  6. Misunderstanding nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tombs, F.

    1981-01-01

    The inaugural lecture of Sir Francis Tombs as newly installed President of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, on the reasons for the widely differing perceptions of opposing factions in the nuclear debate, is reviewed with extensive quotations. The lecturer pointed out that development of nuclear power as an energy source requires the consent of the majority and the uncommitted must be persuaded to spend the time necessary to understand the issues and to evaluate the arguments in an objective way. (U.K.)

  7. Nuclear power: Europe report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Last year, 1999, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, respectively, in 18 countries all over Europe. In eight of the fifteen member countries of the European Union nuclear power plants have been in operation. A total of 218 plants with an aggregate net capacity of 181,120 MWe and an aggregate gross capacity of 171,802 MWe were in operation. Two units, i.e. Civaux 2 in France and Mochovce-2 in Slovakia went critical for the first time and started commercial operation after having been connected to the grid. Three further units in France, Chooz 1 and 2 and Civaux 1, started commercial operation in 1999 after the completion of technical measures in the primary circuit. Last year, 13 plants were under construction in Romania, Russia, Slovakia and the Czech Republic, that is only in East European countries. In eight countries of the European Union 146 nuclear power plants have been operated with an aggregate gross capacity of 129.772 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 123.668 MWe. Net electricity production in 1999 in the EU amounts to approx. 840.2 TWh, which means a share of 35 per cent of the total production. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. They reach 75 per cent in France, 73 per cent in Lithuania, 58 per cent in Belgium and 47 per cent in Bulgaria, Sweden and Slovakia. Nuclear power also provides a noticeable share in the electricity supply of countries, which operate no own nuclear power plants, e.g. Italy, Portugal and Austria. (orig.) [de

  8. Nuclear power: Europe report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    Last year, 2000, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, respectively, in 18 countries all over Europe. In eight of the fifteen member countries of the European Union nuclear power plants have been in operation. A total of 218 plants with an aggregate net capacity of 172 259 MWe and an aggregate gross capacity of 181 642 MWe were in operation (31.12.2000; 215 plants, 180 067 MWe (gross), 172 259 MWe (net)). One unit, i.e. Temelin in the Czech Republic went critical for the first time and started test operation after having been connected to the grid. Temelin adds about 981 MWe (gross) and 912 MWe (net) to the electricity production capacity. Three units, Hinkley Point A1 and A2 in United Kingdom, and Chernobyl 3 in the Ukraine have been shut down during the year 2000. This means a loss of 1534 MWe gross capacity and 1420 MWe net capacity. Last year, 12 plants (31.12.2000: 11 plants) were under construction in Romania, Russia, Slovakia, the Czech Republic and the Ukraine, that is only in east european countries. In eight countries of the European Union 146 nuclear power plants have been operated with an aggregate gross capacity of 129 188 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 123 061 MWe (31.12.2000: 144 plants, 128 613 MWe (gross), 122 627 MWe (net)). Net electricity production in 2000 in the EU amounts to approx. 818.8 TWh, which means a share of 35 per cent of the total production in the whole EU. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. The reach 76 per cent in France, 74 per cent in Lithuania, 57 per cent in Belgium and 47 per cent in the Ukraine. Nuclear power also provides an noticeable share in the electricity supply of countries, which operate no own nuclear power plants, e. g. Italy, Portugal and Austria. (orig.) [de

  9. Innovation in nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.

    2017-01-01

    Institute for Nuclear Business Excellence Roots in Sweden and Finland in Global operation Services on nuclear business leadership: Independent advice, Executive training and Build-up of emerging nuclear countries. Plant construction and safety Plant construction: Plants are larger more complex with increased redundancy. Projects Failure in large technology is due to Corruption, Licensing mis-communication and Unclear roles and responsibilities. The chain of knowledge Design → construction→ operation → lifetime management → waste handling→ decommissioning. Maintenance and ageing start at the drawing table. Plant health monitoring. Today: Sensors are cheap Digital readout Enormous read out capacity''Internet of things''

  10. Nuclear power after Copenhagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.

    2010-01-01

    The presentation discusses the problems of carbon dioxide emissions and advantages of nuclear technology as the only non-carbon technology with a proven track record that can make a significant contribution on the scale that will be required. The nuclear technology also has the potential to produce carbon free heat, and a further potential to produce hydrogen for the transport sector and possibly also for desalination projects. Nuclear energy also helps to reduce the serious health effects resulting from fossil fuel combustion which particularly affects women

  11. Nuclear power : exploding the myths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, G.

    2001-01-01

    dioxide as a dollar spent on nuclear power. The fourth and final myth that the author dispelled was that nuclear power is safe and clean, arguing that irradiated nuclear fuel remains toxic for millions of years. A 10-year environmental review has found safety and environmental concerns regarding a geologic repository project which is estimated to cost approximately $17 billion. 2 figs

  12. How nuclear power began

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowing, M.

