WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear power programme

  1. Canada's nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peden, W.

    1976-01-01

    Although Canada has developed the CANDU type reactor, and has an ambitious programme of nuclear power plant construction, there has been virtually no nuclear controversy. This progress was seen as a means to bring Canada out of the 'resource cow' era, and onto a more equal footing with technologically elite nations. However the Indian nuclear explosion test, waste storage problems, contamination problems arising from use of uranium ore processing waste as land fill and subsidised sale of nuclear power plants to Argentina and South Korea have initiated public and parliamentary interest. Some economists have also maintained that Canada is approaching over-supply of nuclear power and over-investment in plant. Canada has no official overall energy production plan and alternative sources have not been evaluated. (JIW)

  2. Iran's nuclear power programme revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossavar-Rahmani, B.

    1980-01-01

    Iran's new government has not yet made a final decision about the fate of that country's once ambitious nuclear power programme. If the programme is kept alive, it will be limited to the completion of at most one or two of the reactors that were already well underway when the revolution broke out. The author traces the origins and growth of the Iranian nuclear power programme between 1974 and 1978, summarizes the principal economic, infrastructural, and political criticisms of the programme as originally planned, discusses the potential for greater use of natural gas as an alternative and, finally, recommends a long, detailed reassessment of Iran's energy options. (author)

  3. Nuclear power programmes in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The paper on ''Nuclear power programmes in developing countries'' is a report to the IAEA by a Senior Expert Group. A description is given of the requirements for a successful nuclear power programme, including the constraints that developing countries might face in the introduction and execution of the programme. The group attempted to identify the main issues affecting the financing of nuclear power projects and suggested specific actions that could be undertaken in order to reduce economic and financial risks. The various issues were discussed under the topic headings:-programme-project-related factors, investment climate, financing plan, export credits and creditworthiness. (U.K.)

  4. Nuclear power programme planning: An integrated approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has published material on different policy considerations in the introduction of nuclear power, primarily addressed to top level decision makers in government and industry in Member States. Several Member States and experts recommended to the IAEA to address the aspects of an integrated approach to nuclear power programme planning and to serve as guidance to those countries wishing to embark on a nuclear power programme. As a follow-up, the present publication is primarily intended to serve as guidance for executives and managers in Member States in planning for possible introduction of nuclear power plants in their electricity generating systems. Nuclear power programme planning, as dealt with in this publication, includes all activities that need to be carried out up to a well-founded decision to proceed with a project feasibility study. Project implementation beyond this decision is not in the scope of this publication. Although it is possible to use nuclear energy as a heat source for industrial processes, desalination and other heat applications, it is assumed in this publication that the planning is aimed towards nuclear power for electricity generation. Much of the information given would, however, also be relevant for planning of nuclear reactors for heat production. The publication was prepared within the framework of the IAEA programme on nuclear power planning, implementation and performance as a joint activity of the Nuclear Power Engineering Section and the Planning and Economic Studies Section (Division of Nuclear Power)

  5. Power programmes review: Nuclear power in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-07-15

    Several concrete measures have been initiated in Italy for the generation of nuclear power on a substantial scale. Two plants are already under construction and work will start soon on a third. Plans have also been announced for more stations. If the work already initiated is completed on schedule the installed capacity of nuclear power in Italy is likely to exceed 500 mw (electric) in the course of the next four years. This will constitute a sizeable proportion of the total electrical capacity in the country. After the Italian National Committee for Nuclear Research (Comitato Nazionale per le Ricerche Nucleari) was reorganized late in 1956, it prepared what can be described as a nuclear five-year plan for Italy. The plan, designed to cover the period 1957-1962, includes detailed schemes for a comprehensive development of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, including a programme for the generation of power. The Comitato Nazionale per le Ricerche Nucleari (CNRN) promotes and co-ordinates the various activities in the field, and within the framework of its general programme certain industrial groups in Italy have formulated specific projects for nuclear power. At a Geneva conference (1958) it was disclosed that several companies were planning to build nuclear power stations in Italy. (1) SELNI (Societa Elettronucleare Italiana), pertaining to the Edison-Volta group, which plans to build a pressurized water reactor. (2) So.R.I.N. (Societa Ricerche Impianti Nucleari), a company founded by the Fiat and Montecatini groups, which is constructing a research centre, with a swimming pool reactor, and various laboratories for chemistry, physics and metallurgy. This centre will also be used for the training of specialized personnel, in view of the company's programme which envisages two 150 mw (e) plants: one operating with enriched uranium, the other with natural uranium. Such a programme will become effective only when the cost of power produced by these plants may actually

  6. Workforce Planning for New Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    An appropriate infrastructure is essential for the efficient, safe, reliable and sustainable use of nuclear power. The IAEA continues to be encouraged by its Member States to provide assistance to those considering the introduction of nuclear power. Its response has been to increase technical assistance, organize more missions and hold workshops, as well as to issue new and updated publications in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series. Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power, an IAEA Nuclear Energy Series publication (NG-G-3.1), provides detailed guidance on a holistic approach to national nuclear infrastructure development involving three phases. Nineteen issues are identified in this guide, ranging from development of a government's national position on nuclear power to planning for procurement related to the first nuclear power plant. One of these 19 issues upon which each of the other 18 depend is suitable human resources development. As a growing number of Member States begin to consider the nuclear power option, they ask for guidance from the IAEA on how to develop the human resources necessary to launch a nuclear power programme. The nuclear power field, comprising industry, government authorities, regulators, R and D organizations and educational institutions, relies on a specialized, highly trained and motivated workforce for its sustainability and continued success, quite possibly more than any other industrial field. This report has been prepared to provide information on the use of integrated workforce planning as a tool to effectively develop these resources for the spectrum of organizations that have a stake in such nuclear power programmes. These include, during the initial stages, a nuclear energy programme implementing organization (NEPIO), as well as the future operating organization, nuclear regulatory body, government authorities and technical support organizations if a decision is made to initiate a nuclear power

  7. Building infrastructure for new nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starz, A.; Aoki, M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, more than sixty countries have indicated that they are considering or launching nuclear power programmes. It has been more than a decade since a country commissioned its first nuclear power plant. In meantime, the global nuclear community has faced greater concerns about safety, security and non-proliferation, resulting in increased international obligations and a greater expectation for transparency and openness regarding nuclear power programmes. Many of these 'nuclear newcomers' are turning to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to understand the implications of the nuclear power option and to receive advice about how to proceed with implementing a national programme. In response to growing demand for assistance, the IAEA developed a comprehensive, phased approach to establishing the infrastructure necessary to support a national nuclear power programme. This 'Milestones' approach is described in Nuclear Energy Series Guide NG-G-3.1 'Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power' (2007). From establishing the national position and legal framework to nuclear safety, security and safeguards, the Milestones covers 19 issues that need to be addressed. This approach also places special emphasis on the need for involvement of the Government, utility, industry, academic, and other stakeholders in a national decision-making process. The IAEA is also helping 'newcomers' to better understand its Safety Standards, which were written from the perspective of operating nuclear power programmes. A new safety guide is in development which provides a Road-map to the safety standards and identifies the standards that are relevant for each phase consistent with the Milestones. Several countries in the Europe region are working with the IAEA to understand the issues associated with a nuclear power programme in preparation for making a knowledgeable commitment. The starting points and approaches vary widely: some are European

  8. Power programmes review: Nuclear power for India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    India will require a substantial increase in the generation of electrical power to meet the demands of her developing economy. A survey of available resources has been made in the context of development envisaged under the country's five-year plans and it is felt that atomic energy will have to be used in increasing quantities to supplement conventional fuel resources in order to attain the anticipated power targets in the next two decades. It has, therefore, been decided that a small beginning will be made with the erection and commissioning of anatomic power station of 250 MW (electric) capacity by the end of 1964. The installation of a further 750 MW of nuclear power by the end of the third five-year plan period, i.e. by March 1966, is under consideration. Present Pattern and future demand of energy is discussed, as well as available resources and immediate needs. Concerning nuclear fuel cycle and cost estimates it is stated that India's uranium reserves are not large enough to sustain a very long-term programme of power generation, but the reserves for thorium are. Therefore India's nuclear power production will have to be based primarily on thorium with a rather complicated fuel cycles and first, second and third generation atomic power stations. The Atomic Energy Establishment Trombay is India's national centre for research in the peaceful uses of atomic energy. India's first reactor, Apsara, which is of the swimming pool type, has been in operation for more than three years now and two other research reactors are under construction. These are the Canada-India Reactor, which is being built under the Colombo Plan in collaboration with Canada, and Zerlina, which is being designed and built by Indian scientists and engineers. The Canada-India Reactor will be a versatile high flux research reactor and will have facilities in which various power reactor concepts can be tried out in the so-called loop experiments. In addition, it will produce considerable

  9. Power programmes review: Nuclear power for India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-10-15

    India will require a substantial increase in the generation of electrical power to meet the demands of her developing economy. A survey of available resources has been made in the context of development envisaged under the country's five-year plans and it is felt that atomic energy will have to be used in increasing quantities to supplement conventional fuel resources in order to attain the anticipated power targets in the next two decades. It has, therefore, been decided that a small beginning will be made with the erection and commissioning of anatomic power station of 250 MW (electric) capacity by the end of 1964. The installation of a further 750 MW of nuclear power by the end of the third five-year plan period, i.e. by March 1966, is under consideration. Present Pattern and future demand of energy is discussed, as well as available resources and immediate needs. Concerning nuclear fuel cycle and cost estimates it is stated that India's uranium reserves are not large enough to sustain a very long-term programme of power generation, but the reserves for thorium are. Therefore India's nuclear power production will have to be based primarily on thorium with a rather complicated fuel cycles and first, second and third generation atomic power stations. The Atomic Energy Establishment Trombay is India's national centre for research in the peaceful uses of atomic energy. India's first reactor, Apsara, which is of the swimming pool type, has been in operation for more than three years now and two other research reactors are under construction. These are the Canada-India Reactor, which is being built under the Colombo Plan in collaboration with Canada, and Zerlina, which is being designed and built by Indian scientists and engineers. The Canada-India Reactor will be a versatile high flux research reactor and will have facilities in which various power reactor concepts can be tried out in the so-called loop experiments. In addition, it will produce considerable

  10. Material development for India's nuclear power programme

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rials with emphasis on development of fabrication routes of zirconium alloys for .... nuclear power programme, which envisages design and construction of thermal breeder ... Production of Hf-free nuclear grade zirconium ..... Later on for pressure tubes specified limit for hydrogen content in the as manufactured condition.

  11. Developing Infrastructure for New Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-09-01

    Many countries are interested in introducing or expanding nuclear energy programmes because they regard nuclear power as a clean and stable source of electricity that can help to mitigate the impact of climate change. However, the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan - caused by an earthquake and tsunami of unprecedented proportions - demonstrated that there is a constant need to improve global nuclear safety, despite the great progress made in the previous 25 years. A 'safety first' approach needs to become fully entrenched among nuclear power plant operators, governments and regulators everywhere. Safety first must also be the watchword for Member States considering the introduction of nuclear power. I believe that all IAEA Member States should have access to nuclear power if they wish to add it their energy mix. While it is up to each country to decide whether or not to opt for nuclear power, the IAEA has a key role to play in ensuring that the development of nuclear power programmes takes place in a safe, efficient, responsible and sustainable manner. The IAEA has developed guidelines and milestones to help countries work in a systematic way towards the introduction of nuclear power. Use of the 'Milestones' approach can increase transparency both within a country introducing nuclear power, and between it and other States. This brochure summarizes the services which the IAEA offers to Member States considering introducing nuclear power. These include advice on proper planning, building the required human resources and infrastructure, establishing legal and regulatory frameworks, and ensuring the highest standards of safety and security, without increasing proliferation risks. The IAEA offers independent know-how on the construction, commissioning, startup and operation of nuclear reactors. Through the Technical Cooperation programme, we provide targeted support to 'newcomer' countries in response to national development needs

  12. Nuclear power training programmes in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanarro, A.; Izquierdo, L.

    1977-01-01

    The introduction of nuclear power in Spain is developing very rapidly. At present 1.1GW(e) are installed in Spain and this is expected to increase to 8GW(e) in 1980 and to 28GW(e) in 1990. Spanish industry and technology are also rapidly increasing their participation in building nuclear stations, in manufacturing the necessary components and in the activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle. All of this requires properly trained personnel, which is estimated to become approximately 1200 high-level technicians, 1100 medium-level technicians and 1500 technical assistants by 1980. This personnel is trained: (a) in engineering schools; (b) in the Nuclear Studies Institute; (c) in the electric companies with nuclear programmes. The majority of the high-level engineering schools in the country include physics and basic nuclear technology courses in their programmes. Some of them have an experimental low-power nuclear reactor. The Nuclear Studies Institute is an official organism dependent on the Nuclear Energy Commission and responsible, among other subjects, for training personnel for the peaceful use and development of nuclear energy in the country. The electric companies also participate in training personnel for future nuclear stations and they plan to have advanced simulators of PWR and BWR type stations for operator training. The report deals with the personnel requirement forecasts and describes the training programmes. (author)

  13. The Brazilian nuclear power manpower development programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbalho, A.R.; Spitalnik, J.; Machado, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    Since the early stages of decision making, manpower availability has been recognized to be a key factor for the implementation of Brazil's nuclear power programme. Though care has been given to securing an industrial base and financial resources, the consequences of a lack of sufficient qualified manpower could be critical for the success of the whole programme. The broad scope of the Brazilian nuclear power programme which, as a main concept, aimed at establishing in the country a complete fuel cycle industry together with the construction of nuclear power plants, added another burden to the already complex task of providing appropriate human resources when advanced technologies are introduced in a developing country. Thus, not only the work-force required for nuclear power plant operation but also that needed for plant design, component manufacture, fuel cycle plant design and operation, had to be made available in number and qualification in accordance with the standards of the nuclear industry. The feasibility of the Brazilian programme depended on a complete transfer of technology, essentially achieved through personnel training. Again, the process of manpower preparation for an efficient know-how transfer required careful planning, and the great difficulty in its implementation was the lack of reliable experience at the time. (author)

  14. Nuclear power programme: development and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Y.S.R.

    1997-01-01

    The relevance of nuclear power in meeting the short and long term energy needs of India was recognised right at the beginning of the atomic energy programme. From the very beginning, as a long term strategy, the nuclear power programme, formulated by Dr Homi Jehangir Bhabha, embarked on a three stage process linking the fuel cycles of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) and Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR), and was planned for judicious utilisation of the country's limited uranium ore (78,000 tonne) but vast thorium resources (>360,000 tonne). The emphasis of the programme was on self-reliance and thorium utilisation as a long term objective. India selected Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) because of several inherent advantages. (author)

  15. Collective dose commitments from nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.

    1977-01-01

    The concepts of collective dose and collective dose commitment are discussed, particularly regarding their use to compare the relative importance of the exposure from several radiation sources and to predict future annual doses from a continuing practice. The collective dose commitment contributions from occupational exposure and population exposure due to the different components of the nuclear power fuel cycle are evaluated. A special discussion is devoted to exposures delivered over a very long time by released radionuclides of long half-lives and to the use of the incomplete collective dose commitment. The maximum future annual ''per caput'' doses from present and projected nuclear power programmes are estimated

  16. Progress of China's nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jianping

    1997-01-01

    From a long-term point of view, nuclear power is the only solution for the shortage of energy resource. Nuclear power development strategy has been specified in China according to national condition: The electricity development of nuclear power optimizes the national energy structure and ensure the power supply, particularly in east China. China's first self-designed and self-constructed nuclear power plant--Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant (300MWe PWR) is now well under commercial operation. China is willing to cooperate with IAEA, other countries and regions in the field of nuclear energy for peaceful use on basis of mutual benefit. (author)

  17. Development of human resources for Indian nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, R.B.; Puri, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    The continuing research and development on nuclear technology by research establishments in the country and maturing of Indian industry have brought the nuclear energy programme in India to a stage where it is poised to take a quantum leap forward. The vision of expansion of nuclear power also requires a well-structured specialized human resource development programme. This paper discusses the requirements of the human resource development programme for nuclear energy, the challenges in the way of its realization, its national and international status and traces the history of nuclear education in the country. It brings out the linkage of human resource development programme with the nuclear energy programme in the country. It also describes the initiatives by the university system in the area of nuclear education and support provided by the Department of Atomic Energy to the university system by way of extra-mural funding and by providing access to research facilities. (author)

  18. France's nuclear power programme; Le programme nucleaire francais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabanius, J [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Horowitz, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The prospects of development of France's consumption of electricity will widen the deficit of her national energy resources. Nuclear power stations should enable this deficit to be reduced, provided a certain number of uncertainties prevailing today are resolved. The first programme, put forward by Messrs. AILLERET and TARANGER at the 1955 Geneva Conference aimed at commissioning 850 MWe by 1965; the programme was devoted to developing the natural uranium graphite-gas sequence and reaches its completion with the construction of EDF 3, the world's first unit capable of 500 MWe. Before changing over from the prototype stage to their duplication, Electricite De France decided, in agreement with the Commissariat A L'energie Atomique to build EDF 4, which, while reproducing EDF 3's reactor, together with the referring equipment, the entire control equipment and various other systems, pioneers an important innovation by incorporating the heat exchangers and fans inside the prestressed concrete pressure vessel housing the core. At the same time, studies are being carried on on the same type of reactor enabling possible use of a new annular-shaped fuel element, whose use would considerably improve the performance of EDF 5, to be envisaged. On the heavy water side, the construction of EL 4 at Brennilis jointly by the Commissariat A L'energie Atomique and Electricite De France is continuing. Design work on a 500 MWe reactor of this type has already started. As regards pressurized water reactors, the Chooz power station is built jointly by Electricite De France and Belgian Utilities. Finally, the Commissariat A L'energie Atomique is continuing the construction of the 'Rapsodie' rapid neutron reactor at Cadarache, together with studies on a larger power reactor. It may thus be seen that the technical and economic knowledge gained on these various types of reactor mean that an equipment program may be contemplated which will endow nuclear power stations with a place of ever

  19. Promotion and financing of nuclear power programmes in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency established in February 1986 a Senior Expert Group (SEG) on Mechanisms to Assist Developing Countries in the Promotion and Financing of Nuclear Power Programmes, which was asked: (a) To identify and analyse the problems of and constraints on nuclear power introduction/expansion in developing countries, with particular attention being paid to the problems of financing nuclear power projects; (b) To study mechanisms for dealing with the identified problems and constraints in order to assist developing countries with the promotion and financing of their nuclear power programmes, and to determine the role of the IAEA in this context. This report summarizes the Senior Expert Group's study. It also presents a number of recommendations on mechanisms to assist developing countries in promoting and financing their nuclear power programmes. 1 fig., 3 tabs

  20. Atucha I nuclear power plant surveillance programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinchuk, D [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1994-12-31

    After a review of the main characteristics of the Atucha I nuclear power plant and its pressure vessel, the embrittlement surveillance capsules and the irradiation conditions are described; Charpy impact tests and tensile tests were performed on the irradiated samples, and results are discussed and compared to theoretical calculations: transition temperature shifts, displacement per atom values. 6 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Atucha I nuclear power plant surveillance programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinchuk, D.

    1993-01-01

    After a review of the main characteristics of the Atucha I nuclear power plant and its pressure vessel, the embrittlement surveillance capsules and the irradiation conditions are described; Charpy impact tests and tensile tests were performed on the irradiated samples, and results are discussed and compared to theoretical calculations: transition temperature shifts, displacement per atom values. 6 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  2. Nigeria nuclear power generation programme: Suggested way forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adesanmi, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    It has now been established worldwide that nuclear power generation is needed to meet growing energy demands. The gases emitted from fossil fuel have serious adverse effects on the environment. The message from the 50th Annual General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held in Vienna, September 2006 was very clear on this issue. There was a unanimous support for more nuclear power generation to meet the world energy demand. All the member states that can afford the nuclear power technology and willing to abide by the international regulations and safeguards were encouraged to do so. The requirements to participate in the nuclear power generation programme are political will and organized diplomacy, legislative and statutory framework, international safety obligations, institutional framework, public acceptability, capacity building and technology transfer, environmental concern , waste management and financing. Nigeria's performance on all the criteria was evaluated and found satisfactory. All these coupled with Nigeria's dire need for more power and better energy mix, are sufficient and undisputable reasons for the whole world to support Nigeria nuclear power generation programme. Definitely the programme poses serious challenges to the Nigerian Physicists. Therefore, Departments of Physics should endeavour to include nuclear physics option in their programme and work in collaboration with the faculty of Engineering in their various tertiary institutions in order to attain the necessary critical human capacity that will be needed to man the nuclear power industry within the next 10 years

  3. The French nuclear power programme and energy policy in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carle, R.

    1988-01-01

    After briefly describing the Chernobyl reactor accident and its consequences in Western Europe, especially its psychological effects, the French nuclear energy programme is presented in detail. The role of standardization and education as well as of construction time and cost is pointed out. Moreover, the results of the programme are given including extension of the capable French nuclear power industry, economical and ecological benefits. Future measures such as increase of the flexibility of nuclear power plants, improved fuel management, reduction of personnel radiation doses and employment of advanced reactors (the reactor system N4) will facilitate French efforts to free the country from mineral oil and coal imports. (author)

  4. The Indian nuclear power programme: Challenges in PHWR technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Y.S.R.

    1997-01-01

    The long-term strategy for development of nuclear power generation in India is based on a three-stage programme, formulated by Dr. H.J. Bhabha. This strategy takes into account and is optimally suited for achieving self reliance in nuclear technology; India's technological infrastructure; limited resources of Natural Uranium and abundant availability of Thorium within the country

  5. Nuclear power programmes in developing countries: Costs and financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, J.P.; Bennett, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    This article refers to a seminar (organized by the IAEA) on Costs and Financing of Nuclear Power Programmes in Developing Countries held in Vienna from 9-12 September 1985. Its main objective was to promote a dialogue among the various parties involved in the domain of nuclear power financing, i.e. buyers, suppliers and financing organizations. At the meeting the Agency presented information showing that nuclear power plants are an economic means of generating electricity. In relation hereto the article deals with such topics as performance records, economic records, projected nuclear plant additions, financing constraints, current debt problems and new working relationships

  6. MOX fuel for Indian nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, H.S.; Anantharaman, K.; Purushotham, D.S.C.

    2000-01-01

    A sound energy policy and a sound environmental policy calls for utilisation of plutonium (Pu) in nuclear power reactors. The paper discusses the use of Pu in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in two Indian boiling water reactors (BWRs) at Tarapur. An industrial scale MOX fuel fabrication plant is presently operational at Tarapur which is capable of manufacturing MOX fuels for BWRs and in future for PHWRs. The plant can also manufacture mixed oxide fuel for prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR) and development work in this regard has already started. The paper describes the MOX fuel manufacturing technology and quality control techniques presently in use at the plant. The irradiation experience of the lead MOX assemblies in BWRs is also briefly discussed. The key areas of interest for future developments in MOX fuel fabrication technology and Pu utilisation are identified. (author)

  7. Nuclear power programmes in developing countries: Promotion and financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    In 1986 the Agency's Director General established a Senior Expert Group on Mechanisms to Assist Developing Countries in the Promotion and Planning of Nuclear Power Programmes. This group, which was comprised of 20 experts with extensive experience in the topics to be studied, coming from 15 Member States plus the World Bank, was asked to: identify and analyse the problems of and constraints on nuclear power introduction/expansion in developing countries, with particular attention being paid to the problems of financing nuclear power projects; study mechanisms for dealing with the identified problems and constraints in order to assist developing countries with the promotion and financing of their nuclear power programmes and to determine the role of the IAEA in this context. This paper summarizes the Senior Expert Group's study

  8. Technicians for the Brazilian nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins Pinto, C.S.; Spitalnik, J.; Meakins, E.J.; Hurley, I.

    1980-01-01

    The technician has a responsible role to fulfil in nuclear industry, acting as a bridge between the engineer and the skilled worker. Technicians must have sufficient theoretical knowledge to communicate with engineers, and a thorough understanding of technological practice; the nuclear industry demands both theory and practice of a high standard. In Brazil the essential role of the technician in industry is in general recognized. However, the lack of a nationally recognized Nuclear Technician and Nuclear Technologist qualification, as well as a desire of the best technicians to quality as engineers and, in some areas, inadequate salaries has resulted in a shortage of well-trained technicians. A first step to ensure availability of these technicians is to improve their career prospects and status through definition of appropriate career standards and salaries. Practical training by the industry can only be given in factories, plants and construction sites where nuclear work is done. It is proposed to extend apprentice training centres at three sites, to give the most promising students after two years of apprentice training two further years of instruction and practice to qualify as Nuclear Technicians. The training centres are chosen to cover the three sectors of nuclear industry where special training of technicians is important: manufacture and construction; operation and maintenance; and testing and analysis for process control and safety. (author)

  9. Promotion and financing of nuclear power programmes in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.L.; Skjoeldebrand, R.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power has been introduced only to a small extent in a few developing countries. A group of senior experts conducted a study of the existing constraints on nuclear power in developing countries, the requirements to be met for successful introduction of a nuclear power programme, and mechanisms to assist developing countries in overcoming the identified constraints. Financing represents one (but not the only) major constraint to nuclear power development in developing countries. The present schemes of export credits and commercial financing are seen as not adequately meeting the needs of nuclear power financing in terms of repayment periods and profiles, or in terms of flexibility to meet delays and cost overruns. Innovative and workable arrangements to share the economic and financial risks would be helpful in obtaining financing for a nuclear power project. All possible efforts should be made by all parties involved in the development of nuclear power to reduce as far as possible the uncertainties surrounding the cost and schedule of a nuclear power project, as an essential step to improve the overall climate for financing the project. Government commitment, soundly based and thorough planning, development of qualified manpower and other key infrastructures, and good project management are important mechanisms to achieve greater predictability in project schedule and cost. Technical assistance provided by the IAEA can be very helpful in building these capabilities in developing countries. (author). 1 tab

  10. Quality assurance programme of Temelin nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eybl, J.; Nowak, O.

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principle of the system of quality assurance in Czechoslovak nuclear power is quality assurance at all stages of the construction and operation of nuclear power plants and the grading fo measures taken, this in dependence on the impact on nuclear safety of the respective nuclear installation or its part. The system has been made fully operational during the construction of nuclear power plants in Temelin and Mochovce. State surveillance is executed by the Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission, and the Czech and Slovak Offices for Work Safety. Briefly discussed are the tasks of the building subcontractor of the Temelin nuclear power plant with regard to the programme of quality assurance as well as the results of the solution of the respective research tasks. The programme of quality assurance classifies the selected sections of the structure of a nuclear power plant into three safety categories. No part of the structure is classified into the first category, the second category includes, e.g., the reactor building, cooling tanks and diesel generator units, the third includes the reactor building and the building of auxiliary workshops. Attention is also paid to the problems of the qualification of personnel and to inspection activity. (Z.M.). 12 refs

  11. Nuclear power plant ageing management programmes in foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simola, K.; Laakso, K.; Pekkonen, A.

    1992-09-01

    The report describes ageing studies of nuclear power plants and research programmes on plant life extension in foreign countries. Ageing studies are aimed to ascertain that the availability and safety of components and structures can be maintained throughout the plant lifetime. In life extension programmes the purpose is to evaluate the technical and economical possibilities to extend the plant lifetime beyond the originally planned operation period, without reducing the plant safety. The main emphasis of the report is put on the ageing and life extension programmes in the United States. Besides the U.S. studies, research on plant life extension possibilities conducted in France and Japan are also described. Examples of studies performed in other nuclear energy producing countries are given. These examples are mainly related to the development of maintenance programmes and techniques

  12. Developing industrial infrastructures to support a programme of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Guidebook is intended to offer assistance in the many considerations and decisions involved in preparing the national industry for participation in a nuclear power programme. The heavy financial investment, the setting up of certain infrastructures many years ahead of plant construction, plus the high level of technology involved require early and systematic planning. A further purpose of this Guidebook is to serve particularly those decision makers and planners in the various governmental authorities, the technological institutions and in the industries likely to be involved in a nuclear project. These industries include the services of the national engineering resources, the domestic design and manufacturing groups as well as the civil construction companies. These will be responsible for plant erection, testing and commissioning and most of all for the establishment of a framework for quality assurance. All of these are the components of an essential infrastructure necessary to raise the standards of the national industry and to displace increasingly foreign suppliers to the extent possible. In addition, this Guidebook should help to show some of the implications, consequences and options involved in a nuclear power programme. It does not consider the basic decisions for going nuclear, nor does it review the choice of the technology or nuclear process selected for the programme. Instead, it limits itself to a consideration of the nuclear power plant and its essential cycle activities. Figs and tabs

  13. Industrial infrastructure for the Indian nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.R.

    1986-04-01

    For the inception of the Indian nuclear power programme, great emphasis has been laid on development of comprehensive indigenous capability in design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants. The choice of the pressurised heavy water reactor as the mainline for India's first generation nuclear power stations fitted into this perspective. Apart from the inherent advantages of high neutron economy, low fuelling costs and high capacity factors, this system offered significant opportunities for manufacture and design of all the components within the country. The development of indigenous capability has not been without its problems, namely cost overruns and delays. The main causes for these delays have been the developmental nature of the jobs involving learning process and continued tightening of the quality control requirements. The strategy of development to be pursued by any country is naturally dependent upon the size of the programme it wishes to embark upon and the state of industrial infrastructure in the country. The Indian experience has demonstrated that for development of a comprehensive capability, it is necessary to have a well formulated reactor policy, a good inter-disciplinary R and D base, a good base of conventional industrial infrastructure, a comprehensive manpower development programme and an innovative management. It is hoped that this experience will be of benefit to other developing countries embarking on their own nuclear programme

  14. Manpower development for the nuclear power programme in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, A.; Rahman, M.A.; Quaiyum, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    Surveys undertaken in the early sixties established that nuclear power had a great potential for meeting energy demands in Bangladesh. Therefore, since then the development of the requisite manpower for producing nuclear power in the country has been supported by the authorities. Through the co-operation of the IAEA and national and international agencies, Bangladesh has been able to create a corps of scientists and engineers trained at M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels in various nuclear science and technology disciplines. Some are professional nuclear engineers who have participated in the planning, safety evaluation, construction, commissioning and the subsequent operation of nuclear power plants. This paper reviews the present activities and the future plans for developing qualified manpower for Bangladesh's nuclear power programme. The difficulties in developing skilled manpower are also discussed. Overall manpower requirements have been evaluated. It has been found that in certain areas, such as quality control and quality assurance, BAEC has no trained personnel, and existing trained manpower falls short in requirements. Hence, recruitment is being done and training in selected areas is being arranged under different IAEA and bilateral assistance programmes, and a national nuclear training institution with adequate facilities is being established. (author)

  15. Planning and development of the Spanish nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, M.

    1983-01-01

    The paper analyses the Spanish nuclear power programme from its inception to the present time, doing so within the context of the country, characterized by the fairly rapid change from a basically agricultural economy to an economy in which industry and services play an important part and the transformation of which took place mainly during the decade prior to the energy crisis 1973. Reference is made to the early establishment of the Junta de Energia Nuclear (Nuclear Energy Board) (JEN), which was set up as a research body even before nuclear energy became competitive with other sources for the production of electric power and which, by adapting its structure and programmes to the different phases in the development and utilization of nuclear energy in the country, contributed the necessary scientific, technical and legal infrastructure. There is also an analysis of the most striking features of the Spanish energy system and an account of the planning and construction of the first three Spanish nuclear power stations. A further subject of discussion is the energy planning and development projects devised by the Government which gave rise to the second generation of nuclear power plants, some of which are already in operation and the remainder in an advanced state of construction. Emphasis is placed on the action taken by the Spanish Government to increase the participation of Spanish industry in the construction of nuclear power plants and in the supply of equipment and services required for their operation. Reference is made to the experimental changes which have been made in the institutional infrastructure in order to adapt it to the phase of development which has been reached and to the objectives subsequently laid down in the planning: establishment of ENUSA (the national uranium enterprise), the Equipos Nucleares corporation and the Nuclear Safety Council, and also the changes made in the JEN

  16. Human resource issues related to an expanding nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-05-01

    The IAEA Technical Working Group on Training and Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel recommended that the IAEA develop guidelines on human resource management (including staffing) and training/education programmes for new nuclear power plant (NPP) designs. This recommendation was made in recognition that these future NPPs may have significantly different needs in this area compared to operating plants, and if so, NPP operating organizations should integrate these needs into their planning for future NPP projects. This report is primarily intended for use by NPP operating organizations that already have units in operation and that are considering adding to their fleet. Therefore, the addition of both new and current designs are addressed in this report. However, it should also be of value to those organizations that are considering the initial implementation of nuclear power, as well as decision makers in government, and in other nuclear industry organizations

  17. Nuclear power plant operation experience - a feedback programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banica, I.; Sociu, F.; Margaritescu, C.

    1994-01-01

    An effective high quality maintenance programme is required for the safe reliable operation of a nuclear power plant. To achieve the objectives of such a programme, both plant management and staff must be highly dedicated and motivated to perform high quality work at all levels. Operating and maintenance experience data collections and analysis are necessary in order to enhance the safety of the plant and reliability of the structures systems and components throughout their operating life. Significant events, but also minor incident, may reveal important deficiencies or negative trends adverse to safety. Therefore, a computer processing system for collecting, classifying and evaluating abnormal events or findings concerning operating-maintenance and for feeding back the results of the lessons learned from experience into the design and the operation of our nuclear power plant is considered to be of paramount importance. (Author)

  18. Finnish research programmes on nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska, E. K.

    2010-01-01

    The current Finnish national research programme on nuclear power plant safety SAFIR2010 for the years 2007-2010 as well as the coming SAFIR2014 programme for the years 2011-2014 are based on the chapter 7a, 'Ensuring expertise', of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Act. The objective of this chapter is realised in the research work and education of experts in the projects of these research programmes. SAFIR2010 research programme is divided in eight research areas that are Organisation and human, Automation and control room, Fuel and reactor physics, Thermal hydraulics, Severe accidents, Structural safety of reactor circuit, Construction safety, and Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA). All the research areas include both projects in their own area and interdisciplinary co-operational projects. Research projects of the programme are chosen on the basis of annual call for proposals. In 2010 research is carried out in 33 projects in SAFIR2010. VTT is the responsible research organisation in 26 of these projects and VTT is also the coordination unit of SAFIR2010 and SAFIR2014. In 2007-2009 SAFIR2010 produced 497 Specified research results (Deliverables), 618 Publications, and 33 Academic degrees. SAFIR2010 programme covers approximately half of the reactor safety research volume in Finland currently. In 2010 the programme volume is EUR 7.1 million and 47 person years. The major funding partners are VYR with EUR 2.96 million, VTT with EUR 2.66 million, Fortum with EUR 0.28 million, TVO with EUR 0.19 million, NKS with EUR 0.15 million, EU with only EUR 0.03 million and other partners with EUR 0.85 million. The new decisions-in-principle on Olkiluoto unit 4 for Teollisuuden Voima and new nuclear power plant for Fennovoima ratified by the Finnish Parliament on 1 July 2010 increase the annual funding collected according to the Finnish Nuclear Energy Act from Fennovoima, Fortum and Teollisuuden Voima for the SAFIR2014 programme to EUR 5.2 million from the current level of EUR 3

  19. Thailand: Infrastructure Development and Challenges to Launch Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keinmeesuke, Sirichai

    2011-01-01

    In June 2007, the cabinet passed a resolution for Thailand's Power Development Plan (PDP 2007). It was mentioned in the plan that Thailand will have 2 x 1,000 MWe nuclear power plants in 2020 and another 2 x 1,000 MWe in 2021. The PDP 2007 was revised in March 2009 and it was agreed to change the nuclear power generation to only 1 x 1,000 MWe in 2020 and 2021 respectively due to the large excess capacity at present. Many activities related to development of infrastructures in order to support electricity generation using nuclear power are being executed. Milestones for nuclear power program implementation has been developed using the IAEA document 'Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power' with some amendment/additions to suit the country situation. According to the schedule, a lot of activities related to infrastructure establishment, feasibility study, utility preparation and public education and participation are being performed. Within the year 2011, various issues such as legal and regulatory systems and international commitment, industrial and commercial infrastructure, technology transfer and human resource development, safety and environmental protection, public information and public acceptance, preparation of the nuclear power utility establishment, etc. must be solved out and undertaken to assure the cabinet to make final decision to go nuclear. There are many challenges for Thailand embarking of the nuclear power programme. It is essential to plan for the establishment of a regulatory body at the national level to support and regulate the nuclear power plant industry. Currently, the application for a license and the monitoring of a power plant are administered by the authorities of various agencies under different ministries; hence the process is very time-consuming and overlaps with one another. The approach that the regulatory body and the authorities to issue licenses relevant to the nuclear power plant operation

  20. The role of nuclear research centers for the introduction of a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perovic, B.; Frlec, B.; Kundic, V.

    1977-01-01

    Full development of nuclear energy has imposed a new role on nuclear energy centers. Nuclear technology for different reactor concepts is also now in a phase of high development. Several reactor concepts have been developed for industrial use and electric power production. Development of fast reactors is still under way and needs further research efforts. Having in mind these two main guidelines, research programmes in nuclear energy centers should be geared to the development of the activities vital to the implementation of national nuclear energy programmes. In this respect, national nuclear centers should devote their attention to three major tasks. First, to establish a background for the introduction of nuclear energy into the national energy system and to support a national safety system. Second, to support the national programme by skilled manpower, to provide the basic training in nuclear technology for future staff of nuclear power stations and to assist the universities in establishing the necessary educational programme in nuclear energy. Third, to follow the development of nuclear energy technology for the fast breeder reactor concepts. This paper describes some experience in introducing a new programme to the national nuclear energy centers in Yugoslavia. Recently, Yugoslavia has started building its first nuclear power station. Further introduction of nuclear power stations in the national electric energy system is also planned. This implies the need to reconsider the current nuclear energy programme in the nuclear energy centers. It has been decided to evaluate past experience and further needs for research activities regarding the nuclear power programme. Yugoslavia has three main nuclear energy centers whose activities are devoted to the development of national manpower in the field of nuclear sciences. Besides these three organizations, there are several others whose activities are concentrated on specific tasks in nuclear technology. In the

  1. Nuclear waste management programme 2003 for the Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    A joint company Posiva Oy founded by nuclear energy producing Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) and Fortum Power and Heat Oy coordinates the research work of the companies on nuclear waste management in Finland. In Posiva's Nuclear Waste Management Programme 2003, an account of the nuclear waste management measures of TVO and Fortum is given as required by the sections 74 and 75 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. At first, nuclear waste management situation and the programme of activities are reported. The nuclear waste management research for the year 2003 and more generally for the years 2003-2007 is presented

  2. Nuclear Engineering Education in Support of Thailand’s Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanyotha, S.; Pengvanich, P.; Nilsuwankosit, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to introduce the nuclear engineering education at the Department of Nuclear Engineering, Chulalongkon University, Bangkok Thailand. The department has been offering curriculum in nuclear engineering to support the national nuclear power programme since 1970s. It is the oldest established nuclear engineering educational programme in the South East Asia region. Nevertheless, since the nuclear power programme has been postponed several times due to various reasons, the educational programme at the department has been continuously adapted to meet the nation’s needs. Several areas of study have been introduced, including nuclear power engineering, industrial applications of radioisotope, nuclear instrumentation, radioisotope production, radiation processing, environment and safety, nuclear materials, as well as the newly created nuclear security and non-proliferation. With the renewed interest in using nuclear power in Thailand in 2007, the department has been actively assisting both the government and the electric utility in preparing human resources to support the nuclear power programme through various educational and training modules. Realizing the importance of establishing and balancing all 3 aspects of the nuclear 3S (safety, security and safeguard) in Thailand and in the Southeast Asian region. The new curriculum of nuclear security and safeguard programme has been offered since 2013. Since the establishment, the department has produced hundreds of graduates (Diploma, Master’s, and Ph.D. levels) to feed the continuously expanding Thai nuclear industry. The full paper will provide detailed information of the curriculum, the challenges and obstacles that the department has encountered, as well as the national and international linkages which have been established over the years. (author)

  3. Problems faced by Bangladesh in introduction of nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Islam, A.B.M.; Quaiyum, M.A.; Hasnat, K.A.

    1977-01-01

    Bangladesh has one of the lowest per capita energy resources and consumption of energy. The per capita GDP of Bangladesh is also one of the lowest in the world. In view of this situation, the need and importance of nuclear power in providing cheaper and reliable energy for economic development of the country is discussed. Constraints being faced by the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) in the initiation and development of a national nuclear power programme are dealt with. Following liberation of the country in 1971, its financial resources were mainly channelled for rehabilitation and restoration of its economy. As the size of the national grid has remained relatively small, unit sizes in the range of 100-200 MWe only could be considered for commissioning during the next decade. Lack of vendor interest in such small sizes and the difficulty of arranging long-term investment for nuclear station are the main constraints being faced by the BAEC. Other bottlenecks are due to the uncertainty about the nature and extent of future economic development, pricing policy for available indigenous fossil fuel, national energy planning criteria which are mainly influenced by financial resource constraint, drainage of trained man-power, national priority for various essential non-development expenditures which use up most of the country's own earnings and foreign aid, etc. The effect of the growth of opposition to nuclear power in developed countries on the public acceptability of nuclear power in Bangladesh is analysed. The paper also examines the prospective growth of a cartel of nuclear-exporting countries and its possible effect upon Bangladesh

  4. ICRP publication 26. Its applicability in a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.; Donnelly, K.

    1980-01-01

    Ontario Hydro is a major Canadian provincial utility with more than 5 GW(e) installed nuclear electricity generating capacity and with a planned commitment to an additional 8.5 GW(e), all units being of the CANDU pressurized heavy-water type. The radiation protection programme, in addition to complying with Canadian Federal regulations, has been consistent with the philosophy and intent of ICRP recommendations and is frequently reviewed to ensure compliance with these recommendations, the most recent of which is ICRP-26. The application of the ALARA principle in this power reactor programme is described. A set of general guidelines has been established, the main features of which are: (a) achieving a dose consumption per unit of electricity generated which is low compared with reactors of a similar type; (b) ensuring that stations are operable with the dose equivalent of their labour-dictated manpower; (c) ensuring that the risk to atomic radiation workers is compatible with a corporate fatality rate standard of 8 man-hours worked. Achievement of these guidelines has necessitated implementing a continued dose-management programme. This programme is described generally. The cost applied to justify a dose reduction of 1 man.Sv is given, and a comparison is made with the equivalent life costs this implies and the costs used by safety agencies for other risk-reduction activities. Finally, some practical problems associated with some of the recommendations of ICRP-26 are discussed. (author)

  5. Problems faced by Bangladesh in introducing a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Islam, A.B.M.; Quaiyum, M.A.; Hasnat, K.A.

    1977-01-01

    The per capita energy resources and consumption of energy in Bangladesh are among the lowest in the world as in the per capita GDP of the country. The need for and importance of nuclear power in providing cheaper and reliable energy for economic development of the country is discussed in the light of this situation. The constraints faced by the Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) in the initiation and development of a national nuclear power programme are detailed. Following the liberation of the country in 1971 its financial resources were mainly channelled to the rehabilitation and restoration of the economy. As the size of the national grid has remained relatively small, unit sizes in the range of 50-200MW(e) only could be considered for commissioning. Lack of vendor interest in such small sizes and the difficulty of arranging long-term investment for nuclear stations are the main constraints faced by the BAEC. Other bottlenecks are due to the uncertainty about the nature and extent of future economic development, pricing policy for available indigenous fossil fuel, and national energy planning criteria, which are mainly influenced by the limited financial resources, national priority for various essential non-development expenditures, which use up most of the country's own earnings and foreign aid, etc. Problems that are likely to be faced in future are discussed. These include public acceptability of nuclear power in Bangladesh, the obstacles to the transfer of nuclear technology that may be erected through the prospective growth of a cartel of nuclear-exporting countries, drainage of trained manpower, etc. (author)

  6. The role of nuclear research centres in the introduction of a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afgan, N.; Anastasijevic, P.; Kolar, D.; Strohal, P.

    1977-01-01

    Full development of nuclear energy has imposed a new role on nuclear energy centres. Nuclear technology for different reactor concepts is also now in a phase of high development. Several reactor concepts have been developed for industrial use and electric power production. Development of fast reactors is still under way and needs further research efforts. Having in mind these two main guidelines, research programmes in nuclear energy centres should be geared to the development of the activities vital to the implementation of national nuclear energy programmes. In this respect, national nuclear centres should devote their attention to three major tasks. First, to establish a background for the introduction of nuclear energy into the national energy system and to support a national safety system. Secondly, to support the national programme by skilled manpower, to provide the basic training in nuclear technology for future staff of nuclear power stations and to assist the universities in establishing the necessary educational programme in nuclear energy. Thirdly, to follow the development of nuclear energy technology for fast breeder reactor concepts. (author)

  7. China: the long wait. [Developments in the nuclear power programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    The repercussions of Tiananmen Square coupled with worse than expected balance of payments problems have been made it even more difficult than usual to discern the likely future direction of China's nuclear power programme. Currently there are three power reactors under construction, an indigenously designed 300MWe PWR at Qinsham and the two 900MWe Framatome units at Daya Bay, Guang-dong. Prior to the events of June the most likely way forward, beyond these units under construction, appeared to be development of 600MWe units for Chinese conditions in a joint venture with Western companies. There are strong pressures to ''go indigenous'', and attempt to develop a home grown 600MWe design or, perhaps more likely, go for repeats of the 300 MWe plant - assuming it can be operated successfully, a point on which some factions of the Chinese nuclear industry have their doubts. Nuclear district heating still has strong advocates, as an environmentally sound way of meeting the country's huge projected increases in primary energy consumption over the coming years. Construction of a 5MWt district heating reactor at Tsinghua University, Beijing, started in 1986, entered operation at the end of 1989 following a test phase and is now supplying 3MWt to heating of university buildings. (author).

  8. Radioactivity monitoring programme of Krsko nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miklavzic, U.; Martincic, R.; Kanduc, M.; Lulic, S.; Kovac, J.; Breznik, B.

    1996-01-01

    As a successor to the preoperational surveillance programme, the regular offsite radioactivity monitoring programme (RMP) of the Krsko Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) was implemented in 1982, when the power plant formally commenced operating. Observations collected during the first years of its operation were later also the basis for setting up the official 'Regulatory guide on monitoring of nuclear installations', issued not earlier than in 1986. The basic criterion which governed the selection of measuring methods, sampling techniques and locations, was the extent to which the data obtained could serve for the realistic assessment of the committed dose to a member of the population, and later on to members of a representative (critical) group. To be able to differentiate the radioactivity released through the liquid and gaseous effluents of the NPP from other radiation sources (natural radioactivity, global contamination), and especially because of the varying radiotoxicity of different radionuclides, in principle monitoring in the environment, as at the source, had to provide activity data for each individual radionuclide appearing in the effluents. Therefore, as early as 1982 the programme attributed the main weight to high resolution gamma spectrometry, combined with specific radiochemical analytical methods (e.g. 90 Sr/ 89 Sr, 3 H, 14 C, alpha spectrometry of Pu isotopes) which together made feasible determination of individual specific activities of the most significant man-made and natural radionuclides. By weighting the specific activities of the radionuclides identified and measured in the media surveyed by dose factors for intake, the quantity 'B' - the so-called 'radiological burden', was calculated and introduced in the yearly-summary tables. Expressed in relative units, from which the committed dose could be readily calculated, the burden B very lucidly disclosed the relative importance of different artificial pollutants and natural radioactivity present in

  9. Development of the national nuclear programme and preparations for the introduction of nuclear power in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szili, G.; Erdosi, N.; Varga, I.; Ocsai, M.; Szabo, B.

    1977-01-01

    Hungary's energy situation, energy policy and its interest in the use of nuclear energy are reviewed and the main nuclear power programme targets for the medium term (by 1990) and long term (by 2000) are given. Preparatory steps for the introduction of nuclear energy are outlined, emphasizing the important areas of the preparatory programme. A short technical description is given of Hungary's first nuclear power plant, the Paks Nuclear Power Station, including the preparations for construction and erection, the present construction plan, fuel supply, basic technical aspects of safety, and the social consequences of the plant's erection. The problems involved in the introduction of nuclear energy that must be solved by the state administration are summarized. A review is given of earlier legislation on projects and works representing a radiation hazard; duties are discharged by different state administrations. Additional problems arise from the large-scale use of nuclear energy. These require regulation by the authorities. Preliminary steps have been taken to frame appropriate laws. The activities of the authorities in regard to the practical realization of the first nuclear power station are outlined: there will be a scheduled procedure of authorization. The present potentials and trends in the development and design capacities for energy in general and particularly for nuclear power research are discussed. Hungarian R and D and design resources participate in the joint nuclear power development programme of the CMEA countries. Work is divided amongst various institutes. Preparations being made in the manufacturing, building and construction industries will lead to an expected increase in the domestic share in the construction of future nuclear power plants, compared to the first plant, for which the proportions of foreign and domestic participation are given. Hungary's industry is preparing for the manufacture of nuclear power equipment within the framework of the

  10. Dangers associated with civil nuclear power programmes: weaponization and nuclear waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, Frank

    2015-07-24

    The number of nuclear power plants in the world rose exponentially to 420 by 1990 and peaked at 438 in 2002; but by 2014, as closed plants were not replaced, there were just 388. In spite of using more renewable energy, the world still relies on fossil fuels, but some countries plan to develop new nuclear programmes. Spent nuclear fuel, one of the most dangerous and toxic materials known, can be reprocessed into fresh fuel or into weapons-grade materials, and generates large amounts of highly active waste. This article reviews available literature on government and industry websites and from independent analysts on world energy production, the aspirations of the 'new nuclear build' programmes in China and the UK, and the difficulties in keeping the environment safe over an immense timescale while minimizing adverse health impacts and production of greenhouse gases, and preventing weaponization by non-nuclear-weapons states acquiring civil nuclear technology.

