WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear potential

  1. Potential for nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, B.M.

    1977-05-01

    The question of whether or not terrorists will ''go nuclear'' is discussed. It is possible, although there is no historical evidence that any criminal or terrorist group ever made any attempt to acquire nuclear material for use in an explosive or dispersal device. In terms of intentions, psychotics are potential nuclear terrorists, but in terms of capabilities, they are the farthest away from being able to acquire a nuclear weapon. The history of nuclear incidents in the U.S. and abroad is reviewed. As the nuclear industry expands, the number of low-level incidents (bomb threats, pilferage, etc.) will increase also, but not necessarily escalate to more serious incidents. Terrorists may ''go nuclear'' solely for the publicity value; nuclear hoaxes may be attenpted. Nuclear terrorism seems more attractive as a threat than as an action. But the nature of the threat may change in the future, and the danger of imitation of a successful nuclear terrorist act is pointed out

  2. Kazakhstan without nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abishev, M.A.; Iskakova, G.A.

    2000-01-01

    Kazakhstan have great heritage of the USSR military industry in form of test sites and scientific and technological complexes of different kind of weapons developments. The Republic of Kazakstan possesses of most large number of nuclear sites per head of the population. Developed industry of mining, processing of uranium ores demands solution of radioactive wastes handling problems. Therefore regime of non-proliferation and defense conversion are strategic priorities of state policy. For Kazakhstan ideals of non-proliferation of mass destruction weapon have particular meaning. Consequences of nuclear weapon tests of territory of Kazakhstan reflected on population health and on ecological balance of the region. Wide public support helps forms policy in sphere of non-proliferation of nuclear weapon. Kazakhstan executes obligations of Lisbon Protocol and consolidates the frameworks of strategic security

  3. The effective nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skyrme, T.H.R.

    1994-01-01

    An empirical analyses is made of the mean effective internucleon potential required in the shell-model description of nuclei, allowing for the presence of many-body effects as suggested by current theory. A consistent description is found in which the effective two-body interaction acts almost entirely in even states, and the many-body effects are simulated by a repulsive three-body contact interaction. The strength of the two-body interaction is consistent with that expressed by the free scattering matrix of the two-nucleon system, and that of the three-body interaction with the 'rearrangement energy' calculated in the many-body theory. (author). 21 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  4. Nuclear energy: potentiality and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahgat, Gawdat

    2008-01-01

    After a discussion about a broad definition of energy security and about the main challenges facing a potential nuclear renaissance, the article analyses how the European Union and the United States have addressed these challenges. There is no doubt that nuclear power will remain an important component of global energy mix, but it should not be seen as a panacea to the flows in the global energy markets [it

  5. Potential risks of nuclear ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelgaard, P.L.

    1994-07-01

    This report represents an attempt to evaluate the potential risks of nuclear ships. Firstly reasons are given why nuclear ship accidents will not lead to accidents of the magnitude of the Chernobyl accident. This is due to much lower content of radioactive material and to different reactor designs. Next a review is given of the types of accidents which have actually occurred. Of these the reactor accidents which may lead to serious consequences for the crew and the environment are considered further. These are reactivity accidents and loss of coolant accidents. In addition the long term risks of sunken nuclear ships and sea disposed reactor compartments etc. are also discussed. Based on available accident data an attempt is made to estimate the probability of serious nuclear ship accidents. (au)

  6. Nuclear's potential role in desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupitz, J.

    1992-01-01

    Motivated by the growing need for fresh water in developing countries, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has promoted a study of the technical and economic viability of using nuclear energy for producing fresh water by desalination of seawater. The outcome of the study is summarized. The most promising desalination processes for large scale water production are outlined and possible energy sources considered. The main incentives for using nuclear energy rather than fossil fuelled plants include: overall energy supply diversification; conservation of limited fossil fuel resources; promotion of technological development; and in particular, environmental protection through the reduction of emissions causing climate change and acid rain. An economic analysis showed that the levelized costs of electricity generation by nuclear power are in general in the same range as those for fossil fuel. Competitiveness depends on the unit size of the plant and interest rates. (UK)

  7. Potential for nuclear terrorism: a discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellen, K.

    1987-01-01

    Because there has never been an incident of nuclear terrorism, the author is reduced to informed speculation. The past cannot be used to extrapolate into the future. For terrorists as for nations, the domain of nuclear attack represents are unprecedented quantum leap, one that groups think carefully about. Terrorists will consider many factors, including the public climate, because they are not psychotics operating in a vacuum (though groups may include psychotic individuals). Rather, they are people involved in a reciprocal political and psychological relationship with the rest of the world. In reaching some assessment of the potential for nuclear terrorism, there is an immense number of variables to deal with, beginning with the many types of terrorists and terrorism, including nuclear. They can, however, look at individual terrorist groups - a their compositions, capabilities, motivations, and modus operandi - and reach some conclusions. The author first looks at the possible forms nuclear terrorism might take and at the severity of the consequences. A strict distinction must be made between nuclear terrorism where nuclear things are the means (for example, a nuclear device) and nuclear terrorism where nuclear things are the target (for example, nuclear power stations), or where they are both such as a nuclear weapon thrown at a nuclear power station. 2 tables

  8. Chirally motivated K(-) nuclear potentials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cieplý, Aleš; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Gazda, Daniel; Mareš, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 702, č. 5 (2011), s. 402-407 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1441 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Kaon-baryon interactions * Mesic nuclei * Mesonic atoms Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.955, year: 2011

  9. The potential of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hore-Lacy, I.

    1989-01-01

    The main issues addressed include: the economics of nuclear power by comparison with coal-fired electricity generation, environmental considerations in relation with greenhouse gases and radiation increment, waste disposal and reprocessing of spent fuel. A number of ethical issues have also been briefly outlined and refer to alternative/highest use of earth resources, energy conservation, the safety of humanity, weapon proliferation, high level wastes and relationships to democratic institutions. 3 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  10. Towards an understanding of the nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, D.G.; Sinclair, D.K.; Sivers, D.

    1988-01-01

    The formalism for investigating the /bar Q/q/bar Q/q system on the lattice is constructed. We describe how the model may be used to study the nuclear potential, and present some preliminary results on the range of the nuclear force. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  11. The unification of the nuclear optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    The nuclear mean field is defined for bound and scattering states and its parameters shown to vary continuously over the whole energy range. The real and imaginary parts of the potential are connected by dispersion relations, and this unifies the potential from negative to positive energies. Recent analyses of experimental data using dispersion relations are reviewed. (author)

  12. Interatomic potentials for materials of nuclear interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Julian R.; Monti, Ana M.; Pasianot, Roberto C.; Simonelli, G.

    2007-01-01

    Procedures to develop embedded atom method (EAM) interatomic potentials are described, with foreseeable applications in nuclear materials. Their reliability is shown by evaluating relevant properties. The studied materials are Nb, Zr and U. The first two were then used to develop an inter species potential for the Zr-Nb binary system. In this sense, the Fe-Cu system was also studied starting from Fe and Cu potentials extracted from the literature. (author) [es

  13. On radii of nuclear potential and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal'butsev, E.B.; Mikhajlov, I.N.

    1975-01-01

    The Saxon-Woods potential is widely used as an average field in different nuclear models: upsilon(r)=-upsilonsub(0)parameters: upsilonsub(0) is the well depth, Rsub(v) is the well width, a is the diffusivity of the potential edge. The potential parameters should be determined from the data on the nuclear matter distribution. The data available is in agreement with the formula for density: rho(r)=rhosub(0)same sense as Rsub(v), a. The experimental data show that Rsub(v) by 1 Fermi exceed Rsub(rho) approximately. There exist some suggestions that it caused by the finiteness of the radius of action of nuclear forces. It is noted that finiteness of radius of action of forces is a sufficient condition for the presence of this effect. A model is considered in which the matter is limited with a plane surface, so that the density depends only on a single spatial variable normal to the boundary of matter. As is shown by the results, the radius of nuclear potential exceeds that of the volume of the nuclear matter by 0.6 Fermi approximately. The mechanism of this phenomenon takes its origin from a quantum-mechanical effect of turning the wave functions into zero near the infinitely high wall and from their considerable decreasing near the wall of a finite height

  14. Level density from realistic nuclear potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calboreanu, A.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear level density of some nuclei is calculated using a realistic set of single particle states (sps). These states are derived from the parameterization of nuclear potentials that describe the observed sps over a large number of nuclei. This approach has the advantage that one can infer level density for nuclei that are inaccessible for a direct study, but are very important in astrophysical processes such as those close to the drip lines. Level densities at high excitation energies are very sensitive to the actual set of sps. The fact that the sps spectrum is finite has extraordinary consequences upon nuclear reaction yields due to the leveling-off of the level density at extremely high excitation energies wrongly attributed so far to other nuclear effects. Single-particle level density parameter a parameter is extracted by fitting the calculated densities to the standard Bethe formula

  15. Calculation of the well depth parameter to the nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.U.; Kim, Y.J.

    1984-01-01

    Well depth parameter S or range correction factor S-1 is computed for several nuclear potentials such as square, Gaussian, exponential and Yukawa wells. A simple central force is assumed for nuclear potential between nucleons. We adopted only two parameters for potentials and attempted to clarify the fundamental nature of the nuclear forces that bind a proton and a neutron into a deuteron. Results thus obtained were used for an estimate of first order correction to simple square well model. (Author)

  16. Nuclear desalting potential for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Nuclear power, having proved its success in large units, now poses problems for application in developing countries. Possible solutions for electricity supply, desalting systems and agricultural development are suggested by Joseph R. Wilson, of the Agency's Division of Nuclear Power and Reactors. His article is adapted from a lecture to students in Switzerland. (author)

  17. Potential information requirements for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disbrow, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has performed analyses of the requirements for data and information for the management of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) designated for disposal under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). Subsequently, the EIA collected data on the amounts and characteristics of SNF stored at commercial nuclear facilities. Most recently, the EIA performed an analysis of the international and domestic laws and regulations which have been established to ensure the safeguarding, accountability, and safe management of special nuclear materials (SNM). The SNM of interest are those designated for permanent disposal by the NWPA. This analysis was performed to determine what data and information may be needed to fulfill the specific accountability responsibilities of the Department of Energy (DOE) related to SNF handling, transportation, storage and disposal; to work toward achieving a consistency between nuclear fuel assembly identifiers and material weights as reported by the various responsible parties; and to assist in the revision of the Nuclear Fuel Data Form RW-859 used to obtain spent nuclear fuel characteristics data from the nuclear utilities

  18. Quantum Nuclear Extension of Electron Nuclear Dynamics on Folded Effective-Potential Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, B.; Deumens, E.; Ohrn, Y.

    2014-01-01

    A perennial problem in quantum scattering calculations is accurate theoretical treatment of low energy collisions. We propose a method of extracting a folded, nonadiabatic, effective potential energy surface from electron nuclear dynamics (END) trajectories; we then perform nuclear wave packet...

  19. Potential Advantages of Underground Nuclear Parks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Carl W.; Elkins, Ned Z.; Kunze, Jay F.; Mahar, James M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we argue that an underground nuclear park (UNP) could potentially lead to lower capital and operating cost for the reactors installed in the UNP compared to the traditional approach, which would be to site the reactors at the earth's surface at distributed locations. The UNP approach could also lead to lower waste management cost. A secondary benefit would be the increased margins of safety and security that would be realized simply as a consequence of siting the reactors underground. Lowered capital and operating cost for a UNP relative to traditional reactor siting is possible through the aggregate effect of the elimination of containment structures, in-place decommissioning, reduced physical security costs, reduced weather-related costs, reduced cost of liability insurance and reduced unit-cost for the nth reactor made possible through the continuous construction of multiple reactors at the same underground location. Other cost reductions might be possible through the transfer of the capital cost for part of the underground construction from the reactor owners to the owners of the UNP. Lower waste management cost is possible by siting the UNP at a location where there are geological and hydrological conditions suitable for hosting both the reactors and the repository for the waste from those reactors. After adequate storage and cooling, and assuming direct disposal, this would enable the spent fuel from the reactors to be transported directly to the repository and remain entirely underground during the transport process. Community concerns and transportation costs would be significantly reduced relative to current situations where the reactors are separated from the repository by long distances and populated areas. The concept for a UNP in bedded salt is used to develop a rough order of magnitude cost estimate for excavation of the reactor array portion of a UNP. Excavation costs appear to be only a small fraction of the overall power plant costs

  20. Realizing the potential of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walske, C.

    1982-01-01

    The future of nuclear power, just as the future of America, can be viewed with optimism. There is hope in America's record of overcoming obstacles, but growth is essential for that hope to be realized. Despite the downturn in energy demand made possible by conservation, we will need a 35% growth in total energy for new workers and production. Electricity generated by nuclear or coal can make US production more cost-competitive, and it can power mass-transit systems, electric heat pumps, and communications and information systems. Changes in electricity and gross national product (GNP) have been more closely in step since 1973 than have total energy and GNP. The nuclear power units now under construction will add 80,000 megawatts to the 56,000 now on line. It is important to note that, while utilities are cancelling plans for nuclear plants, they aren't ordering new coal plants, which shows the impact of the high cost of money. Interest rates must come down and public-relations efforts to sell electricity must improve to change the situation. Although capital shortages are real, waste disposal is a problem of perception that was politically induced because the government failed to provide a demonstration of safety as the French are doing. Streamlined regulatory and insurance procedures can help to justify optimism in the nuclear option. 4 figures

  1. Nuclear proliferation and the potential threat of nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency emphasises that security strategies can no longer be effective based solely on the concept of national boundaries. The article describes the security problems which have grown along with the development of 'internationalism' and the author defines the need for cooperation, assistance, regional and international networks to combat the threat quoting the IAEA's nuclear security plan as an example of how this may be achieved. In stressing the urgency Dr ElBaradei concludes: 'May it not ultimately be said of our civilisation that we created the inventions that led to our own demise'. (author)

  2. Nuclear proliferation and the potential threat of nuclear terrorism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ElBaradei, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2005-01-15

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency emphasises that security strategies can no longer be effective based solely on the concept of national boundaries. The article describes the security problems which have grown along with the development of 'internationalism' and the author defines the need for cooperation, assistance, regional and international networks to combat the threat quoting the IAEA's nuclear security plan as an example of how this may be achieved. In stressing the urgency Dr ElBaradei concludes: 'May it not ultimately be said of our civilisation that we created the inventions that led to our own demise'. (author)

  3. Nuclear power prospects and potential: scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogner, Hans-Hogler; McDonald, Alan; )

    2002-01-01

    This paper outlines a range of scenarios describing what the world's energy system might look in the middle of the century, and what nuclear energy's most profitable role might be. The starting point is the 40 non-greenhouse-gas-mitigation scenarios in the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Given their international authorship and comprehensive review by governments and scientific experts, the SRES scenarios are the state of the art in long-term energy scenarios

  4. Nuclear potentials due to pion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robillota, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    The two, three and four nucleon potentials due to the exchange of pions can be accurately calculated by means of chiral symmetry. The comparison of the dynamical content of these potentials allow us to understand the geometrical origin of the hierarchy existing among them. (Author) [pt

  5. Additional potential effects of nuclear war on ecological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, T.C.; Harwell, M.A.; Cropper, W.P. Jr.; Grover, H.D.

    1985-01-01

    The authors summarize biological and ecosystem responses to enhanced UV-B, air pollutants, radiation, and fire. The concentrations and biological responses associated with these perturbations are based on current experience and experimentation. Additional research is needed to quantify probable post-nuclear war exposures and potential responses. A summary is provided of all the potential effects of nuclear war on the variety of the Earth's ecosystems, including perturbations from climatic alterations, radiation, pollutants, and UV-B

  6. Corrosion potential monitoring in nuclear power environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molander, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: corrosion monitoring. The corrosion potential is usually an important parameter or even the prime parameter for many types of corrosion processes. One typical example of the strong influence of the corrosion potential on corrosion performance is stress corrosion of sensitized stainless steel in pure high temperature water corresponding to boiling water conditions. The use of in-plant monitoring to follow the effect of hydrogen addition to mitigate stress corrosion in boiling water reactors is now a well-established technique. However, different relations between the corrosion potential of stainless steel and the oxidant concentration have been published and only recently an improved understanding of the electrochemical reactions and other conditions that determine the corrosion potential in BWR systems have been reached. This improved knowledge will be reviewed in this paper. Electrochemical measurements has also been performed in PWR systems and mainly the feedwater system on the secondary side of PWRs. The measurements performed so far have shown that electrochemical measurements are a very sensitive tool to detect and follow oxygen transients in the feedwater system. Also determinations of the minimum hydrazine dosage to the feedwater have been performed. However, PWR secondary side monitoring has not yet been utilized to the same level as BWR hydrogen water chemistry surveillance. The future potential of corrosion potential monitoring will be discussed. Electrochemical measurements are also performed in other reactor systems and in other types of reactors. Experiences will be briefly reviewed. In a BWR on hydrogen water chemistry and in the PWR secondary system the corrosion potentials show a large variation between different system parts. To postulate the material behavior at different locations the local chemical and electrochemical conditions must be known. Thus, modeling of chemical and electrochemical conditions along

  7. Configuration and technology implications of potential nuclear hydrogen system applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Forsberg, C.; Yildiz, B.; ORNL

    2005-11-05

    Nuclear technologies have important distinctions and potential advantages for large-scale generation of hydrogen for U.S. energy services. Nuclear hydrogen requires no imported fossil fuels, results in lower greenhouse-gas emissions and other pollutants, lends itself to large-scale production, and is sustainable. The technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes and the reactor technologies needed to enable these processes, as well waste, proliferation, and economic issues must be successfully addressed before nuclear energy can be a major contributor to the nation's energy future. In order to address technical issues in the time frame needed to provide optimized hydrogen production choices, the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) must examine a wide range of new technologies, make the best use of research funding, and make early decisions on which technology options to pursue. For these reasons, it is important that system integration studies be performed to help guide the decisions made in the NHI. In framing the scope of system integration analyses, there is a hierarchy of questions that should be addressed: What hydrogen markets will exist and what are their characteristics? Which markets are most consistent with nuclear hydrogen? What nuclear power and production process configurations are optimal? What requirements are placed on the nuclear hydrogen system? The intent of the NHI system studies is to gain a better understanding of nuclear power's potential role in a hydrogen economy and what hydrogen production technologies show the most promise. This work couples with system studies sponsored by DOE-EE and other agencies that provide a basis for evaluating and selecting future hydrogen production technologies. This assessment includes identifying commercial hydrogen applications and their requirements, comparing the characteristics of nuclear hydrogen systems to those market requirements, evaluating nuclear hydrogen configuration options

  8. Large-Nc nuclear potential puzzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belitsky, A.V.; Cohen, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    An analysis of the baryon-baryon potential from the point of view of large-N c QCD is performed. A comparison is made between the N c -scaling behavior directly obtained from an analysis at the quark-gluon level to the N c scaling of the potential for a generic hadronic field theory in which it arises via meson exchanges and for which the parameters of the theory are given by their canonical large-N c scaling behavior. The purpose of this comparison is to use large-N c consistency to test the widespread view that the interaction between nuclei arises from QCD through the exchange of mesons. Although at the one- and two-meson exchange level the scaling rules for the potential derived from the hadronic theory matches the quark-gluon level prediction, at the three- and higher-meson exchange level a generic hadronic theory yields a potential which scales with N c faster than that of the quark-gluon theory

  9. Potential strategic consequences of the nuclear energy revival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, Ch.D.

    2010-01-01

    Many people have projected their hopes and fears onto nuclear power. Nuclear energy has both benefits and risks, and disagreement persists about whether this energy source is, on balance, more of an asset than a liability. This debate involves a complicated set of factors that are difficult to assess, let alone fully resolve because of the differing interests in various countries' use and pursuit of nuclear power. Renewed interest throughout the globe in harnessing this energy source has stoked this perennial debate and raised concern about security threats from states and non-state actors while holding out the promise of more electricity for more people. While the motivations for nuclear energy vary among states, the two primary public goods this energy source offers are countering human-induced climate change and providing for greater energy security. Although views on how to achieve energy security differ, the essential aspect for nuclear energy is that for several countries, especially those with scarce indigenous energy sources from fossil fuels, investing in nuclear power plants diversifies electricity production portfolios and helps reduce dependence on foreign sources of energy. The focus here is on assessing the potential security consequences of increased use of nuclear power in the existing nuclear power states and most importantly in many more states that have in recent years expressed interest in this power source. The risks of nuclear power include possible reactor accidents, release of radioactive waste to the environment, attacks on or sabotage of nuclear facilities, and misuse of peaceful nuclear technologies to make nuclear weapons. While safety of nuclear plants and disposal of radioactive waste are important issues, this paper analyzes the latter two issues. In addition, it addresses two under-examined risks: military attacks on nuclear facilities and the effects on security alliances and conventional arms buildups as more countries seek to

  10. Potential strategic consequences of the nuclear energy revival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, Ch.D.

    2010-07-01

    Many people have projected their hopes and fears onto nuclear power. Nuclear energy has both benefits and risks, and disagreement persists about whether this energy source is, on balance, more of an asset than a liability. This debate involves a complicated set of factors that are difficult to assess, let alone fully resolve because of the differing interests in various countries' use and pursuit of nuclear power. Renewed interest throughout the globe in harnessing this energy source has stoked this perennial debate and raised concern about security threats from states and non-state actors while holding out the promise of more electricity for more people. While the motivations for nuclear energy vary among states, the two primary public goods this energy source offers are countering human-induced climate change and providing for greater energy security. Although views on how to achieve energy security differ, the essential aspect for nuclear energy is that for several countries, especially those with scarce indigenous energy sources from fossil fuels, investing in nuclear power plants diversifies electricity production portfolios and helps reduce dependence on foreign sources of energy. The focus here is on assessing the potential security consequences of increased use of nuclear power in the existing nuclear power states and most importantly in many more states that have in recent years expressed interest in this power source. The risks of nuclear power include possible reactor accidents, release of radioactive waste to the environment, attacks on or sabotage of nuclear facilities, and misuse of peaceful nuclear technologies to make nuclear weapons. While safety of nuclear plants and disposal of radioactive waste are important issues, this paper analyzes the latter two issues. In addition, it addresses two under-examined risks: military attacks on nuclear facilities and the effects on security alliances and conventional arms buildups as more countries seek to

  11. Energy Perspectives In Switzerland: The Potential Of Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foskolos, K.; Hardegger, P.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, discussions were started in Switzerland concerning future of energy supply, including domestic electricity generation. On behalf of the Federal Office of Energy, PSI undertook a study to evaluate the potential of future nuclear technologies, covering electricity demand, with a time horizon up to 2050. It has been shown that nuclear power plants (NPPs) of the Third Generation, similar to the ones currently under construction in several other countries, built on the existing nuclear sites in Switzerland, have the potential to replace, at competitive costs, the existing nuclear plants, and even to cover (postulated) increases in electricity demand. Because of their late maturity (expected at the earliest around 2030), NPPs of the Fourth Generation, which are currently under development, cannot play a major role in Switzerland, since, with the exception of the Leibstadt NPP, all decisions regarding replacement of the current Swiss NPPs have to be taken before 2030. (author)

  12. Energy Perspectives In Switzerland: The Potential Of Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foskolos, K.; Hardegger, P

    2005-03-01

    In 2004, discussions were started in Switzerland concerning future of energy supply, including domestic electricity generation. On behalf of the Federal Office of Energy, PSI undertook a study to evaluate the potential of future nuclear technologies, covering electricity demand, with a time horizon up to 2050. It has been shown that nuclear power plants (NPPs) of the Third Generation, similar to the ones currently under construction in several other countries, built on the existing nuclear sites in Switzerland, have the potential to replace, at competitive costs, the existing nuclear plants, and even to cover (postulated) increases in electricity demand. Because of their late maturity (expected at the earliest around 2030), NPPs of the Fourth Generation, which are currently under development, cannot play a major role in Switzerland, since, with the exception of the Leibstadt NPP, all decisions regarding replacement of the current Swiss NPPs have to be taken before 2030. (author)

  13. Microscopic nuclear structure calculations with modern meson-exchange potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjort-Jensen, M.; Osnes, E.; Muether, H.; Schmid, K.W.; Kuo, T.T.S.

    1990-07-01

    The report presents the results of microscopic nuclear shell-model calculations using three different nucleon-nucleon potentials. These are the phenomenological Reid-Soft-Core potential and the meson-exchange potentials of the Paris and the Bonn groups. It is found that the Bonn potential yields sd-shell matrix elements which are more attractive than those obtained with the Reid or the Paris potentials. The harmonic-oscillator matrix elements of the Bonn potential are also in better agreement with the empirically derived matrix elements of Wildenthal. The implications are discussed. 27 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  14. Potential for sharing nuclear power infrastructure between countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    The introduction or expansion of a nuclear power programme in a country and its successful execution is largely dependent on the network of national infrastructure, covering a wide range of activities and capabilities. The infrastructure areas include legal framework, safety and environmental regulatory bodies, international agreements, physical facilities, finance, education, training, human resources and public information and acceptance. The wide extent of infrastructure needs require an investment that can be too large or onerous for the national economy. The burden of infrastructure can be reduced significantly if a country forms a sharing partnership with other countries. The sharing can be at regional or at multinational level. It can include physical facilities, common programmes and knowledge, which will reflect in economic benefits. The sharing can also contribute in a significant manner to harmonization of codes and standards in general and regulatory framework in particular. The opportunities and potential of sharing nuclear power infrastructure is determined by the objectives, strategy and scenario of the national nuclear power programme. A review of individual infrastructure items shows that there are several opportunities for sharing of nuclear power infrastructure between countries if they cooperate with each other. International cooperation and sharing of nuclear power infrastructure are not new. This publication provides criteria and guidance for analyzing and identifying the potential for sharing of nuclear power infrastructure during the stages of nuclear power project life cycle. The target users are decision makers, advisers and senior managers in utilities, industrial organizations, regulatory bodies and governmental organizations in countries adopting or extending nuclear power programmes. This publication was produced within the IAEA programme directed to increase the capability of Member States to plan and implement nuclear power

  15. Expansion potential for existing nuclear power station sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cope, D. F.; Bauman, H. F.

    1977-09-26

    This report is a preliminary analysis of the expansion potential of the existing nuclear power sites, in particular their potential for development into nuclear energy centers (NECs) of 10 (GW(e) or greater. The analysis is based primarily on matching the most important physical characteristics of a site against the dominating site criteria. Sites reviewed consist mainly of those in the 1974 through 1976 ERDA Nuclear Power Stations listings without regard to the present status of reactor construction plans. Also a small number of potential NEC sites that are not associated with existing power stations were reviewed. Each site was categorized in terms of its potential as: a dispersed site of 5 GW(e) or less; a mini-NEC of 5 to 10 GW(e); NECs of 10 to 20 GW(e); and large NECs of more than 20 GW(e). The sites were categorized on their ultimate potential without regard to political considerations that might restrain their development. The analysis indicates that nearly 40 percent of existing sites have potential for expansion to nuclear energy centers.

  16. Expansion potential for existing nuclear power station sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cope, D.F.; Bauman, H.F.

    1977-01-01

    This report is a preliminary analysis of the expansion potential of the existing nuclear power sites, in particular their potential for development into nuclear energy centers (NECs) of 10 (GW(e) or greater. The analysis is based primarily on matching the most important physical characteristics of a site against the dominating site criteria. Sites reviewed consist mainly of those in the 1974 through 1976 ERDA Nuclear Power Stations listings without regard to the present status of reactor construction plans. Also a small number of potential NEC sites that are not associated with existing power stations were reviewed. Each site was categorized in terms of its potential as: a dispersed site of 5 GW(e) or less; a mini-NEC of 5 to 10 GW(e); NECs of 10 to 20 GW(e); and large NECs of more than 20 GW(e). The sites were categorized on their ultimate potential without regard to political considerations that might restrain their development. The analysis indicates that nearly 40 percent of existing sites have potential for expansion to nuclear energy centers

  17. Boson-exchange nucleon-nucleon potential and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grange, Pierre.

    1976-01-01

    A fully momentum-dependent one-boson-exchange potential is derived which takes into account the mesons, π, eta, sigma, rho, ω and phi. Scattering bound states and nuclear matter properties are studied in momentum space. The use of such potential is shown to be as easy as the use of more simple phenomenological interactions. In nuclear matter the formalism of Bethe-Goldstone is chosen to compute the binding energy versus density in the approximation of two-body and three-body correlations. The three-body correlated wave function obtained is then used [fr

  18. Puzzle of the folding potential on the nuclear halo reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, Atef; Lee, Yen Cheong; Mahmoud, Z.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Folding potentials of the elastic scattering drip-line nuclei at various incident energies is one method to study nuclear matter density distributions and nuclear radii. The nuclei with density distributions consisting of a bulk (core) and an outer layer (halo), dilute and spatially extended are called the halo nuclei caused for the weak particle binding. Several halo nuclei are studied and many potential candidates are identified. All the cross-sections of the elastic scattering for the drip-line nuclei 11 Be and 6 He, are calculated to understand the exotic properties of these nuclei starting from its structure, extended radius, nuclear size till the large total reaction cross-sections for these nuclei when it interacts with a stable target 12 C. (author)

  19. Heavy particle decay studies using different versions of nuclear potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Sukumaran, Indu

    2017-10-01

    The heavy particle decay from 212-240Pa , 219-245Np , 228-246Pu , 230-249Am , and 232-252Cm leading to doubly magic 208Pb and its neighboring nuclei have been studied using fourteen versions of nuclear potentials. The study has shown that the barrier penetrability as well as the decay half-lives are found to vary with the nuclear potential used. The investigated decay events of the emission of the clusters 22Ne , 24Ne , 26Mg , 28Mg , 32Si and 33Si are not experimentally detected yet but may be detectable in the future. As most of the half-lives predicted are found to lie within the experimental upper limit, T 1/2 parents with varying slopes and intercepts. Also, it is to be noted that the linearity of the GN plots is unaltered using different nuclear potentials. The universal curve studied ( log10 T 1/2 vs. -ln P for various clusters emitted from various parents shows a linear behavior with the same slope and intercept irrespective of the nuclear potential used.

  20. Methodology for characterizing potential adversaries of Nuclear Material Safeguards Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkwood, C.W.; Pollock, S.M.

    1978-11-01

    The results are described of a study by Woodward--Clyde Consultants to assist the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in the development of methods to analyze and evaluate Nuclear Material Safeguards (NMS) Systems. The study concentrated on developing a methodology to assist experts in describing, in quantitative form, their judgments about the characteristics of potential adversaries of NMS Systems

  1. Methodology for characterizing potential adversaries of Nuclear Material Safeguards Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkwood, C.W.; Pollock, S.M.

    1978-11-01

    The results are described of a study by Woodward--Clyde Consultants to assist the University of California Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in the development of methods to analyze and evaluate Nuclear Material Safeguards (NMS) Systems. The study concentrated on developing a methodology to assist experts in describing, in quantitative form, their judgments about the characteristics of potential adversaries of NMS Systems.

  2. Measurement of nuclear potentials from fusion excitation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, J.R.; Birkelund, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The basis for measuring nuclear potentials from fusion excitation functions at energies above barrier is reviewed. It is argued that because of experimental and conceptual problems fusion excitation functions at high energies cannot lead to model independent measurements of internuclear potential at small separations. The Al 27 + Ne 20 reaction previously analyzed by others is used as an example of problems arising from the inability to distinguish complete and incomplete fusion in experimental data

  3. Market Potential for Non-electric Applications of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, T.; Kononov, S.; Kupitz, J.; McDonald, A.; Rogner, H.H.; Nisan, S.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents results of a recent IAEA study to assess the market potential for non-electric applications of nuclear energy in the near (before 2020) and long term (2020-2050). The applications covered are district heating, desalination, industrial heat supply, ship propulsion, energy supply for spacecraft, and, to a lesser extent, 'innovative' applications such as hydrogen production, coal gasification, etc. While technical details are covered only briefly, emphasis is placed on economics and other factors that may promote or hinder the penetration of nuclear options in the markets for non-electric energy services. The study makes a distinction between the market size (demand for a given service) and the market potential for nuclear penetration (which may be smaller because of technical or non-technical constraints). Near-term nuclear prospects are assessed on the basis of on-going projects in the final stages of design or under construction. For the long term, use has been made of a qualitative scale ranging from 0 to 2 for five critical areas: market structure, demand pressure, technical basis, economic competitiveness, and public acceptance. The paper presents the resulting evaluation of long-term prospects for nuclear energy entering into non-electric markets. (authors)

  4. Building better optical model potentials for nuclear astrophysics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauge, Eric; Dupuis, Marc

    2004-01-01

    In nuclear astrophysics, optical model potentials play an important role, both in the nucleosynthesis models, and in the interpretation of astrophysics related nuclear physics measurements. The challenge of nuclear astrophysics resides in the fact that it involves many nuclei far from the stability line, implying than very few (if any) experimental results are available for these nuclei. The answer to this challenge is a heavy reliance on microscopic optical models with solid microscopic physics foundations that can predict the relevant physical quantities with good accuracy. This use of microscopic information limits the likelihood of the model failing spectacularly (except if some essential physics was omitted in the modeling) when extrapolating away from the stability line, in opposition to phenomenological models which are only suited for interpolation between measured data points and not for extrapolating towards unexplored areas of the chart of the nuclides.We will show how these microscopic optical models are built, how they link to our present knowledge of nuclear structure, and how they affect predictions of nuclear astrophysics models and the interpretation of some key nuclear physics measurements for astrophysics

  5. Potential Benefits to the Philippines of a Nuclear Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asuncion-Astronomo, A.; Romallosa, K.M.D.; Olivares, R.U.

    2015-01-01

    During the late 1950’s, the Philippines was one of the many countries which began the pursuit of the beneficial applications of atomic energy. With the commissioning of the first Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) which attained its first criticality in 1963, our country had the capability for radioisotope production, activation analysis of materials, irradiation studies and various opportunities for basic and applied nuclear science research. The Nuclear Power Plant (PNNP-1) in training plant operators and regulators for the first Philippine Nuclear Power Plant (PNPP-1) in Bataan, which was eventually mothballed in 1986. It is thus unfortunate that the only operating nuclear facility in the country, the PRR-1 encountered technical problems during an upgrade and was shut down in 1988. The problem was not resolved and eventually led to the decommissioning of the PRR-1 in 2005. Without an operating nuclear facility available in the country, the number of personnel knowledgeable and skilled in reactor and nuclear science and engineering has greatly declined and lagged behind our counterparts. This has been the situation for more than two decaded and can only be addressed if the country decides to put up a new nuclear facility. It is acknowledged that putting up a nuclear facility is a major undertaking which requires careful planning, preparation and investment. Thus, a decision by any country to embark on this poster, we will provide an overview of the many potential benefits as well as challenges of establishing a new research reactor and/or accelerator facility in the country. The global distribution, comparisons, capabilities and the different application of these facilities will presented as well.(author)

  6. K- nuclear potentials from in-medium chirally motivated models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cieply, A.; Gazda, D.; Mares, J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2011-01-01

    A self-consistent scheme for constructing K - nuclear optical potentials from subthreshold in-medium KN s-wave scattering amplitudes is presented and applied to analysis of kaonic atoms data and to calculations of K - quasibound nuclear states. The amplitudes are taken from a chirally motivated meson-baryon coupled-channel model, both at the Tomozawa-Weinberg leading order and at the next to leading order. Typical kaonic atoms potentials are characterized by a real part -Re V K - chiral =85±5 MeV at nuclear matter density, in contrast to half this depth obtained in some derivations based on in-medium KN threshold amplitudes. The moderate agreement with data is much improved by adding complex ρ- and ρ 2 -dependent phenomenological terms, found to be dominated by ρ 2 contributions that could represent KNN→YN absorption and dispersion, outside the scope of meson-baryon chiral models. Depths of the real potentials are then near 180 MeV. The effects of p-wave interactions are studied and found secondary to those of the dominant s-wave contributions. The in-medium dynamics of the coupled-channel model is discussed and systematic studies of K - quasibound nuclear states are presented.

  7. Potential health hazard of nuclear fuel waste and uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, K.; Sherman, G.R.; King, S.G.

    1991-06-01

    The variation of the radioactivity of nuclear fuel waste (used fuel and fuel reprocessing waste) with time, and the potential health hazard (or inherent radiotoxicity) resulting from its ingestion are estimated for CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) natural-uranium reactors. Four groups of radionuclides in the nuclear fuel waste are considered: actinides, fission products, activation products of zircaloy, and activation products of fuel impurities. Contributions from each of these groups to the radioactivity and to the potential health hazard are compared and discussed. The potential health hazard resulting from used fuel is then compared with that of uranium ore, mine tailings and refined uranium (fresh fuel) on the basis of equivalent amounts of uranium. The computer code HAZARD, specifically developed for these computations, is described

  8. Comparative study of three-nucleon potentials in nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, Alessandro; Benhar, Omar; Fantoni, Stefano; Schmidt, Kevin E.

    2012-02-01

    A new generation of local three-body potentials providing an excellent description of the properties of light nuclei, as well as of the neutron-deuteron doublet scattering length, has been recently derived. We have performed a comparative analysis of the equations of state of both pure neutron matter (PNM) and symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) at zero temperature obtained using these models of three-nucleon forces. In particular, we have carried out both variational and auxiliary field diffusion Monte Carlo calculations of the equation of state of PNM, while in the case of SNM we have only the variational approach has been considered. None of the considered potentials simultaneously explains the empirical equilibrium density and binding energy of symmetric nuclear matter. However, two of them provide reasonable values of the saturation density. The ambiguity concerning the treatment of the contact term of the chiral inspired potentials is discussed.

  9. Industry potential of large scale uses for peaceful nuclear explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, P.L.

    1969-01-01

    The industrial potential for peaceful uses of nuclear explosions entering a critical stage of development. Should Project Gasbuggy, an experiment to determine to what extent an underground nuclear explosion can stimulate the production of natural gas from low-permeability formations, prove a technical or economic success, a great step forward will have been made. Should other experiments now being considered in natural gas, oil shale, copper, coal, water resources, underground storage, and others, also demonstrate technical or economic advantage, it is conceivable to expect peaceful nuclear explosion to grow from our current rate of one or two experimental shots per year to hundreds of production explosions per year. This growth rate could be severely restricted or reduced to zero if public safety and environmental control cannot be exercised. (author)

  10. Industry potential of large scale uses for peaceful nuclear explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, P L [Bureau of Mines, Denver, CO (United States)

    1969-07-01

    The industrial potential for peaceful uses of nuclear explosions entering a critical stage of development. Should Project Gasbuggy, an experiment to determine to what extent an underground nuclear explosion can stimulate the production of natural gas from low-permeability formations, prove a technical or economic success, a great step forward will have been made. Should other experiments now being considered in natural gas, oil shale, copper, coal, water resources, underground storage, and others, also demonstrate technical or economic advantage, it is conceivable to expect peaceful nuclear explosion to grow from our current rate of one or two experimental shots per year to hundreds of production explosions per year. This growth rate could be severely restricted or reduced to zero if public safety and environmental control cannot be exercised. (author)

  11. Potential role of nuclear power in developing and transition economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiage, D.; Dierstein, P.

    1995-01-01

    The potential role of nuclear power is different in developing or in transition economies; in developing countries such as China, the growth of electricity consumption is high and the construction of several standardized plants is economically justified; in transitional economies, such as Ukraine, the needs are uncertain, old and unsafe plants have to be decommissioned and uncompleted nuclear plants (due to financial problems) should be completed. Nuclear power may provide the developing and transition economies with several advantages such as energy independence and fuel supply security, minimal environmental pollution, support to local industry and employment. It also means the support of national authorities and the development of a suitable infrastructure for plant safety and waste management, financial help and local population acceptance

  12. Potential of light water reactors for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueldner, R.

    2003-01-01

    Energy consumption worldwide is going to increase further in the next few decades. Reliable supplies of electricity can be achieved only by centralized power plant structures. In this scenario, nuclear power plants are going to play a leading role as reliable and competitive plants, also under deregulated market conditions. Today, light water reactors have achieved a leading position, both technically and economically, contributing 85% to worldwide electricity generation in nuclear plants. They will continue to be a proven technology in power generation. In many countries, activities therefore are concentrated on extending the service life of plants beyond a period of forty years. New nuclear generating capacities are expected to be created and added from the end of this decade onward. Most of this capacity will be in light water reactors. The concepts of third-generation reactors will meet all economic and technical safety requirements of the 21st century and will offer considerable potential for further development. Probably some thirty years from now, fourth-generation nuclear power plants will be ready for commercial application. These plants will penetrate especially new sectors of the energy markets. Public acceptance of new nuclear power plants is not a matter of reactor lines, provided that safety requirements are met. The important issue is the management of radioactive waste. The construction of new nuclear power plants in Western Europe and North America mainly hinges on the ability to explain to the public that there is a need for new plants and that nuclear power is fundamental to assuring sustainable development. (orig.)

  13. Nuclear energy role and potential for global sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujita, H.; Matsui, K.

    2006-01-01

    The long-term energy supply simulation that optimizes the energy system cost until 2100 for the world is being performed, by using the energy module of GRAPE model, where energy demand under the C02 emission constraint etc. is assumed. The model has been taken up for the trial calculation in I PCC the third report . Role and potential of nuclear energy system in the energy options is discussed here from the viewpoint of sustainable development with protecting from global warming. Taking the effort for energy conservation as major premise, carbon-sequestration for fossil fuel, renewable energy and nuclear energy should be altogether developed under the C02 constraint. Especially, fast breeder reactor will be attached importance to, as the 22nd century is approaching, due to its carbon free and resource limitless features when the nuclear generation cost is cheap as a current light water reactor level. It takes time around 30 years in order for breeding of Pu, a fast breeder reactor will begin to be introduced from around 2030. If the period for the technology establish of nuclear fuel cycle is assumed to be 30 years, it is necessary to start technical development right now. If the Kyoto Protocol, the emission constraint on only the developed countries, is extended in 21st century, it will promote the growth of nuclear power in the developed countries in the first half of the century. After 2050, the developing countries will face the shortage of uranium and plutonium. Carbon emission constraint should be covered all countries in the World not only for the developed countries but also for the developing countries. Therefore, it is important that the developing countries will use nuclear power effectively from the viewpoint of harmonization of energy growth and global environment. The policy that nuclear power is considered as Clean Development Mechanism would mitigate such global warming problems

  14. Analytical relations between nuclear symmetry energy and single-nucleon potentials in isospin asymmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chang; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Ko, Che Ming

    2011-01-01

    Using the Hugenholtz-Van Hove theorem, we derive general expressions for the quadratic and quartic symmetry energies in terms of the isoscalar and isovector parts of single-nucleon potentials in isospin asymmetric nuclear matter. These expressions are useful for gaining deeper insights into the microscopic origins of the uncertainties in our knowledge on nuclear symmetry energies especially at supra-saturation densities. As examples, the formalism is applied to two model single-nucleon potentials that are widely used in transport model simulations of heavy-ion reactions.

  15. Intermediate-energy nuclear photoabsorption and the pion optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christillin, P.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear photoabsorption around the pion threshold is schematised as photoproduction of a pion which undergoes final-stae interaction with the nucleus, accounted for by the pion optical potential. It is shown that real pion photoproduction and exchange effects are naturally described by the same mechanism with a non-static pion. The complementarity of photoabsorption to pion physics and its usefulness in gaining new information about pion-nucleus dynamics are stressed. (author)

  16. Potential applications of nanostructured materials in nuclear waste management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braterman, Paul S. (The University of North Texas, Denton, TX); Phol, Phillip Isabio; Xu, Zhi-Ping (The University of North Texas, Denton, TX); Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Yang, Yi (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Bryan, Charles R.; Yu, Kui; Xu, Huifang (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Wang, Yifeng; Gao, Huizhen

    2003-09-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained from a Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) project entitled 'Investigation of Potential Applications of Self-Assembled Nanostructured Materials in Nuclear Waste Management'. The objectives of this project are to (1) provide a mechanistic understanding of the control of nanometer-scale structures on the ion sorption capability of materials and (2) develop appropriate engineering approaches to improving material properties based on such an understanding.

  17. Evaluation of a potential nuclear fuel repository criticality: Lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J.R.; Evans, D.

    1995-10-01

    This paper presents lessons learned from a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the potential for a criticality in a repository containing spent nuclear fuel with high enriched uranium. The insights gained consisted of remarkably detailed conclusions about design issues, failure mechanisms, frequencies and source terms for events up to 10,000 years in the future. Also discussed are the approaches taken by the analysts in presenting this very technical report to a nontechnical and possibly antagonistic audience.

  18. Setting the scenario - potential hazards of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, R.J.; McPhail, N.

    1989-01-01

    The range of nuclear fuel cycle services provided by the various plants belonging to BNFL throughout the UK are described. The Sellafield Reprocessing Plant as the site which has the greatest potential for radiological hazard is then considered in more detail. In particular the safety cycle designed to prevent radiological accidents at Sellafield, emergency planning, the consequences of a major accident at Sellafield and the medical arrangements in the event of an accident are all discussed. (UK)

  19. Evaluation of a potential nuclear fuel repository criticality: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.R.; Evans, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents lessons learned from a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the potential for a criticality in a repository containing spent nuclear fuel with high enriched uranium. The insights gained consisted of remarkably detailed conclusions about design issues, failure mechanisms, frequencies and source terms for events up to 10,000 years in the future. Also discussed are the approaches taken by the analysts in presenting this very technical report to a nontechnical and possibly antagonistic audience

  20. Transmutation potential of current and innovative nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slessarev, I.; Salvatores, M.; Uematsu, M.

    1993-01-01

    In the present paper we have investigated the transmutation potential of different nuclear systems from a physical point of view. Transuranium (TRU) elements have been considered, but also long lived fission products (LLFP). The potential for transmutation has to take into account not only the consumption of a specific nucleus (or of a specific 'family' of nuclei), but also the reproduction of other nuclei of higher masses. The present study allows an intercomparison taking into account both aspects. Technological, safety and design constraints were not considered at this stage. However strategic indications for future studies have been obtained. 3 refs., 3 tabs

  1. Status of helium-cooled nuclear power systems. [Development potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melese-d' Hospital, G.; Simnad, M

    1977-09-01

    Helium-cooled nuclear power systems offer a great potential for electricity generation when their long-term economic, environmental, conservation and energy self-sufficiency features are examined. The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) has the unique capability of providing high-temperature steam for electric power and process heat uses and/or high-temperature heat for endothermic chemical reactions. A variation of the standard steam cycle HTGR is one in which the helium coolant flows directly from the core to one or more closed cycle gas turbines. The effective use of nuclear fuel resources for electric power and nuclear process heat will be greatly enhanced by the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) currently being developed. A GCFR using thorium in the radial blanket could generate sufficient U-233 to supply the fuel for three HTGRs, or enough plutonium from a depleted uranium blanket to fuel a breeder economy expanding at about 10% per year. The feasibility of utilizing helium to cool a fusion reactor is also discussed. The status of helium-cooled nuclear energy systems is summarized as a basis for assessing their prospects. 50 references.

  2. Market potential for non-electric applications of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this report is to assess the market potential for the non-electric applications of nuclear energy in the near (before 2020) and long (2020-2050) terms. The main non-electric applications are defined here as district heating, desalination (of sea, brackish and waste water), industrial heat supply, ship propulsion and the energy supply for spacecraft. This report is principally devoted to these applications, although a less detailed assessment of some innovative applications (e.g. hydrogen production and coal gasification) is also provided. While the technical details of these applications are covered briefly, emphasis is placed on the economic and other factors that may promote or hinder the penetration of the nuclear option into the market for non-electric energy services. The report is intentionally targeted towards expected demands. It is for this reason that its sections are structured by demand categories and not according to possible reactor types. At the same time, the orientation on the demand side can result in overlaps at the supply side, because the same nuclear reactor can often serve more than one type of demand. Such cases are noted as appropriate. Each section characterizes a specific non-electric application in terms of its market size, its prospects for nuclear technologies and the economic competitiveness of the technologies

  3. Nuclear industry powering up to tackle potential threats from cyberspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, John

    2015-01-01

    In June 2015, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in cooperation with international agencies including the crime-fighting organisation Interpol, will host a major conference on the protection of computer systems and networks that support operations at the world's nuclear facilities. According to the IAEA, the use of computers and other digital electronic equipment in physical protection systems at nuclear facilities, as well as in facility safety systems, instrumentation, information processing and communication, ''continues to grow and presents an ever more likely target for cyber-attack''. The international nuclear industry is right to take heed of ever-evolving security threats, deal with them accordingly, and be as open and transparent as security allows about what is being done, which will reassure the general public. However, the potential menace of cyberspace should not be allowed to become such a distraction that it gives those who are ideologically opposed to nuclear another stick with which to beat the industry.

  4. Nuclear industry powering up to tackle potential threats from cyberspace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, John [nuclear 24, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    In June 2015, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), in cooperation with international agencies including the crime-fighting organisation Interpol, will host a major conference on the protection of computer systems and networks that support operations at the world's nuclear facilities. According to the IAEA, the use of computers and other digital electronic equipment in physical protection systems at nuclear facilities, as well as in facility safety systems, instrumentation, information processing and communication, ''continues to grow and presents an ever more likely target for cyber-attack''. The international nuclear industry is right to take heed of ever-evolving security threats, deal with them accordingly, and be as open and transparent as security allows about what is being done, which will reassure the general public. However, the potential menace of cyberspace should not be allowed to become such a distraction that it gives those who are ideologically opposed to nuclear another stick with which to beat the industry.

  5. Potential of low-temperature nuclear heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    At present, more than one third of the fossil fuel currently used is being consumed to produce space heating and to meet industrial needs in many countries of the world. Imported oil still represents a large portion of this fossil fuel and despite its present relatively low price future market evolutions with consequent upward cost revisions cannot be excluded. Thus the displacement of the fossil fuel by cheaper low-temperature heat produced in nuclear power plants is a matter which deserves careful consideration. Technico-economic studies in many countries have shown that the use of nuclear heat is fully competitive with most of fossil-fuelled plants, the higher investment costs being offset by lower production cost. Another point in favour of heat generation by nuclear source is its indisputable advantage in terms of benefits to the environment. The IAEA activity plans for 1985-86 concentrate on information exchange with specific emphasis on the design criteria, operating experience, safety requirements and specifications of heat-only reactors, co-generation plants and existing power plants backfitted for additional heat applications. The information gained up to 1985 was discussed during the Advisory Group Meeting on the Potential of Low-Temperature Nuclear Heat Applications held in the Federal Institute for Reactor Research, Wuerenlingen, Switzerland in September 1985 and, is included in the present Technical Document

  6. Adducin family proteins possess different nuclear export potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Mei; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Lin, Wan-Yi; Chen, Hong-Chen

    2017-05-10

    The adducin (ADD) family proteins, namely ADD1, ADD2, and ADD3, are actin-binding proteins that play important roles in the stabilization of membrane cytoskeleton and cell-cell junctions. All the ADD proteins contain a highly conserved bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) at the carboxyl termini, but only ADD1 can localize to the nucleus. The reason for this discrepancy is not clear. To avoid the potential effect of cell-cell junctions on the distribution of ADD proteins, HA epitope-tagged ADD proteins and mutants were transiently expressed in NIH3T3 fibroblasts and their distribution in the cytoplasm and nucleus was examined by immunofluorescence staining. Several nuclear proteins were identified to interact with ADD1 by mass spectrometry, which were further verified by co-immunoprecipitation. In this study, we found that ADD1 was detectable both in the cytoplasm and nucleus, whereas ADD2 and ADD3 were detected only in the cytoplasm. However, ADD2 and ADD3 were partially (~40%) sequestered in the nucleus by leptomycin B, a CRM1/exportin1 inhibitor. Upon the removal of leptomycin B, ADD2 and ADD3 re-distributed to the cytoplasm. These results indicate that ADD2 and ADD3 possess functional NLS and are quickly transported to the cytoplasm upon entering the nucleus. Indeed, we found that ADD2 and ADD3 possess much higher potential to counteract the activity of the NLS derived from Simian virus 40 large T-antigen than ADD1. All the ADD proteins appear to contain multiple nuclear export signals mainly in their head and neck domains. However, except for the leucine-rich motif ( 377 FEALMRMLDWLGYRT 391 ) in the neck domain of ADD1, no other classic nuclear export signal was identified in the ADD proteins. In addition, the nuclear retention of ADD1 facilitates its interaction with RNA polymerase II and zinc-finger protein 331. Our results suggest that ADD2 and ADD3 possess functional NLS and shuttle between the cytoplasm and nucleus. The discrepancy in the

  7. Potential advantages and disadvantages of sequentially building small nuclear units instead of a large nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feretic, D.; Cavlina, N.; Grgic, D.

    2008-01-01

    Renewal of nuclear power programs in countries with modest electricity consumptions and weak electrical grid interconnections has raised the question of optimal nuclear power plants sizes for such countries. The same question would be also valid for isolated or weakly connected regions within a large country. Building large size nuclear power plant could be prevented by technical or financial limits. Research programs have been initiated in the International Atomic Energy Agency and in the USA (within the framework of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program) with the aim to inspect under which circumstances small and medium reactors could be the preferred option compared to large nuclear plants. The economy of scale is a clear advantage of large plants. This paper compares, by using probabilistic methods, the net cash flow of large and medium size plants, taking as example a large nuclear plant (around 1200 MW) and four sequentially built smaller plants (300 MW). Potential advantages and disadvantageous of both options have been considered. Main advantages of the sequential construction of several identical small units could be the reduced investor risk and reduced investment costs due to the learning effect. This analysis is a part of studies for the Croatian power generating system development. (orig.)