    1987-01-01

    Many of the features of the story of nuclear power, both in nuclear weapons and nuclear power stations, derive from their timing. Usually, in the history of science the precise timing of discovery does not make much difference, but in the case of nuclear fission there was the coincidence that crucial discoveries were made and openly published in the same year, 1939, as the outbreak of the Second World War. It is these events of the 1930s and the early post-war era that are mainly discussed. However, the story began a lot earlier and even in the early 1900s the potential power within the atom had been foreseen by Soddy and Rutherford. In the 1930s Enrico Fermi and his team saw the technological importance of their discoveries and took out a patent on their process to produce artificial radioactivity from slow neutron beams. The need for secrecy because of the war, and the personal trusts and mistrusts run through the story of nuclear power. (UK)

  13. Nuclear power safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency, the organization concerned with worldwide nuclear safety has produced two international conventions to provide (1) prompt notification of nuclear accidents and (2) procedures to facilitate mutual assistance during an emergency. IAEA has also expanded operational safety review team missions, enhanced information exchange on operational safety events at nuclear power plants, and planned a review of its nuclear safety standards to ensure that they include the lessons learned from the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident. However, there appears to be a nearly unanimous belief among IAEA members that may attempt to impose international safety standards verified by an international inspection program would infringe on national sovereignty. Although several Western European countries have proposed establishing binding safety standards and inspections, no specific plant have been made; IAEA's member states are unlikely to adopt such standards and an inspection program

  14. Advantages of using 3D design tools in the nuclear power plants projects; Ventajas del uso de herramientas de diseno 3D en los proyectos de centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roldan, P.; Melendro, J.; Gomez, A.; Hermana, I.

    2011-07-01

    It there is anything that distinguished Iberdrola Ingeneria y Construccion, as part of the Iberdrola Group, it is its firm commitment to innovation and continuous improvement. This is the philosophy that led the company to its interest in three-dimensional design tools back when they were in an early stage of development : very little international implementation, lack of integration with other applications, absence of previous experiences to understand the best possible configuration for each case, etc. Nevertheless, the company was able to see the tremendous advantage of having a construction program in the early months of a project- a detailed program that could predict, and therefore avoid, the problems that, if not anticipated, would arise in the construction phase when they result in higher costs, longer time frames and a multitude of complications. This is precisely what 3D design tools offer prediction and this has been proven in the latest combined cycle projects executed with these tools. A project executed without errors not only decreases cost and time overruns, but also necessarily increases the quality of the end result. Efficiency and quality: these are both basic goals of Iberdrola Ingenieria y Construccion. The knowledge of and skill in the use of these tools have grown at the same time that their development has reached increasingly higher levels. As a result, Iberdrola Ingenieria y Conctruccion now has intensive experience in the use of 3D design tools and is preprared for the future challenges posed by these tools, the capabilities of which have attained such heights that it is possible to take on one of the most technically challenging projects that exists a nuclear power plant. And we are ready. (Author)

  15. Nuclear power and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Mi

    2006-01-01

    During the 30s and 40s of the last century atomic physicists discovered the fission of uranium nuclei bombarded by neutrons and realized the first self-sustaining controlled fission chain reaction, which ushered in the atomic age. After 50 years of electricity production, in 2003 nuclear power plants were generating 16% of the total electricity in the world. Of these, thermal neutron reactors make up over 99%. For the large scale production of nuclear power, say up to hundreds of GWe, it is very important to speed up the development and deployment of fast breeder reactors to avoid the future lack of uranium resources. (authors)

  16. Nuclear power plants maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power plants maintenance now appears as an important factor contributing to the competitivity of nuclea energy. The articles published in this issue describe the way maintenance has been organized in France and how it led to an actual industrial activity developing and providing products and services. An information note about Georges Besse uranium enrichment plant (Eurodif) recalls that maintenance has become a main data not only for power plants but for all nuclear industry installations. (The second part of this dossier will be published in the next issue: vol. 1 January-February 1989) [fr

  17. Nuclear power safety economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legasov, V.A.; Demin, V.F.; Shevelev, Ya.V.