  11. Developing National Capacity to Initiate Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndontchueng, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: ⇒ Nuclear power is needed for Developing Countries in the long term development strategy; ⇒ Developing Countries are lack of man power for both the NPP projects and the long term nuclear power program; ⇒ A long term HRD program (strategy) is needed to be established, in cooperation with Developed countries; ⇒ Education and training abroad is essential to the technology transfer; ⇒ Establishment of adequate infrastructure supporting HRD (nuclear engineering faculties, research groups, technical support centers) is indispensible for Developing Countries

  12. India's nuclear power programme and constraints encountered in its implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethna, H.N.; Srinivasan, M.R.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear power development in India is based on the natural uranium fuelled pressurised heavy water reactors. However, in order to acquire early experience in operation and maintenance of nuclear power stations, India's first atomic power station comprised of two units of boiling water reactors. Subsequent nuclear power stations currently in operation or under construction employ natural uranium heavy water reactors and each of the stations is a two reactor installation. While the first two nuclear power stations employ reactors with an output of 235 MW. 500 MW heavy water reactors are visualised for the period beyond 1985. The first nuclear power station was essentially fully imported; the second nuclear power station which employs heavy water reactors already has a significant contribution of equipment manufactured in India. For the third nuclear power station and the subsequent one, practically all equipment is being manufactured indigenously. The nuclear power station at Narora is in a seismic region and hence the design is substantially more advanced than the ones at the earlier sites and also employs concepts which will be used in the 500 MW reactors. Efforts are being made in the country to integrate power generation systems into larger regional grids and eventually into a national grid; however, the distributed nature of power generation at present and other infrastructural limitations still favour small and medium size plants only. The paper brings out the efforts put in over the last ten years in establishing capability for design and manufacture of all equipment and systems required for nuclear power plants. A major constraint in expanding the nuclear power capacity is naturally related to the competing demands on available national resources. The paper also discusses other constraints than purely technological and financial and describes how efforts are being made to overcome these contraints

  13. Nuclear Power Programme in India—Past, Present and Future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    India is poised for multifold growth in nuclear power generation to match the needs of sustained economic growth and improving the standard of living for masses. Nuclear power is currently the fourth-largest source of electricity in India after thermal, hydroelectric and renew- able sources of electricity. Thorium utilization for ...

  14. Infrastructure needs and organizational aspect of nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    I. Introduction. II. Infrastructure development for nuclear power program: a) pre-requisites and requirements for a nuclear power program; b) long-term national policy for a nuclear power (long-term policy reason; national commitment); c) manpower development (role of academic institutions; practical manpower training); d) laws and regulations (regulatory framework; main national laws and regulations); e) nuclear research and development implementation (researches in the university; long term nuclear R and D program; research reactors); f) functions of government organizations (Atomic Energy Commission (PNRI); Department of Science and Technology; Department of Energy; Department of Education and Culture); g) industrial infrastructure; h) technology transfer (recipients's preparedness); i) safeguards obligations; j) public acceptance activities. III. Stages of nuclear power development (stage 1: planning; stage 2: detailed study and procurement; stage 3: construction; stage 4: operation) IV. Conclusion/Recommendation. (author)

  15. India's nuclear power programme and constraints encountered in its implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethna, H.N.; Srinivasan, M.R.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear power development in India is based on natural-uranium fuelled pressurized heavy-water reactors. However, to acquire early experience in operation and maintenance of nuclear power stations, India's first atomic power station comprised two units of boiling-water reactors. Subsequent nuclear power stations currently in operation or under construction employ natural-uranium heavy-water reactors and each is a two-reactor installation. While the first two nuclear power stations employ reactors of 200MW capacity, the subsequent stations employ reactors with an output of 235MW. Heavy-water reactors of 500-MW capacity are foreseen for the period beyond 1985. The first nuclear power station was essentially fully imported: the second, which employs heavy-water reactors, has already made a significant contribution of equipment manufactured in India. For the third nuclear power station and for the subsequent one, practically all equipment is being manufactured indigenously. The nuclear power station at Narora is in a seismic region and hence the design is substantially more advanced than those at the earlier sites and also employs concepts which will be used in the 500-MW reactors. Efforts are being made in India to integrate power generation systems into larger regional grids and eventually into a national grid; however, the distributed nature of power generation at present and other infrastructural limitations still favour small and medium-size plants only. The paper reports the efforts made since the mid-1960s in establishing capability for design and manufacture of all equipment and systems required for nuclear power plants. A major constraint in expanding the nuclear power capacity is naturally related to the competing demands on available national resources. The paper also discusses constraints other than purely technological and financial, and describes the efforts being made to overcome them. (author)

  16. Present status and prospects of nuclear power programme in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan-yong Chon; Byong-whi Lee; Chang-kun Lee

    1987-01-01

    The republic of Korea has made dramatic progress in her economic growth in the last twenty-five years, which had to be supported by annual power increase of typically fifteen (15) percent. The limited domestic energy resources available and also the bitter experience of two oil crises made it necessary that the nation pursue its national nuclear power projects vigourously. Throughout the project execution, however, problems related to nuclear safety have been given the top priority. In the forthcoming KNU Nos. 11 and 12 projects, steadily growing domestic nuclear industries will play major roles in plant design, construction, standardization, and technological self-independence. By the year 2001, the total number of nuclear power plants may reach fourteen, while construction of additional small nuclear power plants for combined cycle district heating may become a reality. Preparation for full-fledged fuel cycle is also underway and necessary amendment to the existing Atomic Energy Act has been enacted. (author)

  17. Occupational exposures at nuclear power plants. Fourteenth annual report of the ISOE programme, 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The ISOE Programme was created by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency in 1992 to promote and co-ordinate international co-operative undertakings in the area of worker protection at nuclear power plants. The programme provides experts in occupational radiation protection with a forum for communication and exchange of experience. The ISOE databases enable the analysis of occupational exposure data from 478 operating and shutdown commercial nuclear power plants participating in the programme (representing some 90% of the world's total operating commercial reactors). The Fourteenth Annual Report of the ISOE Programme summarises achievements made during 2004 and compares annual occupational exposure data. Principal developments in ISOE participating countries are also described. (author)

  18. Occupational exposures at nuclear power plants. Eleventh annual report of the Isoe programme, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The ISOE Programme was created by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency in 1992 to promote and co-ordinate international co-operative undertakings in the area of worker protection at nuclear power plants. The programme provides experts in occupational radiation protection with a forum for communication and exchange of experience. The ISOE databases enable the analysis of occupational exposure data from the 452 commercial nuclear power plants participating in the programme (representing some 90 per cent of the world's total operating commercial reactors). The Eleventh Annual Report of the ISOE Programme summarises achievements made during 2001 and compares annual occupational exposure data. Principal developments in ISOE participating countries are also described. (author)

  19. Needs of countries with limited nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The main paper in this working group comes from Austria; it deals with the assurance of long-term supply of nuclear technology and nuclear fuel. Starting from an analysis of the structure of nuclear power programs of small industrialized countries, the paper discusses how supply of services can be assured in these countries during all steps of the fuel cycle. Detailed data and diagrams outline possible solutions under the aspect of production capacities and cost

  20. Nuclear Power Programme in India—Past, Present and Future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is important due to its security in terms of fuel reserves; since India has one of the largest ... of advanced nuclear power systems for utilization of thorium. ... operating water cooled reactors, the country plans to build innovative nuclear ...

  1. Development of the national nuclear programme and preparations for the introduction of nuclear power in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szili, G.; Erdoesi, N.; Varga, I.; Ocsai, M.; Szabo, B.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes Hungary's energy situation, energy policy and interest in nuclear energy; main targets of the medium-term (by 1990) and long-term (by 2000) nuclear power programme; and preparatory steps for the introduction of nuclear energy. A short technical description is given of the Paks Nuclear Power Station, and of the preparations for construction and erection of Hungary's first nuclear power plant. Fuel supply, basic technical safety aspects and social consequences arising from the plant's erection are discussed. The problems posed by the introduction of nuclear energy which will have to be solved by state administration are summarized. Earlier legislation on projects and works representing radiation danger are described, together with the responsibilities of the various state administrative bodies. Anticipated legal problems are discussed. The participation of Hungarian R and D and design resources in the joint nuclear power development efforts of the CMEA countries is explained and division of design and R and D tasks between various institutes is shown. (author)

  2. Radiation protection programme at Krsko nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breznik, B.

    1996-01-01

    Krsko NPP, a Westinghouse two-loop PWR of 632 M We power, is in commercial operation since 1982. Reduction of radioactive releases to the environment and the reduction of doses to workers is the basic goal in the plant radiological protection. The radiation protection programme is established to ensure that the radiation exposures to workers and members of the public are minimized according to the As Low As Reasonably Achievable approach and controlled in accordance with international safety standards and Slovenian regulations. The basis for the operational and technical measures has been provided according to the industrial good practice. The effluent control is based on the Standard Radioactive Effluent Technical Specifications, and environmental surveillance is established according to the programme defined by the regulations. The dose constraints and performance indicators are used to assure the effectiveness of the radiation protection programme and provide a convenient follow-up tool. The monitoring programme results of each year show that there is no measurable dose to the public due to radioactive releases. The commitment to the dose burden of any member of a critical group is assessed to be below the dose constraint. Individual and collective doses of the workers are within a range typical for the PWRs of a similar type. (author)

  3. Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programme in Uganda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, Ovona

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Despite the effort by the Government to ensure reliable and available access to electricity which is crucial to the socio – economic development, the use of hydro power, biomass and oil, geothermal and peat alone would not meet the target of the vision 2040. There is need to identifies nuclear energy as a potential option for meeting the energy deficit. Development of nuclear energy for power generation needs decision making, preparation and preparatory work which involve human resource development process, strengthening the legislation and regulatory framework, stakeholders’ involvement and public acceptance campaign

  4. Indian nuclear power programme – Past, present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and processing of uranium, construction of plants to produce heavy water and ... In May 1956, a decision was taken to set-up a pilot plant at AEET for ... The development of most of these reactor systems is an integrated result of detailed under- .... NPCIL has engineered the methodology and strategies for Nuclear Power ...

  5. Initiating nuclear power programmes: Responsibilities and capabilities of owners and operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing nuclear power due to growing energy needs, limitations on natural resources and concern for the environment. However, the introduction and development of nuclear power is a major undertaking. This requires building the necessary national infrastructure to construct and operate nuclear power plants in a safe, secure and technically sound manner. Many IAEA Member States that do not yet have nuclear power programmes have expressed their interest to the IAEA about the possibility of introducing nuclear power plants to help meet their energy needs. To assist these Member States, the IAEA is preparing a series of guides and reports. An overall description of the issues was presented by the IAEA in a brochure entitled Considerations to Launch a Nuclear Power Programme (GOV/INF/2007/2), which was targeted mainly at policy makers. A subsequent IAEA Nuclear Energy Series publication, Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power (NG-G-3.1), describes 19 infrastructure issues that should be addressed through the three phases of development outlined in the brochure, Considerations to Launch a Nuclear Power Programme. The IAEA is preparing a number of guides addressing these issues. Once a firm decision has been made by a government to proceed with the development of a nuclear programme, a number of organizations must be developed. A key organization for the successful construction and operation of the first nuclear power plant is the owner/operator, who provides ownership and management of the project. The owner/operator must clearly understand what must be done and how it has to act, who are partners and supporters and the corresponding interactions that have to be established. The owner or operator may be state owned or a private company. It may be an existing utility, or a specially established project organization. Its responsibilities include bidding, construction, licensing, commissioning

  6. Periodic safety review of operational nuclear power plants. A publication within the NUSS programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Safety Guide which supplements the IAEA Safety Fundamentals: The Safety of Nuclear Installations and the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, forms part of the Agency's programme, referred to as the NUSS programme, for establishing Codes and Guides relating to nuclear power plants. A list of NUSS publications is given at the end of this book. This Guide was drafted on the basis of a systematic review approach that was endorsed by the IAEA Conference on the Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance on the conduct of Periodic Safety Reviews (PSRs) for an operational nuclear power plant. The Guide is directed at both owners/operators and regulators. This Safety Guide deals with the PSR of an operational nuclear power plant. A PSR is a comprehensive safety review addressing all important aspects of safety, carried out at regular intervals. 22 refs, 4 figs

  7. RATU - Nuclear power plant structural safety research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintamaa, R.

    1992-07-01

    Studies on the structural materials in nuclear power plants create the experimental data and background information necessary for the structural integrity assessments of mechanical components. The research is carried out by developing experimental fracture mechanics methods including statistical analysis methods of materials property data, and by studying material ageing and, in particular, mechanisms of material deterioration due to neutron irradiation, corrosion and water chemistry. Besides material studies, new testing methods and sensors for measurement of loading and water chemistry parameters have been developed. The monitoring data obtained in real power plants has been used to simulate more precisely the real environment during laboratory tests. The research on structural analysis has focused on extending and verifying the analysis capabilities for structural assessments of nuclear power plants. A widely applicable system including various computational fracture assessment methods has been created with which different structural problems can be solved reliably and effectively. Research on reliability assessment of maintenance in nuclear power plants is directed to practical case studies on components and structures of safety importance, and to the development of models for maintenance related decision support. A systematic analysis of motor-operated valve has been performed

  8. Implementation of accident management programmes in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    good practices and developments in Member States and is intended as reference material for NPPs, as well as an information source for other organizations such as regulatory bodies. It is a follow-up to the IAEA report on Accident Management Programmes in Nuclear Power Plants, published in 1994, and reflects the considerable progress made since that time. The objective of this report is to provide a description of the elements to be addressed by the team responsible for developing and implementing a plant specific AMP at an NPP. Although it is intended primarily for use by NPP operators, utilities and their technical support organizations, it can also facilitate preparation of the relevant national regulatory requirements. Important event sequences that may lead to severe accidents shall be identified using a combination of probabilistic methods, deterministic methods and sound engineering judgement. These event sequences shall then be reviewed against a set of criteria aimed at determining which severe accidents should be addressed in the design. Potential design or procedural changes that could either reduce the likelihood of these selected events, or mitigate their consequences, should these selected events occur, shall be evaluated, and shall be implemented if reasonably practicable. Consideration shall be given to the plant full design capabilities, including the possible use of some systems (i.e. safety and non-safety systems) beyond their originally intended function and anticipated operating conditions, and the use of additional temporary systems to return the plant to a controlled state and/or to mitigate the consequences of a severe accident, provided that it can be shown that the systems are able to function in the environmental conditions to be expected. For multiunit plants, consideration shall be given to the use of available means and/or support from other units, provided that the safe operation of the other units is not compromised. Accident management

  9. Indian nuclear power programme with pressurised heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-09-01

    This compilation is a part of ongoing efforts by Nuclear Power Corporation (NPC) to enable persons: to visit the plants under construction and operation to see for themselves adoption of new and advanced techniques; to have contact with the realities of NPC`s facilities; to familiarize themselves with the regulatory aspects on radiological and environmental protection; and assess for themselves the extent of thrust and importance given to overall safety. figs., tabs.

  10. IAEA programme on water chemistry in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nechaev, A.F.; Skjoeldebrand, R.

    1988-01-01

    The paper reviews the past future efforts of the IAEA, directed to ensure optimal water chemistry regimes in nuclear power plants. Corrosion of structural materials resulting from the interaction of the coolant with the internal surfaces comprising the primary heat transfer and auxiliary circuits of water reactors, creates two main problems. The first is an operational problem resulting in an increase in the core pressure drop or overheating of the fuel elements induced by crud buildup on the fuel cladding. The second problem is related to occupational radiation exposures arising from contamination of out-of-flux surfaces by corrosion products activated in the reactor core. These are the problems of reliability and safety which together with economics could be considered as the 'three whales' of nuclear power. The main goals of international cooperation in reactor water chemistry are: (1) to create a balanced and well-grounded methodological basis for corresponding regulatory and engineering solutions on a national level and (2) to improve 'the models and predictive capability of specialists for conditions that are different from or perhaps just beyond the realm of experience'. Continuing efforts are required to guarantee the highest reliability and safety standards under favorable economic indices of nuclear power plants, and to obtain understanding of such significant potential for solving the remaining problems. (Nogami, K.)

  11. The Communities' research and development programme on decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This is the first progress report of the European Community's programme (1979-1983) of research on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants. It shows the status of the programme on 31 December 1980. The programme seeks to promote a number of research and development projects as well as the identification of guiding principles. The projects concern the following subjects: long-term integrity of buildings and systems; decontamination for decommissioning purposes; dismantling techniques; treatment of specific waste materials: steel, concrete and graphite; large transport containers for radioactive was produced in the dismantling of nuclear power plants; estimation of the quantities of radioactive wastes arising from decommissioning of nuclear power plants in the Community; influence of nuclear power plant design features on decommissioning

  12. Establishing the quality assurance programme for a nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides requirements, recommendations and illustrative examples for establishing the overall quality assurance programme, and its constituent programmes, for a nuclear power plant project. It also provides guidance on the planning and documenting of programme plans and actions that are intended to ensure the achievement of the appropriate quality throughout the design, procurement, manufacture, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of the nuclear power plant. The provisions of this Safety Guide are applicable to all organizations performing activities affecting the quality of items important to safety, such as designing, purchasing, fabricating, manufacturing, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, erecting, installing, testing, commissioning, operating, inspecting, maintaining, repairing, refuelling, modifying and decommissioning

  13. Indian experience in the training of manpower for a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, P.K.; Damodaran, K.K.; Sarma, M.S.R.; Wagadarikar, V.K.

    1977-01-01

    In India manpower training for the nuclear power programme started several years before the introduction of nuclear power plants. Early efforts were concentrated on developing manpower in basic sciences related to nuclear power. The setting up of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre was an important step in this direction. This enabled the first batch of engineers and scientists to be trained on design and operation in the programmes connected with research reactors and use of isotopes in industry, agriculture and medicine. The next step was to establish a Training School in the Centre where young university graduates could be given courses in their own and interconnected disciplines of nuclear sciences. An interdisciplinary approach with teaching by working scientists and engineers and attachment for short periods to the research laboratories is the framework of this training programme. At present about 3000 graduates from this Training School are involved in various capacities in India's nuclear power programme. With the commissioning of the first power reactors, it became necessary to train engineers, scientists and technicians for the operation and maintenance of such systems on a larger scale. For this purpose, a separate training centre at Rajasthan Atomic Power Project was set up. Models, simulators and courses with emphasis on heavy water reactors were introduced. In addition, a number of craftsmen for servicing equipment have also been trained in power station equipment maintenance. The paper describes the development of this programme in its present form. (author)

  14. International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes: Building and Sustaining Capacity. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the conference are to: • Review developments in the global status of HRD since the 2010 international conference; • Emphasize the role of human resources and capacity building programmes at the national and organizational level for achieving safe, secure and sustainable nuclear power programmes; • Discuss the importance of building competence in nuclear safety and security; • Provide a forum for information exchange on national, as well as international, policies and practices; • Share key elements and best practices related to the experience of Member States that are introducing, operating or expanding nuclear power programmes; • Highlight the practices and issues regarding HRD at the organizational and national level; • Highlight education and training programmes and practices; • Emphasize the role of nuclear knowledge management for knowledge transfer and HRD; and • Elaborate on the role and scope of various knowledge networks

  15. Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes. Summary of an International Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Currently, the world is witnessing a resurgence of interest in nuclear power. More than fifty Member States, with support from the IAEA, are considering the introduction of nuclear power, and human resource development is one of the crucial areas in terms of requests for support. The need for human resources in the nuclear sector is not only experienced by countries embarking on new nuclear power programmes, but also by countries with existing programmes that are considering expansion, as many current professionals are approaching retirement age and the number of newly trained staff is generally not sufficient to meet the potential demand. The IAEA conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes was held from 14 to 18 March 2010 in Abu Dhabi, hosted by the Government of the United Arab Emirates. This conference was organized to address work force issues faced by countries which are embarking on new nuclear power programmes, expanding current programmes or planning to supply nuclear technology to other countries. The situation is different for each country; some need to develop their own local expertise, while others need to scale up existing educational and training programmes to increase the number of professionals. The purpose of this conference was to bring together Member States to help formulate country specific policies on human resource development, education, training and knowledge management to help support each country's nuclear power programme. In addition, the IAEA can facilitate better use of other educational opportunities, including research reactors and development of training facilities. These proceedings highlight the key findings and recommendations of the meeting and the conclusions of the chairperson. All papers presented and discussed during the meeting are included on the attached CD-ROM. To access the papers, click on 'Index' on the CD-ROM.

  16. Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes. Summary of an International Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-10-15

    Currently, the world is witnessing a resurgence of interest in nuclear power. More than fifty Member States, with support from the IAEA, are considering the introduction of nuclear power, and human resource development is one of the crucial areas in terms of requests for support. The need for human resources in the nuclear sector is not only experienced by countries embarking on new nuclear power programmes, but also by countries with existing programmes that are considering expansion, as many current professionals are approaching retirement age and the number of newly trained staff is generally not sufficient to meet the potential demand. The IAEA conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes was held from 14 to 18 March 2010 in Abu Dhabi, hosted by the Government of the United Arab Emirates. This conference was organized to address work force issues faced by countries which are embarking on new nuclear power programmes, expanding current programmes or planning to supply nuclear technology to other countries. The situation is different for each country; some need to develop their own local expertise, while others need to scale up existing educational and training programmes to increase the number of professionals. The purpose of this conference was to bring together Member States to help formulate country specific policies on human resource development, education, training and knowledge management to help support each country's nuclear power programme. In addition, the IAEA can facilitate better use of other educational opportunities, including research reactors and development of training facilities. These proceedings highlight the key findings and recommendations of the meeting and the conclusions of the chairperson. All papers presented and discussed during the meeting are included on the attached CD-ROM. To access the papers, click on 'Index' on the CD-ROM.

  17. The nuclear power safety programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1981-01-01

    The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the field of nuclear power safety is growing. In the period since the Three Mile Island accident, a significant expansion in its nuclear safety programme has taken place. To assure an acceptable safety level world-wide, new emphasis is being placed on the major effort to establish and foster the use of a comprehensive set of internationally agreed safety standards for nuclear power plants. New initiatives are in progress to intensify international co-operative safety efforts through the exchange of information on safety-related operating occurrences, and through a more open sharing of safety research results. Emergency accident assistance lends itself to international co-operation and steps are being taken to establish an emergency assistance programme so the Agency can aid in co-ordinating a timely response to provide, at short notice, help and advice in case of a nuclear power accident. There has been some strengthening of those advisory services which involve missions of international experts primarily to countries with less developed nuclear power programmes, and in conjunction with the Technical Assistance Programme there is a co-ordinated programme for developing countries, involving safety training courses and assistance aimed at promoting an effective national regulatory programme in all countries using nuclear power. This paper discusses the major features of the IAEA activities in nuclear power plant safety. An understanding of the programme and its limitations is essential to its more effective use. Additional initiatives may still be proposed, but the possibilities for international and regional co-operation to assure an adequate level of safety world-wide already exist. (author)

  18. Human Resources Development for Rooppur Nuclear Power Programme in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Md. Kabir

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: • Bangladesh faces a huge challenge in implementing the Rooppur NPP and its total nuclear power; • A preliminary assessment has been chalked out a plan to find out methods that can be applied to find out our gaps and then fill them up; • Bangladesh seeks cooperation from the Russian Federation in the form assistance package like National training courses, Seminar/Workshop, Expert Mission/Review and other form of bilateral arrangements in establishing infrastructure for “Rooppur NPP” building;

  19. Nuclear power plants seismic review programme in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Cabanero, J.G.; Jimenez Juan, A.

    1995-01-01

    This presentation deals with seismic design and seismic reevaluation of Spanish operating nuclear power plants. The Spanish NPPs owners Probabilistic seismic hazard study requires an independent and deep review of methodology, modelling techniques, data management and method of eliciting in order to make decision on its acceptability. It reflects the opinion of only one expert tem and it would be necessary to involve more expert opinions to consider the uncertainties. It is proposed to evaluate the probabilistic seismic hazard study and the seismic categorisation

  20. Consideration of the legal system required for achievement of current nuclear power plant construction programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellon Fernandez, E.; Forum Atomico Espanol, Madrid)

    1976-01-01

    The extensive nuclear power plant construction programmes currently in progress in western countries require updating of the legislation in force in this field, especially as regards the following: acquisition of the sites necessary by means of a national planning programme of available sites; simplification of formalities concerning issuance of administrative licenses; revision of the principle of absolute and exclusive liability of the nuclear operator which forms the basis of the third party liability system for nuclear damage; radioactive waste management and decommissioning of nuclear plants. Furthermore, this new legislation should be harmonized between the different countries concerned. (N.E.A.) [fr

  1. Managing Environmental Impact Assessment for Construction and Operation in New Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This publication describes the environmental impact assessment (EIA) process, its utilization and the necessary infrastructure for such a process in order to provide a holistic approach for EIA in new nuclear power programmes. It also emphasizes the environmental aspects unique to a nuclear power programme, assuming that a State embarking on such a programme already has an environmental regulatory framework for the industrial projects in place. This publication also describes the phased implementation of the EIA programme in accordance with the phases described in IAEA Nuclear Energy Series No. NG-G-3.1. This publication is addressed to senior managers, project managers or coordinators and technical specialists of government authorities and agencies, including regulatory bodies, operating organizations and supporting industries, and other organizations involved in environmental issues

  2. Programme of Preparatory Activities on Launching First Nuclear Power Plant in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakic, I.; Lebegner, J.; Perovic, N.

    2010-01-01

    New Croatian energy policy recognizes nuclear energy as solution for rising needs for energy and, thus, opens the possibility to construct first nuclear power plant in Croatia. Within this frame, the Croatian government is developing an implementation programme according to this policy and preparing basis for making decision about construction of nuclear power plant. Croatian parliament is responsible for this decision which is expected by the end of 2012. During this period, stake holders in this project (government, regulatory body and future operator of the plant) have to complete activities of preparatory phase of Croatian Nuclear Energy Programme (CRONEP) project according to methodology recommended by IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). This paper defines these activities and estimate the costs of first, preparatory phase based on previous experience of other countries which finished the phase successfully. Also, it describes the potential role of Croatian utility as stake holder due to its experience as co-owner of Nuclear power plant Krsko.(author).

  3. The Community's research and development programme on decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The programme, adopted by the Council of the European Communities, seeks to promote a number of research and development projects as well as the identification of guiding principles. The projects concern the following subjects: long-term integrity of buildings and systems; decontaminations for decommissioning purposes; dismantling techniques; treatment of specific waste materials (steel, concrete and graphite); large transport containers for radioactive waste arising from decommissioning of nuclear power plants in the Community; and influence of nuclear power plant design features on decommissioning

  4. Pressurised water reactor. A critique of the Government's nuclear power programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flood, M; Chudleigh, R; Conroy, C

    1981-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: energy forecasts - their decline and fall (Department of Energy; electricity supply industry; the writing on the wall); nuclear economics - how the dream dissolved (Britain's programme - off to a bad start; the government's programme -a catastrophe about to be repeated; the cost of a British PWR; a new choice - nuclear power versus insulation); PWR safety - the unresolvable problem (one in a million (query); fundamental weaknesses; consequences of an accident; unresolved safety problems; the select committee's findings); a new energy strategy - catering for our needs (energy efficiency; district heating/combined heat and power; solar heating; liquid fuels; the international context); conclusions.

  5. Developing a Science and Technology Centre for Supporting the Launching of a Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawy, I.

    2013-01-01

    The present investigation aims at developing a science and technology centre for supporting the launching of a nuclear power [NP] programme in a developing country with a relatively high economic growth rate. The development approach is based on enhancing the roles and functions of the proposed centre with respect to the main pillars that would have effect on the safe, secure and peaceful uses of the nuclear energy -particularly- in the field of electricity generation and sea-water desalination. The study underlines the importance of incorporating advanced research and development work, concepts and services provided by the proposed centre to the NP programme, to the regulatory systems of the concerned State and to the national nuclear industry in the fields of nuclear safety, radiation safety, nuclear safeguards, nuclear security and other related scientific and technical fields including human resources and nuclear knowledge management.

  6. The French nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    France has a civil nuclear power generation programme second only to the USA with 49 nuclear units in operation and 13 under construction. The units in service are described. These include 33 PWR 900 MW and 9 PWR 1300 MW units. The electricity consumption and generation in France is illustrated. The absence of a powerful anti-nuclear lobby and two main technical options have contributed to the success of the French nuclear programme. These are the PWR design and the plant standardization policy which allows the setting up of an effective industrial complex (eg for analysis of operating conditions and of safety and reliability information). The programme and the reasons for its success are reviewed. Research programmes and future plans are also discussed. (UK)

  7. Occupational exposures at nuclear power plants. Twelfth annual report of the Isoe programme, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) was created by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency in 1992 to promote and co-ordinate international co-operative undertakings in the area of worker protection at nuclear power plants. The ISOE Programme provides experts in occupational radiation protection with a forum for communication and exchange of experience. The ISOE databases enable the analysis of occupational exposure data from the 465 commercial nuclear power plants participating in the Programme (representing some 90 per cent of the world's total operating commercial reactors). The Twelfth Annual Report of the ISOE Programme summarises achievements made during 2002 and compares annual occupational exposure data. Principal developments in ISOE participating countries are also described. (author)

  8. SAFIR2014. The Finnish Research Programme on Nuclear Power Plant Safety 2011-2014. Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simola, K. [ed.

    2013-02-15

    The Finnish Nuclear Power Plant Safety Research Programme 2011-2014, SAFIR2014, is a 4-year publicly funded national technical and scientific research programme on the safety of nuclear power plants. The programme is funded by the State Nuclear Waste Management Fund (VYR), as well as other key organisations operating in the area of nuclear energy. The programme provides the necessary conditions for retaining knowledge needed for ensuring the continuance of safe use of nuclear power, for developing new know-how and for participation in international co-operation. The SAFIR2014 Steering Group, responsible of the strategic alignements of the programme, consists of representatives of the Finnish Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Ministry of Employment and the Economy (MEE), Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO), Fortum Power and Heat Oy (Fortum), Fennovoima Oy, Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT), Aalto University (Aalto), Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation (Tekes), Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (TTL) and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM). The research programme is divided into nine areas: Man, organisation and society, Automation and control room, Fuel research and reactor analysis, Thermal hydraulics, Severe accidents, Structural safety of reactor circuits, Construction safety, Probabilistic risk analysis (PRA), and Development of research infrastructure. A reference group is assigned to each of these areas to respond for the strategic planning and to supervise the projects in its respective field. Research projects are selected annually based on a public call for proposals. Most of the projects are planned for the entire duration of the programme, but there can also be shorter one- or two-year projects. The annual volume of the SAFIR2014 programme in 2011-2012 has been 9,5-9,9 M euro. Main funding organisations were the State Nuclear Waste Management Fund (VYR) with over 5 M euro and

  9. SAFIR2014. The Finnish Research Programme on Nuclear Power Plant Safety 2011-2014. Interim Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simola, K.

    2013-02-01

    The Finnish Nuclear Power Plant Safety Research Programme 2011-2014, SAFIR2014, is a 4-year publicly funded national technical and scientific research programme on the safety of nuclear power plants. The programme is funded by the State Nuclear Waste Management Fund (VYR), as well as other key organisations operating in the area of nuclear energy. The programme provides the necessary conditions for retaining knowledge needed for ensuring the continuance of safe use of nuclear power, for developing new know-how and for participation in international co-operation. The SAFIR2014 Steering Group, responsible of the strategic alignements of the programme, consists of representatives of the Finnish Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Ministry of Employment and the Economy (MEE), Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO), Fortum Power and Heat Oy (Fortum), Fennovoima Oy, Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT), Aalto University (Aalto), Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation (Tekes), Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (TTL) and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM). The research programme is divided into nine areas: Man, organisation and society, Automation and control room, Fuel research and reactor analysis, Thermal hydraulics, Severe accidents, Structural safety of reactor circuits, Construction safety, Probabilistic risk analysis (PRA), and Development of research infrastructure. A reference group is assigned to each of these areas to respond for the strategic planning and to supervise the projects in its respective field. Research projects are selected annually based on a public call for proposals. Most of the projects are planned for the entire duration of the programme, but there can also be shorter one- or two-year projects. The annual volume of the SAFIR2014 programme in 2011-2012 has been 9,5-9,9 M euro. Main funding organisations were the State Nuclear Waste Management Fund (VYR) with over 5 M euro and

  10. Operational safety review programmes for nuclear power plants. Guidelines for assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA has been offering the Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme to provide advice and assistance to Member States in enhancing the operational safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Simultaneously, the IAEA has encouraged self-assessment and review by Member States of their own nuclear power plants to continuously improve nuclear safety. Currently, some utilities have been implementing safety review programmes to independently review their own plants. Corporate or national operational safety review programmes may be compliance or performance based. Successful utilities have found that both techniques are necessary to provide assurance that (i) as a minimum the NPP meets specific corporate and legal requirements and (ii) management at the NPP is encouraged to pursue continuous improvement principles. These programmes can bring nuclear safety benefits to the plants and utilities. The IAEA has conducted two pilot missions to assess the effectiveness of the operational review programme. Based on these missions and on the experience gained during OSART missions, this document has been developed to provide guidance on and broaden national/corporate safety review programmes in Member States, and to assist in maximizing their benefits. These guidelines are intended primarily for the IAEA team to conduct assessment of a national/corporate safety review programme. However, this report may also be used by a country or utility to establish its own national/corporate safety review programme. The guidelines may likewise be used for self-assessment or for establishing a baseline when benchmarking other safety review programmes. This report consists of four parts. Section 2 addresses the planning and preparation of an IAEA assessment mission and Sections 3 and 4 deal with specific guidelines for conducting the assessment mission itself

  11. Manpower requirements for nuclear power programmes in nations of intermediate capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantarell, I.; Cerrolaza, J.A.; Llado, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A study is made of the manpower required for initiating and carrying out a nuclear power programme in countries which have not developed their own nuclear technology but where the technical and economic level is such to permit a substantial input from local industry. The discussion is based on Spanish experience. The three basic elements in a nuclear programme are taken to be the operating company, the regulating authority and the engineering firm involved. The role of each of these is briefly considered and the manpower requirements during the design, construction and operational phases of a power station are evaluated. A short account is also given of the manpower requirements of other enterprises such as those involved in the civil engineering, the assembly and construction control. The variations in the labour force are described with the aim of deriving estimates of the number of people involved in the development of a nuclear power programme as a function of time: actual numbers are given for the case of the Spanish national energy plan. A brief description is given of the various courses on nuclear science and engineering provided in Spain and the requirements laid down by the regulations. A short account is given of Spanish nuclear development, with emphasis on the work carried out by the Nuclear Energy Board, not only as a research organization but also in its promotional and training capacities and as a source of personnel for industry. Finally, some comments are made on the possibilities opened up by international co-operation. (author)

  12. UK experience of planning the nuclear contribution to the UK power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catchpole, S.; Jenkin, F.P.

    1977-01-01

    The paper outlines U.K. experience in planning nuclear programmes. It examines the factors which have determined the size of such programmes together with those factors which have influenced their implementation. The paper also discusses the role which the utility has played in the deployment of nuclear power in the U.K. At present, nuclear energy can only be utilised on a large scale via the electricity route and the forecasting of electricity demand is therefore a key element in determining the size of the nuclear programme. Other important issues which affect the nuclear contribution are: national fuel policies, discontinuities in price and availability of imported fossil fuels, plant capital costs, fuel price relativities, plant siting, rate of introduction of new nuclear systems, manufacturer's capability, public attitudes towards nuclear power and financing. These issues are dealt with in some detail including their relative importance in the U.K. The paper also discusses the contribution of the various nuclear bodies in the U.K. in securing the implementation of the nuclear programmes. From the inception of nuclear power in the U.K., it has been recognised that a major utility has a central role to play not only in commercial operation but also in the procurement of plant and materials. As explained in the paper this ''informed buyer'' approach, which is being increasingly adopted by other major utilities, calls for an organisation and technical infrastructure far more complex than is the case for fossil plants. The requirements of safety, which is unambiguously the responsibility of the utility, and of high availability of plant operation demand a rigorous approach to design, quality assurance, project management, construction and operation. To this must be added sound research and development and staff training facilities. The paper explains how experience in these vital areas has been built up

  13. Indian experience in the training of manpower for nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, P.K.; Damodaran, K.K.; Sarma, M.S.R.; Wagadarikar, V.K.

    1977-01-01

    In India manpower training for the nuclear power programme started several years before the introduction of nuclear power plants. Early efforts were concentrated on developing manpower in basic sciences related to nuclear power; for example, nuclear physics, chemistry, metallurgy of nuclear materials, aspects of chemical engineering etc. The setting up of the research centre viz. Atomic Energy Establishment Trombay, now named the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, was an important step in this direction. A programme of design and construction of research reactors and its utilization formed the backbone of manpower development. This enabled the first batch of engineers and scientists to be trained on the design and operation in the programmes connected with research reactors and use of isotopes in industry, agriculture and medicine. The next step was to establish a Training School in the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre in which fresh graduates from the Universities could be given courses both in their own disciplines and in other inter-connected disciplines of nuclear sciences. About 200 such graduates are being trained every year since 1957. An inter-disciplinary approach with teaching by working scientists and engineers and the attachment for short periods to the research laboratories is the framework of this training programme. At present about 3000 graduates from this Training School are involved in various capacities in India's nuclear power programme. With the commissioning of the first power reactors, it became necessary to conceive of training engineers, scientists and technicians, particularly for operation and maintenance of such systems on a larger scale. For this purpose, a separate training institute at Rajasthan Atomic Power Project near Rana Pratapsagar was set up. Models, simulators and courses, particularly emphasizing the heavy water system of reactors was introduced. In addition, a number of craftsmen for servicing equipment have also been trained as

  14. India's nuclear energy programme and future power need

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Critics of the recently negotiated 123 Nuclear Agreement between India and the United States of America often cite its retrograde effects on India's longstanding policy of non-alignment in foreign relations. The major part of this article will, therefore, is devoted to various aspects of DAE's performance, areas and problems that need more attention, their future plan on stepping up the production of nuclear energy by a big factor beyond their indigenous reach, and the consequent imperative and compulsion of opening the doors to the international market for bulk purchases. India's access to the international market for nuclear energy was barred because of our refusal to sign the nuclear non-proliferation treaty (NPT). Hence, when George Bush, ex-President of U.S.A., offered to sign a bilateral treaty with India, opening the door for nuclear and other strategic co-operation, the offer was welcome by the DAE and the Government of India with open arms. However, obligations under the rules of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), of which India is a member, still required applying to the Body for their approval so that India could approach the Consortium of nuclear supplier countries for their agreement to do business with India without raising any hindrance arising from NPT and Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT)

  15. The economics of nuclear power programmes in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    In Chapter 1 an overview of the technology involved in the operation of various nuclear reactor types, both thermal and fast breeder, is provided, and the operations that comprise the alternative nuclear fuel cycles examined. Chapter 2 traces the historical development of the uranium market and highlights the effect that institutional arrangements such as the formation of a cartel has had on the market price of uranium. The prospects for increased uranium exploration activity and likely demand scenarios are then reviewed. In Chapter 3 the economic viability of reprocessing 'spent' nuclear fuel in the UK is analysed within the context of the decision to proceed with the construction of the thermal-oxide reprocessing plant (THORP) at Windscale in Cumbria. The various radioactive waste substances emanating from nuclear fuel-cycle operations undertaken in the UK are described in Chapter 4 and the prospects for their safe management and disposal examined. Chapter 5 provides an economic appraisal of both coal and nuclear-fuelled electricity generating plant based on the criterion of social cost. The results are used as the data-input for an appraisal of the investment in generating plant that will be required in the UK to supply four different electricity demand scenarios. The conclusions are discussed in Chapter 6. (author)

  16. The French nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feger, M.

    1990-01-01

    EDF has long been interested in the use of nuclear energy for thermal power generation. After a period of apprenticeship and experiments, EDF launched a major PWR plant programme so as to reduce France's energy dependence and master generation costs. This programme, based on standardization, has achieved the desired results. It must now be adapted to suit the needs of the 21st century. For this programme, all those involved (Governmental authorities, EDF, manufacturers) were mobilized to an unprecedented extent and rigorous working methods were imposed. Experience feedback has been used to make improvements both to the installations themselves and to procedures. Results have proved satisfactory as regards nuclear safety but vigilance must be maintained. Public opinion on nuclear power is reserved we are sentenced to achieving a 'fault-free' track record, all the while mastering costs, so as to ensure the continuing use of nuclear energy. (author)

  17. The French nuclear programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feger, M [Ecole Nationale Superieure d' Electrotechnique de Grenoble, Institute National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires (Saclay), Gif-sur-Yvette, Electricite de France (France)

    1990-06-01

    EDF has long been interested in the use of nuclear energy for thermal power generation. After a period of apprenticeship and experiments, EDF launched a major PWR plant programme so as to reduce France's energy dependence and master generation costs. This programme, based on standardization, has achieved the desired results. It must now be adapted to suit the needs of the 21st century. For this programme, all those involved (Governmental authorities, EDF, manufacturers) were mobilized to an unprecedented extent and rigorous working methods were imposed. Experience feedback has been used to make improvements both to the installations themselves and to procedures. Results have proved satisfactory as regards nuclear safety but vigilance must be maintained. Public opinion on nuclear power is reserved we are sentenced to achieving a 'fault-free' track record, all the while mastering costs, so as to ensure the continuing use of nuclear energy. (author)

  18. Building Technical Capability for the Development of Nuclear Power Programme: Uganda's Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagenu, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Republic of Uganda is a landlocked country in East Africa with a population of about 33 million. It lies along the equator and is bordered on the east by Kenya, north by Sudan, west by the Democratic Republic of the Congo, southwest by Rwanda, and south by Tanzania. Uganda has continued to suffer power shortage, mainly due to slow investment in the power sector as well as unreliable rainfall. To supplement the power supply, it has contracted independent power producers to supply electricity from fossil fuels. The Thermal power is expensive and contributes to emission of large amount of carbon dioxide - a major greenhouse gas causing global warming. The total estimated electricity generation potential is in the long term will be about 5300MW. In view of the increasingly energy needs and urgent environmental concerns related to power production using fossil fuels, the government recognizes that nuclear technology will play important role in future sustainable energy systems. The Government is therefore considering nuclear energy as part of the future energy mix. However, Uganda is not yet having the capacity to build a nuclear power plant, but is making earnest efforts to prepare for nuclear power programme. These include putting in place appropriate legislation and capacity building in nuclear power technology, implementing human resources development plan, which involves recruiting fresh graduate and sending them abroad for further studies in nuclear science and technology for power generation and regulations, and infrastructure requirement.

  19. The power of the will and the French nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boureille, P.

    2010-01-01

    Using certain key episodes in the development of the French nuclear deterrent as examples, the author illustrates the extent to which boldness of decision-making, combined with far-thinking and resolute vision, is the foundation of any international defence policy built for the long term. (author)

  20. Enabling legislation and regulatory determinations for a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha-Vinh, Phuong

    1975-01-01

    Broad definition of the scope of enabling legislation, identification of branches of laws involved in the licensing and regulatory control, overview of some typical licensing practices and provisions, some specific legislative or regulatory requirements including financial security to over nuclear liability. (HP) [de

  1. The discharge of radioactive effluents from the nuclear power programme into western waters of Great Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allday, C.

    1977-01-01

    A brief account is presented of the British nuclear power programme and the types of radioactive effluent that arise from the power stations and from the Windscale reprocessing plant. Routes by which these effluents could affect human populations, and radiation dose limits which have been laid down, are discussed. The discharge of permitted amounts of activity into western coastal waters of Great Britain, and the requirements for monitoring the discharges, are described. (U.K.)

  2. Realizing vision of Dr. Homi Bhabha - first stage of nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhardwaj, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Dr. Homi Bhabha had a vision to harness nuclear energy for peaceful uses of mankind. Considering typical nuclear resources in the country, Dr Bhabha conceptualized the three stage nuclear power programme and gave a road map for its implementation. The robustness of the vision is such that the programme has not undergone a change in last five decades. The first stage of the three-stage programme, based on natural uranium fuelled Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) has been precursor to the nuclear power programme in India. This paper describes the developments in the last five decades. The establishment of research laboratories and reactors, training school for the manpower needs, industrial infrastructure and establishment of regulatory framework are briefly described. Setting up of first nuclear power reactor in the country as turnkey project and experience on operation of these reactors in India are discussed. The learning phase consisting of setting up of first PHWR in technical collaboration with Canada and design of 220 MWe PHWRs for MAPS is described. The safety features consistent with development of nuclear power globally were incorporated in Narora design and this became a standardized 220 MWe reactor of which many PHWRs of 220 MWe were set up. The experiences with operation of these small size reactors leading to internationally best operational experience in the year 2002 are discussed. The efforts of plant life extension, in-core maintenance jobs and other renovation and modernization jobs are discussed. The increase in unit size of 540 MWe, of which two reactors have been already set up, is explained in detail. The economies of scale demanded increase in the unit size and design of 700 MWe PHWR has been established and the salient features of this design are also discussed in detail. Eight reactors of 700 MWe each would complete the first stage of about 10,000 MWe PHWR programme and plans for setting up of these reactors are discussed

  3. The TACIS Nuclear Programme: Assistance in Upgrading Russian Nuclear Power Stations - An Overview of the Individual Projects in the Internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieth, Michel; Schoels, Hubert

    2006-01-01

    The European Union' TACIS1 programme has been established for the New Independent States (NIS), among them in the Russian Federation since 1991. One priority of TACIS funding is Nuclear Safety. The European Commission has made available a total of 944 Million Euros for nuclear safety programmes covering the period 1991-2003. The TACIS nuclear safety programme is devoted to the improvement of the safety of Soviet designed nuclear installations in providing technology and safety culture transfer. JRC is carrying out works in the following areas: On-Site Assistance for TACIS operating Nuclear Power Plants; Design Safety and Dissemination of TACIS results; Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement for VVER; Regulatory Assistance; Industrial Waste Management; Nuclear Safeguards; All TACIS projects, dealing with these areas of activity are now available in so called Project Description Sheets (PDS) or Project Results Sheets (PRS) in the Internet for everybody. JRC has created in the Internet an easy to open and to browse database which contains the result of works in relation to the above mentioned nuclear activities. This presentation gives an on-line overview of the app. 430 projects which have been implemented so far since the outset of the TACIS Nuclear Programme in the Russian Federation, which is representative to the other CIS countries, benefiting from the TACIS. The presentation will mainly consist of an on-line-demonstration of the TACIS Nuclear WEB Page, created by JRC. (authors)

  4. The regulatory evaluation of radiation protection training programmes at Canadian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legare, M.; Tennant, D.

    1996-01-01

    The responsibility for providing the necessary assurance that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment is vested with the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). This responsibility has led the Operator Certification Division of the AECB to develop methods to obtain assurance that nuclear power plant operations personnel are well trained and adequately competent to perform their duties. The features of the AECB approach to evaluation of training programmes based on a systematic approach to training is described. An overview of the Canadian nuclear power plants' radiation protection qualification levels is given. The developing evaluation process is contributing to the improvement of licensee radiation protection training programmes. This is making possible the transfer of part of the responsibility for licensed personnel radiation protection qualification assessment to the licensees, thus enabling a reduction in the operator certification division formal qualification activities. (author)

  5. RATU Nuclear power plant structural safety research programme 1990-1994. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintamaa, R.; Sarkimo, M.

    1995-12-01

    The major part of nuclear energy research in Finland has been organized as five-year nationally coordinated research programmes. The research programme on the Nuclear Power Plant Structural Safety was carried out during the period from 1990 to 1994. The total volume was about 76 person-years and the expenditure about 49 million FIM. Studies on the structural materials in nuclear power plants created the experimental data and background information necessary for the structural integrity assessments of mechanical components. The research was carried out by developing experimental fracture mechanics methods including statistical analysis methods of material property data, and by studying material ageing and, in particular, mechanisms of material deterioration due to neutron irradiation, corrosion and water chemistry. Besides material studies, new testing methods and sensors for the measurement of loading and water chemistry parameters have been developed

  6. SAFIR. The Finnish research programme on nuclear power plant safety 2003-2006. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska, E.

    2006-12-01

    Major part of Finnish public research on nuclear power plant safety during the years 2003-2006 has been carried out in the SAFIR programme. The programme has been administrated by the steering group that was nominated by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM). The steering group of SAFIR has consisted of representatives from Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO), Fortum Power and Heat Oy, Fortum Nuclear Services Oy (Fortum), Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation (Tekes), Helsinki University of Technology (TKK) and Lappeenranta University of Technology (LTY). The key research areas of SAFIR have been (1) reactor fuel and core, (2) reactor circuit and structural safety, (3) containment and process safety functions, that was divided in 2005 into (3a) thermal hydraulics and (3b) severe accidents, (4) automation, control room and IT, (5) organisations and safety management and (6) risk-informed safety management. The research programme has included annually from 20 up to 24 research projects, whose volume has varied from a few person months to several person years. The total volume of the programme during the four year period 2003-2006 has been 19.7 million euros and 148 person years. The research in the programme has been carried out primarily by Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). Other research units responsible for the projects include Lappeenranta University of Technology, Fortum Nuclear Services Oy, Helsinki University of Technology and RAMSE Consulting Oy. In addition, there have been a few minor subcontractors in some projects. The programme management structure has consisted of the steering group, a reference group in each of the seven research areas and a number of ad hoc groups in the various research areas. This report gives a short summary of the results of the SAFIR programme for the period January 2003 - November

  7. Financial aspects of nuclear power programmes from the experience of the Foratom Member Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riverola Pelayo, R.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews the financial aspects of the nuclear power programme from the experience of the Foratom Member countries. To appreciate the magnitude of the financial requirement the investments for the nuclear programme over the period 1976-85 are related to gross national product and gross capital formation. An examination is made of the sources and systems of financing for nuclear power stations and for all stages of the fuel cycle. The importance of interest during construction of the nuclear plant is considered in detail as, with the lengthening of construction times, this has now become a major factor in the total cost of a nuclear station. The possible accounting conventions under which interest during construction can be treated are examined and a study is made of the investment profile, the cost of money and the effect of inflation. The fiscal aspects of nuclear finance are studied with reference to national regulations and amortization rules. The amortization of nuclear installations also presents certain problems associated with their dismantling once their useful life is over, and this raises the question of the need to create a reserve fund which can commence with the startup of the power plant. For the fuel cycle a distinction can be made between areas of high (economic) risk such as in the prospecting and mining of uranium and the reprocessing of irradiated fuel, and those areas of normal risk such as the manufacture of fuel elements. The difficulties of obtaining credit for the first phase should be considered. (author)

  8. Financial aspects of nuclear power programmes from the experience of the FORATOM member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riverola-Pelayo, R.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews the financial aspects of nuclear power programme from the experience of the FORATOM member countries. To appreciate the magnitude of the financial requirement, the investments for the nuclear programme over the period 1976-85 are related to gross national product and gross capital formation. An examination is made of the sources and systems of financing for nuclear power stations and for all stages of the fuel cycle. The importance of interest during construction of nuclear plant is considered in detail as, with the lengthening of construction times, this has now become a major factor in the total cost of a nuclear station. The possible accounting conventions under which interest during construction can be treated are examined and a study is made of the investment profile, the cost of money and the effect of inflation. The fiscal aspects of nuclear finance are studied with reference to national regulations and amortization rules. The amortization of nuclear installations also presents certain problems associated with their dismantling once their useful life is over and this raises the question of the need to create a reserve fund which can commence with the startup of the power plant. For the fuel cycle, a distinction can be made between phases of high (economic) risk such as in the prospection and mining of uranium and the reprocessing of irradiated fuel, and those areas of normal risk such as the manufacture of fuel elements. The difficulties of obtaining credit for the first phase should be considered

  9. Research programme on the conditioning of nuclear power waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultgren, Aa.