  8. Expected brine movement at potential nuclear waste repository salt sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, V.S.; Raines, G.E.

    1987-08-01

    The BRINEMIG brine migration code predicts rates and quantities of brine migration to a waste package emplaced in a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. The BRINEMIG code is an explicit time-marching finite-difference code that solves a mass balance equation and uses the Jenks equation to predict velocities of brine migration. Predictions were made for the seven potentially acceptable salt sites under consideration as locations for the first US high-level nuclear waste repository. Predicted total quantities of accumulated brine were on the order of 1 m 3 brine per waste package or less. Less brine accumulation is expected at domal salt sites because of the lower initial moisture contents relative to bedded salt sites. Less total accumulation of brine is predicted for spent fuel than for commercial high-level waste because of the lower temperatures generated by spent fuel. 11 refs., 36 figs., 29 tabs

  9. The potential for disruptive innovations in nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, F.P.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of 'disruptive innovation' is a management tool that provides a framework for understanding the structure and dynamics of technology markets, especially their sometimes acute response to innovation. The concept was used in a preliminary assessment of a number of energy technologies, including renewable energy technologies and energy storage, as well as nuclear technologies, as they interact in industry and the marketplace. The technologies were assessed and perspectives were provided on their current potential for innovation to disrupt the value networks behind electricity markets. The findings indicate that this concept may provide useful guidance for the planning of technology development. (author)

  10. The potential for disruptive innovations in nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, F.P., E-mail: fred.adams@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    The concept of 'disruptive innovation' is a management tool that provides a framework for understanding the structure and dynamics of technology markets, especially their sometimes acute response to innovation. The concept was used in a preliminary assessment of a number of energy technologies, including renewable energy technologies and energy storage, as well as nuclear technologies, as they interact in industry and the marketplace. The technologies were assessed and perspectives were provided on their current potential for innovation to disrupt the value networks behind electricity markets. The findings indicate that this concept may provide useful guidance for the planning of technology development. (author)

  11. Underground siting of nuclear power plants: potential benefits and penalties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allensworth, J.A.; Finger, J.T.; Milloy, J.A.; Murfin, W.B.; Rodeman, R.; Vandevender, S.G.

    1977-08-01

    The potential for improving nuclear power safety is analyzed by siting plants underground in mined cavities or by covering plants with fill earth after construction in an excavated cut. Potential benefits and penalties of underground plants are referenced to analogous plants located on the surface. Three representative regional sites having requisite underground geology were used to evaluate underground siting. The major factors which were evaluated for all three sites were: (1) containment of radioactive materials, (2) transport of groundwater contamination, and (3) seismic vulnerability. External protection, plant security, feasibility, operational considerations, and cost were evaluated on a generic basis. Additionally, the national availability of sites having the requisite geology for both underground siting concepts was determined

  12. Potential exposure in nuclear safety. INSAG-9. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The report defines potential exposure in terms of probability of its occurrence and possible consequences. Individual risk is expressed as the probability of the exposure and the conditional probability of death resulting from the exposure. Societal risk is more than the sum of individual risks. This report explores the relationship between individual risk and societal risk and the relevant criteria. For accidents causing serious damage to a nuclear power plant or having off-site consequences, individual risk is not sufficiently limiting because of the many aspects of societal impact. The approach to dealing with potential exposures in nuclear safety results in risks that are consistent with or more stringent than the ICRP's recommendations in its recent publications. 10 refs

  13. Nuclear system for problems of environment, economy, and energy. (1) Nuclear energy role and potential for energy system in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujita, Hiroshi; Matsui, Kazuaki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Role and potential of nuclear energy system in the energy options is discussed from the viewpoint of sustainable development with protecting from global warming. It is important for mitigation of global warming that the developing countries will use nuclear power effectively. The policy that nuclear power is considered as Clean Development Mechanism would be the good measure for that. (author)

  14. Current assessment and future potential of the international nuclear market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassidy, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    This is a study of the current and future situation of the international nuclear market. This paper highlights the projections as seen not only by Bechtel Power Corporation, but also by the international nuclear community. It covers in particular the electric power growth projection; the percentage of probable nuclear power generation; operating services for existing nuclear power plants; and the nuclear fuel cycle. (NEA) [fr

  15. Overview of research potential of Institute for Nuclear Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, Marin

    2007-01-01

    The main organizations involved in nuclear power production in Romania, under supervision of Presidency, Prime Minister and Parliament are: CNCAN (National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control), Nuclear Agency, Ministry of Economy and Commerce, ANDRAD (Waste Management Agency), SNN (Nuclearelectrica National Society), RAAN (Romanian Authority for Nuclear Activities), ICN (Institute for Nuclear Research - Pitesti), SITON (Center of Design and Engineering for Nuclear Projects- Bucharest); ROMAG-PROD (Heavy Water Plant), CNE-PROD (Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant - Production Unit), CNE-INVEST (Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant -Investments Unit), FCN (Nuclear Fuel Factory). The Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti INR, Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti is endowed with a TRIGA Reactor, Hot Cells, Materials Laboratories, Nuclear Fuel, Nuclear Safety Laboratories, Nuclear Fuel, Nuclear Safety. Waste management. Other research centers and laboratories implied in nuclear activities are: ICIT, National Institute for cryogenics and isotope technologies at Rm Valcea Valcea. with R and D activity devoted to heavy water technologies, IFIN, Institute for nuclear physics and engineering, Bucharest, as well as the educational institutions involved in atomic energy applications and University research, Politechnical University Bucharest, University of Bucharest, University of Pitesti, etc. The INR activity outlined, i.e. the nuclear power research as a scientific and technical support for the Romanian nuclear power programme, mainly dedicated to the existing NPP in the country (CANDU). Focused with priority are: - Nuclear Safety (behavior of plant materials, components, installations during accident conditions and integrity investigations); - Radioactive Waste Management Radioactive; - Radioprotection; Product and services supply for NPP. INR Staff numbers 320 R and D qualified and experienced staff, 240 personnel in devices and prototype workshops and site support

  16. Some studies in scatering by Coulomb modified nuclear potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laha, U.

    1988-01-01

    Recently, there has been a surge of interest in theoretical questions concerning the Coulomb nuclear problems with the main emphasis on their off-shell behaviour. Earlier approaches to the problem made use of a version of the two-potential formula as used by Bajzer. A slightly different point of view is presented here. An expression for the interacting Green's function for motion in the Coulomb plus Graz potential is constructed and used to obtain the half-off-shell T matrix in the ''maximal reduced form''. Similar results were also derived for the off-shell Jost functions. It is explicitly demonstrated that Coulomb and Coulomb-like potentials the half-off-shell T matrix can be expressed in terms of on-and off-shell Jost functions in the same way as one does for a purely short range interaction. In presenting the results for T matrix and other related quantities, the Coulomb effect is included rigorously. Results clearly delineate the branch point singularities originating from the long range nature of the Coulomb interaction and thus provide a better understanding of the off-shell two-body Coulomb-like T matrices. It is hoped that these results will form an adequate starting point for rigorous calculations on few-body systems with charges. (author). 16 refs

  17. Neural networks and their potential application in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    A neural network is a data processing system consisting of a number of simple, highly interconnected processing elements in an architecture inspired by the structure of the cerebral cortex portion of the brain. Hence, neural networks are often capable of doing things which humans or animals do well but which conventional computers often do poorly. Neural networks have emerged in the past few years as an area of unusual opportunity for research, development and application to a variety of real world problems. Indeed, neural networks exhibit characteristics and capabilities not provided by any other technology. Examples include reading Japanese Kanji characters and human handwriting, reading a typewritten manuscript aloud, compensating for alignment errors in robots, interpreting very noise signals (e.g., electroencephalograms), modeling complex systems that cannot be modeled mathematically, and predicting whether proposed loans will be good or fail. This paper presents a brief tutorial on neural networks and describes research on the potential applications to nuclear power plants

  18. Classical properties and semiclassical quantization of a spherical nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, J.; Brut, F.; Arvieu, R.; Touchard, J.

    1984-03-01

    The geometrical properties of the classical energy-action surface are studied for a nuclear Woods-Saxon-like spherical potential, in connection with the E.B.K. semiclassical method of quantization. Comparisons are made with other well known cases: the spherical harmonic oscillator and the spherical billiard. The shift of single particle energies from A = 208 to A = 16 is calculated by a simple method inspired by the Erhenfest adiabatic invariants. Semiclassical results are then compared with exact Schroedinger energies. It is seen that the most significant features of the single particle spectrum are explained by local properties of the energy action surface (curvature, slope) and by their evolution with the particle number

  19. Neural networks and their potential application to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    A network of artificial neurons, usually called an artificial neural network is a data processing system consisting of a number of highly interconnected processing elements in an architecture inspired by the structure of the cerebral cortex portion of the brain. Hence, neural networks are often capable of doing things which humans or animals do well but which conventional computers often do poorly. Neural networks exhibit characteristics and capabilities not provided by any other technology. Neural networks may be designed so as to classify an input pattern as one of several predefined types or to create, as needed, categories or classes of system states which can be interpreted by a human operator. Neural networks have the ability to recognize patterns, even when the information comprising these patterns is noisy, sparse, or incomplete. Thus, systems of artificial neural networks show great promise for use in environments in which robust, fault-tolerant pattern recognition is necessary in a real-time mode, and in which the incoming data may be distorted or noisy. The application of neural networks, a rapidly evolving technology used extensively in defense applications, alone or in conjunction with other advanced technologies, to some of the problems of operating nuclear power plants has the potential to enhance the safety, reliability and operability of nuclear power plants. The potential applications of neural networking include, but are not limited to diagnosing specific abnormal conditions, identification of nonlinear dynamics and transients, detection of the change of mode of operation, control of temperature and pressure during start-up, signal validation, plant-wide monitoring using autoassociative neural networks, monitoring of check valves, modeling of the plant thermodynamics, emulation of core reload calculations, analysis of temporal sequences in NRC's ''licensee event reports,'' and monitoring of plant parameters

  20. Potential effects of nuclear war on agricultural productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwell, M.A.; Cropper, W.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The authors examine the vulnerabilities of agricultural systems to nuclear war-induced climatic perturbations and to other, indirect effects of nuclear war. Discussion is included of the dependency of agricultural production on technological inputs and the effects of loss or reduction of these inputs in a post-nuclear war world

  1. Risks of potential accidents of nuclear power plants in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaper H; Eggink GJ; Blaauboer RO

    1993-01-01

    Over 200 nuclear power plants for commercial electricity production are presently operational in Europe. The 1986 accident with the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl has shown that severe accidents with a nuclear power plant can lead to a large scale contamination of Europe. This report is focussed

  2. Characterization of serpentine. A potential nuclear shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, A.; Rajeswari, B.; Kadam, R.M.; Kshirsagar, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of serpentine as a potential nuclear shielding material necessitates a chemical quality control of the samples before its use in reactors. With this in view, characterization of these mineral samples was carried out using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) methods. The analytical results obtained by both ICP-AES and NAA techniques were found to be comparable. Na, Cr, Co, Zn, and Cu were found to be present in all samples of Indian origin while Ga, Ag, Ni, and Cd were found to below the limits of detection. A comparison on the detection limits of elements of interest was also carried out by both the analytical techniques and found to be in good agreement. An infrared spectroscopic investigation was also carried out on all the mineral samples. Bands at 3,689 and 3,648 cm -1 were attributed to inner and outer hydroxyl stretching of Mg-OH, respectively. The weak and broad band centered around 3,416 cm -1 was assigned due to the stretching vibrations of the adsorbed water molecules while three bands at 1076, 1022 and 968 cm -1 were prescribed to the vibrations of the SiO 4 tetrahedra. (author)

  3. Manufacturing of porous boron steels potentially useful as nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abenojar, Juana; Velasco, Francisco; Martinez, Miguel Angel

    2006-01-01

    B 4 C is a good neutron absorber, commonly used together with light materials in panels. The objective of this work is to manufacture high boron steels, using B 4 C additions, through mechanical alloying and sintering, to get a material potentially useful for nuclear waste management. The porosity of the material can help to the removal of helium bubbles. Iron and B 4 C powders were mechanically alloyed for different times, following the process studying apparent density, morphology (SEM) and structure (XRD). Powder was uniaxially compacted and sintered at different conditions. Specimens were analysed by SEM and physical and mechanical properties were evaluated (density, dimensional change and bending strength). Microstructures are very different and therefore, they have different properties depending on sintering temperature. Although boride formation always takes place, only ferritic areas were found at 600degC, meanwhile ferritic and perlitic areas appeared at 900degC, and both of them disappeared at 1,200degC. (author)

  4. Discovery potential for directional dark matter detection with nuclear emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, A. M.; NEWSdm Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    Direct Dark Matter searches are nowadays one of the most exciting research topics. Several Experimental efforts are concentrated on the development, construction, and operation of detectors looking for the scattering of target nuclei with Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs). In this field a new frontier can be opened by directional detectors able to reconstruct the direction of the WIMP-recoiled nucleus thus allowing to extend dark matter searches beyond the neutrino floor. Exploiting directionality would also give a proof of the galactic origin of dark matter making it possible to have a clear and unambiguous signal to background separation. The angular distribution of WIPM-scattered nuclei is indeed expected to be peaked in the direction of the motion of the Solar System in the Galaxy, i.e. toward the Cygnus constellation, while the background distribution is expected to be isotropic. Current directional experiments are based on the use of gas TPC whose sensitivity is limited by the small achievable detector mass. In this paper we show the potentiality in terms of exclusion limit of a directional experiment based on the use of a solid target made by newly developed nuclear emulsions and read-out systems reaching sub-micrometric resolution.

  5. Anticipating Potential Waste Acceptance Criteria for Defense Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechard, R.P.; Lord, M.E.; Stockman, C.T.; McCurley, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Office of Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and disposal of DOE owned defense spent nuclear fuel and high level waste (DSNF/DHLW). A desirable option, direct disposal of the waste in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, depends on the final waste acceptance criteria, which will be set by DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). However, evolving regulations make it difficult to determine what the final acceptance criteria will be. A method of anticipating waste acceptance criteria is to gain an understanding of the DOE owned waste types and their behavior in a disposal system through a performance assessment and contrast such behavior with characteristics of commercial spent fuel. Preliminary results from such an analysis indicate that releases of 99Tc and 237Np from commercial spent fuel exceed those of the DSNF/DHLW; thus, if commercial spent fuel can meet the waste acceptance criteria, then DSNF can also meet the criteria. In large part, these results are caused by the small percentage of total activity of the DSNF in the repository (1.5%) and regulatory mass (4%), and also because commercial fuel cladding was assumed to provide no protection

  6. Swords from plowshares: the military potential of civilian nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlstetter, A.; Brown, T.A.; Jones, G.; McGarvey, D.C.; Rowen, H.; Taylor, V.; Wohlstetter, R.

    1977-01-01

    The historical and political aspects of relations between civil nuclear technology and the proliferation of nuclear weapons are analyzed. Many countries will soon be able to come close to making a bomb without violating their nonproliferation agreement. While peaceful nuclear power production should continue, there is a need for basic changes in its development and export. The driving forces behind proliferation are examined and the initial steps set out which need to be taken

  7. Potential cooperative measures on nuclear issues in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, J.

    1997-01-01

    Cooperation on nuclear issues is receiving increased attention in Asia. In Northeast Asia, where the nuclear industry is well-developed, cooperation in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle could help deal with issues such as disposition of spent fuel and long term storage options. In Southeast Asia, where countries are just beginning to introduce nuclear energy, cooperation would be useful in developing standards for the nuclear industry. Throughout Asia, nuclear research and power activities can raise concerns about safety, environmental pollution and proliferation. The sharing of relevant information, i.e. cooperative monitoring, will be essential to addressing these issues. In fact, a number of regional interactions on nuclear issues are already occurring. These range from training exchanges sponsored by the more advanced states to participation in environmental monitoring of the East Sea (Sea of Japan). Several states are considering sharing information from their nuclear facilities; some exchanges of radiation data are already in place. The KEDO reactor project will involve close working relations between the nuclear experts of South Korea, North Korea, Japan, and the US. Areas for further regional cooperation are discussed

  8. Potential refractory alloy requirements for space nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.H. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In reviewing design requirements for refractory alloys for space nuclear applications, several key points are identified. First, the successful utilization of refractory alloys is considered an enabling requirement for the successful deployment of high efficiency, lightweight, and small space nuclear systems. Second, the recapture of refractory alloy nuclear technology developed in the 1960s and early 1970s appears to be a pacing activity in the successful utilization of refractory alloys. Third, the successful application of refractory alloys for space nuclear applications will present a significant challenge to both the materials and the systems design communities

  9. Constraining potential nuclear-weapons proliferation from civilian reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.; Gaines, L.L.; Minkov, V.; Olson, A.P.; Snelgrove, J.

    1993-01-01

    Cessation of the Cold War and renewed international attention to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction are leading to national policies aimed at restraining nuclear-weapons proliferation that could occur through the nuclear-fuel cycle. Argonne, which has unique experience, technology, and capabilities, is one of the US national laboratories contributing to this nonproliferation effort

  10. Nuclear installations abroad the accident risks and their potential consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turvey, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper endeavors to assess the threat to Ireland from severe accidents at civil nuclear installations. Among the various types of nuclear installations worldwide, reactors and reprocessing plants are considered to be the most threatening and so the paper focuses on these. The threat is assumed to be a function of the risk of severe accidents at the above types of installations and the probability of unfavourable weather conditions carrying the radioactive releases to Ireland. Although nuclear installations designed in eastern Europe and Asia are less safe than others, the greatest threat to Ireland arises from nearby installations in the UK. The difficulty of measuring the probabilities and consequences of severe nuclear accidents at nuclear installations in general is explained. In the case of the UK installations, this difficulty is overcome to some degree by using values of 'tolerable' risk adopted by the national nuclear regulator to define the radiotoxic releases from nuclear accidents. These are used as input to atmospheric dispersion models in which unfavourable weather conditions for Ireland are assumed and radiation doses are calculated to members of the Irish public. No countermeasures, such as sheltering, are assumed. In the worst cast scenario no deaths would be expected in Ireland in the immediate aftermath of the accident however, an increase in cancers over a period of 25 years or so would be expected assuming present-day models for the effect of low level radiation are valid

  11. Nuclear installations abroad the accident risks and their potential consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turvey, F J [Radiological Protection Inst. of Ireland (Ireland)

    1996-10-01

    This paper endeavors to assess the threat to Ireland from severe accidents at civil nuclear installations. Among the various types of nuclear installations worldwide, reactors and reprocessing plants are considered to be the most threatening and so the paper focuses on these. The threat is assumed to be a function of the risk of severe accidents at the above types of installations and the probability of unfavourable weather conditions carrying the radioactive releases to Ireland. Although nuclear installations designed in eastern Europe and Asia are less safe than others, the greatest threat to Ireland arises from nearby installations in the UK. The difficulty of measuring the probabilities and consequences of severe nuclear accidents at nuclear installations in general is explained. In the case of the UK installations, this difficulty is overcome to some degree by using values of `tolerable` risk adopted by the national nuclear regulator to define the radiotoxic releases from nuclear accidents. These are used as input to atmospheric dispersion models in which unfavourable weather conditions for Ireland are assumed and radiation doses are calculated to members of the Irish public. No countermeasures, such as sheltering, are assumed. In the worst cast scenario no deaths would be expected in Ireland in the immediate aftermath of the accident however, an increase in cancers over a period of 25 years or so would be expected assuming present-day models for the effect of low level radiation are valid.

  12. Whistleblower litigation: A potential explosion in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowitt, A.J.; Panich, D.

    1990-01-01

    This article examines the protection offered nuclear employees and the limits of a nuclear employer's liability under section 210 of the Energy Reorganization Act. The author's warn that review by the US Supreme Court is not necessary but could only serve to expose the nuclear industry to an onslaught of litigation resulting from the assertion by an employee subjected to an adverse employment decision that the employee was engaged in a protected activity and as a result has a right to protection from retaliation by the employer

  13. Status and potential of nuclear energy in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.M.; Jalal, A.I.

    1991-01-01

    Pakistan is an energy resource deficient country which is heavily dependent on imported energy, while its per capita energy consumption level is still very low. Energy and electricity needs have been growing rapidly and these trends are expected to continue. Pakistan needs to make use of nuclear power on a large scale. This paper discusses the limitations of indigenous energy resources in coping with the future requirements of electricity and compares the cost economics of nuclear power with that of electricity generation based on imported oil and coal. It then describes the efforts being made in the country to make use of nuclear power in a self-reliant manner. (author)

  14. Potential Russian Nuclear Contingencies in the Caucasus: Implications for NATO

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wagner, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    ...; and a conflict involving Turkey. The Caucasus is the region in which it is most plausible that Russia might resort to nuclear weapons in extreme circumstances This region has been in turmoil since the collapse of the Soviet Union...

  15. Potential role of nuclear power in developing and transitional economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiage, D.; Dierstein, Ph.

    1996-01-01

    In some developing countries, such as Asia, the growth of electricity consumption is high, and a nuclear programme based on the construction of several standardised plants could be implemented and economically justified. In transitional economies, such as in Central and Eastern Europe countries, electricity authorities were forced to stop the construction of several nuclear plants, mainly because of financial problems. Nuclear power can provide the developing and transition economies with several advantages, such as energy independence and fuel supply security, minimal environmental pollution, support to local industry and employment. On the other hand, nuclear energy also means the support of national authorities and the development of a suitable infrastructure in order to check the enforcement of legal procedures, plants safety and waste management. Local population must understand and accept this commitment linked hand to hand with the choice of nuclear energy. Finally, nuclear industry is very capital-intensive. Therefore, financial resources are to be found by the local electricity authorities, along with the development of a suitable legal framework and the implementation of new tariff policies which must reflect the real costs of electricity. (R.P.)

  16. Prospect and potential of nuclear power plants in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subki, I.R.; Adiwardojo; Kasim, M.S.; Iskandar, A.; Mulyanto

    1997-01-01

    In line with the national energy policy of Indonesia in promoting the intensification, diversification and conversation of energy, some important steps need to be taken in order to establish alternative energy strategies which will be decisive in the formulation and development of the national energy plan in the future. At present, Indonesia does not have any nuclear power plants. The introduction of nuclear power In Indonesia is not only to reach an optimum energy mix based on costs and the environment, but also to relieve the pressure arising from increasing domestic demand for oil and gas. This paper addresses the present feasibility study being performed on the introduction of nuclear power plants in Indonesia. It is anticipated that nuclear power will contribute about 10% of Indonesia's electrical supply as of the year 2019. This represents approximately 12,600 MWe in capability. The paper describes the results, to date, of the Feasibility Study on nuclear power including the national energy market analysis, the electricity expansion plan and the associated role of nuclear power, the economics and financial plan, site studies on volcanology, seismology and the environment. (author). 3 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  17. Potential wealth creation via nuclear energy in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabar Md Hashim; Dol Malek Md Sap

    2009-01-01

    Like any other developing nation, Malaysia aspires to be an economic force to be reckoned with. A strong opportunity may be in the form of nuclear energy as can be seen from the success stories of France and South Korea. Although nuclear is not the only common parameter that make developed nations tick, the multiplier spin-off impacts of nuclear as sources of wealth creation are deliberated. Foreseeable benefits include job creation (especially highly-skilled knowledge workers), spin-off technologies and vendor development as well as the opportunity to assume regional leadership in carefully-selected sectors. Categorically in Malaysian context, introduction of nuclear energy would yield numerous benefits, i.e. as a strong catalyst to enhance country's competitiveness by raising capacity for knowledge, cutting-edge technology, and eventually, innovation (National Mission Thrust 2) beside ensuring stable electricity generation price; as an element to move up value chain by creating high-skilled knowledge workers who could help to raise country's economic profile and plant the seed for a strong post-2020 Malaysia (National Mission Thrust 1); and as an agent to enhance sustainability and quality of life through clean energy (National Mission Thrust 4) by being environmentally benign due to its low greenhouse gas emissions with very minimal impact to global warming. Our point us that, being synergistic with national aspiration, nuclear energy is a genuine national agenda. (Author)

  18. Nuclear stimulated desorption as a potential tool for surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nir, Dror.

    1993-03-01

    The described research work constitutes a base for an experimental method to be implemented in the study of solid surfaces. Nuclear Stimulated Desorption (NSD) is a new mode of experimentation in thin film and surface physics. It Is based on the interplay between nuclear phenomena (reactions and spontaneous decays), and atomic - scale induced effects on surfaces and very thin films. One may distinguish between two generically different relationships between the two. First, the dynamics of the nuclear reaction -primarily the recoil of the nucleus - may effect the position of the atom or molecule containing it. Second, the nuclear reaction (or decay) may serve as an analytical indicator of the whereabouts of the atom, or molecule, in question. In nuclear stimulated desorption, both thee aspects combine in an essential way. Namely, one employs a series of two consecutive decays (normally weak decays or isomeric transition) . The first of these decays causes the nucleus to desorb from a surface onto which it had been placed; the second serves to determine the position of the daughter and thereby the characteristics of the primary desorption . The essential feature in NSD is that it occurs almost exclusively from the outermost surface layer. This is because we choose to work with nuclei whose recoil energy Is of the same order of magnitude of the binding energy of the atom to the surface . Furthermore, the desorption probability and its angular (and temporal) characteristics, depend on the features (topology, morphology) of its immediate neighborhood. This work describes experiments which were designed to give relevant, phenomenological information about the outgoing flux of the radioactive daughters (for specifically chosen nuclear species) , and in particular the magnitude of the flux, its time dependence and its charged state. In addition. the basic phenomena itself is being distinguished from competing processes (thermal desorption, in particular). We will now

  19. Modern tornado design of nuclear and other potentially hazardous facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.; Zhao, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Tornado wind loads and other tornado phenomena, including tornado missiles and differential pressure effects, have not usually been considered in the design of conventional industrial, commercial, or residential facilities in the United States; however, tornado resistance has often become a design requirement for certain hazardous facilities, such as large nuclear power plants and nuclear materials and waste storage facilities, as well as large liquefied natural gas storage facilities. This article provides a review of current procedures for the design of hazardous industrial facilities to resist tornado effects. 23 refs., 19 figs., 13 tabs

  20. European energy policy and the potential impact of HTR and nuclear cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fütterer, Michael A.; Carlsson, Johan; Groot, Sander de; Deffrennes, Marc; Bredimas, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    This paper first provides an update on the current state of play and the potential future role of nuclear energy in Europe. It then describes the EU energy policy tools in the area of nuclear technology. It explains the three-tier strategy of the European nuclear technology platform and its demonstration initiatives, here specifically for nuclear cogeneration and HTR. The paper closes with an outlook on the boundary conditions at which HTR can become attractive for nuclear cogeneration, not only from an energy policy viewpoint but also economically

  1. European energy policy and the potential impact of HTR and nuclear cogeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fütterer, Michael A., E-mail: michael.fuetterer@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Carlsson, Johan [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Groot, Sander de [Nuclear Research and consultancy Group, NL-1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Deffrennes, Marc [European Commission, DG ENER, L-2530 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Bredimas, Alexandre [LGI Consulting, 13 rue Marivaux, F-75002 Paris (France)

    2014-05-01

    This paper first provides an update on the current state of play and the potential future role of nuclear energy in Europe. It then describes the EU energy policy tools in the area of nuclear technology. It explains the three-tier strategy of the European nuclear technology platform and its demonstration initiatives, here specifically for nuclear cogeneration and HTR. The paper closes with an outlook on the boundary conditions at which HTR can become attractive for nuclear cogeneration, not only from an energy policy viewpoint but also economically.

  2. Potentialities and type of integrating nuclear heating stations into district heating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munser, H.; Reetz, B.; Schmidt, G.

    1978-01-01

    Technical and economical potentialities of applying nuclear heating stations in district heating systems are discussed considering the conditions of the GDR. Special attention is paid to an optimum combination of nuclear heating stations with heat sources based on organic fuels. Optimum values of the contribution of nuclear heating stations to such combined systems and the economic power range of nuclear heating stations are estimated. Final considerations are concerned with the effect of siting and safety concepts of nuclear heating stations on the structure of the district heating system. (author)

  3. Nuclear transport in Entamoeba histolytica: knowledge gap and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwairgi, Marina A; Ghildyal, Reena

    2018-03-22

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite that causes human amoebiasis. It is one of the leading parasitic disease burdens in tropical regions and developing countries, with spread to developed countries through migrants from and travellers to endemic regions. Understanding E. histolytica's invasion mechanisms requires an understanding of how it interacts with external cell components and how it engulfs and kills cells (phagocytosis). Recent research suggests that optimal phagocytosis requires signalling events from the cell surface to the nucleus via the cytoplasm, and the induction of several factors that are transported to the plasma membrane. Current research in other protozoans suggests the presence of proteins with nuclear localization signals, nuclear export signals and Ran proteins; however, there is limited literature on their functionality and their functional similarity to higher eukaryotes. Based on learnings from the development of antivirals, nuclear transport elements in E. histolytica may present viable, specific, therapeutic targets. In this review, we aim to summarize our limited knowledge of the eukaryotic nuclear transport mechanisms that are conserved and may function in E. histolytica.

  4. The Nuclear Disarmament Movement: Politics, Potential, and Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear disarmament is a global ambition and requires collaboration, but who is collaborating, and what are their roles? This paper discusses the role of the American people in the path towards zero. Scholars have discussed at length the historical lessons of the global disarmament movement, and activists have worked to rekindle the movement after…

  5. ''Nuclear Energy - Potential to Substantially Impact California's Energy Use''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2006-01-01

    The use of nuclear power to generate electricity is very widespread today, with about 20% of all U.S. electricity coming from the nation's 103 operating reactors. Worldwide there are over 400 commercial nuclear plants that make a similar contribution percentage-wise. However, all of the current U.S. reactors and most of those elsewhere are relatively old, with no new ones having been started domestically in over two decades and only a few now being built overseas, mostly in Asia. The principal reason for this hiatus in the U.S. is that the cost of electricity from new nuclear plants has been non-competitive with other electricity sources for a long time. The U.S. nuclear-power industry has not been stagnant during this time, however. First, the existing plants themselves are running significantly better than they were twenty years ago, to the extent that the US. reactor fleet is producing about one-third more electricity annually than it was, due largely to improvements in the capacity factors: the plants run more reliably, shut down less often, and the refueling outages take less than half as long as they once did. The safety performance has also improved dramatically, with major improvements in every one of the main indicators of safety. The security of the plants against sabotage or other malevolent acts has always been very strong, and is stronger still after recent upgrades in response to the September 2001 attacks in New York and Washington. Thus the U.S. nuclear-electricity industry has remained dynamic despite the absence of new construction. The U.S. and foreign companies that design reactors and hope someday to sell more of them have also been actively at work--they have developed advanced reactor designs that promise to cost much less to build and to operate, and to have even better safety performance. Several of these advanced designs have received design-certification approvals from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, meaning that a utility could

  6. Studies on cluster decay from trans-lead nuclei using different versions of nuclear potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K.P.; Sukumaran, Indu [Kannur University, School of Pure and Applied Physics, Payyanur, Kerala (India)

    2017-06-15

    The cluster decays from various isotopes of trans-lead nuclei have been studied using 12 different nuclear potentials by evaluating decay half-lives and are then compared with the available experimental data. The study has shown that the barrier penetrability as well as the decay half-lives varies with the nuclear potential used. The standard deviation of the estimated half-lives is also calculated for these twelve nuclear potentials in comparison with the experimental data. The potential Bass 1980 is found to be the most appropriate potential for studying cluster radioactivity as the standard deviation obtained is least. Among the different proximity potential versions; proximity 1977, proximity 1988, proximity 2000, and modified proximity 2000, the minimum standard deviation is for proximity 1988. The Geiger-Nuttall (G-N) plots studied for different cluster emissions from various parents are observed to show linear behavior but with different slopes and intercepts. Again, the G-N plots obtained are linear with different slopes and intercepts when plotted for different nuclear potentials. So it is observed that with the inclusion of different nuclear potentials, the linearity of the G-N plot remains unaltered. Irrespective of the nuclear potential used, the universal curve (log{sub 10}T{sub 1/2} vs. -ln P) studied for various clusters emitted from various parents are obtained as linear with same slope and intercept. (orig.)

  7. Potential uses of lead in nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, F.E.; Pool, K.H.; Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.; Telander, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    In order for lead to be considered as a nuclear waste packaging material, it must be shown that it has adequate corrosion resistance, and that it does not degrade the properties of other important structural or barrier elements in the waste package. The present work focused on determining (a) the corrosion resistance of commercial purity (CP) lead and a Pb-1.5% Sb alloy in irradiated, elevated-temperature tuff ground water environments; (b) the resistance of alloy 825, a candidate container alloy, to embrittlement by molten lead; and (c) the resistance of lead and the Pb-Sb alloy to localized (pitting, crevice) corrosion. The test results support the feasibility of using lead in nuclear waste containers

  8. Potential applications of neural networks to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Application of neural networks to the operation of nuclear power plants is being investigated under a US Department of Energy sponsored program at the University of Tennessee. Projects include the feasibility of using neural networks for the following tasks: diagnosing specific abnormal conditions, detection of the change of mode of operation, signal validation, monitoring of check valves, plant-wide monitoring using autoassociative neural networks, modeling of the plant thermodynamics, emulation of core reload calculations, monitoring of plant parameters, and analysis of plant vibrations. Each of these projects and its status are described briefly in this article. The objective of each of these projects is to enhance the safety and performance of nuclear plants through the use of neural networks

  9. Sustainable development - the potential contribution of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdier, Jean-Pierre; Barre, Bertrand; Durret, Louis-Francois

    1998-01-01

    Sustainable development combines development, durability and sustainability. Energy is crucial for development: it brings work, nutrition, health, security, community, etc. Electrical energy offers the most possibilities for the consumer, particularly as regards the problems of pollution on the site of consumption. Nuclear generation is one of the best ways of producing electricity. Midway between stock energies and flow energies, it has several advantages: low consumption of resources, safety, compactness and cleanliness. Waste is not a specifically nuclear problem: it should be considered in terms of a life cycle analysis; construction, dismantling and functioning have to be assessed. The size of certain energies' contribution to the greenhouse effect is therefore made clear. Reprocessing represents a saving of energy, without environmental or health damage. It contributes to energy control, and therefore to sustainable development

  10. Potential industrial market for process heat from nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R.W.

    1976-07-01

    A specific segment of industrial process heat use has been examined in detail to identify individual plant locations throughout the United states where nuclear generated steam may be a viable alternative. Five major industries have been studied: paper, chemicals, petroleum, rubber, and primary metals. For these industries, representing 75 percent of the total industrial steam consumption, the individual plant locations within the U.S. using steam in large quantities have been located and characterized as to fuel requirements

  11. Risks of potential accidents of nuclear power plants in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaper, H.; Eggink, G.J.; Blaauboer, R.O.

    1993-12-01

    This report is focussed on an integrated assessment of probabilistic cancer mortality risks due to possible accidental releases from the European nuclear power plants. For each of the European nuclear power plants the probability of accidental releases per year of operation is combined with the consequences in terms of the excess doses received over a lifetime (70 years). Risk estimates are restricted to cancer mortality and do not include immediate or short term deaths in the direct vicinity ( -8 per year in Western Europe. Going East the risks increase gradually to over 1000 x 10 -8 per year in regions of the former Soviet Union, where reactors of the Chernobyl type are located. The nuclear power plants in the East European countries dominate the estimated risk pattern and contribute at least 40-50% to the average risk in the West European countries. Improving the reactor safety in eastern European countries could lead to considerable reductions in estimated excess mortality risks. In western Europe the mortality risk might be reduced by a factor of two, and in eastern Europe by a factor of 100 to 1000. (orig.)

  12. International nuclear commerce: structure, trends and proliferation potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodgaard, S.

    1977-01-01

    In recent years a surge has taken place in international nuclear commerce and this paper analyses the new patterns that have emerged. Despite uncertainties in nuclear energy forecasting the market is huge. Projections for the industry for the period 1971-1985 estimate a worldwide investment of 250 billion dollars. Following an initial decade of cooperation, 1955-1965, the superpower monopoly has become eroded. The export market for power reactors is analysed and the growth and spread of reprocessing facilities is discussed. It is pointed out that while commercial scale reprocessing requires vast and complex chemical plant, reprocessing small amounts for bomb production may be done relatively simply. Enrichment capabilities are also becoming more generally available. The market is not only expanding, but becoming multipolar and diversified, and the entire fuel cycle is now involved. The cooperation network France - W. Germany - South Africa- Iran is discussed at some length. The role of international safeguards is also treated fairly extensively, leading to a discussion of the motives and paths in the acquisition of nuclear weapons. It is concluded that little is to be gained from the London talks on safeguard measures and commercial restraint and that the root causes of proliferation should be tackled by comprehensive disarmament schemes. (JIW)

  13. Nuclear three-body problem and energy-dependent potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurakhmanov, A.; Akhmadkhodzhaev, B.; Zubarev, A.L.; Irgaziev, B.F.

    1985-01-01

    Energy-dependent potentials in the three-body problem are being considered. Three-particle equations for the case of pairing energy-dependent potentials are generalized and the problems related to this ambiguous generalization are investigated. In terms of the equations obtained the tritium binding energy and vertex coupling constants (Tdn) and (Tdν) are evaluated. The binding energy and, especially, coupling constants are shown to be sensitive to a shape of the energy-dependent potential

  14. Future perspective of thorium based nuclear fuels and thorium potential of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unak, T.; Yildirim, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Today's nuclear technology has principally been based on the use of fissile U-235 and Pu-239. he existence of thorium in the nature and its potential use in the nuclear technology were not unfortunately into account with a sufficient importance. The global distributions of thorium and uranium reserves indicate that in general some developed countries such as the USA, Canada, Australia, France have considerable uranium reserves, and contrarily only some developing countries such as Turkey, Brazil, India, Egypt have considerable thorium reserves. The studies carried out on the thorium during the last 50 years have clearly showed that the thorium based nuclear fuels have the potential easily use in most of reactor types actually operated with the classical uranium based nuclear fuels without any considerable modification. In the case of the use of thorium based nuclear fuels in future nuclear energy production systems, the serious problems such as the excess of Pu-239, the proliferation potential of nuclear weapons, and also the anxious of nuclear terrorism will probably be resolved, and sustainable nuclear energy production will be realized in the next new century. (authors)

  15. Future perspective of thorium based nuclear fuels and thorium potential of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unak, T.; Yildirim, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Today's nuclear technology has principally been based on the use of fissile U-235 and Pu-239. The existence of thorium in the nature and its potential use in the nuclear technology were not unfortunately into account with a sufficient importance. The global distributions of thorium and uranium reserves indicate that in general some developed countries such as the USA, Canada, Australia, France have considerable uranium reserves, and contrarily only some developing countries such as Turkey, Brazil, India, Egypt have considerable thorium reserves. The studies carried out on the thorium during the last 50 years have clearly showed that the thorium based nuclear fuels have the potential easily use in most of reactor types actually operated with the classical uranium based nuclear fuels without any considerable modification. In the case of the use of thorium based nuclear fuels in future nuclear energy production systems, the serious problems such as the excess of Pu-239, the proliferation potential of nuclear weapons, and also the anxious of nuclear terrorism will probably be resolved, and sustainable nuclear energy production will be realized in the next new century. (authors)

  16. Alpha decay studies on Po isotopes using different versions of nuclear potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K.P.; Sukumaran, Indu [Kannur University, School of Pure and Applied Physics, Payyanur, Kerala (India)

    2017-12-15

    The alpha decays from {sup 186-224}Po isotopes have been studied using 25 different versions of nuclear potentials so as to select a suitable nuclear potential for alpha decay studies. The computed standard deviation of the calculated half-lives in comparison with the experimental data suggested that proximity 2003-I is the apt form of nuclear potential for alpha decay studies as it possesses the least standard deviation, σ = 0.620. Among the different proximity potentials, proximity 1966 (σ = 0.630) and proximity 1977 (σ = 0.636), are also found to work well in alpha decay studies with low deviation. Among other versions of nuclear potentials (other than proximity potentials), Bass 1980 is suggested to be a significant form of nuclear potential because of its good predictive power. However, while the other forms of potentials are able to reproduce the experimental data to some extent, these potentials cannot be considered as apposite potentials for alpha decay studies in their present form. Since the experimental correlation of the models is noticed to be satisfying, the alpha decay half-lives of certain Po isotopes that are not detected experimentally yet have been predicted. (orig.)

  17. Chernobyl Nuclear Catastrophe and the High Risk Potential for Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holowinsky, Ivan Z.

    1993-01-01

    This report considers potential effects of the 1986 nuclear explosion at the Chernobyl (Ukraine) nuclear reactor. Approximately 17 million people, of whom 2.5 million were below the age of 5, are thought to have suffered some radioactive contamination. Many of these children are at high risk for mental retardation and learning disorders.…

  18. Nuclear Energy Center Site Survey, 1975. Part II. The U.S. electric power system and the potential role of nuclear energy centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Information related to Nuclear Energy Centers (NEC) in the U.S. is presented concerning the U.S. electric power system today; electricity demand history and forecasts; history and forecasts of the electric utility industry; regional notes; the status, history, and forecasts of the nuclear role; power plant siting problems and practices; nuclear facilities siting problems and practices; origin and evolution of the nuclear energy center concept; conceptualized description of nuclear energy centers; potential role of nuclear energy centers; assumptions, criteria, and bases; typical evolution of a nuclear energy center; and the nuclear fuel cycle

  19. Neutron optical potentials in unstable nuclei and the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamatsu, K.; Iida, K.

    2003-01-01

    Neutron single particle potential is one of the basic macroscopic properties to describe structure and reactions of nuclei in nuclear reactors and in the universe. However, the potential is quite uncertain for unstable nuclei primarily because the equation of state (EOS) of asymmetric nuclear matter is not known well. The present authors studied systematically the empirical EOS of asymmetric nuclear matter using a macroscopic nuclear model; about two hundred EOS's having empirically allowed values of L (symmetry energy density derivative coefficient) and K 0 (incompressibility) were obtained from the fittings to masses and radii of stable nuclei. It was suggested that the L value could be determined from global (Z, A) dependence of nuclear radii. In the present study, the single particle potential is examined assuming kinetic energies of non-interacting Fermi gases. The potential in a nucleus can be calculated easily, once the density distribution is solved using the effective nuclear interaction (EOS). Neutron and proton single particle potentials are calculated systematically for 80 Ni using the two hundred EOS's. It is found that the neutron-proton potential difference has clear and appreciable L dependence, while the potential for each species does not show such simple dependence on L. (author)

  20. Study on economic potential of nuclear-gas combined cycle power generation in Chinese market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zhiwei; Bian Zhiqiang; Yang Mengjia

    2004-01-01

    Facing the challenges of separation of electric power plant and grid, and the deregulation of Chinese electricity supplying market in near future, nuclear power plants mainly operated as based load at the present regulated market should look for new operation mode. The economics of electric generation with nuclear-natural gas combined cycle is studied based on current conditions of natural gas and nuclear power plants in China. The results indicate that the technology development of nuclear-natural gas combined cycle for power generation is of potential prospects in Chinese electric market. (authors)

  1. Pyrolysis and its potential use in nuclear graphite disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, J.B.; Bradbury, D.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite is used as a moderator material in a number of nuclear reactor designs, such as MAGNOX and AGR gas cooled reactors in the United Kingdom and the RBMK design in Russia. During construction the moderator of the reactor is usually installed as an interlocking structure of graphite bricks. At the end of reactor life the graphite moderator, weighing typically 2,000 tonnes, is a radioactive waste which requires eventual management. Radioactive graphite disposal options conventionally include: In-situ SAFESTORE for extended periods to permit manual disassembly of the graphite moderator through decay of short-lived radionuclides. Robotic or manual disassembly of the reactor core followed by disposal of the graphite blocks. Robotic or manual disassembly of the reactor core followed by incineration of the graphite and release of the resulting carbon dioxide Studsvik, Inc. is a nuclear waste management and waste processing company organised to serve the US nuclear utility and government facilities. Studsvik's management and technical staff have a wealth of experience in processing liquid, slurry and solid low level radioactive waste using (amongst others) pyrolysis and steam reforming techniques. Bradtec is a UK company specialising in decontamination and waste management. This paper describes the use of pyrolysis and steam reforming techniques to gasify graphite leading to a low volume off-gas product. This allows the following options/advantages. Safe release of any stored Wigner energy in the graphite. The process can accept small pieces or a water-slurry of graphite, which enables the graphite to be removed from the reactor core by mechanical machining or water cutting techniques, applied remotely in the reactor fuel channels. In certain situations the process could be used to gasify the reactor moderator in-situ. The low volume of the off-gas product enables non-carbon radioactive impurities to be efficiently separated from the off-gas. The off-gas product can

  2. Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, W.C.; Durant, W.S.; Dexter, A.H.

    1980-12-01

    The occurrence of certain potential events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants could lead to significant consequences involving risk to operating personnel or to the general public. This document is a compilation of such potential initiating events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Possible general incidents and incidents specific to key operations in fuel reprocessing are considered, including possible causes, consequences, and safety features designed to prevent, detect, or mitigate such incidents

  3. Nuclear momentum distribution and potential energy surface in hexagonal ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Morrone, Joseph; Car, Roberto; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-03-01

    The proton momentum distribution in ice Ih has been recently measured by deep inelastic neutron scattering and calculated from open path integral Car-Parrinello simulation. Here we report a detailed investigation of the relation between momentum distribution and potential energy surface based on both experiment and simulation results. The potential experienced by the proton is largely harmonic and characterized by 3 principal frequencies, which can be associated to weighted averages of phonon frequencies via lattice dynamics calculations. This approach also allows us to examine the importance of quantum effects on the dynamics of the oxygen nuclei close to the melting temperature. Finally we quantify the anharmonicity that is present in the potential acting on the protons. This work is supported by NSF and by DOE.

  4. Improved single particle potential for transport model simulations of nuclear reactions induced by rare isotope beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chang; Li Baoan

    2010-01-01

    Taking into account more accurately the isospin dependence of nucleon-nucleon interactions in the in-medium many-body force term of the Gogny effective interaction, new expressions for the single-nucleon potential and the symmetry energy are derived. Effects of both the spin (isospin) and the density dependence of nuclear effective interactions on the symmetry potential and the symmetry energy are examined. It is shown that they both play a crucial role in determining the symmetry potential and the symmetry energy at suprasaturation densities. The improved single-nucleon potential will be useful for more accurate simulation of nuclear reactions induced by rare-isotope beams within transport models.

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of potential ligands for nuclear waste processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iqbal, M.

    2012-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis deals with the synthesis and evaluation of new potential ligands for the complexation of actinide and lanthanide ions either for their extraction from bulk radioactive waste or their stripping from an extracted organic phase for final processing of the waste. In

  6. Quasielastic electron scattering: effect of relativistic nuclear potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do Dang, G.; Nguyen Van Giai.

    1983-11-01

    It is shown that a solution to the difficulty encountered in reproducing simultaneously the experimental longitudinal and transverse response functions deduced from deep inelastic electron scattering may be found in a consistent treatment of the electromagnetic interaction in a Dirac equation in which Lorentz scalar and vector potentials are explicitly introduced. Results for 12 C and 40 Ca are given and compared with experiments

  7. Potential of small nuclear reactors for future clean and safe energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, H.

    1992-01-01

    To cope with the various kinds of energy demands expected in the 21st century, it is necessary to explore the potential of small nuclear reactors and to find a way of promoting their introduction to society. The main goal of current research activities is 'the constitution of the self-consistent nuclear energy system'. These activities can be understood by realizing that the nuclear community is facing a turning point for its survival in the 21st century. Self-consistency can be manifested by investigating and developing the potential advantages of the nuclear fission reaction and lessening the potential disadvantages. The contributions in this volume discuss concepts of small reactors, applications of small reactors, and consistency with conventional energy supply systems

  8. Potential impacts of nuclear power plant operation on the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotulan, J.

    1999-01-01

    Findings from the examination of the health status of population living in the vicinity of nuclear facilities abroad (England, France, Germany ...) are summarized. Where a significant increase in the incidence of leukemia in children and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas were observed, these are not attributed to radioactivity; rather, the virus theory seems to account best for this phenomenon. Author's findings in the area of the Dukovany NPP in the Czech Republic (which have been published) are summarized as follows: (i) Total mortality 1986-1994 in the vicinity of the plant is the same as or lower than in reference regions; (ii) This also applies to premature deaths and to the 'lost years' indicator; (iii) Death rate due to tumors is significantly lower than in reference regions; (iv) This also applies to the majority of the individual types of tumors; (v) Leukemia seems to be an exception, its incidence being higher than in reference regions. The absolute figures, however, are low (11 + 17 in the exposed region) and the differences are not statistically significant. This also applies to lymphatic tissue tumors. (7) Mental well-being was no different from the reference region; in some respects, surprisingly enough, it even appeared to be more favourable. (P.A.)

  9. Potential development of non-destructive assay for nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, R.; Cuypers, M.; Guardini, S.

    1983-01-01

    After a brief summary on the role of non-destructive assay in safeguarding the nuclear fuel cycle, its evolution from NDA methods development to other areas is illustrated. These areas are essentially: a) the evaluation of the performances of NDA techniques in field conditions; b) introduction of full automation of measurement instrument operation, using interactive microprocessors and of measurement data handling evaluation and retrieval features; c) introduction of the adequate link and compatibility to assure NDA measurement data transfer in an integrated safeguards data evaluation scheme. In this field, the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) is developing and implementing a number of techniques and methodologies allowing an integrated and rational treatment of the large amount of safeguards data produced. In particular for the non-destructive assay measurements and techniques, the JRC has studied and tested methodologies for the automatic generation and validation of data of inventory verification. In order to apply these techniques successfully in field, the JRC has studied the design requirements of NDA data management and evaluation systems. This paper also discusses the functional requirements of an integrated system for NDA safeguards data evaluation

  10. Effect of the momentum dependence of nuclear symmetry potential on the transverse and elliptic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lei; Du, Yun; Zuo, Guang-Hua; Gao, Yuan; Yong, Gao-Chan

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport model, the effect of the momentum dependence of nuclear symmetry potential on nuclear transverse and elliptic flows in the neutron-rich reaction 132 Sn+ 124 Sn at a beam energy of 400MeV/nucleon is studied. We find that the momentum dependence of nuclear symmetry potential affects the rapidity distribution of the free neutron to proton ratio, the neutron and the proton transverse flows as a function of rapidity. The momentum dependence of nuclear symmetry potential affects the neutron-proton differential transverse flow more evidently than the difference of neutron and proton transverse flows as well as the difference of proton and neutron elliptic flows. It is thus better to probe the symmetry energy by using the difference of neutron and proton flows since the momentum dependence of nuclear symmetry potential is still an open question. And it is better to probe the momentum dependence of nuclear symmetry potential by using the neutron-proton differential transverse flow the rapidity distribution of the free neutron to proton ratio. (orig.)

  11. Neural networks - Potential appplication in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiftah, S.

    1989-01-01

    Neural networks are an emerging technology which is perceived to have potential for solving complex computation problems which cannot be solved by standard computational methods. One such example is the inverse kinematics problem which is considered to be the most difficult problem in robotics. In 1986, only one neural network modelling tool was available, now there are about twenty offered commercially by various companies in North America

  12. On the Potential of MAX phases for Nuclear Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallman, Darin Joseph

    Materials within nuclear reactors experience some of the harshest environments currently known to man, including long term operation in extreme temperatures, corrosive media, and fast neutron fluences with up to 100 displacements per atom, dpa. In order to improve the efficiency and safety of current and future reactors, new materials are required to meet these harsh demands. The M n+1AXn phases, a growing family of ternary nano-layered ceramics, possess a desirable combination of metallic and ceramic properties. They are composed of an early transition metal (M), a group 13--16 element (A), and carbon and/or nitrogen (X). The MAX phases are being proposed for use in such extreme environments because of their unique combination of high fracture toughness values and thermal conductivities, machinability, oxidation resistance, and ion irradiation damage tolerance. Previous ion irradiation studies have shown that Ti3SiC2 and Ti3AlC2 resist irradiation damage, maintaining crystallinity up to 50 dpa. The aim of this work was to explore the effect of neutron irradiation, up to 9 dpa and at temperatures of 100 to 1000 °C, on select MAX phases for the first time. The MAX phases Ti3SiC2, Ti 3AlC2, Ti2AlC, and Ti2AlN were synthesized, and irradiated in test reactors that simulate in-pile conditions of nuclear reactors. X-ray diffraction, XRD, pattern refinements of samples revealed a distortion of the crystal lattice after low temperature irradiation, which was not observed after high temperature irradiations. Additionally, the XRD results indicated that Ti3AlC2 and Ti2AlN dissociated after relatively low neutron doses. This led us to focus on Ti 3SiC2 and Ti2AlC. For the first time, dislocation loops were observed in Ti3SiC 2 and Ti2AlC as a result of neutron irradiation. At 1 x 1023 loops/m3, the loop density in Ti2 AlC after irradiation to 0.1 dpa at 700°C was 1.5 orders of magnitude greater than that observed in Ti3SiC2, at 3 x 1021 loops/m3. The Ti2AlC composition

  13. GC Side Event: Africa's Energy Needs and the Potential Role of Nuclear Power. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Energy is central to development, and energy availability, accessibility and affordability are central challenges for most African countries. Due to rapidly growing energy demand, the need for socioeconomic development, persistent concerns over climate change and environmental impacts and dependence on imported supplies of fossil fuels, African Member States are looking into possible options to secure sustainable energy supplies, including nuclear energy. The IAEA assists those countries in assessing the nuclear power option and building the necessary infrastructure for a safe, secure and sustainable nuclear power programme. This year, the IAEA is conducting Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR) missions to three African countries (Nigeria, Kenya and Morocco) considering introducing nuclear power. The side event presents recent updates from Africa on the potential role of nuclear power, including the IAEA Third Regional Conference on Energy and Nuclear Power in Africa, held in Mombasa, Kenya, in April 2015, an initiative to launch a new African network for enhancing nuclear power programme development, and others. The event reports on recent developments in several African Member States considering, embarking on, or expanding national nuclear power programmes.