    1984-01-01

    The existing conceptual and methodical basis for the decision-making process insuring safety of the nuclear power and other (industrial and non-industrial) human activities is critically analyzed. Necessity of development a generalized economic safety analysis method (GESAM) is shown. Its purpose is justifying safety measures. Problems of GESAM development are considered including the problem of costing human risk. A number of suggestions on solving them are given. Using the discounting procedure in the assessment of risk or detriment caused by harmful impact on human health is substantiated. Examples of analyzing some safety systems in the nuclear power and other spheres of human activity are given

  18. Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) is located in Zarechny, approximately 60 km east of Ekaterinberg along the Trans-Siberian Highway. Zarechny, a small city of approximately 30,000 residents, was built to support BNPP operations. It is a closed city to unescorted visitors. Residents must show identification for entry. BNPP is one of the first and oldest commercial nuclear power plants in Russia and began operations in 1964. As for most nuclear power plants in the Russian Federation, BNPP is operated by Rosenergoatom, which is subordinated to the Ministry of Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation (Minatom). BNPP is the site of three nuclear reactors, Units 1, 2, and 3. Units 1 and 2, which have been shut-down and defueled, were graphite moderated reactors. The units were shut-down in 1981 and 1989. Unit 3, a BN-600 reactor, is a 600 MW(electric) sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. Unit 3 went on-line in April 1980 and produces electric power which is fed into a distribution grid and thermal power which provides heat to Zarechny. The paper also discusses the SF NIKIET, the Sverdiovsk Branch of NIKIET, Moscow, which is the research and development branch of the parent NIKEIT and is primarily a design institute responsible for reactor design. Central to its operations is a 15 megawatt IVV research reactor. The paper discusses general security and fissile material control and accountability at these two facilities

  19. Safe and green nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushwaha, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    Energy development plays an important role in the national economic growth. Presently the per capita consumption of energy in our country is about 750 kWh including captive power generation which is low in comparison to that in the developed countries like USA where it is about 12,000 kWh. As of now the total installed capacity of electricity generation is about 152,148 MW(e) which is drawn from Thermal (65%), Hydel (24%), Nuclear (3%) power plants and Renewables (8%). It is expected that by the end of year 2020, the required installed capacity would be more than 3,00,000 MW(e), if we assume per capita consumption of about 800-1000 kWh for Indian population of well over one billion. To meet the projected power requirement in India, suitable options need to be identified and explored for generation of electricity. For choosing better alternatives various factors such as availability of resources, potential to generate commercial power, economic viability, etc. need to be considered. Besides these factors, an important factor which must be taken into consideration is protection of environment around the operating power stations. This paper attempts to demonstrate that the nuclear power generation is an environmentally benign option for meeting the future requirement of electricity in India. It also discusses the need for creating the public awareness about the safe operations of the nuclear power plants and ionising radiation. (author)

  20. Nuclear power plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaziz Yunus

    1986-01-01

    A number of issues have to be taken into account before the introduction of any nuclear power plant in any country. These issues include reactor safety (site and operational), waste disposal and, lastly, the decommissioning of the reactor inself. Because of the radioactive nature of the components, nuclear power plants require a different approach to decommission compared to other plants. Until recently, issues on reactor safety and waste disposal were the main topics discussed. As for reactor decommissioning, the debates have been academic until now. Although reactors have operated for 25 years, decommissioning of retired reactors has simply not been fully planned. But the Shippingport Atomic Power Plant in Pennysylvania, the first large scale power reactor to be retired, is now being decommissioned. The work has rekindled the debate in the light of reality. Outside the United States, decommissioning is also being confronted on a new plane. (author)

  1. Nuclear power and modern society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, A.

    1999-01-01

    A treatise consisting of the following sections: Development of modern society (Origin of modern society; Industrial society; The year 1968; Post-industrial society; Worldwide civic society); Historic breaks in the development of the stationary power sector (Stationary thermal power; Historic breaks in the development of nuclear power); Czech nuclear power engineering in the globalization era (Major causes of success of Czech nuclear power engineering; Future of Czech nuclear power engineering). (P.A.)