    1981-01-01

    Main parts of this programme have included the use of zeolites and titanates to improve reactor waste treatment, the fractionation of high level reprocessing waste by extraction, and a study of liquid partition chromotographic technique for the removal of impurities from reactor cooling circuits. Preparation of large crystal zeolites has been continued and refined. For titanate production new routes are tried to produce material of a form suitable for use in a sorption process. The possibility of lithium-7 recovery from spent PWR resins in the elution process is under study. Final products from different routes of heat treatment of loaded zeolites and titanates are characterized and compared. In parallell to this work a full-scale system is under study including transport, system design, integrated process flowsheets and cost estimates. The aim is to have basis early in 1982 to decide on the merits of a plant at the planned repository for low and medium level waste (SFR), to be commissioned around 1990. In the high level waste fractionation project, a demonstration of the developed process has been performed on a fission product solution from the reprocessing of low burn-up fuel. Disregarding some equipment malfunction the design goal of better than 99.99 % actinide removal from the high level waste waste solution was reached. The basic chemistry of the process seems to be quite tolerant against reasonable flow rate deviations in the extraction cycles. Also the concluding sorption step on mordenite-titanate worked quite well. The small scale experiments on liquid partition chromatographic techniques have included studies of the capacity of various carrier materials treated with NH 4 DEHP or Aliquat-336 to sorb radioactive impurities from reactor water, both in the laboratory and at the Ringhals-1 BWR. (author)

  10. Research and development efforts in the implementation of nuclear power programme in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhaemi, T.

    1986-04-01

    Research and development efforts in the implementation of nuclear power programme in Indonesia are presented. According to Indonesia Law, the National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) is an official body which is reponsible for all aspects of nuclear development. In implementing the nuclear power, BATAN together with the State Electricity Corporation (PLN) have pioneered the introduction of nuclear power plant in Indonesia by carrying out various activities, studies, seminars, workshops and report writings. A nuclear power planning study was carried out jointly with the International Atomic Energy Agency. The feasibility studies were also carried out by NIRA, an Italian consultant firm in cooperation with BATAN and PLN. To improve research and development, BATAN has established 5 research nuclear centres which function as centres of basic and applied research, isotope and radiation application, standardization and calibration and uranium exploration. Nowadays BATAN is constructing a sophisticated and multidisciplinary complex at Serpong near Jakarta. It is hoped that the participation of the national industry can be synchronized to the construction of the first nuclear power in Indonesia. To endorse the movement towards the industrial and technological future, the National Centre for Research, Science and Technology (known as PUSPITEK) has been established. There will be 12 different laboratories providing facilities for research and development of all aspects of technology. For training manpower, BATAN has established the Education and Training Centre (PUSDIKLAT). BATAN has also collaborated with universities, such as Gadjahmada University in Yogyakarta, in establishing Nuclear Engineering Division in the School of Engineering. 6 refs, 3 figs

  11. Five years of partnership programme between German and East European nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, P.

    1995-01-01

    In a jointly adopted communique in August 1992 the regulations governing the partnerships were laid down. The following principles are given priority: bilateral exchange of operating experience on the basis of equal partnership; the knowledge gained from the exchange of experience is used to improve the operation and safety of the respective partner plant; the partnership programme is free from commercial interests and does not include transfer of funds. Since the establishment of the first partnership relations (Biblis) with an east european nuclear power plant (Balakowo) late in April 1990, a total of 126 reciprocal visits was paid, 82 of which to German nuclear power plants. The balance of the efforts made by German nuclear power plant operators to integrate east european nuclear plant operators can be considered positive. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Nuclear power programmes and medium term projections in the OECD area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miida, J.; Haeussermann, W.; Mankin, S.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes nuclear power growth forecasts up to 1985 on an individual country basis for the OECD area, based on present nuclear programmes. For the period between 1985 and the year 2000, no individual countries' estimates are given. The projections for this period are subdivided into three main areas: OECD Europe, North America and OECD Pacific Region. These projections are derived from the presently prevailing estimates concerning total energy growth, the increasing share of electricity requirements in total energy requirements and the growth of the nuclear share in electrical installed capacity. The basic assumptions are discussed and the combination of various possibilities results in upper and lower growth limits, which should include the most likely development. An attempt is also made to describe probable scenarios of nuclear reactor strategies, taking into account developments under way in the OECD area. Finally, the factors liable to influence nuclear power growth in a positive or negative way are briefly analysed

  13. Planning and development of nuclear power programmes in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haunschild, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the peaceful utilization of nuclear science and technology in the Federal Republic of Germany started in 1955. It concentrated on the development of nuclear energy with its important potential for energy supply, in order to cover the growing energy demand of the recovering economy, and on the application of nuclear radiation and radioactive isotopes in various areas of science and technology such as biology, medicine, chemistry, physics, materials research and development. From the beginning, the nuclear energy programme was a joint undertaking of government, industry and science. To achieve the necessary impetus and to supplement the activities of industry and universities, several nuclear research centres, in particular at Juelich and Karlsruhe, were founded. This comprehensive approach was the basis for the following rapid development of nuclear technology, as well as for its competitive structure and its safety record. With regard to nuclear energy utilization for electricity generation, heat supply, and ship propulsion a broad range of reactor concepts such as light- and heavy-water reactors, high-temperature reactors, and fast-breeder reactors was examined. Today, nuclear energy meets about 17% of the country's electricity demand. Fifteen nuclear power plants with a capacity of about 10,000 MW(e) are in operation; 11 plants with a total capacity of about 12,000 MW(e) are under construction, and the construction of another 10 plants is definitely planned. Activities in uranium enrichment, fuel element fabrication, and reprocessing have reached the industrial stage. The paper indicates possible future trends of the nuclear programme. The successful development of a national nuclear energy programme goes in parallel with broad international co-operation. Therefore the efforts to re-establish a stable system for co-operation in nuclear commerce and technology, based on international safeguards, should be strengthened

  14. The development and implementation of a public information programme at the Kozloduy nuclear power plant, Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, Keith

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes to examine the aims, approach and evaluation of a Public Information Programme currently being undertaken by the British Nuclear Industry Forum. The Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant has awarded a contract to the British Nuclear Industry Forum to carry out a Public Information Programme with the objective of informing the people of Bulgaria about the content of the Nuclear Safety Account Grant Agreement, the role of the NSA, the role of EBRD and the donor countries in providing the necessary funding, the safety improvement programme being undertaken and the progress being made. The overall aim of the Programme is to build a consensus among energy consumers of the principal issues to be faced in the development and implementation of a Bulgarian energy strategy. There are a number of key elements of the Programme which include: 1) To carry out a communications audit in order to assess current structures and methods of information dissemination. This is to establish the Programme's requirements and provide a detailed operational plan. 2) To assess public opinion and general levels of awareness of the general public, workforce, press, government and industry regarding Kozloduy in order to establish priority messages and create and produce the necessary information material. 3) To review the plant's existing information centre and to provide training and support to facilitate the handling of public and press enquiries and also presentation training for the centre's personnel. 4) To create bespoke outreach programmes which will inform local and national Government, the workforce and local communities, women and schools of safety improvement processes. 5) To implement a media programme which will enable staff at the plant to deal effectively with inquiries and to enable them to anticipate media interest in a range of issues including the safety upgrade. 6) To organise a workshop on issue management so that participants can create and communicate an issue

  15. The development of an integrated nuclear fuel-cycle industry to meet the needs of the Italian nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, A.M.; Badolato, G.; Clementel, E.

    1977-01-01

    The paper summarizes the Italian nuclear power station programme, recently approved by the Government, and illustrates the main reasons for the programme, which are in line with those presented at the Geneva Conference in 1971, and which lead to the consideration that nuclear energy is the main source for meeting practically all new electric power requirements in Italy. The implementation of this programme involves considerable nuclear fuel-cycle services, ranging from uranium supply to waste disposal. The industrial strategy to meet these needs is discussed. Technical and economic factors affecting such strategy, both for the fuel cycle as a whole and for its individual phases, are considered. Attention is focused on problems typical of the Italian situation and on various ways of solving them. A prominent feature of the Italian situation is the lack of sizeable domestic uranium resources, which makes it even more important to try, by local industrial efforts, to cover the phases of the cycle subsequent to uranium supply, so as to increase as much as possible the fraction of added value produced inside the country. The present status of the Italian nuclear fuel-cycle industry is reviewed in detail, and its capability of supporting the nuclear programme is analysed. Future development plans are discussed, taking into account the possibility of European co-operation. While the focus is on short- and medium-term programmes, the long-term nuclear programmes are discussed, such as those based on fast breeders, and stress is laid on the need to build up as quickly as possible a strong nuclear fuel-cycle industry. (author)

  16. Some aspects of programmable digital systems usage in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, D.; Smolej, M.; Sucic, B.

    2004-01-01

    During the operation of the NPP Krsko - NEK and other nuclear power plants, it has been recognized that certain issues related to the usage of digital equipment and associated software in NPP technological process protection, control and monitoring, are usually not adequately addressed in the existing programs and procedures. Moreover, often the problems related to the programmable digital systems usage are not understood correctly, which means that they can not be treated properly. Owing to the specifics of the programmable digital systems usage they have to be treated in a different way than other plant equipment and related documentation. The term as well as the process of Process Computers Configuration Control was introduced to control, among other issues, three 10CFR50 Appendix B quality requirements related to the Process Computers application in NPP: Design Control, Document Control, Identification and Control of Materials, Parts and Components. Based on the experience from NEK and published experience from other NPP and other organizations, this paper sheds light on specifics of the programmable digital systems usage in nuclear power plants. The wording Programmable Digital Systems was used rather than Process Computers, to emphasize wide area of applicability of this term: from simple digital components with burned-in programs to the PLC (Programmable Logic Controllers) and large process computer systems. In order to satisfy requirements of the Process Computer Configuration Control, specific characteristics and specific problems related to the usage of programmable digital systems require specific treatment of these issues. This paper describes those specific characteristics and traditional misunderstandings, false beliefs, false expectations and common errors that are most frequently committed in the life cycle of the programmable digital systems, as well as consequences and problems that could develop. The paper also refers to the regulations, industry

  17. Current status of LTO licensing programme for Bohunice nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borak, J.; Kupca, L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of long term operation (LTO) licensing programme for Bohunice nuclear power plant is to demonstrate that the relevant structures and components shall perform their functions throughout the entire LTO period during which they shall meet all the relevant safety requirements. All the activities-which should result in utility's request to obtain the licence for LTO-must be performed in line with the relevant legal basis. As of May 2012, the anticipated duration of currently running programme is thirteen months. All relevant documentation, required by the established legal basis, shall be submitted to the licensing authority one year before the Unit 3 design life expiry. (author)

  18. Regulatory issues on using programmable logic device in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, G. Y.; Yu, Y. J.; Kim, H. T.; Kwon, Y. I.; Park, H. S.; Jeong, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    For replacing obsolete analog equipment in nuclear power plant, the Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs) using Hardware Description Language (HDL) have been widely adopted in digitalized Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems because of its flexibility. For safety reviews on Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs,) qualifying digitalized safety I and C system using PLDs is an important issue. As an effort to provide regulatory position on using PLDs in safety I and C system, there is a research project to provide the regulatory positions against emerging issues involved with digitalisation of I and C system including using PLDs. Therefore, this paper addresses the important considerations for using PLDs in safety I and C systems such as diversity, independence and qualification, etc. In this point, this study focuses on technical reports for Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) from EPRI,. U.S. NRC, and relevant technical standards

  19. Regulatory issues on using programmable logic device in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, G. Y.; Yu, Y. J.; Kim, H. T.; Kwon, Y. I.; Park, H. S.; Jeong, C. H. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    For replacing obsolete analog equipment in nuclear power plant, the Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs) using Hardware Description Language (HDL) have been widely adopted in digitalized Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems because of its flexibility. For safety reviews on Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs,) qualifying digitalized safety I and C system using PLDs is an important issue. As an effort to provide regulatory position on using PLDs in safety I and C system, there is a research project to provide the regulatory positions against emerging issues involved with digitalisation of I and C system including using PLDs. Therefore, this paper addresses the important considerations for using PLDs in safety I and C systems such as diversity, independence and qualification, etc. In this point, this study focuses on technical reports for Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) from EPRI,. U.S. NRC, and relevant technical standards.

  20. Electricite de France Strategy for its nuclear power plants' decommissioning programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knockaert, J.M.; Gatineau, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Although final shutdown of the first large PWR Power Stations should not occur before 2015, Electricity of France is nevertheless directly concerned by the decommissioning of its nuclear plants. The shutdown programme of the gas-graphite units is in progress and the medium-power PWR plant (300 MWe) installed at Chooz in the Ardennes will be finally shutdown at the end of 1991. This solution requires EDF to have a policy available which enables it to simultaneously run the double operation 'Plant shutdown-decommissioning' and 'New constructions-increasing available power' from both the technical and financial viewpoints. (author)

  1. Options for Management of Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste for Countries Developing New Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. Today, numerous countries are considering construction of their first nuclear power plant or the expansion of a small nuclear power programme, and many of these countries have limited experience in managing radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. They often have limited information about available technologies and approaches for safe and long term management of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel arising from power reactors. The lack of basic know-how and of a credible waste management strategy could present a major challenge or even an obstruction for countries wishing to

  2. Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes - Romanian experience: Master - Nuclear Materials and Technologies Educational Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, S.; Valeca, M.

    2012-01-01

    The main objectives of the Master Nuclear Materials and Technologies Educational Plan are: 1. To deliver higher education and training in the following specific domains, such as: Powders Technology and Ceramic Materials, Techniques of Structural Analysis, Composite Materials, Semiconductor Materials and Components, Metals and Metallic Alloys, Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, Nuclear Materials, The Engineering of Special Nuclear Materials, 2. To train managers of the Nuclear Waste Products and Nuclear Safety, 3. To qualify in ICT Systems for Nuclear Process Guidance, 4. To qualify in Environmental Protection System at the Level of Nuclear Power Stations, 5. To train managers for Quality Assurance of Nuclear Energetic Processes, 6. To deliver higher education and training regarding the International Treatises, Conventions and Settlements in force in the field of nuclear related activities. (author)

  3. Complex programmable logic device based alarm sequencer for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khedkar, Ravindra; Solomon, J. Selva; KrishnaKumar, B.

    2001-01-01

    Complex Programmable Logic Device based Alarm Sequencer is an instrument, which detects alarms, memorizes them and displays the sequences of occurrence of alarms. It caters to sixteen alarm signals and distinguishes the sequence among any two alarms with a time resolution of 1 ms. The system described has been designed for continuous operation in process plants, nuclear power plants etc. The system has been tested and found to be working satisfactorily. (author)

  4. Overview on recent results of the VTT's research programme on assuring nuclear power plant structural safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintamaa, R.; Aaltonen, P.; Kauppinen, P.; Keinaenen, H.; Talja, H.; Valo, M.; Wallin, K.; Toerroenen, K.

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the Finnish national research programme on the Nuclear Power Plant Structural Safety, being carried out from 1990 to 1994, is presented. The focus of this paper is on recent results in the areas of experimental and computational fracture mechanics, material deterioration due to neutron irradiation, corrosion and water chemistry, nondestructive testing methods and procedures, and verification of structural integrity assessment methods by large scale component tests. (author). 21 refs, 21 figs, 2 tabs

  5. Specification for a total quality assurance programme for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This British Standard specifies principles for the establishment and implementation of quality assurance programmes during all phases of design, procurement, fabrication, construction, commissioning, operation, maintenance and decommissioning of structures, systems and components of nuclear power plants. These principles apply to activities affecting the quality of items, such as designing, purchasing, fabricating, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, erecting, installing, testing, commissioning, operating, inspecting, maintaining, repairing, refuelling, modifying and, eventually decommissioning. (author)

  6. Meeting the physics design challenges of modern LWRs being inducted into the Indian nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagannathan, V.; Pal, Usha; Karthikeyan, R.; Raj, Devesh; Srivastava, Argala; Khan, Suhail Ahmad

    2007-01-01

    Indian nuclear power programme started with the two Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) of 210 MWe capacity at Tarapur. Two VVER-1000 MWe reactors which are Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) of Russian design are being constructed at Kudankulam, Tamilnadu and are expected to be commissioned by end 2008. There may be also a possibility of inducting some western PWRs in future. These reactors belong to the category of light water reactors (LWR). The LWRs are compact and have complex physical characteristics distinctly different from those of the Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) which, currently form the mainstay of our indigenous nuclear power programme. The physics design and analysis capability for the modern LWRs (BWR, PWR and VVER) has been developed at Light Water Reactors Physics Section, BARC. This paper presents the current state of art in this key technology area to meet the physics design and operation challenges when LWRs would be inducted in a major way into the Indian nuclear power programme and commence operating in the coming decades. (author)

  7. RATU2 - The Finnish research programme on the structural integrity of nuclear power plants. Synthesis of achievements 1995-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solin, J.; Sarkimo, M.; Asikainen, M.; Aavall, Aa.

    1998-01-01

    The symposium summarises the scientific and technical achievements within the Finnish Research programme on the structural integrity of nuclear power plants (RATU2). The programme began in 1995 and will be accomplished at the end of 1998. The annual volume of this programme represented approximately 6 % of the total nuclear energy R and D in Finland. The research programme was mainly publicly funded and supplied impartial expertise for the regulation of nuclear energy. It also played an important role in the education of new experts, technology transfer and the international exchange of scientific results. (orig.)

  8. Nuclear programme in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahimsa, Djali

    1994-01-01

    Implementation of the energy policy covers several aspects such as issuance of regulations, standards, energy pricing incentives and disincentives, and the application of appropriate technologies. The policies and implementation of the technologies can fully be supported by the use of nuclear technology, especially toward the now popular issue concerning the environment. In view of these policies and the need to implement these policies. i.e. for the diversification of energy and environmental concern, the Department of Mines and Energy has established an Indonesian Energy Coordination Board (BAKOREN). This board has realised the importance of considering nuclear as a source of energy, which has led to a decision in September 1989, for The National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) to conduct a feasibility study to introduce nuclear power plants in Indonesia. The establishment of an authority for the construction and operation of Nuclear Power Plants in Indonesia, which is primarily related to the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants, must also be prepared. This authority is still under considerations by the Indonesian Government. In implementing the Indonesia Nuclear Programme, it is important that cooperation exists among countries of the world, Korea, in this respect, as learning from experiences of other countries are very necessary to plan for a successful Nuclear Programme

  9. Finnish experiences on licensing and using of programmable digital systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapanen, P.; Maskuniitty, M.; Heimburger, H.; Hall, L.E.; Manninen, T.

    1993-01-01

    Finnish utility companies, Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima (TVO), and the licensing authority, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), are preparing for a new nuclear power plant in Finland. Plant vendors are proposing programmable digital automation systems for both the safety-related and the operational I and C (instrumentation and control) systems in this new unit. Also in existing plant units the replacement of certain old analog systems with state-of-the-art digital ones will become necessary in the years to come. Licensing of programmable systems for safety critical applications requires a new approach due to the special properties and failure modes of these systems. The major difficulties seem to be in the assessment and quantification of software reliability. The Technical Research Centre of Finland has in co-operation with the authority and the utilities conducted a project (AJA) to develop domestically applicable licensing requirements, guidelines and practices. International standards, guidelines and licensing practices have been analyzed in order to specify national licensing requirements. The paper describes and discusses the findings and experiences of the AJA project so far. The experience in introducing advanced programmable digital control and computer systems in the operating nuclear power plants will be covered briefly. Although these systems are not safety-related but systems of more general interest regarding nuclear safety, some routines regarding the licensing of safety- related systems have been followed. In these backfitting and replacement projects some experience have been gained in how to license safety-related programmable systems. (Author) 31 refs., 2 figs

  10. Best Practices in the Management of an Operating Experience Programme at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-08-01

    The IAEA Fundamental Safety Principles (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1) state the need for operating organizations to establish a programme for the feedback and analysis of operating experience in nuclear power plants. Such a programme ensures that operating experience is analysed, events important to safety are reviewed in depth, lessons learned are disseminated to the staff of the organization and to the relevant national and international organizations and corrective actions are effectively implemented. In IAEA Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) and Peer Review of the effectiveness of the Operational Safety Performance Experience Review (PROSPER) missions, weaknesses in the management of operating experience (OE) programmes have been identified as one of the root causes of the recurrence of events. This publication has been developed to provide advice and assistance to nuclear installation managers and related institutions, including contractors and support organizations, to strengthen and enhance the management of their OE processes. In this publication, a number of barriers to the successful management of an OE programme have been identified. Managers are encouraged to review and evaluate these barriers with a view to identifying and eliminating them within their own organizations

  11. Experience with respect to dose limitation in nuclear fuel service operations in the United Kingdom supporting civil nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Within the United Kingdom, the nuclear power generation programme is supported by nuclear fuel services including uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication and reprocessing, operated by British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL). These have entailed the processing of large quantities of uranium and of plutonium and fission products arising in the course of irradiation of fuel in nuclear power stations and have necessitated substantial programmes for the radiological protection of the public and of the workers employed in the industry. This paper presents and reviews the statistics of doses recorded in the various sectors of nuclear fuel services operations against the background of the standards to which the industry is required to operate. A description is given of the development of BNFL policy in keeping with the objective of being recognized as among those industries regarded as safe and the resource implications of measures to reduce doses received by workers are reviewed in the light of experience. Finally, the paper reviews the epidemiological data which have been, and continue to be, collected for workers who have been employed in these nuclear fuel services. (author)

  12. Research plan on programmable automation systems in nuclear power plants (OHA) in 1995-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapanen, P.; Pulkkinen, U.; Korhonen, J.

    1995-05-01

    The main purpose of nuclear energy research is to ensure the safety and continued development of Finnish nuclear power plants - a task which places high demands on expertise needed to support the work of public authorities and power companies. A factor necessarily influencing the orientation of the research is the Parliament's decision of late 1993 against further nuclear capacity in the country. Therefore the main emphasis of research shall be directed towards the ensuring the safety of existing plants and the continuous development of their safety along the progress of the science and technology. Anyhow, the preparedness for constructing new plants shall also be preserved. The utilization of programmable digital automation technology for the safety critical functions is the most significant change in the new plants, but also in existing plants this technology will be used for replacing and complementing the ageing automation systems. The safety evaluation of programmable digital systems can not be based on methods applied to conventional analog systems but new evaluation methods and tools must be developed for the assessing of their acceptability. (5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.)

  13. Modernization programme for nuclear power plant units with VVER-1000 in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenderovich, V.

    1997-01-01

    All Ukrainian nuclear power plants with WWER type reactors are briefly described from the safety point of view. Information is given on the design and construction of the units. The main goals of upgrading are: elimination of incompliances with current safety standards, improvement of the reliability of safety significant systems, equipment and elements, and implementation of IAEA recommendations. A list of actions making up the large upgrading programme is given; it includes 181 measures to be taken. At present the measures are being designed in order to find appropriate engineering solutions, to develop technical specifications for new equipment, and to ensure precise cost estimation. (M.D.)

  14. The power of the will and the French nuclear programme; Volontarisme du programme nucleaire francais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boureille, P. [Ministre de la Defense, Dept. Marine, Service Historique de la Defense, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-03-15

    Using certain key episodes in the development of the French nuclear deterrent as examples, the author illustrates the extent to which boldness of decision-making, combined with far-thinking and resolute vision, is the foundation of any international defence policy built for the long term. (author)

  15. RATU2. The Finnish research programme on the structural integrity of nuclear power plants. Interim report 1995 - April 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solin, J.; Sarkimo, M.; Asikainen, M.

    1997-06-01

    The projects within the Finnish public funded research programme on the structural integrity of nuclear power plants (RATU2) are briefly introduced and the scientific and technical results obtained during the first two years, 1995-April 1997, are summarised in this report. The RATU2 programme was started in 1995 and will be continued until 1998. In 1996 this programme represented 6 % of the nuclear energy R and D in Finland. The research programme is mainly publicly funded and supplies impartial expertise for the regulation of nuclear energy. It also plays an important role in the education of new experts, technology transfer and international exchange of scientific results. The programme is organised into five research projects on the following topics: Material degradation in the reactor environment, Reliability of nondestructive inspections of nuclear power plants, Structural analyses for nuclear power plant components, Maintenance strategies and dependability, and Fire safety. The ageing of the structures and components in the Finnish nuclear power plants is one of the main issues to be considered when safety and economic operation of the plants is evaluated. At the same time, ways are being sought to extend the lifetime of components. The first half of the RATU2 research programme has already brought significant scientific findings and useful applications for ensuring the reliability of NPP components. New technology has been transferred to domestic use through active participation to international co-operation. On the other hand, international acceptance of the results has provided valuable feedback and benchmarking. (orig.)

  16. RATU2. The Finnish research programme on the structural integrity of nuclear power plants. Interim report 1995 - April 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solin, J; Sarkimo, M; Asikainen, M [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity; eds.

    1997-06-01

    The projects within the Finnish public funded research programme on the structural integrity of nuclear power plants (RATU2) are briefly introduced and the scientific and technical results obtained during the first two years, 1995-April 1997, are summarised in this report. The RATU2 programme was started in 1995 and will be continued until 1998. In 1996 this programme represented 6 % of the nuclear energy R and D in Finland. The research programme is mainly publicly funded and supplies impartial expertise for the regulation of nuclear energy. It also plays an important role in the education of new experts, technology transfer and international exchange of scientific results. The programme is organised into five research projects on the following topics: Material degradation in the reactor environment, Reliability of nondestructive inspections of nuclear power plants, Structural analyses for nuclear power plant components, Maintenance strategies and dependability, and Fire safety. The ageing of the structures and components in the Finnish nuclear power plants is one of the main issues to be considered when safety and economic operation of the plants is evaluated. At the same time, ways are being sought to extend the lifetime of components. The first half of the RATU2 research programme has already brought significant scientific findings and useful applications for ensuring the reliability of NPP components. New technology has been transferred to domestic use through active participation to international co-operation. On the other hand, international acceptance of the results has provided valuable feedback and benchmarking. (orig.). 112 refs.

  17. The community's research and development programme on decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Third annual progress report (year 1982)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This is the third progress report of the European Community's programme (1979-83) of research on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants. It covers the year 1982 and follows the 1980 and 1981 reports (EUR 7440, EUR 8343). Since 1982 was a very active year of research under the programme, this report contains a large amount of results. Besides, the work programmes of some additional research contracts, awarded through 1982, are described

  18. Nuclear safety. Improvement programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this brochure the improvement programme of nuclear safety of the Mochovce NPP is presented in detail. In 1996, a 'Mochovce NPP Nuclear Safety Improvement Programme' was developed in the frame of unit 1 and 2 completion project. The programme has been compiled as a continuous one, with the aim to reach the highest possible safety level at the time of commissioning and to establish good preconditions for permanent safety improvement in future. Such an approach is in compliance with the world's trends of safety improvement, life-time extension, modernisation and nuclear station power increase. The basic document for development of the 'Programme' is the one titled 'Safety Issues and their Ranking for WWER 440/213 NPP' developed by a group of IAEA experts. The following organisations were selected for solution of the safety measures: EUCOM (Consortium of FRAMATOME, France, and SIEMENS, Germany); SKODA Prague, a.s.; ENERGOPROJEKT Prague, a.s. (EGP); Russian organisations associated in ATOMENERGOEXPORT; VUJE Trnava, a.s

  19. The role of the nuclear programme in the development of the Romanian power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobos, I.; Popescu, A.; Popovici, D.

    2000-01-01

    The power system, major component of the Romanian development, is strictly related to the social-economic and technological policy and to the external factors influencing this development. Taking into consideration the future evolution of the electricity demand in Romania over the period 2000-2020, it is necessary to devise an optimized strategy for electricity generation in order to ensure the economic development of the country and to achieve a high standard of living. For these reasons presented are the role of the nuclear programme for different patterns of electricity consumption evolution, taking into account the present situation of Romanian power system, the evolution of the domestic primary energy resources, the fuel prices evolution, the technologies of the electric and thermal power generation and the environmental requirements. The analysis is achieved in the context of the new political and economic trends facing European countries, related to the Joint Agreement with European Community and to the requirements of the single energy market. (author)

  20. Cost Effective Ways of Implementing Nuclear Power Programme in African Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aderojua, Abraham; Choi, Kwang Sik

    2011-01-01

    still growing fast and hence are characterized by a foreseeable increase in electricity demand to drive the factors of production. 1.3 Objective of this Paper The purpose of this paper is to explore the efficient means of building nuclear power plants and associated infra structure in African countries. The concept adopted in this paper to achieve efficient allocation of resources is sharing of infrastructural items. The paper lists examples of sharing arrangement on the African continent for other purposes other than nuclear power programme. This is an attempt to justify the workability of the concept for nuclear power programme. Mention has also been made of similar sharing arrangement in other countries for the purpose of nuclear power programme. The factors that will enhance the success of sharing concept in African countries have also been highlighted

  1. The Brazilian nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, J.M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Developing an energy policy for a country the size of Brazil is a formidable task. Large differences between the regions in geography and economic development do not allow for a uniform plan. In the mid 1970s, Brazil started a nuclear energy programme to provide it with another option in its energy planning. The objective of the programme was gradually to build a technical and industrial base for nuclear power in the country, so that it would be available when it was needed. It was recognized that it would not be easy for a developing country to acquire the necessary high technology. The organization of the industry is outlined, demand projections are presented and domestic supplies of uranium assessed. (author)

  2. Targets and criteria for the effective participation of national industry in a domestic nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Py, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The interest in maximum use of national resource is common to all countries, the highly industrialized as well as the developing ones. Although benefits can be expected from national participation in a domestic nuclear power programme and may not be limited to this programme, such national participation is restricted by constraining factors: economic, financial, technical and political. Considering the various natures of activities - design, procurement, manufacturing, erection -, their technical difficulties, their potential spin-off effects on the overall industrial development of a country, the paper reviews the materials and components of a nuclear power plants which can be selected as targets for domestic production. The paper also reviews criteria which must be considered in setting these Target materials and components in order to overcome restricting factors to national participation such as cost of national products, financing, investment capability, adequate market size, availability of qualified manpower, industrial capability and quality standards, availability of technology and know-how, conflicts of interests. Some concrete examples drawn from previous experience will illustrate France efforts to overcome these limiting factors [fr

  3. Strengthening Technical Specialist Training for an Expanding Nuclear Power Programme in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, John L.

    2014-01-01

    NTSTS: Future Plans: • Introduce new pathway in Nuclear Reactor Operations into FD/BEng (Plant Engineering) programmes. • Outline curriculum based on INPOs Nuclear Uniform Curriculum for Power Plant Technician, Maintenance and Non-licensed Operations Personnel. • Procurement of generic Pressurised Water Reactor Simulation Suite – due for delivery/commissioning by Sep 2014 • Gen 2 has established a partnership with Tecnatom SA of Spain – experienced in operator training for PWR and BWR. • Proposals to establish a bespoke Reactor Operations Training Centre (ROTC) close to NuGen’s planned AP1000 new build at Moorside, West Cumbria. • In longer term, ROTC could house full scope AP1000 simulator for licensed operator training

  4. Manpower development for nuclear power programme. China. Project findings and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) project was conceived in April 1985, implementation was started on preliminary authorization by summer 1986, and it was approved and signed in early 1987. The duration was originally planned for three years with a UNDP input of US$ 1,657.500 (including Government cost sharing of US$ 280,000). The project is now essentially completed with a few items still pending, though committed as firmly planned, and the current cost estimate is US$ 1,707.617. The objective of the project was to assist in establishing long-term training programmes in two training centres in the People's Republic of China (Qinshan and Suzhou) and strengthen the training capabilities at these centres. The two centres are intended to provide specialized comprehensive training in basic and applied nuclear power engineering disciplines as well as in construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants to technical personnel assigned to the nuclear power plants in the People's Republic of China

  5. Ghana's nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahafia, Albert K.

    1988-01-01

    The Paper gives the purpose of Ghana's Nuclear Programme and describes some specific research activities and peaceful applications of atomic energy in agriculture, medicine and industry. A discussion of some of the problem facing the programme concludes the Paper. (author)

  6. Radioecological studies tied to the French nuclear power station programme: aims, nature and mode of execution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delile, G.

    1980-01-01

    Under present French practice, assessing the effects of radioactive discharges due to the various likely accident situations comes under 'L'Analyse de Surete Nucleaire' (Nuclear Safety Analysis). The assessment of radioactive discharges relating to normal working comes within the framework of radioecologic studies. Radioecology studies are undertkaen for every power station project. They consist in: - studying what is to be done with radioelements discharged as liquids or gases, - estimating their impact on the populations in the areas of influence of the power station and checking that this impact is permissible, - establishing a surveillance measuring programme for checking against the predictions made and, if required, determining the modifications to be made to the facilities or to their method of operation [fr

  7. Iran plans world's fourth biggest nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Power requirements of projected power generation to 1992, and fuel reserves, in Iran are submitted. The current nuclear programme is outlined. 34000 MWe of nuclear power is planned for the end of the century. (U.K.)

  8. Application of Field Programmable Gate Arrays in Instrumentation and Control Systems of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are gaining increased attention worldwide for application in nuclear power plant (NPP) instrumentation and control (I&C) systems, particularly for safety and safety related applications, but also for non-safety ones. NPP operators and equipment suppliers see potential advantages of FPGA based digital I&C systems as compared to microprocessor based applications. This is because FPGA based systems can be made simpler, more testable and less reliant on complex software (e.g. operating systems), and are easier to qualify for safety and safety related applications. This publication results from IAEA consultancy meetings covering the various aspects, including design, qualification, implementation, licensing, and operation, of FPGA based I&C systems in NPPs

  9. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme, Training Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of these training materials is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for a State embarking on a nuclear power programme, and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the Assistance Convention). Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. One of the concerns associated with nuclear power is the possibility that a State embarking on a nuclear power programme might not have sufficient capabilities and therefore would not be adequately prepared to respond to a radiation emergency caused by severe accident conditions. Protecting the public, the environment and property in the event of a failure of any level of defence in depth is the most important safety objective. A robust framework for emergency preparedness and response to a radiation emergency forms the last level of defence in depth and, as such, must be developed and implemented by any State embarking on a nuclear power programme, using best international practices. The establishment of capabilities and arrangements for emergency preparedness and response to severe accident conditions is one of the principal tasks in the development of a national infrastructure for nuclear power. State of the art emergency preparedness and response is a key element in achieving overall plant safety. This training course complements the IAEA publication 'Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme' (EPR-Embarking 2012). These materials are designed to help States apply the guidance in EPR-Embarking 2012, in order to develop the capability to adequately prepare for and respond to a radiation emergency after the commissioning and start of

  10. Recent Perspective on the Severe Accident Management Programme for Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Manwoong; Lee, Sukho; Lee, Jungjae; Chung, Kuyoung

    2017-01-01

    Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs), has been developed to help operators to prevent or mitigate the impacts of accidents at nuclear power plants. Severe accident management was first introduced in the 1990s with the creation of SAMGs following recognition that post-Three Mile Island Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) did not adequately address severe core damage conditions. Establishing and maintaining multiple layers of defence against any internal/external hazards is an important measure to reduce radiological risks to the public and environment. This study is intended to suggest future regulatory perspectives to strengthen the prevention and mitigation strategies for severe accidents by review of the current status of revision of IAEA Safety Standard on Severe Accident Management Programmes for Nuclear Power Plants and the combined PWR SAMG. This new IAEA Safety Guide will address guidelines for preparation, development, implementation and review of severe accident management programs during all operating conditions for both reactor and spent fuel pool. This Guide is used by operating organizations of nuclear power plants and their support organizations. It may also be used by national regulatory bodies and technical support organizations as a reference for developing their relevant safety requirements and for conducting reviews and safety assessments for SAMP including SAMG. The Pressurized Water Reactor Owner’s Group (PWROG) is upgrading the original generic Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs) into single Severe Accident Guidelines (SAGs) for the PWR SAMG aims to consolidate the advantages of each of the separate vendor severe accident (SA) mitigation methods. This new PWROG SAGs changes the SAMG process to be made that can improve SA response. Changes have been made that guidance is available for control room operators when the TSC is not activated thus allowing for timely accident response. Other changes were made to the guidance

  11. RBMK nuclear power plants: Generic safety issues. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This report has been prepared on the basis of above mentioned report and it is intended to provide information on RBMK NPPs generic safety issues. As all other insights, recommendations and conclusions resulting from the IAEA Programme, this report is intended to assist national decision makers, who have sole responsibility for the regulation and safe operation of their nuclear power plants. It also serves to focus national and international projects on priority of the RBMK safety improvements. 23 refs, 10 figs, 3 tabs

  12. The role of national consultant services industries to support the first nuclear power plant programme in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharu Dewi; Sahala Lumbanraja; Sriyana

    2007-01-01

    Study has been done which concerning the role of Indonesian National Consultant Services Industries to support the First Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Programme in Indonesia. NPP programme activities will be success if the studies should be started with good planning. To obtain the optimal results, the opportunity and the role of national consultants should be considered to the localization of NPP Programme to be bigger. Utilizing of national consultants services can be expected to become second opinion which is to play important role in socialization of NPP Programme. The Government and NPP Project Owner's candidate should analysis, plan and implement the Nuclear Power Plant Programme activities, started from identification of the available national consultants, considering the national consults procurement process, definition of scope of works of national consultants activities, carry out the selection of national consultants, evaluation, monitoring and supervision so that the utilizing of national consultants will give benefit more effective, efficient, economic appropriate objectives and good quality. This study to assess the structure and type of national consultants, works package which can be done by national consultants, selection methods of national consultants, constraints of national consultants and enhancing of the role of national consultants to involve and support in the nuclear power plant programme in Indonesia. The research methods are literature study, consultation with resource person and exploring of website/internet. (author)

  13. Co-ordinated research programme on operator support systems in nuclear power plants. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In September 1991 the Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Operator Support Systems (OSSs) in Nuclear Power Plants'' was approved in the framework of the Project ''Man-Machine Interface Studies''. The main objective of the programme is to provide guidance and technology transfer in the development and implementation of OSSs. This includes the experience with man-machine interfaces and closely related issues such as control and instrumentation, the use of computers, and operator qualification. The first Co-ordinated Research Meeting held in Vienna, 13-16 October 1992, prepared a summary report which defined the tasks and the responsibilities of the CRP participants. A time schedule and future actions were also agreed upon at this meeting. The second meeting was held in Budapest, Hungary, from 5 to 8 October 1993 and was sponsored by the KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute. The meeting reviewed the progress of the tasks defined by the first meeting, considered reports on national activities in the subject area, and agreed on time schedule and future actions. The present volume contains: (1) report prepared by the CRP meeting, (2) reports presented by the national delegates, and (3) CRP background and working plan. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Quality assurance for safety in nuclear power plants and other nuclear installations. Code and safety guides Q1-Q14. A publication within the NUSS programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The code provides the basic requirements for establishing and implementing quality assurance programmes for the stages of siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants. These basic requirements apply to all individuals and organizations, including designers, suppliers, constructors, manufacturers and operators. The basic quality assurance requirements presented in this Code also apply, with appropriate modifications, to nuclear installations other than nuclear power plants

  15. Final report of the programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    The review of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants focuses on the wide scope of the activities aimed at identifying safety deficiencies, ranking their importance on the results of safety improvement programmes and on areas where future work is necessary. The information in the report reflects to a large extent, the situation as it stood when individual IAEA tasks actually took place. It deals with the IAEA activities and it discusses selected safety issues and safety review results as they apply to each reactor type. The results, recommendations and conclusions resulting from the IAEA Programme are intended to assist national decision makers who have the sole responsibilities for the regulation and safety operation of their nuclear power plants

  16. Mali. Challenges for a Developing Country in Building Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes: Case of Mali

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kone, Nagantie

    2014-01-01

    Present situation: National Regulatory infrastructure of Radiation Protection: • A legislation and regulations, but not adapted to the case of Nuclear Power Programme; • A Regulatory Body as the sole nuclear institution - very few trained persons in the field of safety and security; - No E and T Institutions; - Lack of adopted system for the management of regulatory activities of practices and activities in NPP field

  17. Radiation and Environmental Protection Programme for the First Upcoming Nuclear Power Plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syahrir

    2007-01-01

    Indonesia plans to operate the first nuclear power plant (NPP) by 2016. A radiation and environmental protection arrangement for NPPs is part of the whole safety system which is embedded in every practice involved radiation exposure to workers and members of public. A radiation and environmental protection programme for the NPP should adhere to international standards and mainstream in order to be acceptable to the public and international communities. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has recommended a radiation protection standard for NPPs as studied in this paper. Focus is given to the operational aspects of radiation protection program and discharge control to the environment. Some documents related to Safety Analysis Reports were used as working examples on its implementation. The study includes the classification of working areas and access control; local rules and supervision of work; work planning and work permits; protective clothing and protective equipment; facilities, shielding and equipment; application of the principle of optimization of protection; and removal or reduction in intensity of sources of radiation. The radiological protection aspects blend together in the whole NPP practices, each individual has his/her own responsibility in association with the radiation protection program implementation. It also present in the whole steps of NPP preparation up to its decommissioning. Promise on safety improvement and significant dose reduction in the recent development in NPP technology should scrutinized so that the option of proven technology as required in commercial power reactor licensing considers this tendency. (author)

  18. Evaluation tests on controbloc, a programmable automaton for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pralus, B.; Bourassin, J.L.; Varaldi, G.

    1983-01-01

    Controbloc is the programmable automaton used by Electricite de France (EDF) to equip its 1300 MW range of power plants. EDF and the designer CGEE Alsthom have conducted a large number of tests on prototype series equipment to determine whether it matches its specifications. These tests were performed in various laboratories in the Paris area and were concerned with: (1) verifying performance (acquisition, processing and retrieval cycle times - multiplexed exchange performance); (2) the robustness of equipment and its behaviour in industrial conditions (climatic tests in line with IEC regulations - earthquake resistance in particularly severe conditions - resistance to industrial interference); (3) behaviour when internal faults occur, an aspect of particular importance in view of the role played by Controbloc in nuclear power plants; in the event of a failure, safety (incorrect commands must not be given) and availability (resumption of operation) must be guaranteed. A large number of checks have been carried out both by the designer and EDF, the latter having put into operation an original method which is described in the paper. Controbloc has been thoroughly tested and its modular construction has facilitated the performance of these tests. Some shortcomings have been revealed which the designer or EDF has remedied. (author)

  19. The Community's research and development programme on decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Fourth annual progress report (year 1983)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    This is the fourth progress report of the European Community's program. (1979-83) of research on decommissioning of nuclear power plants. It covers the year 1983 and follows the 1980, 1981 and 1982 reports (EUR 7440, EUR 8343, EUR 8962). The present report describes the further progress of research and contains a large amount of results. For a majority of the 51 research contracts composing the 1979-83 programme, work was completed by the end of 1983; the conclusions drawn from this work are in this report. The European Community's program deals with the following fields: long-term integrity of buildings and systems; decontamination for decommissioning purposes; dismantling techniques; treatment of specific wastes materials (steel, concrete and graphite); large transport containers for radioactive waste produced in the dismantling of nuclear power plants; estimation of the quantities of radioactive waste arising from the decommissioning of nuclear power plants in the Community; influence of nuclear power plant design features on decommissioning

  20. National Nuclear Power Plant Safety Research 2003-2006. Proposal for the Content and Organisation of a New Research Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    A country utilising nuclear energy is presumed to possess a sufficient infrastructure to cover the education and research in this field, besides the operating and supervisory organisations of the plants. The starting point of public nuclear safety research programmes is that they provide the necessary conditions for retaining the knowledge needed for ensuring the continuance of safe and economic use of nuclear power, for development of new know-how and for participation in international cooperation. In fact, the Finnish organisations engaged in research in this sector have been an important resource which the various ministries, the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) and the power companies have had at their disposal. The Steering Group to the Finnish Research Programme on Nuclear Power Plant Safety (FINNUS), which was launched upon the assignment of the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Energy, appointed in spring 2002 a group to plan the contents of the new programme. This report contains a proposal for the general outline of the programme, preliminarily entitled as SAFIR (SAfety of Nuclear Power Plants - Finnish National Research Programme). The plan has been made for the period 2003-2006, but it is based on safety challenges identified for a longer time span as well. The favourable decision-in-principle on a new nuclear power plant unit adopted by Parliament has also been taken into account in the plan. The safety challenges set by the existing plants and the new plant unit, as well as the ensuing research needs do, however, converge to a great extent. The construction of the new power plant unit will increase the need for experts in the field in Finland. At the same time, the retirement of the existing experts is continuing. These factors together will call for more education and training, in which active research activities play a key role. This situation also makes long-term safety research face a great challenge. The general plan aims to define the

  1. The nuclear power safety programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1981-01-01

    The expanded role of the IAEA in the field of nuclear power safety will be discussed. Emphasis will be given to the NUSS program (the letters being an acronym for Nuclear Safety Standards) to establish internationally accepted safety codes and guides for nuclear power plants dealing with governmental regulatory organizations, siting, design, operation and quality assurance. Other activities discussed will be advisory services, exchange of information and training, emergency accident assistance, and technical assistance. (orig./RW)

  2. The European community's programme of research on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants: objectives, scope and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, B.

    1984-01-01

    The European Community's research activities on the decommissioning of nuclear installations are aimed at developing effective techniques and procedures for ensuring the protection of man and his environment against the potential hazards from nuclear installations that have been withdrawn from service. The first five-year (1979-1983) programme of research on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants has comprised seven R and D projects concerning the following areas: maintaining disused plants in safe condition; surface decontamination for decommissioning purposes; dismantling techniques; treatment of the main waste materials arising in decommissioning, i.e. steel, concrete and graphite; large containers for decommissioning waste; arisings and characteristics of decommissioning waste; plant design features facilitating decommissioning. The research work was carried out by organizations and companies in the Member States under 51 research contracts, most of them cost-sharing. The Commission is now launching a new five-year (1984-1988) programme of research on the decommissioning of nuclear installations. (author)

  3. Molecular Fingerprinting Approach in Plant Species Evaluation for a Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhar Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) as a tool for marker technology is found to be remarkable, advanced and exciting in recent years. DNA markers are valuable tools and important in various plant breeding analyses for identification, gene mapping, marker systems and mutagenesis response. As gene expression is related to concurrent cellular activities and is mobilised in the adaptation of plants to adverse environmental conditions, changes at the DNA levels can be detected simultaneously. The changes also reflect response onto plant traits in which selection for better quality plant materials can be made and/or used as bio-indicator response in tracking any environmental change. The objective of the present study is to show Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) markers as an important technique in differentiating plant DNA genomic in various species for the evaluation of their diversity and radiation effects in population. The technique has been found to be rapid, simple, reliable and robust in generating molecular fingerprinting database in bio surveillance for a nuclear power programme. (author)

  4. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  5. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  6. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme. Publication Date: August 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-15

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  7. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme. Publication Date: August 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  8. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  9. Experience gained in Hungary on the role and responsibility of the public health authority in the nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sztanyik, L.B.