  14. Potential Applications for Nuclear Energy besides Electricity Generation: AREVA Global Perspective of HTR Potential Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soutworth, Finis; Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Lecomte, Michel; Carre, Franck

    2007-01-01

    Energy supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will develop. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat source free of greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated

  15. Determining the potential volume of industrial process steam to be generated in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobsky, T.

    1990-01-01

    The present study serves to determine the market potential of nuclear energy for industrial process steam supply according to branches and sites in the Federal Republic of Germany (excluding the new East German Laender). On the nuclear plant side two HTR reference plants with different unit powers of 200 MWth (HTR-Modul) and 100 MWth are investigated. An essential result in analysing the nuclear market potential is the finding that the number of potential users and sites will triple if smaller unit sizes were introduced. This corresponds to an increase in nuclear plant potential from 28 units of 200 MWth each to 91 units of 100 MWth on the assumptions made in this study. A comparison of economic efficiency between fossil-fired power production plants and the HTR-Modul shows the competitiveness of nuclear process steam and electricity production in the base load range. A single-site evaluation for the centres of energy demand competes conceptually with a combined heat supply by nuclear long-distance energy. This integrated supply concept makes it possible to supply considerably more industrial companies with process steam while reducing the number of sites, since the heat requirements of smaller sites can also be covered by the integrated system. (orig.) [de

  16. Classical properties and semiclassical calculations in a spherical nuclear average potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, J.; Brut, F.; Arvieu, R.; Touchard, J.

    1984-03-01

    We study the relation between the classical properties or an average nuclear potential and its spectral properties. We have drawn the energy-action surface of this potential and related its properties to the spectral ones in the framework of the EBK semiclassical method. We also describe a method allowing us to get the evolution of the spectrum with the mass number

  17. Equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter using re-projected nucleon–nucleon potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi Aghbolaghi, Z.; Bigdeli, M.

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we have calculated the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter using the lowest order constrained variational approach and Argonne family potentials with and without three-nucleon interaction (TNI) contribution. In particular, we have used the AV18 potential and the re-projected potentials, AV8‧, and AV6‧. We have also calculated the saturation properties of symmetric nuclear matter, and the nuclear symmetry energy using AV18+TNI, AV8‧+TNI and AV6‧+TNI potentials. The inclusion of TNI has modified the agreement with experiment. We have also made a comparison between our results and those of other many-body calculations.

  18. Potential utilities of optimal estimation and control in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylee, J.L.; Purviance, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Optimal estimation and control theories offer the potential for more precise control and diagnosis of nuclear power plants. The important element of these theories is that a mathematical plant model is used in conjunction with the actual plant data to optimize some performance criteria. These criteria involve important plant variables and incorporate a sense of the desired plant performance. Several applications of optimal estimation and control to nuclear systems are discussed

  19. Potential National Security Applications of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Glen A.; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Caggiano, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this report is to document the initial investigation into the possible research issues related to the development of NRF-based national security applications. The report discusses several potential applications ranging from measuring uranium enrichment in UF6 canisters to characterization of gas samples. While these applications are varied, there are only a few research issues that need to be addressed to understand the limitation of NRF in solving these problems. These research issues range from source and detector development to measuring small samples. The next effort is to determine how best to answer the research issues, followed by a prioritization of those questions to ensure that the most important are addressed. These issues will be addressed through either analytical calculations, computer simulations, analysis of previous data or collection of new measurements. It will also be beneficial to conduct a thorough examination of a couple of the more promising applications in order to develop concrete examples of how NRF may be applied in specific situations. The goals are to develop an understanding of whether the application of NRF is limited by technology or physics in addressing national security applications, to gain a motivation to explore those possible applications, and to develop a research roadmap so that those possibilities may be made reality.

  20. Vendors woo South Africa as a potential new 'powerhouse' for nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, John [nuclear24, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    South Africa is a country which is increasingly seen as a potential new nuclear market that promises to give one or more of the world's major nuclear vendors an important foothold on the continent. South Africa has two pressurised water reactors operating at the Koeberg nuclear plant. The 930-megawatt (MW) first unit entered commercial operation in July 1984, followed by the second (900 MW) unit in November 1985. These are the only commercial nuclear power plants on the continent of Africa. South Africa's updated draft integrated resources plan (IRP) for electricity for 2010-30, for which a public consultation period ended in February of this year, included revised projections. that suggested no new nuclear baseload capacity would be needed 'until after 2025'. A capacity 'at least 6,600 MW less' is required in terms of reliable overall generating capacity in 2030. However great South Africa's demand for a clean, affordable and reliable supply of nuclear-generated electricity, coupled with the economic benefits such developments will bring, investors also understand the potential for nuclear growth in this part of the world. (orig.)

  1. Vendors woo South Africa as a potential new 'powerhouse' for nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, John

    2014-01-01

    South Africa is a country which is increasingly seen as a potential new nuclear market that promises to give one or more of the world's major nuclear vendors an important foothold on the continent. South Africa has two pressurised water reactors operating at the Koeberg nuclear plant. The 930-megawatt (MW) first unit entered commercial operation in July 1984, followed by the second (900 MW) unit in November 1985. These are the only commercial nuclear power plants on the continent of Africa. South Africa's updated draft integrated resources plan (IRP) for electricity for 2010-30, for which a public consultation period ended in February of this year, included revised projections. that suggested no new nuclear baseload capacity would be needed 'until after 2025'. A capacity 'at least 6,600 MW less' is required in terms of reliable overall generating capacity in 2030. However great South Africa's demand for a clean, affordable and reliable supply of nuclear-generated electricity, coupled with the economic benefits such developments will bring, investors also understand the potential for nuclear growth in this part of the world. (orig.)

  2. Radiation Vulcanization of Natural Rubber Latex (RVNRL): A Potential Material for Nuclear Power Plant Gloves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pairu Ibrahim; Wan Manshol Wan Zain; Keong, C.C.; Mohd Noorwadi Mat Lazim

    2011-01-01

    Radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex has great potential for the production of nuclear power plant gloves due to its low ash and mineral content. And this is in-line with the role played by Malaysian Nuclear Agency as Technical Supporting Organization for Nuclear Power Program. This paper discussed the evaluation done to determine ash content in RVNRL and SVNRL films. Both samples were prepared using casting technique and the properties were compared. Films prepared from raw latex without any vulcanizing agent were regarded as a control. (author)

  3. Workshop on Potentially Disruptive Phenomena for Nuclear Waste Repositories, July 27-28, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    The workshop on Potentially Disruptive Phenomena for Nuclear Waste Repositories brought together experts in the geosciences to identify and evaluate potentially disruptive events and processes and to contribute ideas on how to extrapolate data from the past into the next one million years. The analysis is to be used to model a repository in geologic media for long-term safety assessments of nuclear waste storage. The workshop included invited presentations on the following items: an overview of the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP), simulation techniques, subjective probabilities and methodology of obtaining data, similar modeling efforts at Lawrence Livermore and Sandia Laboratories, and geologic processes or events

  4. Alternative fuel cycle options: performance characteristics and impact on nuclear power growth potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.; Till, C.E.; Rudolph, R.R.; Deen, J.R.; King, M.J.

    1977-09-01

    The fuel utilization characteristics for LWR, SSCR, CANDU and LMFBR reactor concepts are quantified for various fuel cycle options, including once-through cycles, thorium cycles, and denatured cycles. The implications of various alternative reactor deployment strategies on the long-term nuclear power growth potential are then quantified in terms of the maximum nuclear capacity that can be achieved and the growth pattern over time, subject to the constraint of a fixed uranium-resource base. The overall objective of this study is to shed light on any large differences in the long-term potential that exist between various alternative reactor/fuel cycle deployment strategies

  5. The nuclear response and the imaginary potential for nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phatak, S.C.; Sinha, B.

    1983-01-01

    The Fermi-gas model is used in this paper to study the nucleus-nucleus collision. The field produced by one of the nuclei is considered to act on nucleons in the other nucleus, which is treated as a Fermi gas of radius R. The imaginary part of the (non-local) nucleus-nucleus potential is then computed by evaluating the energy-conserving second-order term in which the intermediate states are particle-hole excitations produced in the Fermi gas. The equivalent local potential, obtained by using the Perey-Saxon method, is compared with phenomenological imaginary potentials. Later it is shown that, in the limit of small range of non-locality, the imaginary potential can be related to the nuclear response function. With this, one can write the nuclear friction coefficient that is used in phenomenological analyses of heavy-ion collisions in terms of the imaginary potential. (orig.)

  6. Africa's developing nuclear landscape holds potential for investors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, John [nuclear 24, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    Africa is continuing to draw interest from potential nuclear investors as more of the region's nations consider the prospects for launching civil nuclear programmes. Much of the interest has been driven by South Africa, which announced its intention to push ahead with building a new fleet of nuclear power plants more than two years ago. South Africa's Department of Energy said it aims to select a ''strategic partner or partners'' for its planned new nuclear programme by the end of fiscal year 2015. The country's existing twin-unit Koeberg is the African continent's sole nuclear power plant, but expectations are high that this will change. According to 'The World Nuclear Supply Chain: Outlook 2030', released at the start of this year by the World Nuclear Association, Africa and Latin America could see investments of $ 20 billion (Euro 18.2 bn) and $ 14 billion, respectively over the next 15 years.

  7. Potential impact of thermal effluents from Chongqing Fuling nuclear power plant to the Three Gorges Reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Baohua; Li Jianguo; Ma Binghui; Zhang Yue; Sun Qunli; Hu Yuping

    2012-01-01

    This study is based on the hydrological data near Chongqing Fuling Nuclear Power Plant along the Yangtze River, the present situation of the ecological environment of the Three Gorges Reservoir and the predicted results of thermal effluents from Chongqing Fuling Nuclear Power Plant. The standards of cooling water and the thermal tolerances indexes of aquatic organisms were investigated. The effects of thermal effluents on aquatic organisms were analyzed. The potential impact of Chongqing Fuling nuclear power plant to the Three Gorges Reservoir was explained. The results show that in the most adverse working conditions, the surface temperature near the outfall area is not more than 1℃, the temperature of thermal effluents do not exceed the suitable thermal range of fish breeding, growth and other thermal tolerances indexes. Thermal effluents from nuclear power plant have no influence about fish, plankton and benthic organisms in the Three Gorges Reservoir. (authors)

  8. Potential Fuel Loadings, Fire Ignitions, and Smoke Emissions from Nuclear Bursts in Megacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Robock, A.; Bardeen, C.; Oman, L.; Stenchikov, G. L.

    2006-12-01

    We consider the effects of "small" nuclear detonations in modern "megacities," focusing on the possible extent of fire ignitions, and the properties of corresponding smoke emissions. Explosive devices in the multi-kiloton yield range are being produced by a growing number of nuclear states (Toon et al., 2006), and such weapons may eventually fall into the hands of terrorists. The numbers of nuclear weapons that might be used in a regional conflict, and their potential impacts on population and infrastructure, are discussed elsewhere. Here, we estimate the smoke emissions that could lead to widespread environmental effects, including large-scale climate anomalies. We find that low-yield weapons, which emerging nuclear states have been stockpiling, and which are likely to be targeted against cities in a regional war, can generate up to 100 times as much smoke per kiloton of yield as the high-yield weapons once associated with a superpower nuclear exchange. The fuel loadings in modern cities are estimated using a variety of data, including extrapolations from earlier detailed studies. The probability of ignition and combustion of fuels, smoke emission factors and radiative properties, and prompt scavenging and dispersion of the smoke are summarized. We conclude that a small regional nuclear war might generate up to 5 teragrams of highly absorbing particles in urban firestorms, and that this smoke could initially be injected into the middle and upper troposphere. These results are used to develop smoke emission scenarios for a climate impact analysis reported by Oman et al. (2006). Uncertainties in the present smoke estimates are outlined. Oman, L., A. Robock, G. L. Stenchikov, O. B. Toon, C. Bardeen and R. P. Turco, "Climatic consequences of regional nuclear conflicts," AGU, Fall 2006. Toon, O. B., R. P. Turco, A. Robock, C. Bardeen, L. Oman and G. L. Stenchikov, "Consequences of regional scale nuclear conflicts and acts of individual nuclear terrorism," AGU, Fall

  9. Nuclear proliferation and the potential threat of nuclear terrorism. 8 November 2004, Sydney, Australia, Asia-Pacific Nuclear Safeguards and Security Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2004-01-01

    Today, the focus of the world is on nuclear proliferation and the potential threat of nuclear terrorism in Asia and the Pacific, and this address is presenting the perspectives on the challenges IAEA faces, and how the IAEA is working to strengthen nuclear security and the nuclear non-proliferation regime. But one would emphasize at the outset that, while much of our work must begin locally and regionally, we must not forget to think globally, because ultimately the existence of a nuclear threat anywhere is a threat everywhere, and as a global community, we will win or lose this battle together. This presentation, discusses cooperation, assistance, regional and international networks, and the importance of learning from each other. In effect, the focal subject is 'security culture', a mindset that, while providing the impetus for local and regional action, thinks globally and is fully capable of extending across borders. Sixty years ago, on a day in August, the dawn of the Nuclear Age in Asia left nearly a quarter of a million people dead, with two devices considered crude by modern standards. For six decades, we have managed to avoid a repeat of that event, but remain haunted by the prospect. It is my firm belief that we cannot move out from under the shadow of Hiroshima and Nagasaki until we are ready to make that move collectively, and build a system of security that transcends borders, that focuses on the equal value of every human life, and in which nuclear weapons have no place. May it not ultimately be said of our civilization that we created the inventions that led to our own demise

  10. Single Particle Potential of a Σ Hyperon in Nuclear Matter. II Rearrangement Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, J.

    2000-01-01

    The rearrangement contribution to the real part of the single particle potential of a Σ hyperon in nuclear matter, U Σ , is investigated. The isospin and spin dependent parts of U Σ are considered. Results obtained for four models of the Nijmegen baryon-baryon interaction are presented and discussed. (author)

  11. Nuclear interaction potential in a folded-Yukawa model with diffuse densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randrup, J.

    1975-09-01

    The folded-Yukawa model for the nuclear interaction potential is generalized to diffuse density distributions which are generated by folding a Yukawa function into sharp generating distributions. The effect of a finite density diffuseness or of a finite interaction range is studied. The Proximity Formula corresponding to the generalized model is derived and numerical comparison is made with the exact results. (8 figures)

  12. The potential of nuclear energy to generate clean electric power in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stecher, Luiza C.; Sabundjian, Gaiane; Menzel, Francine; Giarola, Rodrigo S.; Coelho, Talita S.

    2013-01-01

    The generation of electricity in Brazil is concentrated in hydroelectric generation, renewable and clean source, but that does not satisfy all the demand and leads to necessity of a supplementary thermal sources portion. Considering the predictions of increase in demand for electricity in the next years, it becomes necessary to insert new sources to complement the production taking into account both the volume being produced and the needs of environmental preservation. Thus, nuclear power can be considered a potential supplementary source for electricity generation in Brazil as well as the country has large reserves of fissile material, the generation emits no greenhouse gases, the country has technological mastery of the fuel cycle and it enables the production of large volumes of clean energy. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the potential of nuclear energy in electricity production in Brazil cleanly and safely, ensuring the supplies necessary to maintain the country's economic growth and the increased demand sustainable. For this, will be made an analysis of economic and social indicators of the characteristics of our energy matrix and the availability of our sources, as well as a description of the nuclear source and arguments that justify a higher share of nuclear energy in the matrix of the country. Then, after these analysis, will notice that the generation of electricity from nuclear source has all the conditions to supplement safely and clean supply of electricity in Brazil. (author)

  13. Nuclear power in Europe today and its potential competitive role for tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmut, B.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear power is nowadays one of the cornerstones of the occidental Europe electricity supply system. The electricity European market liberalization as well as the uncertainties resulting from acceptabilities problems (which are due to political risks) represent nevertheless a great challenge for the future use of nuclear power. Concerning the energy consumption, the financial advantage of new nuclear power plants compared with fossil-fired power plants seems to be still possible in the future, but all investment decision should however consider in addition to these less high costs the political financial costs which are difficult to appreciate in a lot of European countries. On account of the current conditions, it would be practically senseless to build new nuclear power plants in these countries. The investment safety required for the construction of new plants is only given unfortunately in a few countries, in France for instance. Without any political conditions modification, new nuclear power plants setting up in most of the occidental European countries will be in a near future probably exceptional and with risks division. However, we must not forget that the nuclear power disposes of the potential which allows to reach objectives of a capital importance on the social plan as for instance the CO 2 decrease, the resources economy, the electric power price stability and the employment protection. In the future, the electric power plants will not be in measure to reach the objectives which have been theirs until now as those will induce disadvantages for competitiveness. After the liberalization, it is then the duty of the political responsible persons to establish a sufficient legal protection for the future use of nuclear power and to create thus the ecological and economical potential bound to these ones. (O.M.)

  14. Human performance improvement in organizations: Potential application for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    This publication is primarily intended for managers and specialists in nuclear facility operating organizations working in the area of human performance improvement. It is intended to provide them with practical information they can use to improve human performance in their organizations. While some of the information provided in this publication is based upon the experience of nuclear facility operating organizations, most of it comes from human performance improvement initiatives in non-nuclear organizations and industries. The nuclear industry has a long tradition of sharing good management practices in order to foster continuous improvement. However, it is not always realized that many of the practices that are now well established initially came from non-nuclear industries and were subsequently adapted for application to nuclear power plant operating organizations. There is, therefore, good reason to periodically review non-nuclear industry practices for ideas that might have direct or indirect application to the nuclear industry in order to potentially gain benefits such as the following: new approaches to certain problem areas, insights into new or impending challenges, improvements in existing practices, benchmarking of opportunities, development of learning organizations and avoidance of collective blind spots. The preparation of this report was an activity of the project on Effective Training to Achieve Excellence in the Performance of NPP Personnel. The objective of this project is to enhance the capability of Member States to utilize proven practices developed and transferred by the IAEA for improving personnel performance. The expected outcome from this project is the increased use by organizations in Members States of proven engineering and management practices and methodologies developed and transferred by the IAEA to improve personnel performance

  15. Thermochemical modeling of nuclear fuel and the effects of oxygen potential buffers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loukusa, Henri, E-mail: henri.loukusa@vtt.fi; Ikonen, Timo; Valtavirta, Ville; Tulkki, Ville

    2016-12-01

    The elemental and chemical composition of nuclear fuel pellets are key factors influencing the material properties of the pellets. The oxidation state of the fuel is one of the most important chemical properties influencing the material properties of the fuel, and it can only be determined with the knowledge of the chemical composition. A measure of the oxidation state is the oxygen chemical potential of the fuel. It can be buffered by redox pairs, such as the well-known Mo/MoO{sub 2} pair. In this work, the elemental composition of the fuel is obtained from a burnup calculation and the temperature and pressure calculated with a fuel performance code. An estimate of the oxygen potential of fuel is calculated with Gibbs energy minimization. The results are compared against experimental data from the literature. The significance of the UMoO{sub 6} compound and its buffering effect on the oxygen potential is emphasized. - Highlights: • A Gibbs energy minimization routine has been developed for nuclear fuel modeling. • The initial stoichiometry affects the development of the oxygen potential of fuel. • UMoO{sub 6} is found to buffer the oxygen potential of nuclear fuel.

  16. Coal and nuclear wastes: both potential contributors to environmental and health problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The Chairman, Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power, House Committee on Energy and Commerce, asked GAO to answer eight questions regarding waste produced by coal and nuclear fuels during the generation of electricity. This report primarily discusses the first two items in the Chairman's request: what are the types and quantities of wastes generated at each step of the coal and nuclear fuel cycles. What are the health and environmental problems associated with these wastes. Based on a comprehensive literature search GAO found that wastes produced by both the coal and nuclear fuel cycles present the potential for significant environmental and health hazards. Because the waste types present different types of hazards, however, it is not possible to determine if either waste type is more of a hazard than the other. Nonetheless, most of the hazards from both fuel cycles can be lessened, or in some cases eliminated, if properly controlled and regulated

  17. Study of the nuclear potential in the mass region of supercritical systems by means of phenomenological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiwert, M.

    1985-01-01

    In the present thesis different potential models were extended up to deformed nuclei. The influence of the deformations, orientations, and the nuclear atmosphere on the nuclear potential were analyzed. The double-folding integral was also solved for adiabatic nuclear shapes. The unrealistic binding-energy contributions occurring in the double-folding model were replaced by realistic binding energies by a renormalization procedure. The extended proximity potential, the renormalized double-folding model, and the Yukawa-plus-exponential model were applied to the calculation of the potential of supercritical systems. The resulting potentials of the different models are nonuniform. (orig./HSI) [de

  18. Powering Africa's sustainable development: The potential role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessides, Ioannis N.

    2014-01-01

    The electricity deficit is one of the most serious contemporary issues facing sub-Saharan Africa. Many countries in the region have insufficient generation capacity to meet rapidly rising demand. Electricity shortages have become a binding and powerful constraint on the continent's sustainable development. Their resolution will require coordinated effort to improve the effectiveness and governance of the region's utilities and to significantly scale-up generation capacity. A broad portfolio of low carbon (low-C) technologies needs to be deployed in order to address the electricity deficit in a cost-effective way and not be disruptive to economic growth. Since nuclear power can deliver low-C electricity in bulk, reliably and without intermittency, it could make a significant contribution towards resolving Africa's power crisis. However, the post-Fukushima safety concerns related to large nuclear plants with substantial radioactive inventories will be especially pronounced in Africa. Moreover, large scale reactors with huge upfront investment requirements are likely to be unsuitable for capital-constrained African countries with small electricity grids. One promising direction for nuclear development in Africa might be to downsize reactors from the gigawatt scale to less-complex smaller units (with substantially smaller radioactive inventory) that are more affordable. - Highlights: • We examine the potential role of nuclear power in Africa. • There is growing African interest in nuclear power. • Nuclear power in Africa will require grid strengthening. • Small modular reactors could enhance Africa's energy security. • There are concerns about Africa's safety culture for nuclear power

  19. The potential environmental impacts and the siting of proposed nuclear power plants in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Zhongqi

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews briefly the methodology of assessing environmental impacts from the nuclear power plants and analyses the potential radiological impacts on the environment from proposed nuclear power plants in China. Preliminary studies show that the environmental impacts of the effluents of routine release from PWRs to the proposed sites are extremely small, even if nuclear power plants are constructed either on the Bohai Sea shore with a narrow mouth or in the densely populated regions of Sunan. Thus, the suitability of sites depends mainly on the acceptability of possible exposure to the residents following postulated accidental release of radioactive materials. The paper also discusses relations between the nuclear plant siting and population distribution around the site and compares the distribution of the proposed sites in China with that of other countries sites in according to China actual situation, it is reasonable to adopt a prudent policy that the first series of nuclear power plants in China should be built in relatively low population areas

  20. Nuclear power in developing countries: Its potential role and strategies for its deployment. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The demand for energy, especially electricity, in developing countries is expected to grow rapidly in the coming decades as these countries seek to improve the living standards of their growing populations. Substantial growth in developing country energy demand plus a continued heavy reliance of the power sector on fossil fuels is likely to result in an increased dependence of these countries on energy imports and thus to potential deterioration of their terms-of-trade, reduced energy security and, in the absence of costly mitigation measures, severe degradation of the environment and public health, and will also lead to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. If supply security, health and environmental protection and climate change become pressing policy issues, nuclear power is, in the short to medium term, the only viable non-fossil base load electricity generating alternative (other than hydro where growth potential is limited) that is already meeting 17% of global electricity needs and contributing more than 30% of electricity supplies in 14 countries. It is in the above context that the International Atomic Energy Agency organized this seminar to explore the role of nuclear power in meeting the growing demand for electricity in the developing world, and to identify and discuss suitable ways and means for proper implementation of nuclear power programmes in these countries. Several issues were discussed, in particular, the need and role of nuclear power; economic and financial aspects; technology transfer and national participation; safety, regulation and safeguards; and public acceptance

  1. Nuclear power in developing countries: Its potential role and strategies for its deployment. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-01

    The demand for energy, especially electricity, in developing countries is expected to grow rapidly in the coming decades as these countries seek to improve the living standards of their growing populations. Substantial growth in developing country energy demand plus a continued heavy reliance of the power sector on fossil fuels is likely to result in an increased dependence of these countries on energy imports and thus to potential deterioration of their terms-of-trade, reduced energy security and, in the absence of costly mitigation measures, severe degradation of the environment and public health, and will also lead to increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. If supply security, health and environmental protection and climate change become pressing policy issues, nuclear power is, in the short to medium term, the only viable non-fossil base load electricity generating alternative (other than hydro where growth potential is limited) that is already meeting 17% of global electricity needs and contributing more than 30% of electricity supplies in 14 countries. It is in the above context that the International Atomic Energy Agency organized this seminar to explore the role of nuclear power in meeting the growing demand for electricity in the developing world, and to identify and discuss suitable ways and means for proper implementation of nuclear power programmes in these countries. Several issues were discussed, in particular, the need and role of nuclear power; economic and financial aspects; technology transfer and national participation; safety, regulation and safeguards; and public acceptance.

  2. The Potential of NORM in Non-Nuclear Industry in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunto Wiharto; Syarbaini

    2003-01-01

    Industry with an activity of processing natural resources from crust of earth as raw materials could cause natural radioactivity in crust of earth to be accumulated in waste, by product and or main product of that industry. Natural radioactive elements which are mobilized and then accumulated in end industry process are known as NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials). NORM have a potential radiological impact such as external and internal radiation exposure. Therefore, the existence of NORM in these non-nuclear industries should be studied in order to handle properly the radiological impact of those material to the industrial workers, member of the public and the surrounding environment. This paper describes the non nuclear industrial sectors in Indonesia that have potential NORM sources and radiation safety aspects in connecting with NORM. (author)

  3. Microorganisms in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste and their interactions with radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkouk, A.; Liebe, M.; Luetke, L.; Moll, H.; Stumpf, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2015-07-01

    The long-term safety of nuclear waste in a deep geological repository is an important issue in our society. Microorganisms indigenous to potential host rocks are able to influence the oxidation state, speciation and therefore the mobility of radionuclides as well as gas generation or canister corrosion. Therefore, for the safety assessment of such a repository it is necessary to know which microorganisms are present in the potential host rocks (e.g. clay, salt) and if these microorganisms can influence the performance of a repository. Microbial diversity in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste was analyzed by culture-independent molecular biological methods (e.g. 16S rRNA gene retrieval) as well as enrichment and isolation of indigenous microbes. Among other isolates, a Paenibacillus strain, as a representative of Firmicutes, was recovered in R2A media under anaerobic conditions from Opalinus clay from the Mont Terri in Switzerland. Accumulation experiments and potentiometric titrations showed a strong interaction of Paenibacillus sp. cells with U(VI) within a broad pH range (3-7). Additionally, the interactions of the halophilic archaeal strain Halobacterium noricense DSM 15987, a salt rock representative reference strain, with U(VI) at high ionic strength was investigated. After 48 h the cells were still alive at uranium concentrations up to 60 μM, which demonstrates that Halobacterium noricense can tolerate uranium concentrations up to this level. The formed uranium sorption species were examined with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The results about the microbial communities present in potential host rocks for nuclear waste repositories and their interactions with radionuclides contribute to the safety assessment of a prospective nuclear waste repository.

  4. Microorganisms in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste and their interactions with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkouk, A.; Liebe, M.; Luetke, L.; Moll, H.; Stumpf, T.

    2015-01-01

    The long-term safety of nuclear waste in a deep geological repository is an important issue in our society. Microorganisms indigenous to potential host rocks are able to influence the oxidation state, speciation and therefore the mobility of radionuclides as well as gas generation or canister corrosion. Therefore, for the safety assessment of such a repository it is necessary to know which microorganisms are present in the potential host rocks (e.g. clay, salt) and if these microorganisms can influence the performance of a repository. Microbial diversity in potential host rocks for geological disposal of nuclear waste was analyzed by culture-independent molecular biological methods (e.g. 16S rRNA gene retrieval) as well as enrichment and isolation of indigenous microbes. Among other isolates, a Paenibacillus strain, as a representative of Firmicutes, was recovered in R2A media under anaerobic conditions from Opalinus clay from the Mont Terri in Switzerland. Accumulation experiments and potentiometric titrations showed a strong interaction of Paenibacillus sp. cells with U(VI) within a broad pH range (3-7). Additionally, the interactions of the halophilic archaeal strain Halobacterium noricense DSM 15987, a salt rock representative reference strain, with U(VI) at high ionic strength was investigated. After 48 h the cells were still alive at uranium concentrations up to 60 μM, which demonstrates that Halobacterium noricense can tolerate uranium concentrations up to this level. The formed uranium sorption species were examined with time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The results about the microbial communities present in potential host rocks for nuclear waste repositories and their interactions with radionuclides contribute to the safety assessment of a prospective nuclear waste repository.

  5. The single-particle potential of nuclear matter in the LOCV framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modarres, M., E-mail: mmodares@ut.ac.ir [Physics Department, University of Tehran, North-Kargar Ave., 1439955961 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rajabi, A. [Physics Department, Shahid Rajaei Teacher Training University, Lavizan, 16788 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-10-01

    The density and momentum dependence of single-particle potential (SPP) and effective mass of symmetric nuclear matter are studied in the framework of lowest order constrained variational (LOCV) method. The Reid68, the Reid68-{Delta} and the Av{sub 18} interactions are considered as the input nucleon-nucleon potentials. It is shown that the SPP of nuclear matter, at fixed density, is an increasing function of nucleon momentum, and it has different behavior for the Reid type potentials with respect to Av{sub 18} interaction. We find good agreements between our LOCV SPP and those coming from others many-body techniques such as the (Dirac-)Brueckner-Hartree-Foch ((D)BHF), the fermion hypernetted chain (FHNC), mean field (MF), etc. On the other hand SPP dramatically depends on the density at low and high nucleon momentums. While the effective mass of nuclear matter increases as we increase the nucleon momentum, it decreases at the Fermi surface. Again, good agreements are observed between our calculated effective mass and those coming from the methods mentioned above.

  6. Proposed Nuclear Power Plants in the UK-Potential Radiological Implications for Ireland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, C.; Kelleher, K.; McGinnity, P.; Organo, C.; Smith, K.; Currivan, L.; Ryan, T.

    2013-05-15

    The UK Government has identified up to eight locations for the construction of new nuclear power plants by 2025. Five of these locations are on the Irish Sea coast. The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, RPII was requested by the Minister for the Environment, Community and Local Government to undertake an assessment of the potential radiological impacts on Ireland from this New Build Programme. This report presents the findings of the potential impacts on Ireland of both the anticipated routine radioactive discharges and of a range of postulated nuclear accident scenarios. The following points are the principal findings of the report. Given the prevailing wind direction in Ireland, radioactive contamination in the air, either from routine operation of the proposed nuclear power plants or accidental releases, will most often be transported away from Ireland. The routine operation of the proposed nuclear power plants will have no measurable radiological impact on Ireland or the Irish marine environment. The severe accident scenarios assessed ranged in their estimated frequency of occurrance from 1 in 50,000 to 1 in 33 million per year. The assessment used a weather pattern that maximised the transfer of radioactivity to Ireland. For the severe accident scenarios assessed, food controls or agriculture protective measures would generally be required in Ireland to reduce exposure of the population so as to mitigate potential long-term health effects. In the accident scenario with an estimated 1 in 33 million chance of occurring, short-term measures such as staying indoors would also be advised as a precautionary measure. In general, the accidents with higher potential impact on Ireland are the ones least likely to occur. Regardless of the radiological impact, any accident at the proposed nuclear power plants leading to an increase of radioactivity levels in Ireland would have a socio-economic impact on Ireland. A major accidental release of radioactivity to

  7. Proposed Nuclear Power Plants in the UK-Potential Radiological Implications for Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, C.; Kelleher, K.; McGinnity, P.; Organo, C.; Smith, K.; Currivan, L.; Ryan, T.

    2013-05-01

    The UK Government has identified up to eight locations for the construction of new nuclear power plants by 2025. Five of these locations are on the Irish Sea coast. The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, RPII was requested by the Minister for the Environment, Community and Local Government to undertake an assessment of the potential radiological impacts on Ireland from this New Build Programme. This report presents the findings of the potential impacts on Ireland of both the anticipated routine radioactive discharges and of a range of postulated nuclear accident scenarios. The following points are the principal findings of the report. Given the prevailing wind direction in Ireland, radioactive contamination in the air, either from routine operation of the proposed nuclear power plants or accidental releases, will most often be transported away from Ireland. The routine operation of the proposed nuclear power plants will have no measurable radiological impact on Ireland or the Irish marine environment. The severe accident scenarios assessed ranged in their estimated frequency of occurrance from 1 in 50,000 to 1 in 33 million per year. The assessment used a weather pattern that maximised the transfer of radioactivity to Ireland. For the severe accident scenarios assessed, food controls or agriculture protective measures would generally be required in Ireland to reduce exposure of the population so as to mitigate potential long-term health effects. In the accident scenario with an estimated 1 in 33 million chance of occurring, short-term measures such as staying indoors would also be advised as a precautionary measure. In general, the accidents with higher potential impact on Ireland are the ones least likely to occur. Regardless of the radiological impact, any accident at the proposed nuclear power plants leading to an increase of radioactivity levels in Ireland would have a socio-economic impact on Ireland. A major accidental release of radioactivity to

  8. A preliminary analysis of the risk of transporting nuclear waste to potential candidate commercial repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    In accordance with the provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, environmental assessments for potential candidate sites are required to provide a basis for selection of the first site for disposal of commercial radioactive waste in deep geologic repositories. A preliminary analysis of the impacts of transportation for each of the five potential sites will be described. Transportation was assumed to be entirely by truck or entirely by rail in order to obtain bounding impacts. This paper presents both radiological and nonradiological risks for the once-through fuel cycle

  9. Investigation of potential fire-related damage to safety-related equipment in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanless, J.

    1985-11-01

    Based on a review of vendor information, fire damage reports, equipment qualification and hydrogen burn test results, and material properties, thirty-three types of equipment found in nuclear power plants were ranked in terms of their potential sensitivity to fire environments. The ranking considered both the functional requirements and damage proneness of each component. A further review of the seven top-ranked components was performed, considering the relative prevalence and potential safety significance of each. From this, relays and hand switches dominate as first choices for fire damage testing with logic equipment, power supplies, transmitters, and motor control centers as future candidates

  10. Thorium fuel for light water reactors - reducing proliferation potential of nuclear power fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galperin, A; Radkowski, A [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel)

    1996-12-01

    The proliferation potential of the light water reactor fuel cycle may be significantly reduced by utilization of thorium as a fertile component of the nuclear fuel. The main challenge of Th utilization is to design a core and a fuel cycle, which would be proliferation-resistant and economically feasible. This challenge is met by the Radkowsky Thorium Reactor (RTR) concept. So far the concept has been applied to a Russian design of a 1,000 MWe pressurized water reactor, known as a WWER-1000, and designated as VVERT. The following are the main results of the preliminary reference design: * The amount of Pu contained in the RTR spent fuel stockpile is reduced by 80% in comparison with a VVER of a current design. * The isotopic composition of the RTR-Pu greatly increases the probability of pre-initiation and yield degradation of a nuclear explosion. An extremely large Pu-238 content causes correspondingly large heat emission, which would complicate the design of an explosive device based on RTR-Pu. The economic incentive to reprocess and reuse the fissile component of the RTR spent fuel is decreased. The once-through cycle is economically optimal for the RTR core and cycle. To summarize all the items above: the replacement of a standard (U-based) fuel for nuclear reactors of current generation by the RTR fuel will provide an inherent barrier for nuclear weapon proliferation. This inherent barrier, in combination with existing safeguard measures and procedures is adequate to unambiguously disassociate civilian nuclear power from military nuclear power. * The RTR concept is applied to existing power plants to assure its economic feasibility. Reductions in waste disposal requirements, as well as in natural U and fabrication expenses, as compared to a standard WWER fuel, provide approximately 20% reduction in fuel cycle (authors).

  11. Can the nuclear symmetry potential at supra-saturation densities be negative?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Gaochan

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of an isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (IBUU) transport model, for the central 197 Au+ 197 Au reaction at an incident beam energy of 400 MeV/nucleon, the effect of nuclear symmetry potential at supra-saturation densities on the preequilibrium clusters emission is studied. It is found that for the positive symmetry potential at supra-saturation densities the neutron-to-proton ratio of lighter clusters with mass number A≤3[(n/p) A≤3 ] is larger than that of the heavier clusters with mass number A>3[(n/p) A>3 ], whereas for the negative symmetry potential at supra-saturation densities the (n/p) A≤3 is smaller than the (n/p) A>3 . This may be considered as a probe of the negative symmetry potential at supra-saturation densities.

  12. Nuclear Spiral Shocks and Induced Gas Inflows in Weak Oval Potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woong-Tae [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Elmegreen, Bruce G., E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2017-05-20

    Nuclear spirals are ubiquitous in galaxy centers. They exist not only in strong barred galaxies but also in galaxies without noticeable bars. We use high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations to study the properties of nuclear gas spirals driven by weak bar-like and oval potentials. The amplitude of the spirals increases toward the center by a geometric effect, readily developing into shocks at small radii even for very weak potentials. The shape of the spirals and shocks depends rather sensitively on the background shear. When shear is low, the nuclear spirals are loosely wound and the shocks are almost straight, resulting in large mass inflows toward the center. When shear is high, on the other hand, the spirals are tightly wound and the shocks are oblique, forming a circumnuclear disk through which gas flows inward at a relatively lower rate. The induced mass inflow rates are enough to power black hole accretion in various types of Seyfert galaxies as well as to drive supersonic turbulence at small radii.

  13. Small Modular Reactors: Nuclear Energy Market Potential for Near-term Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokhov, Alexey; Sozoniuk, Vladislav; Rothwell, Geoffrey; ); Cometto, Marco; Paillere, Henri; ); Crozat, Matt; Genoa, Paul; Joon Kim, Tae; McGough, Mike; Ingersoll, Dan; Rickman, Robin; Stout, Dan; Halnon, Greg; Chenais, Jacques; Briffod, Francois-Xavier; Perrier, Sylvain; Shahrokhi, Farshid; Kaufer, Barry; Wasylyk, Andrew; Shropshire, David; ); Danrong, Song; Swinburn, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Recent interest in small modular reactors (SMRs) is being driven by a desire to reduce the total capital costs associated with nuclear power plants and to provide power to small grid systems. According to estimates available today, if all the competitive advantages of SMRs were realised, including serial production, optimised supply chains and smaller financing costs, SMRs could be expected to have lower absolute and specific (per-kWe) construction costs than large reactors. Although the economic parameters of SMRs are not yet fully determined, a potential market exists for this technology, particularly in energy mixes with large shares of renewables. This report assesses the size of the market for SMRs that are currently being developed and that have the potential to broaden the ways of deploying nuclear power in different parts of the world. The study focuses on light water SMRs that are expected to be constructed in the coming decades and that strongly rely on serial, factory-based production of reactor modules. In a high-case scenario, up to 21 GWe of SMRs could be added globally by 2035, representing approximately 3% of total installed nuclear capacity. (authors)

  14. Intellectual decision-making system in the context of potentially dangerous nuclear power facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilov Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with intelligent operation decision support system under condition of potentially hazardous nuclear facilities. The proposed system is referred to the class of advising systems and does not make final decisions in case of deviations of parameters to be analyzed, but generates general ways to solve an encountered problem and issues a set of recommendations for the plant personnel. In the article a fuzzy logic tool is used as mathematic tool. Lessons learnt from operation of nuclear facilities demonstrate that existing critical components (parts, areas, welding joints are subject to increased failure under conditions of high operational loads, including beyond design loads and negative environmental impact. Usually in that situation there is probability of equipment integrity failure, when the unit is at power, with severe defect downing. For instance, the coolant leak and potential development of initial penetration defect to critical dimensions. In other words, in fact, the final observable result is always one – formation and development of operational crack which jeopardizes design integrity of the component and, accordingly, seriously compromises the nuclear power unit operation. The proposed situational model is linked with real knowledge data base where generated situational pairs are stored. The expert system is used for knowledge data base formation. Actually the proposed system consists of two independent fuzzy systems. From mathematical tool point of view, the advantage of such systems combination is lack of defuzzification unit in the first system and fuzzification unit in the second one.

  15. Potential health and environmental impacts attributable to the nuclear and coal fuel cycles: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotchy, R.L.

    1987-06-01

    Estimates of mortality and morbidity are presented based on present-day knowledge of health effects resulting from current component designs and operations of the nuclear and coal fuel cycles, and anticipated emission rates and occupational exposure for the various fuel cycle facilities expected to go into operation during the next decade. The author concluded that, although there are large uncertainties in the estimates of potential health effects, the coal fuel cycle alternative has a greater health impact on man than the uranium fuel fycle. However, the increased risk of health effects for either fuel cycle represents a very small incremental risk to the average individual in the public for the balance of this century. The potential for large impacts exists in both fuel cycles, but the potential impacts associated with a runaway Greenhouse Effect from combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, cannot yet be reasonably quantified. Some of the potential environmental impacts of the coal fuel cycle cannot currently be realistically estimated, but those that can appear greater than those from the nuclear fuel cycle. 103 refs., 1 fig., 18 tabs

  16. New approaches of the potential field for QPSO algorithm applied to nuclear reactor reload problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau, Andressa dos Santos; Schirru, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Recently quantum-inspired version of the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm, Quantum Particle Swarm Optimization (QPSO) was proposed. The QPSO algorithm permits all particles to have a quantum behavior, where some sort of 'quantum motion' is imposed in the search process. When the QPSO is tested against a set of benchmarking functions, it showed superior performances as compared to classical PSO. The QPSO outperforms the classical one most of the time in convergence speed and achieves better levels for the fitness functions. The great advantage of QPSO algorithm is that it uses only one parameter control. The critical step or QPSO algorithm is the choice of suitable attractive potential field that can guarantee bound states for the particles moving in the quantum environment. In this article, one version of QPSO algorithm was tested with two types of potential well: delta-potential well harmonic oscillator. The main goal of this study is to show with of the potential field is the most suitable for use in QPSO in a solution of the Nuclear Reactor Reload Optimization Problem, especially in the cycle 7 of a Brazilian Nuclear Power Plant. All result were compared with the performance of its classical counterpart of the literature and shows that QPSO algorithm are well situated among the best alternatives for dealing with hard optimization problems, such as NRROP. (author)

  17. New approaches of the potential field for QPSO algorithm applied to nuclear reactor reload problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolau, Andressa dos Santos; Schirru, Roberto, E-mail: andressa@lmp.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    Recently quantum-inspired version of the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm, Quantum Particle Swarm Optimization (QPSO) was proposed. The QPSO algorithm permits all particles to have a quantum behavior, where some sort of 'quantum motion' is imposed in the search process. When the QPSO is tested against a set of benchmarking functions, it showed superior performances as compared to classical PSO. The QPSO outperforms the classical one most of the time in convergence speed and achieves better levels for the fitness functions. The great advantage of QPSO algorithm is that it uses only one parameter control. The critical step or QPSO algorithm is the choice of suitable attractive potential field that can guarantee bound states for the particles moving in the quantum environment. In this article, one version of QPSO algorithm was tested with two types of potential well: delta-potential well harmonic oscillator. The main goal of this study is to show with of the potential field is the most suitable for use in QPSO in a solution of the Nuclear Reactor Reload Optimization Problem, especially in the cycle 7 of a Brazilian Nuclear Power Plant. All result were compared with the performance of its classical counterpart of the literature and shows that QPSO algorithm are well situated among the best alternatives for dealing with hard optimization problems, such as NRROP. (author)

  18. Numerical indices for quantification of hydrogen mixing and deflagration potential in the nuclear reactor containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Nilesh, E-mail: nilesh_agrawal@igcar.gov.in [Safety Research Institute, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Government of India, Kalpakkam (India); Das, Sarit K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Four indices for mixing and deflagration potential of H{sub 2} distributions are presented. • Theoretical basis and significance are explained through illustrations. • The influence of steam condensation on H{sub 2} distributions is studied numerically. • The indices depict the rate of mixing and changes in deflagration potential. • Results show that the indices can give useful integral information for comparison. -- Abstract: Studies on hydrogen distribution in the nuclear reactor containment and the effect of a distribution on subsequent combustion are important to nuclear safety. Contour plots, concentration profiles and ternary diagrams are routinely used to represent a distribution. The significance to safety has to be qualitatively inferred from these representations. Thus, there is a need to quantify distributions in terms of gross parameters that are important to safety. In the present study, four numerical indices are developed to obtain quantitative information on the mixing and deflagration potential of a distribution of hydrogen, steam and air. Two indices, namely, Average mole fraction and Non-uniformity index can be used to give the state of mixing of hydrogen in an enclosure at any instant of time. Similarly, the other two indices, namely, deflagration volume fraction and deflagration pressure ratio can be used to indicate the relative size of combustible cloud and the expected pressure rise in case of deflagration in the cloud at any instant of time. The significance and utility of the indices are brought forth through simple illustrations and numerical studies on the influence of steam condensation on hydrogen distributions. The indices depict the rate of mixing and changes in deflagration potential for the situations considered. Results form the simple studies show that the indices can give useful integral information for comparison of mixing and mitigation measures deployed in the nuclear reactor containment.

  19. Evidence of tensor correlations in the nuclear many-body system using a modern NN potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiase, J.O.; Nkoma, J.S.; Sharmaand, L.K.; Hosaka, A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we show evidence of the importance of tensor correlations in the nuclear many-body system by calculating the effective two-body nuclear matrix elements in the frame work of the Lowest-Order Constrained Variational (LOCV) technique with two-body correlation functions using the Reid93 potential. We have achieved this by switching on and off the strength of the tensor correlations, α k . We have found that in order to obtain reasonable agreement with earlier calculations based on the G-matrix theory, we must turn on the strength of the tensor correlations especially in the triplet even (TE) and tensor even (TNE) channels to take the value of approximately, 0.05. As an application, we have estimated the value of the Landau - Migdal parameter, g' NN which we found to be g' NN = 0.65. This compares favorably with the G-matrix calculated value of g' NN = 0.54. (author)

  20. Nuclear heat generating plants - technical concepts and market potentials. Chapter 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenkopf, O.; Erhard, W.D.; Nonnenmacher, A.; Hanselmann, M.

    1988-01-01

    Within the framework of a case study under the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology project 'Nuclear heat generating plants - technological concepts and market potentials', the possible applications of such plants were studied giving the district heat supply network of the Technische Werke der Stadt Stuttgart AG (Technical Works of the City of Stuttgart, Inc.) as an example. The use of district heating systems concentrated specifically on areas identified for economical supply because of their topographical position, existing heat density, distance from power plants, and a reasonable delimination from the available gas network. Based on the results of optimization calculations made by the Stuttgart Institute for Nuclear Technology and Energy Conversion, the required investment capital can be estimated as a function of the amount of fuel savings under the Stuttgart case study. (orig./UA) [de

  1. Potential criticality accident at the General Electric Nuclear Fuel and Component Manufacturing Facility, May 29, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    At the General Electric Nuclear Fuel and Component Manufacturing facility, located near Wilmington, North Carolina, on May 28 and 29, 1991, approximately 150 kilograms of uranium were inadvertently transferred from safe process tanks to an unsafe tank located at the waste treatment facility, thus creating the potential for a localized criticality safety problem. The excess uranium was ultimately safely recovered when the tank contents were centrifuged to remove the uranium-bearing material. Subsequently, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission dispatched an Incident Investigation Team to determine what happened, to identify probable causes, and to make appropriate findings and conclusions. This report describes the incident, the methodology used by the team in its investigation, and presents the team's findings and conclusions. 48 figs., 8 tabs

  2. Determination of plutonium in nuclear fuel materials by controlled potential coulometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambolikar, A.S.; Pillai, Jisha S.; Sharma, M.K.; Kamat, J.V.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of Pu content in nuclear fuel materials is an important requirement for the purpose of chemical quality control, nuclear material accounting and process control. Biamperometry and potentiometry techniques are widely employed for the determination of Pu. These redox electroanalytical based methods are capable of meeting the requirements of high accuracy and precision using milligram amounts of the analyte. However, use of chemical reagents to carry out redox reactions in these methodologies generates radioactive liquid waste which needs to be processed to recover plutonium. In coulometric technique, change in the oxidation state of an electro active species is carried out by charge transfer on an electrode surface, hence chemical reagents as well as chemical standards required for the redox titration based methods are eliminated and analytical waste generated is free from metallic impurities. Therefore the determination of Pu in nuclear fuel materials by coulometry is an attractive option. In view of this, controlled potential coulometric methods have been developed in our laboratory for variety of applications at different stages of nuclear fuel cycle. In the early stage of coulometry developments in our laboratory, coulometers procured from EG and G Princeton Applied Research Corporation were employed. After prolong use, these instruments were showing ageing and hence indigenously built controlled potential coulometer was procured. Performance evaluation studies of these coulometers were reported from our laboratory for the determination of uranium and plutonium in working chemical assay standards. In this paper, we present studies carried out on the determination of plutonium in Pu-alloy and (U, Pu) C samples employing the same indigenous coulometer

  3. Bifurcations and chaos of classical trajectories in a deformed nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, J.; Arvieu, R.

    1982-10-01

    The purpose is to describe the general organization of the trajectories of a nucleon in a deformed potential both in phase space and in configuration space. This question gives rise to a very complex problem in a deformed potential. There one is in the frame of the theory of nonintegrable systems. Many very important mathematical theorems (like K.A.M. theorem) are needed as well as any results of bifurcation theory and also of numerical experiments. This work belongs entirely to classical mechanics. The main problems to be treated are: the organization of phase space, the connection with simple known limiting cases and bifurcation theory, and the occurrence of chaotic trajectories in a nuclear field. These problems must be solved as functions of the size, the deformation of the potential and the excitation energy of the particle

  4. Bifurcations and chaos of classical trajectories in a deformed nuclear potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonell, J; Arvieu, R

    1982-10-01

    The purpose is to describe the general organization of the trajectories of a nucleon in a deformed potential both in phase space and in configuration space. This question gives rise to a very complex problem in a deformed potential. There one is in the frame of the theory of nonintegrable systems. Many very important mathematical theorems (like K.A.M. theorem) are needed as well as any results of bifurcation theory and also of numerical experiments. This work belongs entirely to classical mechanics. The main problems to be treated are: the organization of phase space, the connection with simple known limiting cases and bifurcation theory, and the occurrence of chaotic trajectories in a nuclear field. These problems must be solved as functions of the size, the deformation of the potential and the excitation energy of the particle.

  5. Momentum dependence of the symmetry potential and its influence on nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhaoqing

    2011-01-01

    A Skyrme-type momentum-dependent nucleon-nucleon force distinguishing isospin effect is parametrized and further implemented in the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics model, which leads to a splitting of nucleon effective mass in nuclear matter. Based on the isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model, we investigate the influence of momentum-dependent symmetry potential on several isospin-sensitive observables in heavy-ion collisions. It is found that symmetry potentials with and without the momentum dependence but corresponding to the same density dependence of the symmetry energy result in different distributions of the observables. The midrapidity neutron/proton ratios at high transverse momenta and the excitation functions of the total π - /π + and K 0 /K + yields are particularly sensitive to the momentum dependence of the symmetry potential.

  6. Potential human factors research relating to modern technology in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketchel, J.; Fink, R.; Hanes, L.; Williges, R.; Williges, B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses proposed human factors research to address advanced human-machine interface technology in nuclear power plants. It relates to a current EPRI project to identify a prioritized list of specific research issues that could be assessed to improve control room and other user interface areas. The project seeks to bridge the gap between the functional requirements of advanced design initiatives and the human factors research needed to support them. It seeks to identify potential benefits to be expected, as well as potential problems that might be introduced by advanced technology. It provides an organized approach to identifying human factors research needs, information already available, and measures of performance and effectiveness that might be used to assess the value of potential improvements. Those parts of the proposed plan that are subsequently approved by EPRI management and by the utility advisory committee will provide a basis for recommending research priorities

  7. The Potential Of Fission Nuclear Energy In Resolving Global Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pevec, D.

    2015-01-01

    There is an international consensus on the need of drastic reduction of carbon emission if very serious global climate changes are to be avoided. At present target is to limit global temperature increase to 2 Degrees of C and to keep CO 2 concentration below 450 ppm, though some recent request by climatologists argue for lower limit of 1.5 Degrees of C. The carbon emission reduction has to be done in the next few decades, as climate effects are essentially determined by integral emission. The integral emissions should not exceed 1000 Gt CO 2 to keep the probability of exceeding global temperature by 2 Degrees of C below 25 percent. Consequently, when we consider energy sources that could produce carbon free energy we have to concentrate on the period not later than 2060-2065. The sources that can take the burden of reduction in the years up to 2065 are Renewable Energy Sources (RES) and nuclear fission energy. The potential of RES has been estimated by many organizations and individuals. Their predictions indicate that RES are not likely to be sufficient to replace carbon emitters and fulfill the 2 Degrees of C limit requirements. The nuclear fission energy can give a very serious and hopefully timely (unlike nuclear fusion) contribution to reduction of emission. Even with proven conventional reactors using once through fuel cycle without fuel reprocessing the nuclear build-up in the years 2025-2065 could reach 3330 GW. With this concept nuclear contribution of 94.5 EJ/y would be reached by 2065, while integral CO 2 emission savings would be about 500 Gt CO 2 by 2065. This shows that essential nuclear contribution is possible without the use of plutonium and fast breeders, technology not ready for climate-critical next 50 years and not acceptable in present political environment. This nuclear fission energy contribution along with contributions from renewable sources, energy saving, and increased efficiency in energy use can solve the climate problems. (author).