  2. Power generation by nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear power plays an important role in the world, European (33%) and French (75%) power generation. This article aims at presenting in a synthetic way the main reactor types with their respective advantages with respect to the objectives foreseen (power generation, resources valorization, waste management). It makes a fast review of 50 years of nuclear development, thanks to which the nuclear industry has become one of the safest and less environmentally harmful industry which allows to produce low cost electricity: 1 - simplified description of a nuclear power generation plant: nuclear reactor, heat transfer system, power generation system, interface with the power distribution grid; 2 - first historical developments of nuclear power; 3 - industrial development and experience feedback (1965-1995): water reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu), RBMK, fast neutron reactors, high temperature demonstration reactors, costs of industrial reactors; 4 - service life of nuclear power plants and replacement: technical, regulatory and economical lifetime, problems linked with the replacement; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  3. LDC nuclear power: Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tweedale, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    Argentina's 31-year-old nuclear research and power program makes it a Third World leader and the preeminent Latin American country. Easily accessible uranium fuels the heavy water reactor, Atucha I, which provides 10% of the country's electric power. Atucha II and III are under construction. Several domestic and international factors combined to make Argentina's program succeed, but achieving fuel-cycle independence and the capacity to divert fissionable material to military uses is a cause for some concern. 60 references

  4. Nuclear power: Pt. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janse van Rensburg, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    Based on the annual growthrate of 2,5% in the need for energy and the present coal, oil, gas and uranium reserves, it is expected that there will be an energy deficiency early in the twentieth century. Coal-fired power stations have the disadvantage of pollution and a high water consumption. The use of nuclear power in South Africa is backed-up by its uranium reserves

  5. Haiyang nuclear power construction management and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fengxue

    2010-01-01

    The paper introduces the basic situation of Shandong Haiyang Nuclear Power Plant, as well as the management and progress of the project. Through the construction management practice, problems encountered in nuclear power construction are put forward for peer exchange and discussion. (author)

  6. Clean nuclear power (2. part)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocherolles, R.

    1998-01-01

    The 450 nuclear power plants which produce 24% of world electricity do not generate greenhouse gas effects, but 8,000 tonnes per year of irradiated, radioactive fuel. The first article which was published in the July-August 1997 issue of this journal, described the composition and management of these fuels. This article wish to show the advantage of 'advanced re-processing', which would separate fission products from actinides, in order to incinerate them separately in dedicated fuels and reactors, which, from an ecological point of view, seems more efficient than burying them underground in deep, geological layers. To rid the planet of waste which is continuing to build up, the first step is to build 'incinerators' which will eliminate fission products by slow neutron assisted neutronic capture, and actinides by fast neutron assisted fission. Various projects have been set up, in particular, in Los Alamos, Japan and the CERN. The Carlo Rubbia hybrid machine operating on the well-known thorium cycle is the most advanced project. An incinerator connected up to standard PWR reactor produces no actinide, and reduces the existing stock of plutonium. However, the proper solution, obviously, is to no longer produce waste along with power; second generation nuclear fission will do this. The CERN team bas studied a clean reactor, producing practically no actinides, or fission products, more or less. Thus, the solution to the problem of waste is at hand, and nuclear power will be cleaner that all other types of power. The world market opening up to clean nuclear power is about 1,300 Gigawatts, or 1,300 plants of 1,000 Megawatts. Remarkable progress is taking place under our very eyes; soon we will have clean power in sufficient quantities, at a lower cost than that of other forms of power. (authors)

  7. The abuse of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.

    1977-01-01

    Different aspects of possible abuse of nuclear power by countries or individuals are discussed. Special attention is paid to the advantage of nuclear power, despite the risk of weapon proliferation or terrorism. The concepts of some nuclear power critics, concerning health risks in the nuclear sector are rejected as untrue and abusive

  8. Nuclear power plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of Nuclear Power Plant Analyzers in USA is described. There are two different types of Analyzers under development in USA, the forst in Idaho and Los Alamos national Lab, the second in brookhaven National lab. That one is described in detail. The computer hardware and the mathematical models of the reactor vessel thermalhydraulics are described. (author)

  9. Benchmarking Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakic, I.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main tasks an owner have is to keep its business competitive on the market while delivering its product. Being owner of nuclear power plant bear the same (or even more complex and stern) responsibility due to safety risks and costs. In the past, nuclear power plant managements could (partly) ignore profit or it was simply expected and to some degree assured through the various regulatory processes governing electricity rate design. It is obvious now that, with the deregulation, utility privatization and competitive electricity market, key measure of success used at nuclear power plants must include traditional metrics of successful business (return on investment, earnings and revenue generation) as well as those of plant performance, safety and reliability. In order to analyze business performance of (specific) nuclear power plant, benchmarking, as one of the well-established concept and usual method was used. Domain was conservatively designed, with well-adjusted framework, but results have still limited application due to many differences, gaps and uncertainties. (author).