    1983-01-01

    The public health service of every country has a basic responsibility for maintaining and continuously improving the standard of health of its population. A significant part of this general responsibility, which has grown in importance in recent years, is radiation protection. While substantial economic, social, medical and scientific benefits are derived from various applications of nuclear energy, health authorities must insist on adequate control to protect the population from excessive exposure to radiation. Safety in the nuclear power industry means the assurance that all operational activities are carried out without undue radiation hazard to the general public and to the persons on-site. It is essential, therefore, that national public health authorities give immediate attention to their responsibilities for radiation protection and ensure the development of an adequate system of control as soon as initiation of a nuclear power programme has been decided. The role and responsibility assigned in Hungary to the public health authority by the government, the development of its organizational structure and of its control system and the actions taken to assert radiation protection requirements in the nuclear power programme of the country from the very beginning of its institution till the commissioning of the first 440 MW(e) unit of the nuclear power plant at Paks are reviewed. (author)

  10. Analysis of replies to an IAEA questionnaire on regulatory practices in Member States with nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    The survey of regulatory practices in Member States with nuclear power programmes by means of a questionnaire is the first stage of the programme developed by the IAEA to assist the Member States in the enhancement of their regulatory practices. The questionnaire, drafted by IAEA staff members and consultants, consisted of 120 detailed questions and its structure corresponds approximately to the Structure of Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Governmental Organizations (IAEA Safety Series No. 50-C-G-Rev.1). The questionnaire was sent to 64 Member States on 7 July 1987 and the replies received from 44 Member States have been analysed by IAEA staff members with the assistance of two consultants in order to identify the main differences in approach and the important features of regulatory practices in Member States. This technical document is the summary report of this analysis

  11. Strategic International Cooperation of Fukui Prefectural Government in Human Resources Development for Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Issei

    2014-01-01

    Japan's new 'Basic Energy Plan': • Nuclear Energy is an important ”base load power supply”. • Restart NPPs that adhere to the world’s strictest regulation standards. • Reduce dependence on nuclear power as much as possible. • Ascertain the scale of steady supply, cost reduction, global warming, ensuring safety. • Decide the best mix of energy sources as soon as possible

  12. OSART programme highlights 1995-1996. Operational safety practices in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The IAEA Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme provides advice and assistance to Member States in enhancing the operational safety of nuclear power plants. This report continues the practice of summarizing mission results so that all the aspects of OSART missions, Pre-OSART missions and good practices are to be found in one volume. It also includes results of follow-up visits. Attempts have been made in this report to highlight the most significant findings whilst retaining as much of the vital background information as possible. This report is in four parts: Part I summarizes the most significant observations made during the missions and follow-up visits during 1995-1996; Part II, in chronological order, is an overview of the major strengths and opportunities for improvement identified during each OSART mission and summaries of follow-up visits performed during the period; Part III lists good practices that were identified during 1995 and 1996; and Part IV presents the OSART mission results (OSMIR) database. Each part of the report is intended for different levels in operating and regulatory organizations but not exclusively so. Part I is primarily to the executive management level; Part II to middle managers; and Parts III and IV to those involved in operational experience feedback. Because of widely different plant designs, operating and management styles, cultural practices, and other factors affecting plant operations, no OSART findings were applicable to all of the plants visited in 1995 and 1996. Individual findings varied considerably in scope and significance. However, the findings do reflect some common strengths and opportunities for improvement

  13. Financing a nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.

    2010-10-01

    Nuclear power plant construction projects have many characteristics in common with other types of large infrastructure investment, both within the power generation sector and elsewhere. However, nuclear power itself has special features that can make nuclear financing particularly challenging. These features include the high capital cost, the relatively long period required to recoup investments, the often controversial nature of nuclear projects. The need for clear solutions and financing schemes for radioactive waste management and decommissioning and the need for nuclear power plants to operate at high capacity factors, preferably under base load conditions. During the previous major expansion of nuclear power in the 1970 and 1980, many nuclear projects suffered very large construction delays and cost overruns. The legacy of such problems increases the risks perceived by potential investors. A recent study undertaken jointly by the Iea and the Nea showed that the competitiveness of nuclear power strongly depends on the cost of financing due to the high share of fixed capital costs in the total lifetime costs of nuclear power. A key issue in this context is the long-term predictability of carbon pricing arrangements, which, for the time being and despite positive evolutions in this respect, most notably in Europe, does not yet exist. This paper will consider how the risks can be mitigated and examine in detail various models for corporate finance and the role of government assistance in providing a suitable financial basis. (Author)

  14. Status of Nuclear Science Education and the Needs for Competency Based Education at the Beginning of Nuclear Power Programme in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yücel, H.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In Turkey, in recent years, public opinion is mostly positive towards the establishment of NPPs because electricity demand is ever-increasing with a growing population and developing economy. For peaceful nuclear energy use, Turkey ratified the NPT in 1979 and has had a safeguards agreement, and its Additional Protocol since 2001. However, Turkey has not accumulated the essential nuclear knowledge and experience until now. The present nuclear education and training programmes are not focused on nuclear safety and power technology. There is lack of competencies concerned with measuring and monitoring, instrumentation and control for a safe operation of a reactor, and other specific nuclear equipment and facilities on site. The urgent needs should be determined to commence a competency based education in which the younger generations will instill confidence to nuclear technology. In nuclear training and education programs, it should be given a priority to nuclear safety and security culture. This should be a key requirement for newcomers to nuclear technology. In this presentation, the present status of nuclear science education in Turkey is discussed briefly and the fundamental arguments are dealt to focus on competency based nuclear education. Within international community, Turkey can seek collaborations and can consider the new challenges to tackle with the present difficulties in nuclear education programmes as a newcomer country. (author

  15. Design and development of microcontroller based programmable ramp generator for AC-DC converter for simulating decay power transient in experimental facility for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Gaurava Deep; Kulkarni, R.D.

    2015-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, fuel is subjected to a wide range of power and temperature transients during normal and abnormal conditions. The reactor setback and step-back power pattern, fast temperature profile occurred during Loss of Coolant Accident and decay power followed by shutdown of power plant are the typical transients in nuclear power plant. For a variety of reactor engineering and reactor safety related study, one needs to simulate these transients in experimental facility. In experimental facilities, high response AC-DC converters are used to handle these power and temperature transients safely in a controlled manner for generating a database which is utilized for design of thermal hydraulic system, development of computer codes, study of reliability of reactor safety system, etc. for nuclear power plants. The paper presents the methodology developed for simulating the typical reactor decay power transient in an experimental facility. The design and simulation of AC-DC power electronic converter of 3 MW capacity is also presented. The microcontroller based programmable ramp generator is designed and hardware implemented for feeding reference voltage to the closed loop control system of AC-DC converter for obtaining the decay power profile at the converter output. The typical decay power transient of the nuclear power plant is divided into several small power ramps for simulating the transient. The signal corresponding to each power ramp is generated by programmable ramp generator and fed to the comparator for generating control signal for the converter. The actual decay power transient obtained from the converter is compared with the theoretical decay power transient. (author)

  16. Transfer of radioactive waste management expertise from Switzerland to other countries with small nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, I.; Birkhaeuser, Ph.; Kickmaier, W.; Vomvoris, S.; Zuidema, P.

    2000-01-01

    A legal requirement which coupled demonstration of the feasibility of nuclear waste disposal to the extension of reactor operational licenses beyond 1985 acted to force rapid development of the Swiss radioactive waste management programme. Over a period of almost 30 years and at a cost of approximately 800 M CHF Nagra has become established as a centre of excellence in this field. Resources include highly experienced manpower, literature and databases supporting development of national repositories for L/ILW and HLW/TRU and state-of-the-art R and D infrastructure (including 2 underground laboratories, hot-laboratory facilities at PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute), modelling groups at universities etc.). This paper reviews Nagra's experience and considers various ways in which expertise can be transferred to other small countries to minimise duplication of effort and optimise development of their own national programmes. (author)

  17. Evaluation of fire hazard analyses for nuclear power plants. A publication within the NUSS programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The present publication has been developed with the help of experts from regulatory, operating and engineering organizations, all with practical experience in the field of fire safety of nuclear power plants. The publication supplements the broad concepts of Safety Series No. 50-SG-D2 (Rev.1), Fire Protection in Nuclear Power Plants, by providing a detailed list of the issues, and some of the limitations, to be considered when evaluating the adequacy and effectiveness of the fire hazard analysis of a nuclear power plant. The publication is intended for assessors of fire hazard analyses, including regulators, independent assessors or plant assessors, and gives a broad description of the methodology to be used by operators in preparing a fire hazard analysis for their own plant. 1 fig

  18. Manpower development for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Guidebook provides policy-makers and managers of nuclear power programmes with information and guidance on the role, requirements, planning and implementation of manpower development programmes. It presents and discusses the manpower requirements associated with the activities of a nuclear power programme, the technical qualifications of this manpower and the manpower development corresponding to these requirements and qualifications. The Guidebook also discusses the purpose and conditions of national participation in the activities of a nuclear power programme

  19. Creation of nuclear power stations for export. Adapting a reference power station from the technical level of a national programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcaillou, J.; Haond, H.; Py, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    The recent evolution of primary energy supplies places those countries with a nuclear industry in an exporting role. Exporting countries have generally developed a limited number of national reactor types and attempt to extend their manufacture with as few changes as possible. The EDF in France is implementing an important 900-MW(e) PWR programme based on Framatome nuclear reactors, initially conceived by Westinghouse. Standardization imposes constraints, has limits, but offers incontestable advantages in terms of reliability, availability and security. These advantages were highly appreciated during the introduction into service of conventional thermal loads. Importing countries are all concerned to purchase a proven model. However, various local restrictions are often present, which are usually different from those accounted for in the export model, thus resulting in a need for modification. The different ways of considering the inescapable constraints can be analysed and their influence on the 'disfigurement' of the reactor model can be examined. Some of these constraints are connected with characteristics of the site. The nature of the soil and the seismicity influence the foundation and the depth of the installation and the choice between a foundation on antiseismic supports or structural reinforcement. The hydrology (risk of flooding or of deviation of the cold source) influences the choice between elevation of the installation and a protective dike, and also the stand-by coolant circuit. The atmospheric conditions and the temperature of cooling water influence the materials and their conditioning as well as the power level of the station. The surrounding demography influences the waste treatment systems. The characteristics of the electricity network influence the plan of the electric power supply and the conditions of operation. Finally, the characteristics of the personnel of the undertaking provide training problems. Other parameters to be taken into

  20. The nuclear power stations of the French atomic energy programme (1960); Les centrales nucleaires de puissance du programme francais (1960)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leduc, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Roux, J P [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1960-07-01

    After recalling the entry of nuclear energy into energy production in France, the paper emphasizes the evolution of techniques applied in the designing of French nuclear power plants and describes the means employed for reducing costs per kWh of EDF2 and EDF3 compared with EDF1: the electric power per ton of uranium varies from 493 kW/t for EDF1 to 970 kW/t for EDF3. For this purpose the thermal power and electric power of units are changed respectively from 290 MWt for EDF1 to 1200 or 1600 MWt for EDF3 and from 28 to 250 MW. The results are obtained by an improvement in neutronic characteristics, developments in nuclear fuel technology, and simplification of the system of charging the reactor, whose means of maintenance are increased; the EDF2 heat-exchangers have been so designed as to increase the unit power of the elements, which will attain 9 MWt, as against 3 for EDF1. For EDF3 an advance project forecasts a thermodynamic layout with only one pressure stage. The paper ends with a description of the burst-slug detection systems, and an appendix gives a detailed comparative table of EDF1, EDF2 and EDF3 plant characteristics. (author) [French] Apres avoir rappele l'integration de l'energie nucleaire parmi les moyens de production de l'energie en France, les auteurs se penchent surtout sur l'evolution des techniques appliquees dans l'equipement des centrales nucleaires francaises et decrivent les moyens mis en oeuvre pour reduire les prix de revient du kWh d'EDF2 et d'EDF3 par rapport a EDF1: la puissance electrique par tonne d'uranium varie de 493 kW/t pour EDF1 a 970 kW/t pour EDF3. C'est dans ce but que les puissances thermiques et la puissance unitaire des groupes turbo-alternateurs passent respectivement de 290 MWt pour EDF1 a 1200 ou 1600 MWt pour EDF3 et de 82 a 250 MW. Les resultats sont obtenus par une amelioration des caracteristiques neutroniques, des progres realises sur la technologie des elements combustibles, une simplification du systeme de

  1. The nuclear power stations of the French atomic energy programme (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leduc, C.

    1960-01-01

    After recalling the entry of nuclear energy into energy production in France, the paper emphasizes the evolution of techniques applied in the designing of French nuclear power plants and describes the means employed for reducing costs per kWh of EDF2 and EDF3 compared with EDF1: the electric power per ton of uranium varies from 493 kW/t for EDF1 to 970 kW/t for EDF3. For this purpose the thermal power and electric power of units are changed respectively from 290 MWt for EDF1 to 1200 or 1600 MWt for EDF3 and from 28 to 250 MW. The results are obtained by an improvement in neutronic characteristics, developments in nuclear fuel technology, and simplification of the system of charging the reactor, whose means of maintenance are increased; the EDF2 heat-exchangers have been so designed as to increase the unit power of the elements, which will attain 9 MWt, as against 3 for EDF1. For EDF3 an advance project forecasts a thermodynamic layout with only one pressure stage. The paper ends with a description of the burst-slug detection systems, and an appendix gives a detailed comparative table of EDF1, EDF2 and EDF3 plant characteristics. (author) [fr

  2. Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas-Hamilton, J.; Home Robertson, J.; Beith, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this debate the Government's policy on nuclear power is discussed. Government policy is that nuclear power is the safest and cleanest way of generating electricity and is cheap. Other political parties who do not endorse a nuclear energy policy are considered not to be acting in the people's best interests. The debate ranged over the risks from nuclear power, the UK safety record, safety regulations, and the environmental effects of nuclear power. The Torness nuclear power plant was mentioned specifically. The energy policy of the opposition parties is strongly criticised. The debate lasted just over an hour and is reported verbatim. (UK)

  3. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2005-01-01

    This chapter discussed the following topics related to the nuclear power: nuclear reactions, nuclear reactors and its components - reactor fuel, fuel assembly, moderator, control system, coolants. The topics titled nuclear fuel cycle following subtopics are covered: , mining and milling, tailings, enrichment, fuel fabrication, reactor operations, radioactive waste and fuel reprocessing. Special topic on types of nuclear reactor highlighted the reactors for research, training, production, material testing and quite detail on reactors for electricity generation. Other related topics are also discussed: sustainability of nuclear power, renewable nuclear fuel, human capital, environmental friendly, emission free, impacts on global warming and air pollution, conservation and preservation, and future prospect of nuclear power

  4. Developing the necessary infrastructure. Chapter 1; IAEA activities in support of countries considering embarking on Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akira, O.

    2010-01-01

    The IAEA supports in a variety of ways in establishing an appropriate infra-structure necessary to secure safe and reliable operation and still maintaining the international safeguards regime, especially in developing countries which are considering introduction of nuclear power programme. The TC projects to support introduction of nuclear power has been formulated and its number increased significantly recently. Various guidance documents have been published by the IAEA recently to enable progressive development of national infrastructure. The IAEA guidance documents constitute a basis of advises to newcomer countries. The recently formulated important mission is INIR mission to review the status of national infrastructure in the context of measuring the distance to the expected milestone. Finally, it is expected that the newcomers would make informed decision-making on going to nuclear power by fully understanding the necessary obligations and national long-term commitment, by confirming viability of nuclear power options in the country's energy plan through Energy Planning and long-term strategic assessment using IAEA guidance and tools

  5. Neutron dosimetry in EDF experimental surveillance programme for VVER-440 nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Erben, O.; Novosad, P.; Zerola, L.; Hogel, J.; Trollat, C.

    2001-01-01

    Fourteen chains containing experimental surveillance material specimens of the VVER 440/213 nuclear power reactor pressure vessels were irradiated in the surveillance channels of the Nuclear Power Plant Dukovany in the Czech Republic. The irradiation periods were one, two or three cycles. The chains contained different number and types of containers, the omitted ones were replaced by chain elements. All of the containers were instrumented with wire neutron fluence detectors, some of the containers in the chain had spectrometric sets of neutron fluence monitors. For the absolute fluence values evaluation it was taken into account time history of the reactor power and local changes of the neutron flux along the reactor core height, correction factors due to the orientation of monitors with respect to the reactor core centre. Unfolding programs SAND-II or BASA-CF were used. The relative axial fluence distribution was obtained from the O-wire measurements. Neutron fluence values above 0.5 MeV energy and above 1.0 MeV energy in the container axis on the axial positions of the sample centres and fluence values in the geometric centre of the samples was calculated making use the exponential attenuation model of the incident neutron beam. Received fast neutron fluence values can be used as reference values to all VVER-440 type 213 nuclear power plant reactors. (author)

  6. YKAe - Research programme on nuclear power plant systems behaviour and operational aspects of safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, L.; Vanttola, T.

    1992-01-01

    The major part of nuclear energy research in Finland has been organised as five-year nationally coordinated research programs. The research programme on Systems Behaviour and Operational Aspects of Safety is under way during 1990-1994. Its annual volume has been about 35 person-years and its annual expenditure about FIM 18 million. Studies in the field on safe operational margins of nuclear fuel and reactor core concentrate on fuel high burn-up behaviour, VVER fuel experiments, and reactor core behaviour in complex reactivity transients such as 3-D phenomena and ATWS events. The PACTEL facility is used for the thermal hydraulic studies of the Loviisa type reactors (scaled 1:305). Validation of accident analysis codes is carried out by participation in international standard problems. Advanced foreign computer codes for severe reactor accidents are implemented, modified as needed and applied to level-2 PSAs and the improvement of accident management procedures. Fire simulation methods are tested using data from experiments in the German HDR facility. A nuclear plant analyzer for efficient safety analyses is being developed using the APROS process simulation environment. Computerized operator support systems are being studied in cooperation with the OECD Halden Project. The basic factors affecting plant operator activities and the development of their competence are being investigated. A comprehensive system for the control of plant operational safety is being developed by combining living PSA and safety indicators

  7. The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate's Review Statement and Evaluation of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co's RD and D Programme 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    According to the Act on Nuclear Activities, the holder of a licence to operate a nuclear reactor must adopt all necessary measures to manage and dispose of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The Act stipulates requirements on a research programme which is to be submitted to the competent regulatory authority once every three years. The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) is the competent authority that evaluates and reviews the programme. SKI distributes the programme to a wide circle of reviewing bodies for comment, including authorities, municipalities, universities and NGOs. The Swedish programme for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel started about 25 years ago. According to the Swedish Nuclear Waste Management Co. (SKB), the planned repository will not be closed until sometime in the 2050's. A series of decisions must be made before this goal is attained. The decision process can therefore be described as a multi-stage process. During each stages, safety will be evaluated and there is a possibility of taking additional time for development work or of selecting improved solutions. SKI's task is to ensure safety compliance throughout all of these stages. In its decision in January 2000, the Government explained that the Programme for Research, Development and Demonstration for the Treatment and Final Disposal of Nuclear Waste (RD and D Programme 98) complied with legislative requirements but that certain supplementary reporting should be conducted by SKB and submitted no later than when the next programme, in accordance with paragraph 12 of the Act on Nuclear Activities, was prepared (September 2001). The supplementary reporting requested by the Government, and which was submitted by SKB to SKI in December 2000, dealt with issues relating to method selection, site selection and the site investigation programme. SKI submitted its review of the supplement to the Government in June 2001 and the Government made a decision on the matter on November 1, 2001

  8. Selection of quality assurance programme levels for nuclear power plants. Present practice in Canada and future developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    According to the IAEA Code of Practice on the subject and also to numerous national standards, effective quality assurance (QA) for safety in nuclear power plants depends upon the application of a number of fundamental principles. One of these principles is that QA for systems, components and structures should be commensurate with the individual importance to safety of each item. Evidently, money spent on excessive QA may be partly or wholly wasted, while too little QA will provide insufficient confidence that an item will perform satisfactorily in service. To deal successfully with the requirement of 'importance to safety', a detailed methodology must be established, by means of which QA can be prescribed rationally and consistently. Set in the context of the Canadian nuclear power and nuclear standards programmes, two related methodologies which account for importance to safety as well as for some other specific factors have been developed and are in use. These related methodologies are applied to the manufacture and installation of safety-related items, and are based on the implementation of the fixed-step, graded standards of the Canadian Standards Association, CSA Z299. Information is presented on the main features of the methodologies and on Canadian nuclear power plant QA practice in general. (author)

  9. Design assurance programme for modifications at the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, K.

    1985-01-01

    The Engineering Department within the site organization is responsible for modifications and improvements of plant design. Internal and external specialists are also involved in the design activities. Modifications follow the procedures laid down in the Design Assurance Programme (DAP), according to the overall directions given in 10CFR50 APP B and the more detailed recommendations in American Nuclear Standard 3.2, and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guides 1.33 and 1.64. The site Quality Assurance Department has adapted these directions to Swedish conditions. All plant modifications are ordered from customers within the site organization. The design work is performed according to the following steps: priority of problems or requirements; overall analysis of problems or requirements; basic design (preliminary and final); detailed design (electrical, mechanical, civil); purchase of equipment; installation in plant; testing of installed equipment. The project engineer is responsible for modifications from the initiation of analysis until testing and documentation are finalized. For each step, procedures and checklists are available. Internal and external specialists as well as the Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate are involved when appropriate. Design engineers and QC/QE engineers are also involved. Special groups within the site organization handle purchase and installation. Testing the installed equipment is performed in co-operation with the operation staff. Deviations from DAP must be reported by all personnel, and corrective actions must be taken. Internal audits have to be done once a year for the entire DAP and the audit, with its findings and the corrective actions taken, must be reported to the QA group. (author)

  10. Statement to International Conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Kaabi, H.

    2010-03-01

    United Arab Emirates is going through a rapid growth in its energy needs, projected to increase to three folds by the year 2020 compared to 2007, reflecting an annual growth rate of 9% from 2007 onward. In evaluating different options to meet the projected demand, Nuclear energy emerged as a proven, environmentally promising and commercially competitive option which could make a significant contribution to the UAE's economy and future energy security. A sustainable , materially-sized nuclear energy program could contribute substantially to the UAE's basic power needs for decades, retain the continued support of international investment partners, yield sufficient revenues to support a competent and fully-professionalized regulation and safety authority, and ensure the continual improvement of safety practices and security in accordance with best international standards. In conclusion, I would like to emphasize the importance that nuclear energy introduction plans are based on long term sustainable strategy to ensure its successful deployment in a safe and responsible manner, and through the adoption of plans and strategies that will ensure the availability of resources and efficiency of the sector through its long life. In the UAE, as we continue to develop our nuclear energy program , the actions outlined in the policy paper will continue to provide a framework which is robust, in line with international best practices, and which is an accurate demonstration of our commitments as a responsible member of the international community

  11. Development of domestic capabilities for the Indian nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakodkar, A.; Sinha, R.K.; Chetal, S.C.; Bhoje, S.B.

    2000-01-01

    India, has an extensive programme for nuclear power that is self reliant to achieve long term energy security. This paper describes the Indian experience in structuring and implementing the national nuclear programme turned to its natural resources. (author)

  12. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, Arthur.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter of the final report of the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning in Ontario updates its interim report on nuclear power in Ontario (1978) in the light of the Three Mile Island accident and presents the commission's general conclusions and recommendations relating to nuclear power. The risks of nuclear power, reactor safety with special reference to Three Mile Island and incidents at the Bruce generating station, the environmental effects of uranium mining and milling, waste management, nuclear power economics, uranium supplies, socio-political issues, and the regulation of nuclear power are discussed. Specific recommendations are made concerning the organization and public control of Ontario Hydro, but the commission concluded that nuclear power is acceptable in Ontario as long as satisfactory progress is made in the disposal of uranium mill tailings and spent fuel wastes. (LL)

  13. Inspection and enforcement by the regulatory body for nuclear power plants. A safety guide. A publication within the NUSS programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance on fulfilling the requirements for inspection and enforcement by the regulatory body, as set out in the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants; Governmental Organization. This Safety Guide deals with the responsibilities of the regulatory body, the organization of inspection programmes, the inspection resources of the regulatory body, methods of inspection, requirements on the applicant/licensee in regard to regulatory inspection, inspection reports, and regulatory action and enforcement. It is recognized that many of the provisions of this Safety Guide may be applicable to the regulations of other nuclear facilities and related activities including research reactors, fuel processing and manufacturing plants, irradiated fuel processing plants and radioactive waste management facilities. This Safety Guide does not deal specifically with the functions of a regulatory body responsible for such matters; however, the guidance presented here may be applied as appropriate to these activities. 11 refs, 1 fig

  14. Fire protection programme during construction of the Chashma nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mian Umer, M.

    1998-01-01

    A clear view is given of several measures that have been taken with regard to fire prevention, protection and fire fighting during all phases of the construction, installation and commissioning of the Chasma nuclear power plant to protect personnel and equipment so that any delays in plant operation as a result of fire incident can be avoided. These measures include the precautions taken, the provisions made for fire extinguishers and hydrants, and the setting up of a fire brigade. An overview is also given of the fire incidents that have occurred. (author)

  15. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    ''Nuclear Power'' describes how a reactor works and examines the different designs including Magnox, AGR, RBMK and PWR. It charts the growth of nuclear generation in the world and its contributions to world energy resources. (author)

  16. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, P.

    1990-01-01

    Written from the basis of neutrality, neither for nor against nuclear power this book considers whether there are special features of nuclear power which mean that its development should be either promoted or restrained by the State. The author makes it dear that there are no easy answers to the questions raised by the intervention of nuclear power but calls for openness in the nuclear decision making process. First, the need for energy is considered; most people agree that energy is the power to progress. Then the historicalzed background to the current position of nuclear power is given. Further chapters consider the fuel cycle, environmental impacts including carbon dioxide emission and the greenhouse effect, the costs, safety and risks and waste disposal. No conclusion either for or against nuclear power is made. The various shades of opinion are outlined and the arguments presented so that readers can come to their own conclusions. (UK)

  17. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The committee concludes that the nature of the proliferation problem is such that even stopping nuclear power completely could not stop proliferation completely. Countries can acquire nuclear weapons by means independent of commercial nuclear power. It is reasonable to suppose if a country is strongly motivated to acquire nuclear weapons, it will have them by 2010, or soon thereafter, no matter how nuclear power is managed in the meantime. Unilateral and international diplomatic measures to reduce the motivations that lead to proliferation should be high on the foreign policy agenda of the United States. A mimimum antiproliferation prescription for the management of nuclear power is to try to raise the political barriers against proliferation through misuse of nuclear power by strengthening the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and to seek to raise the technological barriers by placing fuel-cycle operations involving weapons-usable material under international control. Any such measures should be considered tactics to slow the spread of nuclear weapons and thus earn time for the exercise of statesmanship. The committee concludes the following about technical factors that should be considered in formulating nuclear policy: (1) rate of growth of electricity use is a primary factor; (2) growth of conventional nuclear power will be limited by producibility of domestic uranium sources; (3) greater contribution of nuclear power beyond 400 GWe past the year 2000 can only be supported by advanced reactor systems; and (4) several different breeder reactors could serve in principle as candidates for an indefinitely sustainable source of energy

  18. Technology transfer in the Spanish nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Naredo, F.

    1983-01-01

    The paper describes the process of technology transfer under the Spanish nuclear programme and its three generations of nuclear power plants during the last 20 years, with special reference to the nine new plants equipped with Westinghouse pressurized water reactors and the rising level of national involvement in these stations. It deals with the development of Westinghouse Nuclear's organization in Spain, referring to its staff and to the manufacturers who supply equipment for the programme, going into particular detail where problems of quality assurance are concerned. In conclusion, it summarizes the present capacity of Spanish industry in various areas connected with the design, manufacture and construction of nuclear power plants. (author)

  19. Nuclear power training courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The training of technical manpower for nuclear power projects in developing countries is now a significant part of the IAEA Technical Assistance Programme. Two basic courses are the cornerstones of the Agency's training programme for nuclear power: a course in planning and implementation, and a course in construction and operation management. These two courses are independent of each other. They are designed to train personnel for two distinct phases of project implementation. The nuclear power project training programme has proven to be successful. A considerable number of highly qualified professionals from developing countries have been given the opportunity to learn through direct contact with experts who have had first-hand experience. It is recognized that the courses are not a substitute for on-the-job training, but their purpose is achieved if they have resulted in the transfer of practical, reliable information and have helped developing countries to prepare themselves for the planning, construction and operation management of nuclear power stations

  20. Nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povolny, M.

    1980-01-01

    The development and uses of nuclear power in Czechoslovakia and other countries are briefly outlined. In the first stage, the Czechoslovak nuclear programme was oriented to the WWER 440 type reactor while the second stage of the nuclear power plant construction is oriented to the WWER 10O0 type reactor. It is envisaged that 12 WWER 440 type reactors and four to five WWER 1000 type reactors will be commissioned till 1990. (J.P.)

  1. Nuclear power in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    the plans of the Spanish Government to reduce their dependence on oil over the next ten years by a considerable increase in nuclear generating capacity are outlined. Data on the type, generating power, location and commissioning data of a number of nuclear power stations in Spain are tabulated. The use of foreign companies for the design and construction of the nuclear stations and the national organisations responsible for different aspects of the programme are considered. (UK)

  2. Regulatory evaluation of nuclear power plant on-the-job training programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J.

    1996-01-01

    It is now well recognized internationally in the nuclear industry that a Systematic Approach to Training (SAT), as described in IAEA-TECDOC-525, represents the currently most effective method of providing effective, efficient training to Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) personnel. For this reason the Canadian regulator, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), has made SAT a requirement for the training of NPP personnel whose job activities could affect plant or public safety. In this respect the AECB recognizes that the SAT process will dictate on-the-job-training (OJT) and the prudent use of Job Performance Measures (JPMs) as the most effective method of providing parts of the required training to some work groups. The AECB has adopted a process of training program evaluation for NPP operations personnel which comprises methods to evaluate all types of training including OJT. This paper describes some variations which have been identified in the conduct of OJT at Canadian utilities. It then presents the three step process established by the AECB to effectively evaluate training programs expertise is required. The concept of utility self-evaluations is introduced. Finally, the importance of consistency on the part of the regulator in following a systematic approach to evaluation through the application of a viable standard is addressed. (author). 2 figs

  3. The reality of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, D.

    1979-01-01

    The following matters are discussed in relation to the nuclear power programmes in USA and elsewhere: siting of nuclear power plants in relation to a major geological fault; public attitudes to nuclear power; plutonium, radioactive wastes and transfrontier contamination; radiation and other hazards; economics of nuclear power; uranium supply; fast breeder reactors; insurance of nuclear facilities; diversion of nuclear materials and weapons proliferation; possibility of manufacture of nuclear weapons by developing countries; possibility of accidents on nuclear power plants in developing countries; radiation hazards from use of uranium ore tailings; sociological alternative to use of nuclear power. (U.K.)

  4. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2003-01-01

    This chapter discuss on nuclear power and its advantages. The concept of nucleus fission, fusion, electric generation are discussed in this chapter. Nuclear power has big potential to become alternative energy to substitute current conventional energy from coal, oil and gas

  5. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bupp, I.C.

    1991-01-01

    Is a nuclear power renaissance likely to occur in the United States? This paper investigates the many driving forces that will determine the answer to that question. This analysis reveals some frequently overlooked truths about the current state of nuclear technology: An examination of the issues also produces some noteworthy insights concerning government regulations and related technologies. Public opinion will play a major role in the unfolding story of the nuclear power renaissance. Some observers are betting that psychological, sociological, and political considerations will hod sway over public attitudes. Others wager that economic and technical concerns will prevail. The implications for the nuclear power renaissance are striking

  6. The socio-economic monitoring of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant region: methodology, programme, implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baubinas, R.; Burneika, D.; Daugirdas, V.

    2002-01-01

    The article is devoted to the argumentation of the main principles of socio-economic monitoring of the Ignalina NPP region. The programme and the territorial levels of the monitoring as well as the main results of the trial of the programme are presented. (author)

  7. Optimization of maintenance programme at Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station based on RCM analysis results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Min

    2003-01-01

    This paper begins with an introduction to Guangdong Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS) and gives a simple introduction to the operations and maintenance documentation system at GNPS. It then will review the maintenance program guidelines base and the associated problems prior to the application of reliability centered maintenance (RCM). How RCM was implemented at GNPS, how the results of RCM analysis were used to optimize the maintenance program and test program, and what is the interface between RCM and the existing maintenance program will be shown. Next, it will show the successful implementation of RCM at GNPS resulted in the following changes: A new understanding of equipment failure challenges operations and maintenance beliefs, maintenance concepts undergo a large change, maintenance program and periodic testing program are continuously modified and optimized, new on-condition maintenance technologies are introduced, non-productive scheduled overhauls are discarded, maintenance costs are effectively controlled, maintenance appropriateness has improved, management of hidden failures is more effective and timely. It will show the benefit of greater equipment reliability brought about by all of these changes, which in turn increases the reliability and safety of the entire power station. (author)

  8. IRIS guidelines. 2014 ed. Integrated Review of Infrastructure for Safety (IRIS) for self-assessment when establishing the safety infrastructure for a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA safety standards reflect an international consensus on what constitutes a high level of safety for protecting people and the environment, and therefore represent what all Member States should achieve, whilst recognizing the ultimate responsibility of each State to ensure safety when implementing a nuclear power programme. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSG-16, entitled Establishing the Safety Infrastructure for a Nuclear Power Programme was published in order to provide recommendations, presented in the form of sequential actions, on meeting safety requirements progressively during the initial three phases of the development of safety, as described in INSAG-22, Nuclear Safety Infrastructure for a National Nuclear Power Programme Supported by the IAEA Fundamental Safety Principles. To that end, the 200 safety related actions, which are proposed by SSG-16, constitute a roadmap to establish a foundation for promoting a high level of safety over the entire lifetime of the nuclear power plant. These actions reflect international consensus on good practice in order to achieve full implementation of IAEA safety standards. The IAEA has developed a methodology and tool, the Integrated Review of Infrastructure for Safety (IRIS), to assist States in undertaking self-assessment with respect to SSG-16 recommendations when establishing the safety infrastructure for a nuclear power programme, and to develop an action plan for improvement. The IRIS methodology and the associated tool are fully compatible with the IAEA safety standards and are also used, when appropriate, in the preparation of review missions, such as the Integrated Regulatory Review Service and advisory missions. The present guidelines describe the IRIS methodology for self-assessment against SSG-16 recommendations. Through IRIS implementation, every organization concerned with nuclear safety may gain proper awareness and engage in a continuous progressive process to develop the effective national

  9. Chemistry Programme for Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants. Specific Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-01-15

    This publication provides guidance on establishing a high standard chemistry programme in accordance with plant safety policy and regulatory requirements. It will be useful to managers of operating organizations and other staff responsible for supporting or monitoring plant activities and for oversight of the plant chemistry programme, as well as to regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Functions, responsibilities and interfaces; 3. Chemistry programme; 4. Chemistry control; 5. Chemistry aspects of radiation exposure optimization; 6. Chemistry surveillance; 7. Management of chemistry data; 8. Training and qualification; 9. Quality control of chemicals and other substances.

  10. Chemistry Programme for Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants. Specific Safety Guide (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This publication provides guidance on establishing a high standard chemistry programme in accordance with plant safety policy and regulatory requirements. It will be useful to managers of operating organizations and other staff responsible for supporting or monitoring plant activities and for oversight of the plant chemistry programme, as well as to regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Functions, responsibilities and interfaces; 3. Chemistry programme; 4. Chemistry control; 5. Chemistry aspects of radiation exposure optimization; 6. Chemistry surveillance; 7. Management of chemistry data; 8. Training and qualification; 9. Quality control of chemicals and other substances

  11. Chemistry Programme for Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides guidance on establishing a high standard chemistry programme in accordance with plant safety policy and regulatory requirements. It will be useful to managers of operating organizations and other staff responsible for supporting or monitoring plant activities and for oversight of the plant chemistry programme, as well as to regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Functions, responsibilities and interfaces; 3. Chemistry programme; 4. Chemistry control; 5. Chemistry aspects of radiation exposure optimization; 6. Chemistry surveillance; 7. Management of chemistry data; 8. Training and qualification; 9. Quality control of chemicals and other substances

  12. Cooperation with the Soviet Union in the development of the fuel and power base and in the implementation of the nuclear programme in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvanek, Z.

    1976-01-01

    One of the decisive chapters of the long-term programme of international cooperation with the Soviet Union is the solution of the problems of the development of the Czechoslovak fuel and power base, i.e., by the implementation of the nuclear programme. Cooperation in the solution of these tasks is oriented to the following spheres of activity: the realization of and cooperation in research and development tasks, the implementation of project designs based on basic and applied research, and cooperation in the production and assembly of technological equipment for nuclear power production. (J.P.)

  13. Fracture mechanics investigations within the swiss surveillance programme for the pressure vessel of modern nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, G; Krompholz, K [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1994-12-31

    In the frame of surveillance programmes of Swiss nuclear power plants, irradiation tests have been performed on tensile, impact and wedge opening load specimens as well as on three point bend-type specimens (for J-integral investigations) and pre-cracked Charpy impact specimens (for dynamical stress intensities K{sub ID}). An experimental method (potential drop technique) is used together with a mathematical procedure which allow for the determination of the stress intensity K{sub IC} for small CT-samples instead of large ones: agreement of these both methods is found excellent, and the mapping of both methods to fatigue pre-cracked small specimens (3 PB and Charpy) is possible. The application of the analysis method to dynamical tests is also possible. 15 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Armenian nuclear power plant: US NRC assistance programme for seismic upgrade and safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simos, N.; Perkins, K.; Jo, J.; Carew, J.; Ramsey, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (US NRC) technical support program activities associated with the Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP) safety upgrade. The US NRC program, integrated within the overall IAEA-led initiative for safety re-evaluation of the WWER plants, has as its main thrust the technical support to the Armenian Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ANRA) through close collaboration with the scientific staff at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Several major technical areas of support to ANRA form the basis of the NRC program. These include the seismic re-evaluation and upgrade of the ANPP, safety evaluation of critical systems, and the generation of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR). Specifically, the seismic re-evaluation of the ANPP is part of a broader activity that involves the re-assessment of the seismic hazard at the site, the identification of the Safe Shutdown Equipment at the plant and the evaluation of their seismic capacity, the detailed modeling and analysis of the critical facilities at ANPP, and the generation of the Floor Response Spectra (FRS). Based on the new spectra that incorporate all new findings (hazard, site soil, structure, etc.), the overall capacity of the main structures and the seismic capacity of the critical systems are being re-evaluated. In addition, analyses of critical safe shutdown systems and safe shutdown processes are being performed to ensure both the capabilities of the operating systems and the enhancement of safety due to system upgrades. At present, one of the principal goals of the US NRC's regulatory assistance activities with ANRA is enhancing ANRA's regulatory oversight of high-priority safety issues (both generic and plant-specific) associated with operation of the ANPP. As such, assisting ANRA in understanding and assessing plant-specific seismic and other safety issues associated with the ANPP is a high priority given the ANPP's being located in a seismically active area

  15. Infrastructure and Other Considerations to Launch Nuclear Power Programme: The Case of Sub-Sahara African Developing Countries like Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshesha, Atnatiwos Zeleke

    2011-01-01

    Trends in the world's population and energy use during the past decades show dramatic increases; and the demand for electricity, mainly from developing countries, is expected to increase more rapidly than the demand for other forms of energy. Besides, concern of climate change led to the need for production of significant amount of 'safe and clean' energy which in turn favours to nuclear option. Other alternative renewable sources like solar and wind can assist but currently they are short of supplying the required high energy demand either economically or/and in substantial amount. Nuclear option therefore remains a possible (developed) technology to fill this energy gap; and many countries including developing one show interest to make use of this energy source. In this paper the economic situations and energy production of six East Africa Sub-Saharan developing countries, with total population of 240 million were assessed, and 6.8% and 2.9% average GDP and population growth respectively registered in the last four years; however, their energy production in 2008 (est.) was 17.662 billion kWh, which is the least in the world. The contribution of inadequate energy and its poor coverage in hampering development, increase poverty and unstability were also analyzed. To come out of this cyclic challenge; it is recommended that countries based on regional economic cooperation should interconnect their electricity grid like EAPP and cooperate to invest commonly or unilaterally to launch Nuclear Power Programmes in relatively stable countries. Candid support of the international community is crucial, and IAEA should support and encourage such arrangements. It is also noted that the best candidate to start NP programme in these countries would be the worldwide dominant water cooled reactors. However, for countries with low grid capacity and to carry out projects in remote areas which are far-away from national grid systems or to desalinate water, considerations for smaller

  16. Contribution of International and Regional Networks in Developing and Maintaining Human Capacity Building for Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, O. E.

    2015-01-01

    Capacity is defined as; the ability of individuals and organizations or organizational units to perform functions effectively, efficiently and sustainably. Capacity building is an evidence-driven process of strengthening the abilities of individuals, organizations, and systems to perform core functions sustainably, and to continue to improve and develop over time. This article will explain the contributions of knowledge networks at the national, regional and international level in developing the existing capacity building and human resources for regulatory body in Sudan, to confront the future challenges regarding to nuclear power program- safety and security. The article will compare the advantages and effectiveness of these knowledge networks (IAEA, ANNuR, FNRBA) in capacity building and enhance the infrastructure of national regulatory body. And how these networks contribute to enable the regulatory bodies in Africa and Arab countries, to establish and strengthen their regulatory infrastructure for nuclear power programme consistent with international standards and recommendations. As well as the recommendations resulting and deduced from comparative study to promote the exchange of knowledge, experience and information among its members. (author)

  17. Nuclear power and weapons proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, T.; Rathjens, C.W.; Ruina, J.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear weapons development and nuclear electric power is examined. A brief description of nuclear weapons design is first given. This is then followed by a discussion of various aspects of nuclear power technology and of how they affect a nuclear weapon programme. These include fuel cycles, chemical reprocessing of spent fuel, uranium enrichment, and the control of dissemination of nuclear technology. In conclusion there is a discussion of possible political and institutional controls for limiting nuclear proliferation. (U.K.)

  18. India's nuclear power programme present status, future prospects and related issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Y.S.R.

    1998-01-01

    India is poorly placed in terms of world energy resources, while 16% of world's population lives in India, only 6% of coal and 0.6% of oil and gas reserves exist in the country. Moreover, the distribution of primary commercial energy resources is quite skewed. However, India is endowed with vast reserves of thorium. The energy potential of our modest uranium resources and sizeable thorium resources has been estimated to be six times that of our total coal reserves. Though during last fifty years since independence, India has made tremendous progress in the energy sector where the use of commercial energy has increased by ten folds. Electricity used during the same period has increased by eighty times. In spite of such an impressive growth the country, due to population growth, finds itself in the almost lowest bracket with regard to per capita consumption which is many fold lower than the world average. India as of today is a net energy importing country. The demand for energy, in particular electricity that has established to be the most efficient and convenient source, is projected to grow at 7-8% per annum for coming two decades. In such a demand scenario it is imperative that all the resources of energy must be judiciously utilised. However, with the depletion of fossil fuels and resulting possible price shocks a long-term energy security is required for the country. The paper deals with the role nuclear power can play in meeting the country's short term and long term demands, progress made and related issues. (author)

  19. Nuclear power: the turning tide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, P.J.; Warren, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    During 1980 and 1981, opposition to the expansion of the nuclear power generation programme grew from about 45% of the population to approximately 53%. Women, young people and labour voters are the most strongly opposed to nuclear power but among no section of the population is there a clear majority in favour of building more nuclear power stations. (author)

  20. The role of environmental survey laboratory at Nuclear Power Plants sites in India in environmental awareness and education programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, A.G.; Singhal, R.K.; Sharma, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    Increased public awareness of nuclear power runs the gamut from immediate disengagement to whole-hearted approval of the use of and expansion of this energy source. The involved study carried out at different Environmental Survey Laboratories (ESL) is mainly responsible for the environment friendly attitudes of the large section of public. The scientists working in these laboratories collected vast data on different environmental issues related to releases of very low levels of radioactivity in the environment. The total dose received by a hypothetical individual member of public (critical group) evaluated at plant boundary i.e. 1.6 km zone is generally in the range of 2-50 mSv/y which is about two order of magnitude less compared to limits prescribed by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) and International Commission on Radiological Protection ICRP) suggested value of 1 mSv/y. The ESL staff give special attention to communicate to the public to clear their queries and dislodge, their misconception about the nuclear facilities operating at their site. At ESL, various environmental pathways responsible for radiation dose and their impact on different environmental matrices are nicely presented in the form of charts and posters. Site and off-site emergency exercise are conducted regularly in co-ordination with inter governmental agencies responsible for mass sheltering, medical facilities and transportation. During these exercises mass communication programme are conducted to educate the public in the vicinity of Nuclear Power Plants Sites. ESL also updates from time to time the population distribution data within 30 km radial zone and the dietary habit of the population within this zone. (author)

  1. Contribution of IAEA, FNRBA and ANNuR as Networking in Developing and Maintaining Capacity Building for a nuclear power programme: Comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Omer E.

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly recognised that the mobilization and exchange of knowledge between different sectors (such as academia, policymakers, Regulators and practitioners) and regions or global can be of paramount importance in the field of Capacity Building for a nuclear power programme. As a result, the number of knowledge networks in this field has risen dramatically in recent years. Some of these networks bring together actors within a specific region, such as European Nuclear Safety Regulators Group (ENSREG), Western European Nuclear Regulators Association (WENRA), The Arab Network of Nuclear Regulators (ANNuR). Still others cover entire continents such as Asian Nuclear Safety Network (ANSN), Asia Pacific Safeguards Network (APSN) and Forum of Nuclear Regulatory Bodies in Africa (FNRBA). Or even operate worldwide and globally, like IAEA Special Support Services, Global Nuclear Safety and Security Network (GNSSN), World Organization of Nuclear Operators (WANO) and International Nuclear Regulators Association (INRA)

  2. International Nuclear Management Programmes -- INMP-- (VNMU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    • INMP is an IAEA-facilitated collaboration for universities to provide master’s degree programs in nuclear management, targeting managers or future managers working in the nuclear sector. • There are currently no full master’s degree programmes specializing in management for the nuclear sector. • Managers at NPP are typically engineers with few chances of formal management education. • In newcomer countries to nuclear energy, working towards the introduction of nuclear power, often lack technical or managerial experience in nuclear energy

  3. YKAe Research programme on nuclear power plant systems behaviour and operational aspects of safety 1990-1994, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, L.; Vanttola, T.

    1995-04-01

    The research programme on Nuclear Power Plant Systems Behaviour and Operational Aspects of Safety was carried out between 1990 and 1994. In the field of Safe operational margins of nuclear fuel and reactor core, an up-to-date steady-state fuel performance model was validated for higher burn-ups and well-characterized VVER fuel experiments were carried out. A comprehensive reactor analysis code system was extended and validated for complex 3-D phenomena, such as ATWS and boron dilution transients. Advanced hydraulics methods were added to the dynamics codes. Experiments were carried out with PACTEL, the most comprehensive thermal-hydraulic test facility for VVER-440-type reactors worldwide. For example, a series of natural circulation tests were provided for the first VVER-related international standard problem of the OECD/NEA. Advanced foreign computer codes for severe accidents were evaluated and modified for the needs of Finnish power plants. Specific progress was made in modelling the reflooding of an overheated core and in the structural analysis of a pressure vessel under corium load, as well as in experimental and theoretical studies of aerosol and hydrogen behaviour. Fire modelling was improved by implementing advanced calculation methods and by validating them against our own experiments and international test data. Techniques in living probabilistic safety assessment and risk decision-making were refined in pilot applications for continuous monitoring, follow-up and management of risks of an operating power plant. In the area of human reliability and organizational performance, factors important for the continuous development of the competence of control room operator teams and plant maintenance staff were identified. (237 refs., 75 figs., 13 tabs.)

  4. France without nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, B.; Charmant, A.; Devezeaux, J.G.; Ladoux, N.; Vielle, M.

    1995-01-01

    As environmental issues (particularly questions associated with the greenhouse effect) become a matter of increasing current concern, the French nuclear power programme can, in retrospect, be seen to have had a highly positive impact upon emissions of atmospheric pollutants. The most spectacular effect of this programme was the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions from 530 million tonnes per annum in 1973 to 387 million tonnes per annum today. Obviously, this result cannot be considered in isolation from the economic consequences of the nuclear power programme, which have been highly significant.The most obvious consequence of nuclear power has been the production of cheap electricity, while a further consequence has been the stability of electricity prices resulting from the increasing self-sufficiency of France in energy supplies (from 22% in 1973 to 49.% in 1992). Moreover, French nuclear industry exports. In 1993, 61.7 TW·h from nuclear production were exported, which contributed F.Fr. 14.2 billion to the credit side of the balance of payment. For the same year, Framatome exports are assessed at about F.Fr. 2 billion, corresponding to manufacturing and erection of heavy components, and maintenance services. Cogema, the French nuclear fuel operator, sold nuclear materials and services for F.Fr. 9.3 billion. Thus, nuclear activities contributed more than F.Fr. 25 billion to the balance of payment. Therefore, a numerical assessment of the macroeconomic impact of the nuclear power programme is essential for any accurate evaluation of the environmental consequences of that programme. For this assessment, which is presented in the paper, the Micro-Melodie macroeconomic and energy supply model developed by the Commissariat a l'energie atomique has been used. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  5. A review from the regulatory position of the control of occupational exposure associated with the first 20 years of the United Kingdom commercial nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmerson, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    Experience gained by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) during the past 20 years in the regulatory control of the nuclear power programme is discussed. After discussing control objectives, the principle sources of occupational exposure associated with the nuclear power programme are tabulated from 1962 to 1979. The fuel reprocessing plants give rise to the highest contribution to radiation dose. It is concluded that there is an improving trend in the radiological exposure pattern despite increasing power generation, fuel burn-up and processing plant throughput. The objective of ensuring that individuals do not exceed the statutory dose limits has largely been achieved. However, optimization procedures will probably be used in the future to optimise procedures and thus exposure data for various tasks will be required. (UK)

  6. IAEA's technical co-operation programme and its role in assisting member states in the safe utilisation of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this contribution the author deals with the technical co-operation projects of the IAEA. The Agency's technical co-operation programme is a most welcome mechanism for the transfer of nuclear technology, and to developing countries it is certainly the most attractive side of the Agency, since it is through this programme that the IAEA can contribute to the solution of their problems through the provision of know-how, technology and training. (authors)

  7. Scientific forum during the 46th regular session of the IAEA General Conference. Topical issues: Nuclear Power - Life Cycle Management; Managing Nuclear Knowledge; Nuclear Security. Programme and synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In response to the recommendations of several Agency advisory committees, to address issues related to nuclear power life cycle management, knowledge management in the field of nuclear power, and security of radiation sources and other nuclear material the IAEA is organizing the scientific forum to be held during the General Conference. The purpose of the meeting is to sharpen awareness and understanding of the emerging concerns about the aging of nuclear power plants, maintenance and preservation of knowledge and expertise in nuclear science, technology and applications, to emphasise the significance of security and physical protection of radiation sources and other radioactive material, and to better comprehend the role of the Agency in these processes

  8. Statement to International Conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Kaabi, Hamad

    2012-01-01

    United Arab Emirates is going through a rapid growth in its energy needs, projected to increase to three folds by the year 2020 compared to 2007, reflecting an annual growth rate of 9% from 2007 onward. In evaluating different options to meet the projected demand, Nuclear energy emerged as a proven, environmentally promising and commercially competitive option which could make a significant contribution to the UAE's economy and future energy security. In April 2008, UAE Government has formally endorsed its 'Policy on the Evaluation and Potential Development of Peaceful Nuclear Energy'. The policy defines a framework for developing the domestic nuclear energy program in form of commitments, strategies and principles. The policy is based on principles of complete operational transparency, highest standards of safety, security and non-proliferation, working directly with the IAEA and responsible nations of expertise, and lastly developing the program in way that ensures the long term sustainability. Focusing on the later, government plans on introduction of nuclear energy has put a great emphasis from the outset on principles that will ensure the program is successful and sustainable in the long run.

  9. Pakistan's Nuclear programme for peaceful purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilali, A.Z.

    1994-01-01

    Pakistan's nuclear programme is peaceful purposes and as the foregoing analysis shows, it is essential for its economic development. Nuclear power provides affordable energy for development of Pakistan economy and for meeting the minimum requirements of the people. Growing conventional energy requirements reflect Pakistan's expanding industrial demand for energy intensive appliances. Prospects for developing domestic sources of oil, natural gas, coal and hydro power are limited and the search for natural resources is slow due to lack of foreign aid and capital. Nuclear technology is an immensely powerful factor in the achievement of socio-economic development and elimination of poverty. (Orig./A.B.)