  8. Support to other nuclear waste disposal programmes considering clay as a potential host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volckaert, G.

    2009-01-01

    SCK-CEN started to study the Boom Clay as potential host rock for nuclear waste disposal in 1974. Since then, SCK-CEN has been involved in other international projects studying clay as potential host rock in order to get a broader support for disposal in clay and to acquire broader insight in clay behaviour. Besides Belgium, France and Switzerland are currently investigating clay formations as potential host rock for the disposal of radioactive waste. In the Netherlands, clay formations have always been considered as an alternative to disposal in salt. The general interest in clays is increasing: in Germany and The United Kingdom, it was decided a few years ago that besides respectively salt and crystalline rock also clays need to be evaluated. In Eastern and Central Europe, the Slovak republic and Lithuania consider both clay and granite as possible host rocks for spent fuel while in Russia recently a project was started to study the possible disposal of low and medium level waste in a clay formation in the Leningrad area. Within the EC research and development framework programs and the OECD/NEA Clay Club, collaborations were developed between countries studying clay and with a strong involvement of SCK-CEN. The collaboration with the Eastern and Central European countries is supported through the support programme of the Belgian Ministry of Economic affairs. The objectives of these co-operations are to deliver expert services to other nuclear waste disposal programs considering clay as host rock; to to acquire broader international recognition of our expertise and support for the development of nuclear waste disposal in clay; to get a broader insight in the properties and behaviour of clays

  9. Survey of networked control systems and their potential applications in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadri, A. [Univ. of Western Ontario, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, London, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: akadri@uwo.ca

    2006-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of networked control systems (NCSs) and their industrial applications. Most widely used NCSs based on fieldbus technologies; namely, ControlNet, Profibus (DP/PA), and Foundation Fieldbus have been discussed. The objectives and benefits of using such networks are presented and factors influencing their design and implementation are examined. Then, some of the special requirements in controlling nuclear power plant (NPP) have been considered. The potential of applying networked control systems in such installations has been discussed. Finally, the concept of wireless networked control systems is also described. (author)

  10. Survey of insulation used in nuclear power plants and the potential for debris generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolbe, R.; Gahan, E.

    1982-05-01

    In support of Unresolved Safety Issue, USI A-43, Containment emergency Sump Performance, 8 additional nuclear power plants (representative of different US reactor manufacturers and architect-engineers) were surveyed to identify and document the types and amounts of insulation used, location within containment, components insulated, material characteristics, and methods of installation and attachment. These plants were selected to obtain survey information on older plants and supplements information previously reported in NUREG/CR-2403. In addition, a preliminary assessment was made of the potential for migration to the emergency sump of the insulation debris which might be generated as a result of the postulated loss-of-coolant accident

  11. Economic Analyses and Potential Market of the 200MW Nuclear Heating Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yongqing; Wang, Guiying

    1992-01-01

    Based on the 5MW experimental nuclear heating reactor, Intent has developed a 200MW demonstration nuclear heating reactor. Owing to its simplified systems and low operating parameters, the NCR-200 has preferable investment in comparison with that of a nuclear power plant. The pre-feasibility studies for several cities in Northern China have shown that the heat cost of a NCR-200 can be competitive with a coal fired heating plant. As a safe, clean and economic heat source, the NCR could pose a large market in replacement of coal for heating. The R and D work performed up to now has demonstrated that the NCR-200 operating under the present parameters can supply low pressure steam for industrial process and co-generation to enhance it economic benefit. The NCR-200 could also serve a heat source for air condition by using Li Br refrigerator, this application is very interesting to some cities in Central and Southern China. The applications of the NCR in oil recovery by injecting hot water and transportation are very promising for some oil fields in North China. In addition, the study on sea water desalination using the NCR-200 is being carried out at present under international cooperation. All of these will expansion the possible application of the NCR. The paper presents the economic analysis and the potential market of the NCR-200

  12. Potential nuclear material safeguards applied to the Department of Energy's Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danker, W.J.; Floyd, W.

    1993-01-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) within the U.S. Department of Energy is charged with the responsibility of safe and efficient disposal of this Nation's civilian high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel. Part of this responsibility includes providing for the application of both domestic and international safeguards on nuclear material at facilities of the Civilian Waste Management System. While detailed safeguards requirements for these disposal facilities have yet to be established, once established, they could impact facility design. Accordingly, OCRWM has participated in efforts to develop safeguards approaches for geologic repositories and will continue to participate actively with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), as well as other Department of Energy (DOE) Offices in efforts to resolve safeguards issues related to spent fuel disposal, to minimize any potential design impacts and to support effective nuclear material safeguards. The following paper discusses current plants and issues related to the application of safeguards to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS)

  13. Potential for recycling of slightly radioactive metals arising from decommissioning within nuclear sector in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrncir, Tomas; Strazovec, Roman; Zachar, Matej

    2017-09-07

    The decommissioning of nuclear installations represents a complex process resulting in the generation of large amounts of waste materials containing various concentrations of radionuclides. Selection of an appropriate strategy of management of the mentioned materials strongly influences the effectiveness of decommissioning process keeping in mind safety, financial and other relevant aspects. In line with international incentives for optimization of radioactive material management, concepts of recycling and reuse of materials are widely discussed and applications of these concepts are analysed. Recycling of some portion of these materials within nuclear sector (e.g. scrap metals or concrete rubble) seems to be highly desirable from economical point of view and may lead to conserve some disposal capacity. However, detailed safety assessment along with cost/benefit calculations and feasibility study should be developed in order to prove the safety, practicality and cost effectiveness of possible recycling scenarios. Paper discussed the potential for recycling of slightly radioactive metals arising from decommissioning of NPPs within nuclear sector in Slovakia. Various available recycling scenarios are introduced and method for overall assessment of various recycling scenarios is outlined including the preliminary assessment of safety and financial aspects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Potential Signatures of Semi-volatile Compounds Associated With Nuclear Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Probasco, Kathleen M.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Maughan, A. D.

    2002-06-01

    Semi-volatile chemicals associated with nuclear processes (e.g., the reprocessing of uranium to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons, or the separation of actinides from processing waste streams), can provide sticky residues or signatures that will attach to piping, ducting, soil, water, or other surface media. Volatile compounds, that are more suitable for electro-optical sensing, have been well studied. However, the semi-volatile compounds have not been well documented or studied. A majority of these semi-volatile chemicals are more robust than typical gaseous or liquid chemicals and can have lifetimes of several weeks, months, or years in the environment. However, large data gaps exist concerning these potential signature compounds and more research is needed to fill these data gaps so that important signature information is not overlooked or discarded. This report investigates key semi-volatile compounds associated with nuclear separations, identifies available chemical and physical properties, and discusses the degradation products that would result from hydrolysis, radiolysis and oxidation reactions on these compounds.

  15. Bio fertilizer development incorporating nuclear technologies - Challenges and potentials to the industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairuddin Abdul Rahim; Phua, Choo Kwai Hoe; Ahmad Nazrul Abdul Wahid; Pauline, Liew Woan Ying; Ahamad Sahali Mardi; Mat Rasol Awang

    2010-01-01

    The development of bio fertilizer products, which involve incorporation of known microorganisms with desired functions, requires sterilisation of the carriers or substrates. Conventional sterilisation method using heat treatment or autoclaving has its limitations, especially in mass production of bio fertilizers. The Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA) through its Bio fertilizer Project Group encourages the use of gamma irradiation for carrier sterilisation, capitalising on the quality of the final products following proper sterilisation. Gamma irradiation at doses of 30 to 50 kGy was found suitable for sterilisation, depending on the carrier materials. More deliberation is needed for bio fertilizer companies far away from the gamma irradiation facilities to utilise gamma irradiation services for their bio fertilizer carriers, on aspects of cost of transportation, sterilisation, storage and convenience of use. Evaluation of bio fertilizer products on crops in the field need to be conducted to assess their efficacy. Several isotope-aided trials have been conducted to evaluate nutrient use efficiency of several formulations of Nuclear Malaysia bio fertilizer products, involving vegetable and herbal crops, with varying results. The paper highlights trials in Nuclear Malaysia and Cameron Highlands. Presently, product evaluation is limited to use of the stable isotope, nitrogen-15, in particular when considering radiation safety in field trials. Having joint trials involving potential end users is still a challenge. (author)

  16. α-decay half-lives of some nuclei from ground state to ground state using different nuclear potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akrawy Dashty T.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical α-decay half-lives of some nuclei from ground state to ground state are calculated using different nuclear potential model including Coulomb proximity potential (CPPM, Royer proximity potential and Broglia and Winther 1991. The calculated values comparing with experimental data, it is observed that the CPPM model is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Utilization of Used Nuclear Fuel in a Potential Future US Fuel Cycle Scenario - 13499

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. BOX 2008 MS6172, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831-6172 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    To date, the US reactor fleet has generated approximately 68,000 MTHM of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and even with no new nuclear build in the US, this stockpile will continue to grow at approximately 2,000 MTHM per year for several more decades. In the absence of reprocessing and recycle, this UNF is a liability and needs to be dealt with accordingly. However, with the development of future fuel cycle and reactor technologies in the decades ahead, there is potential for UNF to be used effectively and efficiently within a future US nuclear reactor fleet. Based on the detailed expected operating lifetimes, the future UNF discharges from the existing reactor fleet have been calculated on a yearly basis. Assuming a given electricity demand growth in the US and a corresponding growth demand for nuclear energy via new nuclear build, the future discharges of UNF have also been calculated on a yearly basis. Using realistic assumptions about reprocessing technologies and timescales and which future fuels are likely to be reprocessed, the amount of plutonium that could be separated and stored for future reactor technologies has been determined. With fast reactors (FRs) unlikely to be commercially available until 2050, any new nuclear build prior to then is assumed to be a light water reactor (LWR). If the decision is made for the US to proceed with reprocessing by 2030, the analysis shows that the UNF from future fuels discharged from 2025 onwards from the new and existing fleet of LWRs is sufficient to fuel a realistic future demand from FRs. The UNF arising from the existing LWR fleet prior to 2025 can be disposed of directly with no adverse effect on the potential to deploy a FR fleet from 2050 onwards. Furthermore, only a proportion of the UNF is required to be reprocessed from the existing fleet after 2025. All of the analyses and conclusions are based on realistic deployment timescales for reprocessing and reactor deployment. The impact of the delay in recycling the UNF

  18. Utilization of Used Nuclear Fuel in a Potential Future US Fuel Cycle Scenario - 13499

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worrall, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    To date, the US reactor fleet has generated approximately 68,000 MTHM of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and even with no new nuclear build in the US, this stockpile will continue to grow at approximately 2,000 MTHM per year for several more decades. In the absence of reprocessing and recycle, this UNF is a liability and needs to be dealt with accordingly. However, with the development of future fuel cycle and reactor technologies in the decades ahead, there is potential for UNF to be used effectively and efficiently within a future US nuclear reactor fleet. Based on the detailed expected operating lifetimes, the future UNF discharges from the existing reactor fleet have been calculated on a yearly basis. Assuming a given electricity demand growth in the US and a corresponding growth demand for nuclear energy via new nuclear build, the future discharges of UNF have also been calculated on a yearly basis. Using realistic assumptions about reprocessing technologies and timescales and which future fuels are likely to be reprocessed, the amount of plutonium that could be separated and stored for future reactor technologies has been determined. With fast reactors (FRs) unlikely to be commercially available until 2050, any new nuclear build prior to then is assumed to be a light water reactor (LWR). If the decision is made for the US to proceed with reprocessing by 2030, the analysis shows that the UNF from future fuels discharged from 2025 onwards from the new and existing fleet of LWRs is sufficient to fuel a realistic future demand from FRs. The UNF arising from the existing LWR fleet prior to 2025 can be disposed of directly with no adverse effect on the potential to deploy a FR fleet from 2050 onwards. Furthermore, only a proportion of the UNF is required to be reprocessed from the existing fleet after 2025. All of the analyses and conclusions are based on realistic deployment timescales for reprocessing and reactor deployment. The impact of the delay in recycling the UNF

  19. Probability estimation of potential harm to human health and life caused by a hypothetical nuclear accident at the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviov, Vladyslav; Pysmenniy, Yevgen

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes some general methodological aspects of the assessment of the damage to human life and health caused by a hypothetical nuclear accident at the nuclear power plant (NPP). Probability estimation of death (due to cancer and non-cancer effects of radiation injury), disability and incapacity of individuals were made by taking into account the regulations of Ukraine. According to the assessment, the probability of death due to cancer and non-cancer effects of radiation damage to individuals who received radiation dose of 1 Sv is equal to 0.09. Probability of disability of 1, 2 or 3 group regardless of the radiation dose is 0.009, 0.0054, 0.027, respectively. Probability of temporary disability of the individual who received dose equal to 33 mSv (the level of potential exposure in a hypothetical nuclear accident at the NPP) is equal 0.16. This probability estimation of potential harm to human health and life caused by a hypothetical nuclear accident can be used for NPP in different countries using requirements of regulations in these countries. And also to estimate the amount of insurance payments due to the nuclear damage in the event of a nuclear accident at the NPP or other nuclear industry enterprise. (author)

  20. Under-examined aspects of the potential environmental effects of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacCracken, M.C.; Penner, J.E.

    1987-07-01

    In addition to destroying the area near the explosions, a nuclear war would lead to injection of a wide range of substances into the environment, both as a result of the delivery systems and explosions themselves and as a consequence of the blast, fires, and resulting destruction and disruption. While addressing the many remaining uncertainties concerning the effects of smoke injections on climate is the major topic of present research, there are a number of other potential impacts that could have major consequences, but which are currently poorly understood and have not yet been carefully examined. These under-examined effects include perturbations to atmospheric chemistry, the effects of injections of dust and water (which could create ice particles), the consequences of emissions from the smoldering phase of the fires, resuspension of materials due to perturbed surface conditions, and a range of other potential consequences

  1. Industrial environmental monitoring in non nuclear industry which potential to generate TENORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronica Tuka

    2011-01-01

    Constitution of the Republic of Indonesia Year 1945 states that the environment is good and healthy life is a human rights and constitutional rights of every citizen of Indonesia. In Indonesia has many industrial and mining activities that produce Norm (Naturally occurring Radioactive Materials) and TENORM (technologically Enhanced Naturally occurring Radioactive Materials). TENORM is a natural radioactive material which due to human activity or process technology increases the potential exposure when compared to the initial state and the potential radiological impact either external or internal radiation exposure. BAPETEN must ensure that the activities undertaken by non-nuclear industry, especially in the handling of radioactive waste at Norm and TENORM which can lead to chronic exposure, carried out securely and safely, both for workers, public and the environment. (author)

  2. Geopolymers and their potential applications in the nuclear waste management field. A bibliographical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantarel, Vincent; Motooka, Takafumi; Yamagishi, Isao

    2017-06-01

    After a necessary decay time, the zeolites used for the water decontamination will eventually be conditioned for their long-term storage. Geopolymer is considered as a potential matrix to manage radioactive cesium and strontium containing waste. For such applications, a correct comprehension of the binder structure, its macroscopic properties, its interactions with the waste and the physico-chemical phenomena occurring in the wasteform is needed to be able to judge of the soundness and viability of the material. Although the geopolymer is a young binder, a lot of research has been carried out over the last fifty years and our understanding of this matrix and its potential applications is progressing fast. This review aims at gathering the actual knowledge on geopolymer studies about geopolymer composites, geopolymer as a confinement matrix for nuclear wastes and geopolymer under irradiation. This information will finally provide guidance for the future studies and experiments. (author)

  3. Geologic and hydrologic investigations of a potential nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, M.D.; Yount, J.C. (eds.)

    1988-12-31

    Yucca Mountain in southern Nye County, Nevada, has been selected by the United States Department of Energy as one of three potential sites for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository. Its deep water table, closed-basin ground-water flow, potentially favorable host rock, and sparse population have made the Yucca Mountain area a viable candidate during the search for a nuclear waste disposal site. Yucca Mountain, however, lies within the southern Great Basin, a region of known contemporary tectonism and young volcanic activity, and the characterization of tectonism and volcanism remains as a fundamental problem for the Yucca Mountain site. The United States Geological Survey has been conducting extensive studies to evaluate the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain, as well as the timing and rates of tectonic and volcanic activity in the region. A workshop was convened by the Geologic Survey in Denver, Colorado, on August 19, 20, and 21, 1985, to review the scientific progress and direction of these studies. Considerable debate resulted. This collection of papers represents the results of some of the studies presented at the workshop, but by no means covers all of the scientific results and viewpoints presented. Rather, the volume is meant to serve as a progress report on some of the studies within the Geological Survey`s continuing research program toward characterizing the tectonic framework of Yucca Mountain. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

  4. The potential for microbial life in a Canadian high-level nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S.

    1989-12-01

    Recent studies have concluded that microbial contamination of a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault is inevitable. Factors that will affect the development of substantial population of micro-organisms include: physiological tolerance of microbes; fluid movement in a vault; availability of nutrients; and availability of energy sources. It is difficult to resolve whether microbial growth will either positively or negatively affect the performance of a vault. One of the necessary steps towards ultimately answering this question is to assess the potential for microbial growth in a disposal vault, based on a nutrient and energy budget. This report gives a quantitative (but conservative) inventory of nutrients and potential energy sources present in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste vault, which hypothetically could support the growth of micro-organisms. Maximum population densities are calculated based on these inventories and assuming that all conditions for microbial growth are optimal, although this will certainly not be the case. Laboratory studies under the vault-relevant conditions are being performed to put realistic boundaries on the calculated numbers. Initial results from these studies, combined with data from a natural analogue site indicate that the calculated population densities could be overestimated by four to five orders of magnitude. Limited data show no effect of the presence of microbes on the transport of Tc, I, and Sr in backfill sand columns. Additional work is needed to address transport effects on buffer and backfill clay columns

  5. Geologic and hydrologic investigations of a potential nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, M.D.; Yount, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Yucca Mountain in southern Nye County, Nevada, has been selected by the United States Department of Energy as one of three potential sites for the nation's first high-level nuclear waste repository. Its deep water table, closed-basin ground-water flow, potentially favorable host rock, and sparse population have made the Yucca Mountain area a viable candidate during the search for a nuclear waste disposal site. Yucca Mountain, however, lies within the southern Great Basin, a region of known contemporary tectonism and young volcanic activity, and the characterization of tectonism and volcanism remains as a fundamental problem for the Yucca Mountain site. The United States Geological Survey has been conducting extensive studies to evaluate the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain, as well as the timing and rates of tectonic and volcanic activity in the region. A workshop was convened by the Geologic Survey in Denver, Colorado, on August 19, 20, and 21, 1985, to review the scientific progress and direction of these studies. Considerable debate resulted. This collection of papers represents the results of some of the studies presented at the workshop, but by no means covers all of the scientific results and viewpoints presented. Rather, the volume is meant to serve as a progress report on some of the studies within the Geological Survey's continuing research program toward characterizing the tectonic framework of Yucca Mountain. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base

  6. Probabilistic risk assessment from potential exposures to the public applied for innovative nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorzhak, Alla; Mora, Juan C.; Robles, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Potential exposures are those that may occur as a result of unanticipated operational performance or accidents. Potential exposure situations are probabilistic in nature because they depend on uncertain events such as equipment failure, operator errors or external initiators beyond the control of the operator. Consequently, there may exist a range of possible radiological impacts that need to be considered. In this paper a Level 3 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for a hypothetical scenario relevant to Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems (INS) was conducted using computer code MACCS (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code Systems). The acceptability of an INS was analyzed taking into account the general requirement that relocation or evacuation measures must not be necessary beyond the site boundary. In addition, deterministic modeling of the accident consequences for the critical meteorological conditions was carried out using the JRODOS decision support system (Real-time On-line Decision Support system for off-site emergency management in Europe). The approach used for dose and risk assessment from potential exposure of accidental releases and their comparison with acceptance criteria are presented. The methodology described can be used as input to the licensing procedure and engineering design considerations to help satisfy relevant health and environmental impact criteria for fission or fusion nuclear installations. - Highlights: • PSA Level-3 based on WinMACCS code is carried out for accidental release. • Family curves of percentiles for radiation exposure doses are constructed. • Risk indicators for potential exposure are defined. • Using of risk acceptance curve criteria is proposed for decision making process.

  7. Effect of deformation and orientation on spin orbit density dependent nuclear potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rajni; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-11-01

    Role of deformation and orientation is investigated on spin-orbit density dependent part VJ of nuclear potential (VN=VP+VJ) obtained within semi-classical Thomas Fermi approach of Skyrme energy density formalism. Calculations are performed for 24-54Si+30Si reactions, with spherical target 30Si and projectiles 24-54Si having prolate and oblate shapes. The quadrupole deformation β2 is varying within range of 0.023 ≤ β2 ≤0.531 for prolate and -0.242 ≤ β2 ≤ -0.592 for oblate projectiles. The spin-orbit dependent potential gets influenced significantly with inclusion of deformation and orientation effect. The spin-orbit barrier and position gets significantly influenced by both the sign and magnitude of β2-deformation. Si-nuclei with β220. The possible role of spin-orbit potential on barrier characteristics such as barrier height, barrier curvature and on the fusion pocket is also probed. In reference to prolate and oblate systems, the angular dependence of spin-orbit potential is further studied on fusion cross-sections.

  8. Study of various models of nuclear interaction potentials: nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, H.

    1984-01-01

    Several models, performed within a mean field theory, are developed for the calculation of nucleon-nucleus interaction potentials. The first part of the thesis deals with the nucleon-nucleus average interaction. It is mainly devoted to the calculation of dynamical corrections to the Hartree-Fock approximation. Two approaches are used: a microscopic model performed in the framework of the nuclear structure approach and a semi-phenomenological one, based on the application of the dispersion relations to the empirical imaginary potential. Both models take into account finite size effects like collectivity or threshold effects which are important at low energy. The Green's function properties are used for both models. The second part of this work is devoted to the interaction potential between two heavy ions. This calculation, which is performed in the framework of the sudden approximation, uses the energy density formalism (Thomas-Fermi approximation). It has been extended to finite temperature. At T=0 the experimental fusion barriers of heavy systems are reproduced within 4%. Their temperature dependence is studied. The proximity scaling is checked and a universal function is obtained at T=0 and at finite temperature. It is found that the proximity theorem is well satisfied on the average. The dispersion around the mean behaviour increases with increasing temperature. At last, P+A* and α+A* interaction potentials are calculated within a double folding model using a schematic effective interaction [fr

  9. The role of spin-orbit potential in nuclear prolate-shape dominance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahara, Satoshi, E-mail: staka@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp [Kyorin University, School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Onishi, Naoki [University of Tokyo (Japan); University of Yamanashi (Japan); Shimizu, Yoshifumi R. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Tajima, Naoki [Department of Applied Physics, University of Fukui, 3-9-1 Bunkyo, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)

    2011-08-26

    It is confirmed, in terms of the Woods-Saxon-Strutinsky method, that the spin-orbit potential plays a decisive role in the predominance of prolate deformation, which has been a long standing problem in nuclear physics. It is originated from the combined effects of the spin-orbit coupling and the diffused surface of the potential, in agreement with the previous work based on a more schematic Nilsson-Strutinsky method. The degree of prolate-shape dominance exhibits an oscillatory behavior with respect to the strength of spin-orbit potential and, the prolate-shape dominance is realized at the proper strength of the spin-orbit potential together with the standard surface diffuseness; this oscillatory behavior disappears in case of small diffuseness corresponding to ellipsoidal cavity. The calculated energy differences between oblate and prolate minima in this Letter are consistent with those of our extensive self-consistent calculations of the Hartree-Fock + BCS method with the Skyrme interaction.

  10. The role of spin-orbit potential in nuclear prolate-shape dominance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahara, Satoshi; Onishi, Naoki; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.; Tajima, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    It is confirmed, in terms of the Woods-Saxon-Strutinsky method, that the spin-orbit potential plays a decisive role in the predominance of prolate deformation, which has been a long standing problem in nuclear physics. It is originated from the combined effects of the spin-orbit coupling and the diffused surface of the potential, in agreement with the previous work based on a more schematic Nilsson-Strutinsky method. The degree of prolate-shape dominance exhibits an oscillatory behavior with respect to the strength of spin-orbit potential and, the prolate-shape dominance is realized at the proper strength of the spin-orbit potential together with the standard surface diffuseness; this oscillatory behavior disappears in case of small diffuseness corresponding to ellipsoidal cavity. The calculated energy differences between oblate and prolate minima in this Letter are consistent with those of our extensive self-consistent calculations of the Hartree-Fock + BCS method with the Skyrme interaction.

  11. Radioecological consequences of a potential accident during transport of spent nuclear fuel along an Arctic coastline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iosjpe, M.; Reistad, O.; Amundsen, I.B.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents results pertaining to a risk assessment of the potential consequences of a hypothetical accident occurring during the transportation by ship of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) along an Arctic coastline. The findings are based on modelling of potential releases of radionuclides, radionuclide transport and uptake in the marine environment. Modelling work has been done using a revised box model developed at the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. Evaluation of the radioecological consequences of a potential accident in the southern part of the Norwegian Current has been made on the basis of calculated collective dose to man, individual doses for the critical group, concentrations of radionuclides in seafood and doses to marine organisms. The results of the calculations indicate a large variability in the investigated parameters above mentioned. On the basis of the calculated parameters the maximum total activity ('accepted accident activity') in the ship, when the parameters that describe the consequences after the examined potential accident are still in agreement with the recommendations and criterions for protection of the human population and the environment, has been evaluated

  12. Combined therapeutic potential of nuclear receptors with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wairagu, Peninah M.; Park, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jihye; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Yeh, Byung-Il; Jung, Soon-Hee; Yong, Suk-Joong; Jeong, Yangsik

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The 48 NR genes and 48 biological anti-cancer targets are profiled in paired-cells. • Growth inhibition by NR ligands or TKIs is target receptor level-dependent. • T0901317 with gefitinib/PHA665752 shows additive growth inhibition in lung cells. - Abstract: Cancer heterogeneity is a big hurdle in achieving complete cancer treatment, which has led to the emergence of combinational therapy. In this study, we investigated the potential use of nuclear receptor (NR) ligands for combinational therapy with other anti-cancer drugs. We first profiled all 48 NRs and 48 biological anti-cancer targets in four pairs of lung cell lines, where each pair was obtained from the same patient. Two sets of cell lines were normal and the corresponding tumor cell lines while the other two sets consisted of primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines. Analysis of the expression profile revealed 11 NRs and 15 cancer targets from the two pairs of normal versus tumor cell lines, and 9 NRs and 9 cancer targets from the primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines had distinct expression patterns in each category. Finally, the evaluation of nuclear receptor ligand T0901317 for liver X receptor (LXR) demonstrated its combined therapeutic potential with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The combined treatment of cMET inhibitor PHA665752 or EGFR inhibitor gefitinib with T0901317 showed additive growth inhibition in both H2073 and H1993 cells. Mechanistically, the combined treatment suppressed cell cycle progression by inhibiting cyclinD1 and cyclinB expression. Taken together, this study provides insight into the potential use of NR ligands in combined therapeutics with other biological anti-cancer drugs

  13. Evaluation of a seafloor nuclear power supply and its potential applications. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The seafloor nuclear power supply (SNPS) concept has been proposed by Atomics International (AI) and Lockheed Petroleum Services, Ltd. (LPS) as a source of electrical energy for subsea pumping of petroleum products. It consists of a small nuclear reactor, moderated by zirconium hydride (ZrH) and cooled by liquid metal (NaK), which drives a 3-MW turbine/generator system using toluene as the working fluid. Arthur D. Little, Inc., was selected to assess the technical and economic feasibility of a SNPS, and to determine if potential applications for a SNPS might exist in offshore-oil-field development schemes where conventional power supplies could not be used. It was determined that the concept is technically feasible, with regard to the nuclear, marine, electrical, and petroleum engineering aspects. However, its initial cost of $14 million and operating expenses of $900,000 per year are considerably more in each case than the costs of conventional alternative power supplies. For the type of field development proposed as an example by LPS, a combination of gas turbines and dc cables would cost about $8 million. Fuel in the form of gas from the wells would be available at near-zero cost in almost all cases of field development, so that operating expenses would be minimal. Other power supply and cable systems were investigated, up to lengths of 200 miles. Alternating-current systems are preferred at distances less than 20 miles; direct current is more economical at greater distances. No set of circumstances was found in which oil field development is likely to occur and for which the SNPS offers uniquely attractive capabilities

  14. The potential of laser cutting and snake arm robots in aspects of nuclear decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, Paul; Khan, Ali

    2013-01-01

    This paper will describe recent work conducted in the UK to highlight the potential of applying high power laser cutting to aspects of decommissioning and dismantling in the nuclear sector. A major driver for this activity is size reduction of metallic structures, vessels and tubing, with the objective of efficient stacking of the cut parts for future long term storage. TWI have used a standard 5 kW multi-mode laser with fibre optic delivery of the beam, to demonstrate techniques for cutting stainless steel tubing, at diameters up to 150 mm and wall thicknesses up to 7 mm, and various thicknesses of plate materials. Using specially developed cutting heads, employing long focal length lenses to form the beam, techniques were developed to allow the cutting of tubes from one side only and without changing the focal position of the laser beam with respect to the diameter of the tube perpendicular to the incident beam. The latter means that remote programming of the cutting path becomes much simpler. For cutting plate materials, special gas nozzle dynamics have produced great tolerance of the cutting process to stand-off distance (the distance between the surface of the material being cut and the exit of the cutting nozzle). One particularly interesting method of remote deployment of these cutting techniques is to use 'snake arm' robots. These robots, by nature of their construction, can access areas un-accessible using other techniques. This of course makes them particularly suited to aspects of nuclear decommissioning, particularly in what are termed 'un-structured environments', where the exact disposition of items encountered is not known. The paper will also describe the first time a laser cutting head has been installed on the end of a snake arm robot and the combination used in a simulated nuclear cutting application. (author)

  15. Centrifugal micro-fluidic platform for radiochemistry: Potentialities for the chemical analysis of nuclear spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruchet, Anthony; Mariet, Clarisse; Taniga, Velan; Descroix, Stephanie; Malaquin, Laurent; Goutelard, Florence

    2013-01-01

    The use of a centrifugal micro-fluidic platform is for the first time reported as an alternative to classical chromatographic procedures for radiochemistry. The original design of the micro-fluidic platform has been thought to fasten and simplify the prototyping process with the use of a circular platform integrating four rectangular microchips made of thermoplastic. The microchips, dedicated to anion-exchange chromatographic separations, integrate a localized monolithic stationary phase as well as injection and collection reservoirs. The results presented here were obtained with a simplified simulated nuclear spent fuel sample composed of non-radioactive isotopes of Europium and Uranium, in proportion usually found for uranium oxide nuclear spent fuel. While keeping the analytical results consistent with the conventional procedure (extraction yield for Europium of ∼97%), the use of the centrifugal micro-fluidic platform allowed to reduce the volume of liquid needed by a factor of ∼250. Thanks to their unique 'easy-to-use' features, centrifugal micro-fluidic platforms are potential successful candidates for the down-scaling of chromatographic separation of radioactive samples (automation, multiplexing, easy integration in glove-boxes environment and low cost of maintenance). (authors)

  16. Potentially of using vertical and three dimensional isolation systems in nuclear structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Zhiuang; Wong, Jenna; Mahin, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Although the horizontal component of an earthquake response can be significantly reduced through the use of conventional seismic isolators, the vertical component of excitation is still transmitted directly into the structure. Records from instrumented structures, and some recent tests and analyses have actually seen increases in vertical responses in base isolated structures under the combined effects of horizontal and vertical ground motions. This issue becomes a great concern to facilities such as a Nuclear Power Plants (NPP), with specialized equipment and machinery that is not only expensive, but critical to safe operation. As such, there is considerable interest worldwide in vertical and three-dimensional (3D) isolation systems. This paper examines several vertical and 3D isolation systems that have been proposed and their potential application to modern nuclear facilities. In particular, a series of case study analyses of a modern NPP model are performed to examine the benefits and challenges associated with 3D isolation compared with horizontal isolation. It was found that compared with the general horizontal isolators, isolators that have vertical frequencies of no more than 3 Hz can effectively reduce the vertical in-structure responses for the studied NPP model. Among the studied cases, the case that has a vertical isolation frequency of 3 Hz is the one that can keep the horizontal period of the isolators as the first period while having the most flexible vertical isolator properties. When the vertical frequency of isolators reduces to 1 Hz, the rocking effect is obvious and rocking restraining devices are necessary

  17. Atmospheric Dispersion Assessment for Potential Accidental Releases at Yonggwang Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Man Gyun; Sim, Young Rok; Jung, Chul Kee; Lee, Goung Jin; Kim, Soong Pyung; Chung, Sung Tai

    2000-01-01

    XOQ DW code is currently used to assess the atmospheric dispersion for the routine releases of radioactive gaseous effluents at Yonggwang nuclear power plants. This code was developed based on XOQDOQ code and an additional code is required to assess the atmospheric dispersion for potential accidental releases. In order to assess the atmospheric dispersion for the accidental releases, XOQAR code has been developed by using PAVAN code that is based on Reg. Guide 1.145. The terrain data of XOQ DW code inputs and the relative concentrations (X/Q) of XOQ DW code outputs are used as the inputs of the XOQAR code through the interface with XOQ DW code. By using this code, the maximum values of X/Q at exclusion area and low population zone boundaries except for sea areas were assessed as 1.33 x 10 -4 and 7.66 x 10 -6 sec/m 3 , respectively. Through the development of this code, a code system is prepared for assessing the atmospheric dispersion for the accidental releases as well as the routine releases. This developed code can be used for other domestic nuclear power plants by modifying the terrain input data

  18. Potentially of using vertical and three dimensional isolation systems in nuclear structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhiuang [Research Institute of Structural Engineering and Disaster Reduction, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Wong, Jenna [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley (United States); Mahin, Stephen [University of California, Berkeley (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Although the horizontal component of an earthquake response can be significantly reduced through the use of conventional seismic isolators, the vertical component of excitation is still transmitted directly into the structure. Records from instrumented structures, and some recent tests and analyses have actually seen increases in vertical responses in base isolated structures under the combined effects of horizontal and vertical ground motions. This issue becomes a great concern to facilities such as a Nuclear Power Plants (NPP), with specialized equipment and machinery that is not only expensive, but critical to safe operation. As such, there is considerable interest worldwide in vertical and three-dimensional (3D) isolation systems. This paper examines several vertical and 3D isolation systems that have been proposed and their potential application to modern nuclear facilities. In particular, a series of case study analyses of a modern NPP model are performed to examine the benefits and challenges associated with 3D isolation compared with horizontal isolation. It was found that compared with the general horizontal isolators, isolators that have vertical frequencies of no more than 3 Hz can effectively reduce the vertical in-structure responses for the studied NPP model. Among the studied cases, the case that has a vertical isolation frequency of 3 Hz is the one that can keep the horizontal period of the isolators as the first period while having the most flexible vertical isolator properties. When the vertical frequency of isolators reduces to 1 Hz, the rocking effect is obvious and rocking restraining devices are necessary.

  19. Potential threat to licensed nuclear activities from insiders (insider study). Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, S.A.; Davidson, J.J.; Jones, H.B. Jr.

    1980-07-01

    The Insider Study was undertaken by NRC staff at the request of the Commission. Its objectives were to: (1) determine the characteristics of potential insider adversaries to licensed nuclear activities; (2) examine security system vulnerabilities to insider adversaries; and (3) assess the effectiveness of techniques used to detect or prevent insider malevolence. The study analyzes insider characteristics as revealed in incidents of theft or sabotage that occurred in the nuclear industry, analogous industries, government agencies, and the military. Adversary characteristics are grouped into four categories: position-related, behavioral, resource and operational. It also analyzes (1) the five security vulnerabilities that most frequently accounted for the success of the insider crimes in the data base; (2) the 11 means by which insider crimes were most often detected; and (3) four major and six lesser methods aimed at preventing insider malevolence. In addition to case history information, the study contains data derived from non-NRC studies and from interviews with over 100 security experts in industry, government (federal and state), and law enforcement

  20. Studies on nuclear fusion energy potential based on a long-term world energy and environment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokimatsu, K.; Fujino, J.; Asaoka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates introduction conditions and potential of nuclear fusion energy as energy supply and CO 2 mitigation technologies in the 21st century. Time horizon of the 21st century, 10 regionally allocated world energy/environment model (Linearized Dynamic New Earth 21) is used for this study. Following nuclear fusion technological data are taken into consideration: cost of electricity (COE) in nuclear fusion introduction year, annual COE reduction rates, regional introduction year, and maximum regional plant capacity constraints by maximum plant construction speed. We made simulation under a constraint of atmospheric CO 2 concentration of 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv) targeted at year 2100, assuming that sequestration technologies and unknown innovative technologies for CO 2 reduction are available. The results indicate that under the 550ppm scenario with nuclear fusion within maximum construction speed, 66mill/kWh is required for introducing nuclear fusion in 2050, 92 mill/kWh in 2060, and 106 mill/kWh in 2070. Therefore, tokamak type nuclear fusion reactors of present several reactor cost estimates are expected to be introduced between 2060 and 2070, and electricity generation fraction by nuclear fusion will go around 20% in 2100 if nuclear fusion energy growth is limited only by the maximum construction speed. CO 2 reduction by nuclear fusion introduced in 2050 from business-as-usual (BAU) scenario without nuclear fusion is about 20% of total reduction amount in 2100. In conclusion, nuclear fusion energy is revealed to be one of the candidates of energy supply technologies and CO 2 mitigation technologies. Cost competitiveness and removal of capacity constraint factors are desired for use of nuclear fusion energy in a large scale. (author)

  1. Possible experiments to distinguish between different methods of treating the Pauli principle in nuclear potential models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolle, D.; Assenbaum, H.J.; Funck, C.; Langanke, K.

    1987-01-01

    The finite Pauli repulsion model of Walliser and Nakaichi-Maeda and the orthogonality condition model are two microscopically motivated potential models for the description of nuclear collisions which, however, differ from each other in the way they incorporate antisymmetrization effects into the nucleus-nucleus interaction. We have used α+α scattering at low energies as a tool to distinguish between the two different treatments of the Pauli principle. Both models are consistent with the presently available on-shell (elastic) and off-shell (bremsstrahlung) data. We suggest further measurements of α+α bremsstrahlung including the coplanar laboratory differential cross section in Harvard geometry at α-particle angles of around 27 0 and the γ-decay width of the 4 + resonance at E/sub c.m./ = 11.4 MeV, because in both cases the two models make significantly different predictions

  2. The Economic Potential of Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems Producing Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cutler, Dylan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores-Espino, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stark, Greg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-04-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that Idaho National Laboratory and the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis are publishing that address the technical and economic aspects of nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems (N-R HESs). This report discusses an analysis of the economic potential of a tightly coupled N-R HES that produces electricity and hydrogen. Both low and high temperature electrolysis options are considered in the analysis. Low-temperature electrolysis requires only electricity to convert water to hydrogen. High temperature electrolysis requires less electricity because it uses both electricity and heat to provide the energy necessary to electrolyze water. The study finds that, to be profitable, the examined high-temperature electrosis and low-temperature electrosis N-R HES configurations that produce hydrogen require higher electricity prices, more electricity price volatility, higher natural gas prices, or higher capacity payments than the reference case values of these parameters considered in this analysis.

  3. International Court of Justice on Potential Transboundary Damage and its Consequences in Nuclear Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cletienne, M.

    2010-01-01

    On 4 May 2006, Argentina filed in the International Court of Justice ('ICJ') an application instituting proceedings against Uruguay. Argentina claimed that Uruguay, by authorizing the construction of a pulp mill (the 'CMB mill') and the construction and commissioning of another pulp mill (the 'Orion mill'), breached its obligations under the 1975 Statute of the River Uruguay, a treaty between Argentina and Uruguay, notably the obligation to take all necessary measures for the optimum and rational utilisation of the River Uruguay. On 20 April 2010,1 the court rendered its decision settling this environmental dispute between Argentina and Uruguay. This paper will first summarize the judgement and then consider the main contribution of this decision to international environmental law, e.g. the recognition of an international customary rule to conduct an environmental impact assessment. Finally, the potential consequences of the decision in nuclear law will be addressed in the last part

  4. The potential for vault-induced seismicity in nuclear fuel waste disposal: experience from Canadian mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.D.; Chandler, N.A.

    1996-12-01

    A seismic event which causes damage to an underground opening is called a rockburst. Practical experience indicates that these damaging seismic events are associated with deep mines where extraction ratios are greater than 0.6. For the arrangement being considered by AECL for nuclear fuel waste disposal vaults, extraction ratios, for the room and pillar design, will be less than 0.3. At this extraction ratio the stress magnitudes will not be sufficient to induce seismic events that can damage the underground openings. Documented world-wide experience shows that unless the underground opening is very close to the source of a naturally occurring seismic event, such as an earthquake, the opening will also not experience any significant damage. Backfilling a disposal vault will improve its resistance to earthquake damage. Backfilling a disposal vault will also reduce the total convergence of the openings caused by thermal loads and hence minimize the potential for thermally-induced seismic events. (author)

  5. Nuclear fusion and its large potential for the future world energy supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ongena Jef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An overview of the energy problem in the world is presented. The colossal task of ‘decarbonizing’ the current energy system, with ~85% of the primary energy produced from fossil sources is discussed. There are at the moment only two options that can contribute to a solution: renewable energy (sun, wind, hydro, etc. or nuclear fission. Their contributions, ~2% for sun and wind, ~6% for hydro and ~5% for fission, will need to be enormously increased in a relatively short time, to meet the targets set by policy makers. The possible role and large potential for fusion to contribute to a solution in the future as a safe, nearly inexhaustible and environmentally compatible energy source is discussed. The principles of magnetic and inertial confinement are outlined, and the two main options for magnetic confinement, tokamak and stellarator, are explained. The status of magnetic fusion is summarized and the next steps in fusion research, ITER and DEMO, briefly presented.

  6. Nuclear protein phosphatase-1: an epigenetic regulator of fear memory and amygdala long-term potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshibu, K; Gräff, J; Mansuy, I M

    2011-01-26

    Complex brain diseases and neurological disorders in human generally result from the disturbance of multiple genes and signaling pathways. These disturbances may derive from mutations, deletions, translocations or rearrangements of specific gene(s). However, over the past years, it has become clear that such disturbances may also derive from alterations in the epigenome affecting several genes simultaneously. Our work recently demonstrated that epigenetic mechanisms in the adult brain are in part regulated by protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a protein Ser/Thr phosphatase that negatively regulates hippocampus-dependent long-term memory (LTM) and synaptic plasticity. PP1 is abundant in brain structures involved in emotional processing like the amygdala, it may therefore be involved in the regulation of fear memory, a form of memory related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in human. Here, we demonstrate that PP1 is a molecular suppressor of fear memory and synaptic plasticity in the amygdala that can control chromatin remodeling in neurons. We show that the selective inhibition of the nuclear pool of PP1 in amygdala neurons significantly alters posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of histones and the expression of several memory-associated genes. These alterations correlate with enhanced fear memory, and with an increase in long-term potentiation (LTP) that is transcription-dependent. Our results underscore the importance of nuclear PP1 in the amygdala as an epigenetic regulator of emotional memory, and the relevance of protein phosphatases as potential targets for therapeutic treatment of brain disorders like PTSD. © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Plant life extensions for German nuclear power plants? Controversial discussion on potential electricity price effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthes, Felix C.; Hermann, Hauke

    2009-06-01

    The discussions on electricity price effects in case of the plant life extension of German nuclear power plants covers the following topics: (1) Introduction and methodology. (2) Electricity generation in nuclear power plants and electricity price based on an empirical view: electricity generation in nuclear power plants and final consumption price for households and industry in the European Union; electricity generation in nuclear power plants and electricity wholesale price in case of low availability of nuclear power plants in Germany; comparison of electricity wholesale prices in Germany and France. (3) Model considerations in relation to electricity prices and nuclear phase-out. (4) Concluding considerations.

  8. Application of Solar Chimney Concept to Solve Potential Safety Issues of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khasawneh, Khalid; PARK, Youn Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper two main events and their causes have been investigated and a potential alternative supporting system will be provided. The first event to be addressed is the Station Blackout (SBO) caused by the inherent unreliability of the Emergency Diesel Generators (EDGs) and Alternative AC (AAC) power sources. Different parameters affect The EDG unreliability; for instance, mechanical, operational, maintenance and surveillance. Those parameters will be analyzed and linked to plant safety and Core Damage Frequency (CDF). Also the AACs, the SBO diesel generators, will be studied and their operational requirements similarity with the EDGs will be discussed. The second event to be addressed is the Loss of Ultimate Heat Sink (LUHS) caused by the degradation of heat exchange effectiveness, that is, the poor heat transfer to the Ultimate Heat Sink (UHS). Different causes to such case were observed; intake lines blockages due to ice and foreign biological matters formation and oil spill near the heat sink causing the oil leakage to the heat exchangers tubes. The later cause, oil spill, has been given a special attention here due its potential effects for different nuclear power plants (NPPs) around the world; for example, Finland and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). For the Finnish case, the Finnish nuclear regulator (STUK) took already countermeasures for such scenario by introducing alternative heat sink, cooling towers, for the primary used heat sink, sea water, for one of its nuclear power plants. The abundance of the solar irradiation in the UAE region provides a perfect condition for the implementation of solar power applications. Utilizing this unique characteristic of that region may provide promising alternative and diverse options for solving potential safety related issues of their NPPs. The Solar Chimney Power Plant (SCPP) could be employed to serve as a supporting system to provide emergency power, in the case of SBO, and emergency cooling, in the case of

  9. Application of Solar Chimney Concept to Solve Potential Safety Issues of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasawneh, Khalid; PARK, Youn Won

    2014-01-01

    In this paper two main events and their causes have been investigated and a potential alternative supporting system will be provided. The first event to be addressed is the Station Blackout (SBO) caused by the inherent unreliability of the Emergency Diesel Generators (EDGs) and Alternative AC (AAC) power sources. Different parameters affect The EDG unreliability; for instance, mechanical, operational, maintenance and surveillance. Those parameters will be analyzed and linked to plant safety and Core Damage Frequency (CDF). Also the AACs, the SBO diesel generators, will be studied and their operational requirements similarity with the EDGs will be discussed. The second event to be addressed is the Loss of Ultimate Heat Sink (LUHS) caused by the degradation of heat exchange effectiveness, that is, the poor heat transfer to the Ultimate Heat Sink (UHS). Different causes to such case were observed; intake lines blockages due to ice and foreign biological matters formation and oil spill near the heat sink causing the oil leakage to the heat exchangers tubes. The later cause, oil spill, has been given a special attention here due its potential effects for different nuclear power plants (NPPs) around the world; for example, Finland and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). For the Finnish case, the Finnish nuclear regulator (STUK) took already countermeasures for such scenario by introducing alternative heat sink, cooling towers, for the primary used heat sink, sea water, for one of its nuclear power plants. The abundance of the solar irradiation in the UAE region provides a perfect condition for the implementation of solar power applications. Utilizing this unique characteristic of that region may provide promising alternative and diverse options for solving potential safety related issues of their NPPs. The Solar Chimney Power Plant (SCPP) could be employed to serve as a supporting system to provide emergency power, in the case of SBO, and emergency cooling, in the case of

  10. Geohydrology surrounding a potential high-level nuclear waste repository in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandstetter, A.; Kroitoru, L.; Andrews, R.W.; Thackston, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Gibson Dome area in the Paradox Basin in southeastern Utah has been identified as a potential location for a high-level nuclear waste repository on the basis of an adequate thickness of bedded salt formations at desirable depths, suitable topography for surface facilities, few known archaeological sites, less resource potential than otherwise similar areas, and long-term geologic and tectonic stability. The area appears also suitable from a geohydrologic viewpoint, on the basis of data collected and analyses performed to date. The upper, near-surface, geologic formations include both regionally continuous water-bearing formations and locally perched ground waters that discharge into nearby surface streams and into the Colorado River. Below the Paradox salts, the formations of interest with respect to repository safety include regionally continuous water-bearing formations, with the Leadville limestone being the principal water-transmitting unit. Flows in all water-bearing formations are essentially horizontal. If a vertical connection were established through a potential repository, hydraulic gradients indicate that the flow would first be downward from the upper to the lower formations and then laterally, principally in the Leadville formation. There are some indications that minor leakage could occur into the Colorado River as close as Cataract Canyon, about 20 to 25 km (10 to 15 miles) from a potential repository location in Davis Canyon, or into the Colorado River in Marble Canyon (Arizona), about 240 km (150 miles) to the southwest. Groundwater flow from a repository to these locations is unlikely, however, since water would first have to penetrate the essentially impermeable salt layers before it would reach the Leadville formation. 11 references, 4 figures

  11. Effect of controlled potential on SCC of nuclear waste package container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lum, B. Y.; Roy, A. K.; Spragge, M. K.

    1999-01-01

    The slow-strain-rate (SSR) test technique was used to evaluate the susceptibility of Titanium (Ti) Gr-7 (UNS R52400) and Ti Gr-12 (UNS R53400) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Ti Gr-7 and Ti Gr-12 are two candidate container materials for the multi-barrier package for nuclear waste. The tests were done in a deaerated 90 C acidic brine (pH ∼ 2.7) containing 5 weight percent (wt%) sodium chloride (NaCl) using a strain rate of 3.3 x 10 -6 sec -1 . Before being tested in the acidic brine, specimens of each alloy were pulled inside the test chamber in the dry condition at ambient temperature. Then while in the test solution, specimens were strained under different cathodic (negative) controlled electrochemical potentials. These controlled potentials were selected based on the corrosion potential measured in the test solution before the specimens were strained. Results indicate that the times to failure (TTF) for Ti Gr-12 were much shorter than those for Ti Gr-7. Furthermore, as the applied potential became more cathodic, Ti Gr-12 showed reduced ductility in terms of percent reduction in area (%RA) and true fracture stress (σ f ). In addition, TTF and percent elongation (%El) reached the minimum values when Ti Gr-12 was tested under an impressed potential of -1162 mV. However, for Ti Gr-7, all these ductility parameters were not significantly influenced by the changes in applied potential. In general, the results of hydrogen analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) showed increased hydrogen concentration at more cathodic controlled potentials. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to evaluate the morphology of cracking both at the primary fracture face and the secondary cracks along the gage section of the broken tensile specimen. Transgranular secondary cracks were observed in both alloys possibly resulting from the formation of brittle titanium hydrides due to cathodic charging. The primary fracture face was characterized

  12. Ground-water travel time calculations for the potential nuclear repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younker, J.L.; Wilson, W.E.; Sinnock, S.