  10. Nuclear power and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidambaram, R.

    1992-01-01

    Some aspects of safety of nuclear power with special reference to Indian nuclear power programme are discussed. India must develop technology to protect herself from the adverse economic impact arising out of the restrictive regime which is being created through globalization of safety and environmental issues. Though the studies done and experience gained so far have shown that the PHWR system adopted by India has a number of superior safety features, research work is needed in the field of operation and maintenance of reactors and also in the field of reactor life extension through delaying of ageing effects. Public relations work must be pursued to convince the public at large of the safety of nuclear power programme. The new reactor designs in the second stage of evolution are based on either further improvement of existing well-proven designs or adoptions of more innovative ideas based on physical principles to ensure a higher level of safety. The development of Indian nuclear power programme is characterised by a balanced approach in the matter of assuring safety. Safety enforcement is not just looked upon as a pure administrative matter, but experts with independent minds are also involved in safety related matters. (M.G.B.)

  11. Nuclear Power in Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    Research has shown that nuclear radioisotope power generators can supply compact, reliable, and efficient sources of energy for a broad range of space missions. These missions range from televising views of planetary surfaces to communicating scientific data to Earth. This publication presents many applications of the advancing technology and…

  12. Captivated by nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaageson, P.; Kjellstroem, B.

    1984-01-01

    The Swedish decision to discontinue nuclear power production is discussed. The basis of the referendum is presented. A number of cases where the decision to stop production in the year 2010 is counteracted, are described. The political and technical steps to facilitate the settlement are presented. (GB)

  13. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  14. Aspect of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghighi Oskoei, R.; Raeis Hosseiny, N.

    2004-01-01

    Over the next 50 years, unless patterns change dramatically, energy production and use will contribute to global warming through large-scale greenhouse gas emissions-hundreds of billions of tonnes of carbon in the form of carbon dioxide. Nuclear power would be one option for reducing carbon emissions. At present, however, this is unlikely: nuclear power faces stagnation and decline. We decided to study the future of nuclear power because we believe this technology , despite the changes it faces, is an important option for the world to meet future energy needs without emitting carbon dioxide and other atmospheric pollutants. Other options include increased efficiency, renewable and sequestration. We believe that all options should be preserved as nations develop strategies at provide energy while meeting important environmental challenges. The nuclear power option will only be exercised, however if the technology demonstrates better economics, improved safety, successful waste management, and low proliferation risk, and if public policies place a significant value on electricity production that does not produce carbon dioxide

  15. Research on process management of nuclear power technological innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hua; Zhou Yu

    2005-01-01

    Different from the other technological innovation processes, the technological innovation process of nuclear power engineering project is influenced deeply by the extensive environmental factors, the technological innovation of nuclear power engineering project needs to make an effort to reduce environmental uncertainty. This paper had described the mechanism of connection technological innovation process of nuclear power engineering project with environmental factors, and issued a feasible method based on model of bargaining to incorporate technological innovation process management of nuclear power engineering project with environmental factors. This method has realistic meanings to guide the technological innovation of nuclear power engineering project. (authors)

  16. Nuclear project management experience in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jae-Pung Jeon

    1987-01-01

    Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) has been dereloping nuclear power steadily over last 30 years to support effective economic growth of the nation with cheap electric power. In the course of development, KEPCO has experienced various project management patterns diverging from turn-key contracts with foreign vendors to non-turnkey with local affiliates. To culative own project management capabilities, one has to pay continuous efforts for better management systems development and manpower training. KEPCO is ready to share its priceless experiences gained over last three decades of nuclear project operation with any developing nation. (Liu)

  17. Safe nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cady, K.B.

    1992-01-01

    Nearly 22 percent of the electricity generated in the United States already comes from nuclear power plants, but no new plants have been ordered since 1978. This paper reports that the problems that stand in the way of further development have to do with complexity and perceived risk. Licensing, construction management, and waste disposal are complex matters, and the possibility of accident has alienated a significant portion of the public. But a national poll conducted by Bruskin/Goldring at the beginning of February shows that opposition to nuclear energy is softening. Sixty percent of the American people support (strongly or moderately) the use of nuclear power, and 18 percent moderately oppose it. Only 15 percent remain obstinately opposed. Perhaps they are not aware of recent advances in reactor technology

  18. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampmann, D.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Nystrup, P.E.

    2007-04-01

    The report is the fourth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2006 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power, and international relations and conflicts. (LN)

  19. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The report is the second report in a new series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2004 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power and international relations and conflicts. (ln)

  20. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampman, D.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Nystrup, P.E.

    2006-03-01

    The report is the third report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2005 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power and international relations and conflicts. (ln)