  10. Country nuclear power profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles was initiated within the framework of the IAEA`s programme for nuclear power plant performance assessment and feedback. It responded to a need for a database and a technical document containing a description of the energy and economic situation and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. The task was included in the IAEA`s programmes for 1993/1994 and 1995/1996. In March 1993, the IAEA organized a Technical Committee meeting to discuss the establishment of country data ``profiles``, to define the information to be included in the profiles and to review the information already available in the IAEA. Two expert meetings were convened in November 1994 to provide guidance to the IAEA on the establishment of the country nuclear profiles, on the structure and content of the profiles, and on the preparation of the publication and the electronic database. In June 1995, an Advisory Group meeting provided the IAEA with comprehensive guidance on the establishment and dissemination of an information package on industrial and organizational aspects of nuclear power to be included in the profiles. The group of experts recommended that the profiles focus on the overall economic, energy and electricity situation in the country and on its nuclear power industrial structure and organizational framework. In its first release, the compilation would cover all countries with operating power plants by the end of 1995. It was also recommended to further promote information exchange on the lessons learned from the countries engaged in nuclear programmes. For the preparation of this publication, the IAEA received contributions from the 29 countries operating nuclear power plants and Italy. A database has been implemented and the profiles are supporting programmatic needs within the IAEA; it is expected that the database will be publicly accessible in the future. Refs, figs, tabs.

  11. Country nuclear power profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles was initiated within the framework of the IAEA's programme for nuclear power plant performance assessment and feedback. It responded to a need for a database and a technical document containing a description of the energy and economic situation and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. The task was included in the IAEA's programmes for 1993/1994 and 1995/1996. In March 1993, the IAEA organized a Technical Committee meeting to discuss the establishment of country data ''profiles'', to define the information to be included in the profiles and to review the information already available in the IAEA. Two expert meetings were convened in November 1994 to provide guidance to the IAEA on the establishment of the country nuclear profiles, on the structure and content of the profiles, and on the preparation of the publication and the electronic database. In June 1995, an Advisory Group meeting provided the IAEA with comprehensive guidance on the establishment and dissemination of an information package on industrial and organizational aspects of nuclear power to be included in the profiles. The group of experts recommended that the profiles focus on the overall economic, energy and electricity situation in the country and on its nuclear power industrial structure and organizational framework. In its first release, the compilation would cover all countries with operating power plants by the end of 1995. It was also recommended to further promote information exchange on the lessons learned from the countries engaged in nuclear programmes. For the preparation of this publication, the IAEA received contributions from the 29 countries operating nuclear power plants and Italy. A database has been implemented and the profiles are supporting programmatic needs within the IAEA; it is expected that the database will be publicly accessible in the future

  12. Iran's nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boureston, J.; Marvin, B.

    2004-01-01

    Iran's nuclear program is discussed, activity of enterprises connected with the nuclear industry of the country is evaluated. IAEA initiated inspection of some industrial sites with the aim of data acquisition about nuclear developments of Iran. Uranium ore mining and reducing to small size, uranium conversion, uranium enrichment, fabrication of nuclear fuel, production of plutonium: plant of heavy water production, spent fuel reprocessing are discussed [ru

  13. Training simulators in nuclear power plants: Experience, programme design and assessment methodology. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    Simulators became an indispensable part of training world-wide. Therefore, international exchange of information is important to share the experience gained in different countries in order to assure high international standards. A second aspects is the tremendous evolution in the computing capacities of the simulator hardware and the increasing functionality of the simulator software. This background has let the IAEA to invite the simulator experts for an experience exchange. The German Simulator Centre in Essen, which is operated by the companies KSG and GfS, was asked to host this Specialists' Meeting. The Specialists' Meeting on ''Training Simulators in Nuclear Power Plants: Experience, Programme Design and Assessment Methodology'' was organized by IAEA in-cooperation with the German Simulator Centre operated by KSG Kraftwerks-Simulator-Gesellschaft mbH and GfS Gesellschaft fuer Simulatorschulung mbH and was held from 17 - 19 November 1997 in Essen, Germany. The meeting focused on developments in simulation technology, experiences with simulator upgrades, utilization of computerized tools as support and complement of simulator training, use of simulators for other purposes. The meeting was attended by 50 participants from 16 countries. In the course of four sessions 21 technical presentations were made. The present volume contains the papers by national delegates at the Specialists' Meeting

  14. Training simulators in nuclear power plants: Experience, programme design and assessment methodology. Proceedings of a specialists` meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Simulators became an indispensable part of training world-wide. Therefore, international exchange of information is important to share the experience gained in different countries in order to assure high international standards. A second aspects is the tremendous evolution in the computing capacities of the simulator hardware and the increasing functionality of the simulator software. This background has let the IAEA to invite the simulator experts for an experience exchange. The German Simulator Centre in Essen, which is operated by the companies KSG and GfS, was asked to host this Specialists` Meeting. The Specialists` Meeting on ``Training Simulators in Nuclear Power Plants: Experience, Programme Design and Assessment Methodology`` was organized by IAEA in-cooperation with the German Simulator Centre operated by KSG Kraftwerks-Simulator-Gesellschaft mbH and GfS Gesellschaft fuer Simulatorschulung mbH and was held from 17 - 19 November 1997 in Essen, Germany. The meeting focused on developments in simulation technology, experiences with simulator upgrades, utilization of computerized tools as support and complement of simulator training, use of simulators for other purposes. The meeting was attended by 50 participants from 16 countries. In the course of four sessions 21 technical presentations were made. The present volume contains the papers by national delegates at the Specialists` Meeting Refs, figs, tabs

  15. Opening Address [International Conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates), 14-18 March 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Y [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-10-15

    Full text: It is a pleasure for me to open this IAEA conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes. I am very grateful to the Government of the United Arab Emirates for hosting this important event. As you know, the world is witnessing a resurgence of interest in nuclear power. The IAEA has projects on introducing nuclear power with no fewer than 58 of our Member States. We expect between 10 and 25 new countries to bring their first nuclear power plants on line by 2030. These are momentous changes. However, some countries are concerned about a possible shortage of skilled professionals in the nuclear field in the coming decades. The generation of professionals who built and led the nuclear power industry for much of the past 50 years is approaching retirement and in some countries not enough students are coming up through the educational system to take their place. Naturally, we, at the IAEA, want to do all we can to help Member States address this issue. That is why we have organized this conference. The situation is different in each country. For countries with expanding nuclear power programmes, the challenge is to scale up their existing education and training in order to have the required qualified workforce on time. Countries planning to supply nuclear technology to others must not only meet their national human resource needs, but also be able to transfer education and training capacity together with the technology they provide. Finally, countries embarking on nuclear power cannot become too dependent on their technology supplier and need to develop their own home grown expertise and skills base. The IAEA would be happy to help interested States to formulate country specific policies on human resource development, education, training and knowledge management in support of nuclear power programmes. We could also help countries make better use of training facilities, research reactors and other educational

  16. The Nordic Research programme on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    Only two of the five Nordic countries (Denmark, Iceland, Finland, Norway and Sweden) - Sweden and Finland - operate nuclear power plants, but there are a number of nuclear installations close to their borders. Regular 4-year programmes were initiated in 1977, designated NKS-programmes. (NKS: Nordisk KerneSikkerhedsforskning - Nordic nuclear-safety research). The current fourth NKS-programme is, influenced by the Chernobyl accident, dominated by the necessity for acquiring knowledge on unexpected events and release of radioactive material from nuclear installations. The present programme is divided into the areas of emergency preparedness, waste and decommissioning, radioecology and reactor safety. It comprises a total of 18 projects, the results of which will later be published in the form of handbooks for use in cases of emergency etc. The future of joint Nordic project work in the nuclear safety field must be seen in the light of changing conditions in and around the Nordic countries, such as the opening of relations to neighbours in the east, the move towards the European Communities and the need for training a new generation of specialists in the nuclear field etc. Each project is described in considerable detail and a list of reports resulting from the third NKS-programme 1985-1989 is given. (AB)

  17. Nuclear power generating costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.R.; Kati, S.L.; Raman, R.; Nanjundeswaran, K.; Nadkarny, G.V.; Verma, R.S.; Mahadeva Rao, K.V.

    1983-01-01

    Indian experience pertaining to investment and generation costs of nuclear power stations is reviewed. The causes of investment cost increases are analysed and the increases are apportioned to escalation, design improvements and safety related adders. The paper brings out the fact that PHWR investment costs in India compare favourably with those experienced in developed countries in spite of the fact that the programme and the unit size are relatively much smaller in India. It brings out that in India at current prices a nuclear power station located over 800 km from coal reserves and operating at 75% capacity factor is competitive with thermal power at 60% capacity factor. (author)

  18. Nuclear power experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The International Conference on Nuclear Power Experience, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency, was held at the Hofburg Conference Center, Vienna, Austria, from 13 to 17 September 1982. Almost 1200 participants and observers from 63 countries and 20 organizations attended the conference. The 239 papers presented were grouped under the following seven main topics: planning and development of nuclear power programmes; technical and economic experience of nuclear power production; the nuclear fuel cycle; nuclear safety experience; advanced systems; international safeguards; international co-operation. The proceedings are published in six volumes. The sixth volume contains a complete Contents of Volume 1 to 5, a List of Participants, Authors and Transliteration Indexes, a Subject Index and an Index of Papers by Number

  19. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme. Publication Date: June 2013 (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  20. India's nuclear energy programme: prospects and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    India has announced ambitious plans to expand its nuclear energy programme nearly 15 fold in the next 20 years, from the current 4,500 MWe to about 62,000 MWe by 2032. By 2020, India's Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) plans to install 20,000 MWe of nuclear power generation capacity (the fifth largest in the world). The department has plans beyond 2030 too. According to these plans India will have the capacity to produce 275 GWe (Giga Watt of electricity) of nuclear power by the year 2052. The DAE's projections are summarised. This is a truly ambitious plan. Without sufficient quantities of energy, India cannot hope to become a global power. Its dream of registering eight to nine per cent economic growth per annum will remain just that, a dream. Even with such ambitious plans on the nuclear energy front, the share of nuclear power in the overall energy mix will remain small. Currently nuclear energy constitutes only about three per cent of the total energy consumed in India. If the current projections are realised, the share of nuclear energy in the total energy output will still be about 20 per cent. India takes pride in its nuclear programme. Over the years, successive governments have fully supported the DAE's plans. This support is likely to continue in the future. In fact, following the Indo-US civil nuclear deal and the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) waiver in 2008, the mood in India has turned upbeat. India is now getting integrated into the global nuclear regime even though it has not signed the Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty (NNPT). The NSG waiver has, however, allowed India to enter into civil nuclear cooperation with several countries

  1. Nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, P.

    1985-01-01

    The question 'Do we really need nuclear power' is tackled within the context of Christian beliefs. First, an estimate is made of the energy requirements in the future and whether it can be got in conventional ways. The dangers of all the ways of supplying energy (eg coal mining, oil and gas production) are considered scientifically. Also the cost of each source and its environmental effects are debated. The consequences of developing a new energy source, as well as the consequences of not developing it, are considered. Decisions must also take into account a belief about the ultimate purpose of life, the relation of men to each other and to nature. Each issue is raised and questions for discussion are posed. On the whole the book comes down in favour of nuclear power.

  2. Economics of nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, I.H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear power development in Taiwan was initiated in 1956. Now Taipower has five nuclear units in smooth operation, one unit under construction, two units under planning. The relatively short construction period, low construction costs and twin unit approach had led to the significant economical advantage of our nuclear power generation. Moreover betterment programmes have further improved the availability and reliability factors of our nuclear power plants. In Taipower, the generation cost of nuclear power was even less than half of that of oil-fired thermal power in the past years ever since the nuclear power was commissioned. This made Taipower have more earnings and power rates was even dropped down in March 1983. As Taiwan is short of energy sources and nuclear power is so well-demonstrated nuclear power will be logically the best choice for Taipower future projects

  3. External man-induced events in relation to nuclear power plant design. A Safety Guide. A publication within the NUSS programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In order to take account of lessons learned since the first publication of the NUSS programme was issued, it was decided in 1986 to revise and reissue the Codes and Safety Guides. During the original development of these publications, as well as during the revision process, care was taken to ensure that all Member States, in particular those with active nuclear power programmes, could provide their input. Several independent reviews took place including a final one by the Nuclear Safety Standards Advisory Group (NUSSAG). The revised Codes were approved by the Board of Governors in June 1988. In the revision process new developments in technology and methods of analysis have been incorporated on the basis of international consensus. It is hoped that the revised Codes will be used, and that they will be accepted and respected by Member States as a basis for regulation of the safety of power reactors within the national legal and regulatory framework. 28 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  4. Inspection of fire protection measures and fire fighting capability at nuclear power plants. A publication within the NUSS programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The present publication has been developed with the help of experts from regulatory, operating and engineering organizations, all with practical experience in the field of fire protection of nuclear power plants. The publication outlines practices for inspecting the fire protection measures at nuclear power plants in accordance with Safety Series No.50-SG-D2(Rev.1), Fire Protection in Nuclear Power Plants, and includes a comprehensive fire safety inspection checklist of the specific elements to be addressed when evaluating the adequacy and effectiveness of the fire protection measures and manual fire fighting capability available at operating nuclear power plants. The publication will be useful not only to regulators and safety assessors but also to operators and designers. The book addresses a specialized topic and it is recommended that it be used in conjunction with Safety Guide No.50-SG-D2(Rev.1)

  5. Opening remarks at the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, D.E.

    2010-03-01

    The topic of this conference - human resources development and the expansion of nuclear power - is about the commitment and investment in people. The importance of this 'human side' of modern technology is sometimes forgotten or assumed to develop on its own once basic educational programs and institutions are put in place. In my view, the development and maintenance of a skilled national workforce is critical to the development of a stable, successful national nuclear power program

  6. Nuclear power and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidambaram, R.

    1992-01-01

    Some aspects of safety of nuclear power with special reference to Indian nuclear power programme are discussed. India must develop technology to protect herself from the adverse economic impact arising out of the restrictive regime which is being created through globalization of safety and environmental issues. Though the studies done and experience gained so far have shown that the PHWR system adopted by India has a number of superior safety features, research work is needed in the field of operation and maintenance of reactors and also in the field of reactor life extension through delaying of ageing effects. Public relations work must be pursued to convince the public at large of the safety of nuclear power programme. The new reactor designs in the second stage of evolution are based on either further improvement of existing well-proven designs or adoptions of more innovative ideas based on physical principles to ensure a higher level of safety. The development of Indian nuclear power programme is characterised by a balanced approach in the matter of assuring safety. Safety enforcement is not just looked upon as a pure administrative matter, but experts with independent minds are also involved in safety related matters. (M.G.B.)

  7. Broader utilization of programmable automation equipment in French nuclear power plants: Reflections on the choices made by Electricite de France and French designers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudry, Y.; Varaldi, G.

    1983-01-01

    More than 1000 microprocessors and more than 10,000 data memories in each of the twenty or so 1300 MW units in the French nuclear programme: that was the decision taken by Electricite de France (EDF) in conjunction with the designers in 1974, with the intention of introducing programmable automata on a wide scale in French nuclear power plants. This programme was carried out with the assistance of advanced research services such as the universities, the Commissariat a l'energie atomique (CEA), EDF's design and research service and the designers, most of whom were already EDF suppliers for the 900 MW range. Having used computers for linking sequences (themselves carried out with electromagnetic technology) for its latest natural-uranium gas-cooled graphite-moderated power plants, EDF decided to call a temporary halt, in the case of its 900 MW light-water range, to the use of digital techniques for the control and automation of power plants although it continued to employ such techniques widely in data processing. Thus, the widespread introduction of programmable automata, which was decided upon in 1974/75 at a time when no equivalent existed at the international level, led EDF and French designers to undertake a major development effort in order to meet the requirements - particularly safety and reliability requirements - for such automata to be incorporated into the nuclear field. How does this choice fit in with the logical evolution of the digitalization of French nuclear power plants. What problems has it caused for EDF and French industry. How have these problems been tackled. How have they been overcome. These are the questions dealt with in this paper. (author)

  8. The Dutch nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering Services Ltd. has, in fulfillment of its contractual commitment to the Dutch Industrial Council for Energy and Environment Technology (IREM), investigated the broad capability of the Dutch industry in playing a major role in the supply of goods and services for the construction of nuclear plants in the Netherlands. The findings are summarized in this document. 5 tabs

  9. Progress of French nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierrard, J.-H.

    1981-02-01

    The aims of the French nuclear programme launched in 1974 are briefly recalled to mind, as are the projects completed at the end of 1980. The operating results mentioned, particularly concern the new PWR units brought into commercial service in 1980 [fr

  10. NPP financial and regulatory risks-Importance of a balanced and comprehensive nuclear law for a newcomer country considering nuclear power programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manan, J. A. N. Abd; Mostafa, N. A.; Salim, M. F.

    2015-04-01

    understanding of various requirements of public, regulators, investors, financial institutions, international community, operator and other important stakeholders. Ambiguities and uncertainties, especially with regards to certain conditions and requirements should be minimised by emulating good practices of experienced nuclear regulators. The imposition of various financial requirements such as funds for decommissioning, radioactive waste management, financial security, nuclear liabilities and licensing fees are necessary, but at the same time the quantum needs to be clearly defined. Concerns on absolute liability of the operators need to be addressed through a creation of necessary and proper nuclear insurance legislations to mitigate operator S nuclear liability obligations and other financial risks. Another major risk to investors is the possibility of public resistance which will not only can hinder the construction but can also stop operation of the nuclear power plant which will contribute to huge losses to investors and countries. This may require a provision in the legislation that provide proper compensation for these situations and at the same time to allow operators to engage in nuclear promotional activities, such as community benefit and public consultation as voluntary initiatives. Through proper planning, research, consultation and execution, the proposed nuclear law shall be able to promote good regulatory practices for public and investors' confidence and benefit. Early involvement of various stakeholders is essential as a platform for regular communications between regulators and interested parties. Stakeholders' participation in the NPP programme and law developments will also promote transparency of the projects while upholding the independency of the regulators.

  11. NPP financial and regulatory risks-Importance of a balanced and comprehensive nuclear law for a newcomer country considering nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manan, J. A. N. Abd; Mostafa, N. A.; Salim, M. F.

    2015-01-01

    understanding of various requirements of public, regulators, investors, financial institutions, international community, operator and other important stakeholders. Ambiguities and uncertainties, especially with regards to certain conditions and requirements should be minimised by emulating good practices of experienced nuclear regulators. The imposition of various financial requirements such as funds for decommissioning, radioactive waste management, financial security, nuclear liabilities and licensing fees are necessary, but at the same time the quantum needs to be clearly defined. Concerns on absolute liability of the operators need to be addressed through a creation of necessary and proper nuclear insurance legislations to mitigate operator S nuclear liability obligations and other financial risks. Another major risk to investors is the possibility of public resistance which will not only can hinder the construction but can also stop operation of the nuclear power plant which will contribute to huge losses to investors and countries. This may require a provision in the legislation that provide proper compensation for these situations and at the same time to allow operators to engage in nuclear promotional activities, such as community benefit and public consultation as voluntary initiatives. Through proper planning, research, consultation and execution, the proposed nuclear law shall be able to promote good regulatory practices for public and investors’ confidence and benefit. Early involvement of various stakeholders is essential as a platform for regular communications between regulators and interested parties. Stakeholders’ participation in the NPP programme and law developments will also promote transparency of the projects while upholding the independency of the regulators

  12. NPP financial and regulatory risks-Importance of a balanced and comprehensive nuclear law for a newcomer country considering nuclear power programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manan, J. A. N. Abd, E-mail: jamalan@tnb.com.my; Mostafa, N. A.; Salim, M. F. [Nuclear Energy Department, Planning Division, Tenaga Nasional Berhad Level 32, Dua Sentral, No. 8 Jalan Tun Sambanthan, 50470 Brickfields, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    understanding of various requirements of public, regulators, investors, financial institutions, international community, operator and other important stakeholders. Ambiguities and uncertainties, especially with regards to certain conditions and requirements should be minimised by emulating good practices of experienced nuclear regulators. The imposition of various financial requirements such as funds for decommissioning, radioactive waste management, financial security, nuclear liabilities and licensing fees are necessary, but at the same time the quantum needs to be clearly defined. Concerns on absolute liability of the operators need to be addressed through a creation of necessary and proper nuclear insurance legislations to mitigate operator S nuclear liability obligations and other financial risks. Another major risk to investors is the possibility of public resistance which will not only can hinder the construction but can also stop operation of the nuclear power plant which will contribute to huge losses to investors and countries. This may require a provision in the legislation that provide proper compensation for these situations and at the same time to allow operators to engage in nuclear promotional activities, such as community benefit and public consultation as voluntary initiatives. Through proper planning, research, consultation and execution, the proposed nuclear law shall be able to promote good regulatory practices for public and investors’ confidence and benefit. Early involvement of various stakeholders is essential as a platform for regular communications between regulators and interested parties. Stakeholders’ participation in the NPP programme and law developments will also promote transparency of the projects while upholding the independency of the regulators.

  13. Energy situation and nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megahid, M R [Reactor and Neutron physics Department Nuclear Research Center A.E., Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    A brief general review is given concerning the requirements of power throughout history with an indication to the world capital reserves of energy. The energy released from the conversion of mass in chemical and nuclear processes is also discussed with comparative analysis between conventional fuel fired plant and nuclear power plant having the same energy output. The advantages and disadvantages arising from having a nuclear power programme are also discussed. 1 fig.

  14. Nuclear power. Its development in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pocock, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    The subject is covered chronologically in chapters, entitled: from war to peace; the Atomic Energy Authority and the first nuclear power station; a civil power programme; Windscale - the need for caution; research for the future; the new (Magnox) power stations; revision of the nuclear power programme; supply of nuclear fuels; nuclear power for ship propulsion; completion of first programme; Dungeness B and second programme, political assessment of (nuclear) industry's structure; reorganization of the industry; nuclear power in the environment; completion of second programme; the energy crisis; decision on third programme. (U.K.)

  15. No ''all clear'' signal yet. Although the West has set up support programmes for nuclear power plants in eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehrlich, D.

    1996-01-01

    During the first years after the catastrophic nuclear accident at Chernobyl, reports on Soviet nuclear power plants leaking to the west seldom contained hard facts. Now, after five years of a partnership between east and west in matters of reactor safety, things are clearer. What the commitment of the west to more reactor safety in eastern Europe means in practice was the subject of the winter meeting of the Deutsches Atomforum, Bonn. (orig.) [de

  16. Country Nuclear Power Profiles. 2016 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-12-01

    The Country Nuclear Power Profiles compile background information on the status and development of nuclear power programmes in Member States. The publication summarizes organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programmes and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory and international framework in each State. Its descriptive and statistical overview of the overall economic, energy and electricity situation in each State and its nuclear power framework is intended to serve as an integrated source of key background information about nuclear power programmes throughout the world. This 2016 edition, issued on CD-ROM, contains updated country information for 51 States.

  17. Country Nuclear Power Profiles - 2015 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-08-01

    The Country Nuclear Power Profiles compile background information on the status and development of nuclear power programmes in Member States. The publication summarizes organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programmes and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory and international framework in each State. Its descriptive and statistical overview of the overall economic, energy and electricity situation in each State and its nuclear power framework is intended to serve as an integrated source of key background information about nuclear power programmes throughout the world. This 2015 edition, issued on CD-ROM, contains updated country information for 51 States

  18. Steps to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The recent increase in oil prices will undoubtedly cause the pace at which nuclear power is introduced in developing countries to quicken in the next decade, with many new countries beginning to plan nuclear power programmes. The guidebook is intended for senior government officials, policy makers, economic and power planners, educationalists and economists. It assumes that the reader has relatively little knowledge of nuclear power systems or of nuclear physics but does have a general technical or management background. Nuclear power is described functionally from the point of view of an alternative energy source in power system expansion. The guidebook is based on an idealized approach. Variations on it are naturally possible and will doubtless be necessary in view of the different organizational structures that already exist in different countries. In particular, some countries may prefer an approach with a stronger involvement of their Atomic Energy Commission or Authority, for which this guidebook has foreseen mainly a regulatory and licensing role. It is intended to update this booklet as more experience becomes available. Supplementary guidebooks will be prepared on certain major topics, such as contracting for fuel supply and fuel cycle requirements, which the present book does not go into very deeply

  19. The UK nuclear programme: The Sizewell experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salter, W.B.

    1990-01-01

    The current status of the Sizewell 'B' PWR programme and the effect on it of the proposed privatisation of U.K electricity generation is reviewed. Departures from and additions to the Standard Nuclear Unit Power Plant System (SNUPPS) reference plant design are given. These include Reactor Coolant System overpressure protection and the addition of an Emergency Charging System and an Emergency Boration System. Improvements in monitoring Reactor Coolant System water level during refuelling and maintenance shutdown operations are presented. (author)

  20. Activity determination for neutron dosimetry in the vigilance programme for the pressure vessel in Atucha I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furnari, J.C.; Cohen, I.M.; Ciriani, D.F.; Helzel Garcia, J.

    1993-01-01

    The methodologies for the activity determination of Co-60, Nb-93m and Nb-94 in flux monitors are presented. This was done in order to evaluate dose and damage caused by radiation received by pressure vessel materials of the Atucha I nuclear power plant for its surveillance program. (author)

  1. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described

  2. Nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A few of the essential issues which arise when we consider nuclear power and development together in the context of energy policy are discussed. Ethical concerns must ultimately be expressed through policies and their impact on people. There are ethical issues associated with nuclear power in the developing countries which deserve our attention. Four aspects of the question of nuclear power in developing countries are considered: their energy situation; the characteristics of nuclear power which are relevant to them; whether developing countries will undertake nuclear power programmes; and finally the ethical implications of such programmes. It is concluded that what happens in developing countries will depend more on the ethical nature of major political decisions and actions than on the particular technology they use to generate their electricity. (LL)

  3. Plan for ecumenical hearing on the risks and potentialities of the further expansion of nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, J.M.; Abrecht, P.

    1976-01-01

    The basis of the Hearing, initiated by the World Council of Churches, is explained. Some countries are planning a rapid development of nuclear power, but others are reluctant to follow this line. An outline is presented of the divergent views: those against refer to the political, social and technical problems which are being left with future generations (management of obsolete reactor systems, storage of radioactive wastes); restriction on free discussion on grounds of national security; need for international safeguards; economic questions; environmental impact; plutonium hazard of breeder reactors. Those for nuclear power argue that there is no obvious alternative way of meeting the world's power demands. Intermediate views are also presented. The Hearing received position papers prepared by specialists on the various aspects of the subject. The Hearing Group held a meeting at Sigtuna, Sweden, June 24 to 29, 1975. The text of the document they prepared and the position papers, are presented as separate papers in the present series. (U.K.)

  4. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Data concerning the existing nuclear power plants in the world are presented. The data was retrieved from the SIEN (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: nuclear plants, its status and type; installed nuclear power plants by country; nuclear power plants under construction by country; planned nuclear power plants by country; cancelled nuclear power plants by country; shut-down nuclear power plants by country. (E.G.) [pt

  5. Fire hazard analysis for WWER nuclear power plants. Report of the IAEA extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    This status report presents an overview of the different techniques available to carry out a fire hazard analysis, from qualitative criteria to quantitative methodologies of different purposes and basis; and then, it details a simplified methodology based on a screening approach which could be used in former Soviet designed nuclear power plants. The methodology presented in this report is an adequate means to identify fire related plant specific vulnerabilities to severe accidents, and it provides a useful tool for ranking the various plant fires according to their significances, as well as technical basis for prioritizing the implementation of plant improvements. The applicability of the methodology proposed to the former Soviet Union designed reactors has been evaluated. Its usefulness to the purpose defined above is conclusive. However, some aspects need further consideration, among others data sources and screening criteria. Computer codes for studying fire effects and fire spread in plant locations are also dealt with. Some computer codes are shortly described, from simplified models to more complex ones which allow more accurate modelling of geometries and accounting for additional phenomena. 10 refs, 5 tabs

  6. Hendry collides with nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, S.

    1979-01-01

    It is argued that nuclear power is not the answer to future energy needs in the UK. Problems associated with nuclear power programmes are summarized (cost; lead time; ecological; safety; reliability; waste disposal). It is suggested, instead, that conservation is the first key to economic stability over the next decade, and steps are proposed. Particular emphasis is laid on combined heat and power schemes, linked to a district heating network. (U.K.)

  7. Lessons Learned in Performing and Implementing the Results of TNA in a Newly Developed Regulatory Body with a Mandate to Regulate the Country's Expanding Nuclear Power Programme: A Case Study of PNRA no. 97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahzad, Moazzam

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: → It is essential that regulatory bodies apply a systematic approach to training need assessment; → Education and training requires capital investment, time and effort; it must be planned long in advance to be effective; → It is essential for a country considering a nuclear power programme to establish and implement a corresponding manpower development programme for its regulatory body

  8. Datafile: [nuclear power in] Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Japan is third after the USA and France in terms of the Western World's installed nuclear capacity, but it has by far the largest forward programme. Great effort is also being put into the fuel cycle and advanced reactors. There is close co-operation between the government, utilities and manufacturers, but Japan has not sought to export reactors. The government has responded to the growing public opposition to nuclear power with a massive increase in its budget for public relations. Details of the nuclear power programme are given. (author)

  9. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    d'Easum, Lille.

    1976-03-01

    An environmentalist's criticism of nuclear energy is given, on a layman's level. Such subjects as conflict of interest in controlling bodies, low-level radiation, reactor safety, liability insurance, thermal pollution, economics, heavy water production, export of nuclear technology, and the history of the anti-nuclear movement are discussed in a sensationalistic tone. (E.C.B.)

  10. Nuclear power and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    A brief statement is presented of the nuclear power reactor programme in the United Kingdom and of the statutory and other organisations for ensuring reactor safety. The possible effects of the programme on the environment are dealt with under three heads: (1) discharge of radioactive effluents during normal operation of the power plants; (2) storage and disposal of radioactive waste; (3) reactor safety. Radiological protection of operating staff is also described briefly. (U.K.)

  11. Databases on safety issues for WWER and RBMK reactors. Users' manual. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    At the beginning of the IAEA Extrabudgetary Programme on the safety of WWER reactors a great number of findings and recommendations (safety items) were collected as a result of design review and safety review missions of the WWER-440/230 type reactors. On the basis of these findings a technical database containing more than 1300 records was established to support the consolidation of the information obtained and to help in identification of safety issues. After the scope of the WWER extrabudgetary programme was extended similar data sets were prepared for the WWER-440/213, WWER-1000 and RBMK nuclear power plants. This publication describes the structure of the databases on safety issues of WWER and RBMK NPPs, the information sources used in the databases and interrogation capabilities for users to obtain the necessary information. 14 refs, 9 figs, 5 tabs

  12. Civil engineering firms and the nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giral, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Pointing out that the realization of the electronuclear programme accounted for just under 5 % of the annual turnover of civil engineering firms from 1975 to 1987, the author lists the main types of work entrusted to these firms for the bulding of the power stations: electrical work, structural work (civil engineering, metal structures. He then describes the two main problems which the profession has to face in the nuclear field: the management of final contract stages and adaptation to the slowing down in the rate of commitment of power plants [fr

  13. Questions for considerations in context of launch a nuclear energy programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The main problems to be considered at the beginning of a nuclear power programme were presented . This is polish translation of '' Considerations to launch a nuclear programme '' IAEA 2007, printed by National Atomic Agency - Document of Nuclear Power Support Group coordinated by IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy. Strategy elements influencing the political decision, the main programme factors concerning the first nuclear power plant, IAEA support and reference documents are included

  14. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 5B. Experience data. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material contains reports on the effects of Armenia earthquakes on selected power, industry and commercial facilities and seismic functional qualification of active mechanical and electrical components tested on shaking table

  15. Nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.; Bennett, L.L.; Skjoeldebrand, R.

    1984-01-01

    Experience clearly indicates that most developing countries actively planning and implementing nuclear power require broad-scope assistance if their use of nuclear technology is to be safe, economic, and reliable. The IAEA's assistance is directed both to general planning, and to the development of supporting structures and is based on an assessment of needs which cannot be satisfied by other means. The Agency's Division of Nuclear Power has the technical background and tools to support a comprehensive programme of assistance in nuclear power assessment, planning, and implementation. The overall objective of such a programme is to help strengthen national capabilities of executing the following tasks: Analysis of overall energy and electricity demand and supply projections; planning the possible role of nuclear power in electricity supply, through determining the economically optimal extent and schedule for the introduction of nuclear power plants; assessing the available infrastructures and the need, constraints, and possibilities for their development; and developing master schedules, programmes, and recommendations for action. Proposed programmes must be reviewed periodically, and one of the Agency's aims is to ensure that national competence to carry out such reviews exists or can be developed. Training of local staff is therefore one of the most important objectives

  16. Planning and implementation of nuclear research programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The planning and implementation of nuclear research programmes in developed and developing countries is discussed. The main aspects of these programmes in USA, France, Japan, India and Brazil are reported. (M.W.O.) [pt

  17. The IAEA Nuclear Security Programme Combating Nuclear Terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Discusses the four threats of nuclear terrorism,which are theft of a nuclear weapon, theft of material to make an improvised nuclear explosive device,theft of other radioactive material for an Radiological dispersal device and sabotage of a facility or transport. The IAEA Nuclear Security programme combating Nuclear Terrorism therefore adopts a comprehensive approach. The programme addresses the need to cover nuclear and other radioactive materials, nuclear facilities and transports, non-nuclear, medical and industrial applications of sources

  18. Nuclear Power Today and Tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, with 437 nuclear power reactors in operation and 68 new reactors under construction, nuclear power's global generating capacity reached 372.5 GW(e) at the end of 2012. Despite public scepticism, and in some cases fear, which arose following the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, two years later the demand for nuclear power continues to grow steadily, albeit at a slower pace. A significant number of countries are pressing ahead with plans to implement or expand their nuclear power programmes because the drivers toward nuclear power that were present before Fukushima have not changed. These drivers include climate change, limited fossil fuel supply, and concerns about energy security. Globally, nuclear power looks set to continue to grow steadily, although more slowly than was expected before the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. The IAEA's latest projections show a steady rise in the number of nuclear power plants in the world in the next 20 years. They project a growth in nuclear power capacity by 23% by 2030 in the low projection and by 100% in the high projection. Most new nuclear power reactors planned or under construction are in Asia. In 2012 construction began on seven nuclear power plants: Fuqing 4, Shidaowan 1, Tianwan 3 and Yangjiang 4 in China; Shin Ulchin 1 in Korea; Baltiisk 1 in Russia; and Barakah 1 in the United Arab Emirates. This increase from the previous year's figures indicates an on-going interest and commitment to nuclear power and demonstrates that nuclear power is resilient. Countries are demanding new, innovative reactor designs from vendors to meet strict requirements for safety, national grid capacity, size and construction time, which is a sign that nuclear power is set to keep growing over the next few decades.

  19. Responsibilities and capabilities of a nuclear energy programme implementing organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    An appropriate infrastructure is essential for the efficient, safe, reliable and peaceful use of nuclear power. The IAEA was encouraged by its Member States to provide assistance to those considering the introduction of nuclear power. These countries face the challenge of building a national nuclear infrastructure to support a first nuclear power plant. The IAEA is responding to their needs through increased technical assistance, missions and workshops, and with new and updated technical publications in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series. Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power, an IAEA Nuclear Energy Series publication (NG-G-3.1), provides detailed guidance on a holistic approach to national nuclear infrastructure development, over three phases. Nineteen issues are identified in this guide, ranging from development of a government's national position on nuclear power to planning for procurement related to the first NPP. An important element of the holistic approach is an entity that can help prepare the decision makers in a country to make a knowledgeable commitment to nuclear power, and then to coordinate infrastructure development efforts among various implementing organizations so that they arrive at the point of readiness to issue a bid tender at the same time. In the Milestones guide, this entity is called a nuclear energy programme implementing organization (NEPIO). As a growing number of Member States started to consider the nuclear power option, they asked for guidance from the IAEA on how to launch a nuclear power programme. In particular, Member States requested additional information on how to establish a NEPIO, especially in the earliest phases of a programme. This report has been prepared to provide information on the responsibilities and capabilities of a NEPIO, as well as to give an indication on how it relates to other key national organizations in the implementation of a nuclear power programme, such as the owner

  20. Nuclear power economic database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Xiaoming; Li Lin; Zhao Shiping

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear power economic database (NPEDB), based on ORACLE V6.0, consists of three parts, i.e., economic data base of nuclear power station, economic data base of nuclear fuel cycle and economic database of nuclear power planning and nuclear environment. Economic database of nuclear power station includes data of general economics, technique, capital cost and benefit, etc. Economic database of nuclear fuel cycle includes data of technique and nuclear fuel price. Economic database of nuclear power planning and nuclear environment includes data of energy history, forecast, energy balance, electric power and energy facilities

  1. The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate's Review Statement and Evaluation of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co's RD and D Programme 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-09-01

    According to the Act on Nuclear Activities, the holder of a licence to operate a nuclear reactor must adopt all necessary measures to manage and dispose of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The Act stipulates requirements on a research programme which is to be submitted to the competent regulatory authority once every three years. The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) is the competent authority that evaluates and reviews the programme. SKI distributes the programme to a wide circle of reviewing bodies for comment, including authorities, municipalities, universities and NGOs. The Swedish programme for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel started about 25 years ago. According to the Swedish Nuclear Waste Management Co. (SKB), the planned repository will not be closed until sometime in the 2050's. A series of decisions must be made before this goal is attained. The decision process can therefore be described as a multi-stage process. During each stages, safety will be evaluated and there is a possibility of taking additional time for development work or of selecting improved solutions. SKI's task is to ensure safety compliance throughout all of these stages. In its decision in January 2000, the Government explained that the Programme for Research, Development and Demonstration for the Treatment and Final Disposal of Nuclear Waste (RD and D Programme 98) complied with legislative requirements but that certain supplementary reporting should be conducted by SKB and submitted no later than when the next programme, in accordance with paragraph 12 of the Act on Nuclear Activities, was prepared (September 2001). The supplementary reporting requested by the Government, and which was submitted by SKB to SKI in December 2000, dealt with issues relating to method selection, site selection and the site investigation programme. SKI submitted its review of the supplement to the Government in June 2001 and the Government made a decision on the matter on November

  2. Nuclear power in Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, Ronald E.

    1998-08-01

    Contains Executive Summary and Chapters on: Nuclear Energy in the Asian context; Types of nuclear power reactors used in Asia; A survey of nuclear power by country; The economics of nuclear power; Fuels, fuel cycles and reprocessing; Environmental issues and waste disposal; The weapons issues and nuclear power; Conclusions. (Author)

  3. Development of field programmable gate array–based encryption module to mitigate man-in-the-middle attack for nuclear power plant data communication network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdallah Elakrat

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a security module based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA to mitigate man-in-the-middle cyber attacks. Nowadays, the FPGA is considered to be the state of the art in nuclear power plants I&C systems due to its flexibility, reconfigurability, and maintainability of the FPGA technology; it also provides acceptable solutions for embedded computing applications that require cybersecurity. The proposed FPGA-based security module is developed to mitigate information-gathering attacks, which can be made by gaining physical access to the network, e.g., a man-in-the-middle attack, using a cryptographic process to ensure data confidentiality and integrity and prevent injecting malware or malicious data into the critical digital assets of a nuclear power plant data communication system. A model-based system engineering approach is applied. System requirements analysis and enhanced function flow block diagrams are created and simulated using CORE9 to compare the performance of the current and developed systems. Hardware description language code for encryption and serial communication is developed using Vivado Design Suite 2017.2 as a programming tool to run the system synthesis and implementation for performance simulation and design verification. Simple windows are developed using Java for physical testing and communication between a personal computer and the FPGA. Keywords: AES-128, Cyber Security, Encryption, Field Programmable Gate Array, I&C

  4. Lessons of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collingridge, D.

    1984-01-01

    In an earlier article the author has argued that the turbulent history of nuclear power in Britain and the USA stems from the technology itself, and has little to do with the very different institutional arrangements made for the new technology in the two countries. Nuclear plant has various features which make its planning extraordinarily difficult. Its long lead time, large unit size, capital intensity and dependence on complex infrastructure combine to ensure that mistakes are likely to be made in planning the technology and that what mistakes do occur are expensive. This article aims to expand on the earlier one in two ways; by looking at the apparent success of the French nuclear programme which seems to run counter to the thesis of the earlier article, and by trying to draw lessons from the earlier analysis for the breeder reactor. (author)

  5. Safe and economic performance of nuclear power plant. Operation through meticulous Q/A programmes - a german example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenk, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    Safe and reliable operation of a nuclear power plant over its life time of 40 to 60 years is the essential condition for an economic performance. This goal can be achieved by a qualified responsible staff realizing a high quality of operation and by maintaining high quality and technical standards in the plant in accordance with the status of science and technology. Quality assurance procedures have to verify this in detail, in close contact with the work to be performed. In this presentation I would like to describe our approach in Philippsburg to cope with this task

  6. Nuclear power to aid development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Before nuclear power can play its full role in contributing to the development of less advanced countries, full understanding of the capital investment, fuel costs and other economic factors as well as of the place it must take in existing power programmes is essential. Some insight into the problems and prospects was gained at the symposium arranged by the Agency, and held in Istanbul in October, on 'Nuclear Energy Costs and Economic Development'. (author)

  7. Status of nuclear power in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.R.

    1976-01-01

    The article traces the history of Indian atomic energy programme and deals with the various nuclear power reactors operating commercially and under construction. Development of atomic energy in India is firmly committed to the installation of PHWR's as the mainstay of the country's immediate nuclear power programme. Indian nuclear power programme upto 1982 and major efforts at indigenisation, as reflected by the diminishing foreign exchange component in capital cost of different projects are discussed. Operational highlights of Tarapur atomic power station and Rajasthan atomic power station are reported. (S.K.K.)

  8. Planning and developing the French nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carle, R.

    1983-01-01

    Since France has been compelled to free itself from the domination of oil, it has undertaken a nuclear programme capable of providing for nearly one third of its energy needs by 1990. Some years after the first oil crisis, a good part of the battle has already been won: 22 reactor units of 900 MW each have been connected to the grid and account for 40% of the electricity produced in France, while 12 other 900 MW units, together with the first 1300 MW units, are under construction. Nuclear power has thus become an industrial reality possessed of the tools appropriate for the whole fuel cycle, which has managed to cope with costs and meet deadlines, and has developed a safe and reliable product. With these positive results despite inevitable incidents the French nuclear industry has come of age. There are, however, handicaps which remain to be overcome: high investment costs, operating constraints and continuing doubt on the part of the public. The efforts deployed in these three spheres are beginning to bear fruit. As a result, implementation of the French nuclear programme is being continued, albeit at a slower rate, for the aim is no longer to replace oil by nuclear power as soon as possible, but rather to keep up with the rise in consumption. In pursuing its nuclear efforts, France will henceforth be stressing progress in terms of quality, which can still be achieved in terms of increased reliability (incorporation of feedback), better economic return (initiation of a new series known as ''N4''), easier operation (improvement of the man-machine interface) and also more independence. The ''frenchification'' of the light-water reactor has from the beginning been seen as one of the means of achieving this independence. This also applies to mastery of the whole fuel cycle. And finally, fast breeders represent the next stage

  9. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-07-01

    The IAEA is organizing a major conference on nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle, which is to be held from 2 to 13 May 1977 in Salzburg, Austria. The programme for the conference was published in the preceding issue of the IAEA Bulletin (Vol.18, No. 3/4). Topics to be covered at the conference include: world energy supply and demand, supply of nuclear fuel and fuel cycle services, radioactivity management (including transport), nuclear safety, public acceptance of nuclear power, safeguarding of nuclear materials, and nuclear power prospects in developing countries. The articles in the section that follows are intended to serve as an introduction to the topics to be discussed at the Salzburg Conference. They deal with the demand for uranium and nuclear fuel cycle services, uranium supplies, a computer simulation of regional fuel cycle centres, nuclear safety codes, management of radioactive wastes, and a pioneering research project on factors that determine public attitudes toward nuclear power. It is planned to present additional background articles, including a review of the world nuclear fuel reprocessing situation and developments in the uranium enrichment industry, in future issues of the Bulletin. (author)

  10. Nuclear power in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The increase in electronuclear production is the result of an investment policy which was started twenty years ago and actively pursued, notably by France where the programme was speeded up during the last decade. Over the whole of Europe taken in the widest sense, that is to say over the 10 million sq kms which stretch from the Atlantic to the Eastern borders of the Soviet Union with its population of nearly 664 million inhabitants (a sixth of the world population), the number of reactors continues to grow. In Eastern Europe a major investment programme is in progress and the Soviets have already reached the 1,500 MWe level. In the West, after a period of uncertainty marked by a systematic opposition to nuclear, public opinion is now much more favourable to this form of energy. The next referendum due to be held in Switzerland is likely to confirm this trend. There is still some uncertainty over the size of programmes as in Spain and Italy but it is true that the economic crisis had lead to a cut-back in energy demand. Consumption increases however turn up increasingly often. The following study examines 17 European countries which have already built nuclear power plants or are just about to do so [fr

  11. JYT - Publicly financed nuclear waste management research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1993-06-01

    The nuclear waste management research in Finland is funded both by the state and the utilities (represented in cooperation by the Nuclear Waste Commission of the Finnish power companies). A coordinated research programme (JYT) comprising the publicly financed waste management studies was started in 1989 and continues until 1993. The utilities continue to carry out a parallel research programme according to their main financial and operational responsibility for nuclear waste management. The research programme covers the following main topic areas: (1) Bedrock characteristics, groundwater and repository, (2) Release and transport of radionuclides, (3) Performance and safety assessment of repositories, and (4) Waste management technology and costs

  12. JYT - Publicly financed nuclear waste management research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1992-07-01

    The nuclear waste management research in Finland is funded both by the state and the utilities (represented in cooperation by the Nuclear Waste Commission of the Finnish power companies). A coordinated research programme (JYT) comprising the publicly financed waste management studies was started in 1989 and continues until 1993. The utilities continue to carry out a parallel research programme according to their main financial and operational responsibility for nuclear waste management. The research programme covers the following main topic areas: (1) Bedrock characteristics, groundwater and repository, (2) Release and transport of radionuclides, (3) Performance and safety assessment of repositories, and (4) Waste management technology and costs

  13. JYT - Publicly financed nuclear waste management research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1991-07-01

    The nuclear waste management research in Finland is funded both by the state and the utilities (represented in cooperation by the Nuclear Waste Commission of the Finnish power companies). A coordinated research programme (JYT) comprising the publicly financed waste management studies was started in 1989 and continues until 1993. The utilities continue to carry out a parallel research programme according to their main financial and operational responsibility for nuclear waste management. The research programme covers the following main topic areas: (1) Bedrock characteristics, groundwater and repository, (2) Release and transport of radionuclides, (3) Performance and safety assessment of repositories, and (4) Waste management technology and costs

  14. Where are we now on nuclear power?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppenheimer, A.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion at the March 1991 Conference of the institute of Energy 'Where are we now on Nuclear Power' is summarized. Speakers from the Institution of Nuclear Engineers, Nuclear Electric, the European Commission Energy Directorate, British Nuclear Fuels, Scottish Nuclear and others looked at the economic aspects and the safety and pollution record of nuclear power in the United Kingdom. Technically, nuclear power is doing well although political problems remain. There was a problem of retaining skilled people in the absence of an assured construction programme. However there was a mood of cautious optimism over the future of nuclear power in the UK. (UK)

  15. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The Single Channel Trip System for the Dungeness B AGRs in the United Kingdom has enabled Nuclear Electric to enhance the performance of each of the twin reactors progressively towards the design figure of 660MW. The unique self-testing dynamic nature of the microprocessor-based ISAT system was one of the key factors in satisfying the UK Regulator that the system met the demanding requirements of the Dungeness B application, and current operational and maintenance experience is very encouraging. Systems based on the ISAT principle have application in reactor protection systems throughout the world. (Author)

  16. Regulatory Practices on Ageing Management and Long Term Operation of Nuclear Power Plants in the Ibero-American Region. Results of the FORO/IAEA Programme on Nuclear and Radiation Safety in Ibero-America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-09-01

    Although the operating lifetime of a nuclear power plant was originally anticipated to be in the range of 30-40 years, 200 of the 434 currently in operation are over 30 years old. In this context, Member States have assigned high priority to continuing the operation of nuclear power plants beyond the lifetime initially planned - while also maintaining the highest safety conditions possible. It is thus essential to encourage international cooperative efforts in the development of safety regulatory practices on ageing management and long term operation. Established in 1997, the Ibero-American Forum of Radiological and Nuclear Regulatory Agencies (FORO) aims to strengthen its members' radiological and nuclear safety regulatory organizations. Through a regional network of radiological and nuclear safety regulators, States in the Ibero-American region have worked together to strengthen radiation protection for patients, to improve safety at radiation installations, to tightten controls on radioactive sources used in medicine, agriculture and industry, and to improve safety and security at nuclear power plants. Since FORO's creation, it has cooperated with the IAEA in areas of mututal interest, and a technical programme administered by the IAEA was established in 2003 and formalized in Practical Arrangements signed in 2010. This publication presents the results of the 2009-2010 FORO/IAEA project on regulatory practices on ageing management and safety considerations for extending the operating lifetime of nuclear power plants. The purpose of the project was to provide nuclear regulators in the region with guidance on regulatory criteria, assessment, regulatory inspection and periodic safety reviews relating to ageing management and long term operation of nuclear power plants. The results are presented in a set of four reports, with guidelines for FORO members and a summary report of the project. These reports contain valuable information for the development of future

  17. Nuclear power in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koryakin, Yu.I.

    1977-01-01

    The present states of nuclear power in Spain is shortly surveyed. Data are provided on NPPs currently in operation, under construction, designed and planned. In line with the 10-year ''National programme of electricity supply'' a major and all increasing part of the electricity generation growth is to be ensured by NPPs and to account for more than 50% by the end of the period (1987). Out of the 7 units of NPPs now under construction, 6 units utilize PWR reactors and only 1 unit- a BWR reactor. The roles of private and public sectors are noted. Main characteristics of the ''ENSA'' plant now under construction are provided where components of NPPs with PWR and BWR reactors will be fabricated. Major developments in the fields of mining, milling and extraction of U from lignites, U enrichment, fuel fabrication and spent fuel reprocessing are considered. Measures now taken to improve the licensing procedure, surveillance of NPPs and personnel training are to advance the nuclear power development programme in the country

  18. Nuclear power newsletter. Vol. 1, no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    This first issue of newsletter describes the Nuclear Power Division of the Department of Nuclear Energy responsible for implementation of the IAEA programme on Nuclear Power. The mission of the Division is to increase the capability of interested Member States to implement and maintain competitive and sustainable nuclear power programmes and to develop and apply advanced nuclear technologies. The topics covered in this publication are: Engineering and Management Support for Competitive Nuclear Power; Improving Human Performance, Quality and Technical Infrastructure; Co-ordination of International Collaboration for the Development of Innovative Nuclear Technology; Technology Developments and Applications for Advanced Reactors; The International Conference on 'Fifty Years of Nuclear Power - the Next Fifty Years'. A list of documents published recently by the Nuclear Power Division in enclosed

  19. The use of algae in monitoring discharges of radionuclides. Experiences from the 1992 and 1993 monitoring programmes at the Swedish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoeijs, P. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Ecological Botany; Simenstad, P. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1995-01-01

    All four Swedish nuclear power plants (Forsmark, Oskarshamn, Barsebaeck and Ringhals) use brackish water as coolant (Baltic Sea and Swedish west coast). Radionuclides are discharged together with the cooling water. The gamma spectra of monthly algal samples harvested in 1992 and 1993 close to the discharge points of these power plants were determined within the routine monitoring programmes. The main radionuclides detected in the algal samples were {sup 54}Mn, {sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs. Most {sup 137}Cs in the samples from the northern Baltic Sea (Forsmark) still originated from the 1986 Chernobyl accident. Other radionuclides, notably {sup 51}Cr, {sup 65}Zn, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 95}Nb, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 124}b, {sup 125}Sb and {sup 134}Cs, were regularly detected at s of the sites. Transfer factors from discharge to algae were generally in the order of 0.3-3 Bq kg{sup -1} per MBq discharge. For the major discharged radionuclides, significant linear relationships were in most cases found between discharges and concentrations in algal samples. Differences in transfer factors and regression coefficients were explained by location of the sampling sites and type of radionuclide. It is concluded that algal samples provide useful complements to water and sediment samples in the monitoring programmes since radionuclide concentrations are much higher in algal samples and proportional to the discharges. 21 refs, figs.