    1986-01-01

    In support of the US Department of Energy Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, ground-water travel times were calculated for flow paths in both the saturated and unsaturated zones at Yucca Mountain, a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository in southern Nevada. The calculations were made through a combined effort by Science Applications International Corporation, Sandia National Laboratories, and the US Geological Survey. Travel times in the unsaturated zone were estimated by dividing the flow path length by the ground-water velocity, where velocities were obtained by dividing the vertical flux by the effective porosity of the rock types along assumed vertical flow paths. Saturated zone velocities were obtained by dividing the product of the bulk hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic gradient by the effective porosity. Total travel time over an EPA-established 5-km flow path was then calculated to be the sum of the travel times in the two parts of the flow path. Estimates of ground water fluxes and travel times are critical for evaluating the favorability of the Yucca Mountain site because they provide the basis for estimating the potential for radionuclides to reach the accessible environment within certain time limits

  13. PC based controlled potential coulometric titrator for quantitative analysis of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manna, A.; Moorthy, A.D.; Bhogale, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    With increased requirements for process control and accountability of nuclear materials in plutonium reprocessing plants, the PC based controlled potential coulometric titrator was developed which has the capability of automatic quantitative analysis of the samples. The instruments based on electromechanical methods, incorporates an electronic potentiostat, a digital coulometer with wide dynamic range and a PC with a control interface card. The potentiostat is required to control the potential at the working electrode surface as per predetermined controlled voltage with respect to a reference electrode under wide variations in the conductivity and double layer capacitance of the electrochemical cell. The digital coulometer precisely measures the amount of electronic charge taking part in the electrochemical reactions of interest. The software has the facility to carry out three different types of analysis, i.e., primary coulometry, secondary coulometry and coulogram curve tracing. Due to complete analysis of the samples under program control, the human related errors are minimized and a better precision in the results are obtained. It has been possible to obtain an overall precession of better than +/- 0.3% in the determination of plutonium using the instrument. (author)

  14. Chinese perceptions of the utility of nuclear weapons. Prospects and potential problems in disarmament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing-dong, Yuan

    2010-07-01

    The Obama administration is putting nuclear disarmament back on the agenda. In a major speech in Prague in April 2009, he envisioned a world free of nuclear weapons and called on nations to work toward that end. Reversing years of setbacks and stagnation, Washington and Moscow agreed on renewing negotiation on extending the START I Treaty last year and concluded the New START treaty in March 2010. The 2010 Nuclear Posture Review indicates a shift in U.S. nuclear doctrine in that Washington pledges not to use nuclear weapons against non-nuclear weapons states that abide by the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. The prospects of nuclear disarmament look much promising as the momentum generated could also exert pressure on the second-tier nuclear-weapon States: Britain, France, and China. Beijing's responses to these developments have been favorable, viewing them as positive contribution to international nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation. In particular China endorses President Obama's call for securing global nuclear materials and safeguarding vulnerable nuclear facilities to prevent nuclear terrorism. However, Chinese perspectives and policies on important international nuclear arms control and disarmament, and on the role of nuclear weapons and nuclear deterrence remain largely declaratory and less specific on its own commitments and participation. Chinese analyses, at the same time, point out the difficulties ahead on the road toward a nuclear weapons free world. Indeed, rhetoric notwithstanding, Beijing continues to modernize its nuclear arsenal to develop a secure and reliable second-strike deterrence capability. This paper takes a careful look at China's perceptions of the role of nuclear weapons in its national security policy and defense posture. This is important because China is perceived to be the only country among the five original nuclear-weapon States that is actually expanding its nuclear arsenal, as indicated by the recent

  15. Chinese perceptions of the utility of nuclear weapons. Prospects and potential problems in disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing-dong, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The Obama administration is putting nuclear disarmament back on the agenda. In a major speech in Prague in April 2009, he envisioned a world free of nuclear weapons and called on nations to work toward that end. Reversing years of setbacks and stagnation, Washington and Moscow agreed on renewing negotiation on extending the START I Treaty last year and concluded the New START treaty in March 2010. The 2010 Nuclear Posture Review indicates a shift in U.S. nuclear doctrine in that Washington pledges not to use nuclear weapons against non-nuclear weapons states that abide by the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. The prospects of nuclear disarmament look much promising as the momentum generated could also exert pressure on the second-tier nuclear-weapon States: Britain, France, and China. Beijing's responses to these developments have been favorable, viewing them as positive contribution to international nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation. In particular China endorses President Obama's call for securing global nuclear materials and safeguarding vulnerable nuclear facilities to prevent nuclear terrorism. However, Chinese perspectives and policies on important international nuclear arms control and disarmament, and on the role of nuclear weapons and nuclear deterrence remain largely declaratory and less specific on its own commitments and participation. Chinese analyses, at the same time, point out the difficulties ahead on the road toward a nuclear weapons free world. Indeed, rhetoric notwithstanding, Beijing continues to modernize its nuclear arsenal to develop a secure and reliable second-strike deterrence capability. This paper takes a careful look at China's perceptions of the role of nuclear weapons in its national security policy and defense posture. This is important because China is perceived to be the only country among the five original nuclear-weapon States that is actually expanding its nuclear arsenal, as indicated by the recent deployment of the long

  16. Potential effects of climatic change on radiological doses from disposal of Canadian nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiro, B.D.

    1997-01-01

    The environmental assessment of deep geologic disposal of Canadian nuclear fuel waste considers many processes that could affect radionuclide transport to humans over thousands of years. Climatic change is an important feature that will occur over these long times. Glaciation will likely occur within the next 100,000 years over much of Canada, and its impact on radiological doses has been assessed previously. In the present study, we investigate the potential effect of short- term climatic change, usually associated with global warming caused by increases in atmospheric trace gases. We study the main biosphere transport pathways causing a radiological dose to humans from 129 I, which is the most important radionuclide in disposal of Canadian used nuclear fuel. Irrigation of a garden with contaminated well water is the main pathway and it can be affected by changes in temperature and precipitation. A cold, wet climate decreases the need for irrigation, and this decreases the radiological dose. A drastic climatic change, such as an increase in temperature from 10 to 20 degrees C and decrease in precipitation from 0.3 to 0.2 m during the growing season, is estimated to increase the dose by a factor of four. This is a relatively small change compared to the range of doses that arise from the variability and uncertainty in many of the parameters used in the environmental assessment models. Therefore, it is likely that the results of probabilistic dose assessment models can include the consequences of short-term climatic change. 39 refs., 3 figs

  17. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-jun

    2014-01-01

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo

  18. Potential of primary kidney cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer mediated transgenesis in pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richter Anne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT is currently the most efficient and precise method to generate genetically tailored pig models for biomedical research. However, the efficiency of this approach is crucially dependent on the source of nuclear donor cells. In this study, we evaluate the potential of primary porcine kidney cells (PKCs as cell source for SCNT, including their proliferation capacity, transfection efficiency, and capacity to support full term development of SCNT embryos after additive gene transfer or homologous recombination. Results PKCs could be maintained in culture with stable karyotype for up to 71 passages, whereas porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs and porcine ear fibroblasts (PEFs could be hardly passaged more than 20 times. Compared with PFFs and PEFs, PKCs exhibited a higher proliferation rate and resulted in a 2-fold higher blastocyst rate after SCNT and in vitro cultivation. Among the four transfection methods tested with a GFP expression plasmid, best results were obtained with the NucleofectorTM technology, resulting in transfection efficiencies of 70% to 89% with high fluorescence intensity, low cytotoxicity, good cell proliferation, and almost no morphological signs of cell stress. Usage of genetically modified PKCs in SCNT resulted in approximately 150 piglets carrying at least one of 18 different transgenes. Several of those pigs originated from PKCs that underwent homologous recombination and antibiotic selection before SCNT. Conclusion The high proliferation capacity of PKCs facilitates the introduction of precise and complex genetic modifications in vitro. PKCs are thus a valuable cell source for the generation of porcine biomedical models by SCNT.

  19. Potentiality of Using Vertical and Three-Dimensional Isolation Systems in Nuclear Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguang Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the horizontal component of an earthquake response can be significantly reduced through the use of conventional seismic isolators, the vertical component of excitation is still transmitted directly into the structure. Records from instrumented structures, and some recent tests and analyses have actually seen increases in vertical responses in base isolated structures under the combined effects of horizontal and vertical ground motions. This issue becomes a great concern to facilities such as a Nuclear Power Plants (NPP, with specialized equipment and machinery that is not only expensive, but critical to safe operation. As such, there is considerable interest worldwide in vertical and three-dimensional (3D isolation systems. This paper examines several vertical and 3D isolation systems that have been proposed and their potential application to modern nuclear facilities. In particular, a series of case study analyses of a modern NPP model are performed to examine the benefits and challenges associated with 3D isolation compared with horizontal isolation. It was found that compared with the general horizontal isolators, isolators that have vertical frequencies of no more than 3 Hz can effectively reduce the vertical in-structure responses for the studied NPP model. Among the studied cases, the case that has a vertical isolation frequency of 3 Hz is the one that can keep the horizontal period of the isolators as the first period while having the most flexible vertical isolator properties. When the vertical frequency of isolators reduces to 1 Hz, the rocking effect is obvious and rocking restraining devices are necessary.

  20. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kai [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Shandong Province (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Song, Yong [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Department of Stomatology, Liu Zhou People' s Hospital, Guangxi (China); Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-lin [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Liu, Ke, E-mail: liuke.1999@aliyun.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial-Head and Neck oncology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Shang, Zheng-jun, E-mail: shangzhengjun@hotmail.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial-Head and Neck oncology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China)

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo.

  1. The role of governments in promoting a realistic public understanding of the potentialities of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapar, H.K.

    1983-01-01

    Adverse public attitudes towards nuclear power have been and continue to be a significant obstacle in the way of nuclear power growth. The three main ways in which governments could help to promote public understanding of nuclear power are 1) by carrying out effectively their traditional tasks of deciding priorities, funding research, encouraging information exchange with other countries and regulating nuclear activities; 2) by providing basic information about the need for nuclear power and its economic importance and providing appropriate opportunities for changes in policies and 3) by showing leadership particularly when no clear course is apparent. (U.K.)

  2. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    Volume IV provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest

  3. Epidemiologic investigation on health hazard of potential exposure to ionizing radiation among nuclear workers and residents near nuclear power plants in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Keun Young

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the health hazard of potential exposure to ionizing radiation among nuclear workers of the KEPCO and community residents nearby nuclear power plants since 1990 in Korea. The objectives of this study encompass 1) to delineate the relationship between cancer occurrence in the target population and radiation possibly emitted from the nuclear power plant, and 2) to provide special health service for health promotion of the community residents including periodic health examinations. The phase I study has been conducted during 1990-1995, which will be followed up by the phase II study until 2003. Hereby the interim report on the phase I study will be presented. As a baseline survey, the cross-sectional comparison shows that there were no significant difference in the health status of nuclear workers and control groups. This prospective study could eventually provide a valid conclusion on the causal relationship of radiation and cancer occurrence among residents nearby nuclear power plants through the phase II study which will be launched out during 1998-2000. (Cho, G. S.)

  4. Potential use of nuclear irradiation technology for the microbial industry in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, P.; Isyanti, I.

    2002-01-01

    The potential application of irradiation is numerous. The process seems technically feasible for sterilization of medical devices, pharmaceutical products, foods, cosmetics, packaging materials, scientific laboratory materials like petri dishes, growth media, complying with phytosanitary requirements for fruit and vegetables etc. An awareness of biofertilizer or microbial product has established itself to be a significant part of food production and consumption internationally as well as in Malaysia. People are discovering organic agriculture can serve their need for safe quality food, environment conservation and social accountability. One of the major technical constraints of viable microbial or biofertilizer product production is contaminated free carrier materials. In order to develop the good microbial product, we are practicing the gamma irradiation on our carrier materials and successfully established the product. The different carrier materials were packed and used 25 kGy Cobalt-60 source (JS 8900, SINAGAMA, MINT) for sterilization and simultaneously the materials were sterilized in steam. The cultured Trichoderma virile and T harzianum were mixed with sterilized carrier and observed the colony formin. unit (CFU) on regular intervals. The results showed the efficient colony forming unit on both sterilization method of materials. However, the nuclear irradiation is more cost effective and time saving than steam method. (Author)

  5. The oncoprotein BCL11A binds to orphan nuclear receptor TLX and potentiates its transrepressive function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara B Estruch

    Full Text Available Nuclear orphan receptor TLX (NR2E1 functions primarily as a transcriptional repressor and its pivotal role in brain development, glioblastoma, mental retardation and retinopathologies make it an attractive drug target. TLX is expressed in the neural stem cells (NSCs of the subventricular zone and the hippocampus subgranular zone, regions with persistent neurogenesis in the adult brain, and functions as an essential regulator of NSCs maintenance and self-renewal. Little is known about the TLX social network of interactors and only few TLX coregulators are described. To identify and characterize novel TLX-binders and possible coregulators, we performed yeast-two-hybrid (Y2H screens of a human adult brain cDNA library using different TLX constructs as baits. Our screens identified multiple clones of Atrophin-1 (ATN1, a previously described TLX interactor. In addition, we identified an interaction with the oncoprotein and zinc finger transcription factor BCL11A (CTIP1/Evi9, a key player in the hematopoietic system and in major blood-related malignancies. This interaction was validated by expression and coimmunoprecipitation in human cells. BCL11A potentiated the transrepressive function of TLX in an in vitro reporter gene assay. Our work suggests that BCL11A is a novel TLX coregulator that might be involved in TLX-dependent gene regulation in the brain.

  6. The oncoprotein BCL11A binds to orphan nuclear receptor TLX and potentiates its transrepressive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Sara B; Buzón, Víctor; Carbó, Laia R; Schorova, Lenka; Lüders, Jens; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX (NR2E1) functions primarily as a transcriptional repressor and its pivotal role in brain development, glioblastoma, mental retardation and retinopathologies make it an attractive drug target. TLX is expressed in the neural stem cells (NSCs) of the subventricular zone and the hippocampus subgranular zone, regions with persistent neurogenesis in the adult brain, and functions as an essential regulator of NSCs maintenance and self-renewal. Little is known about the TLX social network of interactors and only few TLX coregulators are described. To identify and characterize novel TLX-binders and possible coregulators, we performed yeast-two-hybrid (Y2H) screens of a human adult brain cDNA library using different TLX constructs as baits. Our screens identified multiple clones of Atrophin-1 (ATN1), a previously described TLX interactor. In addition, we identified an interaction with the oncoprotein and zinc finger transcription factor BCL11A (CTIP1/Evi9), a key player in the hematopoietic system and in major blood-related malignancies. This interaction was validated by expression and coimmunoprecipitation in human cells. BCL11A potentiated the transrepressive function of TLX in an in vitro reporter gene assay. Our work suggests that BCL11A is a novel TLX coregulator that might be involved in TLX-dependent gene regulation in the brain.

  7. Criteria for seismic evaluation and potential design fixes for WWER type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose for this document is to provide a criteria for the seismic evaluation and development of potential design fixes for structures, systems and components for the WWER type Nuclear power plants. The design fixes are divided into two categories, detailed and easy fixes. Detailed fixes are typically applicable to building structures, components for which there is little or no seismic capacity information, large tanks and vital systems and components which make up the reactor cooling system and components which perform support or auxiliary functions. In case of the design of 'easy fixes', the criteria presented may be used for both the seismic design as well as for the evaluation of structures, systems and components to which easy fix design applies. Easy fixes are situations where seismic capacities of structures, systems and components can be significantly increased with relatively minor, inexpensive fixes usually associated with anchorage modification of safety related structures, systems and components or those that could interact with safety related structures, systems and components. Often these fixes can be accomplished while the plant is in operation

  8. Direct Measurement of Surface Dissolution Rates in Potential Nuclear Waste Forms: The Example of Pyrochlore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Cornelius; Finkeldei, Sarah; Brandt, Felix; Bosbach, Dirk; Luttge, Andreas

    2015-08-19

    The long-term stability of ceramic materials that are considered as potential nuclear waste forms is governed by heterogeneous surface reactivity. Thus, instead of a mean rate, the identification of one or more dominant contributors to the overall dissolution rate is the key to predict the stability of waste forms quantitatively. Direct surface measurements by vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) and their analysis via material flux maps and resulting dissolution rate spectra provide data about dominant rate contributors and their variability over time. Using pyrochlore (Nd2Zr2O7) pellet dissolution under acidic conditions as an example, we demonstrate the identification and quantification of dissolution rate contributors, based on VSI data and rate spectrum analysis. Heterogeneous surface alteration of pyrochlore varies by a factor of about 5 and additional material loss by chemo-mechanical grain pull-out within the uppermost grain layer. We identified four different rate contributors that are responsible for the observed dissolution rate range of single grains. Our new concept offers the opportunity to increase our mechanistic understanding and to predict quantitatively the alteration of ceramic waste forms.

  9. Criteria for seismic evaluation and potential design fixes for WWER type nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J D [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The purpose for this document is to provide a criteria for the seismic evaluation and development of potential design fixes for structures, systems and components for the WWER type Nuclear power plants. The design fixes are divided into two categories, detailed and easy fixes. Detailed fixes are typically applicable to building structures, componentsfor which there is little or no seismic capacity information, large tanks and vital systems and components which make up the reactor cooling system and components which perform support or auxiliary functions. In case of the design of 'easy fixes', the criteria presented may be used for both the seismic design as well as for the evaluation of structures, systems and components to which easy fix design applies. Easy fixes are situations where seismic capacities of structures, systems and components can be significantly increased with relatively minor, inexpensive fixes usually associated with anchorage modification of safety related structures, systems and components or those that could interact with safety related structures, systems and components. Often these fixes can be accomplished while the plant is in operation.

  10. Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in north-west Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisovsky, I.; Baklanov, A.; Jacovlev, V.; Prutskov, V.; Bergman, R.

    1999-05-01

    This Technical Report, being part of the INTAS project 96-1802, constitutes a comprehensive presentation - covering basic results from separate contributions as specified below - of work performed during the first period (February 1998- February 1999). The aim of the INTAS project 96-1802: 'Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in north-west Russia' is to assess the potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination from nuclear units in north-west Russia and resulting impacts on population and terrestrial ecosystems in the north. The work focuses mainly on airborne radioactive contamination, but some case studies also deal with accidental leakage from terrestrial nuclear sites to soil and coastal waters. The present material comprises in more detail the contributions from participants no.4 and no.5 based on the four internal reports referred to below: (1) Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in Northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in north-west Russia: 'Determination of the list of typical sources of danger emergency radioactive releases in an environment in connection with military activity in the North of Russia.' Technical report no.1 of the team no.5. St.-Petersburg State Technical University, St.-Petersburg. July 1998. 43 p.; (2) Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in Northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in North-west Russia: 'Analysis and description of source-term characteristics for accident linked with airborne radioactive releases from Kola Nuclear Power Plant. Establishing a network facility at INEP for communication among the INTAS Project participants.' Technical report no.1 of the team no.4. Kola Science Centre, Apatity. August 1998. 56 p.; (3) Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in Northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in

  11. Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in north-west Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisovsky, I. [St. Petersburg State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation); Baklanov, A. [Inst. of the Northern Ecology Problems (INEP) (Russian Federation); Jacovlev, V. [St. Petersburg State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation); Prutskov, V. [Ministry of Defence (Russian Federation). First Central Research Inst. of Naval Shipbuilding; Tarasov, I. [Ministry of Defence (Russian Federation). 23 State Marine Project Inst.; Blecher, A. [State Unitary Enterprise (Russian Federation). Research Inst. of Industrial and Marine Medicine; Zvonariev, B.; Kuchin, N.; Rubanov, S.; Sergeiev, I. [State Scientific Centre (Russian Federation). Central Research Inst. of A. Krylov; Morozov, S.; Koshkin, V.; Fedorenko, Yu.; Rigina, O. [Inst. of the Northern Ecology Problems (INEP) (Russian Federation); Bergman, R. [ed.] [Defence Research Establishment, Umeaa (Sweden). Div. of NBC Defence

    1999-05-01

    This Technical Report, being part of the INTAS project 96-1802, constitutes a comprehensive presentation - covering basic results from separate contributions as specified below - of work performed during the first period (February 1998- February 1999). The aim of the INTAS project 96-1802: `Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in north-west Russia` is to assess the potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination from nuclear units in north-west Russia and resulting impacts on population and terrestrial ecosystems in the north. The work focuses mainly on airborne radioactive contamination, but some case studies also deal with accidental leakage from terrestrial nuclear sites to soil and coastal waters. The present material comprises in more detail the contributions from participants no.4 and no.5 based on the four internal reports referred to below: (1) Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in Northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in north-west Russia: `Determination of the list of typical sources of danger emergency radioactive releases in an environment in connection with military activity in the North of Russia.` Technical report no.1 of the team no.5. St.-Petersburg State Technical University, St.-Petersburg. July 1998. 43 p.; (2) Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in Northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in North-west Russia: `Analysis and description of source-term characteristics for accident linked with airborne radioactive releases from Kola Nuclear Power Plant. Establishing a network facility at INEP for communication among the INTAS Project participants.` Technical report no.1 of the team no.4. Kola Science Centre, Apatity. August 1998. 56 p.; (3) Assessment of potential risk of environmental radioactive contamination in Northern Europe from terrestrial nuclear units in

  12. Potential application of nuclear remote-handling technology to underwater inspection and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccleston, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Examples are given of remote handling equipment developed within the nuclear industry and employing telemanipulative or telerobotic principles. In telerobotics the nuclear industry has been following a trend towards increased levels of autonomy, delegating operator control to a computer, for example, in resolved rate manipulator tip control, teach-and-repeat control and collision avoidance. Illustrations are presented of remote-handling techniques from the nuclear industry which may be carried over into undersea remote inspection, maintenance and repair systems. (author)

  13. Market potential of small and medium-size nuclear reactors as combined heat and power plants in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candeli, R.; Leuchs, D.; Garribba, S.F.; Hansen, U.; Lefevre, J.C.; Schoen, R.; Vivante, C.

    1988-01-01

    The preliminary results are presented concerning a study launched by the Commission of the European Communities to assess the potential market of small and medium-size nuclear reactors through EC member countries. The study was aimed at identifying those factors that may have a role in shaping the eventual deployment and diffusion of this class of nuclear reactors. In a first phase, attention focused on modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors that would be installed to produce low-temperature heat and power. Federal Republic of Germany, Italy and France are the countries for which the investigation has been completed. The time span of interest is up to the year 2020. Referring to this horizon, an appraisal has been made of the number of nuclear units which could come on line to cope with energy demand and their timing. Through the study a distinction is made between technical potential, economic potential, and effective market potential. It is understood indeed that both economic competitiveness towards other energy sources and also institutional or organizational factors may restrict the market which could become accessible and would be covered by the new nuclear plants. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This document proposes a presentation and discussion of the main notions, issues, principles, or characteristics related to nuclear energy: radioactivity (presence in the environment, explanation, measurement, periods and activities, low doses, applications), fuel cycle (front end, mining and ore concentration, refining and conversion, fuel fabrication, in the reactor, back end with reprocessing and recycling, transport), the future of the thorium-based fuel cycle (motivations, benefits and drawbacks), nuclear reactors (principles of fission reactors, reactor types, PWR reactors, BWR, heavy-water reactor, high temperature reactor of HTR, future reactors), nuclear wastes (classification, packaging and storage, legal aspects, vitrification, choice of a deep storage option, quantities and costs, foreign practices), radioactive releases of nuclear installations (main released radio-elements, radioactive releases by nuclear reactors and by La Hague plant, gaseous and liquid effluents, impact of releases, regulation), the OSPAR Convention, management and safety of nuclear activities (from control to quality insurance, to quality management and to sustainable development), national safety bodies (mission, means, organisation and activities of ASN, IRSN, HCTISN), international bodies, nuclear and medicine (applications of radioactivity, medical imagery, radiotherapy, doses in nuclear medicine, implementation, the accident in Epinal), nuclear and R and D (past R and D programmes and expenses, main actors in France and present funding, main R and D axis, international cooperation)

  15. Sediment characteristics of the 2800 meter Atlantic nuclear waste disposal site: Radionuclide retention potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neiheisel, James

    1979-09-01

    The sediments of the abandoned 2800 meter Atlantic nuclear waste dumpsite have been analyzed for texture mineral composition, physical properties, cation exchange capacity and factors effecting sediment deposition, as part of an extensive program by the Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate ocean disposal as an alternative nuclear waste disposal method. The sediments physical and chemical properties are evaluated in the light of the geologic setting for their potential role in retarding radionuclide leachate migration from the waste drums to the water column. The sediments are relatively uniform silty clays and clayey silts comprised of approximately one-third biogenous carbonate materials, one-third terrigenous materials and one-third clay minerals. The biogenous materials in the sand and upper silt-size fraction are predominantly foraminifera with minor amounts of diatoms while coccoliths dominate the finer silt and clay size fractions. The terrigenous materials in the course sediment fractions are predominantly quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of mica, glauconite, and heavy minerals. Clay minerals, of the clay-size fraction, in order of abundance, include illite, kaolinite, chlorite and montmorillonite. Relatively high cation exchange capacity in the sediment (15.2-25.4 meq/100g) is attributed to the clay minerals comprising approximately one-third of the sediment. Correspondingly high Kd values might also be expected as a result of sorption of radionuclides onto clay minerals with most favorable conditions related to pH, Eh, and other environmental factors. The biogenous fraction might also be expected to retain some strontium-90 by isomorphous substitution of this radionuclide for calcium. Diagnostic heavy minerals in the sand-size fraction reflect the source areas as predominantly the adjacent continental shelf, and provide important clues concerning the mechanisms effecting transport and deposition of the sediment. Longshore currents along the

  16. Shear Slip Potential Induced by Thermomechanical Loading in an Underground Repository for Nuclear Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaewon; Min, Kibok; Stephansson, Ove

    2010-01-01

    In the context of a deep geological repository for nuclear water, the thermal stress generated by nuclear waster is expected to contribute to shear slip and dilation, which will eventually alter the fracture permeability in the region. In this study, the probability of the occurrence of shear slip at a fracture was examined by the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. The study was based on the fracture orientation generated by the Latin hypercube sampling method, which can improve the efficiency of Monte Carlo simulations by the use of a more systematic approach for selecting the input samples. Statistical data of fracture orientations from the site investigation in Forsmark, Sweden, were used in this study. The historical assessment of thermal stress was based on three-dimensional finite element modeling of a geological repository that measures 800 m by 2000 m and on a time scale up to 10,000 years. The results show that the probability of shear slip evolved differently at six selected points due to the difference stresses at each point. However, it was evident that the probability of shear slip was more that twice as large as the initial probability of failure. This increased permeability and micro seismicity, which can be an issue during the initial operation of the repository. The study provided a quantitative assessment of the probability of shear slip at a fracture, which is an important parameter for assessing the performance of a geological repository. Conclusions are summarized as follows: · With random orientation data, the probability of shear slip around the repository model increases with increased thermal stress. · The probability of shear slip depends on the manner in which the thermal stress is generated. Higher shear slip is expected with higher differential thermal stress. · The probability of shear slip at Forsmark was less than 1 %. If different sites have fracture sets with more overlap, however, the probability may become increase. Therefore, a

  17. Potential Impact of Atmospheric Releases at Russian Far East Nuclear Submarine Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, F.; Mahura, A.; Compton, K.; Brown, K.; Takano, M.; Novikov, V.; Soerensen, J. H.; Baklanov, A.

    2003-02-25

    An ''Assessment of the Impact of Russian Nuclear Fleet Operations on Far Eastern Coastal Regions'' is being performed as part of the Radiation Safety of the Biosphere Project (RAD) of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) of Laxenburg, Austria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive unclassified analysis of the potential impact of accidents at the Russian Far East nuclear submarine sites near Vladivostok and Petropavlovsk. We have defined the situation there based upon available information and studies commissioned by RAD in collaboration with Russian research institutes including Russian Research Center-''Kurchatov Institute'', Institute of Northern Environmental Problems and Lazurit Central Design Bureau. Further, in our original work, some in collaboration with the staff of the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) and members of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, we have calculated the nuclide trajectories from these sites in the atmospheric boundary layer, less than 1.5 kilometers high, and determined their probability of crossing any of the nearby countries as well as Asiatic Russia. We have further determined the concentrations in each of these crossings as well as the total, dry and wet depositions of nuclides on these areas. Finally, we have calculated the doses to the Japanese Island population from typical winter airflow patterns (those most likely to cross the Islands in the minimum times), strong north winds, weak north winds and cyclonic winds for conditions similar to the Chazhma Bay criticality accident (fresh fuel) and for a criticality accident for the same type of reactor with fuel being withdrawn (spent fuel). The maximum individual committed dosages were less than 2 x 10-7 and 2 x 10-3 mSv, respectively. The long-term external doses by radionuclides deposited on the ground and the internal doses by consumption of foods were not evaluated as it is

  18. Shear Slip Potential Induced by Thermomechanical Loading in an Underground Repository for Nuclear Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaewon; Min, Kibok; Stephansson, Ove

    2010-01-01

    In the context of a deep geological repository for nuclear water, the thermal stress generated by nuclear waster is expected to contribute to shear slip and dilation, which will eventually alter the fracture permeability in the region. In this study, the probability of the occurrence of shear slip at a fracture was examined by the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. The study was based on the fracture orientation generated by the Latin hypercube sampling method, which can improve the efficiency of Monte Carlo simulations by the use of a more systematic approach for selecting the input samples. Statistical data of fracture orientations from the site investigation in Forsmark, Sweden, were used in this study. The historical assessment of thermal stress was based on three-dimensional finite element modeling of a geological repository that measures 800 m by 2000 m and on a time scale up to 10,000 years. The results show that the probability of shear slip evolved differently at six selected points due to the difference stresses at each point. However, it was evident that the probability of shear slip was more that twice as large as the initial probability of failure. This increased permeability and micro seismicity, which can be an issue during the initial operation of the repository. The study provided a quantitative assessment of the probability of shear slip at a fracture, which is an important parameter for assessing the performance of a geological repository. Conclusions are summarized as follows: · With random orientation data, the probability of shear slip around the repository model increases with increased thermal stress. · The probability of shear slip depends on the manner in which the thermal stress is generated. Higher shear slip is expected with higher differential thermal stress. · The probability of shear slip at Forsmark was less than 1 %. If different sites have fracture sets with more overlap, however, the probability may become increase. Therefore, a

  19. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest.

  20. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest

  1. Supplemental Performance Analyses for the Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevougian, S. D.; McNeish, J. A.; Coppersmith, K.; Jenni, K. E.; Rickertsen, L. D.; Swift, P. N.; Wilson, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the possible recommendation of a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the potential development of a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. To facilitate public review and comment, in May 2001 the DOE released the Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report (S and ER) (1), which presents technical information supporting the consideration of the possible site recommendation. The report summarizes the results of more than 20 years of scientific and engineering studies. Based on internal reviews of the S and ER and its key supporting references, the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) (2) and the Analysis Model Reports and Process Model Reports cited therein, the DOE has recently identified and performed several types of analyses to supplement the treatment of uncertainty in support of the consideration of a possible site recommendation. The results of these new analyses are summarized in the two-volume report entitled FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analysis (SSPA) (3,4). The information in this report is intended to supplement, not supplant, the information contained in the S and ER. The DOE recognizes that important uncertainties will always remain in any assessment of the performance of a potential repository over thousands of years (1). One part of the DOE approach to recognizing and managing these uncertainties is a commitment to continued testing and analysis and to the continued evaluation of the technical basis supporting the possible recommendation of the site, such as the analysis contained in the SSPA. The goals of the work described here are to provide insights into the implications of newly quantified uncertainties, updated science, and evaluations of lower operating temperatures on the performance of a potential Yucca Mountain repository and to increase confidence in the results of the TSPA described

  2. Motivations and possible actions of potential criminal adversaries of US nuclear programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, G.; Jenkins, B.; Kellen, K.; Krofcheek, J.; Petty, G.; Reinstedt, R.; Ronfeldt, D.

    1981-01-01

    The motivations that might impel individuals or groups to undertake criminal actions against US nuclear facilities or programs are explored in the report (R and R-2554-SL) from which this note is taken. The analysis involves examination of the motivations behind nuclear-related crimes that have already occurred and of those behind analogous nonnuclear crimes

  3. Calculation of binary magnetic properties and potential energy curve in xenon dimer: second virial coefficient of (129)Xe nuclear shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Runeberg, Nino; Jokisaari, Jukka; Vaara, Juha

    2004-09-22

    Quantum chemical calculations of the nuclear shielding tensor, the nuclear quadrupole coupling tensor, and the spin-rotation tensor are reported for the Xe dimer using ab initio quantum chemical methods. The binary chemical shift delta, the anisotropy of the shielding tensor Delta sigma, the nuclear quadrupole coupling tensor component along the internuclear axis chi( parallel ), and the spin-rotation constant C( perpendicular ) are presented as a function of internuclear distance. The basis set superposition error is approximately corrected for by using the counterpoise correction (CP) method. Electron correlation effects are systematically studied via the Hartree-Fock, complete active space self-consistent field, second-order Møller-Plesset many-body perturbation, and coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) theories, the last one without and with noniterative triples, at the nonrelativistic all-electron level. We also report a high-quality theoretical interatomic potential for the Xe dimer, gained using the relativistic effective potential/core polarization potential scheme. These calculations used valence basis set of cc-pVQZ quality supplemented with a set of midbond functions. The second virial coefficient of Xe nuclear shielding, which is probably the experimentally best-characterized intermolecular interaction effect in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, is computed as a function of temperature, and compared to experiment and earlier theoretical results. The best results for the second virial coefficient, obtained using the CCSD(CP) binary chemical shift curve and either our best theoretical potential or the empirical potentials from the literature, are in good agreement with experiment. Zero-point vibrational corrections of delta, Delta sigma, chi (parallel), and C (perpendicular) in the nu=0, J=0 rovibrational ground state of the xenon dimer are also reported.

  4. Efficient and Adaptive Methods for Computing Accurate Potential Surfaces for Quantum Nuclear Effects: Applications to Hydrogen-Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGregorio, Nicole; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2018-01-09

    We present two sampling measures to gauge critical regions of potential energy surfaces. These sampling measures employ (a) the instantaneous quantum wavepacket density, an approximation to the (b) potential surface, its (c) gradients, and (d) a Shannon information theory based expression that estimates the local entropy associated with the quantum wavepacket. These four criteria together enable a directed sampling of potential surfaces that appears to correctly describe the local oscillation frequencies, or the local Nyquist frequency, of a potential surface. The sampling functions are then utilized to derive a tessellation scheme that discretizes the multidimensional space to enable efficient sampling of potential surfaces. The sampled potential surface is then combined with four different interpolation procedures, namely, (a) local Hermite curve interpolation, (b) low-pass filtered Lagrange interpolation, (c) the monomial symmetrization approximation (MSA) developed by Bowman and co-workers, and (d) a modified Shepard algorithm. The sampling procedure and the fitting schemes are used to compute (a) potential surfaces in highly anharmonic hydrogen-bonded systems and (b) study hydrogen-transfer reactions in biogenic volatile organic compounds (isoprene) where the transferring hydrogen atom is found to demonstrate critical quantum nuclear effects. In the case of isoprene, the algorithm discussed here is used to derive multidimensional potential surfaces along a hydrogen-transfer reaction path to gauge the effect of quantum-nuclear degrees of freedom on the hydrogen-transfer process. Based on the decreased computational effort, facilitated by the optimal sampling of the potential surfaces through the use of sampling functions discussed here, and the accuracy of the associated potential surfaces, we believe the method will find great utility in the study of quantum nuclear dynamics problems, of which application to hydrogen-transfer reactions and hydrogen

  5. First plastid phylogenomic study reveals potential cyto-nuclear discordance in the evolutionary history of Ficus L. (Moraceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Lund, Sam; Clement, Wendy; Kjellberg, Finn

    2017-01-01

    Standard Sanger chloroplast markers provide limited information to resolve species level relationships within plants, in particular within large genera. Figs (Ficus L., Moraceae) compose one of the 50 largest genera of angiosperms with 750 species occurring in the tropics and subtropics worldwide...... to all other Ficus. However, conflicts between the new plastome topology and previous nuclear studies are observed for both individual species as well as relationships among some sections at deeper levels. Conflicts could be caused by lack of resolution in the nuclear data or may indicate potential cyto...

  6. 3rd DAtF-seminar on the development of potential for young scientists and engineers in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassner, H.

    2003-01-01

    The 3 rd seminar organized by the Deutsches Atomforum e.V. for young nuclear scientists and engineers seeking to realize their potential was about 'Communication - Key to Acceptance'. The topic was presented in contributions outlining the scientific viewpoint and in results of practical everyday experience. The young participants from all areas of the nuclear industry were sensitized to the problem areas under discussion, which were then debated in more detail. Reference was made to the importance of continuous communication with all participants. The seminar offered valuable suggestions for working with the media and the public, but also for handling information in one's daily work. (orig.)

  7. Chemical variability of zeolites at a potential nuclear waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broxton, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    The compositions of clinoptilolites and their host tuffs have been examined by electron microprobe and x-ray fluorescence, respectively, to determine their variability at a potential nuclear waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Because of their sorptive properties, these zeolites could provide important geologic barriers to radionuclide migration. Variations in clinoptilolite composition can strongly affect the mineral's thermal and ion-exchange properties, thus influencing its behavior in the repository environment. Clinoptilolites and heulandites closest to the proposed repository have calcium-rich compositions (60 to 90 mol. % Ca) and silica-to-aluminum ratios that concentrate between 4.0 and 4.6. In contrast, clinoptilolites and their host tuffs deeper in the volcanic sequence have highly variable compositions that vary vertically and laterally. Deeper-occurring clinoptilolites in the eastern part of Yucca Mountain are characterized by calcic-potassic compositions and tend to become more calcium-rich with depth. Clinoptilolites at equivalent stratigraphic levels on the western side of Yucca Mountain have sodic-potassic compositions and tend to become more sodium-rich with depth. Despite their differences in exchangeable cation compositions these two deeper-occurring compositional suites have similar silica-to-aluminum ratios, concentrating between 4.4 and 5.0. The chemical variability of clinoptilolites and their host tuffs at Yucca Mountain suggest that their physical and chemical properties will also vary. Compositionally-dependent clinoptilolite properties important for repository performance assessment include expansion/contraction behavior, hydration/dehydration behavior, and ion-exchange properties

  8. Long interspersed nuclear element-1 hypomethylation and oxidative stress: correlation and bladder cancer diagnostic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maturada Patchsung

    Full Text Available Although, increased oxidative stress and hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1 associate with bladder cancer (BCa development, the relationship between these alterations is unknown. We evaluated the oxidative stress and hypomethylation of the LINE-1 in 61 BCa patients and 45 normal individuals. To measure the methylation levels and to differentiate the LINE-1 loci into hypermethylated, partially methylated and hypomethylated, peripheral blood cells, urinary exfoliated cells and cancerous tissues were evaluated by combined bisulfite restriction analysis PCR. The urinary total antioxidant status (TAS and plasma protein carbonyl content were determined. The LINE-1 methylation levels and patterns, especially hypomethylated loci, in the blood and urine cells of the BCa patients were different from the levels and patterns in the healthy controls. The urinary TAS was decreased, whereas the plasma protein carbonyl content was increased in the BCa patients relative to the controls. A positive correlation between the methylation of LINE-1 in the blood-derived DNA and urinary TAS was found in both the BCa and control groups. The urinary hypomethylated LINE-1 loci and the plasma protein carbonyl content provided the best diagnostic potential for BCa prediction. Based on post-diagnostic samples, the combination test improved the diagnostic power to a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 96%. In conclusion, decreased LINE-1 methylation is associated with increased oxidative stress both in healthy and BCa subjects across the various tissue types, implying a dose-response association. Increases in the LINE-1 hypomethylation levels and the number of hypomethylated loci in both the blood- and urine-derived cells and increase in the oxidative stress were found in the BCa patients. The combination test of the urinary hypomethylated LINE-1 loci and the plasma protein carbonyl content may be useful for BCa screening and monitoring of

  9. Geogas in crystalline bedrock and its potential significance for disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeblom, R.; Hermansson, H.P.; Aakerblom, G.

    1995-01-01

    In assessments of the safety of final repositories for nuclear waste situated in crystalline basement rock it is usually postulated that the transfer of radionuclides to the biosphere can take place only through transport by water. However, in order for such an assumption to be valid, it must be verified that any geogas that is present will not affect the transport. Geogas in crystalline rock consists of species such as nitrogen, argon, helium, hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and oxygen. The gas originates from the atmosphere, chemical reactions in the rock, te decay of radioactive elements in the rock, and degassing from the mantle of the earth. In most observed cases, geogas is dissolved in the groundwater. The transfer of geogas through the rock and to the surface takes place through flow in fractures. Firstly, dissolved geogas migrated due to the flow of the groundwater, and secondly, pockets of gas may form and eventually be released in the form of bursts. In the second case, the gas might act as a carrier for heavy elements through four different mechanisms: (1) formation of volatile compounds, (2) formation of surface active complexes, (3) flotation, and (4) formation of aerosols. When a potential site for waste disposal is being evaluated, studies of geogas should form part of such a characterization program. Favorable conditions for the formation of free gas may develop as a result of the heating of the rock by radioactive decay in the waste. It is also conceivable that methane-ice might form in the backfill of a repository in connection with a glaciation. The decomposition behavior of such methane-ice appears to be largely unknown. Positive aspects may include the possibility of utilizing geogas flow for the non-destructive monitoring of a site after closure of the repository

  10. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-Lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-Jun

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer-macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A simple analysis of potential radiological exposure from geological disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiro, B.D.; Dormuth, K.W.

    1996-02-01

    AECL has submitted an environmental impact statement (EIS) describing its proposal for geological disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The EIS presents a detailed analysis of potential radiation exposure of an individual of a critical group of people in a hypothetical case. In this report, we provide a simpler analysis of potential exposure in the hope that the inherent safety of the disposal will be more readily evident from the analysis. A key to the simplification is the elimination from the analysis of the complex transport processes through disposal vault sealing materials and the geosphere. We also eliminate the relatively complex function describing the failure of the thin-walled titanium containers in the case study presented in the EIS. We therefore conceptually replace the thin-walled titanium containers with thicker-walled copper containers, are expected to remain intact much longer than 10,000 a, the period for which a quantitative estimate of individual exposure is made. However, about 1 in 5000 containers could have small defects that were undetected during manufacture. Our analysis applies only to the case of an undisrupted vault. We assume that the vault and geosphere barriers remain intact and prevent immobile radionuclides from reaching the biosphere. However, we also assume that the three most important mobile radionuclides can escape through an undected manufacturing defect in the container wall, and that the flux of these radionuclides is diluted by well water being used by people. We have focused on 129 I, 36 Cl and 14 C, because these nuclides are found to be the dominant source of exposure in more complex analyses. If a single container released radionuclides to well water, we estimate dose rates of about 1 μSv.a -1 from drinking water and 29 μSv.a -1 , which the Atomic Eenrgy Control Board has adopted as a de minimis dose rate, i.e., a dose rate so small as to not warrant institutional control. We believe that the dose rates are

  12. The potential effects of nuclear installations on the physical and human environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volders, R.

    Thermal effluents from nuclear power plants have some aquatic and atmospheric effects. In aquatic ecosystems, sharp changes in temperature are more disrupting than the small increases in temperature prevailing in Canadian conditions. The rejected heat must be utilized in the long term, probably for district or process heat. Radioactive effluents are well within international guidelines but the public conception and imperfect scientific understanding of chronic low dose irradiation effects are a severe hindrance to nuclear power proliferation. Nuclear power has non-radiological human effects due to its high technological nature, demand for services, skilled labor, and capital, and preference for sparcely populated sites. (E.C.B.)

  13. New CSA guideline for the exemption or clearance from regulatory control of materials that contain, or potentially contain, nuclear substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, M.; Kwong, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Canadian Standards Association (CSA) guideline N292.5, Guideline for the exemption or clearance from regulatory control of materials that contain, or potentially contain, nuclear substances, was recently developed to address a need for guidance on approaches for clearance of materials from facilities licensed by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) consistent with Canadian and international recommendations. This guideline is also applicable to determining if an activity associated with materials that contain nuclear substances is exempt from requiring a CNSC licence. The guideline summarizes the regulatory requirements associated with the exemption and clearance of materials and provides a graded approach to designing a survey based on the risk of residual contamination being present. (author)

  14. Compilation of nuclear safety criteria potential application to DOE nonreactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This bibliographic document compiles nuclear safety criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a Safety Analysis Report for a nonreactor nuclear facility (NNF). The criteria listed are derived from federal regulations, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guides and publications, DOE and DOE contractor publications, and industry codes and standards. The titles of the chapters and sections of Regulatory Guide 3.26, ''Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Fuel Reprocessing Plants'' were used to format the chapters and sections of this compilation. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups, namely: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) USNRC Regulatory Guides, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplementary Information

  15. Civil society involvement in informing population on potential risks of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgescu, C.; Andrei, L.

    1996-01-01

    In 1977 the town Cernavoda, Romania has been selected for the construction of the first Romanian Nuclear Power Plant provided with five CANDU type reactors, planned, at that time, to cover one third of the country power demand. The first Cernavoda Unit has been commissioned on December 2, 1996. The paper presents the preoccupation of different non-governmental organizations with respect to the impact of the nuclear plant operation on the environment and public health and, more generally, of the Uranium mining, heavy water production plants and radioactive waste disposal problems. Such issues, concerning the the energy efficiency and the nuclear power problems in Romania were not exposed so far to the public debate and little, if any, reliable information was provided to the population. The paper stresses the role of civil society in informing population on the risks implied by the nuclear power projects. 2 refs

  16. Study of the potential uses of the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an evaluation of possible international and domestic uses for the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, located in South Carolina, at the conclusion of the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. Four generic categories of use options for the Barnwell plant have been considered: storage of spent LWR fuel; reprocessing of LWR spent fuel; safeguards development and training; and non-use. Chapters are devoted to institutional options and integrated institutional-use options

  17. Study of the potential uses of the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-25

    The purpose of this study is to provide an evaluation of possible international and domestic uses for the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, located in South Carolina, at the conclusion of the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. Four generic categories of use options for the Barnwell plant have been considered: storage of spent LWR fuel; reprocessing of LWR spent fuel; safeguards development and training; and non-use. Chapters are devoted to institutional options and integrated institutional-use options.

  18. Potential for nuclear desalination as a source of low cost potable water in North Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    Based on the limited regional water resources and in recognizing the possible role of nuclear energy in seawater desalination, the five North African Countries (NACs): Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia submitted a request to the IAEA in 1990 for assistance in carrying out a feasibility study on the use of nuclear energy for seawater desalination in some pre-selected sites in these countries to cover their medium- and long-term needs for economical potable water. The present report has been prepared and is presented to the NACs in response to their request. It contains an assessment of the regional specific aspects, the available technical options with respect to desalination processes and energy sources, the cost evaluation of various technical options for the production of desalinated water, as well as the financial constraints and options, and finally the necessary steps needed to ensure the successful implementation of a nuclear desalination programme. The report also complements other work of the IAEA in the field of nuclear desalination, carried out in response to various resolutions of the IAEA General Conferences since 1989, namely: ``Use of Nuclear Reactors for Seawater Desalination``, IAEA-TECDOC-574 (1990) and ``Technical and Economic Evaluation of Potable Water Production through Desalination of Seawater by using Nuclear Energy and Other Means``, IAEA-TECDOC-666 (1992). 105 refs, 39 figs, tabs.

  19. Potential growth of nuclear and coal electricity generation in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomster, C.H.; Merrill, E.T.

    1989-08-01

    Electricity demand should continue to grow at about the same rate as GNP, creating a need for large amounts of new generating capacity over the next fifty years. Only coal and nuclear at this time have the abundant domestic resources and assured technology to meet this need. However, large increase in both coal and nuclear usage will require solutions to many of the problems that now deter their increased usage. For coal, the problems center around the safety and environmental impacts of increased coal mining and coal combustion. For nuclear, the problems center around reactor safety, radioactive waste disposal, financial risk, and nuclear materials safeguards. This report assesses the impacts associated with a range of projected growth rates in electricity demand over the next 50 years. The resource requirements and waste generation resulting from pursuing the coal and nuclear fuel options to meet the projected growth rates are estimated. The fuel requirements and waste generation for coal plants are orders of magnitude greater than for nuclear. Improvements in technology and waste management practices must be pursued to mitigate environmental and safety concerns about electricity generation from both options. 34 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs

  20. Potential for nuclear desalination as a source of low cost potable water in North Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    Based on the limited regional water resources and in recognizing the possible role of nuclear energy in seawater desalination, the five North African Countries (NACs): Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia submitted a request to the IAEA in 1990 for assistance in carrying out a feasibility study on the use of nuclear energy for seawater desalination in some pre-selected sites in these countries to cover their medium- and long-term needs for economical potable water. The present report has been prepared and is presented to the NACs in response to their request. It contains an assessment of the regional specific aspects, the available technical options with respect to desalination processes and energy sources, the cost evaluation of various technical options for the production of desalinated water, as well as the financial constraints and options, and finally the necessary steps needed to ensure the successful implementation of a nuclear desalination programme. The report also complements other work of the IAEA in the field of nuclear desalination, carried out in response to various resolutions of the IAEA General Conferences since 1989, namely: ''Use of Nuclear Reactors for Seawater Desalination'', IAEA-TECDOC-574 (1990) and ''Technical and Economic Evaluation of Potable Water Production through Desalination of Seawater by using Nuclear Energy and Other Means'', IAEA-TECDOC-666 (1992). 105 refs, 39 figs, tabs

  1. Market potential of small and medium-size nuclear reactors as combined heat and power plants in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoen, R.; Hansen, U.; Candeli, R.; Leuchs, D.; Garribba, S.F.; Lefevre, J.C.; Vivante, C.

    1987-01-01

    A Study has been launched and supported by the Commission of the European Communities to assess the potential market of small and medium size nuclear reactors through EC Countries and to identify those factors which may play a dominant role in this respect. In its first phase, the Study addresses to modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors that would be installed to produce low-temperature heat and power. Federal Republic of Germany, Italy and France are the countries for which the investigation has been either completed or is under way. The time span of interest is up to the year 2020. Referring to this horizon an appraisal has been made of the number of nuclear units which could come on line to cope with energy demand and their timing. Through the Study a distinction is made between technical potential, economic potential, and effective market potential. It is understood indeed that both economic competitiveness towards other energy sources and institutional or organizational factors may restrict the market which could be covered by this class of nuclear reactors. (author)

  2. The potential role of nuclear energy in mitigating CO2 emissions in the United Arab Emirates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlFarra, Hasan Jamil; Abu-Hijleh, Bassam

    2012-01-01

    The annual CO 2 emissions have more than doubled in the UAE since 1990. Electricity generated by fossil fuels is responsible for almost half of the country's emissions. Keeping with the Kyoto Protocol, the UAE decided to integrate nuclear energy into the electricity scheme to mitigate CO 2 emissions as declared by the government. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the UAE's proposed nuclear energy strategy in mitigating CO 2 emissions from the built environment up to year 2050. The IAEA's simulation model “MESSAGE” is used to estimate the energy demand and CO 2 emissions in the UAE up to year 2050. Several energy supply/fuels scenarios are modeled and simulated including the following: Business as Usual (BaU), the UAE proposed nuclear strategy (APR1400) as well as 12 more aggressive Clean Energy Era (CEE) proposed scenarios. Nuclear energy, especially in its extreme CEE scenario (8NPPs), was found to be more practical option in mitigating CO 2 than renewable energy and carbon capture and sequestration among the simulated scenarios. Nuclear energy also demonstrated an economic viability. The cost of electricity produced from nuclear energy was calculated to be 3.2 cents/kWh, significantly less than the current cost of 8.15 cents/kWh for electricity generation from fossil fuels in the UAE. - Highlights: ► Effectiveness of the UAE's proposed nuclear energy strategy in mitigating CO 2 emissions. ► Simulation is used to estimate the energy demand and CO 2 emissions in the UAE. ► Tested several energy supply/fuels scenarios on mitigating CO 2 .

  3. The potential benefits and drawbacks of deferring the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, R.; Pomfret, D.G.

    2000-01-01

    The need to decommission redundant plants or sites at the end of operations is accepted throughout the industry, by the timing of such work requires careful consideration. In a world where political issues dominate, safety and business drivers are often only two of the inputs, and it is therefore imperative that industry is clear in its understanding of the different drivers that affect this issue. Issues are; 1. The formal positions adopted by governments and regulators are often directed at specifically to water reactors. Should other types of facilities be constrained by the same policies? 2. Political drivers can be dominated by short to medium term considerations. Can we encourage long term strategic planning, and ? 3. The failings of the industry (especially accidents) and fear of nuclear weapons can often dominate public perception. Can industry counter these adverse associations? The key benefits relate to better risk management (especially if the radiological inventory was minimised at plant closure). Extending the decommissioning programme does allow dose reductions to take place, especially if short-lived isotopes are involved. Other benefits include more time is allowed for optioneering and planning of the decommissioning processes. This time frame also gives opportunity to develop new or better technologies. With proper control, political strategies can be developed and financial planning can take place. The concern of 'Will there be enough money to fund decommissioning' can become 'A little funding set aside early, and properly managed, can pay for decommissioning in the future'. Savings in dose, impact on the environment, and money can be achieved through a well-managed deferred programme. An extended programme of decommissioning demands the political will and the infrastructure to remain in place over a long period. Tied in to this is the need to keep money available for a long time, and to be able to retain and recover the relevant knowledge

  4. The potential for methane hydrate formation in deep repositories of spent nuclear fuel in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohidi, Bahman; Chapoy, Antonin; Smellie, John; Puigdomenech, Ignasi

    2010-12-01

    The main aim of this work was to establish whether the pertaining pressure and temperature conditions and dissolved gas concentration in groundwater is conducive to gas hydrate formation using a modelling approach. The hydrate stability pressure-temperature zone of dissolved methane in the presence of salt has been obtained through calculations which show that a decrease in the system pressure and/or an increase in salt concentration favours hydrate formation, as both factors reduce equilibrium gas solubility in the aqueous phase. This behaviour is unlike that of the system including a gas phase, where the water phase is always saturated with methane, and hence the methane solubility in water is not a limiting factor. The main conclusion is that hydrate formation is not possible at the reported methane concentrations and water salinities for the Forsmark and Laxemar sites in Sweden and Olkiluoto in Finland. At the highest salinities and methane concentrations encountered, namely ∼0.00073 mole fraction methane and ∼10 mass % NaCl at a depth of 1,000 m in Olkiluoto, Finland, hydrates could form if the system temperatures and pressures are below 2.5 deg C and 60 bar, respectively, i.e. values that are much lower than those prevailing at that depth (∼20 deg C and ∼100 bar, respectively). Furthermore, the calculated results provide the necessary data to estimate the effect of increase in dissolved methane concentration on potential hydrate formation, as well as two phase flow. The available depth dependency of methane concentration at the sites studied in Sweden and Finland was used in another study to estimate the diffusive flow of methane in the rock volumes. These diffusion rates, which are highest at Olkiluoto, indicate that even if the conditions were to become favourable to methane hydrate formation, then it would take several millions of years before a thin layer of hydrates could be formed, a condition which is outside the required period of satisfactory

  5. The potential for methane hydrate formation in deep repositories of spent nuclear fuel in granitic rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohidi, Bahman; Chapoy, Antonin (Hydrafact Ltd, Inst. of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)); Smellie, John (Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)); Puigdomenech, Ignasi (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    The main aim of this work was to establish whether the pertaining pressure and temperature conditions and dissolved gas concentration in groundwater is conducive to gas hydrate formation using a modelling approach. The hydrate stability pressure-temperature zone of dissolved methane in the presence of salt has been obtained through calculations which show that a decrease in the system pressure and/or an increase in salt concentration favours hydrate formation, as both factors reduce equilibrium gas solubility in the aqueous phase. This behaviour is unlike that of the system including a gas phase, where the water phase is always saturated with methane, and hence the methane solubility in water is not a limiting factor. The main conclusion is that hydrate formation is not possible at the reported methane concentrations and water salinities for the Forsmark and Laxemar sites in Sweden and Olkiluoto in Finland. At the highest salinities and methane concentrations encountered, namely approx0.00073 mole fraction methane and approx10 mass % NaCl at a depth of 1,000 m in Olkiluoto, Finland, hydrates could form if the system temperatures and pressures are below 2.5 deg C and 60 bar, respectively, i.e. values that are much lower than those prevailing at that depth (approx20 deg C and approx100 bar, respectively). Furthermore, the calculated results provide the necessary data to estimate the effect of increase in dissolved methane concentration on potential hydrate formation, as well as two phase flow. The available depth dependency of methane concentration at the sites studied in Sweden and Finland was used in another study to estimate the diffusive flow of methane in the rock volumes. These diffusion rates, which are highest at Olkiluoto, indicate that even if the conditions were to become favourable to methane hydrate formation, then it would take several millions of years before a thin layer of hydrates could be formed, a condition which is outside the required period of

  6. The atomic power state and national security - the hazardous nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damm, W.; Daniels, W.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have chosen the uranium/plutonium cycle, the problems involved in safety engineering of power plant, and the power industry's structural pattern in order to show and to prove the doubtfulness of safety philosophies developed for nuclear energy which in fact is not mastered by the country's technological, social, or economic capabilities. The party 'The Greens' considers nuclear energy to be a hazard to national security and therefore demands prompt abandonment of nuclear power in order to save man and the natural environment. Surplus power supply is to be replaced by the concept of demand-tailored power generation, which is to be placed on the following footing: (1) purposeful and intelligent utilisation of energy allowing dramatic reduction of energy consumption; (2) Use and promotion of renewable energy sources; (3) Abandonment of monopolistic and undemocratic structures in the energy sector of the economy. (orig./HSCH) [de

  7. Nuclear trafficking of proteins from RNA viruses: potential target for antivirals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caly, Leon; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Jans, David A

    2012-09-01

    A key aspect of the infectious cycle of many viruses is the transport of specific viral proteins into the host cell nucleus to perturb the antiviral response. Examples include a number of RNA viruses that are significant human pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, influenza A, dengue, respiratory syncytial virus and rabies, as well agents that predominantly infect livestock, such as Rift valley fever virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Inhibiting the nuclear trafficking of viral proteins as a therapeutic strategy offers an attractive possibility, with important recent progress having been made with respect to HIV-1 and dengue. The results validate nuclear protein import as an antiviral target, and suggest the identification and development of nuclear transport inhibitors as a viable therapeutic approach for a range of human and zoonotic pathogenic viruses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The economic potential of a cassette-type-reactor-installed nuclear ice-breaking container ship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Takamasa, T.