  20. The Russian nuclear data research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The report contains the Russian programme of nuclear data research, approved by the Russian Nuclear Data Committee on 16 December 1994. It gives surveys on nuclear data needs, on the structure of nuclear data activities, on experimental facilities for nuclear data measurements at five Russian institutes, on theoretical model work, nuclear data evaluation, and nuclear data testing. It describes four Russian nuclear data centers and their relations to the International Nuclear Data Centres Network, and their holdings of nuclear data libraries of Russian and international origin. A summary of nuclear data applications in energy and non-energy fields is given. An appendix contains a detail nuclear data research programme for the years 1995 - 2005. (author). 16 refs, 1 fig., 6 tabs

  1. Nuclear power. The Windscale controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, G.

    1978-01-01

    The aims of this unit are: (1) to provide a basic understanding of nuclear technology and of the associated technical and environmental problems; (2) to provide an understanding of: (a) the historical growth of the nuclear industry; (b) the arguments for the continued development of nuclear power, and the institutions promoting that development; (3) to provide a basic understanding of the mechanisms and institutions which officially regulate the nuclear power programme in the UK; (4) to provide an understanding of the main issues - technical, economic, social and political - involved in the controversy over the proposed expansion of British Nuclear Fuels Ltd's reprocessing facilities at Windscale, and the events leading up to the Public Inquiry on the proposal which began in June 1977; and (5) to examine (a) the reason for the growth in opposition to nuclear power in various countries and the different approaches taken by the opposition groups; (b) the political impact and effectiveness of that opposition. (author)

  2. Inr training programme in nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cretu, I.; Ionila, M.; Gyongyosi, E.; Dragan, E.; Petra, M.

    2013-01-01

    main challenges of the nuclear field in the near future. Thus, starting 2011 every year lecturers from the institute present in an organized environment seminars focused on key areas of activity: reactor and nuclear materials, nuclear power plants and operating nuclear installations, nuclear security, nuclear security culture, radioactive waste, radiation protection, environment, quality, safety and work health, quality culture, emergency preparedness, prevention and protection, information technology, intellectual property protection, physical protection and protection of classified information, international cooperation, technological transfer, the economic-financial system in the scientific research domain, legislations, regulations, standardization. This paper presents the main results achieved through the general training programme for the nuclear activities conducted within SCN and the conclusions drawn from this type of training. (authors)

  3. Safety assessment of proposed modifications of Ignalina nuclear power plant. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The objective of the meeting was to further discuss previous findings and recommendations and their application to the particular situation of the Ignalina NPP. Since design information and a series of proposed modifications for INPP had been prepared by the main RBMK designer, Research and Development Institute for Power Engineering (RDIPE), it was considered appropriate to conduct the meeting in two parts, the first from 17 to 22 October 1994, at RDIPE headquarters in Moscow and the second from 24 to 28 October 1994, at the plant site in Lithuania. Twelve international experts and IAEA staff participated in the meetings, together with a large group of RDIPE specialists and plant staff. The review covered five topical areas: core monitoring and control; pressure boundary integrity; accident migration; safety and support systems and instrumentation and control. A summary of the reviews in each technical areas is given in this report. Appendices 1 and 5 present the records of the reviews and detailed findings and recommendations in each topical area. The experts strongly supported the effort to develop a new extended safety analysis report. They also stressed the need for close monitoring of the fuel channel conditions and the need for an integrated approach for the upgrading of the control and safety systems. Refs, figs, tabs

  4. Nuclear power proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear industry is experiencing a multiple crisis in which economic, technical and ethical aspects are blended inextricably. Nuclear hardware costs have everywhere soared far beyond inflation in the last five years, largely as a result of delays in programme completion arising from problems of reactor and fuel cycle. Meanwhile, partly as a result of this cost escalation, there is widespread and growing doubt as to whether capital will be available to finance the electricity generating levels projected by the industry and by governments for the 1990s. The nuclear industry is now in trouble at every stage of the fuel cycle. The industry's difficulties have also revealed a lack of overall - but particularly nuclear - energy strategy at either national or international levels, and a lack of will to create regulations and institutional machinery at either of these levels which might reassure both concerned publics and the energy industries themselves. This paper appraises some of the present limitations of international institutions in achieving control and management of nuclear power. (author)

  5. Analysis of replies to an IAEA questionnaire on procedures for accreditation of training programmes and for authorization and licensing of nuclear power plant operations personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The intent of this survey was to gather data and present results to facilitate the international exchange of information and experience in this field. This was accomplished using a questionnaire developed by the IAEA that was sent in September, 1989 to the thirty-one Member States having nuclear power plants operating or under construction. Of these, twenty-one responses were received. The questionnaire was constructed in two parts: (1) Accreditation of Training Programmes; and (2) Authorization and (Formal) Licensing of Operations Personnel. The analysis was conducted by IAEA staff with the assistance of consultants and resulted in an identification of the commonalities and differences in approach on these issues. An advisory group subsequently considered this analysis, interpreted the results relative to the original responses, and reached conclusions that are contained in this document

  6. Nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, J.A.; Covarrubias, A.J.; Csik, B.J.; Fattah, A.; Woite, G.

    1977-01-01

    This paper is intended to be a companion to similar papers by OECD/NEA and CMEA and will summarize the nuclear power system plans of developing Member States most likely to have nuclear programmes before the year 2000. The information that is presented is derived from various sources such as the Agency 1974 study of the market for nuclear power in developing countries, the annual publication, ''Power Reactors in Member States - 1976 Edition'', various nuclear power planning studies carried out by the Agency during the period 1975 and 1976, direct correspondence with selected Member States and published information in the open literature. A preliminary survey of the prospects for nuclear power in Member States not belonging to the OECD or having centrally planned economies indicates that about 27 of these countries may have operating nuclear power plants by the end of the century. In the 1974 Edition of the ''Market Survey'' it was estimated that the installed nuclear capacity in these countries might reach 24 GW by 1980, 157 GW by 1190 and 490 GW by the year 2000. It now appears that these figures are too high for a number of reasons. These include 1) the diminished growth in electrical demand which has occurred in many Member States during the last several years, 2) the extremely high cost of nuclear plant construction which has placed financial burdens on countries with existing nuclear programmes, 3) the present lack of commercially available small and medium power reactors which many of the smaller Member States would need in order to expand their electric power systems and 4) the growing awareness of Member States that more attention should be paid to exploitation of indigenous energy sources such as hydroelectric power, coal and lignite

  7. Human reliability analysis in probabilistic safety assessment for nuclear power plants. A Safety Practice. A publication within the NUSS programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is playing an increasingly important role in the safe operation of nuclear power plants throughout the world. In order to establish a consistent framework for conducting PSA studies, for promoting technology transfer of the state of the art, and for encouraging uniformity in the way PSA is carried out, the IAEA is preparing a set of publications which gives guidance on various aspects of PSA. This document presents a practical approach for incorporating human reliability analysis (HRA) into PSA. It describes the steps needed and the documentation that should be provided both to support the PSA itself and to ensure effective communication of important information arising from the studies. It also describes a framework for analysing those human actions which could affect safety and for relating such human influences to specific parts of a PSA. This Safety Practice also addresses the limitations of PSA in taking account of human factors in relation to safety and risk. Refs, figs and tabs

  8. Design of 50 MWe HTR-PBMR reactor core and nuclear power plant fuel using SRAC2006 programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bima Caraka Putra; Yosaphat Sumardi; Yohannes Sardjono

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to assess the design of core and fuel of nuclear power plant type High Temperature Reactor-Pebble Bed Modular Reactor 50 MWe from the Beginning of Life (BOL) to Ending of life (EOL) with eight years operating life. The parameters that need to be analyzed in this research are the temperature distribution inside the core, quantity enrichment of U 235 , fuel composition, criticality, and temperature reactivity coefficient of the core. The research was conducted with a data set of core design parameters such as nuclides density, core and fuel dimensions, and the axial temperature distribution inside the core. Using SRAC2006 program package, the effective multiplication factor (k eff ) values obtained from the input data that has been prepared. The results show the value of the criticality of core is proportional to the addition of U 235 enrichment. The optimum enrichment obtained at 10.125% without the use of burnable poison with an excess reactivity of 3.1 2% at BOL. The addition Gd 2O3 obtained an optimum value of 12 ppm burnable poison with an excess reactivity 0.38 %. The use of Er 2O3 with an optimum value 290 ppm has an excess reactivity 1.24 % at BOL. The core temperature reactivity coefficient with and without the use of burnable poison has a negative values that indicates the nature of its inherent safety. (author)

  9. An overview of the need of manpower supply for a nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palabrica, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The present paper deals with the need for trained manpower and special features of nuclear power affecting manpower requirements and gives a manpower loading schedule for the different nuclear power activities and programmes for manpower development. (orig./RW)

  10. Nuclear power in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Association believes that the CANDU nuclear power generation system can play a major role in achieving energy self-sufficiency in Canada. The benefits of nuclear power, factors affecting projections of electric power demand, risks and benefits relative to other conventional and non-conventional energy sources, power economics, and uranium supply are discussed from a Canadian perspective. (LL)

  11. A new nuclear safety programme for areas adjacent to Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varjoranta, T.

    1997-01-01

    The projects aimed at improving nuclear and radiation safety in areas adjacent to Finland have been compiled into one programme. The purpose of the programme is to promote activities that minimise accident risks at nuclear power plants and that improve preparedness for situations involving a risk. Nuclear materials are also to be kept under strict control. In the last few years, nuclear and radiation safety has clearly improved in areas adjacent to Finland. But work is still needed to reduce the remaining risks. The Finnish support programme comprises two very definite functions. On one hand, the programme acts as a catalyst for projects launched by the Russians themselves or by the Western partners together, and strives to pave the way for international financing projects. On the other hand, assistance is given as direct support for certain hand-picked projects. (orig.)

  12. Development of Czechoslovak nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keher, J.

    1985-01-01

    The output of Czechoslovak nuclear power plants is envisaged at 2200 MW by 1985, 4400 MW by 1990 and 10,280 MW by the year 2000. The operation so far is assessed of Bohunice V-1 and Bohunice V-2 power plants as is the construction of the Dukovany nuclear power plant. International cooperation in the fulfilment of the nuclear power programme is based on the General Agreement on Cooperation in the Prospective Development and Interlinkage of CMEA Power Systems to the year 1990, the Agreement on Multilateral International Specialization and Cooperation of Production and on Mutual Deliveries of Nuclear Power Plant Equipment. The most important factor in international cooperation is the Programme of Cooperation between the CSSR and the USSR. The primary target in the coming period is the Temelin nuclear power plant project and the establishment of unified control of the nuclear power complex. (M.D.)

  13. Power program and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernilin, Yu.F.

    1990-01-01

    Main points of the USSR power program and the role of nuclear power in fuel and power complex of the country are considered. Data on dynamics of economic indices of electric power generation at nuclear power plants during 1980-1988 and forecasts till 2000 are presented. It is shown that real cost of 1 kW/h of electric power is equal to 1.3-1.8 cop., and total reduced cost is equal to 1.8-2.4 cop

  14. Emergency power systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the Nuclear Safety Standards programme for establishing Codes and Safety Guides relating to nuclear power plants (NPPs). The first edition of the present Safety Guide was developed in the early 1980s. The text has now been brought up-to-date, refined in several details and amended to include non-electrical diverse and independent power sources. This Guide applies to NPP for which the total power supply comprises a normal power supply and an emergency power supply (EPS), which may be electrical or a combination of electrical and non-electrical. The Guide provides general guidance for all types of EPS and specific guidance on the design safety requirements and the features of the electrical and non-electrical portions of the EPS. 9 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Nuclear power of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun Bee-Ho

    2011-01-01

    National nuclear is presented. Nuclear energy safety after Fukushima, international cooperation in nuclear energy is discussed. Nuclear projects with the United Arab Emirates have been developed to build 4 nuclear power plants in the UAE - APR 1400. At the Korea-Bulgaria Industrial Committee Meeting in Sofia (March 2011) Korean side proposed Nuclear Safety Training Program in Korea for Bulgarian government officials and experts transfer of know-how and profound expertise on world-class nuclear technology and nuclear safety

  16. Guidelines for the review of accident management programmes in nuclear power plants. Reference document for the IAEA safety service missions on review of accident management programmes in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Similarly as for other IAEA safety services, the objectives of accident management safety service are to assist the Member States in ensuring and enhancing the safety of NPPs. In particular, the objective is to assist at the utility and NPP (i.e. licensee) level in effective plant specific AMP preparation, development and implementation. However, assistance can also be provided to the regulatory body in its reviewing of AMPs. Objectives of the safety service can be summarized as follows: To explain to licensee personnel principles and possible approaches in effective implementation of AMP based on experience world-wide; To give opportunities to experts from the host plant to broaden their experience and knowledge in the field; To perform an objective assessment of the status in various phases of AMP implementation, compared with international experience and practices; To provide the licensee with suggestions and assistance for improvements in various stages of AMP implementation. The objective of the IAEA safety services is to offer two options to respond to individual requirements. These options include missions to review accident analysis needed for accident management and missions to review the whole AMP. Review of accident analysis for accident management (RAAAM): this review is intended to check completeness and quality of accident analysis covering BDBA and severe accidents. The review should be typically performed prior to use of accident analysis for development of AMP. It is considered that 2 experts and 1 IAEA team leader in one-week mission can perform the review. Detailed guidelines for review of analysis are provided in Section 2. Reference is also made to another IAEA Safety Report (Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-1) which is devoted to guidance for accident analysis of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Review of AMP (RAMP): this review of AMP, which is in particular appropriate prior to its implementation, is intended to check its quality, consistency

  17. Economic competitiveness of nuclear power in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Chuanwen

    2005-01-01

    Development of nuclear power in China has made a good progress. Currently, economic competitiveness of nuclear power compared to fossil-fuelled power plants is one of the major problems which hamper its development. This article presents the economic competitiveness of nuclear power in China with two-level analyses. First, levelized lifetime cost method is adopted for electricity generation cost comparisons. Important factors influencing economic competitiveness of nuclear power are described. Furthermore, a broad economic evaluation of the full fuel chain of nuclear power and fossil-fuelled plants is discussed concerning macro social-economic issues, environmental and health impacts. The comprehensive comparative assessment would be carried out for decision making to implement nuclear power programme. In consideration of external costs and carbon value, the economic competitiveness of nuclear power would be further improved. Facing swift economic growth, huge energy demand and heavy environmental burden, nuclear power could play a significant role in sustainable development in China. (authors)

  18. Nuclear power and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackerron, Gordon; Berkhout, Frans

    1990-01-01

    The environmental effects of nuclear power discussed in this paper are specifically the effects of radiation on human populations, either directly or through the food chain. Controlling the environmental effects of nuclear power has two dimensions, waste management and safety. Regulatory controls aim to keep the risk of death due to man-made radiation down to what is thought to be an acceptable level; the background to the establishing of such levels is examined. The scale of the nuclear industry is outlined. In industrial countries with nuclear power, with the possible exception of the USA and USSR which have extensive nuclear weapons programmes, most radioactive wastes arise in the civil nuclear fuel cycle; medical, research and industrial users of nuclear materials produce the rest. The extreme variety of materials included in radioactive wastes is highlighted. Approaches to the management of different kinds of radioactive waste are discussed; the particular problems associated with reactor decommissioning are considered. The enormous potential harm of serious accidents at nuclear power plants through a release of large quantities of radionuclides into the environment has been a dominant influence in the design of reactors. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl underline the need for careful examination of management issues as well as design and operational failures. Finally, the catastrophic effects of a full scale nuclear war are briefly considered within the context of nuclear proliferation and international security. (UK)

  19. China and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouquoire-Brillet, E.

    1999-01-01

    This book presents the history of nuclear power development in China from the first research works started in the 1950's for the manufacturing of nuclear weapons to the recent development of nuclear power plants. This study tries to answer the main questions raised by the attitude of China with respect to the civil and military nuclear programs. (J.S.)

  20. Nuclear power revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grear, B.

    2008-01-01

    Modern development of nuclear power technology and the established framework of international agreements and conventions are responding to the major political, economic and environmental issues - high capital costs, the risks posed by nuclear wastes and accidents, and the proliferation of nuclear weaponry - that until recently hindered the expansion of nuclear power.

  1. The future for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall of Goring, Lord.

    1989-01-01

    Lord Marshall explains how the situation for nuclear power in late 1989 in the United Kingdom had come about. Despite warnings that for a successful nuclear programme a large generator which has the obligation to supply in a defined geographical area should operate, this is not what will happen under the plans to privatise the electricity supply industry in the UK. Under these no body will have the obligation to supply electricity and the distribution Company will not have the obligation to supply after the first few years. Other problems with the privatisation plans are discussed. The implications of the government's decisions on nuclear power, first to maintain the Magnox stations in the government sector, second to abandon the full PWR construction programme and thirdly not to transfer the AGRs to the private sector, are discussed. (UK)

  2. Nuclear power in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addinall, E.; Ellington, H.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters: (the nature of nuclear power) the atomic nucleus - a potential source of energy; how nuclear reactors work; the nuclear fuel cycle; radioactivity - its nature and biological effects; (why we need nuclear power) use of energy in the non-communist world -the changing pattern since 1950; use of energy - possible future scenarios; how our future energy needs might be met; (a possible long term nuclear strategy) the history of nuclear power; a possible nuclear power strategy for the Western World; (social and environmental considerations) the hazards to workers in the nuclear power industry; the hazards to the general public (nuclear power industry; reactor operation; transport of radioactive materials; fuel reprocessing; radioactive waste disposal; genetic hazards); the threat to democratic freedom and world peace. (U.K.)

  3. Country Nuclear Power Profiles - 2013 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-08-01

    The Country Nuclear Power Profiles compile background information on the status and development of nuclear power programmes in Member States. The CNPP summarizes organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programs and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory, and international framework in each country. Its descriptive and statistical overview of the overall economic, energy, and electricity situation in each country and its nuclear power framework is intended to serve as an integrated source of key background information about nuclear power programs in the world. This 2013 edition, issued on CD-ROM and Web pages, contains updated country information for 51 countries

  4. Reactor physics in support of the naval nuclear propulsion programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisley, P.G.; Beeley, P.A.

    1994-01-01

    Reactor physics is a core component of all courses but in particular two postgraduate courses taught at the department in support of the naval nuclear propulsion programme. All of the courses include the following elements: lectures and problem solving exercises, laboratory work, experiments on the Jason zero power Argonaut reactor, demonstration of PWR behavior on a digital computer simulator and project work. This paper will highlight the emphasis on reactor physics in all elements of the education and training programme. (authors). 9 refs

  5. Nuclear power prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-09-15

    A survey of the nuclear power needs of the less-developed countries and a study of the technology and economics of small and medium scale power reactors are envisioned by the General Conference. Agency makes its services available to Member States to assist them for their future nuclear power plans, and in particular in studying the technical and economic aspects of their power programs. The Agency also undertakes general studies on the economics of nuclear power, including the collection and analysis of cost data, in order to assist Member States in comparing and forecasting nuclear power costs in relation to their specific situations

  6. Dictionary of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    2012-06-01

    The actualized version (June 2012) of the dictionary on nuclear power includes all actualizations and new inputs since the last version of 2001. The original publication dates from 1980. The dictionary includes definitions, terms, measuring units and helpful information on the actual knowledge concerning nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear facilities, radioactive waste management, nuclear physics, reactor physics, isotope production, biological radiation effects, and radiation protection.

  7. Crucial role for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dastidar, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Generation of electricity by a nuclear reactor is explained. After taking a survey of the hydro-electric potential and coal deposits of India and considering their limitations, the need for nuclear power becomes evident. It is also economically competitive. The strategy for nuclear power development in India is to use natural uranium fuel based heavy water moderated thermal reactors to produce plutonium-239 and to use thorium based fast breeder reactors to breed plutonium-239 and uranium-233, and in turn these radioisotopes will be used to fuel FBR type reactors. This strategy maximises the energy obtainable from natural uranium by a factor of 400. The present state of nuclear power generation in India and the research programmes of the FBR type reactor are outlined. Other benefits from nuclear energy research are mentioned. Some of them are leak detection techniques, radiosterilisation and plant breeding by radiation mutation. The spin-off of the Indian atomic energy programme are : development of radiation detection instruments and other sophisticated electronic instruments, development of methods of preparation of ultra-pure materials, fabrication of components such as seamless tubes, non-destructive testing methods, and reliability evaluation techniques. Other applications of nuclear energy are mentioned. (M.G.B.)

  8. Crucial role for nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dastidar, P R

    1980-01-01

    Generation of electricity by a nuclear reactor is explained. After taking a survey of the hydro-electric potential and coal deposits of India and considering their limitations, the need for nuclear power becomes evident. It is also economically competitive. The strategy for nuclear power development in India is to use natural uranium fuel based heavy water moderated thermal reactors to produce plutonium-239 and to use thorium based fast breeder reactors to breed plutonium-239 and uranium-233, and in turn these radioisotopes will be used to fuel FBR type reactors. This strategy maximises the energy obtainable from natural uranium by a factor of 400. The present state of nuclear power generation in India and the research programmes of the FBR type reactor are outlined. Other benefits from nuclear energy research are mentioned. Some of them are leak detection techniques, radiosterilisation and plant breeding by radiation mutation. The spin-off of the Indian atomic energy programme are: development of radiation detection instruments and other sophisticated electronic instruments, development of methods of preparation of ultra-pure materials, fabrication of components such as seamless tubes, non-destructive testing methods, and reliability evaluation techniques. Other applications of nuclear energy are mentioned.

  9. Public attitudes to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margerison, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    The British public is very poorly informed about nuclear power. 55 % express concern about it, but few can explain why. Some of the reasons given are extraordinary: 37 % of the public think nuclear power causes acid rain which pollutes lakes and kills trees; 47 % think coal is a safer fuel for making electricity than nuclear; a quarter think natural radiation is less harmful than that from nuclear stations. And a very large number of people have greatly exaggerated views of the amount of radiation released from power stations and the harm that it is doing people. Also, a quarter of everyone asked thought that nuclear power stations make bombs as well as electricity. Most of these concerns come from the media, and in particular from television which has broadcast many programmes which are strongly anti-nuclear, often inaccurate, and usually sensational. Fortunately, the effect of these stories is less damaging than one might think. At present about 42 % of the adult British population are not in favour of nuclear power, so there is still a majority who are not against. About 44 % are positively in favour, and the remainder are not sure or have no view

  10. Indicators for Nuclear Power Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Considering the scale of nuclear power aspirations, the number of planned nuclear new builds and the prospects of a number of countries constructing their first nuclear power plants, there is a need to assess the broader context of nuclear energy programmes in areas of macro-and socioeconomic conditions, energy systems and nuclear power, and the environment. It is important to assess the degree to which introduction or expansion of nuclear power is beneficial under these specific circumstances. This publication provides a set of indicators for nuclear power development that can serve as a tool to help explore these issues. The indicators are meant to provide a first order assessment of the situation and identify the issues that present the benefits and challenges in a balanced and objective manner and thereby help guide more detailed evaluations in the next stage of planning and preparations. Methodology sheets are provided to help users in data collection, quantification and interpretation of the indicators. The application of the indicators set is flexible. Users can select a subset of indicators that are most relevant for the questions they wish to explore in a given study or decision making process

  11. Safety issues and their ranking for 'small series' WWER-1000 nuclear power plants. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    This report presents the safety issues in 'small series' WWER-1000 nuclear power plants (NPPs). Safety issues are deviations from current recognized safety practices in design and operation judged to be safety significant by their impact on the plants' defence in depth. This report is intended to serve as reference for the development of plant specific safety improvement programmes and for the evaluation of measures proposed and/or implemented. The identification of safety issues is based on safety studies conducted by the operators of 'small series' WWER-1000 units and by organizations dealing with these reactors, on findings of IAEA safety missions to 'small series' WWER-1000 plants in South Ukraine, at Novovoronezh and Kalinin, and on information obtained from specialists from various countries during an IAEA consultants meeting, 8-12 September 1997 in Vienna, within the framework of the Extra budgetary Programme on the Safety of WWER and RBMK NPPs. Safety issues are first presented according to their impact on the main safety functions and are then described individually. The safety issues are characterized by issue title and specified by issue clarification. Safety issues connected with plant design are followed by the ranking of the issue and ranking justification. Altogether 85 safety issues have been identified, 12 of which are in Category III (defence in depth is insufficient, immediate corrective action is necessary), 38 in Category 11 (defence in depth is degraded, action is needed to resolve the issue) and 22 in Category I (departure from international practices, to be addressed as part of actions to resolve higher priority issues). In the case of operational safety issues (13 safety issues) no ranking is provided as the available material was considered insufficient. For each safety issue, comments and recommendations are made by the IAEA; the status of corresponding measures to improve safety implemented or planned at each site are presented in the

  12. Safety issues and their ranking for 'small series' WWER-1000 nuclear power plants. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    This report presents the safety issues in 'small series' WWER-1000 nuclear power plants (NPPs). Safety issues are deviations from current recognized safety practices in design and operation judged to be safety significant by their impact on the plants' defence in depth. This report is intended to serve as reference for the development of plant specific safety improvement programmes and for the evaluation of measures proposed and/or implemented. The identification of safety issues is based on safety studies conducted by the operators of 'small series' WWER-1000 units and by organizations dealing with these reactors, on findings of IAEA safety missions to 'small series' WWER-1000 plants in South Ukraine, at Novovoronezh and Kalinin, and on information obtained from specialists from various countries during an IAEA consultants meeting, 8-12 September 1997 in Vienna, within the framework of the Extra budgetary Programme on the Safety of WWER and RBMK NPPs. Safety issues are first presented according to their impact on the main safety functions and are then described individually. The safety issues are characterized by issue title and specified by issue clarification. Safety issues connected with plant design are followed by the ranking of the issue and ranking justification. Altogether 85 safety issues have been identified, 12 of which are in Category III (defence in depth is insufficient, immediate corrective action is necessary), 38 in Category 11 (defence in depth is degraded, action is needed to resolve the issue) and 22 in Category I (departure from international practices, to be addressed as part of actions to resolve higher priority issues). In the case of operational safety issues (13 safety issues) no ranking is provided as the available material was considered insufficient. For each safety issue, comments and recommendations are made by the IAEA; the status of corresponding measures to improve safety implemented or planned at each site are presented in the

  13. The costs of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vestenhaug, O.; Sauar, T.O.; Nielsen, P.O.

    1979-01-01

    A study has been made by Scandpower A/S of the costs of nuclear power in Sweden. It is based on the known costs of existing Swedish nuclear power plants and forecasts of the expected costs of the Swedish nuclear power programme. special emphasis has been put on the fuel cycle costs and future costs of spent fuel processing, waste disposal and decommissioning. Costs are calculated in 1978 Swedish crowns, using the retail price index. An actual interest rate of 4% is used, with depreciation period of 25 years and a plant lifetime of 30 years. Power production costs are estimated to be about 7.7 oere/kWh in 1978, rising to 10.5 oere/kWh in 2000. The cost is distributed with one third each to capital costs, operating costs and fuel costs, the last rising to 40% of the total at the end of the century. The main single factor in future costs is the price of uranium. If desired, Sweden can probably be self-sufficient in uranium in 2000 at a lower cost than assumed here. National research costs which, in Scandpower's opinion, can be debited to the commercial nuclear power programme are about 0.3 oere/kWh. (JIW)

  14. Dictionary of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    2012-04-01

    The actualized version (April 2012) of the dictionary on nuclear power includes all actualizations and new inputs since the last version of 2001. The original publication dates from 1980. The dictionary includes definitions, terms, measuring units and helpful information on the actual knowledge concerning nuclear power, nuclear facilities, and radiation protection.

  15. Nuclear power status 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document gives statistical information on nuclear power plants status in the world in 1999, including the number of reactors in operation or under construction, the electricity supplied by nuclear power reactors and the respective percentage of electricity produced by nuclear energy in 1999, and the total operating experience to 31 December 1999, by country

  16. Nuclear power publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This booklet lists 69 publications on nuclear energy available free from some of the main organisations concerned with its development and operation in the UK. Headings are: general information; the need for nuclear energy; the nuclear industry; nuclear power stations; fuel cycle; safety; waste management. (U.K.)

  17. Organization and development of the Brazilian nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, C.S.M.; Souza, J.A.M. de; Grinberg, M.; Alves, R.N.; Costa, H.M. da; Grimberg, M.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Programme, its development, the organizations and the distribution of responsibilities involved in its execution at the present time. The nuclear power policy is established at the Presidency of the Republic and is planned, executed and controlled through the Ministry of Mines and Energy. Directly subject to the Ministry is the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), which has regulatory, standardization, licensing, planning and surveillance functions. The nuclear fundamental research and manpower formation are also under CNEN responsibility. Also subject to the Ministry are two companies responsible for the execution of the Programme: the Centrais Eletricas Brasileiras S.A. - Eletrobras, which advises on the granting of permits for the construction and operation of nuclear power plants, and the Empresas Nucleares Brasileiras S.A. - Nuclebras, which holds the monopoly of the nuclear fuel cycle in the country, designs and builds nuclear power plants and provides assistance to the electric utilities and promotes the participation of Brazilian industry. Besides describing the new distribution of regulatory functions given by law to CNEN, the paper gives special emphasis to the large industrial complex in the process of being established through the setting-up of the many Nuclebras subsidiaries in joint venture with German firms under the Industrial Co-operation Agreement Between Brazil and the Federal Republic of Germany in the Field of the Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy. The programmes for these subsidiaries are presented and their participation in the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Programme is discussed. The technology transfer aspects of the industrial activities are also discussed. (author)

  18. WWER-1000 steam generator integrity. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    Programme was initiated by IAEA in 1990 with the aim to assist the countries of Central and Eastern Europe and former Soviet Union in evaluating the safety of their first generation WWER-440/230 nuclear power plants. The main objectives were: to identify major design and operational safety issues; to establish international consensus on priorities for safety improvements; and to provide assistance in the review of the competence and and adequacy of safety improvement programs. The scope was extended in 1992 ro include RBMK, WWER-440/312 and WWER-1000 plants in operation and under construction. Based on the operational experience of more than 90 reactor years of WWER-1000 NPPs having 80 steam generators in operation or under construction the steam generator integrity was recognized as an important issue of high safety concern. The purpose of this report is to integrate available information on the issue of WWER-1000 steam generator integrity with the focus on the steam generator cold collector damage in particular. This information covers the status of stem generators at operating plants, cause analysis of collector cracking, the damage mechanisms involved, operational aspects and corrective measures developed and implemented. Consideration is given to material, design and fabrication related aspects, operational conditions, system solutions, and in-service inspection. Detailed conclusions and recommendations are provided for each of these aspects

  19. Nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nealey, S.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine factors and prospects for a resumption in growth of nuclear power in the United States over the next decade. The focus of analysis on the likelihood that current efforts in the United States to develop improved and safer nuclear power reactors will provide a sound technical basis for improved acceptance of nuclear power, and contribute to a social/political climate more conducive to a resumption of nuclear power growth. The acceptability of nuclear power and advanced reactors to five social/political sectors in the U.S. is examined. Three sectors highly relevant to the prospects for a restart of nuclear power plant construction are the financial sector involved in financing nuclear power plant construction, the federal nuclear regulatory sector, and the national political sector. For this analysis, the general public are divided into two groups: those who are knowledgeable about and involved in nuclear power issues, the involved public, and the much larger body of the general public that is relatively uninvolved in the controversy over nuclear power

  20. Nuclear power plants - Quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This International Standard defines principles for the establishment and implementation of quality assurance programmes during all phases of design, procurement, fabrication, construction, commissioning, operation, maintenance and decommissioning of structures, systems and components of nuclear power plants. These principles apply to activities affecting the quality of items, such as designing, purchasing, fabricating, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, erecting, installing, testing, commissioning, operating, inspecting, maintaining, repairing, refuelling and modifying and eventually decommissioning. The manner in which the principles described in this document will be implemented in different organizations involved in a specific nuclear power project will depend on regulatory and contractual requirements, the form of management applied to a nuclear power project, and the nature and scope of the work to be performed by different organizations

  1. Nuclear power infrastructure and planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    There are several stages in the process of introducing nuclear power in a country. These include feasibility studies; technology evaluation; request for proposals and proposal evaluation; project and contracts development and financing; supply, construction, and commissioning; and finally operation. The IAEA is developing guidance directed to provide criteria for assessing the minimum infrastructure necessary for: a) a host country to consider when engaging in the implementation of nuclear power, or b) a supplier country to consider when assessing that the recipient country would be in an acceptable condition to begin the implementation of nuclear power. There are Member States that may be denied the benefits of nuclear energy if the infrastructure requirements are too large or onerous for the national economy. However if co-operation could be achieved, the infrastructure burden could be shared and economic benefits gained by several countries acting jointly. The IAEA is developing guidance on the potential for sharing of nuclear power infrastructure among countries adopting or extending nuclear power programme

  2. Nuclear power flies high

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear power in aircraft, rockets and satellites is discussed. No nuclear-powered rockets or aircraft have ever flown, but ground tests were successful. Nuclear reactors are used in the Soviet Cosmos serles of satellites, but only one American satellite, the SNAP-10A, contained a reactor. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators, many of which use plutonium 238, have powered more than 20 satellites launched into deep space by the U.S.A

  3. Worldwide nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royen, J.

    1981-01-01

    Worldwide nuclear power (WNP) is a companion volume to UPDATE. Our objective in the publication of WNP is to provide factual information on nuclear power programs and policies in foreign countries to U.S. policymakers in the Federal Government who are instrumental in defining the direction of nuclear power in the U.S. WNP is prepared by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy from reports obtained from foreign Embassies in Washington, U.S. Embassies overseas, foreign and domestic publications, participation in international studies, and personal communications. Domestic nuclear data is included only where its presence is needed to provide easy and immediate comparisons with foreign data

  4. Nuclear power controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, A.W.

    1976-01-01

    Arthur W. Murphy in the introductory chapter cites the issues, pro and con, concerning nuclear power. In assessing the present stance, he first looks back to the last American Assembly on nuclear power, held October 1957 and notes its accomplishments. He summarizes the six papers of this book, which focus on nuclear power to the end of this century. Chapter I, Safety Aspects of Nuclear Energy, by David Bodansky and Fred Schmidt, deals with the technical aspects of reactor safety as well as waste storage and plutonium diversion. Chapter 2, The Economics of Electric Power Generation--1975-2000, by R. Michael Murray, Jr., focuses specifically on coal-fired and nuclear plants. Chapter 3, How Can We Get the Nuclear Job Done, by Fritz Heimann, identifies actions that must take place to develop nuclear power in the U.S. and who should build the reprocessing plants. Chapter 4, by Arthur Murphy, Nuclear Power Plant Regulation, discusses the USNRC operation and the Price-Anderson Act specifically. Chapter 5, Nuclear Exports and Nonproliferation Strategy, by John G. Palfrey, treats the international aspects of the problem with primary emphasis upon the situation of the U.S. as an exporter of technology. Chapter 6, by George Kistiakowsky, Nuclear Power: How Much Is Too Much, expresses doubt about the nuclear effort, at least in the short run

  5. Nuclear power in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rim, C.S.

    1990-01-01

    Before addressing the issue of public and utility acceptance of nuclear power in Korea, let me briefly explain the Korean nuclear power program and development plan for a passively safe nuclear power plant in Korea. At present, there are eight PWRs and one CANDU in operation; two PWRs are under construction, and contract negotiations are underway for one more CANDU and two more PWRs, which are scheduled to be completed by 1997,1998 and 1999, respectively. According to a recent forecast for electricity demand in Korea, about fifty additional nuclear power plants with a generating capacity of 1000MWe are required by the year 2030. Until around 2006, Korean standardized nuclear power plants with evolutionary features such as those in the ALWR program are to be built, and a new type of nuclear power plant with passive safety features is expected to be constructed after 2006. The Korean government is making a serious effort to increase public understanding of the safety of nuclear power plants and radioactive waste storage and disposal. In addition, the Korean government has recently introduced a program of benefits for residents near nuclear power plants. By this program, common facilities such as community centers and new roads are constructed, and scholarships are given to the local students. Nuclear power is accepted positively by the utility and reasonably well by the public in Korea

  6. Role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklund, S.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of world nuclear installations, the operating experiences of power reactors, and estimates of future nuclear growth leads to the conclusion that nuclear power's share of world electric power supply will grow slowly, but steadily during this decade. This growth will lead advanced countries to use the commercial breeder by the end of the century. Nuclear power is economically viable for most industrialized and many developing countries if public acceptance problems can be resolved. A restructuring of operational safety and regulations must occur first, as well as a resolution of the safeguards and technology transfer issue. 7 figures, 7 tables

  7. Nuclear power in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Australian Uranium Association reports that Asia is the only region in the world where electricity generating capacity and specifically nuclear power is growing significantly. In East and South Asia, there are over 109 nuclear power reactors in operation, 18 under construction and plans to build about a further 100. The greatest growth in nuclear generation is expected in China, Japan, South Korea and India. As a member of the SE Asian community, Australia cannot afford to ignore the existence and growth of nuclear power generation on its door step, even if it has not, up to now, needed to utilise this power source

  8. Nuclear power in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, C S [Radioactive Waste Management Centre, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon, Choong-Nam (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-01

    Before addressing the issue of public and utility acceptance of nuclear power in Korea, let me briefly explain the Korean nuclear power program and development plan for a passively safe nuclear power plant in Korea. At present, there are eight PWRs and one CANDU in operation; two PWRs are under construction, and contract negotiations are underway for one more CANDU and two more PWRs, which are scheduled to be completed by 1997,1998 and 1999, respectively. According to a recent forecast for electricity demand in Korea, about fifty additional nuclear power plants with a generating capacity of 1000MWe are required by the year 2030. Until around 2006, Korean standardized nuclear power plants with evolutionary features such as those in the ALWR program are to be built, and a new type of nuclear power plant with passive safety features is expected to be constructed after 2006. The Korean government is making a serious effort to increase public understanding of the safety of nuclear power plants and radioactive waste storage and disposal. In addition, the Korean government has recently introduced a program of benefits for residents near nuclear power plants. By this program, common facilities such as community centers and new roads are constructed, and scholarships are given to the local students. Nuclear power is accepted positively by the utility and reasonably well by the public in Korea.

  9. The Nordic safety programme in the nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, B.; Marcus, F.

    1987-01-01

    Safety of nuclear installations has been a concern of all the Nordic countries, although only Finland and Sweden have selected to build nuclear power plants. It was recognized early that the resources in a single country were limited and previous Nordic cooperation in the nuclear field was therefore followed up through a safety programme which started ten years ago. This research cooperation has been intensified during the years, and today more than 70 organizations in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden participate. The present programme is the third in a row and it will continue until 1989. Human factors and operational experience are touched upon in the RAS (safety philosophy) and the INF (advanced information technology) subprogrammes. The paper gives a brief overview of the Nordic safety programme in general and the RAS and INF subprogrammes. 11 refs. (author)

  10. Radiation protection programme for nuclear gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzongomerwa, A.

    2014-04-01

    Ionizing radiation including the use of nuclear gauges can be very hazardous to humans and steps must be taken to minimize the risks so as to prevent deterministic effects and limiting chances for stochastic effects. The availability of a Radiation Protection Programme and its effective implementation ensures appropriate safety and security provisions for sealed radiation sources and promotes a safety culture within a facility that utilizes these sources. This study aims at establishing a guide on the radiation protection programme in nuclear gauges that comply with national requirements derived from current international recommendations. Elements that form part of a radiation protection programme are covered in detail as well as recommendations. The overall objective is to protect people (operators and the public) and the environment from the harmful effects of these sources if they are not properly controlled. Nuclear gauges for well logging and X-ray based gauges are outside the scope of this study. (au)

  11. Engineering and science education for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Guidebook contains detailed information on curricula which would provide the professional technical education qualifications which have been established for nuclear power programme personnel. The core of the Guidebook consists of model curricula in engineering and science, including relevant practical work. Curricula are provided for specialization, undergraduate, and postgraduate programmes in nuclear-oriented mechanical, chemical, electrical, and electronics engineering, as well as nuclear engineering and radiation health physics. Basic nuclear science and engineering laboratory work is presented together with a list of basic experiments and the nuclear equipment needed to perform them. Useful measures for implementing and improving engineering and science education and training capabilities for nuclear power personnel are presented. Valuable information on the national experiences of IAEA Member States in engineering and science education for nuclear power, as well as examples of such education from various Member States, have been included

  12. Development of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    The discussion on the development of nuclear power took place on 28 September 1960 in Vienna. In his opening remarks, Director General Cole referred to the widespread opinion that 'the prospect of cheap electricity derived from nuclear energy offers the most exciting prospect for improving the lot of mankind of all of the opportunities for uses of atomic energy'. He then introduced the four speakers and the moderator of the discussion, Mr. H. de Laboulaye, IAEA Deputy Director General for Technical Operations. n the first part of the discussion the experts addressed themselves in turn to four topics put forward by the moderator. These were: the present technical status of nuclear power, the present costs of nuclear power, prospects for future reductions in the cost of nuclear power, and applications of nuclear power in less-developed areas

  13. Problems facing a first nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, E.

    1986-01-01

    Requirement of nuclear power generation. Reason for considering a nuclear power programme. Decision to 'go nuclear'. Existing antecedents in the country (nuclear research institution, conventional generating plants, other nuclear utilities). - First organizational steps. Feasibility studies. Site selection and power module. Eventual reactor type decision. Site approval. - Pre-purchasing activities. Eventual selection of a consultant. Domestic participation capabilities. Pre-qualification bids. - Definition of contract type and scopes. Turn-key/non-turn-key. Architect Engineer organization. Bidding documentation. Financing. Warranties. Role of the owner. Licensing procedures and regulations. (orig./GL)

  14. Nuclear power debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunwick, Richard

    2005-01-01

    A recent resurgence of interest in Australia in the nuclear power option has been largely attributed to growing concerns over climate change. But what are the real pros and cons of nuclear power? Have advances in technology solved the sector's key challenges? Do the economics stack up for Australia where there is so much coal, gas and renewable resources? Is the greenhouse footprint' of nuclear power low enough to justify its use? During May and June, the AIE hosted a series of Branch events on nuclear power across Sydney, Adelaide and Perth. In the interest of balance, and at risk of being a little bit repetitive, here we draw together four items that resulted from these events and that reflect the opposing views on nuclear power in Australia. Nuclear Power for Australia: Irrelevant or Inevitable? - a summary of the presentations to the symposium held by Sydney Branch on 8 June 2005. Nuclear Reactors Waste the Planet - text from the flyer distributed by The Greens at their protest gathering outside the symposium venue on 8 June 2005. The Case For Nuclear Power - an edited transcript of Ian Hore-Lacy's presentation to Adelaide Branch on 19 May 2005 and to Perth Branch on 28 June 2005. The Case Against Nuclear Power - an article submitted to Energy News by Robin Chappie subsequent to Mr Hore-Lacy's presentation to Perth Branch

  15. Nuclear power and public opinion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    The diversity of factors involved in nuclear power development and the complexity of public attitudes towards this source of energy have raised the nuclear debate to a topic of national significance in all the OECD countries with nuclear programmes and even in some countries which have not embarked on the nuclear course. This study examines the different experiences of seventeen member countries and underlines basic approaches and practices aimed at winning greater public acceptance for nuclear power. The first part of the study is a country-by-country presentation of public acceptance activities and the role of the various public or private bodies involved. There is also a description of the background energy situation and the place of nuclear power, the evolution of the nuclear debate and a review of present public and political attitudes to nuclear energy. In the second part, some of the notable factors which determine public attitudes to, and perception of, nuclear energy have been assembled. The study points, in particular, to a number of general principles which require continuous implementation, not least because they contribute to placing nuclear energy in its proper context for the public. Vigorous government leadership in making energy choices, long term efforts in energy education, and open information policies can go a long way towards resolving many doubts about nuclear energy in the public mind. But, perhaps, above all, it is the continuing demonstration of the safe and efficient industrial operation of plants in the nuclear fuel cycle which will have the strongest influence on public opinion. In addition to these basic principles, the study calls attention to some of the most successful means of improving communication between the authorities and the public, notably at the local level. The contribution to the decision-making process of public participation is also evaluated in the light of recent national experiences.

  16. Nuclear power and public opinion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The diversity of factors involved in nuclear power development and the complexity of public attitudes towards this source of energy have raised the nuclear debate to a topic of national significance in all the OECD countries with nuclear programmes and even in some countries which have not embarked on the nuclear course. This study examines the different experiences of seventeen member countries and underlines basic approaches and practices aimed at winning greater public acceptance for nuclear power. The first part of the study is a country-by-country presentation of public acceptance activities and the role of the various public or private bodies involved. There is also a description of the background energy situation and the place of nuclear power, the evolution of the nuclear debate and a review of present public and political attitudes to nuclear energy. In the second part, some of the notable factors which determine public attitudes to, and perception of, nuclear energy have been assembled. The study points, in particular, to a number of general principles which require continuous implementation, not least because they contribute to placing nuclear energy in its proper context for the public. Vigorous government leadership in making energy choices, long term efforts in energy education, and open information policies can go a long way towards resolving many doubts about nuclear energy in the public mind. But, perhaps, above all, it is the continuing demonstration of the safe and efficient industrial operation of plants in the nuclear fuel cycle which will have the strongest influence on public opinion. In addition to these basic principles, the study calls attention to some of the most successful means of improving communication between the authorities and the public, notably at the local level. The contribution to the decision-making process of public participation is also evaluated in the light of recent national experiences

  17. Sustaining the nuclear power option in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamal Khaer bin Ibrahim.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the approach taken to establish the information base required prior to a decision on a nuclear power programme, and the strategy adopted and the rationale behind the development of the basic core expertise on nuclear reactor technology. The effect of a lack of decision on the question of nuclear power generation on efforts to build this core technical expertise is also described. (author)

  18. IAEA Nuclear Security Programme Combating Nuclear Terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    IAEA Plans of activities include, General Conference in September 2001 which reviewed activities relevant to preventing nuclear terrorism and proposed master plan. The Board of Governors approved new Nuclear Security Plan for the next four years. Three activity areas are; - needs assessment, analysis and coordination, prevention and detection and response.

  19. Computer programmes for nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmore, D.

    1981-02-01

    Two programmes for use in the calculation of problems involving the scattering of neutrons, protons or heavier composite particles from nuclei are described. The first, an optical model for the calculation of the elastic, total and absorption cross-sections from an optical potential, includes facilities for automatically finding the appropriate optical potential to describe any given set of experimental data. The second a statistical model for the calculation of inelastic and other compound nucleus scattering processes, according to three different theories, includes level width fluctuation calculations. (U.K.)