    2000-01-01

    The design concept of the cassette-type-reactor MRX (Marine Reactor X), being under development in Japan for the nuclear ice-breaker container ship is described. The MRX reactor is the monoblock water-cooled and moderated reactor with passive cooling system of natural circulation. It is shown that application of the reactor being under consideration gives an opportunity to decrease greatly the difference in prices for similar nuclear and diesel ships. Economic estimations for applicability of the nuclear ice-breaker container ship with the MRX reactor in Arctics for transportation of standard containers TEU from Europe to Far East as compared with transportation of the same containers by diesel ships via Suets Canal are made [ru

  9. Estimating the potential impacts of a nuclear reactor accident: methodology and case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, J.V.; Beemiller, R.M.; Trott, E.A. Jr.; Younger, J.M.

    1982-04-01

    This monograph describes an industrial impact model that can be used to estimate the regional industry-specific impacts of disasters. Special attention is given to the impacts of possible nuclear reactor accidents. The monograph also presents three applications of the model. The impacts estimated in the case studies are based on (1) general information and reactor-specific data, supplied by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), (2) regional economic models derived from the Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS II) developed at the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), and (3) additional methodology developed especially for taking into account the unique characteristics of a nuclear reactor accident with respect to regional industrial activity

  10. Potential Nuclear Power Plant Siting Issues in the United Arab Emirates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Hanai, Waddah T.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the need to develop additional sources of electricity to meet future demand and to ensure the rapid growth of its economy, the United Arab Emirates has embarked on a nuclear programme. The Federal Law by Decree No. 6 of 2009, Concerning the Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy was signed by the President, last fall. This law created the Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation (FANR), which is developing the framework of regulations which will guide the UAE programme. This paper reviews the development of the FANR regulation on Siting and the related environmental issues in general and those unique to the area. This will include steps being planned by the Authority to review the license application and the current concepts being looked at for the inspection programme. Among the unique aspects the author will look at are the results from a recent in-depth study performed on dust and sand storms. (author)

  11. The potential role of nuclear power in controlling CO2 emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E.; Delene, J.G.; Perry, A.M.; Cantor, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear power currently reduces CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel burning worldwide by about 8% (0.4 Gt(C)/yr). It can continue to play an important role only if it can grow substantially in the next 50 years. For such growth to occur public confidence will need to improve throughout the world. That might happen if (a) other non-fossil alternatives are inadequate to meet electricity demand growth, (b) the risks to society from global warming are perceived to be very high, (c) nuclear technology improves substantially, and (d) an international institutional setting is devised to manage the nuclear enterprise so that the technology is available to all nations while catastrophic accidents and proliferation of nuclear weapon capabilities are avoided. It seems feasible that the necessary technological and institutional advances can be devised and tested over the next 20 years. It is also plausible that the direct costs of electricity produced by the system would be in the range of 50-100 mills/kWhr (1990 dollars) delivered to the grid. In other words, the direct costs of nuclear power should not be greater than they are today. Achieving such an outcome will require aggressive technical and institutional RD ampersand D performed in a cooperative international setting. If rapid growth of nuclear power can begin again in 15-20 years it could supply 30-50% of world electricity in 50 years and cut CO 2 emission rates by up to 2.5 Gt(C)/yr. This would be a substantial contribution to controlling greenhouse gases, but it is not sufficient. Improved efficiency and various renewable energy sources must also grow rapidly if CO 2 emission rates from electricity generation are to be reduced from the current value of about 2 Gt(C)/yr. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  12. The potential role of nuclear power in controlling CO sub 2 emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulkerson, W.; Jones, J.E.; Delene, J.G.; Perry, A.M.; Cantor, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear power currently reduces CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel burning worldwide by about 8% (0.4 Gt(C)/yr). It can continue to play an important role only if it can grow substantially in the next 50 years. For such growth to occur public confidence will need to improve throughout the world. That might happen if (a) other non-fossil alternatives are inadequate to meet electricity demand growth, (b) the risks to society from global warming are perceived to be very high, (c) nuclear technology improves substantially, and (d) an international institutional setting is devised to manage the nuclear enterprise so that the technology is available to all nations while catastrophic accidents and proliferation of nuclear weapon capabilities are avoided. It seems feasible that the necessary technological and institutional advances can be devised and tested over the next 20 years. It is also plausible that the direct costs of electricity produced by the system would be in the range of 50-100 mills/kWhr (1990 dollars) delivered to the grid. In other words, the direct costs of nuclear power should not be greater than they are today. Achieving such an outcome will require aggressive technical and institutional RD D performed in a cooperative international setting. If rapid growth of nuclear power can begin again in 15-20 years it could supply 30-50% of world electricity in 50 years and cut CO{sub 2} emission rates by up to 2.5 Gt(C)/yr. This would be a substantial contribution to controlling greenhouse gases, but it is not sufficient. Improved efficiency and various renewable energy sources must also grow rapidly if CO{sub 2} emission rates from electricity generation are to be reduced from the current value of about 2 Gt(C)/yr. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Chernobyl nuclear catastrophe and the high risk potential for mental retardation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holowinsky, I.Z.

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear explosion at Chernobyl nuclear reactor on April 26, 1986, continues to have wide political, social, and medical ramifications. Hot debris from the Chernobyl reactor covered an area of more than 5,000 square kilometers with nearly 20 million curies of radionuclides. Eleven regions with a population of nearly 17 million people, of whom 2.5 million were children below the age of 5 years, suffered some degree of radioactive contamination. These children are currently of elementary school age. One of the tragedies of the explosion is that thousands of these children are at high risk for mental retardation and learning disorders

  14. The potential for nuclear energy and its impact on the greenhouse situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.

    1992-01-01

    In this address, the author maintains that the nuclear industry has the ability to provide economic, safe electric generating capacity with minimum environmental impacts. Even with an increased nuclear capacity, there will still be problems in stabilizing greenhouse gas emissions; however, without this growth stabilization will be more difficult. Pressure from developing countries to acquire electricity will result in the use of more fossil fuels. As a result, it may be desirable for OECD countries to make even stronger commitments to technologies that emit no greenhouse gases

  15. Value of non-electric applications of nuclear energy beyond market potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamis, I.

    2014-01-01

    Providing process steam at different temperatures, Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) could be coupled to various types of non-electric applications such as seawater desalination, hydrogen production, district heating or cooling, as well as any energy-demanding process heat industrial application. This will not only make nuclear power a more feasible option helping to accelerate its penetration into the the heat and transportation markets, but also helping to improve their overall thermal efficiencies. Typical thermal efficiencies of NPPs are about 33%. All existing reactor types can be coupled to non-electric application based on cogeneration i.e. the production of electricity and process heat. (authors)

  16. The Potential Pathways of Radionuclide Transformations On The Location Candidate of Nuclear Power Plants in Muria Peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simandjuntak, A.G.; Syahrir

    1998-01-01

    The potential pathways of radionuclide transformations on the location candidate of nuclear power plants in Muria peninsula proposed to explain the potential of radionuclide pathways in the ecosystem to human based on annual effective dose calculations with elimination factor ≥ 1 of dose limit 50 mSv per year. The effective dose equivalent calculations used the program package Genll. The datum found from Bureau of Statistic Centre and NEWJEC was taken into calculations. The result of this study is very useful for radiological impact and environmental impact analysis. (author)

  17. Economic potential of fuel recycling options: A lifecycle cost analysis of future nuclear system transition in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Ruxing; Choi, Sungyeol; Il Ko, Won; Kim, Sungki

    2017-01-01

    In today's profit-driven market, how best to pursue advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies while maintaining the cost competitiveness of nuclear electricity is of crucial importance to determine the implementation of spent fuel reprocessing and recycling in China. In this study, a comprehensive techno-economic analysis is undertaken to evaluate the economic feasibility of ongoing national projects and the technical compatibility with China's future fuel cycle transition. We investigated the dynamic impacts of technical and economic uncertainties in the lifecycle of a nuclear system. The electricity generation costs associated with four potential fuel cycle transition scenarios were simulated by probabilistic and deterministic approaches and then compared in detail. The results showed that the total cost of a once-through system is lowest compared those of other advanced systems involving reprocessing and recycling. However, thanks to the consequential uncertainties caused by the further progress toward technology maturity, the economic potential of fuel recycling options was proven through a probabilistic uncertainty analysis. Furthermore, it is recommended that a compulsory executive of closed fuel cycle policy would pose some investment risk in the near term, though the execution of a series of R&D initiatives with a flexible roadmap would be valuable in the long run. - Highlights: • Real-time economic performance of the four scenarios of China's nuclear fuel cycle system transition until 2100. • Systematic assessments of techno-economic feasibility for ongoing national reprocessing projects. • Investigation the cost impact on nuclear electricity generation caused by uncertainties through probabilistic analysis. • Recommendation for sustainable implementation of fuel cycle R&D initiative ingrate with flexible roadmap in the long run.

  18. The electricity supply options in Cuba and the potential role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Martin, D.; Lopez Lopez, I.

    2000-01-01

    Cuba is poor in primary energy resources. After an economic crisis initiated in 1990, a recuperation process began in 1994, but in the electric sector we could not reach the 1989 generation level. A comparative assessment of different options to cover electricity demand until 2015 performed using DECADES tools shows that the most important options are: hydro, nuclear, biomass, combined cycle and combustion turbines. The nuclear power option in the evaluated electric system expansion cases can play an important economic and environment role. The introduction of one nuclear power plant will save 330 million dollars in the expansion of the national electricity system. Environment emissions calculations during the study period, taking into consideration only the generation step, show that only the introduction of one NPP until 2015 will produce significant environment benefits. With the assumption that in generation step hydro, nuclear and biomass plants do not produce emissions, if the amount of electricity generated by these plants during study period would be generated in conventional Oil Steam Boilers with typical emission factors for Cuban conditions, the CO 2 emissions would increase in 26 millions tonnes, 576 thousand tonnes of SO x and 102 thousand tonnes of NO x . The NPP cover 80% of these reductions. (author)

  19. Adversary modeling: an analysis of criminal activities analogous to potential threats to nuclear safeguard systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heineke, J.M.

    1978-12-20

    This study examines and analyzes several classes of incidents in which decision makers are confronted with adversaries. The classes are analogous to adversaries in a material control system in a nuclear facility. Both internal threats (bank frauds and embezzlements) and external threats (aircraft hijackings and hostage-type terrorist events were analyzed. (DLC)

  20. Nuclear techniques as efficient methods in entomology and pest management: potential and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, R.K.; Sethi, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    Major economic loss to crop and other agricultural commodities occurs due to insects, which has been a serious concern to entomologists. In this context, the possible uses and perspectives of the utilization of nuclear energy in entomological research studies and pest control tactics have been highlighted. (author). 100 refs., 1 fig

  1. The Coming Nuclear Renaissance for Next Generation Safeguards Specialists--Maximizing Potential and Minimizing the Risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eipeldauer, Mary D.

    2009-01-01

    This document is intended to provide an overview of the workshop entitled 'The Coming Nuclear Renaissance for the Next Generation Safeguards Experts-Maximizing Benefits While Minimizing Proliferation Risks', conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in partnership with the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This document presents workshop objectives; lists the numerous participant universities and individuals, the nuclear nonproliferation lecture topics covered, and the facilities tours taken as part of the workshop; and discusses the university partnership sessions and proposed areas for collaboration between the universities and ORNL for 2009. Appendix A contains the agenda for the workshop; Appendix B lists the workshop attendees and presenters with contact information; Appendix C contains graphics of the evaluation form results and survey areas; and Appendix D summarizes the responses to the workshop evaluation form. The workshop was an opportunity for ORNL, Y-12, and SRNL staff with more than 30 years combined experience in nuclear nonproliferation to provide a comprehensive overview of their expertise for the university professors and their students. The overall goal of the workshop was to emphasize nonproliferation aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and to identify specific areas where the universities and experts from operations and national laboratories could collaborate

  2. The time-reversal- and parity-violating nuclear potential in chiral effective theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maekawa, C. M.; Mereghetti, E.; de Vries, J.; van Kolck, U.

    2011-01-01

    We derive the parity- and time-reversal-violating nuclear interactions stemming from the QCD (theta) over bar term and quark/gluon operators of effective dimension 6: quark electric dipole moments, quark and gluon chromo-electric dipole moments, and two four-quark operators. We work in the framework

  3. Adversary modeling: an analysis of criminal activities analogous to potential threats to nuclear safeguard systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heineke, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    This study examines and analyzes several classes of incidents in which decision makers are confronted with adversaries. The classes are analogous to adversaries in a material control system in a nuclear facility. Both internal threats (bank frauds and embezzlements) and external threats (aircraft hijackings and hostage-type terrorist events were analyzed

  4. Electric cable insulation pyrolysis and ignition resulting from potential hydrogen burn scenarios for nuclear containment buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlad, A.L.; Jaung, R.; Pratt, W.T.

    1982-01-01

    Electric cable insulation in nuclear containment buildings may participate in pyrolysis and combustion processes engendered by hydrogen burn phenomena. This paper examines these pyrolysis/ignition processes of those polymeric materials present in the electric cable insulation and their possible relation to hydrogen burn scenarios

  5. The Coming Nuclear Renaissance for Next Generation Safeguards Specialists--Maximizing Potential and Minimizing the Risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eipeldauer, Mary D [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    This document is intended to provide an overview of the workshop entitled 'The Coming Nuclear Renaissance for the Next Generation Safeguards Experts-Maximizing Benefits While Minimizing Proliferation Risks', conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in partnership with the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This document presents workshop objectives; lists the numerous participant universities and individuals, the nuclear nonproliferation lecture topics covered, and the facilities tours taken as part of the workshop; and discusses the university partnership sessions and proposed areas for collaboration between the universities and ORNL for 2009. Appendix A contains the agenda for the workshop; Appendix B lists the workshop attendees and presenters with contact information; Appendix C contains graphics of the evaluation form results and survey areas; and Appendix D summarizes the responses to the workshop evaluation form. The workshop was an opportunity for ORNL, Y-12, and SRNL staff with more than 30 years combined experience in nuclear nonproliferation to provide a comprehensive overview of their expertise for the university professors and their students. The overall goal of the workshop was to emphasize nonproliferation aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and to identify specific areas where the universities and experts from operations and national laboratories could collaborate.

  6. Nuclear heat generating plants - technical concepts and market potentials. Chapter 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoene, E.

    1988-01-01

    To determine the advantages and disadvantages of different heat generating systems, a comparison is made between nuclear heat generating plants and competing heat generating systems. Nuclear heat generating plant concepts in practice have to compete with a wide range of existing and new fossil heat generating technologies of the most different capacities, ranging from combined heat and power generation to individual heating in one-family houses. Heat generation costs are calculated by means of a dynamic annuity method from an economic point of view. The development of real prices of fossil energy sources is based on two scenarios characterized as follows: scenario I - insignificant price increase by the year 2000, then stagnant; scenario II - moderate price increase by the year 2010, then stagnant. As a result of that systems comparison it can be stated that the considered nuclear heat generating plants may be an interesting competitive heat generation option, provided the assumptions on which the study is based can be implemented. This applies especially to investment costs. At the same time those plants contribute to a diversification of energy source options on the heat market. Their use leads to a reduction of fossil fuel imports, increasing at the same time short- and long-term supply guarantees. If nuclear heat generating plants substitute fossil heat generating plants, or render the construction of new ones superfluous, they contribute to avoiding chemical air pollutants. (orig./UA) [de

  7. The Economic Potential of Two Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cutler, Dylan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores-Espino, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stark, Greg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jenkin, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simpkins, Travis [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Tightly coupled nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems (N-R HESs) are an option that can generate zero-carbon, dispatchable electricity and provide zero-carbon energy for industrial processes at a lower cost than alternatives. N-R HESs are defined as systems that are managed by a single entity and link a nuclear reactor that generates heat, a thermal power cycle for heat to electricity conversion, at least one renewable energy source, and an industrial process that uses thermal and/or electrical energy. This report provides results of an analysis of two N-R HES scenarios. The first is a Texas-synthetic gasoline scenario that includes four subsystems: a nuclear reactor, thermal power cycle, wind power plant, and synthetic gasoline production technology. The second is an Arizona-desalination scenario with its four subsystems a nuclear reactor, thermal power cycle, solar photovoltaics, and a desalination plant. The analysis focuses on the economics of the N-R HESs and how they compare to other options, including configurations without all the subsystems in each N-R HES and alternatives where the energy is provided by natural gas.

  8. The potential role of nuclear energy in greenhouse gas abatement strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, J.; Cornish, E.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear energy plays an essential role in avoiding greenhouse gas emissions. The contribution of nuclear power to electricity supplies has grown rapidly since the 1970's. As of July 2000, 432 power reactors were in operation in 31 countries. Nuclear power provided some 2300 TWh. This is about 17% of the world's total electricity, or 7% of total primary energy. This contribution avoids the emissions of about 2300 million tonnes of carbon dioxide annually, assuming that it would otherwise be provided mainly by coal-fired plants. This represents nearly one-third of the carbon dioxide presently emitted by power generation. Since electricity generation accounts for about 30% of all anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, total emissions would be about 10% higher if it were not for nuclear power. In contrast, the objective of the Kyoto Protocol is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in industrialized nations by 5% by 2008-12 compared to a 1990 baseline. In order for atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations to be stabilized at a sustainable level, it will be necessary to reduce emissions by around 60% from the 1990 level. Advocates of a policy of 'convergence and contraction', where developed and developing countries are to be allowed similar levels of emissions on a per capita basis, state that developed countries may have to reduce emissions by as much as 80%. Nuclear energy will make a significant contribution to meeting the world's future electricity demand while helping reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, the scale of that contribution will be strongly influenced by the way in which this contribution is recognized in national and international policies designed to tackle climate change. The debate continues to rage over the science of climate change: is climate change the result of human intervention or is it a naturally occurring phenomenon? The majority of scientists involved in this debate would agree that enhanced global warming, as witnessed in recent

  9. Methods and practice in the evaluation of potential radiation exposure around nuclear installations in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, A.; Franzen, L.F.; Handge, P.; Meurin, G.

    1977-01-01

    The estimation and evaluation of potential radiation exposure around nuclear installations resulting from airborne and aquatic releases of radioactivity has always been included in the Nuclear Authorization Procedures (atomrechtliches Genehmigungsverfahren) in the Federal Republic of Germany. Basic investigations have shown that first of all the radiological burden is expected via the pathway of external radiation exposure. Since about 1970 the pasture - cow - milk -pathway has been accorded an increased importance by introducing a corresponding dose rate guideline for the thyroid burden. With the rapid increase of energy production from nuclear power plants, a detailed analysis of the environmental radiological burden possibly brought about by these facilities was inserted into the Nuclear Authorization Procedures. In order to estimate in detail the consequences resulting from the release of radioactivity, nowadays the potential radiation exposure for a site is evaluated for exposures resulting from airborne discharges and for exposures resulting from aquatic discharges. Furthermore, some other pathways of exposure depending on local characteristics are taken into account. Particularly, extensive inquiry is needed concerning the deposition of radionuclides and the reconcentration by food chains. The choice of appropriate parameters often is difficult as site-specific values are not available. The determination of critical population groups and critical persons and their behavioral or dietary habits results in comparable difficulties. Therefore, a site-independent model for the evaluation of the potential radiological exposure in the Federal Republic of Germany was worked out and submitted to the nuclear regulatory commission. Moreover, some other groups - among others the Radiation Protection Commission (Strahlenschutzkommission) and the Federal Health Office (Bundesgesundheitsamt) - are investigating by theory and experiment ecological procedures and parameters

  10. The economic potential of a cassette-type-reactor-installed nuclear ice-breaking container ship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Koichi; Takamasa, Tomoji

    1999-01-01

    An improved cassette-type marine reactor MRX (Marine Reactor X) which is currently researched and developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is designed to be easily removed and transferred to another ship. If the reactor in a nuclear-powered ship, which is the reason for its higher cost, were replaced by the cassette-type-MRX, the reusability of the MRX would reduce the cost difference between nuclear-powered and diesel ships. As an investigation of one aspect of a cassette-type MRX, we attempted in this study to do an economic review of an MRX-installed nuclear-powered ice-breaking container ship sailing via the Arctic Ocean. The transportation cost between the Far East and Europe to carry one TEU (twenty-foot-equivalent container unit) over the entire life of the ship for an MRX (which is used for a 20-year period)-installed container ship sailing via the Arctic Ocean is about 70% higher than the Suez Canal diesel ship, carrying 8,000 TEU and sailing at 25 knots, and about 10% higher than the Suez Canal diesel ship carrying 4,000 TEU and sailing at 34 knots. The cost for a cassette-type-MRX (which is used for a 40-year period, removed and transferred to a second ship after being used for 20 years in the first ship)-installed nuclear-powered container ship is about 7% lower than that for the one operated for 20 years. Considering any loss or reduction in sales opportunities through the extension of the transportation period, the nuclear-powered container ship via the Arctic Sea is a more suitable means of transportation than a diesel ship sailing at 25 knots via the Suez Canal when the value of the commodities carried exceeds 2,800 dollars per freight ton. (author)

  11. Economic potential of nuclear-powered ice-breaking container ship via the northern sea route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamasa, Tomoji; Kondo, Koichi

    2000-01-01

    An improved cassette-type marine reactor MRX (Marine Reactor X) which is currently researched and developed by the JAERI is designed to be easily removed and transferred to another ship. If the reactor in a nuclear-powered ship, which is the reason for its higher cost, were replaced by the cassette-type-MRX, the reusability of the MRX would reduce the cost difference between nuclear-powered and diesel ships. As an investigation of one aspect of a cassette-type MRX, we attempted in this study to do an economic review of an MRX-installed nuclear-powered ice-breaking container ship sailing via the Arctic Ocean. The transportation cost between the Far East and Europe to carry one TEU (twenty-foot-equivalent container unit) over the entire life of the ship for an MRX (which is used for a 20-year period)-installed container ship sailing via the Arctic Ocean is about 70% higher than the Suez Canal diesel ship, carrying 8,000 TEU and sailing at 25 knots, and about 10% higher than the Suez Canal diesel ship carrying 4,000 TEU and sailing at 34 knots. The cost for a cassette-type-MRX (which is used for a 40-year period, removed and transferred to a second ship after being used for 20 years in the first ship)-installed nuclear-powered container ship is about 7% lower than that for the one operated for 20 years. Considering any loss or reduction in sales opportunities through the extension of the transportation period, the nuclear-powered container ship via the Arctic Sea is a more suitable means of transportation than a diesel ship sailing at 25 knots via the Suez Canal when the value of the commodities carried exceeds 2,800 dollars per freight ton. (author)

  12. Giant titanium electron wave function in gallium oxide: A potential electron-nuclear spin system for quantum information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentink-Vigier, Frédéric; Binet, Laurent; Vignoles, Gerard; Gourier, Didier; Vezin, Hervé

    2010-11-01

    The hyperfine interactions of the unpaired electron with eight surrounding G69a and G71a nuclei in Ti-doped β-Ga2O3 were analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopies. They are dominated by strong isotropic hyperfine couplings due to a direct Fermi contact interaction with Ga nuclei in octahedral sites of rutile-type chains oriented along b axis, revealing a large anisotropic spatial extension of the electron wave function. Titanium in β-Ga2O3 is thus best described as a diffuse (Ti4+-e-) pair rather than as a localized Ti3+ . Both electron and G69a nuclear spin Rabi oscillations could be observed by pulsed EPR and pulsed ENDOR, respectively. The electron spin decoherence time is about 1μs (at 4 K) and an upper bound of 520μs (at 8 K) is estimated for the nuclear decoherence time. Thus, β-Ga2O3:Ti appears to be a potential spin-bus system for quantum information processing with a large nuclear spin quantum register.

  13. Potential applications for nuclear energy besides electricity generation: A global perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, Jean Claude; Ballot, Bernard; Lebrun, Jean Philippe; Lecomte, Michel; Hittner, Dominique; Carre, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Energy supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will be developed. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat sources free of Greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated

  14. Reactive inspection response of NRC Region III to potential technical deficiencies identified in recent Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    In order to effectively meet its responsibility to protect the public health and safety, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) nuclear power plant licensing and inspection programs respond to potential technical deficiencies identified by conference and professional society meeting papers when deemed appropriate. The NRC staff's response mechanisms for such technical deficiencies include: generic letters, Bulletins, Information Notices, Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800) revisions, docketed Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) questions, special studies, special (reactive) inspection, and inspection program revisions. This paper describes reactive inspection efforts by Region III in response to potential technical deficiencies identified in recent air cleaning conference papers, including: post-accident effluent sample line deposition losses; failure to implement good engineering practices in the design, construction, and testing of Nuclear Air Treatment Systems (NATS); filter bypass via filter housing drain lines; spinster carbon degradation; use of silicone sealants and other temporary patching material in NATS; filter housing fire protection deluge system problems; lack of charcoal batch traceability; Quality Assurance records problems involving equipment, vendor, filter, and personnel qualifications; inadequate ANSI/ASME N510 acceptance criteria and tests; and failure to adequately demonstrate control room habitability per 10 CFR 50, Appendix A, General Design Criterion-19. Region III inspections indicate that many of these deficiencies appear to be prevalent. Inspection findings and utility responses to the findings are discussed. NRC Region III and Headquarters programmatic reactions to the identified generic problem areas are also discussed

  15. Continental-scale enrichment of atmospheric 14CO2 from the nuclear power industry: potential impact on the estimation of fossil fuel-derived CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, H. D.; Gruber, N.

    2011-12-01

    The 14C-free fossil carbon added to atmospheric CO2 by combustion dilutes the atmospheric 14C/C ratio (Δ14C), potentially providing a means to verify fossil CO2 emissions calculated using economic inventories. However, sources of 14C from nuclear power generation and spent fuel reprocessing can counteract this dilution and may bias 14C/C-based estimates of fossil fuel-derived CO2 if these nuclear influences are not correctly accounted for. Previous studies have examined nuclear influences on local scales, but the potential for continental-scale influences on Δ14C has not yet been explored. We estimate annual 14C emissions from each nuclear site in the world and conduct an Eulerian transport modeling study to investigate the continental-scale, steady-state gradients of Δ14C caused by nuclear activities and fossil fuel combustion. Over large regions of Europe, North America and East Asia, nuclear enrichment may offset at least 20% of the fossil fuel dilution in Δ14C, corresponding to potential biases of more than -0.25 ppm in the CO2 attributed to fossil fuel emissions, larger than the bias from plant and soil respiration in some areas. Model grid cells including high 14C-release reactors or fuel reprocessing sites showed much larger nuclear enrichment, despite the coarse model resolution of 1.8°×1.8°. The recent growth of nuclear 14C emissions increased the potential nuclear bias over 1985-2005, suggesting that changing nuclear activities may complicate the use of Δ14C observations to identify trends in fossil fuel emissions. The magnitude of the potential nuclear bias is largely independent of the choice of reference station in the context of continental-scale Eulerian transport and inversion studies, but could potentially be reduced by an appropriate choice of reference station in the context of local-scale assessments.

  16. The Economic Potential of Three Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems Providing Thermal Energy to Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cutler, Dylan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores-Espino, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stark, Greg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jenkin, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report is one of a series of reports that Idaho National Laboratory and National Renewable Energy Laboratory are producing to investigate the technical and economic aspects of nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems (N-R HESs). Previous reports provided results of an analysis of two N-R HES scenarios. This report builds that analysis with a Texas-synthetic gasoline scenario providing the basis in which the N-R HES sells heat directly to an industrial customer. Subsystems were included that convert electricity to heat, thus allowing the renewable energy subsystem to generate heat and benefit from that revenue stream. Nuclear and renewable energy sources are important to consider in the energy sector's evolution because both are considered to be clean and non-carbon-emitting energy sources.

  17. US market potential for small and medium-sized nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardie, R.W.; Jackson, S.V.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results of on-site interviews with representatives of 23 investor-owned utilities and 3 publicly-owned utilities. The purpose of the interviews was to obtain information on utilities' attitudes towards small and medium-sized power plants and towards building new nuclear plants in general. Most of the utilities interviewed preferred power plants smaller than the ones currently being offered, as long as the smaller plants did not incur a major economic penalty. However, according to the utilities interviewed, without changes in the current environment it is unlikely that there will be a significant market for new nuclear plants of any size. A trend in the utility industry towards generating companies appears to be a positive step. (orig.)

  18. US market potential for small and medium-sized nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardie, R.W.; Jackson, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the results of on-site interviews with representatives of 23 investor-owned utilities and 3 publicly-owned utilities. The purpose of the interviews was to obtain information on utilities' attitudes toward small and medium-sized power plants and towards building new nuclear plants in general. Most of the utilities interviewed preferred power plants smaller than the ones currently being offered, as long as the smaller plants did not incur a major economic penalty. However, according to the utilities interviewed, without changes in the current environment it is unlikely that there will be a significant market for new nuclear plants of any size. A trend in the utility industry towards generating companies appears to be a positive step. (author)

  19. Economic potential of smaller-sized nuclear plants in today's economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    In this study, the cost of producing power was modelled for a utility with specified financial and production parameters. Two reference cases were considered: in one, it was assumed that the utility would build 400-megawatt nuclear units as necessary to meet its growth in load; in the second, that it would meet its load growth by building 1200-MW units. The smaller plants were assumed to cost 12 percent more per kilowatt than the larger units. The object was to see if the lower financing costs of the 400-megawatt units were enough to overcome the larger plants' economies of scale. In addition to the reference cases, the sensitivity of the cost measurement to changes in various parameters was modelled. The parameters tested included interest rates, fuel mix, cost differential between the 400-megawatt and 1200-megawatt plants, and the rate of growth in load. The results of these cases indicate strongly that small nuclear power plants could have a market

  20. The Economic Potential of Three Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems Providing Thermal Energy to Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, Mark; Cutler, Dylan; Flores-Espino, Francisco; Stark, Greg; Jenkin, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This report is one of a series of reports that Idaho National Laboratory and National Renewable Energy Laboratory are producing to investigate the technical and economic aspects of nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems (N-R HESs). Previous reports provided results of an analysis of two N-R HES scenarios. This report builds that analysis with a Texas-synthetic gasoline scenario providing the basis in which the N-R HES sells heat directly to an industrial customer. Subsystems were included that convert electricity to heat, thus allowing the renewable energy subsystem to generate heat and benefit from that revenue stream. Nuclear and renewable energy sources are important to consider in the energy sector's evolution because both are considered to be clean and non-carbon-emitting energy sources.

  1. Advanced Quantification of Plutonium Ionization Potential to Support Nuclear Forensic Evaluations by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    woman I know. She is the true cornerstone of my career. Through the tribulations of deployments and long hours in port, she steadily provided me...right diagram (b), shows an odd isotope with the nuclear spin angular momenta of I = 3/2. In contrast with the even isotope, there is two states, F...The electron spin angular momentum is not affected by the dipole operator. The even isotopes have equal squares of their Clebsch-Gordan

  2. Citizens' views about the proposed Hartsville Nuclear Power Plant: a preliminary report of potential social impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, C.R.; Fowler, J.R.; Mattingly, T.J. Jr.; Sundstrom, E.; Lounsbury, J.; Passino, E.M.; Dowell, D.A.; Hutton, B.J.

    1975-05-01

    Preliminary results of a survey of public attitudes toward a proposed nuclear power plant facility at Hartsville, Tennessee are summarized. The purpose of the study was to aid in developing better methods for understanding the social consequences of energy facility development. The report is based on data obtained in interviews with 350 randomly selected respondents administered in Trousdale County, Tennessee during February 1975. (U.S.)

  3. Cradle-to-Grave Nuclear Fuel Supply Assurance Workshop: Industry’s Potential Role

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengelsdorf, Harold (Hal); Hund, Gretchen; Kessler, Carol E.; Mahy, Heidi A.; McGoldrick, Fred; Seward, Amy M.

    2007-09-30

    The Pacific Northwest Center for Global Security hosted a workshop on June 6, 2007 in Washington D.C. to discuss the feasibility, merits and implications of the United States offering cradle-to-grave nuclear fuel cycle services to other countries. The workshop consisted of a small group of senior individuals from the private sector, government and the national laboratories. The workshop is summarized and recommendations given.

  4. The egyptian placer deposits - A potential source for nuclear raw materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabbour, G A [Nuclear materials authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    The extensive black sands placer deposits are disconsolately distributed along the northern Mediterranean castle plain of the Nile Delta and Sinai Peninsula. These sediments contain strategic and economic heavy minerals which are required for the industrial exploitation whether for nuclear industry or other metallurgical and engineering industries. They comprise huge reserves of monazite, Zircon, magnetite, ilmenite and garnet. The first three economic minerals contain U, Th, Zr, Hf, Ti and REEs. Thus, monazite assays 0.48% U{sub 3} O{sub 8}, 6.04% (Zr+Hf) 02, 0.06% U{sub 3} O{sub 8} and 0.04% Th O{sub 2}. The beach rutile has 98.64% Ti O{sub 2}. Therefore, the estimated geological reserves of the nuclear materials are enormous. In the light of these data, the nuclear materials Authority has its own programmes for physical and chemical processing of the Egyptian black sands. In the mean time, zircon as a mineral would be used in ceramic industry while rutile as a mineral would be used in welding rods industry. The rare earths oxides cake could be used ferro-silicon alloy. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. The potential risks from Russian nuclear ships. NKS-SBA-1 status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelgaard, P.L. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2001-11-01

    A review is given of the information available on the Russian nuclear ships including submarines, cruisers and ice-breaking ships with special emphasis on the vessels of the Northern Fleet and the Russian icebreakers. A significant part of these ships has today been taken out of active service, and they are in various stages of decommissioning. Information on the decommissioned vessels, their storage sites and the procedures planned for the further decommissioning works is discussed. The handling of spent nuclear fuel is also considered. The various types of accidents, which might occur with these ships, operational as well as decommissioned, are considered, and examples of actual accidents with operational vessels are presented. The types of accidents considered include criticality accidents, loss-of-coolant accidents, fires/explosions and sinking. Some measures taken by the Russians to avoid such accidents are discussed. The special problems connected to the two decommissioned submarines of the Northern Fleet, which have damaged cores, are mentioned. In appendices data on the Russian nuclear vessels are presented. (au)

  6. The potential role of nuclear energy in greenhouse gas abatement strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, J.; Cornish, E.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear energy will make a significant contribution to meeting the world's future electricity demand while helping reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However the scale of that contribution will be strongly influenced by the way in which this contribution is recognised in national and international policies designed to tackle climate change. The debate continues to rage over the science of climate change: is climate change the result of human intervention or is it a naturally occurring phenomenon? The majority of scientists involved in this debate would agree that enhanced global warming, as witnessed in recent years, has come about as a result of the massive explosion in greenhouse gas emissions since the beginning of the industrial era. This paper will give an overview of the institutions and organisations involved in the international climate change negotiations. It will describe the political positions of different countries on their perceived role of nuclear power in mechanisms designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The paper will also give an insight into the financial impact of assigning a value to carbon emissions and how that might change the relative economics of nuclear power in comparison to fossil fuel generation

  7. Perceived risk, stigma, and potential economic impacts of a high-level nuclear waste repository in Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovic, P.; Layman, M.; Kraus, N.N.; Chalmers, J.; Gesel, G.; Flynn, J.

    1989-07-01

    This paper describes a program of research designed to assess the potential impacts of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, upon tourism, retirement and job-related migration, and business development in Las Vegas and the state. Adverse economic impacts may be expected to result from two related social processes. One has to do with perceptions of risk and socially amplified reactions to ''unfortunate events'' associated with the repository (major and minor accidents, discoveries of radiation releases, evidence of mismanagement, attempts to sabotage or disrupt the facility, etc.). The second process that may trigger significant adverse impacts is that of stigmatization. The conceptual underpinnings of risk perception, social amplification, and stigmatization are discussed in this paper and empirical data are presented to demonstrate how nuclear images associated with Las Vegas and the State of Nevada might trigger adverse effects on tourism, migration, and business development

  8. Evaluation and communication of potential risk of radionuclide contamination of foods after Fukushima nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekizawa, Jun; Nakamura, Yumiko

    2011-01-01

    A large scale nuclear power plant accident happened after the great earthquake with a huge tsunami in the Eastern part of Japan in March 2011. Potential risk from radionuclide contamination in foods after the nuclear power plant accident was estimated using data of radiological food contamination from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Data analyzed by combining nuclide, food, level of radiation detection, period, age-classified population, were compared to provisional index levels of radionuclides, and existing contamination levels in food by natural radioactive potassium. Health risk was shown to be very low or negligible considering presence of background radiological exposure from foods and the environment. Appropriate explanation of risk to various stakeholders of the society is imperative and results of trials were reported. (author)

  9. Pathogenic and Diagnostic Potential of BLCA-1 and BLCA-4 Nuclear Proteins in Urothelial Cell Carcinoma of Human Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Santoni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the bladder is one of the most common malignancies of genitourinary tract. Patients with bladder cancer need a life-long surveillance, directly due to the relatively high recurrence rate of this tumor. The use of cystoscopy represents the gold standard for the followup of previously treated patients. Nevertheless, several factors, including cost and invasiveness, render cystoscopy not ideal for routine controls. Advances in the identification of specific alterations in the nuclear structure of bladder cancer cells have opened novel diagnostic landscapes. The members of nuclear matrix protein family BLCA-1 and BLCA-4, are currently under evaluation as bladder cancer urinary markers. They are involved in tumour cell proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. In this paper, we illustrate the role of BLCA-1 and BLCA-4 in bladder carcinogenesis and their potential exploitation as biomarkers in this cancer.

  10. Preliminary analysis of the cost and risk of transporting nuclear waste to potential candidate commercial repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmot, E.L.; Madsen, M.M.; Cashwell, J.W.; Joy, D.S.

    1983-06-01

    This report documents preliminary cost and risk analyses that were performed in support of the Nuclear Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. The analyses compare the costs and hazards of transporting wastes to each of five regions that contain potential candidate nuclear waste repository sites being considered by the NWTS program. These regions are: the Gulf Interior Region, the Permian Basin, the Paradox Basin, Yucca Mountain, and Hanford. Two fuel-cycle scenarios were analyzed: once-through and reprocessing. Transportation was assumed to be either entirely by truck or entirely by rail for each of the scenarios. The results from the risk analyses include those attributable to nonradiological causes and those attributable to the radioactive character of the wastes being transported. 17 references

  11. Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    The first text deals with a new circular concerning the collect of the medicine radioactive wastes, containing radium. This campaign wants to incite people to let go their radioactive wastes (needles, tubes) in order to suppress any danger. The second text presents a decree of the 31 december 1999, relative to the limitations of noise and external risks resulting from the nuclear facilities exploitation: noise, atmospheric pollution, water pollution, wastes management and fire prevention. (A.L.B.)

  12. Nuclear power supplies: their potential and the practical problems to their achievement for space missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colston, B.W.; Brehm, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The anticipated growth of the space station power requirement provides a good example of the problem the space nuclear power supply developers have to contend with: should a reactor power supply be developed that attempts to be all things to all missions, i.e., is highly flexible in its ability to meet a wide variety of missions, or should the development of a reactor system await a specific mission definition and be customized to this mission. This leads, of course, to a chicken-and-egg situation. For power requirements of several hundreds of kilowatts or more, no nuclear power source exists or is even far enough along in the definition stage (much less the development stage) for NASA to reasonably assume probable availability within the next 10 years. The real problem of space nuclear power is this ''chicken-and-egg'' syndrome: DOE will not develop a space reactor system for NASA without a firm mission, and NASA will not specify a firm mission requiring a space reactor because such a system doesn't exist and is perceived not to be developable within the time frame of the mission. The problem is how to break this cycle. The SP-100 program has taken an important first step to breaking this cycle, but this program is much more design-specific than what is required to achieve a broad technology base and latitude in achievable power level. In contrast to the SP-100 approach, a wider perspective is required: the development of the appropriate technologies for power levels can be broken into ranges, say, from 100 kWe to 1000 kWe, and from 1000 kWe to 10,000 kWe

  13. POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN BUILDUP IN HANFORD SEALED AIR FILLED NUCLEAR STORAGE VESSELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEY BE

    2008-01-01

    This calculation is performed in accordance with HNF-PRO-8259, PHMC Calculation Preparation and Issue and addresses the question as to whether a flammable mixture of hydrogen gas can accumulate in a Hanford sealed nuclear storage vessel where the only source of hydrogen is the moisture in the air that initially filled the vessel Of specific concern is nuclear fuel inside IDENT 69-Gs, placed in Core Component Containers (CCCs) located inside Interim Storage Vaults (ISVs) at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) The CCCs are to be removed from the ISVs and placed inside a Hanford Unirradiated Fuel Package (HUFP) for transport and interim storage. The repackaging procedures mandated that no plastics were permitted, all labels and tape were to be removed and the pins to be clean and inspected Loading of the fuel into the CCC/ISV package was permitted only if it was not raining or snowing. This was to preclude the introduction of any water The purpose was to minimize the presence of any hydrogenous material inside the storage vessels. The scope of NFPA 69, 'Standard on Explosion Prevention Systems', precludes its applicability for this case. The reactor fuel pins are helium bonded. The non-fuel pins, such as the pellet stacks, are also helium bonded. The fuel pellets were sintered at temperatures that preclude any residual hydrogenous material. Hydrogen gas can be formed from neutron and gamma radiolysis of water vapor. The radiolysis reaction is quite complex involving several intermediate radicals, and competing recombination reactions. Hydrogen gas can also be formed through corrosion. This analysis takes a simplistic approach and assumes that all water vapor present in the storage vessel is decomposed into hydrogen gas. Although the analysis is needed to specifically address HUFP storage of nuclear fuel, it is equally applicable to any sealed fuel storage vessel under the assumptions listed

  14. Potentials for advanced nuclear technique (reactor) demonstration in eastern part of Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasman, A.N.; Kusnanto; Masduki, B.; Dasuki, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Because the differentiation of the ground water, the mining resources, the climate, the people density and the distance between one and another island so the national industry development becomes unique and complex. The main requirement for the national industry development is the supply of adequate energy, especially for developing of eastern part of Indonesia. The advanced nuclear reactor should be an energy source which can be universally used for the electric power and non electric application. It means, that using of this technology could lead to the development of eastern part of Indonesia. (author). 5 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  15. Potential of remote multiplexing systems in reducing cabling cost and complexity in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, A.J.; L'Archeveque, J.V.R.

    1977-03-01

    Control and instrumentation cabling accounts for nearly 1% of the capital cost of a CANDU generating station. This study of cabling requirements, methods and costs for nuclear reactors, shows that efficient design and scale economies make CANDU wiring costs (per field point) among the lowest for comparable applications. Although attractive in other reactors, commercially available remote multiplexing systems are not, as yet, cost effective for general use in CANDU stations. The report, with its comprehensive tabulation of remote multiplexing equipment, and analysis of cabling procedures describes an approach for re-evaluating the tradeoff between remote multiplexing and conventional wiring as conditions change. (author)

  16. The Economic Potential of Two Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cutler, Dylan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores-Espino, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stark, Greg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jenkin, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simpkins, Travis [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report is one of a series of reports that investigate the technical and economic aspects of Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems. It provides the results of an analysis of two scenarios. The first is a Texas-synthetic gasoline scenario and the second is an Arizona-desalination scenario. The analysis focuses on the economics of the N-R HESs and how they compare to other options, including configurations without all the subsystems in each N-R HES and alternatives in which natural gas provides the energy.

  17. Analytical matrix elements of semifinite 2D two centre nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niculescu, V. L. R.; Catana, S.; Catana, D.; Babin, V.

    1998-01-01

    In the present work we introduce a new 2D potential which is a symmetric double-well in one variable and with one centre in the other. The factorable potential matrix elements are expressed by analytical formulas. This implies a shorter computational time. (author)

  18. Nuclear safety. Seguranca nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aveline, A [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1981-01-01

    What is nuclear safety Is there any technical way to reduce risks Is it possible to put them at reasonable levels Are there competitiveness and economic reliability to employ the nuclear energy by means of safety technics Looking for answers to these questions the author describes the sources of potential risks to nuclear reactors and tries to apply the answers to the Brazilian Nuclear Programme. (author).

  19. Numerical simulations of electric potential field for alternating current potential drop associated with surface cracks in low-alloy steel nuclear material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chun-Ping; Huang, Jiunn-Yuan

    2018-04-01

    Low-alloy steels used as structural materials in nuclear power plants are subjected to cyclic stresses during power plant operations. As a result, cracks may develop and propagate through the material. The alternating current potential drop technique is used to measure the lengths of cracks in metallic components. The depth of the penetration of the alternating current is assumed to be small compared to the crack length. This assumption allows the adoption of the unfolding technique to simplify the problem to a surface Laplacian field. The numerical modelling of the electric potential and current density distribution prediction model for a compact tension specimen and the unfolded crack model are presented in this paper. The goal of this work is to conduct numerical simulations to reduce deviations occurring in the crack length measurements. Numerical simulations were conducted on AISI 4340 low-alloy steel with different crack lengths to evaluate the electric potential distribution. From the simulated results, an optimised position for voltage measurements in the crack region was proposed.

  20. Exploratory shaft facility: It's role in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site for a potential nuclear repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalia, H.N.; Merson, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is characterizing Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to assess its suitability as a potential site for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from nuclear power plants and defense related activities. The assessment activities include surface investigations, drill holes from the surface, and an underground facility for in situ characterization tests. This underground exploratory shaft facility is being designed to meet the criteria for characterizing the mountain as described in the Site Characterization Plan. 9 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  1. Exploratory shaft facility: It`s role in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site for a potential nuclear repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalia, H.N.; Merson, T.J.

    1990-03-01

    The US Department of Energy is characterizing Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to assess its suitability as a potential site for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from nuclear power plants and defense related activities. The assessment activities include surface investigations, drill holes from the surface, and an underground facility for in situ characterization tests. This underground exploratory shaft facility is being designed to meet the criteria for characterizing the mountain as described in the Site Characterization Plan. 9 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Virtual screening for potential inhibitors of Mcl-1 conformations sampled by normal modes, molecular dynamics, and nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glantz-Gashai Y

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Yitav Glantz-Gashai,* Tomer Meirson,* Eli Reuveni, Abraham O Samson Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee, Bar Ilan University, Safed, Israel *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1 is often overexpressed in human cancer and is an important target for developing antineoplastic drugs. In this study, a data set containing 2.3 million lead-like molecules and a data set of all the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved drugs are virtually screened for potential Mcl-1 ligands using Protein Data Bank (PDB ID 2MHS. The potential Mcl-1 ligands are evaluated and computationally docked on to three conformation ensembles generated by normal mode analysis (NMA, molecular dynamics (MD, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, respectively. The evaluated potential Mcl-1 ligands are then compared with their clinical use. Remarkably, half of the top 30 potential drugs are used clinically to treat cancer, thus partially validating our virtual screen. The partial validation also favors the idea that the other half of the top 30 potential drugs could be used in the treatment of cancer. The normal mode-, MD-, and NMR-based conformation greatly expand the conformational sampling used herein for in silico identification of potential Mcl-1 inhibitors. Keywords: virtual screening, Mcl-1, molecular dynamics, NMR, normal modes

  3. Studies of potential severe accidents in Finnish nuclear power plants. Quarterly report 3. quarter 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aro, Ilari.

    1989-07-01

    This thesis is based on six publications dealing with severe accident studies in Finnish nuclear power plants. Main emphasis has been put on general technical bases and methodologies applied in severe accident evaluation in Finland. As an example of the use of the analysis and evaluation methods, the analysis of one representative accident sequence, t otal loss of AC power , has been presented for both Finnish power plant types. This accident sequence is required to be analyzed in the Finnish safety guide YVL 2.2 which deals with transient and accident analyses as a basis of technical solutions at nuclear powr plants. Two different analysis methods, MAAP 3.0 and MARCH 3/STCP have been used for receiving as complete a picture as possible of the flow of events and for verifying the models to some extent. Besides the use of the two different models, the method of sensitivity analysis has been used for evaluating the effects of some important technical parameters on the accident flow. Finally, conclusions of the applicability of the two methods for analyzing severe accident sequences in Finnish plants have been discussed

  4. Use of swelling clays to reduce permeability and its potential application to nuclear waste repository sealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, D.E.; Morrow, C.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The injection of swelling-clay slurries into joints or faults at a deep-burial nuclear waste disposal site may result in signficant permeability reductions for the effective containment of radioactive wastes. In an experiment conducted to illustrate the permeability change accompanying clay swelling, a coarse stone with interconnected pore spaces was injected with a clay-electrolyte slurry, modelling the pressure-grouting of a fractured repository rock. Subsequently, solutions with lower electroylte concentrations were driven through the clay-filled stone, corresponding to migration of lower salinity ground-waters through the clay-grouted fracture. The initial injection procedure reduced the permeability of the stone from 1--10 darcies to 700 nanodarcies; the changes in solution composition decreased permeability by more than 2 additional orders of magnitude to 3 nanodarcies. For application at a nuclear waste repository, the electrolyte concentration of the injected clay slurry should be made higher than that of the ground-water in the host rock. Subesquent interaction of the ground-water with the clays would initiate swelling and create the additional, post-injection permeability reductions that may be important in preventing the escape of buried radioactive wastes. The measured permeability of the clay filling is considerably lower than that of cement tested for borehole plugging. Clays also have the advantage over cement and chemical grouts in that they are geologically stable at relatively low temperatures and have a high capacity for radionuclide adsorption

  5. Potentiality of an accounting system for nuclear materials in the PNC plutonium fuel facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, T.; Aoki, M.; Tsutsumi, M.; Akutsu, H.

    1976-01-01

    The accounting system based on data filing and inquiry processing by the use of an optical mark reader (OMR) has been developed and operated satisfactorily for criticality control and accountancy of nuclear materials in the plutonium facilities of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC). The OMR system has merits, especially compared with an old chit and punch-card system, such as low cost, abundance of the data included on a single sheet, universality of use for all kinds of material transfers, ease of data correction, and a large capacity. The OMR system is applied to the material transfer and also for physical inventory taking. This system, together with the use of an accurate automatic balance equipped at each glove box, which is generally designated as an accounting unit for the criticality control, generated a MUF of 0.43% for a fuel fabrication campaign of 119 assemblies for a fast reactor, which can be decreased further. In relation to the recent safeguarding situation and also to fitting in with an automatic fuel fabrication process, however, a further development of the present system will be necessary in the near future. This future system is discussed with reference to criticism of the current accountancy system by Rosenbaum and others, and its possible framework with the emphasis on the weighing and reading of numbered items is suggested. (author)

  6. The hydrogen economy for a sustainable future and the potential contribution of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, C.