  20. The nuclear power decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear power has now become highly controversial and there is violent disagreement about how far this technology can and should contribute to the Western energy economy. More so than any other energy resource, nuclear power has the capacity to provide much of our energy needs but the risk is now seen to be very large indeed. This book discusses the major British decisions in the civil nuclear field, and the way they were made, between 1953 and 1978. That is, it spans the period between the decision to construct Calder Hall - claimed as the world's first nuclear power station - and the Windscale Inquiry - claimed as the world's most thorough study of a nuclear project. For the period up to 1974 this involves a study of the internal processes of British central government - what the author terms 'private' politics to distinguish them from the very 'public' or open politics which have characterised the period since 1974. The private issues include the technical selection of nuclear reactors, the economic arguments about nuclear power and the political clashes between institutions and individuals. The public issues concern nuclear safety and the environment and the rights and opportunities for individuals and groups to protest about nuclear development. The book demonstrates that British civil nuclear power decision making has had many shortcomings and concludes that it was hampered by outdated political and administrative attitudes and machinery and that some of the central issues in the nuclear debate were misunderstood by the decision makers themselves. (author)

  1. Japanese programme on the development of high duty fuel and related power ramping tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, Y

    1983-06-01

    Power ramping tests hitherto planned or carried out in Japan can be classified into two categories: 1) the tests programme by private organizations on fuel behaviour under various conditions of power ramping, in participating international programmes; and 2) a partially government sponsored programme, which was officially inaugurated in 1981 under the title of High-Duty Fuel Development Programme. The latter has been carried out by the Nuclear Power Engineering Test Centre, based on the schedule decided by the MITI Committee (chaired by the author), for a period of 10 years. These programmes will be described with emphasis on the latter (National Programme). (author)

  2. Japanese programme on the development of high duty fuel and related power ramping tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Power ramping tests hitherto planned or carried out in Japan can be classified into two categories: 1) the tests programme by private organizations on fuel behaviour under various conditions of power ramping, in participating international programmes; and 2) a partially government sponsored programme, which was officially inaugurated in 1981 under the title of High-Duty Fuel Development Programme. The latter has been carried out by the Nuclear Power Engineering Test Centre, based on the schedule decided by the MITI Committee (chaired by the author), for a period of 10 years. These programmes will be described with emphasis on the latter (National Programme). (author)

  3. Financing nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheriffah Noor Khamseah Al-Idid Syed Ahmad Idid

    2009-01-01

    Global energy security and climate change concerns sparked by escalating oil prices, high population growth and the rapid pace of industrialization are fueling the current interest and investments in nuclear power. Globally, a significant number policy makers and energy industry leaders have identified nuclear power as a favorable alternative energy option, and are presently evaluating either a new or an expanded role for nuclear power. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has reported that as of October 2008, 14 countries have plans to construct 38 new nuclear reactors and about 100 more nuclear power plants have been written into the development plans of governments for the next three decades. Hence as new build is expected to escalate, issues of financing will become increasingly significant. Energy supply, including nuclear power, considered as a premium by government from the socio-economic and strategic perspective has traditionally been a sector financed and owned by the government. In the case for nuclear power, the conventional methods of financing include financing by the government or energy entity (utility or oil company) providing part of the funds from its own resources with support from the government. As national financing is, as in many cases, insufficient to fully finance the nuclear power plants, additional financing is sourced from international sources of financing including, amongst others, Export Credit Agencies (ECAs) and Multilateral Development Institutions. However, arising from the changing dynamics of economics, financing and business model as well as increasing concerns regarding environmental degradation , transformations in methods of financing this energy sector has been observed. This paper aims to briefly present on financing aspects of nuclear power as well as offer some examples of the changing dynamics of financing nuclear power which is reflected by the evolution of ownership and management of nuclear power plants

  4. Nuclear power status 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document gives general statistical information (by country) about electricity produced by nuclear power plants in the world in 1998, and in a table the number of nuclear reactors in operation, under construction, nuclear electricity supplied in 1998, and total operating experience as of 31 December 1998

  5. Nuclear Power Plants. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell, Walter, III

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Why Use Nuclear Power?; From Atoms to Electricity; Reactor Types; Typical Plant Design Features; The Cost of Nuclear Power; Plants in the United States; Developments in Foreign…

  6. Balakovo nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    A key means of improving the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants is through effective training of plant personnel. The goal of this paper is to show the progress of the training at the Balakovo Nuclear Power Plant, and the important role that international cooperation programs have played in that progress

  7. Nuclear power economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moynet, G.

    1987-01-01

    The economical comparison of nuclear power plants with coal-fired plants in some countries or areas are analyzed. It is not difficult to show that nuclear power will have a significant and expanding role to play in providing economic electricity in the coming decades. (Liu)

  8. Nuclear power: Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Wyk, A.

    1985-01-01

    The use of nuclear power in warfare is viewed from the point of use usefullness, essentiality and demolition. The effects of a H-bomb explosion are discussed as well as the use of nuclear power in warfare, with a Christian ethical background

  9. Consideration of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, I.

    1982-01-01

    Mr. Smart notes that the optimistic promise of nuclear energy for developing countries has not been met, but feels that nuclear power can still provide a growing share of energy during the transition from oil dependence. He observes that cost-benefit analyses vary for each country, but good planning and management can give nuclear power a positive future for those developing countries which can establish a need for it; have access to the economic, technological, and human resources necessary to develop and operate it; and can make nuclear power compatible with the social, economic, and cultural structure. 11 references

  10. Decommissioning of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    In the United Kingdom the Electricity Boards, the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) and BNFL cooperate on all matters relating to the decommissioning of nuclear plant. The Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB) policy endorses the continuing need for nuclear power, the principle of reusing existing sites where possible and the building up of sufficient funds during the operating life of a nuclear power station to meet the cost of its complete clearance in the future. The safety of the plant is the responsibility of the licensee even in the decommissioning phase. The CEGB has carried out decommissioning studies on Magnox stations in general and Bradwell and Berkeley in particular. It has also been involved in the UKAEA Windscale AGR decommissioning programme. The options as to which stage to decommission to are considered. Methods, costs and waste management are also considered. (U.K.)

  11. Nuclear power in crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blowers, Andrew.; Pepper, David.

    1987-01-01

    Six themes run through this book: nuclear decision making and democratic accountability, nuclear bias and a narrow-based energy policy, scientific discredit and popular expertise, fusing science with social values, managerial competence and the geography of nuclear power. These are covered in thirteen chapters (all indexed separately) grouped into four parts -the political and planning context, nuclear waste, risk and impact - the social dimension and the future of nuclear power. It considers aspects in France, the United States and the United Kingdom with particular references to the Sizewell-B inquiry and the Sellafield reprocessing plant. (UK)

  12. Nuclear power plant outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) controls nuclear power plant safety in Finland. In addition to controlling the design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants, STUK also controls refuelling and repair outages at the plants. According to section 9 of the Nuclear Energy Act (990/87), it shall be the licence-holder's obligation to ensure the safety of the use of nuclear energy. Requirements applicable to the licence-holder as regards the assurance of outage safety are presented in this guide. STUK's regulatory control activities pertaining to outages are also described

  13. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulova, T.Ch.

    1976-01-01

    The textbook focuses on the technology and the operating characteristics of nuclear power plants equiped with pressurized water or boiling water reactors, which are in operation all over the world at present. The following topics are dealt with in relation to the complete plant and to economics: distribution and consumption of electric and thermal energy, types and equipment of nuclear power plants, chemical processes and material balance, economical characteristics concerning heat and energy, regenerative preheating of feed water, degassing and condenser systems, water supply, evaporators, district heating systems, steam generating systems and turbines, coolant loops and pipes, plant siting, ventilation and decontamination systems, reactor operation and management, heat transfer including its calculation, design of reactor buildings, and nuclear power plants with gas or sodium cooled reactors. Numerous technical data of modern Soviet nuclear power plants are included. The book is of interest to graduate and post-graduate students in the field of nuclear engineering as well as to nuclear engineers

  14. Design verification enhancement of field programmable gate array-based safety-critical I&C system of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Ibrahim [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 17104 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jaecheon, E-mail: jcjung@kings.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Power Plant Engineering, KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, 658-91 Haemaji-ro, Seosang-myeon, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 45014 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Gyunyoung [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 17104 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • An enhanced, systematic and integrated design verification approach is proposed for V&V of FPGA-based I&C system of NPP. • RPS bistable fixed setpoint trip algorithm is designed, analyzed, verified and discussed using the proposed approaches. • The application of integrated verification approach simultaneously verified the entire design modules. • The applicability of the proposed V&V facilitated the design verification processes. - Abstract: Safety-critical instrumentation and control (I&C) system in nuclear power plant (NPP) implemented on programmable logic controllers (PLCs) plays a vital role in safe operation of the plant. The challenges such as fast obsolescence, the vulnerability to cyber-attack, and other related issues of software systems have currently led to the consideration of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) as an alternative to PLCs because of their advantages and hardware related benefits. However, safety analysis for FPGA-based I&C systems, and verification and validation (V&V) assessments still remain important issues to be resolved, which are now become a global research point of interests. In this work, we proposed a systematic design and verification strategies from start to ready-to-use in form of model-based approaches for FPGA-based reactor protection system (RPS) that can lead to the enhancement of the design verification and validation processes. The proposed methodology stages are requirement analysis, enhanced functional flow block diagram (EFFBD) models, finite state machine with data path (FSMD) models, hardware description language (HDL) code development, and design verifications. The design verification stage includes unit test – Very high speed integrated circuit Hardware Description Language (VHDL) test and modified condition decision coverage (MC/DC) test, module test – MATLAB/Simulink Co-simulation test, and integration test – FPGA hardware test beds. To prove the adequacy of the proposed

  15. Design verification enhancement of field programmable gate array-based safety-critical I&C system of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Ibrahim; Jung, Jaecheon; Heo, Gyunyoung

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An enhanced, systematic and integrated design verification approach is proposed for V&V of FPGA-based I&C system of NPP. • RPS bistable fixed setpoint trip algorithm is designed, analyzed, verified and discussed using the proposed approaches. • The application of integrated verification approach simultaneously verified the entire design modules. • The applicability of the proposed V&V facilitated the design verification processes. - Abstract: Safety-critical instrumentation and control (I&C) system in nuclear power plant (NPP) implemented on programmable logic controllers (PLCs) plays a vital role in safe operation of the plant. The challenges such as fast obsolescence, the vulnerability to cyber-attack, and other related issues of software systems have currently led to the consideration of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) as an alternative to PLCs because of their advantages and hardware related benefits. However, safety analysis for FPGA-based I&C systems, and verification and validation (V&V) assessments still remain important issues to be resolved, which are now become a global research point of interests. In this work, we proposed a systematic design and verification strategies from start to ready-to-use in form of model-based approaches for FPGA-based reactor protection system (RPS) that can lead to the enhancement of the design verification and validation processes. The proposed methodology stages are requirement analysis, enhanced functional flow block diagram (EFFBD) models, finite state machine with data path (FSMD) models, hardware description language (HDL) code development, and design verifications. The design verification stage includes unit test – Very high speed integrated circuit Hardware Description Language (VHDL) test and modified condition decision coverage (MC/DC) test, module test – MATLAB/Simulink Co-simulation test, and integration test – FPGA hardware test beds. To prove the adequacy of the proposed

  16. Nuclear power in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, J.

    2000-01-01

    Currently nuclear power accounts for more than 25% of total electricity production in Europe (including Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union) However, significant new construction is planned in Central and Eastern Europe only, apart from some in France and, possibly in Finland. Many countries in Western Europe have put nuclear construction plans on hold and several have cancelled their nuclear programs. This report looks at the history of nuclear power and its current status in both Eastern and Western Europe. It provides an outline of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, from uranium procurement to final waste disposal. Economic and environmental issues are discussed, as well as the prospect of increased East-West trade and cooperation in the new poso-cold war world. Detailed profiles are provided of all the countries in Western Europe with significant nuclear power programs, as well as profiles of major energy and nuclear companies

  17. Mobile nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.

    1988-11-01

    This report is meant to present a general survey of the mobile nuclear power systems and not a detailed review of their technical accomplishments. It is based in published material mainly up to 1987. Mobile nuclear power systems are of two fundamentally different kinds: nuclear reactors and isotopic generators. In the reactors the energy comes from nuclear fission and in the isotopic generators from the radioactive decay of suitable isotopes. The reactors are primarily used as power sourves on board nuclear submarines and other warships but have also been used in the space and in remote places. Their thermal power has ranged from 30 kWth (in a satellite) to 175 MWth (on board an aircraft carrier). Isotopic generators are suitable only for small power demands and have been used on board satellites and spaceprobes, automatic weatherstations, lighthouses and marine installations for navigation and observation. (author)

  18. The nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plettner, B.

    1987-04-01

    The processes taking place in a nuclear power plant and the dangers arising from a nuclear power station are described. The means and methods of controlling, monitoring, and protecting the plant and things that can go wrong are presented. There is also a short discourse on the research carried out in the USA and Germany, aimed at assessing the risks of utilising nuclear energy by means of the incident tree analysis and probability calculations. (DG) [de

  19. Nuclear power in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aftergood, S.; Hafemeister, D.W.; Prilutsky, O.F.; Rodionov, S.N.; Primack, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear reactors have provided energy for satellites-with nearly disastrous results. Now the US government is proposing to build nuclear-powered boosters to launch Star Wars defenses. These authors represent scientific groups that are opposed to the use of nuclear power in near space. The authors feel that the best course for space-borne reactors is to ban them from Earth orbit and use them in deep space

  20. Nuclear power experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daglish, J.

    1982-01-01

    A report is given of a recent international conference convened by the IAEA to consider the technical and economic experience acquired by the nuclear industry during the past 30 years. Quotations are given from a number of contributors. Most authors shared the opinion that nuclear power should play a major role in meeting future energy needs and it was considered that the conference had contributed to make nuclear power more viable. (U.K.)

  1. Country Nuclear Power Profiles - 2007 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles (CNPP) was initiated within the framework of the IAEA's programme on assessment and feedback of nuclear power plant performance. It responded to a need for a database and a technical publication containing a description of the energy and economic situation, the energy and the electricity sector, and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. It covers background information on the status and development of nuclear power programmes in countries having nuclear plants in operation and/or plants under construction. This is the 2007 edition issued on CD-ROM and Web pages. It updates the country information, in general, to the end of 2006 for 39 countries. The CNPP is updated based on information voluntarily provided by participating IAEA Member States. Participants include the 30 countries that have operating nuclear power plants, as well as nine countries having past or planned nuclear power programmes (Bangladesh, Egypt, Indonesia, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Italy, Kazakhstan, Poland, Turkey, and Vietnam). For the 2007 edition, 21 countries provided information to the IAEA to update their profiles. For the 18 other countries, the IAEA updated the profile statistical tables on nuclear power, energy development, and economic indicators based on information from IAEA and World Bank databases. These 18 countries are Argentina, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Egypt, Finland, Indonesia, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, and Ukraine. Overall, the CNPP reviews the organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programmes in participating countries, and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory and international frameworks in each country. It compiles the current issues in the new environment within which the electricity and nuclear sector operates, i.e. energy policy, and privatization and deregulation in

  2. Public sector's research programme on nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    2000-06-01

    According to the Finnish nuclear energy legislation, each producer of nuclear waste is responsible for the safe handling, management and disposal of the waste as well as for the arising costs. Authorities supervise and control the implementation of the national waste management programme and set the necessary safety and other requirements. In these tasks the authorities are supported by a research programme on nuclear waste management that is independent of the implementing organisations and power companies. The main objective of the research programme has been to provide the authorities with information and research results relevant for the safety of nuclear waste management. The main emphasis in this research programme has been devoted to the final disposal of spent fuel. The whole area of the research programme has been subdivided into the following main topic areas: (1) Behaviour of bedrock (2) Geohydrology and geochemistry, (3) Release of radionuclides from repository and subsequent transport in bedrock, (4) Engineered safety barriers of the repository, system, (5) Performance and safety assessment of spent fuel disposal facilities, (6) Waste management technology and costs (7) Evaluation of the contents and scope of and observation of the realisation of the environmental impact assessment procedure for the siting of spent nuclear fuel disposal facility, and research on other societal and sociopolitical issues, and (8) Public information, attitude, and image issues for waste management facilities. The research programme has generated considerably increased information on the behaviour of the natural and technical release barriers of the disposal system and thereby contributed to building of confidence on the long-term safety of geological disposal of spent fuel. Furthermore, increased confidence among the public in the affected candidate municipalities has probably been achieved by the complementary studies conducted within the research programme on topics

  3. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 3A. Kozloduy NPP units 5/6: Analysis/testing. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. This volume of Working material contains reports related analyses and testing of Kozloduy nuclear power plant, units 5 and 6

  4. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 3B. Kozloduy NPP units 5/6: Analysis/testing. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. This volume of Working material contains reports related analyses and testing of Kozloduy nuclear power plant, units 5 and 6.

  5. Governance of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, G.; Carnesale, A.; Zigman, P.; DeRosa, F.

    1981-01-01

    Utility decisions on whether to invest in nuclear power plants are complicated by uncertainties over future power demand, regulatory changes, public perceptions of nuclear power, and capital costs. A review of the issues and obstacles confronting nuclear power also covers the factors affecting national policies, focusing on three institutional questions: regulating the industry, regulating the regulators, and regulatory procedures. The specific recommendations made to improve safety, cost, and public acceptance will still not eliminate uncertainties unless the suggested fundamental changes are made. 29 references

  6. TKS-2006. Nuclear waste management of the Olkiluoto and Loviisa power plants: Programme for research, development and technical design for 2007-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-11-01

    The report at hand describes the status and near-term future plans of the research and technology development (RTD) for the nuclear waste management of the Olkiluoto and Loviisa nuclear power plants. Since the facilities for the management and disposal of low- and intermediate-level wastes have already been built and are in operation, and the decommissioning of the nuclear power plant will only take place far away in the future, the emphasis of this report is on the RTD related to the disposal of spent fuel. For the RTD programme on spent fuel disposal the report is also a part of the interim reporting proposed by the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) in the early 2000's. Other reports related to the interim reporting include the updated facility description and the separate reports on the expected evolution of the spent fuel repository, the summary of the biosphere studies and the updated site description ('Site 2006'). Pursuant to the guidelines given by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM) Posiva aims at submission of the application of the construction license for the disposal facility by the end of the year 2012. By the end of 2009 Posiva will present an outline of the whole documentation intended for the application. In practice this requires that the components of the disposal system are specified in sufficient detail for the actual implementation. Accordingly, the principal goals of the next three-year period 2007 - 2009 will be: to define the performance goals for the main components of the disposal system in a way that the system as a whole fulfils the safety requirements set for disposal, and to demonstrate that these requirements can be met by the technology available. The report reviews the present status of the performance goals for the main components. For most main components (release barriers) the principal performance goals have already been defined and their feasibility has been demonstrated. The encapsulation technology

  7. Nuclear power under strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-08-01

    The German citizen faces the complex problem of nuclear power industry with slight feeling of uncertainty. The topics in question can only be briefly dealt with in this context, e.g.: 1. Only nuclear energy can compensate the energy shortage. 2. Coal and nuclear energy. 3. Keeping the risk small. 4. Safety test series. 5. Status and tendencies of nuclear energy planning in the East and West. (GL) [de

  8. Radiological impact of the Argentine Nuclear Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is made of the radiological impact resulting from the activities carried out so far under the Argentine Nuclear Programme, together with a prediction of the impact which could result from the future activities planned under that Programme. The average individual risks and the radiological detriment due to the various activities are determined in terms of the average individual effective dose equivalents and the collective effective dose equivalent commitments. The assessments cover exposures of occupationally exposed workers and the public. The data obtained indicate that both the risks and the resultant detriment are reasonably comparable with those derived from other similar programmes. Moreover, they clearly indicate that the radiological impact of the Programme is tending to decrease with time so that it can be assumed that the radiological impact per unit of practice will be even lower in future. (author)

  9. Educational Programme in Nuclear Security (Chinese Version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Higher education plays an essential role in nuclear security capacity building. It ensures the availability of experts able to provide the necessary competencies for the effective national nuclear security oversight of nuclear and other radioactive material and to establish and maintain an appropriate nuclear regime in a State. This guide provides both the theoretical knowledge and the practical skills necessary to meet the requirements described in the international framework for nuclear security. Emphasis is placed on the implementation of these requirements and recommendations in States. On the basis of this guide, each university should be able to develop its own academic programme tailored to suit the State's educational needs in the area of nuclear security and to meet national requirements.

  10. Current nuclear programmes in third world countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, Anna.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1964, when China became the fifth declared nuclear weapons state NWS (joining the US, Soviet Union, Britain and France), no other state has openly declared a nuclear capacity. But four states - Israel, South Africa, India and Pakistan - are now believed to have such a capacity. This chapter will briefly document the nuclear weapons programmes of these four 'threshold' countries which possess the industrial infrastructure to enable them to produce nuclear weapons' but assiduously refrain from publicly expressing any interest in acquiring such weapons. The chapter will go on to discuss those states which are not on the threshold but which are attempting to become nuclear-capable through building the necessary technology or acquiring it on the international market. The political motivation for these countries to 'go nuclear', and the assistance they have received in this endeavour from the NWSs themselves, will also be discussed. (author)

  11. Worldwide nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Worldwide Nuclear Power (WNP) is a companion volume to Update. Our objective in the publication of WNP is to provide factual information on nuclear power programs and policies in foreign countries to U.S. policymakers in the Federal Government. Facts about the status of nuclear activities abroad should be available to those who are instrumental in defining the direction of nuclear power in the U.S. WNP is prepared by the Office of Nuclear Energy from reports obtained from foreign embassies in Washington, U.S. Embassies overseas, foreign and domestic publications, participation in international studies, and personal communications. It consists of two types of information, tabular and narrative. Domestic nuclear data is included only where its presence is needed to provide easy and immediate comparisons with foreign data. In general, complete U.S. information will be found in Update

  12. Nuclear power and public health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The nuclear power industry has always emphasized the health and safety aspects of the various stages of power production. Nevertheless, the question of public acceptance is becoming increasingly important in the expansion of nuclear power programmes. Objections may arise partly from the tendency to accept familiar hazards but to react violently to unfamiliar ones such as radiation, which is not obvious to the senses and may result in delayed adverse effects, sometimes manifested only in the descendants of the individuals subjected to the radiation. The public health authorities therefore have an important role in educating the public to overcome these fears. However, they also have the duty to reassure the public and convince it that proper care has been taken to protect man and his environment. This duty can be fulfilled by means of independent evaluation and control to ensure that safe nuclear facilities are built, care is taken with their siting, they are operated safely, and the effects of possible accidents are minimized. The selection and development of a nuclear power facility should be carried out with a sound understanding of the factors involved. WHO has collaborated with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the preparation of a booklet summarizing the available information on the subject. It deals with the role of atomic energy in meeting future power needs, radiation protection standards, the safe handling of radioactive materials, disturbances of the environment arising from plant construction and ancillary operations, and the public health implications

  13. Nuclear power and public health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1974-07-01

    The nuclear power industry has always emphasized the health and safety aspects of the various stages of power production. Nevertheless, the question of public acceptance is becoming increasingly important in the expansion of nuclear power programmes. Objections may arise partly from the tendency to accept familiar hazards but to react violently to unfamiliar ones such as radiation, which is not obvious to the senses and may result in delayed adverse effects, sometimes manifested only in the descendants of the individuals subjected to the radiation. The public health authorities therefore have an important role in educating the public to overcome these fears. However, they also have the duty to reassure the public and convince it that proper care has been taken to protect man and his environment. This duty can be fulfilled by means of independent evaluation and control to ensure that safe nuclear facilities are built, care is taken with their siting, they are operated safely, and the effects of possible accidents are minimized. The selection and development of a nuclear power facility should be carried out with a sound understanding of the factors involved. WHO has collaborated with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the preparation of a booklet summarizing the available information on the subject. It deals with the role of atomic energy in meeting future power needs, radiation protection standards, the safe handling of radioactive materials, disturbances of the environment arising from plant construction and ancillary operations, and the public health implications.

  14. Nuclear power statistics 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelgaard, P.L.

    1986-06-01

    In this report an attempt is made to collect literature data on nuclear power production and to present it on graphical form. Data is given not only for 1985, but for a number of years so that the trends in the development of nuclear power can be seen. The global capacity of nuclear power plants in operation and those in operation, under construction, or on order is considered. Further the average capacity factor for nuclear plants of a specific type and for various geographical areas is given. The contribution of nuclear power to the total electricity production is considered for a number of countries and areas. Finally, the accumulated years of commercial operation for the various reactor types up to the end of 1985 is presented. (author)

  15. Nuclear power: European report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, nuclear power plants were operated and/or built in eighteen European countries. Thirteen of these countries are members of EU-25. Five of the ten countries joining the European Union on May 1, 2004 operate nuclear power stations. A total of 206 power reactors with a gross power of 181,941 MWe and a net power of 172,699 MWe were in operation at the end of the year. In 2004, one nuclear power plant was commissioned in Russia (Kalinin 3), two (Kmelnitzki 2 and Rowno 4) in Ukraine. Five nuclear power plants were decommissioned in Europe in the course of 2004. As announced in 2000, the Chapelcross 1 to Chapelcross 4 plants in Britain were shut down for economic reasons. In Lithuania, the Ignalina 1 unit was disconnected from the power grid, as had been demanded by the EU Commission within the framework of the negotiations about the country's accession to the EU. As a result of ongoing technical optimization in some plants, involving increases in reactor power or generator power as well as commissioning of plants of higher capacity, nuclear generating capacity increased by approx. 1.5 GW. In late 2004, four nuclear generating units were under construction in Finland (1), Romania (1), and Russia (2). 150 nuclear power plants were operated in thirteen states of the European Union (EU-25), which is sixteen more than the year before as a consequence of the accession of new countries. They had an aggregate gross power of 137,943 MWe and a net power of 131,267 MWe, generating approx. 983 billion gross kWh of electricity in 2003, thus again contributing some 32% to the public electricity supply in the EU-25. In largest share of nuclear power in electricity generation is found in Lithuania (80%), followed by 78% in France, 57% in the Slovak Republic, 56% in Belgium, and 46% in Ukraine. In several countries not operating nuclear power plants of their own, such as Italy, Portugal, and Austria, nuclear power makes considerable contributions to public electricity supply as

  16. The nuclear power cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Fifty years after the first nuclear reactor come on-line, nuclear power is fourth among the world's primary energy sources, after oil, coal and gas. In 2002, there were 441 reactors in operation worldwide. The United States led the world with 104 reactors and an installed capacity of 100,000 MWe, or more than one fourth of global capacity. Electricity from nuclear energy represents 78% of the production in France, 57% in Belgium, 46% in Sweden, 40% in Switzerland, 39% in South Korea, 34% in Japan, 30% in Germany, 30% in Finland, 26% in Spain, 22% in Great Britain, 20% in the United States and 16% in Russia. Worldwide, 32 reactors are under construction, including 21 in Asia. This information document presents the Areva activities in the nuclear power cycle: the nuclear fuel, the nuclear reactors, the spent fuel reprocessing and recycling and nuclear cleanup and dismantling. (A.L.B.)

  17. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs

  18. Nuclear power in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    India has now nine years of experience with her in nuclear power generation. The system has been acclaimed on various grounds by the authority concerned with its organization in the country. The present paper intends to examine critically the claim for economic superiority of the nuclear power over the thermal power which is asserted often by the spokesmen for the former. Information about the cost of nuclear power that is available to researchers in India is very meagre. Whatever appears in official publications is hardly adequate for working out reasonable estimates for scrutiny. One is therefore left to depend on the public statements made by dignitaries from time to time to form an idea about the economics of nuclear power. Due to gaps in information we are constrained to rely on the foreign literature and make careful guesses about possible costs applicable to India

  19. LDC nuclear power: Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, V.

    1982-01-01

    Brazil has been expanding its nuclear power since 1975, following the Bonn-Brasilia sales agreement and the 1974 denial of US enriched uranium, in an effort to develop an energy mix that will reduce dependence and vulnerability to a single energy source or supplier. An overview of the nuclear program goes on to describe domestic non-nuclear alternatives, none of which has an adequate base. The country's need for transfers of capital, technology, and raw materials raises questions about the advisability of an aggressive nuclear program in pursuit of great power status. 33 references

  20. Nuclear power - the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hann, J.

    1991-01-01

    It is asserted by the author that nuclear power is the only available resource - indeed the only solution to an ever-increasing demand for energy in the United Kingdom over the next 50-100 years. It must be the cornerstone of a practical integrated energy policy, covering that sort of time-scale. In fact, it is going to be a strategic necessity. In this paper the background to establishing a policy is sketched. An explanation is given of what the nuclear industry is doing so as to ensure that the nuclear option is very definitely retained as a result of the 1994 Review of nuclear power in the UK. (author)

  1. Peaceful nuclear programme and front end nuclear fuel cycle activities in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Mukhtar Ahmed

    1999-01-01

    Pakistan has a modest but broad based nuclear programme related to peaceful uses of atomic energy in nuclear power, agriculture, medicine and industry. While development projects in these areas form the major segment of Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission's work, complimentary activities in basic research and human resource development are also supported. PAEC through its activities has been moving towards the goal of achieving self-reliance for its existing programme in an international atmosphere of embargoes and restrictions and in pursuit of creating an infrastructure to help sustain an indigenous nuclear power programme. To solve the local needs and requirements, radioisotopes and nuclear techniques have been applied in agriculture, medicine, hydrology and industry. PAEC has one large research and development establishment in physical sciences, three R and D centers in agriculture, one in biotechnology, and ten nuclear medical centers for diagnostics and oncology treatment. Two research reactors form nucleus of research and development activities in nuclear sciences. In the power sector a 137 Mew CANDU power reactor is in operation in Karachi since 1971. Another 300 Mew PWR is under construction and is nearing completion. Front-end fuel cycle and engineering infrastructure facilities have been established to support continued operation of Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP). To support the engineering activities it has established facilities for precision workshops, non-destructive testing center and a welding institute. (author)

  2. Country nuclear power profiles. 2003 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles (CNPP) was initiated within the framework of the IAEA's programme on assessment and feedback of nuclear power plant performance. It responded to a need for a database and a technical publication containing a description of the energy and economic situation, the energy and the electricity sector, and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. The CNPP covers background information on the status and development of nuclear power programmes in countries having nuclear plants in operation and/or plants under construction. It reviews the organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programmes in participating countries, and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory and international frameworks in each country. The CNPP compiles the current issues in the new environment within which the electricity and nuclear sector operates, i.e. energy policy, and privatization and deregulation in these sectors, the role of government, nuclear energy and climate change, and safety and waste management, which differ from country to country

  3. Country nuclear power profiles. 2003 ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-03-01

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles (CNPP) was initiated within the framework of the IAEA's programme on assessment and feedback of nuclear power plant performance. It responded to a need for a database and a technical publication containing a description of the energy and economic situation, the energy and the electricity sector, and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. The CNPP covers background information on the status and development of nuclear power programmes in countries having nuclear plants in operation and/or plants under construction. It reviews the organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programmes in participating countries, and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory and international frameworks in each country. The CNPP compiles the current issues in the new environment within which the electricity and nuclear sector operates, i.e. energy policy, and privatization and deregulation in these sectors, the role of government, nuclear energy and climate change, and safety and waste management, which differ from country to country.

  4. Country nuclear power profiles. 2004 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-12-01

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles (CNPP) was initiated within the framework of the IAEA's programme on assessment and feedback of nuclear power plant performance. It responded to a need for a database and a technical publication containing a description of the energy and economic situation, the energy and the electricity sector, and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. The CNPP covers background information on the status and development of nuclear power programmes in countries having nuclear plants in operation and/or plants under construction. It reviews the organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programmes in participating countries, and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory and international frameworks in each country. The CNPP compiles the current issues in the new environment within which the electricity and nuclear sector operates, i.e. energy policy, and privatization and deregulation in these sectors, the role of government, nuclear energy and climate change, and safety and waste management, which differ from country to country

  5. Nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Katumi; Sato, Akira; Kaimori, Kimihiro; Kumano, Tetsuji

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power generation for commercial use in Japan has passed 35 years since beginning of operation in the Tokai Nuclear Power Station in 1966, and has 51 machines of reactor and about 44.92 MW of total output of equipment scale in the 21st century. However, an environment around nuclear energy becomes severer at present, and then so many subjects to be overcome are remained such as increased unreliability of the public on nuclear energy at a chance of critical accident of the JCO uranium processing facility, delay of pull-thermal plan, requirement for power generation cost down against liberalization of electric power, highly aging countermeasure of power plant begun its operation as its Genesis, and so on. Under such conditions, in order that nuclear power generation in Japan survives as one of basic electric source in future, it is necessary not only to pursue safety and reliability of the plant reliable to the public, but also to intend to upgrade its operation and maintenance by positively adopting good examples on operational management method on abroad and to endeavor further upgrading of application ratio of equipments and reduction of generation cost. Here were outlined on operation conditions of nuclear power stations in Japan, and introduced on upgrading of their operational management and maintenance management. (G.K.)

  6. Development of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    An extensive discussion of problems concerning the development of nuclear power took place at the fifth regular session of the IAEA General Conference in September-October 1961. Not only were there many references in plenary meetings to the nuclear power plans of Member States, but there was also a more specific and detailed debate on the subject, especially on nuclear power costs, in the Program, Technical and Budget Committee of the Conference. The Conference had before it a report from the Board of Governors on the studies made by the Agency on the economics of nuclear power. In addition, it had been presented with two detailed documents, one containing a review of present-day costs of nuclear power and the other containing technical and economic information on several small and medium-sized power reactors in the United States. The Conference was also informed of the report on methods of estimating nuclear power costs, prepared with the assistance of a panel of experts convened by the Agency, which was reviewed in the July 1961 issue of this Bulletin

  7. Development of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1962-01-15

    An extensive discussion of problems concerning the development of nuclear power took place at the fifth regular session of the IAEA General Conference in September-October 1961. Not only were there many references in plenary meetings to the nuclear power plans of Member States, but there was also a more specific and detailed debate on the subject, especially on nuclear power costs, in the Program, Technical and Budget Committee of the Conference. The Conference had before it a report from the Board of Governors on the studies made by the Agency on the economics of nuclear power. In addition, it had been presented with two detailed documents, one containing a review of present-day costs of nuclear power and the other containing technical and economic information on several small and medium-sized power reactors in the United States. The Conference was also informed of the report on methods of estimating nuclear power costs, prepared with the assistance of a panel of experts convened by the Agency, which was reviewed in the July 1961 issue of this Bulletin

  8. Britain's Nuclear Electric pursues a major programme to enhance safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The UK state-owned nuclear utility, Nuclear Electric, is actively pursuing a major initiative inherited from its predecessor the Central Electricity Generating Board, known as the Station Enhancement Programme. The Enhancement Programme is a multi-million pound project and covers all Nuclear Electric's stations (including relevant aspects of the de-commissioning site at Berkeley). Its fundamental objective is to enhance the arrangements, practices and attitudes on the power stations to create an overall environment likely to promote ever safer and more reliable operation, and to take full account of the best international practices. The four year programme started in the spring of 1989, and is expected to be completed in 1993. Key elements of the programme include quality assurance based management systems; improvements to site and plant material conditions; a more formal approach to training; additional resources and controls to aid the management of maintenance defects; higher profile for the feedback of operational experience; management targets; a station evaluation programme; and formal feedback of lessons learned from the IAEA operational and safety review team visit to the Oldbury-on-Severn station in 1989. (author)

  9. 600 MW nuclear power database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Ruiding; Chen Guorong; Chen Xianfeng; Zhang Yishu

    1996-01-01

    600 MW Nuclear power database, based on ORACLE 6.0, consists of three parts, i.e. nuclear power plant database, nuclear power position database and nuclear power equipment database. In the database, there are a great deal of technique data and picture of nuclear power, provided by engineering designing units and individual. The database can give help to the designers of nuclear power

  10. NOKIA - nuclear power plant monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    The monitoring system is described developed specially for the LOVIISA-1 and -2 nuclear power plants with two WWER-440 units. The multiprocessor system of the WWER-440 contains 3 identical main computers. The in core instrumentation is based on stationary self-powered neutron detectors and on thermocouples for measuring the coolant temperature. The system has equipment for the automatic control of the insulation resistance of the self-powered detectors. It is also equipped with a wide range of standard and special programmes. The standard programmes permit the recording of analog and digital data at different frequencies depending on the pre-set requirements. These data are processed and form data files which are accessible from all programmes. The heart of the special programme is a code for the determination of the power distribution in the core of the WWER-440 reactor. The main part of the programme is the algorithm for computing measured neutron fluxes derived from the signals of the self-powered detectors and the algorithm for deriving the global distribution of the neutron flux in the core. The computed power distribution is used for the determination of instantaneous thermal loads and the distribution of burnup in the core. The production programme of the FINNATOM company for nuclear power plants is listed. (B.S.)

  11. The nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serres, R.

    1999-01-01

    The French nuclear generating industry is highly competitive. The installations have an average age of fifteen years and are half way through their expected life. Nuclear power accounts for 70% of the profits of the French generating company, EDF. Nuclear generation has a minimal effect on the atmosphere and France has a level of CO 2 emissions, thought to be the main cause of the greenhouse effect, half that of Europe as a whole. The air in France is purer than in neighbouring countries, mainly because 75% of all electrical power is generated in nuclear plants and 15% in hydroelectric stations. The operations and maintenance of French nuclear power plants in the service and distribution companies out of a total of 100 000 employees in all, 90 % of whom are based in mainland France. (authors)

  12. Without nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The arguments put forward by the SPD point to the following: Backing out of nuclear power is a must, because of the awful quality of the hazards involved; because there can be no real separation guaranteed between civil and military utilisation of nuclear energy; for reasons of international responsibility; because we must not pass the buck on to the next generation; because social compatibility must be achieved; because the story of the 'cheap' nuclear generation of electricity is a fairy tale; because nuclear power pushes back coal as an energy source; because current ecological conditions call for abandonment of nuclear power, and economic arguments do not really contradict them. A reform of our energy system has to fulfill four requirements: Conserve energy; reduce and avoid environmental pollution; use renewable energy sources as the main sources; leave to the next generation the chance of choosing their own way of life. (HSCH) [de

  13. Nuclear power and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.; Tasker, A.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power currently provides about a fifth of both Britain's and the world's electricity. It is the largest single source of electricity in Western Europe; in France three quarters of electricity is generated by nuclear power stations. This booklet is about the safety of those plants. It approaches the subject by outlining the basic principles and approaches behind nuclear safety, describing the protective barriers and safety systems that are designed to prevent the escape of radioactive material, and summarising the regulations that govern the construction and operation of nuclear power stations. The aim is to provide a general understanding of the subject by explaining the general principles of the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor and setting out the UKAEA strategy for nuclear safety, the objective being always to minimize risk. (author)

  14. Nuclear Power in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Duk-Sang

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Korea's nuclear power program has been promoted by step-by-step approach; the first stage was 1970's when it depended on the foreign contractors' technology and the second was 1980's when it accumulated lots of technology and experience by jointly implementing the project. Lastly in the third stage in 1990's, Korea successfully achieved the nuclear power technological self-reliance and developed its standard nuclear power plant, so-called Optimized Power Reactor 1000 (OPR 1000). Following the development of OPR 1000, Korea has continued to upgrade the design, known as the Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR 1400) and APR+. Korea is one of the countries which continuously developed the nuclear power plant projects during the last 30 years while the other advanced countries ceased the project, and therefore, significant reduction of project cost and construction schedule were possible which benefits from the repetition of construction project. And now, its nuclear industry infrastructure possesses the strong competitiveness in this field.The electricity produced from the nuclear power is 150,958 MWh in 2008, which covers approximately 36% of the total electricity demand in Korea, while the installed capacity of nuclear power is 17,716 MW which is 24% of the total installed capacity. We are currently operating 20 units of nuclear power plants in Korea, and also are constructing 8 additional units (9,600 MW). Korea's nuclear power plants have displayed their excellent operating performance; the average plant capacity factor was 93.4% in 2008, which are about 15% higher than the world average of 77.8%. Moreover, the number of unplanned trips per unit was only 0.35 in 2008, which is the world top class performance. Also currently we are operating four CANDU nuclear units in Korea which are the same reactor type and capacity as the Cernavoda Units. They have been showing the excellent operating performance, of which capacity in 2008 is 92.8%. All the Korean

  15. The future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeile, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    Present conditions and future prospects for the nuclear power industry in the United States are discussed. The presentation includes a review of trends in electrical production, the safety of coal as compared to nuclear generating plants, the dangers of radiation, the economics of nuclear power, the high cost of nuclear power in the United States, and the public fear of nuclear power. 20 refs

  16. Nuclear power industry, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    The intent of this publication is to provide a single volume of resource material that offers a timely, comprehensive view of the nuclear option. Chapter 1 discusses the development of commercial nuclear power from a historical perspective, reviewing the factors and events that have and will influence its progress. Chapters 2 through 5 discuss in detail the nuclear powerplant and its supporting fuel cycle, including various aspects of each element from fuel supply to waste management. Additional dimension is brought to the discussion by Chapters 6 and 7, which cover the Federal regulation of nuclear power and the nuclear export industry. This vast body of thoroughly documented information offers the reader a useful tool in evaluating the record and potential of nuclear energy in the United States

  17. Safety and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, John; Gunning, Angela.

    1988-01-01

    Representatives of the supporters and opponents of civil nuclear power put forward the arguments they feel the public should consider when making up their mind about the nuclear industry. The main argument in favour of nuclear power is about the low risk in comparison with other risks and the amount of radiation received on average by the population in the United Kingdom from different sources. The aim is to show that the nuclear industry is fully committed to the cause of safety and this has resulted in a healthy workforce and a safe environment for the public. The arguments against are that the nuclear industry is deceitful, secretive and politically motivated and thus its arguments about safety, risks, etc, cannot be trusted. The question of safety is considered further - in particular the perceptions, definitions and responsibility. The economic case for nuclear electricity is not accepted. (U.K.)

  18. Nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Moreira, Y.M. de.

    1979-01-01

    The legal aspects of nuclear power plant construction in Brazil, derived from governamental political guidelines, are presented. Their evolution, as a consequence of tecnology development is related. (A.L.S.L.) [pt

  19. Nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulkiewicz, M.; Navratil, J.

    The construction of a nuclear power plant is conditioned on territorial requirements and is accompanied by the disturbance of the environment, land occupation, population migration, the emission of radioactive wastes, thermal pollution, etc. On the other hand, a nuclear power plant makes possible the introduction of district heating and increases the economic and civilization activity of the population. Due to the construction of a nuclear power plant the set limits of negative impacts must not be exceeded. The locality should be selected such as to reduce the unfavourable effects of the plant and to fully use its benefits. The decision on the siting of the nuclear power plant is preceded by the processing of a number of surveys and a wide range of documentation to which the given criteria are strictly applied. (B.H.)

  20. Country Nuclear Power Profiles - 2009 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-08-01

    The Country Nuclear Power Profiles compiles background information on the status and development of nuclear power programs in Member States. It consists of organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programs and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory, and international framework in each country. Its descriptive and statistical overview of the overall economic, energy, and electricity situation in each country, and its nuclear power framework is intended to serve as an integrated source of key background information about nuclear power programs in the world. The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles (CNPP) was initiated in 1990s. It responded to a need for a database and a technical publication containing a description of the energy and economic situation, the energy and the electricity sector, and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. This is the 2009 edition issued on CD-ROM and Web pages. It updates the country information for 44 countries. The CNPP is updated based on information voluntarily provided by participating IAEA Member States. Participants include the 30 countries that have operating nuclear power plants, as well as 14 countries having past or planned nuclear power programmes (Bangladesh, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Italy, Kazakhstan, Nigeria, Philippines, Poland, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey and Vietnam). For the 2009 edition, 26 countries provided updated or new profiles. For the other countries, the IAEA updated the profile statistical tables on nuclear power, energy development, and economic indicators based on information from IAEA and World Bank databases

  1. Nuclear power in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, Z.H.; Qureshi, I.H.

    2005-01-01

    Pakistan started its nuclear power program by installing a 137 M We Canadian Deuterium Reactor (Candu) at Karachi in 1971 which became operational in 1972. The post-contract technical support for the Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP) was withdrawn by Canada in 196 as a consequence of Indian nuclear device test in 1974. In spite of various difficulties PAEC resolved to continue to operate KANUPP and started a process for the indigenous fabrication of spare parts and nuclear fuel. The first fuel bundle fabricated in Pakistan was loaded in the core in 1980. Since then KANUPP has been operating on the indigenously fabricated fuel. The plant computer systems and the most critical instrumentation and Control system were also replaced with up-to date technology. In 2002 KANUPP completed its original design life of 30 year. A program for the life extension of the plant had already been started. The second nuclear power plant of 300 M We pressurized water reactor purchased from China was installed in Chashma in 1997, which started commercial operations in 2001. Another unit of 300 M We will be installed at Chashma in near future. These nuclear power plants have been operating under IAEA safeguards agreements. PAEC through the long-term performance of the two power plants has demonstrated its competence to safely and successfully operate and maintain nuclear power plants. Pakistan foresees an increasingly important and significant share of nuclear power in the energy sector. The Government has recently allocated a share of 8000 MWe for nuclear energy in the total energy scenario of Pakistan by the year 2025. (author)

  2. The Korean nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Tong

    1996-01-01

    Although the world nuclear power industry may appear to be in decline, continued nuclear power demand in Korea indicates future opportunities for growth and prosperity in this country. Korea has one of the world's most vigorous nuclear power programs. Korea has been an active promoter of nuclear power generation since 1978, when the country introduced nuclear power as a source of electricity. Korea now takes pride in the outstanding performance of its nuclear power plants, and has established a grand nuclear power scheme. This paper is aimed at introducing the nuclear power program of Korea, including technological development, international cooperation, and CANDU status in Korea. (author). 2 tabs

  3. Commercial nuclear power 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents historical data on commercial nuclear power in the United States, with projections of domestic nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2020. The report also gives country-specific projections of nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2010 for other countries in the world outside centrally planned economic areas (WOCA). Information is also presented regarding operable reactors and those under construction in countries with centrally planned economies. 39 tabs

  4. [Nuclear News -- Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The topics discussed in this section are: (1) NU(Northeast Utilities) receives largest court fine levied for false records. (2) ComEd nuclear fleet has best-ever performance. (3) Perry and Beaver Valley now run by First Energy Nuclear. (4) Slight reactor power increases may save dollars; (5) Nuclear plants shares to change hands. (6) Y2K nonsafety-related work scheduled for completion. (7) New NRC plan for reviewing plant license transfers with foreign ownership.

  5. Nuclear power and acceptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speelman, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    In 1989 a workshop was held organized by the IAEA and the Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose was to investigate under which circumstances a large-scale extension of nuclear power can be accepted. Besides the important technical information, the care for the environment determined the atmosphere during the workshop. The opinion dominated that nuclear power can contribute in tackling the environment problems, but that the social and political climate this almost makes impossible. (author). 7 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  6. Discounting and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1984-01-01

    The paper describes the practice of discounting and its applicability to nuclear power, and the choice of discount rates. Opportunity cost of capital; risk; social time preference; intergenerational equity; non-monetary aspects; and discounting and nuclear energy; are all discussed. (U.K.)

  7. Nuclear power and leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimston, M.

    1991-03-01

    This booklet describes the nature of leukaemia, disease incidence in the UK and the possible causes. Epidemiological studies observing rates of leukaemia near nuclear power stations in the UK and other parts of the world are discussed. Possible causes of leukaemia excesses near nuclear establishments include radioactive discharges into the environment, paternal radiation exposure and viral causes. (UK)

  8. No to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Kim Beazley has again stated a Labor Government would not pursue nuclear power because the economics 'simply don't stack up'. 'We have significant gas, coal and renewable energy reserves and do not have a solution for the disposal of low-level nuclear waste, let alone waste from nuclear power stations.' The Opposition Leader said developing nuclear power now would have ramifications for Australia's security. 'Such a move could result in our regional neighbours fearing we will use it militarily.' Instead, Labor would focus on the practical measures that 'deliver economic and environmental stability while protecting our national security'. Mr Beazley's comments on nuclear power came in the same week as Prime Minister John Howard declined the request of Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh for uranium exports, although seemingly not ruling out a policy change at some stage. The Prime Ministers held talks in New Delhi over whether Australia would sell uranium to India without it signing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. An agreement reached during a visit by US President George W. Bush gives India access to long-denied nuclear technology and guaranteed fuel in exchange for allowing international inspection of some civilian nuclear facilities. Copyright (2006) Crown Content Pty Ltd

  9. Nuclear Power Plant Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, George A.

    1975-01-01

    The author recognizes a body of basic knowledge in nuclear power plant technoogy that can be taught in school programs, and lists the various courses, aiming to fill the anticipated need for nuclear-trained manpower--persons holding an associate degree in engineering technology. (Author/BP)

  10. Nuclear power for beginners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croall, S.; Sempler, K.

    1978-01-01

    A 'comic strip' account of nuclear power, covering weapons and weapons proliferation, reactor accidents involving human errors, radiation hazards, radioactive waste management and the fuel cycle, fast breeder reactors and plutonium, security, public relations and sociological aspects, energy consumption patterns, energy conservation and alternative energy sources, environmental aspects and anti-nuclear activities. (U.K.)

  11. Progress by nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creamer, A.

    1980-01-01

    United States scientist Petr Beckmann predicts that there will eventually be nuclear power stations in the Transvaal in South Africa. This will take place for two reasons: to decrease pollution problems and to ensure economic advancement. He also refers to the the toxicity of nuclear wastes and coal wastes

  12. Development of nuclear emergency exercise programme (NEEP) in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, H. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, M. K.; Kim, S. H.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear emergency exercise programme (NEEP) is a PC-based application intended for design and planning emergency preparedness and response (EP and R) exercises for a potential nuclear emergency in Korea. The application programme allows EP and R staff to create and edit exercise scenarios based on information customised for a specific nuclear power plant's emergency plans. NEEP includes the following features: (1) step-by-step guide to developing new exercise scenario according to emergency alarm level and potential accident type, (2) database of specific plant's field exercise scenarios that can be easily modified by users, (3) generating master scenario events list and messages of exercise participants and (4) allowing the quantitative evaluation of exercise participants from the view of exercise objectives and evaluator guides. NEEP also features tools for queries, reports and visualisation that can be used to create documentation during the scenario planning and exercise evaluation processes. (authors)

  13. Red alert. The worldwide dangers of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J

    1986-01-01

    The book 'Red Alert' considers the problems and hazards of nuclear power. The politics behind the nuclear power programmes in the United Kingdom and other countries are examined, along with the sequence of events in Britain which led to the building of the Magnox and Advanced Gas-Cooled nuclear reactors. Health hazards of radiation, radioactive waste management, nuclear weapons programmes, and radiation accidents including the Chernobyl accident, are also discussed. (U.K.).