    2003-01-01

    The Hydrogen Economy encompasses the production of hydrogen using a wide range of energy sources, its storage and distribution as an economic and universal energy carrier, and its end use by industry and individuals with negligible emission of pollutants and greenhouse gases. Hydrogen is an energy carrier not a primary energy source, just like electricity is an energy carrier. The advantages of hydrogen as a means of storage and distribution of energy, and the methods of production of hydrogen, are reviewed. Energy sources for hydrogen production include fossil fuels, renewables, hydropower and nuclear power. Hydrogen has many applications in industry, for residential use and for transport by air, land and sea. Fuel cells are showing great promise for conversion of hydrogen into electricity and their development and current status are discussed. Non-energy uses of hydrogen and the safety aspects of hydrogen are also considered. It is concluded that the Hydrogen Economy, especially if coupled to renewable and nuclear energy sources, is a technically viable and economic way of achieving greater energy diversity and security and a sustainable future in this century

  7. Tennessee Valley region study: potential year 2000 radiological dose to population resulting from nuclear facility operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    A companion report, DOE/ET-0064/1, presents a geographic, cultural, and demographic profile of the Tennessee Valley Region study area. This report describes the calculations of radionuclide release and transport and of the resultant dose to the regional population, assuming a projected installed capacity of 220,000 MW in the year 2000, of which 144,000 MW would be nuclear. All elements of the fuel cycle were assumed to be in operation. The radiological dose was calculated as a one-year dose based on ingestion of 35 different food types as well as for nine non-food pathways, and was reported as dose to the total body and for six specific organs for each of four age groups (infant, child, teen, and adult). Results indicate that the average individual would receive an incremental dose of 7 x 10 -4 millirems in the year 2000 from the operation of nuclear facilities within and adjacent to the region, five orders of magnitude smaller than the dose from naturally occurring radiation in the area. The major contributor to dose was found to be tritium, and the most significant pathways were immersion in air, inhalation of air, transpiration of tritium (absorption through the skin), and exposure radionuclide-containing soil. 60 references

  8. Potential radiological impact assessment related to the visit of nuclear submarines to the port of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Jose Francisco; Rochedo, Elaine R.R.

    2005-01-01

    Brazil is signatory of international protocols for receiving the visit of nuclear ships and submarines. Such naval units, during their stays in Brazilian ports, inform that there is no release of radioactive material to the environment. However, there is always the possibility of an accident, leading to environmental release of radioactive material. This work had the objective of assessing the potential radiological environmental impact due to the eventual occurrence of an accident during the permanence of ships and submarines of nuclear propulsion in the port of the city of Rio de Janeiro, in Guanabara Bay. The accident scenarios considered include releases to the marine environment and to the atmosphere. Previous results indicated that, in normal operation conditions, no significant radiological impact is foreseen due to the visits of nuclear submarines to the city, even if small routine radionuclide releases occur. The analysis of the accidental releases, however, indicates that the anchorage points should be located at a minimum distance of 2,5 km of inhabited areas in the contour the Bay. (author)

  9. Microscopic optical potential for 208Pb in the nuclear structure approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, V.; Nguyen Van Gai.

    1979-04-01

    The optical potential for nucleon- 208 Pb scattering below 30 MeV is calculated microscopically as the sum of a real Hartree-Fock term and a complex correction term arising from the coupling to excited states of the target. The Skyrme effective interaction is used to generate the Hartree-Fock field, the RPA excited states and the coupling. A complex local equivalent potential is defined and used to calculate scattering and absorption cross-sections. The real part of the optical potential is reasonably well described in this approach while the imaginary part is too weak. Inclusion of rearrangement processes could improve the agreement with experiment

  10. A Review on the Potential Use of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Nuclear Fusion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Sümer; Übeyli, Mustafa

    2008-12-01

    Various engineering materials; austenitic stainless steels, ferritic/martensitic steels, vanadium alloys, refractory metals and composites have been suggested as candidate structural materials for nuclear fusion reactors. Among these structural materials, austenitic steels have an advantage of extensive technological database and lower cost compared to other non-ferrous candidates. Furthermore, they have also advantages of very good mechanical properties and fission operation experience. Moreover, modified austenitic stainless (Ni and Mo free) have relatively low residual radioactivity. Nevertheless, they can't withstand high neutron wall load which is required to get high power density in fusion reactors. On the other hand, a protective flowing liquid wall between plasma and solid first wall in these reactors can eliminate this restriction. This study presents an overview of austenitic stainless steels considered to be used in fusion reactors.

  11. Potential safety enhancements to nuclear plant control: proof testing at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, R.W.; Chisholm, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    Future changes in nuclear plant control and protective systems will reflect an evolutionary improvement through increased use of computers coupled with a better integration of man and machine. Before improvements can be accepted into the licensed commercial plant environment, significant testing must be accomplished to answer safety questions and to prove the worth of new ideas. The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) is being used as a test-bed for both in-house development and testing for others in a DOE sponsored Man-Machine Integration program. The ultimate result of the development and testing would be a control system for which safety credit could be taken in the licensing process

  12. Partitioning-transmutation technology: a potential future nuclear waste management option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, S.; Morita, Y.; Nishihara, K.; Oigawa, H.

    2005-01-01

    Partitioning-transmutation technology (PT) will produce radioactive wastes of different physical and chemical properties and in different amounts from those generated in the current nuclear fuel cycle. To assess quantitatively the effects of PT on waste disposal, we first analyzed the amounts of the PT wastes, assumed conditioning for each type of the waste, and then made an attempt to estimate the repository area for disposal of the PT wastes. The properties of the hot Sr-Cs waste form are controlling factors in determining the size of the geologic repository. The disposal area could be reduced if the Sr-Cs fraction is disposed in a different subsurface repository or by long-term storage of the waste under institutional control. Disposal in a subsurface repository was found to comply with the Japanese law in terms of radioactivity constraint, through a performance assessment for disposal of the Sr-Cs fraction. (authors)

  13. Uses and evaluation methods of potential hydrogen permeation barriers for nuclear reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noga, J.O.; Piercy, G.R.; Bowker, J.T.

    1985-07-01

    This report summarizes results on the use of coatings as hydrogen permeation barriers on nuclear reactor component materials. Two classes of base materials were considered, exothermic hydrogen absorbers and endothermic hydrogen absorbers. The results of the tests indicate that substantial reductions in the amount of hydrogen absorbed by a metal can be achieved through the use of hydrogen permeation barrier coatings. Gold was determined to provide an effective hydrogen permeation barrier on Zr-2-1/2 Nb pressure tube material. Tin was determined to be a suitable hydrogen permeation barrier when applied on AISI 410 stainless steel and iron. Both gas phase and electrochemical permeation techniques were used to determine hydrogen permeabilities through coatings and base materials

  14. The ORSphere Benchmark Evaluation and Its Potential Impact on Nuclear Criticality Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; J. Blair Briggs

    2013-10-01

    In the early 1970’s, critical experiments using an unreflected metal sphere of highly enriched uranium (HEU) were performed with the focus to provide a “very accurate description…as an ideal benchmark for calculational methods and cross-section data files.” Two near-critical configurations of the Oak Ridge Sphere (ORSphere) were evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook). The results from those benchmark experiments were then compared with additional unmoderated and unreflected HEU metal benchmark experiment configurations currently found in the ICSBEP Handbook. For basic geometries (spheres, cylinders, and slabs) the eigenvalues calculated using MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 were within 3 of their respective benchmark values. There appears to be generally a good agreement between calculated and benchmark values for spherical and slab geometry systems. Cylindrical geometry configurations tended to calculate low, including more complex bare HEU metal systems containing cylinders. The ORSphere experiments do not calculate within their 1s uncertainty and there is a possibility that the effect of the measured uncertainties for the GODIVA I benchmark may need reevaluated. There is significant scatter in the calculations for the highly-correlated ORCEF cylinder experiments, which are constructed from close-fitting HEU discs and annuli. Selection of a nuclear data library can have a larger impact on calculated eigenvalue results than the variation found within calculations of a given experimental series, such as the ORCEF cylinders, using a single nuclear data set.

  15. Interferon γ-Induced Nuclear Interleukin-33 Potentiates the Release of Esophageal Epithelial Derived Cytokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shan

    Full Text Available Esophageal epithelial cells are an initiating cell type in esophageal inflammation, playing an essential role in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. A new tissue-derived cytokine, interleukin-33 (IL-33, has been shown to be upregulated in esophageal epithelial cell nuclei in GERD, taking part in mucosal inflammation. Here, inflammatory cytokines secreted by esophageal epithelial cells, and their regulation by IL-33, were investigated.In an in vitro stratified squamous epithelial model, IL-33 expression was examined using quantitative RT-PCR, western blot, ELISA, and immunofluorescence. Epithelial cell secreted inflammatory cytokines were examined using multiplex flow immunoassay. IL-33 was knocked down with small interfering RNA (siRNA in normal human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs. Pharmacological inhibitors and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1 siRNA were used to explore the signaling pathways.Interferon (IFNγ treatment upregulated nuclear IL-33 in HEECs. Furthermore, HEECs can produce various inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1, regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and presumably secreted (RANTES, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF in response to IFNγ. Nuclear, but not exogenous IL-33, amplified IFN induction of these cytokines. P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and janus protein tyrosine kinases (JAK/STAT1 were the common signaling pathways of IFNγ-mediated induction of IL-33 and other cytokines.Esophageal epithelial cells can actively participate in GERD pathogenesis through the production of various cytokines, and epithelial-derived IL-33 might play a central role in the production of these cytokines.

  16. Detecting and modeling persistent self-potential anomalies from underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKague, H.L.; Kansa, E.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    Self-potential anomalies are naturally occurring, nearly stationary electric fields that are detected by measuring the potential difference between two points on (or in) the ground. SP anomalies arise from a number of causes: principally electrochemical reactions, and heat and fluid flows. SP is routinely used to locate mineral deposits, geothermal systems, and zones of seepage. This paper is a progress report on our work toward detecting explosion-related SP signals at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and in understanding the physics of these anomalies that persist and continue changing over periods of time that range from months to years. As background, we also include a brief description of how SP signals arise, and we mention their use in other areas such as exploring for geothermal resources and locating seepage through dams. Between the years 1988 and 1991, we surveyed the areas around seven underground nuclear tests for persistent SP anomalies. We not only detected anomalies, but we also found that various phenomena could be contributing to them and that we did not know which of these were actually occurring. We analyzed our new data with existing steady state codes and with a newly developed time-dependent thermal modeling code. Our results with the new code showed that the conductive decay of the thermal pulse from an underground nuclear test could produce many of the observed signals, and that others are probably caused by movement of fluid induced by the explosion. 25 refs

  17. Long-Term Waste Package Degradation Studies at the Yucca Mountain Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mon, K. G.; Bullard, B. E.; Longsine, D. E.; Mehta, S.; Lee, J. H.; Monib, A. M.

    2002-01-01

    The Site Recommendation (SR) process for the potential repository for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level nuclear waste (HLW) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is underway. Fulfillment of the requirements for substantially complete containment of the radioactive waste emplaced in the potential repository and subsequent slow release of radionuclides from the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) into the geosphere will rely on a robust waste container design, among other EBS components. Part of the SR process involves sensitivity studies aimed at elucidating which model parameters contribute most to the drip shield and waste package degradation characteristics. The model parameters identified included (a) general corrosion rate model parameters (temperature-dependence and uncertainty treatment), and (b) stress corrosion cracking (SCC) model parameters (uncertainty treatment of stress and stress intensity factor profiles in the Alloy 22 waste package outer barrier closure weld regions, the SCC initiation stress threshold, and the fraction of manufacturing flaws oriented favorably for through-wall penetration by SCC). These model parameters were reevaluated and new distributions were generated. Also, early waste package failures due to improper heat treatment were added to the waste package degradation model. The results of these investigations indicate that the waste package failure profiles are governed by the manufacturing flaw orientation model parameters and models used

  18. Assessment of empirical potential for MOX nuclear fuels and thermomechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboa, Hector; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Chartier, Alain; Le Bouar, Yann

    2017-11-01

    We assess five empirical interatomic potentials in the approximation of rigid ions and pair interactions for the (U1-y,Puy)O solid solution. The assessment compares available experimental data and Fink's recommendation with simulations on: the structural, thermodynamics, and mechanical properties over the full range of plutonium composition, from pure UO2 to pure PuO2 and for temperatures ranging from 300 K to the melting point. The best results are obtained by potentials referred as Cooper and Potashnikov potentials. The first one reproduces more accurately recommendations for the thermodynamics and mechanical properties exhibiting ductile-like behaviour during crack propagation, while the second one gives brittle behaviour at low temperature.

  19. Nuclear polarization potential due to particle transfer in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landowne, S.; Dasso, C.H.; Winther, A.; Pollarolo, G.

    1986-01-01

    The effective interaction which determines the elastic scattering of heavy composite systems consists of a ''bare'' real potential V, noramally identified with the folding model, a renormalization term or ''polarization potential'' ΔV and an imaginary ''absorptive potential'' iW. The latter contributions originate from the couplings to intrinsic degrees of freedom. While iW is a conspicuous feature of all optical model analyses, the related term ΔV has received relatively little attention until recently. The microscopic structure of ΔV + iW is examined using second-order semi-classical perturbation theory. Focus is on the long-range part of ΔV which is governed by single-particle transfer reactions between the colliding systems

  20. Nuclear polarization potential due to particle transfer in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landowne, S.; Dasso, C.H.; Winther, A.; Pollarolo, G.

    1986-01-01

    The effective interaction which determines the elastic scattering of heavy composite systems consists of a bare real potential V, normally identified with the folding model, a renormalization term or polarization potential ΔV and an imaginary absorptive potential iW. The latter contributions originate from the couplings to intrinsic degrees of freedom. While iW is a conspicuous feature of all optical model analyses, the related term ΔV has received relatively little attention until recently. Here the authors examine the microscopic structure of ΔV + IW using second-order semi-classical perturbation theory. In particular, they focus on the long-range part of ΔV which is governed by single-particle transfer reactions between the colliding systems

  1. Nuclear structure approach to the calculation of the imaginary alpha-nucleus optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermawan, H.; Osterfeld, F.; Madsen, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    A microscopic calculation of the second-order imaginary optical potential for 40 (Ca(α,α) is made for incident energies of 31 and 100 MeV using RPA transition densities for intermediate excited states. The projectile is treated as an elementary particle, and the alpha-nucleon interaction is normalized by fitting 3 - inelastic cross sections with a folded M3Y potential. The use of an optical Green's function for the intermediate propagator is found to be important. Equivalent local potentials are obtained and used to calculate elastic scattering cross sections. Agreement with low-angle experimental data is fair at 31 MeV, but at 100 MeV the calculated cross sections indicate much too little absorption. 9 figures, 1 table

  2. Self-energy of the Δ-isobar in nuclear matter for the Paris and the Green-Niskanen-Sainio potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, J.; Abdul Matin, M.; Samanta, B.C.

    1985-11-01

    A coupled channel calculation, with the compensated Paris potential and the isobar transition potential due to Green, Niskanen and Sainio, yields the nucleon and isobar self-energies in nuclear matter. Unlike the Reid soft core, the Paris potential is found to bind the isobar at small momentum by a potential of the order of 10 MeV. The change in the binding energy and the wound integral in nuclear matter, due to the explicit treatment of isobar degrees of freedom, is small. (author)

  3. Interaction of nuclear waste panels with shafts and access ramps for a potential repository at Yucca Mountain: Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St John, C.M.

    1987-09-01

    A series of two-dimensional and three-dimensional analyses of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain were performed to estimate the thermal stresses that would be experienced at the possible locations of shafts or ramps providing access to the repository horizon. Two alternative assumptions were made for the initial state of stress, and calculations were performed to investigate behavior at repository scale. The computed states of stress were also used as boundary conditions for a series of analyses of the access ramps and vertical shafts. The results of the repository scale analyses indicated that there is a region above the repository horizon where the horizontal stresses are reduced as a consequence of the thermal loads imposed by waste emplacement. If the initial state of stress is relatively low then the total horizontal stresses near the ground surface above the repository may be tensile. An evaluation of the total stress state relative to the strength of the rock matrix and vertical and near vertical joints indicates that there is no potential for development of new fractures in the matrix, but joints near the surface could be activated if the initial stress state is low. 13 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation: An Examination of Potential Lessons Learned From Prior Shipping Campaigns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Keister; K, McBride

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, assigned the Department of Energy (DOE) responsibility for developing and managing a Federal system for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for accepting, transporting, and disposing of SNF and HLW at the Yucca Mountain repository (if licensed) in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. OCRWM faces a near-term challenge--to develop and demonstrate a transportation system that will sustain safe and efficient shipments of SNF and HLW to a repository. To better inform and improve its current planning, OCRWM has extensively reviewed plans and other documents related to past high-visibility shipping campaigns of SNF and other radioactive materials within the United States. This report summarizes the results of this review and, where appropriate, lessons learned. The objective of this lessons learned study was to identify successful, best-in-class trends and commonalities from past shipping campaigns, which OCRWM could consider when planning for the development and operation of a repository transportation system. Note: this paper is for analytical and discussion purposes only, and is not an endorsement of, or commitment by, OCRWM to follow any of the comments or trends. If OCRWM elects to make such commitments at a future time, they will be appropriately documented in formal programmatic policy statements, plans and procedures. Reviewers examined an extensive study completed in 2003 by DOE's National Transportation Program (NTP), Office of Environmental Management (EM), as well as plans and documents related to SNF shipments since issuance of the NTP report. OCRWM examined specific planning, business, institutional and operating practices that have been identified by DOE, its transportation contractors

  5. Preequilibrium decay in the exciton model for nuclear potential with a finite depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogila, Ye.A.; Kolomiets, V.M.; Sanzhur, A.I.; Shlomo, S.

    1995-01-01

    The spectra of preequilibrium particles, taking into account the energy dependence of the single-particle level density, are calculated using the particle-hole (exciton) level density. We demonstrate the significant effect of the finite depth of the potential well (continuum effect) on partial emission spectra for configurations with a small exciton number

  6. The convention planning process: Potential impact of a high-level Nuclear Waste Repository in Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunreuther, H.; Easterling, D.; Kleindorfer, P.

    1988-09-01

    This report presents results from two studies that test whether a high level nuclear waste repository sites at Yucca Mountain, Nevada will diminish the willingness of meeting planners to schedule conventions, trade shows, and other meetings in Las Vegas. The first study, a focus group interview with nine meeting planners from the Philadelphia area, found little evidence that planners' selection decisions would be influenced by environmental hazards (e.g., earthquakes, pollution), unless planners were led to believe that these hazards would have a direct impact on convention delegates and the planner could conceivably be held personally responsible for any such impacts. Participants did point out that they would be sensitive to continued media coverage of a negative event, as this might stigmatize the city in the eyes of delegates. The results from the focus group guided the development of a larger and more formal questionnaire survey of meeting planners who were known to have selected Las Vegas for a meeting. Of the 153 planners recruited, 114 had a future meeting scheduled and 39 had arranged a meeting that was recently held in the city. Subjects first answered a number of questions that described the process by which they chose Las Vegas among the possible convention cities. They were then instructed to reconsider their decision in light of seven different scenarios pertaining to the repository at Yucca Mountain

  7. An assessment of the potential impacts on irradiated nuclear fuel transportation operations of applying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Ratledge, J.E.; Hill, C.V.; Loud, G.C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper described the possible impacts on future irradiated nuclear cask designs and their operations which could result from implementing the ICRP 60 recommendations into a future edition of Safety Series No. 6. Depending upon the changes that are made in Safety Series No. 6 in response to ICRP 60 recommendations, the operations of such casks could become much more complex and, in some cases, could become impossible. Most important, however, it has been shown that as consideration is given to changing the transportation regulations in the radiation protection area, the requirements imposed to control radiation exposures must be considered as a group and not individually. In addition, they should probably be assessed against quantitative examples, as was done here. In doing this, the requirements in paragraphs 204, 205, and 470(b), and other radiation protection requirements throughout Safety Series No. 6, must all be considered together and changed in a manner that they do not impose conflicting requirements on package design and operation. (J.P.N.)

  8. Development of cytoplasmic-nuclear male sterility, its inheritance, and potential use in hybrid pigeonpea breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Kul B; Ravikoti, V Kumar; Dalvi, Vijay A; Pandey, Lalji B; Gaddikeri, Guruprasad

    2010-01-01

    Pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.] is a unique food legume because of its partial (20-30%) outcrossing nature, which provides an opportunity to breed commercial hybrids. To achieve this, it is essential to have a stable male-sterility system. This paper reports the selection of a cytoplasmic-nuclear male-sterility (CMS) system derived from an interspecific cross between a wild relative of pigeonpea (Cajanus sericeus Benth. ex. Bak.) and a cultivar. This male-sterility source was used to breed agronomically superior CMS lines in early (ICPA 2068), medium (ICPA 2032), and late (ICPA 2030) maturity durations. Twenty-three fertility restorers and 30 male-sterility maintainers were selected to develop genetically diverse hybrid combinations. Histological studies revealed that vacuolation of growing tetrads and persistence of tetrad wall were primary causes of the manifestation of male sterility. Genetic studies showed that 2 dominant genes, of which one had inhibitory gene action, controlled fertility restoration in the hybrids. The experimental hybrids such as TK 030003 and TK 030009 in early, ICPH 2307 and TK 030625 in medium, and TK 030861 and TK 030851 in late maturity groups exhibited 30-88% standard heterosis in multilocation trials.

  9. An assessment of the potentials of nuclear power and carbon capture and storage in the long-term global warming mitigation options based on Asian Modeling Exercise scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Shunsuke

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of global warming mitigation options based on scenarios from the Asian Modeling Exercise. Using an extended version of the integrated assessment model MARIA-23 (Multiregional Approach for Resource and Industry Allocation), we analyze nuclear fuel recycling options, carbon capture and storage technologies (CCS), and biomass utilization. To assess the potential implications of decreased social acceptance of nuclear power in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear accident, additional scenarios including a nuclear power expansion limitation, are analyzed. We also evaluate MARIA-23 model simulation estimates of long-term contributions and interrelationships among nuclear power, biomass, and CCS. Finally, potential costs of nuclear limitation under carbon control policies are assessed. The simulation results in this paper suggest the following: (1) under the reference scenario, global GDP losses in climate limitation scenarios range from 1.3% per year to 3.9% per year in 2060, rising to between 3.5% per year and 4.5% per year in 2100; (2) the use of nuclear fuel reprocessing technologies increase rapidly in all carbon control policy scenarios; (3) under a scenario where the price of CO 2 is $30 and nuclear power expansion is strictly limited, GDP losses increase significantly—from 4.5% per year to 6.4% per year by 2100; (4) nuclear power and CCS are substitute mitigation technologies. With nuclear power technology available CCS deployment reaches approximately 15,000 Mt-CO 2 per year by 2010; without a nuclear power option, CCS deployment rises to more than 80,000 Mt-CO 2 per year; and (5) biomass utilization cannot fully compensate for limitations to nuclear power expansion in policy scenarios. In addition to examining the role of these three technologies on global scales, we report results for several major Asian regions, namely Japan, China, and India. China tends to deploy nuclear power (if available) in response to rapidly growing

  10. Bifurcations and chaos of classical trajectories in a deformed nuclear potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, J.; Arvieu, R.

    1983-01-01

    The organization of the phase space of a classical nucleon in an axially symmetric deformed potential with the restriction Lsub(z)=0 is studied by drawing the Poincare surfaces of section. In the limit of small deformations three simple limits help to understand this organization. Moreover important bifurcations of periodic trajectories occur. At higher deformations multifurcations and chaos are observed. Chaos is developed to a larger extent in the heavier nuclei. (author)

  11. Nitrite fixation by humic substances: Nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance evidence for potential intermediates in chemodenitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, K.A.; Mikita, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Studies have suggested that NO2/-, produced during nitrification and denitrification, can become incorporated into soil organic matter and, in one of the processes associated with chemodenitrification, react with organic matter to form trace N gases, including N2O. To gain an understanding of the nitrosation chemistry on a molecular level, soil and aquatic humic substances were reacted with 15N-labeled NaNO2, and analyzed by liquid phase 15N and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) Pahokee peat and peat humic acid were also reacted with Na15NO2 and analyzed by solid-state 15N NMR. In Suwannee River, Armadale, and Laurentian fulvic acids, phenolic rings and activated methylene groups underwent nitrosation to form nitrosophenols (quinone monoximes) and ketoximes, respectively. The oximes underwent Beckmann rearrangements to 2??amides, and Beckmann fragmentations to nitriles. The nitriles in turn underwent hydrolysis to 1??amides. Peaks tentatively identified as imine, indophenol, or azoxybenzene nitrogens were clearly present in spectra of samples nitrosated at pH 6 but diminished at pH 3. The 15N NMR spectrum of the peat humic acid exhibited peaks corresponding with N-nitroso groups in addition to nitrosophenols, ketoximes, and secondary Beckmann reaction products. Formation of N-nitroso groups was more significant in the whole peat compared with the peat humic acid. Carbon-13 NMR analyses also indicated the occurrence of nitrosative demethoxylation in peat and soil humic acids. Reaction of 15N-NH3 fixated fulvic acid with unlabeled NO2/- resulted in nitrosative deamination of aminohydroquinone N, suggesting a previously unrecognized pathway for production of N2 gas in soils fertilized with NH3.Studies have suggested that NO2-, produced during nitrification and denitrification, can become incorporated into soil organic matter and, in one of the processes associated with chemodenitrification, react with organic

  12. Safety assessment for a potential SNF repository and its implication to the proliferation resistance nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y.; Jeong, M.S.; Seo, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    KAERI is developing the pyro-process technology to minimize the burden on permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel. In addition, KAERI has developed the Korean Reference System for potential spent nuclear fuel disposal since 1997. The deep geologic disposal system is composed of a multi-barrier system in a crystalline rock to dispose of 36,000 MT of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from a CANDU and a PWR. Quite recently, introduction of advanced nuclear fuel cycles such as pyro-processing is a big issue to solve the everlasting disposal problem and to assure the sustainable supply of fuel for reactors. To compare the effect of direct disposal of SNF with that of the high level waste disposal for waste generated from the advanced nuclear fuel cycles, the total system performance assessment for two different schemes is developed; one for direct disposal of SNF and the other for the introduction of the pyro-processing and direct disposal CANDU spent nuclear fuel. The safety indicators to assess the environmental friendliness of the disposal option are annual individual doses, toxicities and risks. Even though many scientists use the toxicity to understand the environmental friendliness of the disposal, scientifically the annual individual doses or risks are meaningful indicators for it. The major mechanisms to determine the doses and risks for direct disposal are as follows: (1) Dissolution mechanisms of uranium dioxides which control the dissolution of most nuclides such as TRU's and most parts of fission products. (2) Instant release fraction of highly soluble nuclides such as I-129, C-135, Tc-99, and others. (3) Retardation and dilution effect of natural and engineered barriers. (4) Dilution effect in the biosphere. The dominant nuclide is I-129 which follows both congruent and instantaneous release modes. Since its long half life associated with the instantaneous release I-129 is dominant well beyond one million. The impact of the TRU's is negligible until the significant

  13. A semi-relativistic treatment of spinless particles subject to the nuclear Woods-Saxon potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamzavi, M.; Ikhdair, S.M.; Rajabi, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    By applying an appropriate Pekeris approximation to deal with the centrifugal term, we present an approximate systematic solution of the two-body spinless Salpeter (SS) equation with the Woods-Saxon interaction potential for an arbitrary l-state. The analytical semi-relativistic bound-state energy eigenvalues and the corresponding wave functions are calculated. Two special cases from our solution are studied: the approximated Schroedinger-Woods-Saxon problem for an arbitrary l-state and the exact s-wave (l=0). (authors)

  14. The electric potential of particles in interstellar space released from a nuclear waste payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A. C.

    1980-01-01

    Mechanisms for charging a grain in the interplanetary medium include: (1) capture of solar wind electrons; (2) capture of solar wind protons; (3) ejection of electrons through the photoelectric effect due to the solar radiation; (4) escape of beta particles from beta emitters in the grain; and (5) escape of alpha particles from alpha emitters in the grain. The potentials on both nonradioactive and radioactive grains are considered with relation to particle size and time, and the distance from the Sun. Numerical results are presented where the waste mix is assumed to be PW-4b.

  15. Radionuclide disequilibria studies for investigating the integrity of potential nuclear waste disposal sites: subseabed studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laul, J.C.; Thomas, C.W.; Petersen, M.R.; Perkins, R.W.

    1981-09-01

    This study of subseabed sediments indicates that natural radionuclides can be employed to define past long-term migration rates and thereby evaluate the integrity of potential disposal sites in ocean sediments. The study revealed the following conclusions: (1) the sedimentation rate of both the long and short cores collected in the North Pacific is 2.5 mm/1000 yr or 2.5 m/m.yr in the upper 3 meters; (2) the sedimentation rate has been rather constant over the last one million years; and (3) slow diffusive processes dominate within the sediment. Reworking of the sediment by physical processes or organisms is not observed

  16. Perceived risk, stigma, and potential economic impacts of a high-level nuclear waste repository in Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovic, P.; Layman, M.; Kraus, N.; Flynn, J.; Chalmers, J.; Gesell, G.

    1991-01-01

    This study investigates the potential impacts of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, upon tourism, retirement and job-related migration, and business development in Las Vegas and the state. Adverse impacts may be expected to result from perceptions of risk, stigmatization, and socially amplified reactions to 'unfortunate events' associated with the repository (major and minor accidents, discoveries of radiation releases, evidence of mismanagement, attempts to sabotage or disrupt the facility, etc.). The conceptual underpinnings of risk perception, stigmatization, and social amplification are discussed and empirical data are presented to demonstrate how nuclear images associated with Las Vegas and the State of Nevada might trigger adverse economic effects. The possibility that intense negative imagery associated with the repository may cause significant harm to Nevada's economy can no longer be ignored by serious attempts to assess the risks and impacts of this unique facility. The behavioral processes described here appear relevant as well to the social impact assessment of any proposed facility that produces, uses, transports, or disposes of hazardous materials

  17. The potential for stress corrosion cracking of copper containers in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    1996-09-01

    The potential for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper nuclear fuel waste containers in a conceptual Canadian disposal vault has been assessed through a review of the literature and comparison of those environmental factors that cause SCC with the expected disposal environment. Stress-corrosion cracking appears to be an unlikely failure mode for Cu containers in a Canadian disposal vault because of a combination of environmental factors. Most importantly, there is only a relatively short period during which the containers will be undergoing strain when cracking should be possible at all, and then cracking is not expected because of the absence of known SCC agents, such as NH 3 , NO 2 - or organic acids. In addition, other environmental factors will mitigate SCC, namely, the presence of C1 - and its effect on film properties and the limited supply of oxidants. These arguments, to greater or lesser extent, apply to the three major mechanisms proposed for SCC of Cu alloys in aqueous solutions: film-rupture/anodic dissolution, tarnish rupture and film-induced cleavage. Detailed reviews of the SCC literature are presented as Appendices. The literature on the SCC of Cu (>99 wt.% Cu) is reviewed, including studies carried out in a number of countries under nuclear waste disposal conditions. Because of similarities with the behaviour of Cu, the more extensive literature on the SCC of α-brass in ammonia solutions is also reviewed. (author). 140 refs., 3 tabs., 25 figs

  18. Perceived risk, stigma, and potential economic impacts of a high-level nuclear waste repository in Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovic, P; Layman, M; Kraus, N; Flynn, J; Chalmers, J; Gesell, G

    1991-12-01

    This study investigates the potential impacts of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, upon tourism, retirement and job-related migration, and business development in Las Vegas and the state. Adverse impacts may be expected to result from perceptions of risk, stigmatization, and socially amplified reactions to "unfortunate events" associated with the repository (major and minor accidents, discoveries of radiation releases, evidence of mismanagement, attempts to sabotage or disrupt the facility, etc.). The conceptual underpinnings of risk perception, stigmatization, and social amplification are discussed and empirical data are presented to demonstrate how nuclear images associated with Las Vegas and the State of Nevada might trigger adverse economic effects. The possibility that intense negative imagery associated with the repository may cause significant harm to Nevada's economy can no longer be ignored by serious attempts to assess the risks and impacts of this unique facility. The behavioral processes described here appear relevant as well to the social impact assessment of any proposed facility that produces, uses, transports, or disposes of hazardous materials.

  19. Hydrologic investigations to evaluate a potential site for a nuclear-waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, is being evaluated by the U.S. Department of Energy for its suitability as a site for a mined geologic respository for high-level nuclear wastes. The repository facility would be constructed in densely welded tuffs in the unsaturated zone. In support of the evaluation, the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting hydrologic investigations of both the saturated and unsaturated zones, as well as paleohydrologic studies. Investigation in saturated-zone hydrology will help define one component of ground-water flow paths and travel times to the accessible environment. A two-dimensional, steady-state, finite-element model was developed to describe the regional hydrogeologic framework. The unsaturated zone is 450 to 700 meters thick at Yucca Mountain; precipitation averages about 150 millimeters per year. A conceptual hydrologic model of the unsaturated zone incorporates the following features: minimal net infiltration, variable distribution of flux, lateral flow, potential for perched-water zones, fracture and matrix flow, and flow along faults. The conceptual model is being tested primarily by specialized test drilling; plans also are being developed for in-situ testing in a proposed exploratory shaft. Quaternary climatic and hydrologic conditions are being evaluated to develop estimates of the hydrologic effects of potential climatic changes during the next 10,000 years. Evaluation approaches include analysis of plant macrofossils in packrat middens, evaluation of lake and playa sediments, infiltration tests, and modeling effects of potential increased recharge on the potentiometric surface

  20. Plant species potentially suitable for cover on low-level solid nuclear waste disposal sites: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenkert, A.L.; Parr, P.D.; Taylor, F.G.

    1984-09-01

    This report reviews available literature on soil conditions, hydrology, and climatological data and suggests plant species suitable for covering the low-level nuclear waste disposal areas in the White Oak Creek Watershed within the Oak Ridge Reservation. Literature on naturally invading species and secondary succession, on plant species used for reclamation of coal spoils and roadsides, and on horticultural species is reviewed. The potential of plant species to take up, or mine, the waste through deep rooting is assessed. The effects of vegetation cover on the water balance in a watershed are reviewed. Several conclusions are presented concerning the management of vegetation cover on low-level solid waste disposal areas. 163 references, 2 figures, 9 tables

  1. Seismic stability of the survey areas of potential sites for the deep geological repository of the spent nuclear fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaláb Zdeněk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the seismic stability of the survey areas of potential sites for the deep geological repository of the spent nuclear fuel in the Czech Republic. The basic source of data for historical earthquakes up to 1990 was the seismic website [10]. The most intense earthquake described occurred on September 15, 1590 in the Niederroesterreich region (Austria in the historical period; its reported intensity is Io = 8-9. The source of the contemporary seismic data for the period since 1991 to the end of 2014 was the website [11]. It may be stated based on the databases and literature review that in the period from 1900, no earthquake exceeding magnitude 5.1 originated in the territory of the Czech Republic.

  2. Leaching studies of natural and synthetic titanite, a potential host for wastes from the reprocessing of Canadian nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, P.J.; Doern, F.E.; Cecchetto, E.V.; Mitchell, S.L.

    1983-01-01

    Glass ceramics (i.e., glasses subjected to controlled crystallization) with synthetic titanite as the major crystalline phase are being considered as potential hosts for the radioactive wastes arising from possible future reprocessing of nuclear fuel in Canada. In order to assess the stability of titanite in the anticipated environment of a disposal vault sited 500-1000 m deep within a granitic pluton in the Canadian Shield, leaching experiments have been performed with natural and synthetic titanite, using a synthetic groundwater whose composition is based on findings from a recent borehole-survey. The results are in qualitative agreement with calculations of solution equilibria for titanite and its main alteration products, and indicate that titanite should be stable and suffer no net leaching under anticipated conditions in the vault

  3. Plant species potentially suitable for cover on low-level solid nuclear waste disposal sites: a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenkert, A.L.; Parr, P.D.; Taylor, F.G.

    1984-09-01

    This report reviews available literature on soil conditions, hydrology, and climatological data and suggests plant species suitable for covering the low-level nuclear waste disposal areas in the White Oak Creek Watershed within the Oak Ridge Reservation. Literature on naturally invading species and secondary succession, on plant species used for reclamation of coal spoils and roadsides, and on horticultural species is reviewed. The potential of plant species to take up, or mine, the waste through deep rooting is assessed. The effects of vegetation cover on the water balance in a watershed are reviewed. Several conclusions are presented concerning the management of vegetation cover on low-level solid waste disposal areas. 163 references, 2 figures, 9 tables.

  4. Identification and characterization of potential discharge areas for radionuclide transport by groundwater from a nuclear waste repository in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Sten; Bosson, Emma; Selroos, Jan-Olof; Sassner, Mona

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes solute transport modeling carried out as a part of an assessment of the long-term radiological safety of a planned deep rock repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden. Specifically, it presents transport modeling performed to locate and describe discharge areas for groundwater potentially carrying radionuclides from the repository to the surface where man and the environment could be affected by the contamination. The modeling results show that topography to large extent determines the discharge locations. Present and future lake and wetland objects are central for the radionuclide transport and dose calculations in the safety assessment. Results of detailed transport modeling focusing on the regolith and the upper part of the rock indicate that the identification of discharge areas and objects considered in the safety assessment is robust in the sense that it does not change when a more detailed model representation is used.

  5. Perceived risk, stigma, and potential economic impacts of a high-level nuclear waste repository in Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovic, P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper addresses the potential for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository to have serious adverse economic impacts on the city of Las Vegas and the State of Nevada. Adverse economic impacts may be expected to result from two related social processes. One has to do with perceptions of risk and socially amplified reactions to unfortunate events associated with the repository (major and minor accidents, discoveries of radiation releases, evidence of mismanagement, attempts to sabotage or disrupt the facility, etc.). The second process that may trigger significant adverse impacts is that of stigmatization. The conceptual underpinnings of risk perception, social amplification, and stigma are discussed in this paper and empirical data are presented to demonstrate how nuclear images associated with Las Vegas and the State of Nevada might trigger adverse effects on tourism, migration, and business development

  6. The EU’s Potential Role in the Six Party Talks and the North Korean Nuclear Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millard Andrew S.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Discourse on the Six Party Talks has focused solely on denuclearisation. Through the power struggles of the members and the refusal of the People’s Democratic Republic of Korea (DPRK to return to negotiations, the Six Party Talks have been stalled since 2008. Due to current increased tensions and the use of brinkmanship tactics the Talks must be restarted, albeit under a reformed shape. This paper analyses the potential role of the EU in furthering the peace process in Northeast Asia. This paper suggests that the EU needs to be more assertive and the Talks should focus on building trust and cooperation, not on the DPRK’s nuclear program. With its impartiality, experience in integration and use of soft power, the EU can act as an effective mediator building trust.

  7. Using limnological and optical knowledge to detect discharges from nuclear facilities - Potential application of satellite imagery for international safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borstad, G.; Truong, Q.S. Bob; Keeffe, R.; Baines, P.; Staenz, K.; Neville, R.

    2001-01-01

    Previous work carried out under the Canadian Safeguards Support Program, has shown that thermal imagery from the American Landsat satellites could be used to detect the cooling water discharges, and could therefore be used to verify the operational status of nuclear facilities. In some images, thermal plumes could be easily detected in single band imagery with no mathematical manipulation and little image enhancement because there was a very strong thermal contrast between the effluent and the receiving water. However, for certain situations such as discharges into well mixed conditions (cold water and violent tides) the thermal plume may be more subtle. We show here that the visible bands of Landsat and IKONOS images often contain additional information, and that the thermal signature of a discharge from a nuclear facility is not the only signal available to describe its operation. This paper introduces some important hydrological phenomena that govern the biological and physical organization of water bodies, and discusses some basic concepts of marine and aquatic optics that are relevant to the safeguards problem. Using image analysis techniques that have been used widely in ocean optics work and in applications in the mapping and monitoring of water quality, we have re-analyzed data that were obtained under a joint project between various Canadian government departments. We present a preliminary examination of imagery from both satellite multispectral and aircraft hyperspectral sensors, and discuss methods to extract information that could be useful in the detection and verification of declared or undeclared nuclear activities. In one example of an IKONOS image of the Canadian Bruce Nuclear Generating Facility, simple enhancement techniques failed to find any plume other than a small jet visible in the surface wave field. With knowledge of limnology, oceanography and aquatic optics, we have been able to separate and remove the surface reflection, and detect a

  8. RODOS-based simulation of potential accident scenarios for emergency response management in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, H.; Gering, F.; Arnold, K.; Gerich, B.; Heinrich, G.; Welte, U.

    2016-09-15

    In the wake of the Fukushima disaster in March 2011, the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) started to investigate the potential radiological consequences of a ''Fukushima-like'' accident in a German nuclear power plant and conducted appropriate simulations in 2012. Between the end of 2012 and the end of 2013, the first study was followed by a much more detailed and comprehensive investigation comprising more than 5000 case studies for three nuclear power plant (NPP) sites in Germany. Based on these results the German Commission on Radiological Protection (SSK) released a new recommendation in March 2014 including an expansion of the current emergency planning zones for nuclear power plants in Germany. The key results of this study with respect to the maximum dimensions of the affected areas where dose criteria may be exceeded are described below. The following results are based on the largest nuclear release scenario ''FKA'' (INES scale 7): - Threshold levels for deterministic effects and high doses (effective doses higher than 1000 mSv) can be reached or exceeded within a distance of about 3 km on average. - The emergency reference level for the intervention ''Evacuation'' can be reached or exceeded within a distance of up to 9 to 18 km (adults) and/or up to 14 to 24 km (infants) on average (the indicated interval describes the minimum and maximum levels of the median value at all three NPP sites). - The emergency reference level for the intervention ''Sheltering'' can be reached or exceeded within a distance of up to 62 to 80 km (adults) and/or up to 91 to 114 km (infants) on average. - The emergency reference level for the intervention ''Stable iodine prophylaxis'' can be exceeded within a distance of up to 24 to 34 km (adults) and/or up to 148 to 161 km (infants and pregnant women) on average.

  9. Evaluation of the radiologic potential due to the nuclear submarine visits to the Rio de Janeiro port

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Jose Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Brazil is signatory of international protocols related to the visit of nuclear-powered vessels, aircraft carriers and submarines to Brazilian ports. The submarines, during their stay in Brazilian ports, inform that there is no release of radioactive material to the environment. However, the possibility of occurrence of accidents with environmental releases from PWR reactors is real. Between 1993 and 2003, 13 nuclear submarines visited Brazilian ports. This work aimed to evaluate the potential impact due to the visits of nuclear-powered ships and submarines to the port of the city of Rio de Janeiro, in relation to releases of radioactive materials to the environment, considering both routine releases and accidental situations. The models selected to perform the assessments took into account the scenarios to be simulated. Simple, but conservative methodologies were used for the evaluation of routine releases. For accidental releases, the dynamics of the materials dispersion into the environment were considered. The present study was mainly focalized on the initial phase of an accident. The doses for the crew of the Brazilian navy ships, for IRD teams performing environmental monitoring, and for the population around the Guanabara Bay, close to the points of anchorage, were assessed. The results indicated that, in normal operational conditions, no significant radiological impact due to the visit of nuclear submarines to the port of the city of Rio de Janeiro is expected, even considering the occurrence of small routine radionuclide releases. The analysis of accidental releases, however, indicated that the submarines should be located at a minimum distance of 2,5 km from inhabited areas in the coast of the Guanabara Bay. The need for environmental control and training of the teams involved in the attendance of the submarines, during the period of their visit, was also considered. The need for revising the procedures for the preoperational surveys to be performed at the

  10. Organic components of nuclear wastes and their potential for altering radionuclide distribution when released to soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, K.M.

    1980-08-01

    Normal waste processing at the Hanford operations requires the use of many organic materials, chiefly in the form of complexing agents and diluents. These organic materials and their chemical and radiolytic degradation products, have potential for complexing fission products and transuranium elements, both in the waste streams and upon infiltration into soil, perhaps influencing future sorption or migration of the nuclides. Particular complexation characteristics of various nuclides which constitute the major fission products, long-lived isotopes, and the most mobile in radioactive wastes are discussed briefly with regards to their anticipated sorption or mobility in soils. Included in the discussion are Am, Sb, Ce, Cs, Co, Cm, Eu, I, Np, Pm, Pu, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, U, and Zr. 107 references

  11. Methodology used for total system performance assessment of the potential nuclear waste repository at yucca mountain (USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devonec, E.; Sevougian, S.D.; Mattie, P.D.; Mcneish, J.A.; Mishra, S.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors are currently evaluating a site in Nevada (Yucca Mountain) for disposal of high-level radioactive waste from U.S. commercial nuclear plants and U.S. government-owned facilities. The suitability of the potential geologic repository is assessed, based on its performance in isolating the nuclear waste from the environment. Experimental data and models representing the natural and engineered barriers are combined into a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) model. Because of the uncertainty in the current data and in the future evolution of the total system, simulations follow a probabilistic approach. Multiple realization simulations using Monte Carlo analysis are conducted over time periods of up to one million years, which estimates a range of possible behaviors of the repository. In addition to the nominal scenario, other exposure scenarios include the possibility of disruptive events such as volcanic eruption or intrusion, or accidental human intrusion. Sensitivity to key uncertain processes is analyzed. The influence of stochastic variables on the TSPA model output is assessed by ''uncertainty importance analysis'', e.g., regression analysis and classification tree analysis. Further investigation of the impact of parameters and assumptions is conducted through ''one-off analysis'', which consists in fixing a parameter at a particular value, using an alternative conceptual model, or in making a different assumption. Finally, robustness analysis evaluates the performance of the repository when various natural or engineered barriers are assumed to be degraded. The objective of these analyses is to evaluate the performance of the potential repository system under conditions ranging from expected to highly unlikely, though physically possible conditions. (author)

  12. Methodology used for total system performance assessment of the potential nuclear waste repository at yucca mountain (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devonec, E.; Sevougian, S.D.; Mattie, P.D.; Mcneish, J.A. [Duke Engineering and Services, Town Center Drive, Las Vegas (United States); Mishra, S. [Duke Engineering and Services, Austin, TX (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors are currently evaluating a site in Nevada (Yucca Mountain) for disposal of high-level radioactive waste from U.S. commercial nuclear plants and U.S. government-owned facilities. The suitability of the potential geologic repository is assessed, based on its performance in isolating the nuclear waste from the environment. Experimental data and models representing the natural and engineered barriers are combined into a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) model. Because of the uncertainty in the current data and in the future evolution of the total system, simulations follow a probabilistic approach. Multiple realization simulations using Monte Carlo analysis are conducted over time periods of up to one million years, which estimates a range of possible behaviors of the repository. In addition to the nominal scenario, other exposure scenarios include the possibility of disruptive events such as volcanic eruption or intrusion, or accidental human intrusion. Sensitivity to key uncertain processes is analyzed. The influence of stochastic variables on the TSPA model output is assessed by ''uncertainty importance analysis'', e.g., regression analysis and classification tree analysis. Further investigation of the impact of parameters and assumptions is conducted through ''one-off analysis'', which consists in fixing a parameter at a particular value, using an alternative conceptual model, or in making a different assumption. Finally, robustness analysis evaluates the performance of the repository when various natural or engineered barriers are assumed to be degraded. The objective of these analyses is to evaluate the performance of the potential repository system under conditions ranging from expected to highly unlikely, though physically possible conditions. (author)

  13. Reliability improvement of potential transformer and secondary circuit of 6 kV 1E-class buses in Qinshan nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Houjun

    2014-01-01

    There are design defects in potential transformer (PT) and secondary circuit of 6 kV 1E-class buses in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant Nuclear Island. During the operating period, there happened several serious operational events (loss of power) caused by PT resonance. The essay analyses the defects of original design, and put forward corresponding modification measures, which have been carried out by two steps between 2009 and 2010, and after the modification the same problems have not happened again. (author)

  14. On the Potential of Nuclear Fission Energy for Effective Reduction of Carbon Emission under the Constraint of Uranium Resources Use without Spent Fuel Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, V.; Pevec, D.; Matijevic, M.

    2010-01-01

    Urgency to stop further increase of greenhouse gases emissions and reverse the trends, as stated in the Fourth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPPC) Report and in Copenhagen discussions, limits the realistic choice of energy technologies to those available now or in the near future of few decades. In the coming fifty years neither nuclear fusion nor carbon capture and storage (CCS) can be expected to give a significant contribution to world energy production. Two perspective intermittent sources such as wind and solar together with nuclear fission energy covering the base load consumption appears to be a combination with a potential to produce a large share of carbon free energy in the total world energy production. This contribution considers the issues, associated with required large scale deployment of nuclear fission energy. A serious question associated with nuclear energy is nuclear proliferation. Spread of uranium enrichment and spent fuel reprocessing installations in many new countries constructing nuclear reactors would be a major concern in present political environment. We investigate whether uranium resources would be sufficient to support nuclear build-up in next 50-60 years sufficiently large to significantly reduce carbon emission without reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. A positive answer would mean that 50-60 years can be available to develop effective international control of nuclear fuel cycle installations. Our results show that a maximum nuclear build-up which would consume currently estimated uranium resources by 2065 without reprocessing could reduce by 2065 carbon emission by 39.6% of the total reduction needed to bring the WEO 2009 Reference Scenario prediction of total GHG emissions in 2065 to the level of the WEO 450 Scenario limiting global temperature increase to 2 degrees of C. The less demanding strategy of the nuclear replacement of all non-CCS coal power plants retiring during the 2025-2065 period would reduce emission

  15. Fluid flow and reactive transport around potential nuclear waste emplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spycher, N.F.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; Apps, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The evolution of fluid chemistry and mineral alteration around a potential waste emplacement tunnel (drift) is evaluated using numerical modeling. The model considers the flow of water, gas, and heat, plus reactions between minerals, CO 2 gas, and aqueous species, and porosity permeability-capillary pressure coupling for a dual permeability (fractures and matrix) medium. Two possible operating temperature modes are investigated: a ''high-temperature'' case with temperatures exceeding the boiling point of water for several hundred years, and a ''loW--temperature'' case with temperatures remaining below boiling for the entire life of the repository. In both cases, possible seepage waters are characterized by dilute to moderate salinities and mildly alkaline pH values. These trends in fluid composition and mineral alteration are controlled by various coupled mechanisms. For example, upon heating and boiling, CO 2 exsolution from pore waters raises pH and causes calcite precipitation. In condensation zones, this CO 2 redissolves, resulting in a decrease in pH that causes calcite dissolution and enhances feldspar alteration to clays. Heat also enhances dissolution of wallrock minerals leading to elevated silica concentrations. Amorphous silica precipitates through evaporative concentration caused by boiling in the high-temperature case, but does not precipitate in the loW--temperature case. Some alteration of feldspars to clays and zeolites is predicted in the high-temperature case. In both cases, calcite precipitates when percolating waters are heated near the drift. The predicted porosity decrease around drifts in the high-temperature case (several percent of the fracture volume) is larger by at least one order of magnitude than in the low temperature case. Although there are important differences between the two investigated temperature modes in the predicted evolution of fluid compositions and mineral alteration around drifts, these differences are small relative to

  16. The potential of fission nuclear power in resolving global climate change under the constraints of nuclear fuel resources and once-through fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, Vladimir; Pevec, Dubravko; Matijevic, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear fission is receiving new attention as a developed source of carbon-free energy. A much larger number of nuclear reactors would be needed for a major impact on carbon emission. The crucial question is whether it can be done without increasing the risk of nuclear proliferation. Specifically, can a larger nuclear share in world energy production, well above the present 6%, be achieved in the next few decades without adding the proliferation-sensitive technologies of reprocessing spent fuel and recycling plutonium to the problems of the unavoidable use of enrichment technology? The answer depends on the available uranium resources. We first looked for the maximum possible nuclear build-up in the 2025-2065 period under the constraints of the estimated uranium resources and the use of once-through nuclear fuel technology. Our results show that nuclear energy without reprocessing could reduce carbon emission by 39.6% of the total reduction needed to bring the WEO 2009 Reference Scenario prediction of total GHG emissions in 2065 to the level of the WEO 450 Scenario limiting global temperature increase to 2 deg. C. The less demanding strategy of the nuclear replacement of all non-CCS coal power plants retiring during the 2025-2065 period would reduce emission by 26.1%.

  17. External radiation dose and cancer mortality among French nuclear workers. Considering potential confounding by internal radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, L.; Laurent, O.; Samson, E.; Caer-Lorho, S.; Laurier, D.; Leuraud, K. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay aux Roses (France). Ionizing Radiation Epidemiology Lab.; Laroche, P. [AREVA, Paris (France); Le Guen, B. [EDF, Saint Denis (France)

    2016-11-15

    French nuclear workers have detailed records of their occupational exposure to external radiation that have been used to examine associations with subsequent cancer mortality. However, some workers were also exposed to internal contamination by radionuclides. This study aims to assess the potential for bias due to confounding by internal contamination of estimates of associations between external radiation exposure and cancer mortality. A cohort of 59,004 workers employed for at least 1 year between 1950 and 1994 by CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique), AREVA NC, or EDF (Electricite de France) and badge-monitored for external radiation exposure were followed through 2004 to assess vital status and cause of death. A flag based on a workstation-exposure matrix defined four levels of potential for internal contamination. Standardized mortality ratios were assessed for each level of the internal contamination indicator. Poisson regression was used to quantify associations between external radiation exposure and cancer mortality, adjusting for potential internal contamination. For solid cancer, the mortality deficit tended to decrease as the levels of potential for internal contamination increased. For solid cancer and leukemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia, adjusting the dose-response analysis on the internal contamination indicator did not markedly change the excess relative risk per Sievert of external radiation dose. This study suggests that in this cohort, neglecting information on internal dosimetry while studying the association between external dose and cancer mortality does not generate a substantial bias. To investigate more specifically the health effects of internal contamination, an effort is underway to estimate organ doses due to internal contamination.