  14. Basic infrastructure for a nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    There are several stages in the process of introducing nuclear power in a country. These include development of nuclear policies and regulations, feasibility studies, public consultations, technology evaluation, requests for proposals and evaluations, contracts and financing, supply, construction, commissioning, operation and finally decommissioning. This publication addresses the 'basic' infrastructure needs, which are adequate until the issue of the construction license. It is obvious that a fully developed nuclear infrastructure will be required for the further implementation stages of a nuclear power reactor. The officials and experts in each country will undertake the transition from a basic infrastructure to a fully developed infrastructure that covers the stages of construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning. The publication is directed to provide guidance for assessing the basic infrastructure necessary for: - A host country to consider when engaging in the implementation of nuclear power, and - A supplier country to consider when assessing whether the recipient country is in an acceptable condition to begin the implementation of a nuclear power project. The target users are decision makers, advisers and senior managers in the governmental organizations, utilities, industrial organizations and regulatory bodies in the countries adopting nuclear power programmes or exporting supplies for these programmes. The governmental organizations that may find this publication useful include: Ministries of Economy, Energy, Foreign Affairs, Finance, Mining, Internal Affairs, Academic Institutions, Nuclear Energy Agencies and Environmental Agencies. This publication was produced within the IAEA programme directed to increase the capability of Member States to plan and implement nuclear power programmes and to establish and enhance national nuclear infrastructure. This publication should be used in conjunction with the IAEA Safety Standards Series and other

  15. World status - nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of nuclear power are not so much anti-nuclear public opinion, but more the decrease of electricity consumption growth rate and the high cost of building reactors. Because of these factors, forecasts of world nuclear capacity have had to be reduced considerably over the last three years. The performance of reactors is considered. The CANDU reactor remains the world's best performer and overall tends to out-perform larger reactors. The nuclear plant due to come on line in 1984 are listed by country; this shows that nuclear capacity will increase substantially over a short period. At a time of stagnant demand this will make nuclear energy an important factor in the world energy balance. Nuclear power stations in operation and under construction in 1983 are listed and major developments in commercial nuclear power in 1983 are taken country by country. In most, the report is the same; national reactor ordering cut back because the expected increase in energy demand has not happened. Also the cost-benefit of nuclear over other forms of energy is no longer as favourable. The export opportunities have also declined as many of the less developed countries are unable to afford reactors. (U.K.)

  16. Nuclear power costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    A report prepared by the IAEA Secretariat and presented to the seventh session of the Agency's General Conference says that information on nuclear power costs is now rapidly moving from the domain of uncertain estimates to that of tested factual data. As more and more nuclear power stations are being built and put into operation, more information on the actual costs incurred is becoming available. This is the fourth report on nuclear power costs to be submitted to the IAEA General Conference. The report last year gave cost information on 38 nuclear power projects, 17 of which have already gone into operation. Certain significant changes in the data given last year are included-in the present report; besides, information is given on seven new plants. The report is divided into two parts, the first on recent developments and current trends in nuclear power costs and the second on the use of the cost data for economic comparisons. Both stress the fact that the margin of uncertainty in the basic data has lately been drastically reduced. At the same time, it is pointed out, some degree of uncertainty is inherent in the assumptions made in arriving at over-all generating cost figures, especially when - as is usually the case - a nuclear plant is part of an integrated power system

  17. Nuclear power in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghaie, S.

    2007-01-01

    The development of space nuclear power and propulsion in the United States started in 1955 with the initiation of the ROVER project. The first step in the ROVER program was the KIWI project that included the development and testing of 8 non-flyable ultrahigh temperature nuclear test reactors during 1955-1964. The KIWI project was precursor to the PHOEBUS carbon-based fuel reactor project that resulted in ground testing of three high power reactors during 1965-1968 with the last reactor operated at 4,100 MW. During the same time period a parallel program was pursued to develop a nuclear thermal rocket based on cermet fuel technology. The third component of the ROVER program was the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) that was initiated in 1961 with the primary goal of designing the first generation of nuclear rocket engine based on the KIWI project experience. The fourth component of the ROVER program was the Reactor In-Flight Test (RIFT) project that was intended to design, fabricate, and flight test a NERVA powered upper stage engine for the Saturn-class lunch vehicle. During the ROVER program era, the Unites States ventured in a comprehensive space nuclear program that included design and testing of several compact reactors and space suitable power conversion systems, and the development of a few light weight heat rejection systems. Contrary to its sister ROVER program, the space nuclear power program resulted in the first ever deployment and in-space operation of the nuclear powered SNAP-10A in 1965. The USSR space nuclear program started in early 70's and resulted in deployment of two 6 kWe TOPAZ reactors into space and ground testing of the prototype of a relatively small nuclear rocket engine in 1984. The US ambition for the development and deployment of space nuclear powered systems was resurrected in mid 1980's and intermittently continued to date with the initiation of several research programs that included the SP-100, Space Exploration

  18. Nuclear power for beginners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croall, S.; Sempler, K.

    1979-01-01

    Witty, critically, and with expert knowledge, 'Atomic power for beginners' describes the development of nuclear power for military purposes and its 'peaceful uses' against the will of the population. Atomic power, the civil baby of the bomb is not only a danger to our lives - it is enemy to all life as all hard technologies are on which economic systems preoccupied with growth put their hopes. Therefore, 'Atomic power for beginners' does not stop at nuclear engineering but proceeds to investigate its consequences, nationally and with a view to the Third World. And since the consequences are so fatal and it is not enough to say no to nuclear power, it gives some thoughts to a better future - with soft technology and alternative production. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 MKO [de

  19. Energy and nuclear power planning studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, L.L.; Molina, P.E.; Mueller, T.

    1990-01-01

    The article focuses on the procedures established by the IAEA for providing assistance to international Member States in conducting studies for the analysis of the economic viability of a nuclear power programme. This article specifically reviews energy and nuclear power planning (ENPP) studies in Algeria, Jordan, and Thailand. It highlights major accomplishments in the context of study objectives and organizations, and the principal lessons learned in the process. 4 figs, 1 tab

  20. Possible health hazards of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneale, G.W.

    1981-01-01

    In considering the possible health hazards of nuclear power, evidence is examined that official estimates of risks, on which governments may be supposed to base their decisions as to the acceptibility of a nuclear power programme, may be understated. In particular the case that the Hanford survey is more appropriate as a basis of risk estimation than the survey of the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Japan, The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission Study, is discussed. (U.K.)

  1. Nuclear power for tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.; Konstantinov, L.V.; Dastidar, P.

    1989-09-01

    The evolution of nuclear power has established this energy source as a viable mature technology, producing at comparative costs more than 16% of the electricity generated world-wide. After outlining the current status of nuclear power, extreme future scenarios are presented, corresponding respectively to maximum penetration limited by technical-economic characteristics, and nuclear phase-out at medium term. The situation is complex and country specific. The relative perception of the importance of different factors and the compensation of advantages vs. disadvantages, or risk vs. benefits, has predominant influence. In order to proceed with an objective and realistic estimate of the future role of nuclear power worldwide, the fundamental factors indicated below pro nuclear power and against are assessed, including expected trends regarding their evolution: Nuclear safety risk; reduction to levels of high improbability but not zero risk. Reliable source of energy; improvements towards uniform standards of excellence. Economic competitiveness vs. alternatives; stabilization and possible reduction of costs. Financing needs and constraints; availability according to requirements. Environmental effects; comparative analysis with alternatives. Public and political acceptance; emphasis on reason and facts over emotions. Conservation of fossil energy resources; gradual deterioration but no dramatic crisis. Energy supply assurance; continuing concerns. Infrastructure requirements and availability; improvements in many countries due to overall development. Non-proliferation in military uses; separation of issues from nuclear power. IAEA forecasts to the year 2005 are based on current projects, national plans and policies and on prevailing trends. Nuclear electricity generation is expected to reach about 18% of total worldwide electricity generation, with 500 to 580 GW(e) installed capacity. On a longer term, to 2030, a stabilized role and place among available viable

  2. Economics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bupp, I.C.; Derian, J.C.; Donsimoni, M.P.; Treitel, R.

    1975-01-01

    Present trends in nuclear reactor costs are interpreted as the economic result of a fundamental debate regarding the social acceptability of nuclear power. Rising capital costs for nuclear power plants are evaluated through statistical analysis of time-related factors, characteristics of licensing and construction costs, physical characteristics of reactors, and geographic and site-related factors. Conclusions are drawn regarding the impact of social acceptability on reactor costs, engineering estimates of future costs, and the possibility of increased potential relative competitiveness for coal-fueled plants. 7 references. (U.S.)

  3. The European programme for controlled nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This illustrated document is intended for information only and should not be used as a technical reference. The nuclear fusion reactors are presented with the two approaches: magnetic confinement and inertial confinement; are described: the place of fusion in the world energy scene and its importance for Europe, how research is at present organized, and the European programme with this next stage: the JET (Joint European Torus), the largest tokamak machine in Europe

  4. Training in radiological protection for nuclear programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Many Member States are developing or already have developed their own national training programmes. The IAEA is actively involved in promoting training in radiological protection for nuclear programmes. The various types of training are fully discussed, with suggested curricula. An earlier report was published as Technical Reports Series No.31 in 1964. In 1973, new and additional information was received from Member States which is reflected in the present report. Training programmes are classified, according to those requiring training: specialists; persons whose work is closely related to radiological protection (administrators, public health officers and industrial health personnel, safety inspectors and engineers in nuclear installations, public service personnel); persons working with radiation; and the general public. Forms, scope and duration of training are discussed. Different types of training programmes are currently required for training of medical doctors (those providing medical surveillance for radiation workers and others dealing with public health aspects of radiation hazards), for technical supervisors, radiologists, and qualified workers in nuclear medicine, technological staff, administrators, persons working with radiation, and public service personnel. Standard curricula and desirable experiments and exercises are discussed. The organization of training together with the facilities, equipment and teaching staff required are considered, as is follow-up training. Annexes 1 to 4 give examples of training curricula and training courses available in various countries, a suggested syllabus for training of technical supervisors, and a bibliography consisting of 210 references dealing with general topics, nuclear radiation physics, radiochemistry and radiation chemistry, radiation biology and biophysics, dosimetry and health physics and radiation protection, medical aspects and toxicology, and environmental aspects

  5. NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

    1963-05-14

    A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

  6. Nuclear power prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, K.

    1994-01-01

    The technical, economic and political prospects of nuclear power are described with regard to ecological aspects. The consensus talks, which failed in spite of the fact that they were stripped of emotional elements and in spite of major concessions on the part of the power industry, are discussed with a view to the political and social conditions. (orig.) [de

  7. The nuclear power alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1989-04-01

    The Director General of the IAEA stressed the need for energy policies and other measures which would help to slow and eventually halt the present build-up of carbon dioxide, methane and other so-called greenhouse gases, which are held to cause global warming. He urged that nuclear power and various other sources of energy, none of which contribute to global warming, should not be seen as alternatives, but should all be used to counteract the greenhouse effect. He pointed out that the commercially used renewable energies, apart from hydropower, currently represent only 0.3% of the world's energy consumption and, by contrast, the 5% of the world's energy consumption coming from nuclear power is not insignificant. Dr. Blix noted that opposition for nuclear power stems from fear of accidents and concern about the nuclear wastes. But no generation of electricity, whether by coal, hydro, gas or nuclear power, is without some risk. He emphasized that safety can never be a static concept, and that many new measures are being taken by governments and by the IAEA to further strengthen the safety of nuclear power

  8. Future nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosbah, D.S.; Nasreddine, M.

    2006-01-01

    The book includes an introduction then it speaks about the options to secure sources of energy, nuclear power option, nuclear plants to generate energy including light-water reactors (LWR), heavy-water reactors (HWR), advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGR), fast breeder reactors (FBR), development in the manufacture of reactors, fuel, uranium in the world, current status of nuclear power generation, economics of nuclear power, nuclear power and the environment and nuclear power in the Arab world. A conclusion at the end of the book suggests the increasing demand for energy in the industrialized countries and in a number of countries that enjoy special and economic growth such as China and India pushes the world to search for different energy sources to insure the urgent need for current and anticipated demand in the near and long-term future in light of pessimistic and optimistic outlook for energy in the future. This means that states do a scientific and objective analysis of the currently available data for the springboard to future plans to secure the energy required to support economy and welfare insurance.

  9. Physics and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttery, N E

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear power owes its origin to physicists. Fission was demonstrated by physicists and chemists and the first nuclear reactor project was led by physicists. However as nuclear power was harnessed to produce electricity the role of the engineer became stronger. Modern nuclear power reactors bring together the skills of physicists, chemists, chemical engineers, electrical engineers, mechanical engineers and civil engineers. The paper illustrates this by considering the Sizewell B project and the role played by physicists in this. This covers not only the roles in design and analysis but in problem solving during the commissioning of first of a kind plant. Looking forward to the challenges to provide sustainable and environmentally acceptable energy sources for the future illustrates the need for a continuing synergy between physics and engineering. This will be discussed in the context of the challenges posed by Generation IV reactors

  10. Nuclear power in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringwood, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    The nuclear power debate hinges upon three major issues: radioactive waste disposal, reactor safety and proliferation. An alternative strategy for waste disposal is advocated which involves disposing of the radwaste (immobilized in SYNROC, a titanate ceramic waste form) in deep (4 km) drill-holes widely dispersed throughout the entire country. It is demonstrated that this strategy possesses major technical (safety) advantages over centralized, mined repositories. The comparative risks associated with coal-fired power generation and with the nuclear fuel cycle have been evaluated by many scientists, who conclude that nuclear power is far less hazardous. Considerable improvements in reactor design and safety are readily attainable. The nuclear industry should be obliged to meet these higher standards. The most hopeful means of limiting proliferation lies in international agreements, possibly combined with international monitoring and control of key segments of the fuel cycle, such as reprocessing

  11. LDC nuclear power: Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selim, M.E.S.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter reviews the evolution of Egypt's nuclear program, the major factors that influenced the successive series of nuclear decisions, and the public debate over the far-reaching program attempted by the late President Anwar El-Sadat. Egypt's program is important, not only because it was the first Arab country to enter the nuclear age, but because it is an ambitious program that includes the installation of eight reactors at a time when many countries are reducing their commitment to nuclear power. Major obstacles remain in terms of human, organizational, and natural resource constraints. 68 references, 1 table

  12. Nuclear power economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emsley, Ian; Cobb, Jonathan [World Nuclear Association, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    Many countries recognize the substantial role which nuclear power has played in providing energy security of supply, reducing import dependence and reducing greenhouse gas and polluting emissions. Nevertheless, as such considerations are far from being fully accounted for in liberalized or deregulated power markets, nuclear plants must demonstrate their viability in these markets on commercial criteria as well as their lifecycle advantages. Nuclear plants are operating more efficiently than in the past and unit operating costs are low relative to those of alternative generating technologies. The political risk facing the economic functioning of nuclear in a number of countries has increased with the imposition of nuclear-specific taxes that in some cases have deprived operators of the economic incentive to continue to operate existing plants.

  13. Nuclear power economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emsley, Ian; Cobb, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Many countries recognize the substantial role which nuclear power has played in providing energy security of supply, reducing import dependence and reducing greenhouse gas and polluting emissions. Nevertheless, as such considerations are far from being fully accounted for in liberalized or deregulated power markets, nuclear plants must demonstrate their viability in these markets on commercial criteria as well as their lifecycle advantages. Nuclear plants are operating more efficiently than in the past and unit operating costs are low relative to those of alternative generating technologies. The political risk facing the economic functioning of nuclear in a number of countries has increased with the imposition of nuclear-specific taxes that in some cases have deprived operators of the economic incentive to continue to operate existing plants.

  14. New nuclear programmes must not neglect waste management - 59077

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCombie, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Many established nuclear power programmes have learned to their dismay that waste management and disposal are not tasks that can be postponed at will if public and political acceptance is a prerequisite for progress. In fact, some programmes that recognised this back in the 1970's and 1980's moved into leading positions in repository development. This happened, for example, in Sweden and Switzerland where already in the 1970's Laws were passed specifying that safe disposal must be demonstrated before new nuclear plants could operate. In recent years, it has become recognised that, in order to ensure that the radioactive wastes in any country are managed safely, it is necessary to have an established legislative and regulatory framework and also to create the necessary organizations for implementation and for oversight of waste management operations and facility development. Guidance on these issues is given in the Joint Convention and a number of other IAEA documents. The IAEA, and also the EC, have in addition published key overarching advisory documents for new nuclear programmes. These are useful for strategic planning but, when it comes to actual implementation projects, the advice tends to imply that all nuclear programmes, however large or small, should be pressing ahead urgently towards early operation of geological repositories. In practice, however, in small programmes there are neither economic nor technical drivers for early implementation of deep geological repositories. Constructing simpler facilities for the disposal of the larger volume of low-level wastes has higher priority. Nevertheless, in all countries political decisions have to be taken and policies set in place to ensure that geological disposal will implemented without unjustified delay. This paper distils out a set of key messages for new programmes. Amongst the most critical are the following. Even if disposal is far off, planning and organization should begin at the initiation of the

  15. Co-ordinated research programme on benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants. V. 4B. Paks NPP: Analysis/testing. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Co-ordinated research programme on the benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type nuclear power plants was initiated subsequent to the request from representatives of Member States. The conclusions adopted at the Technical Committee Meeting on Seismic Issues related to existing nuclear power plants held in Tokyo in 1991 called for the harmonization of methods and criteria used in Member States in issues related to seismic safety. The Consulltants' Meeting which followed resulted in producing a working document for CRP. It was decided that a benchmark study is the most effective way to achieve the principal objective. Two types of WWER reactors (WWER-440/213 and WWER-1000) were selected as prototypes for the benchmark exercise to be tested on a full scale using explosions and/or vibration generators. The two prototypes are Kozloduy Units 5/6 for WWER-1000 and Paks for WWER-440/213 nuclear power plants. This volume of Working material contains reports on dynamic study of the main building of the Paks NPP; shake table investigation at Paks NPP and the Final report of the Co-ordinated Research Programme

  16. Nuclear power in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishida, J.

    1990-01-01

    The Japanese movement against nuclear energy reached a climax in its upsurge in 1988 two years after the Chernobyl accident. At the outset of that year, this trend was triggered by the government acknowledgement that the Tokyo market was open to foods contaminated by the fallout from Chernobyl. Anti-nuclear activists played an agitating role and many housewives were persuaded to join them. Among many public opinion surveys conducted at that time by newspapers and broadcasting networks, I would like to give you some figures of results from the poll carried out by NHK: Sixty percent of respondents said that nuclear power 'should be promoted', either 'vigorously' 7 or 'carefully' 53%). Sixty-six percent doubted the 'safety of nuclear power', describing it as either 'very dangerous' 20%) or 'rather dangerous' (46%). Only 27% said it was 'safe'. In other words, those who acknowledged the need for nuclear power were almost equal in number with those who found it dangerous. What should these figures be taken to mean? I would take note of the fact that nearly two-thirds of valid responses were in favor of nuclear power even at the time when public opinion reacted most strongly to the impact of the Chernobyl accident. This apparently indicates that the majority of the Japanese people are of the opinion that they would 'promote nuclear power though it is dangerous' or that they would 'promote it, but with the understanding that it is dangerous'. But the anti-nuclear movement is continuing. It remains a headache for both the government and the electric utilities. But we can regard the anti-nuclear movement in Japan as not so serious as that faced by other industrial nations

  17. Nuclear power in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishida, J [Japan Research Institute, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1990-07-01

    The Japanese movement against nuclear energy reached a climax in its upsurge in 1988 two years after the Chernobyl accident. At the outset of that year, this trend was triggered by the government acknowledgement that the Tokyo market was open to foods contaminated by the fallout from Chernobyl. Anti-nuclear activists played an agitating role and many housewives were persuaded to join them. Among many public opinion surveys conducted at that time by newspapers and broadcasting networks, I would like to give you some figures of results from the poll carried out by NHK: Sixty percent of respondents said that nuclear power 'should be promoted', either 'vigorously' 7 or 'carefully' 53%). Sixty-six percent doubted the 'safety of nuclear power', describing it as either 'very dangerous' 20%) or 'rather dangerous' (46%). Only 27% said it was 'safe'. In other words, those who acknowledged the need for nuclear power were almost equal in number with those who found it dangerous. What should these figures be taken to mean? I would take note of the fact that nearly two-thirds of valid responses were in favor of nuclear power even at the time when public opinion reacted most strongly to the impact of the Chernobyl accident. This apparently indicates that the majority of the Japanese people are of the opinion that they would 'promote nuclear power though it is dangerous' or that they would 'promote it, but with the understanding that it is dangerous'. But the anti-nuclear movement is continuing. It remains a headache for both the government and the electric utilities. But we can regard the anti-nuclear movement in Japan as not so serious as that faced by other industrial nations.

  18. Code on the safety of nuclear power plants: Siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Code provides criteria and procedures that are recommended for safety in nuclear power plant siting. It forms part of the Agency's programme for establishing Codes and Safety Guides relating to land based stationary thermal neutron power plants

  19. Country nuclear power profiles. 2001 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles was initiated within the framework of the IAEA's programme on assessment and feedback of nuclear power plant performance. It responded to a need for a database and a technical document containing a description of the economic situation, the energy and the electricity sector and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. In 1998, the first edition of the Country Nuclear Power Profiles was published focusing on the overall economic, energy and electricity situation in the country and on its nuclear power industrial structure and organizational framework. The compilation was made based on contributions of 29 Member States with operating nuclear power plants by the end of 1995 and Italy. It also incorporated the 'Fact Sheets' on international, multilateral and bilateral agreements as collected by EXPO. The second edition, issued on CD-ROM only, covered the changes in the new environment of the electricity and the nuclear sector, i.e. the impact of privatization and deregulation on these sectors, be it that the situation differs from country to country. The third edition, issued as hard copy and CD-ROM, updates the country information, in general, to the end of 2000. This publication compiles background information on the status and development of nuclear power programmes in countries having operating nuclear plants and/or plants under construction as of 1 January 2001 and in countries actively engaged in planning such a programme. It presents historical information on energy supply and demand; reviews the organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programmes in participating countries for the same period; and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory, and international framework in each country. Topics such as reactor safety, the nuclear fuel cycle, radioactive waste management and research programmes are for the most part not discussed in detail

  20. Country nuclear power profiles. 2001 ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-01

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles was initiated within the framework of the IAEA's programme on assessment and feedback of nuclear power plant performance. It responded to a need for a database and a technical document containing a description of the economic situation, the energy and the electricity sector and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. In 1998, the first edition of the Country Nuclear Power Profiles was published focusing on the overall economic, energy and electricity situation in the country and on its nuclear power industrial structure and organizational framework. The compilation was made based on contributions of 29 Member States with operating nuclear power plants by the end of 1995 and Italy. It also incorporated the 'Fact Sheets' on international, multilateral and bilateral agreements as collected by EXPO. The second edition, issued on CD-ROM only, covered the changes in the new environment of the electricity and the nuclear sector, i.e. the impact of privatization and deregulation on these sectors, be it that the situation differs from country to country. The third edition, issued as hard copy and CD-ROM, updates the country information, in general, to the end of 2000. This publication compiles background information on the status and development of nuclear power programmes in countries having operating nuclear plants and/or plants under construction as of 1 January 2001 and in countries actively engaged in planning such a programme. It presents historical information on energy supply and demand; reviews the organizational and industrial aspects of nuclear power programmes in participating countries for the same period; and provides information about the relevant legislative, regulatory, and international framework in each country. Topics such as reactor safety, the nuclear fuel cycle, radioactive waste management and research programmes are for the most part not discussed in detail

  1. Productivity studies of the nuclear waste programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, Haakan

    2002-08-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate reviews and supplements the SKB proposal for cost estimations for the nuclear waste programme. These estimations are of great importance for the determination of annual fees to the Nuclear Waste Fund and guarantee amounts in accordance with the Financing Act. The majority of the Nuclear Waste Fund's assets are invested in real interest bonds, issued by the Swedish state. The average duration for the Nuclear Waste Fund investments was 12.8 years at the end of December 2001. From July 1, 2002 on the Nuclear waste Fund investments will consist of nominal and real bonds on the official market. The Fund is increased in line with the Consumer Price Index (KPI). If real costs within the nuclear waste programme increase at a faster rate than the KPI, there is a risk that the Nuclear Waste Fund will be 'under balanced'. SKI has developed a weighted index, the KBS-3-index, to compare the SKB cost re-estimate with. Productivity changes have however no impact on these indices. The KBS-3-index indicates that there might be a risk that the de facto, cost increases will exceed KPI. An improved productivity might however balance the cost escalations. Productivity is normally defined as production divided by the input of production factors. The production can be a quantity measurement or the value added. A common approach is calculation of the labour productivity. The productivity development within different industries in Sweden and in EU varies, and is not only positive. The so called DEA method is used for productivity and efficiency measurements in public and private operations. Efficiency evaluations based on known norms are not made with the DEA models. Instead the evaluation is performed in relation to an empirically based reference technology, a relative efficiency. A selection or an optimisation of output is difficult for the nuclear waste programme. It is not possible to change parts of the nuclear waste programme to something else

  2. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  3. Results of research into nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polak, V.; Hladky, E.; Moravek, J.; Suchomel, J.; Stehlik, J.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given of computer programmes for the safety analysis of nuclear power plants with WWER type reactors and with fast breeder reactors. The programmes solve accidents in the core, the primary circuit and the containment. A comparison is made of Czechoslovak and foreign computer programmes and their agreement proved. Also studied is the problem of radiation safety of nuclear power plants with regard to the leakage of radioactive isotopes and their detection. (J.B.)

  4. Anticipated transients without scram for WWER reactors. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    Anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) are anticipated operational occurrences followed by the failure of one reactor scram function. Current international practice requires that the capability of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) to cope with ATWS be demonstrated following a systematic evaluation of plants' defence in depth. Countries operating PWRs require design consideration of ATWS events on a deterministic basis. The regulatory requirements may concern either specific mitigating systems or acceptable plant performance during these events. The prevailing international practice for performing transient analysis of ATWS for licensing is the best estimate approach. Available transient analyses of ATWS events indicate that WWER reactors, like PWRs, have the tendency to shut themselves down if the inherent nuclear feedback is sufficiently negative. Various control and limitation functions of the WWER plants also provide a degree of defence against ATWS. However, for most WWER plants, complete and systematic ATWS analyses have yet to be submitted for rigorous review by the regulatory authorities and preventive or mitigative measures have not been established. In addition, it has also been recognized that plant behaviour in case of ATWS also relies on certain system functions (use of pressurizer safety valves for liquid discharge, availability of steam dump valve to both the condenser (BRU-K) and the atmosphere (BRU-A) for secondary side pressure control, and others) which have been identified as safety issues and need to be qualified for accident conditions. In all countries operating WWERs, the need for ATWS investigations is recognized and reflected in the safety improvement programmes. ATWS analysis for WWERs is not required for the licensing process in Bulgaria, the Czech Republic (with the exception of the Temelin nuclear power plant) and Russia. Design consideration of ATWS is required if expert assessments of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) results

  5. Nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This press dossier presented in Shanghai (China) in April 1999, describes first the activities of the Framatome group in the people's republic of China with a short presentation of the Daya Bay power plant and of the future Ling Ao project, and with a description of the technological cooperation with China in the nuclear domain (technology transfers, nuclear fuels) and in other industrial domains (mechanics, oil and gas, connectors, food and agriculture, paper industry etc..). The general activities of the Framatome group in the domain of energy (nuclear realizations in France, EPR project, export activities, nuclear services, nuclear fuels, nuclear equipments, industrial equipments) and of connectors engineering are presented in a second and third part with the 1998 performances. (J.S.)

  6. Legal issues associated with preparing for a nuclear energy programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelzer, N.

    2009-01-01

    Developing and implementing a national programme for the civilian use of nuclear energy means embarking on the use of a Janus-faced form of energy. We all know that nuclear energy implies both extraordinary benefits and extraordinary risks. This fact requires a legal framework appropriate to cope with both elements of nuclear power. Legislators and State authorities have to establish a sound balance between risks and benefits. That is not at all an easy task. While excluding or limiting risks requires severe legal control mechanisms, the benefits can only fully be enjoyed if the legal framework ensures freedom of research and of economic and industrial development including the guarantee of property ownership and of investments. Combining both opposite poles seems like trying to square the circle. In case of a conflict between promotion and protection, there is no doubt that the protection against nuclear risks has to prevail. Therefore this aspect of nuclear law will be mainly dealt with in this presentation. Establishing a legal framework to tame the hazards of nuclear energy is a much more challenging task for law-makers than providing a legal basis for promoting the use of nuclear energy. With regard to the promotion of nuclear energy, States enjoy a broad range of discretion and may use a great number of legal and non-legal instruments to support the development of a nuclear programme. From a legal point of view, promoting nuclear energy does not require a specific regime. However, it does require a specific regime to control the risks of nuclear energy. States preparing for a nuclear energy programme have to be aware that the use of nuclear energy is not an exclusively national matter. In particular the risk associated with nuclear energy extends beyond national borders. Using the benefits also needs international cooperation in many fields including, e.g., research or fuel supply. Today a network of multilateral and bilateral international treaties exists

  7. Guidebook on the introduction of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This ''Guidebook on the Introduction of Nuclear Power'' has been structured into three parts. The first part contains a survey of nuclear power, with the objective of providing general background information to the reader on the present status and future prospects of nuclear power and on the technical and economic aspects of available power reactor types and nuclear fuel cycles. In the second part of the Guidebook, the special aspects and considerations relevant to the introduction of nuclear power in a country are discussed. The subject is subdivided into three main headings: the technical aspects and national requirements; the safety and environmental considerations; and the international aspects of nuclear power. Emphasis is placed on the tasks to be performed within the country introducing nuclear power, on responsibilities that cannot be delegated and on the need for adequate national infrastructures and long-term commitments. Finally, the third part of the Guidebook contains more detailed information and guidance on the planning and preparatory stages of launching a first nuclear power project, including in particular: nuclear power programme planning, siting, feasibility studies, bidding and contracting. Design, construction and operation are covered in a brief overview for the sake of completeness

  8. Abuse of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, J [UKAEA

    1976-09-01

    This paper reproduces an address by Sir John Hill, Chairman of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, at a conference in London organised by the Financial Times in July 1976. Actions that, in the author's view, could be regarded as constituting abuse of nuclear power are first summarised, and the various aspects of the use and abuse of nuclear power are discussed. The author considers that achieving the maximum degree of acceptance of the Non-Proliferation Treaty is the most important political objective in nuclear power, but considers that nuclear terrorism would be abortive and that, so far as the UK is concerned, the present precautions are adequate and will remain so. It is considered that much abuse of nuclear power arises from the prevalence of its critics, particularly with reference to Pu hazards, the health of nuclear employees, and possible damage to the health of the public. The Pu problem is considered to be far more emotive than rational. The possibility of lung cancer and leukaemia is discussed. It is concluded that atomic energy is one of the best of industries in which to work, both from the health and interest points of view.

  9. Nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otway, H.J.

    1974-01-01

    Action at the international level will assume greater importance as the number of nuclear power plants increases, especially in the more densely populated parts of the world. Predictions of growth made prior to October 1973 [9] indicated that, by 1980, 14% of the electricity would be supplied by nuclear plants and by the year 2000 this figure would be about 50%. This will make the topic of international co-operation and standards of even greater importance. The IAEA has long been active in providing assistance to Member States in the siting design and operation of nuclear reactors. These activities have been pursued through advisory missions, the publication of codes of practice, guide books, technical reports and in arranging meetings to promote information exchange. During the early development of nuclear power, there was no well-established body of experience which would allow formulation of internationally acceptable safety criteria, except in a few special cases. Hence, nuclear power plant safety and reliability matters often received an ad hoc approach which necessarily entailed a lack of consistency in the criteria used and in the levels of safety required. It is clear that the continuation of an ad hoc approach to safety will prove inadequate in the context of a world-wide nuclear power industry, and the international trade which this implies. As in several other fields, the establishment of internationally acceptable safety standards and appropriate guides for use by regulatory bodies, utilities, designers and constructors, is becoming a necessity. The IAEA is presently planning the development of a comprehensive set of basic requirements for nuclear power plant safety, and the associated reliability requirements, which would be internationally acceptable, and could serve as a standard frame of reference for nuclear plant safety and reliability analyses

  10. Nuclear power in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckurts, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    On the occasion of the retirement of the Editor-in-chief of 'atomwirtschaft', the author gave a keynote speech on the development of nuclear power in the Federal Republic of Germany at the headquarters of the Handelsblatt Verlag in Duesseldorf on October 30, 1984. He subdivided the period under discussion into five phases, the first of which comprises the 'founding years' of 1955 to 1960. This was the time when activities in nuclear research and nuclear technology in Germany, which were permitted again in mid-1955, began with the establishment of the national research centers, the first Atomic Power Program, the promulgation of the Atomic Energy Act, the foundation of government organizations, including the Federal Ministry for Atomic Energy, etc. In the second phase, between 1960 and 1970, a solid foundation was laid for the industrial peaceful uses of nuclear power in the construction of the first LWR experimental nuclear power stations, the first successful export contracts, the beginnings of the first nuclear fuel cycle plants, such as the WAK reprocessing plant, the Asse experimental repository, the Almelo agreement on centrifuge enrichment. The third phase, between 1970 and 1975, was a period of euphoria, full of programs and forecasts of a tremendous boom in nuclear generating capacities, which were further enhanced by the 1973 oil squeeze. In 1973 and 1974, construction permits for ten nuclear power plants were applied for. The fourth phase, between 1975 and 1980, became a period of crisis. The fifth phase, the eighties, give rise to hope for a return to reason. (orig./UA) [de

  11. Nuclear power safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports that since the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident in 1986, over 70 of the International Atomic Energy Agency's 112 member states have adopted two conventions to enhance international cooperation by providing timely notification of an accident and emergency assistance. The Agency and other international organizations also developed programs to improve nuclear power plant safety and minimize dangers from radioactive contamination. Despite meaningful improvements, some of the measures have limitations, and serious nuclear safety problems remain in the design and operation of the older, Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. The Agency's ability to select reactors under its operational safety review program is limited. Also, information on the extent and seriousness of safety-related incidents at reactors in foreign countries is not publicly available. No agreements exist among nuclear power countries to make compliance with an nuclear safety standards or principles mandatory. Currently, adherence to international safety standards or principles is voluntary and nonbinding. Some states support the concept of mandatory compliance, but others, including the United States, believe that mandatory compliance infringes on national sovereignty and that the responsibility for nuclear reactor safety remains with each nation

  12. Nuclear power's burdened future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavin, C.

    1987-01-01

    Although governments of the world's leading nations are reiterating their faith in nuclear power, Chernobyl has brought into focus the public's overwhelming feeling that the current generation of nuclear technology is simple not working. Despite the drastic slowdown, however, the global nuclear enterprise is large. As of mid-1986, the world had 366 nuclear power plants in operation, with a generating capacity of 255,670 MW. These facilities generate about 15% of the world's electricity, ranging from 65% in France to 31% in West Germany, 23% in Japan, 16% in the United States, 10% in the Soviet Union, and non in most developing nations. Nuclear development is clearly dominated by the most economically powerful and technologically advanced nations. The United States, France, the Soviet Union, Japan, and West Germany has 72% of the world's generating capacity and set the international nuclear pace. The reasons for scaling back nuclear programs are almost as diverse as the countries themselves. High costs, slowing electricity demand growth, technical problems, mismanagement, and political opposition have all had an effect. Yet these various factors actually form a complex web of inter-related problems. For example, rising costs usually represent some combination of technical problems and mismanagement, and political opposition often occurs because of safety concerns or rising costs. 13 references

  13. Nuclear power: Europa report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    Last year, 2003, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, respectively, in 18 countries all over Europe. In 8 of the 15 member countries of the European Union (EU-15) nuclear power plants have been operation. In 7 of the 13 EU Candidate Countries (incl. Turkey) nuclear energy was used for power production. A total of 208 plants with an aggregate net capacity of 171 031 MWe and an aggregate gross capacity of 180 263 MWe were in operation at the end of 2003. No unit reached first criticality in 2003 or was connected to the grid. The unit Calder Hall 1 to Calder Hall 4 have been permanently shut down in Great Britain due to economical reasons and an earlier decision. In Germany the NPP Stade was closed. The utility E.ON has decided to shut down the plant due to the efforts of the liberalisation of the electricity markets. Last year, 8 plants were under construction in Romania (1), Russia (3), Slovakia (2 - suspended), and the Ukraine (2), that is only in East European Countries. The Finnish parliament approved plans for the construction of the country's fifth nuclear power reactor by a majority of 107 votes to 92. The consortium led by Framatome ANP was awarded the contract to build the new nuclear power plant (EPR, 1 600 MW) in Olkiluoto. In eight countries of the European Union 136 nuclear power plants have been operated with an aggregate gross capacity of 127 708 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 121 709 MWe. Net electricity production in 2003 in the EU amounts to approx. 905 TWh gross, which means a share of about 33 per cent of the total production in the whole EU. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. They reach 80% in Lithuania, 78% in France, 57% in the Slovak Republic, 57% in Belgium, and 46% in the Ukraine. Nuclear power also provides a noticeable share in the electricity supply of countries, which operate no own nuclear power plants, e.g. Italy, Portugal, and Austria. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear power. Europe report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    Last year, 2001, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, respectively, in 18 countries all over Europe. In 8 of the 15 member countries of the European Union nuclear power plants have been in operation. In 7 of the 13 EU Candidate Countries nuclear energy was used for power production. A total of 216 plants with an aggregate net capacity of 171 802 MWe and an aggregate gross capacity of 181 212 MWe were in operation. One unit, i.e. Volgodonsk-1 in Russia went critical for the first time and started test operation after having been connected to the grid. Volgodonsk-1 adds about 1 000 MWe (gross) nd 953 MWe (net) to the electricity production capacity. The operator of the Muehlheim-Kaerlich NPP field an application to decommission and dismantle the plant; this plant was only 13 months in operation and has been shut down since 1988 for legal reasons. Last year, 10 plants were under construction in Romania (1), Russia (4), Slovakia (2), the Czech Republic (1) and the Ukraine (2), that is only in East European Countries. In eight countries of the European Union 143 nuclear power plants have been operated with an aggregate gross capacity of 128 758 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 122 601 MWe. Net electricity production in 2001 in the EU amounts to approx. 880.3 TWh gross, which means a share of 33,1 per cent of the total production in the whole EU. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. The reach 75.6% in France, 74.2% in Lithuania, 58.2% in Belgium, 53.2% in the Slovak Republic, and 47.4% in the Ukraine. Nuclear power also provides a noticeable share in the electricity supply of countries, which operate no own nuclear power plants, e.g. Italy, Portugal, and Austria. On May 24th, 2002 the Finnish Parliament voted for the decision in principle to build a fifth nuclear power plant in the country. This launches the next stage in the nuclear power plant project. The electric output of the plant unit will be 1000-1600 MW

  15. Nuclear Power after Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, B.

    2011-01-01

    On 11 March 2011 Japan suffered an earthquake of very high magnitude, followed by a tsunami that left thousands dead in the Sendai region, the main consequence of which was a major nuclear disaster at the Fukushima power station. The accident ranked at the highest level of severity on the international scale of nuclear events, making it the biggest since Chernobyl in 1986. It is still impossible to gauge the precise scope of the consequences of the disaster, but it has clearly given rise to the most intense renewed debates on the nuclear issue. Futuribles echoes this in the 'Forum' feature of this summer issue which is entirely devoted to energy questions. Bernard Bigot, chief executive officer of the technological research organization CEA, looks back on the Fukushima disaster and what it changes (or does not change) so far as the use of nuclear power is concerned, particularly in France. After recalling the lessons of earlier nuclear disasters, which led to the development of the third generation of power stations, he reminds us of the currently uncontested need to free ourselves from dependence on fossil fuels, which admittedly involves increased use of renewables, but can scarcely be envisaged without nuclear power. Lastly, where the Fukushima disaster is concerned, Bernard Bigot shows how it was, in his view, predominantly the product of a management error, from which lessons must be drawn to improve the safety conditions of existing or projected power stations and enable the staff responsible to deliver the right response as quickly as possible when an accident occurs. In this context and given France's high level of dependence on nuclear power, the level of use of this energy source ought not to be reduced on account of the events of March 2011. (author)

  16. France without nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charmant, A.; Devezeaux, J.G.; Ladoux, N.; Vielle, M.

    1991-01-01

    As coal production declined and France found herself in a condition of energy dependency, the country decided to turn to nuclear power and a major construction program was undertaken in 1970. The consequences of this step are examined in this article, by imagining where France would be without its nuclear power. At the end of the sixties, fuel-oil incontestably offered the cheapest way of producing electricity; but the first petroleum crisis was to upset the order of economic performance, and coal then became the more attractive fuel. The first part of this article therefore presents coal as an alternative to nuclear power, describing the coal scenario first and then comparing the relative costs of nuclear and coal investment strategies and operating costs (the item that differs most is the price of the fuel). The second part of the article analyzes the consequences this would have on the electrical power market, from the supply and demand point of view, and in terms of prices. The third part of the article discusses the macro-economic consequences of such a step: the drop in the level of energy dependency, increased costs and the disappearance of electricity exports. The article ends with an analysis of the environmental consequences, which are of greater and greater concern today. The advantage here falls very much in favor of nuclear power, if we judge by the lesser emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and especially carbon dioxide. 22 refs.; 13 figs.; 10 tabs

  17. Reviewing nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Colin

    1990-01-01

    The UK government has proposed a review of the prospects for nuclear power as the Sizewell B pressurized water reactor project nears completion in 1994. However, a delay in the completion of Sizewell B or a change of government could put off the review for some years beyond the mid 1990s. Anticipating, though, that such a review will eventually take place, issues which it should consider are addressed. Three broad categories of possible benefit claimed for nuclear power are examined. These are that nuclear power contributes to the security of energy supply, that it provides protection against long run fossil fuel price increases and that it is a means of mitigating the greenhouse effect. Arguments are presented which cost doubt over the reality of these benefits. Even if these benefits could be demonstrated, they would have to be set against the financial, health and accident costs attendant on nuclear power. It is concluded that the case may be made that nuclear power imposes net costs on society that are not justified by the net benefits conferred. Some comments are made on how a government review, if and when it takes place, should be conducted. (UK)

  18. Financing aspects of nuclear power plant construction under Polish economic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besant-Jones, John E.

    1999-01-01

    Within the framework of the new Polish Energy Law the different issues important far financing a programme to develop nuclear power power in Poland such as: economic competitiveness of nuclear power, financing options for nuclear power projects, managing the various risks for financing nuclear power as well as nuclear and business liability are considered. The importance of policy issues is stressed

  19. The politics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, D.

    1978-01-01

    The contents of the book are: introduction; (part 1, the economy of nuclear power) nuclear power and the growth of state corporatism, ownership and control - the power of the multi-nationals, economic and political goals - profit or control, trade union policy and nuclear power; (part 2, nuclear power and employment) nuclear power and workers' health and safety, employment and trade union rights, jobs, energy and industrial strategy, the alternative energy option; (part 3, political strategies) the anti-nuclear movement, trade unions and nuclear power; further reading; UK organisations. (U.K.)

  20. Nuclear power and other energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doederlein, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison is made between nuclear power plants, gas-fuelled thermal power plants and oil-fired thermal power plants with respect to health factors, economy, environment and resource exploitation, with special reference to the choice of power source to supplement Norwegian hydroelectric power. Resource considerations point clearly to nuclear power, but, while nuclear power has an overall economic advantage, the present economic situation makes its heavy capital investment a disadvantage. It is maintained that nuclear power represents a smaller environmental threat than oil or gas power. Finally, statistics are given showing that nuclear power involves smaller fatality risks for the population than many other hazards accepted without question. (JIW)

  1. Nuclear power production costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erramuspe, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The economic competitiveness of nuclear power in different highly developed countries is shown, by reviewing various international studies made on the subject. Generation costs (historical values) of Atucha I and Embalse Nuclear Power Plants, which are of the type used in those countries, are also included. The results of an international study on the economic aspects of the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle are also reviewed. This study shows its relatively low incidence in the generation costs. The conclusion is that if in Argentina the same principles of economic racionality were followed, nuclear energy would be economically competitive in the future, as it is today. This is of great importance in view of its almost unavoidable character of alternative source of energy, and specially since we have to expect an important growth in the consumption of electricity, due to its low share in the total consumption of energy, and the low energy consumption per capita in Argentina. (Author) [es

  2. Environment and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Aimed at the general public this leaflet, one of a series prepared by AEA Technology, on behalf of the British Nuclear Industry Forum, seeks to put the case for generating electricity to meet United Kingdom and world demand using nuclear power. It examines the environmental problems linked to the use of fossil-fuels in power stations and other uses, such as the Greenhouse Effect. Problems associated with excess carbon dioxide emissions are also discussed, such as acid rain, the effects of deforestation and lead in petrol. The role of renewable energy sources is mentioned briefly. The leaflet also seeks to reassure on issues such as nuclear waste managements and the likelihood and effects of nuclear accidents. (UK)

  3. Thai Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namwong, Ratanachai

    2011-01-01

    The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT), the main power producer in Thailand, was first interested in nuclear power as an electricity option in 1967 when the electricity demand increased considerably for the first time as a result of the economic and industrial growth. Its viability had been assessed several times during the early seventies in relation to the changing factors. Finally in the late 1970s, the proceeding with nuclear option was suspended for a variety of reasons, for instance, public opposition, economic repercussion and the uncovering of the indigenous petroleum resources. Nonetheless, EGAT continued to maintain a core of nuclear expertise. During 1980s, faced with dwindling indigenous fossil fuel resources and restrictions on the use of further hydro as an energy source, EGAT had essentially reconsidered introducing nuclear power plants to provide a significant fraction to the long term future electricity demand. The studies on feasibility, siting and environmental impacts were conducted. However, the project was never implemented due to economics crisis in 1999 and strong opposition by environmentalists and activists groups. The 1986 Chernobyl disaster was an important cause. After a long dormant period, the nuclear power is now reviewed as one part of the solution for future energy supply in the country. Thailand currently relies on natural gas for 70 percent of its electricity, with the rest coming from oil, coal and hydro-power. One-third of the natural gas consumed in Thailand is imported, mainly from neighbouring Myanmar. According to Power Development Plan (PDP) 2007 rev.2, the total installed electricity capacity will increase from 28,530.3 MW in 2007 to 44,281 MW by the end of plan in 2021. Significantly increasing energy demand, concerns over climate change and dependence on overseas supplies of fossil fuels, all turn out in a favor of nuclear power. Under the current PDP (as revised in 2009), two 1,000- megawatt nuclear

  4. International conference on innovative technologies for nuclear fuel cycles and nuclear power. Book of extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    A wide range of issues relevant to the innovative technologies for nuclear power cycle and nuclear power were addressed. The 7 sessions of the conference were entitled: (1) no title; (2) needs, prospects and challenges for innovation; (3) evolution of technical, social, economic and political conditions; (4) panel on challenges for the deployment of innovative technologies; (5) international programmes on innovative nuclear systems; (6) innovative nuclear systems and related R and D programmes; (7) concluding panel.

  5. Nuclear Power Plants (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell III, Walter [Southern Nuclear Engineering, Inc.

    1973-01-01

    Projected energy requirements for the future suggest that we must employ atomic energy to generate electric power or face depletion of our fossil-fuel resources—coal, oil, and gas. In short, both conservation and economic considerations will require us to use nuclear energy to generate the electricity that supports our civilization. Until we reach the time when nuclear power plants are as common as fossil-fueled or hydroelectric plants, many people will wonder how the nuclear plants work, how much they cost, where they are located, and what kinds of reactors they use. The purpose of this booklet is to answer these questions. In doing so, it will consider only central station plants, which are those that provide electric power for established utility systems.

  6. Pulsed nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, C.V.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear power plant. This power plant consists of: 1.) a cavity; 2.) a detonatable nuclear device in a central region of the cavity; 3.) a working fluid inside of the cavity; 4.) a method to denote a nuclear device inside of the cavity; 5.) a mechanical projection from an interior wall of the cavity for recoiling to absorb a shock wave produced by the detonation of the nuclear device and thereby protecting the cavity from damage. A plurality of segments defines a shell within the cavity and a plurality of shock absorbers, each connecting a corresponding segment to a corresponding location on the wall of the cavity. Each of these shock absorbers regulate the recoil action of the segments; and 6.) means for permitting controlled extraction of a quantity of hot gases from the cavity produced by the vaporization of the working fluid upon detonation of the nuclear device. A method of generating power is also described. This method consists of: 1.) introducing a quantity of water in an underground cavity; 2.) heating the water in the cavity to form saturated steam; 3.) detonating a nuclear device at a central location inside the cavity; 4.) recoiling plate-like elements inside the cavity away from the central location in a mechanically regulated and controlled manner to absorb a shock wave produced by the nuclear device detonation and thereby protect the underground cavity against damage; 5.) extracting a quantity of superheated steam produced by the detonation of the nuclear device; and 6.) Converting the energy in the extracted superheated steam into electrical power

  7. Misunderstanding nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tombs, F.

    1981-01-01

    The inaugural lecture of Sir Francis Tombs as newly installed President of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, on the reasons for the widely differing perceptions of opposing factions in the nuclear debate, is reviewed with extensive quotations. The lecturer pointed out that development of nuclear power as an energy source requires the consent of the majority and the uncommitted must be persuaded to spend the time necessary to understand the issues and to evaluate the arguments in an objective way. (U.K.)

  8. Nuclear power in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, A.

    1990-01-01

    I want to give some ideas on the situation of public and utility acceptance of nuclear power in the Federal Republic of Germany and perhaps a little bit on Europe. Let me start with public perception. I think in Germany we have a general trend in the public perception of technology during the last decade that has been investigated in a systematic manner in a recent study. It is clear that the general acceptance of technology decreased substantially during the last twenty years. We can also observe during this time that aspects of the benefits of technology are much less reported in the media, that most reporting by the media now is related to the consequences of technologies, such as negative environmental consequences. hat development has led to a general opposition against new technological projects, in particular unusual and large. That trend is related not only to nuclear power, we see it also for new airports, trains, coal-fired plants. here is almost no new technological project in Germany where there is not very strong opposition against it, at least locally. What is the current public opinion concerning nuclear power? Nuclear power certainly received a big shock after Chernobyl, but actually, about two thirds of the German population wants to keep the operating plants running. Some people want to phase the plants out as they reach the end-of-life, some want to substitute newer nuclear technology, and a smaller part want to increase the use of nuclear power. But only a minority of the German public would really like to abandon nuclear energy

  9. The realities of nuclear power: international economic and regulatory experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    The book is aimed at the energy industry, energy ministries, nuclear power organisations and national agencies. A description is given of a framework for evaluating nuclear power technology development, along with the economic evaluation of nuclear power. The contrasting records are examined of four of the major users of nuclear power - the USA, the Federal Republic of Germany, Canada and France, and factors are identified which have been important in determining the success or otherwise of each of the four nuclear power programmes. Finally the future of nuclear power is discussed. (U.K.)

  10. Nuclear power: Europe report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-