  18. External radiation dose and cancer mortality among French nuclear workers: considering potential confounding by internal radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, L; Laurent, O; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Laroche, P; Le Guen, B; Laurier, D; Leuraud, K

    2016-11-01

    French nuclear workers have detailed records of their occupational exposure to external radiation that have been used to examine associations with subsequent cancer mortality. However, some workers were also exposed to internal contamination by radionuclides. This study aims to assess the potential for bias due to confounding by internal contamination of estimates of associations between external radiation exposure and cancer mortality. A cohort of 59,004 workers employed for at least 1 year between 1950 and 1994 by CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique), AREVA NC, or EDF (Electricité de France) and badge-monitored for external radiation exposure were followed through 2004 to assess vital status and cause of death. A flag based on a workstation-exposure matrix defined four levels of potential for internal contamination. Standardized mortality ratios were assessed for each level of the internal contamination indicator. Poisson regression was used to quantify associations between external radiation exposure and cancer mortality, adjusting for potential internal contamination. For solid cancer, the mortality deficit tended to decrease as the levels of potential for internal contamination increased. For solid cancer and leukemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia, adjusting the dose-response analysis on the internal contamination indicator did not markedly change the excess relative risk per Sievert of external radiation dose. This study suggests that in this cohort, neglecting information on internal dosimetry while studying the association between external dose and cancer mortality does not generate a substantial bias. To investigate more specifically the health effects of internal contamination, an effort is underway to estimate organ doses due to internal contamination.

  19. Methodology Used for Total System Performance Assessment of the Potential Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain (USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. Devibec; S.D. Sevougian; P.D. Mattie; J.A. McNeish; S. Mishra

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors are currently evaluating a site in Nevada (Yucca Mountain) for disposal of high-level radioactive waste from U.S. commercial nuclear plants and U.S. government-owned facilities. The suitability of the potential geologic repository is assessed, based on its performance in isolating the nuclear waste from the environment. Experimental data and models representing the natural and engineered barriers are combined into a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) model [1]. Process models included in the TSPA model are unsaturated zone flow and transport, thermal hydrology, in-drift geochemistry, waste package degradation, waste form degradation, engineered barrier system transport, saturated zone flow and transport, and biosphere transport. Because of the uncertainty in the current data and in the future evolution of the total system, simulations follow a probabilistic approach. Multiple realization simulations using Monte Carlo analysis are conducted over time periods of up to one million years, which estimates a range of possible behaviors of the repository. The environmental impact is measured primarily by the annual dose received by an average member of a critical population group residing 20 km down-gradient of the potential repository. In addition to the nominal scenario, other exposure scenarios include the possibility of disruptive events such as volcanic eruption or intrusion, or accidental human intrusion. Sensitivity to key uncertain processes is analyzed. The influence of stochastic variables on the TSPA model output is assessed by ''uncertainty importance analysis'', e.g., regression analysis and classification tree analysis. Further investigation of the impact of parameters and assumptions is conducted through ''one-off analysis'', which consists in fixing a parameter at a particular value, using an alternative conceptual model, or in making a different assumption. Finally, robustness analysis evaluates

  20. Solid state deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance detection of transmembrane-potential-driven tetraphenylphosphonium redistribution across Giant Unilamellar Vesicle bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzin, Carla Maria Mirella

    1995-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ( 2 H NMR) of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) consisting of specifically choline-deuterated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), plus 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) and cholesterol can be used to monitor the transbilayer redistribution of tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP + ) in response to a transmembrane potential (δψ tm ). The 2 H quadrupolar splittings (δν Q 's) measured reflect the level of TPP + bound at the membrane surface due to the latter's effect on the membrane surface electrostatic potential, ψ s . Results reveal the appearance of two distinct δν Q 's, due to differences in bound TPP + at the inner versus the outer monolayer in response to a δψ tm . The observed values of the δν Q 's agree with theoretical predictions based on a derived mathematical model that takes into account δψ tm , plus ψ s , plus the equilibrium binding of TPP + from solution onto the membrane surface, plus the sensitivity of δν Q to the amount of bound TPP + . This model identifies experimental factors that lead to improvements in spectral resolution. Henceforth, 2 H NMR is a valuable tool for quantifying transmembrane asymmetries of ψ s . (author)

  1. Effect of microbial action on the corrosion potential of austenitic alloy containers for high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angell, P.; Dunn, D.S.; Cragnolino, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    The safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) entails the ability to ensure the integrity of waste containers for prolonged time periods. It is generally accepted that under certain conditions, microbial action may change local benign environments to those in which localized corrosion can be actively promoted. The use of repassivation potential (E rp ) in relation to the value of the corrosion potential (E corr ) has been proposed as a means of assessing the propensity of a metallic material to localized corrosion. Microbial activity is known to influence E corr however, the precise mechanism is unresolved. Shewanella putrefaciens, a bacteria with many of the characteristics of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), are being grown under controlled conditions on 316L stainless steel (SS) surfaces to understand the relationship between E corr and metabolic activity. It has been observed that the growth of the bacteria under aerobic conditions, without the production of metabolic sulfide, leads to only minor variation in E corr . These changes possibly correlate to the periods of active bacterial growth

  2. Modeling of 3d Space-time Surface of Potential Fields and Hydrogeologic Modeling of Nuclear Waste Disposal Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestopalov, V.; Bondarenko, Y.; Zayonts, I.; Rudenko, Y.

    Introduction After the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) disaster (04.26.1986) a huge amount (over 2000 sq. km) of nuclear wastes appeared within so-called "Cher- nobyl Exclusion Zone" (CEZ). At present there are not enough storage facilities in the Ukraine for safe disposal of nuclear wastes and hazardous chemical wastes. The urgent problem now is safe isolation of these dangerous wastes. According to the developed state program of radioactive waste management, the construction of a na- tional storage facility of nuclear wastes is planned. It is also possible to create regional storage facilities for hazardous chemical wastes. The region of our exploration cov- ers the eastern part of the Korosten Plutone and its slope, reaching the CNPP. 3D Space-Time Surface Imaging of Geophysical Fields. There are only three direct meth- ods of stress field reconstruction in present practice, namely the field investigations based on the large-scale fracturing tests, petrotectonic and optical polarization meth- ods. Unfortunately, all these methods are extremely laborious and need the regular field tests, which is difficult to conduct in the areas of anisotropic rock outcrops. A compilation of magnetic and gravity data covering the CNPP area was carried out as a prelude to an interpretation study. More than thirty map products were generated from magnetic, gravity and geodesy data to prepare the 3D Space-Time Surface Images (3D STSI). Multi-layer topography and geophysic surfaces included: total magnetic intensity, isostatically-corrected Bouguer gravity, aspect and slope, first and second derivatives, vertical and horizontal curvature, histogram characteristics and space cor- relation coefficients between the gradient fields. Many maps shows the first and sec- ond derivatives of the potential fields, with the results of lineament (edge) structure detection superimposed. The lineament or edges of the potential fields are located from maximal gradient in many directions

  3. A study on the neighboring countries' nuclear potentials in terms of technical capabilities and their impact on our national security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. S.; Yang, M. H.

    2001-12-01

    Neighbouring countries surrounding Korean Peninsula, which are the US, China, Russia, Japan and Taiwan, are all the nuclear countries. Some of the neighbouring countries, the US, China and Russia, are nuclear weapon states as well as the nuclear peaceful use countries. Other countries, Japan and Taiwan are not the nuclear weapon states but keep the high level of nuclear energy technologies. Meanwhile, Korea is recognized as the country of which peaceful activities for nuclear energy utilization are much more vigorous. Therefore, Korean national policies on politics, diplomacy and defense may be highly possible to be impacted on by nuclear policies of the neighbouring countries. This study defined the neighbouring countries as those which have politically or economically a direct or indirect relationship with Korea. And then, nuclear capabilities of the neighbouring countries and their impacts on our national security were analyzed in terms of nuclear techniques. Defensive response is technically most probable measure against nuclear threats and terrors. It include the establishment of national nuclear emergency response system as well as the development of environmental radiation protection, decontamination and environment recovering technology. Finally, it was suggested that a cooperation agency of enhancing the development of dual-use technologies be located at a science and technology complex

  4. The potential for using slags activated with near neutral salts as immobilisation matrices for nuclear wastes containing reactive metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y.; Collier, N. C.; Milestone, N. B.; Yang, C. H.

    2011-06-01

    The UK currently uses composite blends of Portland cement and other inorganic cementitious material such as blastfurnace slag and pulverised fuel ash to encapsulate or immobilise intermediate and low level radioactive wastes. Typically levels up 9:1 blast furnace slag:Portland cement or 4:1 pulverised fuel ash:Portland cement are used. Whilst these systems offer many advantages, their high pH causes corrosion of various metallic intermediate level radioactive wastes. To address this issue, lower pH/weakly alkaline cementitious systems have to be explored. While the blast furnace slag:Portland cement system is referred to as a composite cement system, the underlying reaction is actually an indirect activation of the slag hydration by the calcium hydroxide generated by the cement hydration, and by the alkali ions and gypsum present in the cement. However, the slag also can be activated directly with activators, creating a system known as alkali-activated slag. Whilst these activators used are usually strongly alkaline, weakly alkaline and near neutral salts can also be used. In this paper, the potential for using weakly alkaline and near neutral salts to activate slag in this manner is reviewed and discussed, with particular emphasis placed on the immobilisation of reactive metallic nuclear wastes.

  5. Evaluation of J-R curve testing of nuclear piping materials using the direct current potential drop technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackett, E.M.; Kirk, M.T.; Hays, R.A.

    1986-08-01

    A method is described for developing J-R curves for nuclear piping materials using the DC Potential Drop (DCPD) technique. Experimental calibration curves were developed for both three point bend and compact specimen geometries using ASTM A106 steel, a type 304 stainless steel and a high strength aluminum alloy. These curves were fit with a power law expression over the range of crack extension encountered during J-R curve tests (0.6 a/W to 0.8 a/W). The calibration curves were insensitive to both material and sidegrooving and depended solely on specimen geometry and lead attachment points. Crack initiation in J-R curve tests using DCPD was determined by a deviation from a linear region on a plot of COD vs. DCPD. The validity of this criterion for ASTM A106 steel was determined by a series of multispecimen tests that bracketed the initiation region. A statistical differential slope procedure for determination of the crack initiation point is presented and discussed. J-R curve tests were performed on ASTM A106 steel and type 304 stainless steel using both the elastic compliance and DCPD techniques to assess R-curve comparability. J-R curves determined using the two approaches were found to be in good agreement for ASTM A106 steel. The applicability of the DCPD technique to type 304 stainless steel and high rate loading of ferromagnetic materials is discussed. 15 refs., 33 figs

  6. Improved cloning efficiency and developmental potential in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer with the oosight imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Young; Park, Min Jee; Park, Hyo Young; Noh, Eun Ji; Noh, Eun Hyung; Park, Kyoung Sik; Lee, Jun Beom; Jeong, Chang Jin; Riu, Key Zung; Park, Se Pill

    2012-08-01

    In somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) procedures, exquisite enucleation of the recipient oocyte is critical to cloning efficiency. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two enucleation systems, Hoechst staining and UV irradiation (hereafter, irradiation group) and Oosight imaging (hereafter, Oosight group), on the in vitro production of bovine SCNT embryos. In the Oosight group, the apoptotic index (2.8 ± 0.5 vs. 7.3 ± 1.2) was lower, and the fusion rate (75.6% vs. 62.9%), cleavage rate (78.0% vs. 63.7%), blastocyst rate (40.2% vs. 29.2%), and total cell number (128.3±4.8 vs. 112.2 ± 7.6) were higher than those in the irradiation group (all p<0.05). The overall efficiency after SCNT was twice as high in the Oosight group as that in the irradiation group (p<0.05). The relative mRNA expression levels of Oct4, Nanog, Interferon-tau, and Dnmt3A were higher and those of Caspase-3 and Hsp70 were lower in the Oosight group compared with the irradiation group (p<0.05). This is the first report to show the positive effect of the Oosight imaging system on molecular gene expression in the SCNT embryo. The Oosight imaging system may become the preferred choice for enucleation because it is less detrimental to the developmental potential of bovine SCNT embryos.

  7. Management of waste heat at nuclear power plants: Its potential impact on the environment and its possible economic use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Y.H.

    1987-01-01

    The efficacy of the disposal of waste heat from nuclear power plants by means of once-through and closed-cycle cooling systems is examined in the context of the physical aspects of water quality standards and guidelines for thermal discharges. Typical thermal standards for each of the four classes of water bodies (rivers, lakes, estuaries, and coastal waters) are identified. Examples of thermal standards established for once-through cooling on open coastal waters are presented. The design and general layout of various types of cooling systems are reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the cooling systems are presented, with particular emphasis on the discussion of potential environmental impacts. Modeling techniques available for impact assessment are presented. Proper selection and application of the models depend on the availability of site characteristics and understanding of the modeling techniques. Guidelines for choosing an appropriate model are presented. Various methods have been developed for the beneficial use of waste heat largely dissipated to the environment. Examples and associated problems of waste-heat utilization are discussed for agricultural, industrial, aquacultural, and residential uses

  8. Investigating the Potential Barrier Function of Nanostructured Materials Formed in Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) Designed for Nuclear Waste Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Jaime; Ruiz, Ana Isabel; Fernández, Raúl

    2018-02-21

    Clay and cement are known nano-colloids originating from natural processes or traditional materials technology. Currently, they are used together as part of the engineered barrier system (EBS) to isolate high-level nuclear waste (HLW) metallic containers in deep geological repositories (DGR). The EBS should prevent radionuclide (RN) migration into the biosphere until the canisters fail, which is not expected for approximately 10 3  years. The interactions of cementitious materials with bentonite swelling clay have been the scope of our research team at the Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM) with participation in several European Union (EU) projects from 1998 up to now. Here, we describe the mineral and chemical nature and microstructure of the alteration rim generated by the contact between concrete and bentonite. Its ability to buffer the surrounding chemical environment may have potential for further protection against RN migration. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Seismic stability of the survey areas of potential sites for the deep geological repository of the spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaláb, Zdeněk; Šílený, Jan; Lednická, Markéta

    2017-07-01

    This paper deals with the seismic stability of the survey areas of potential sites for the deep geological repository of the spent nuclear fuel in the Czech Republic. The basic source of data for historical earthquakes up to 1990 was the seismic website [1-]. The most intense earthquake described occurred on September 15, 1590 in the Niederroesterreich region (Austria) in the historical period; its reported intensity is Io = 8-9. The source of the contemporary seismic data for the period since 1991 to the end of 2014 was the website [11]. It may be stated based on the databases and literature review that in the period from 1900, no earthquake exceeding magnitude 5.1 originated in the territory of the Czech Republic. In order to evaluate seismicity and to assess the impact of seismic effects at depths of hypothetical deep geological repository for the next time period, the neo-deterministic method was selected as an extension of the probabilistic method. Each one out of the seven survey areas were assessed by the neo-deterministic evaluation of the seismic wave-field excited by selected individual events and determining the maximum loading. Results of seismological databases studies and neo-deterministic analysis of Čihadlo locality are presented.

  10. On the properties of nuclear matter with an excess of neutrons, spin-up neutrons and spin-up protons using effective nucleon-nucleon potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.Y.; Ramadan, S.

    1978-01-01

    The binding energy of nuclear matter with an excess of neutrons, with spin-up neutrons and spin-up protons (characterized by the corresponding parameters αsub(tau)=(N-Z)/A, αsub(n)=(N(up)-N(down))/A, and αsub(p)=(Z(up)-Z(down))/A) contains three symmetry energies: the isospin symmetry energy epsilon sub(tau), the spin symmetry energy epsilon sub(sigma) and the spin-isospin symmetry energy epsilon sub(sigma tau). These energies are calculated using velocity-dependent effective potential of s-wave interaction, which was developed by Dzhibuti and Mamasakhlisov. The spin, isospin and spin-isospin dependent parts of the single-particle potential in nuclear matter are also calculated using the same effective nucleon-nucleon potentials. The spin-spin part of the optical model potential is estimated. (author)

  11. Experimental study on the shrinkage properties and cracking potential of high strength concrete containing industrial by-products for nuclear power plant concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KIm, Baek Joong; Yi, Chong Ku

    2017-01-01

    In Korea, attempts have been made to develop high strength concrete for the safety and design life improvement of nuclear power plants. In this study, the cracking potentials of nuclear power plant-high strength concretes (NPP-HSCs) containing industrial by-products with W/B 0.34 and W/B 0.28, which are being reviewed for their application in the construction of containment structures, were evaluated through autogenous shrinkage, unrestrained drying shrinkage, and restrained drying shrinkage experiments. The cracking potentials of the NPP-HSCs with W/B 0.34 and W/B 0.28 were in the order of 0.34FA25 > 0.34FA25BFS25 > 0.34BFS50 > 0.34BFS65SF5 and 0.28FA25SF5 >> 0.28BFS65SF5 > 0.28BFS45SF5 > 0.28 FA20BFS25SF5, respectively. The cracking potentials of the seven mix proportions excluding 0.28FA25SF5 were lower than that of the existing nuclear power plant concrete; thus, the durability of a nuclear power plant against shrinkage cracking could be improved by applying the seven mix proportions with low cracking potentials

  12. Experimental study on the shrinkage properties and cracking potential of high strength concrete containing industrial by-products for nuclear power plant concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIm, Baek Joong; Yi, Chong Ku [School of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In Korea, attempts have been made to develop high strength concrete for the safety and design life improvement of nuclear power plants. In this study, the cracking potentials of nuclear power plant-high strength concretes (NPP-HSCs) containing industrial by-products with W/B 0.34 and W/B 0.28, which are being reviewed for their application in the construction of containment structures, were evaluated through autogenous shrinkage, unrestrained drying shrinkage, and restrained drying shrinkage experiments. The cracking potentials of the NPP-HSCs with W/B 0.34 and W/B 0.28 were in the order of 0.34FA25 > 0.34FA25BFS25 > 0.34BFS50 > 0.34BFS65SF5 and 0.28FA25SF5 >> 0.28BFS65SF5 > 0.28BFS45SF5 > 0.28 FA20BFS25SF5, respectively. The cracking potentials of the seven mix proportions excluding 0.28FA25SF5 were lower than that of the existing nuclear power plant concrete; thus, the durability of a nuclear power plant against shrinkage cracking could be improved by applying the seven mix proportions with low cracking potentials.

  13. Development of a high-throughput method for the systematic identification of human proteins nuclear translocation potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawai Jun

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Important clues to the function of novel and uncharacterized proteins can be obtained by identifying their ability to translocate in the nucleus. In addition, a comprehensive definition of the nuclear proteome undoubtedly represents a key step toward a better understanding of the biology of this organelle. Although several high-throughput experimental methods have been developed to explore the sub-cellular localization of proteins, these methods tend to focus on the predominant localizations of gene products and may fail to provide a complete catalog of proteins that are able to transiently locate into the nucleus. Results We have developed a method for examining the nuclear localization potential of human gene products at the proteome scale by adapting a mammalian two-hybrid system we have previously developed. Our system is composed of three constructs co-transfected into a mammalian cell line. First, it contains a PCR construct encoding a fusion protein composed of a tested protein, the PDZ-protein TIP-1, and the transactivation domain of TNNC2 (referred to as ACT construct. Second, our system contains a PCR construct encoding a fusion protein composed of the DNA binding domain of GAL4 and the PDZ binding domain of rhotekin (referred to as the BIND construct. Third, a GAL4-responsive luciferase reporter is used to detect the reconstitution of a transcriptionally active BIND-ACT complex through the interaction of TIP-1 and rhotekin, which indicates the ability of the tested protein to translocate into the nucleus. We validated our method in a small-scale feasibility study by comparing it to green fluorescent protein (GFP fusion-based sub-cellular localization assays, sequence-based computational prediction of protein sub-cellular localization, and current sub-cellular localization data available from the literature for 22 gene products. Conclusion Our reporter-based system can rapidly screen gene products for their ability

  14. Studies of breakeven prices and electricity supply potentials of nuclear fusion by a long-term world energy and environment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokimatsu, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Okano, K.; Yoshida, T.; Hiwatari, R.; Konishi, S.; Nishio, S.; Fujino, J.; Ogawa, Y.; Yamaji, K.

    2002-01-01

    In response to social demand, this paper investigates the breakeven price (BP) and potential electricity supply of nuclear fusion energy in the 21st century by means of a world energy and environment model. We set the following objectives in this paper: (i) to reveal the economics of the introduction conditions of nuclear fusion; (ii) to know when tokamak-type nuclear fusion reactors are expected to be introduced cost-effectively into future energy systems; (iii) to estimate the share in 2100 of electricity produced by the presently designed reactors that could be economically selected in the year. The model can give in detail the energy and environment technologies and price-induced energy saving, and can illustrate optimal energy supply structures by minimizing the costs of total discounted energy systems at a discount rate of 5%. The following parameters of nuclear fusion were considered: cost of electricity (COE) in the nuclear fusion introduction year, annual COE reduction rates, regional introduction year, and regional nuclear fusion capacity projection. The investigations are carried out for three nuclear fusion projections one of which includes tritium breeding constraints, four future CO 2 concentration constraints, and technological assumptions on fossil fuels, nuclear fission, CO 2 sequestration, and anonymous innovative technologies. It is concluded that: (1) the BPs are from 65 to 125 mill kW -1 h -1 depending on the introduction year of nuclear fusion under the 550 ppmv CO 2 concentration constraints; those of a business-as-usual (BAU) case are from 51 to 68 mill kW -1 h -1 . Uncertainties resulting from the CO 2 concentration constraints and the technological options influenced the BPs by plus/minus some 10-30 mill kW -1 h -1 , (2) tokamak-type nuclear fusion reactors (as presently designed, with a COE range around 70-130 mill kW -1 h -1 ) would be favourably introduced into energy systems after 2060 based on the economic criteria under the 450 and

  15. Studies of breakeven prices and electricity supply potentials of nuclear fusion by a long-term world energy and environment model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokimatsu, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Konishi, S.; Fujino, J.; Ogawa, Y.; Okano, K.; Nishio, S.; Yoshida, T.; Hiwatari, R.; Yamaji, K.

    2002-11-01

    In response to social demand, this paper investigates the breakeven price (BP) and potential electricity supply of nuclear fusion energy in the 21st century by means of a world energy and environment model. We set the following objectives in this paper: (i) to reveal the economics of the introduction conditions of nuclear fusion; (ii) to know when tokamak-type nuclear fusion reactors are expected to be introduced cost-effectively into future energy systems; (iii) to estimate the share in 2100 of electricity produced by the presently designed reactors that could be economically selected in the year. The model can give in detail the energy and environment technologies and price-induced energy saving, and can illustrate optimal energy supply structures by minimizing the costs of total discounted energy systems at a discount rate of 5%. The following parameters of nuclear fusion were considered: cost of electricity (COE) in the nuclear fusion introduction year, annual COE reduction rates, regional introduction year, and regional nuclear fusion capacity projection. The investigations are carried out for three nuclear fusion projections one of which includes tritium breeding constraints, four future CO2 concentration constraints, and technological assumptions on fossil fuels, nuclear fission, CO2 sequestration, and anonymous innovative technologies. It is concluded that: (1) the BPs are from 65 to 125 mill kW-1 h-1 depending on the introduction year of nuclear fusion under the 550 ppmv CO2 concentration constraints; those of a business-as-usual (BAU) case are from 51 to 68 mill kW-1h-1. Uncertainties resulting from the CO2 concentration constraints and the technological options influenced the BPs by plus/minus some 10 30 mill kW-1h-1, (2) tokamak-type nuclear fusion reactors (as presently designed, with a COE range around 70 130 mill kW-1h-1) would be favourably introduced into energy systems after 2060 based on the economic criteria under the 450 and 550 ppmv CO2

  16. 75 FR 63214 - Errata Notice; Notice of Public Workshop on a Potential Rulemaking for Spent Nuclear Fuel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555..., 2010, workshop will be held at the Hilton Washington, DC/Rockville Hotel & Executive Meeting Center... October 19-20, 2010, at the Sheraton Albuquerque Uptown Hotel, located at 2600 Louisiana Boulevard NE...

  17. H.R. 5051: a bill to authorize funding for research on the potential atmospheric, climatic, biological, health, and environmental consequences of nuclear explosions and nuclear exchanges... Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, June 18, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Winter Research Act of 1986 authorizes funding to study the potential consequences of nuclear explosions. The research will cover possible atmospheric, climatic, biological, health, or environmental changes to see if the nuclear winter theory is plausible. The bill authorizes $8.5 million over a five-year period for the Department of Defense study. It also establishes a Nuclear Winter Study Commission to determine and evaluate what implications these potential effects have for defense policy

  18. The Environmental Protection Agency's Safety Standards for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel: Potential Path Forward in Response to the Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future - 13388

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forinash, Betsy; Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Following the decision to withdraw the Yucca Mountain license application, the Department of Energy created a Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future, tasked with recommending a national strategy to manage the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. The BRC issued its final report in January 2012, with recommendations covering transportation, storage and disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF); potential reprocessing; and supporting institutional measures. The BRC recommendations on disposal of SNF and high-level waste (HLW) are relevant to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which shares regulatory responsibility with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC): EPA issues 'generally applicable' performance standards for disposal repositories, which are then implemented in licensing. For disposal, the BRC endorses developing one or more geological repositories, with siting based on an approach that is adaptive, staged and consent-based. The BRC recommends that EPA and NRC work cooperatively to issue generic disposal standards-applying equally to all sites-early in any siting process. EPA previously issued generic disposal standards that apply to all sites other than Yucca Mountain. However, the BRC concluded that the existing regulations should be revisited and revised. The BRC proposes a number of general principles to guide the development of future regulations. EPA continues to review the BRC report and to assess the implications for Agency action, including potential regulatory issues and considerations if EPA develops new or revised generic disposal standards. This review also involves preparatory activities to define potential process and public engagement approaches. (authors)

  19. Insertion of a nuclear factor kappa B DNA nuclear-targeting sequence potentiates suicide gene therapy efficacy in lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, F; Christensen, C L; Poulsen, T T

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer currently causes the majority of cancer-related deaths worldwide and new treatments are in high demand. Gene therapy could be a promising treatment but currently lacks sufficient efficiency for clinical use, primarily due to limited cellular and nuclear DNA delivery. In the present...

  20. Nuclear questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Civilian and military nuclear questions fill a multitude of publications these days, especially after the Japanese tsunami and the Fukushima disaster. The author analyses some of them and highlights the links between civil and military nuclear industries, the realities of the nuclear cycle and related industrial questions before concluding on the controversial issue of weapons and their proliferation potential

  1. Concrete-polymer composite materials and their potential for construction, urban waste utilization, and nuclear waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, E.E.; Steinberg, Meyer.

    1974-01-01

    A wide range of concrete-polymer composites have been investigated by Brookhaven National Laboratory. Polymer impregnated concrete (PIC) is basically formed by drying cured conventional concrete, displacing the air from open cell void volume, diffusing low viscosity monomer (less than 10 cps) through the open cell structure, saturating the concrete with the monomer and in-situ polymerizing the monomer to polymer by most convenient means. Mainly free-radical vinyl type monomers are used. For increased thermal stability, crosslinking agents and thermosetting monomers such as styrene-trimethylol propane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene are used. Much informations on the formation, structural properties and durability of PIC have been accumulated over past five years. U.S. Patent 3,567,496 has been issued on the production of PIC. Compressive strength can be increased from 352 kg/cm 2 of conventional concrete to 1,410 kg/cm 2 . Water absorption is reduced by 99% and the freeze-thaw resistance is remarkably improved. With high silica cement, strong basaltic aggregate, and high temperature steam curing, strength increase from 845 to over 2,630 kg/cm 2 can be obtained. A maximum of 238 kg/cm 2 tensile strength has been obtained with the steam-cured concrete. In the steam- cured concrete, polymer loading roughly around 8% by weight is obtained. Aggregates can include the urban solid waste discarded by man. Sewage and solid waste refuse-polymer concrete has been produced by using garbage as aggregate and sewage as the hydrating media for cement. The potentially important application of hydrauric cement concrete, in combination with the polymers in PIC and PC, is the storage of long-living radioactive wastes from nuclear industry. (Iwakiri, K.)

  2. Potential consequences in Norway after a hypothetical accident at Leningrad nuclear power plant. Potential release, fallout and predicted impacts on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalbandyan, A.; Ytre-Eide, M.A.; Thoerring, H.; Liland, A.; Bartnicki, J.; Balonov, M.

    2012-06-01

    The report describes different hypothetical accident scenarios at the Leningrad nuclear power plant for both RBMK and VVER-1200 reactors. The estimated release is combined with different meteorological scenarios to predict possible fallout of radioactive substances in Norway. For a hypothetical catastrophic accident at an RBMK reactor combined with a meteorological worst case scenario, the consequences in Norway could be considerable. Foodstuffs in many regions would be contaminated above the food intervention levels for radioactive cesium in Norway. (Author)

  3. Potential consequences in Norway after a hypothetical accident at Leningrad nuclear power plant. Potential release, fallout and predicted impacts on the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalbandyan, A.; Ytre-Eide, M.A.; Thoerring, H.; Liland, A.; Bartnicki, J.; Balonov, M.

    2012-06-15

    The report describes different hypothetical accident scenarios at the Leningrad nuclear power plant for both RBMK and VVER-1200 reactors. The estimated release is combined with different meteorological scenarios to predict possible fallout of radioactive substances in Norway. For a hypothetical catastrophic accident at an RBMK reactor combined with a meteorological worst case scenario, the consequences in Norway could be considerable. Foodstuffs in many regions would be contaminated above the food intervention levels for radioactive cesium in Norway. (Author)

  4. Identification of potential nuclear reprogramming and differentiation factors by a novel selection method for cloning chromatin-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liu; Zheng Aihua; Yi Ling; Xu Chongren; Ding Mingxiao; Deng Hongkui

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming is critical for animal cloning and stem cell creation through nuclear transfer, which requires extensive remodeling of chromosomal architecture involving dramatic changes in chromatin-binding proteins. To understand the mechanism of nuclear reprogramming, it is critical to identify chromatin-binding factors specify the reprogramming process. In this report, we have developed a high-throughput selection method, based on T7 phage display and chromatin immunoprecipitation, to isolate chromatin-binding factors expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells using primary mouse embryonic fibroblast chromatin. Seven chromatin-binding proteins have been isolated by this method. We have also isolated several chromatin-binding proteins involved in hepatocyte differentiation. Our method provides a powerful tool to rapidly and selectively identify chromatin-binding proteins. The method can be used to study epigenetic modification of chromatin during nuclear reprogramming, cell differentiation, and transdifferentiation

  5. Electrophoretic characterization of the Mammalian nuclear matrix proteome, nuclear envelope, nucleoli and covalently bound ADP-ribose polymers: potential applications to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Xavier G; Racho, Ronald G; Pacheco-Rodríguez, Gustavo; Alvarez-González, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid metabolism is biochemically compartmentalized to the nucleus. Thus, it is necessary to define the proteome of the various macromolecular structures within this organelle. We isolated the nuclear matrix (NM) fraction from rat liver by sequential centrifugation steps at 13,000 rpm, staggered between endogenous nuclease treatment for 2 h at 37°C, followed by high-salt (H.S.; 2.0 M NaCl) and non-ionic detergent extractions (0.1%- or 1.0% Triton X-100) to eliminate the bulk of chromosomal DNA/RNA, histone proteins and the nuclear envelope (NE). Integrity of the NM and NE structures was confirmed by electron microscopy. Next, we analyzed the NM proteome on a 20% polyacrylamide gel using the PhastSystem. We observed the absence of histone proteins and the characteristic presence of the lamins by Coomassie blue staining. By contrast, upon silver staining, following electrophoretic separation with a Tris-Borate-EDTA buffer, we observed the NM-associated nucleic RNA and protein-free ADP-ribose polymers. While polymers are found in much lower concentration than RNA in NM, they were purified by affinity chromatography on boronate resin prior to electrophoresis. We observed the electrophoretic resolution of free ADP-ribose chains (5-25 units) by silver staining. The significance of our observations to cancer studies and carcinogenesis is discussed. Copyright© 2014, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. A basic framework for the analysis of the human error potential due to the computerization in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. H.

    1999-01-01

    Computerization and its vivid benefits expected in the nuclear power plant design cannot be realized without verifying the inherent safety problems. Human error aspect is also included in the verification issues. The verification spans from the perception of the changes in operation functions such as automation to the unfamiliar experience of operators due to the interface change. Therefore, a new framework for human error analysis might capture both the positive and the negative effect of the computerization. This paper suggest a basic framework for error identification through the review of the existing human error studies and the experience of computerizations in nuclear power plants

  7. Potential human factors deficiencies in the design of local control stations and operator interfaces in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, C.S.; Levy, I.S.; Fecht, B.A.

    1984-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has completed a project to identify human factors deficiencies in safety-significant control stations outside the control room of a nuclear power plant and to determine whether NUREG-0700, Guidelines for Control Room Design Reviews, would be sufficient for reviewing those local control stations (LCSs). The project accomplished this task by first, reviewing existing data pertaining to human factors deficiencies in LCSs involved in significant safety actions; second, surveying LCSs environments and design features at several operating nuclear power plants; and third, assessing the results of that survey relative to the contents of NUREG-0700

  8. Influence of the Pauli exclusion principle and the polarization of nuclei on the nuclear part of the interaction potential in the 40Ca +40Ca system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov, V. O.

    2018-06-01

    In the framework of the energy density method with the use of the wave function of the two-center shell model, the influence of the simultaneous account for the Pauli exclusion principle and the monopole and quadrupole polarizations of nuclei on the nuclear part of the potential of their interaction by the example of the 40Ca +40Ca system is considered. The calculations performed in the framework of the adiabatic approximation show that the consideration of the Pauli exclusion principle and the polarization of nuclei, especially the quadrupole one, essentially affects the nucleus-nucleus interaction potential.

  9. Single-particle potential of the Λ hyperon in nuclear matter with chiral effective field theory NLO interactions including effects of Y N N three-baryon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M.

    2018-03-01

    Adopting hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-nucleon-nucleon interactions parametrized in chiral effective field theory, single-particle potentials of the Λ and Σ hyperons are evaluated in symmetric nuclear matter and in pure neutron matter within the framework of lowest-order Bruckner theory. The chiral NLO interaction bears strong Λ N -Σ N coupling. Although the Λ potential is repulsive if the coupling is switched off, the Λ N -Σ N correlation brings about the attraction consistent with empirical data. The Σ potential is repulsive, which is also consistent with empirical information. The interesting result is that the Λ potential becomes shallower beyond normal density. This provides the possibility of solving the hyperon puzzle without introducing ad hoc assumptions. The effects of the Λ N N -Λ N N and Λ N N -Σ N N three-baryon forces are considered. These three-baryon forces are first reduced to normal-ordered effective two-baryon interactions in nuclear matter and then incorporated in the G -matrix equation. The repulsion from the Λ N N -Λ N N interaction is of the order of 5 MeV at normal density and becomes larger with increasing density. The effects of the Λ N N -Σ N N coupling compensate the repulsion at normal density. The net effect of the three-baryon interactions on the Λ single-particle potential is repulsive at higher densities.

  10. Summary of a joint US-Japan study of potential approaches to reduce the attractiveness of various nuclear materials for use in a nuclear explosive device by a terrorist group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathke, C.G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Inoue, N.; Kuno, Y.; Mihara, T.; Sagara, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-49 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan); Ebbinghaus, B.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box L-168, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Murphy, J.; Dalton, D. [National Nuclear Security Administration, Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave, SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Nagayama, Y. [Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, 3-2-2 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8959 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a joint US-Japan study to establish a mutual understanding, through scientific-based study, of potential approaches to reduce the attractiveness of various nuclear materials for use in a terrorist nuclear explosive device (NED). 4 approaches that can reduce materials attractiveness with a very high degree of effectiveness are: -) diluting HEU with natural or depleted U to an enrichment of less than 10% U-235; -) storing Pu in nuclear fuel that is not man portable and with a dose rate greater or equal to 10 Gy/h at 1 m; -) storing Pu or HEU in heavy items, i.e. not transportable, provided the removal of the Pu or HEU from the item requires a purification/processing capability; and -) converting Pu and HEU to very dilute forms (such as wastes) that, without any security barriers, would require very long acquisition times to acquire a Category I quantity of Pu or of HEU. 2 approaches that can reduce materials attractiveness with a high degree of effectiveness are: -) converting HEU-fueled research reactors into LEU-fueled research reactors or dilute HEU with natural or depleted U to an enrichment of less than 20% U-235; -) converting U/Al reactor fuel into U/Si reactor fuel. Other approaches have been assessed as moderately or totally inefficient to reduce the attractiveness of nuclear materials.

  11. Economics and resources analysis of the potential use of reprocessing options by the current Spanish nuclear reactor park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Merino Rodriguez, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.

    2014-07-01

    Reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel serves multiple purposes, from Pu separation and recovery for MOX fuel fabrication to reduction of high level waste volume, and is nowadays being implemented in several countries like France, Japan, Russia or United Kingdom. This work is aimed at exploring the possibility (in resources and economic terms) of implementing reprocessing for MOX fabrication in Spain. (Author)

  12. Nuclear process steam for industry: potential for the development of an Industrial Energy Park adjacent to the Bruce Nuclear Power Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seddon, W A

    1981-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of an industrial survey jointly funded by the Bruce County Council, the Ontario Energy Corporation, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and conducted with the cooperation of Ontario Hydro and the Ontario Ministry of Industry and Tourism. The objective of the study was to identify and assess the future needs and interest of energy-intensive industries in the concept of an Industrial Energy Park adjacent tof the Bruce Nuclear Power Development. The proposed Energy Park would capitalize on the infrastructure of the existing CANDU reactors and Ontario Hydro's proven and unique capability to produce steam, as well as electricity, at a cost currently about half that from a comparable coal-fired station.

  13. Nuclear power 1996: potential for further development. Session reports of the annual meeting on nuclear technology, May 21-23, 1996 in Mannheim

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    For the third time, the 'Rosengarten', the congress center of the city of Mannheim, was the venue of the Annual Nuclear Conference, this year on May 21-23, 1996. Attendance showed a slight increase, and the organizers, Deutsches Atomforum (DAtF) and the Kerntechnische Gesellschaft (KTG), welcomed more than 1000 participants at the world's biggest event of this kind. The program was arranged in the traditional, proven format, with plenary sessions on the first day, and technical sessions, poster sessions, special events, and technical excursions on the other two days. These proceedings were accompanied by an exhibition arranged by vendors, suppliers, and service companies. Following the summary of the plenary day published on pp. 385-95 in atw 6/96, the survey in this issue covers the technical sessions as seen by the rapporteurs. (orig.) [de

  14. Potential problems in introduction of personnel reliability certification systems into Japan's nuclear industry. Implications from the German and the U.S. laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Tomoyuki

    2009-01-01

    In Japan, while the interest in nuclear terrorism has increased which led law revision aiming for reinforcing physical protection in 2005, there is a growing concern in an insider threat in the nuclear industry. To cope with this threat, 'personnel reliability certification systems' are introduced in the United States and other nuclear industrized countries as an effective measure. The report examines current personnel reliability certification systems in Germany and the United States, and identifies common characteristics as well as key differences between two legal systems and regulations, and thereby attempts to identify the potential problems that the Japanese nuclear industry would face if such institutions as seen in Germany and the United States would be introduced in Japan, and suggests some measures to overcome these problems. The author suggests the following measures as practically useful essential in introducing similar systems in Japan: (1) introduction of comprehensive regulation (not industry specific) on personnel reliability certification systems, (2) clarification of conditions of prior consents by the employees, and (3) privacy protection procedures of the employees and information management. (author)

  15. NATO's Nuclear Glue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Horton, Scott T

    2007-01-01

    .... nuclear weapons prepositioned in Europe? This paper reviews the past and current role of US nuclear forces in NATO, considers future nuclear policy options, and discusses potential consequences of those decisions...

  16. On-Line Monitoring of Environment-Assisted Cracking in Nuclear Piping Using Array Probe Direct Current Potential Drop

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Y.; Choi, S.; Yoon, J. Y.; Nam, W. C.; Hwang, I. S.; Bromberg, Leslie; Stahle, Peter W; Ballinger, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    A direct current potential drop method utilizing array probes with measurement ends maintaining an equalized potential designated as equi-potential switching array probe direct current potential drop (ESAP-DCPD) technique has been developed earlier at Seoul National University. This paper validates ESAP-DCPD technique by showing consistency among experimental measurements, analytical solution and numerical predictions using finite element analysis (FEA) of electric field changes with crack gr...

  17. Environmental consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwell, M.A.; Hutchinson, T.C.; Cropper, W.P. Jr.; Harwell, C.C.; Grover, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book addresses the ecological, agricultural, and human effects of nuclear war. The topics covered include: Ecological principles relevant to nuclear war; Vulnerability of ecological systems to climatic effects on nuclear war; Additional potential effects of nuclear war on ecological systems; Potential effects of nuclear war on agricultural productivity; Food availability after nuclear war; and Experiences and extrapolations from Hiroshima and Nagasaki

  18. Plan for ecumenical hearing on the risks and potentialities of the further expansion of nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, J.M.; Abrecht, P.

    1976-01-01

    The basis of the Hearing, initiated by the World Council of Churches, is explained. Some countries are planning a rapid development of nuclear power, but others are reluctant to follow this line. An outline is presented of the divergent views: those against refer to the political, social and technical problems which are being left with future generations (management of obsolete reactor systems, storage of radioactive wastes); restriction on free discussion on grounds of national security; need for international safeguards; economic questions; environmental impact; plutonium hazard of breeder reactors. Those for nuclear power argue that there is no obvious alternative way of meeting the world's power demands. Intermediate views are also presented. The Hearing received position papers prepared by specialists on the various aspects of the subject. The Hearing Group held a meeting at Sigtuna, Sweden, June 24 to 29, 1975. The text of the document they prepared and the position papers, are presented as separate papers in the present series. (U.K.)

  19. Rational power utilization and generation without nuclear energy: Potentials and assessment of effects on the power industry, ecology, and economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuhr, K.P.; Eckerle, K.; Hofer, P.; Meckel, H.; Wolff, H.; Frey, B.; Schilling, K.; Brand, M.; Jochem, E.

    1987-10-01

    The unabridged version of the investigation gives the reader interested in details the relevant information on the individual analyses. The development of the investigation describes the analysis of the demographical and economical framework data, the long-term development of the energy price and the long-term energy demand development in a reference scenario. As most important status-quo condition it is defined that the development lines to be expected of the expected fuel and power demand and the supply of the power demand are indicated under the condition of further development of the nuclear power generation being borne by a political consensus. A contrast scenario examines if replacement of the nuclear energy would be possible by power cuts, development of the local heat supply and long-distance heat supply by cogeneration systems and development of the industrial cogeneration systems. (DG) [de

  20. Nuclear physics for nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xingzhong; Liu Bin; Wei Qingming; Ren Xianzhe

    2004-01-01

    The D-T fusion cross-section is calculated using quantum mechanics with the model of square nuclear potential well and Coulomb potential barrier. The agreement between ENDF data and the theoretically calculated results is well in the range of 0.2-280 keV. It shows that the application of Breit-Wigner formula is not suitable for the case of the light nuclei fusion reaction. When this model is applied to the nuclear reaction between the charged particles confined in a lattice, it explains the 'abnormal phenomena'. It implies a prospect of nuclear fusion energy without strong nuclear radiations

  1. Potential vulnerabilities of nuclear fuel cycle facilities to the year 2000 (Y2K) issue and measures to address them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    The exchange of information and experience among Member Sates is an essential component of the IAEA action plan for addressing the Year 2000 problem. The objective is to enable Member States to identify any gaps in their own conversion programmes, benefit form the experience of others in developing remedial actions and establish the basis for future action to solve remaining problems. Experts in Year 2000 issues particularly those related to digital equipment prepared this report dealing with nuclear fuel cycle facilities

  2. A geotechnical evaluation of potentially acceptable sites for a high-level nuclear waste repository near the Red Lake Indian Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The scope and work which served as the basis for this report included the following major activities; (1) A review and summary of the screening methodologies utilized by DOE for the selection of proposed nuclear waste repository sites, including a description of the inherent weakness in those methodologies. (2) A description of the geologic and hydrologic features of the rock bodies selected by DOE and an identification of those features which could result in hazardous conditions as a result of the location of a high-level nuclear waste repository. (3) An assessment of potential environmental impacts of the repository and discussion of endanged species in the proposed repository project areas. This report is organized in three major sections in relationship to the scope of work. A list of references is also included at the end of this report. 37 refs., 2 figs

  3. Nuclear energy acceptance and potential role to meet future energy demand. Which technical/scientific achievements are needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, Roland

    2012-06-01

    25 years after Chernobyl, the Fukushima disaster has changed the perspectives of nuclear power. The disaster has shed a negative light on the independence, reliability and rigor of the national nuclear regulator and plant operator and the usefulness of the international IAEA guidelines on nuclear safety. It has become clear that, in the light of the most severe earthquake in the history of Japan, the plants at Fukushima Daiichi were not adequately protected against tsunamis. Nuclear acceptance has suffered enormously and has changed the perspectives of nuclear energy dramatically in countries that have a very risk-sensitive population, Germany is an example. The paper analyses the reactions in major countries and the expected impact on future deployment of reactors and on R&D activities. On the positive side, the disaster has demonstrated a remarkable robustness of most of the 14 reactors closest to the epicentre of the Tohoku Seaquake although not designed to an event of level 9.0. Public acceptance can only be regained with a rigorous and worldwide approach towards inherent reactor safety and design objectives that limit the impact of severe accidents to the plant itself (like many of the new Gen III reactors). A widespread release of radioactivity and the evacuation (temporary or permanent) of the population up to 30 km around a facility are simply not acceptable. Several countries have announced to request more stringent international standards for reactor safety. The IAEA should take this move forward and intensify and strengthen the different peer review mission schemes. The safety guidelines and peer reviews should in fact become legally binding for IAEA members. The paper gives examples of the new safety features developed over the last 20 years and which yield much safer reactors with lesser burden to the environment under severe accident conditions. The compatibility of these safety systems with the current concepts for fusion-fission hybrids, which have

  4. Nuclear energy acceptance and potential role to meet future energy demand. Which technical/scientific achievements are needed?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenkel, Roland [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1,76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-06-19

    25 years after Chernobyl, the Fukushima disaster has changed the perspectives of nuclear power. The disaster has shed a negative light on the independence, reliability and rigor of the national nuclear regulator and plant operator and the usefulness of the international IAEA guidelines on nuclear safety. It has become clear that, in the light of the most severe earthquake in the history of Japan, the plants at Fukushima Daiichi were not adequately protected against tsunamis. Nuclear acceptance has suffered enormously and has changed the perspectives of nuclear energy dramatically in countries that have a very risk-sensitive population, Germany is an example. The paper analyses the reactions in major countries and the expected impact on future deployment of reactors and on R and D activities. On the positive side, the disaster has demonstrated a remarkable robustness of most of the 14 reactors closest to the epicentre of the Tohoku Seaquake although not designed to an event of level 9.0. Public acceptance can only be regained with a rigorous and worldwide approach towards inherent reactor safety and design objectives that limit the impact of severe accidents to the plant itself (like many of the new Gen III reactors). A widespread release of radioactivity and the evacuation (temporary or permanent) of the population up to 30 km around a facility are simply not acceptable. Several countries have announced to request more stringent international standards for reactor safety. The IAEA should take this move forward and intensify and strengthen the different peer review mission schemes. The safety guidelines and peer reviews should in fact become legally binding for IAEA members. The paper gives examples of the new safety features developed over the last 20 years and which yield much safer reactors with lesser burden to the environment under severe accident conditions. The compatibility of these safety systems with the current concepts for fusion-fission hybrids, which

  5. One nuclear calcium transient induced by a single burst of action potentials represents the minimum signal strength in activity-dependent transcription in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan; Oberlaender, Kristin; Bengtson, C Peter; Bading, Hilmar

    2017-07-01

    Neurons undergo dramatic changes in their gene expression profiles in response to synaptic stimulation. The coupling of neuronal excitation to gene transcription is well studied and is mediated by signaling pathways activated by cytoplasmic and nuclear calcium transients. Despite this, the minimum synaptic activity required to induce gene expression remains unknown. To address this, we used cultured hippocampal neurons and cellular compartment analysis of temporal activity by fluorescence in situ hybridization (catFISH) that allows detection of nascent transcripts in the cell nucleus. We found that a single burst of action potentials, consisting of 24.4±5.1 action potentials during a 6.7±1.9s depolarization of 19.5±2.0mV causing a 9.3±0.9s somatic calcium transient, is sufficient to activate transcription of the immediate early gene arc (also known as Arg3.1). The total arc mRNA yield produced after a single burst-induced nuclear calcium transient was very small and, compared to unstimulated control neurons, did not lead to a significant increase in arc mRNA levels measured using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) of cell lysates. Significantly increased arc mRNA levels became detectable in hippocampal neurons that had undergone 5-8 consecutive burst-induced nuclear calcium transients at 0.05-0.15Hz. These results indicate that a single burst-induced nuclear calcium transient can activate gene expression and that transcription is rapidly shut off after synaptic stimulation has ceased. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. On the contribution of external cost calculations to energy system governance: The case of a potential large-scale nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laes, Erik; Meskens, Gaston; Sluijs, Jeroen P. van der

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of nuclear power to a sustainable energy future is a contested issue. This paper presents a critical review of an attempt to objectify this debate through the calculation of the external costs of a potential large-scale nuclear accident in the ExternE project. A careful dissection of the ExternE approach resulted in a list of 30 calculation steps and assumptions, from which the 6 most contentious ones were selected through a stakeholder internet survey. The policy robustness and relevance of these key assumptions were then assessed in a workshop using the concept of a 'pedigree of knowledge'. Overall, the workshop outcomes revealed the stakeholder and expert panel's scepticism about the assumptions made: generally these were considered not very plausible, subjected to disagreement, and to a large extent inspired by contextual factors. Such criticism indicates a limited validity and useability of the calculated nuclear accident externality as a trustworthy sustainability indicator. Furthermore, it is our contention that the ExternE project could benefit greatly - in terms of gaining public trust - from employing highly visible procedures of extended peer review such as the pedigree assessment applied to our specific case of the external costs of a potential large-scale nuclear accident. - Highlights: → Six most contentious assumptions were selected through a stakeholder internet survey. → Policy robustness of these assumptions was assessed in a pedigree assessment workshop. → Assumptions were considered implausible, controversial, and inspired by contextual factors. → This indicates a limited validity and useability as a trustworthy sustainability indicator.

  7. Novel nuclear localization and potential function of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor/insulin receptor hybrid in corneal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chieh Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R and insulin receptor (INSR are highly homologous molecules, which can heterodimerize to form an IGF-1R/INSR hybrid (Hybrid-R. The presence and biological significance of the Hybrid-R in human corneal epithelium has not yet been established. In addition, while nuclear localization of IGF-1R was recently reported in cancer cells and human corneal epithelial cells, the function and profile of nuclear IGF-1R is unknown. In this study, we characterized the nuclear localization and function of the Hybrid-R and the role of IGF-1/IGF-1R and Hybrid-R signaling in the human corneal epithelium. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: IGF-1-mediated signaling and cell growth were examined in a human telomerized corneal epithelial (hTCEpi cell line using co-immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting and cell proliferation assays. The presence of Hybrid-R in hTCEpi and primary cultured human corneal epithelial cells was confirmed by immunofluorescence and reciprocal immunoprecipitation of whole cell lysates. We found that IGF-1 stimulated Akt and promoted cell growth through IGF-1R activation, which was independent of the Hybrid-R. The presence of Hybrid-R, but not IGF-1R/IGF-1R, was detected in nuclear extracts. Knockdown of INSR by small interfering RNA resulted in depletion of the INSR/INSR and preferential formation of Hybrid-R. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation sequencing assay with anti-IGF-1R or anti-INSR was subsequently performed to identify potential genomic targets responsible for critical homeostatic regulatory pathways. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In contrast to previous reports on nuclear localized IGF-1R, this is the first report identifying the nuclear localization of Hybrid-R in an epithelial cell line. The identification of a nuclear Hybrid-R and novel genomic targets suggests that IGF-1R traffics to the nucleus as an IGF-1R/INSR heterotetrameric complex to regulate corneal epithelial homeostatic

  8. Potentialities of the molten salt reactor concept for a sustainable nuclear power production based on thorium cycle in epithermal spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuttin, Alexis

    2002-01-01

    In the case of a significant nuclear contribution to world energy needs, the problem of present nuclear waste management pose the sustainability of the PWR fuel cycle back into question. Studies on storage and incineration of these wastes should therefore go hand in hand with studies on innovative systems dedicated to a durable nuclear energy production, as reliable, clean and safe as possible. We are here interested in the concept of molten salt reactor, whose fuel is liquid. This particularity allows an online pyrochemical reprocessing which gives the possibility to overcome some neutronic limits. In the late sixties, the MSBR (Molten Salt Breeder Reactor) project of a graphite-moderated fluoride molten salt reactor proved thus that breeding is attainable with thorium in a thermal spectrum, provided that the online reprocessing is appropriate. By means of simulation tools developed around the Monte Carlo code MCNP, we first re-evaluate the performance of a reference system, which is inspired by the MSBR project. The complete study of the pre-equilibrium transient of this 2,500 MWth reactor, started with 232 Th/ 233 U fuel, allows us to validate our reference choices. The obtained equilibrium shows an important reduction of inventories and induced radio-toxicities in comparison with the other possible fuel cycles. The online reprocessing is efficient enough to make the system breed, with a doubling time of about thirty years at equilibrium. From the reference system, we then test different options in terms of neutron economy, transmutation and control of reactivity. We find that the online reprocessing brings most of its flexibility to this system, which is particularly well adapted to power generation with thorium. The study of transition scenarios to this fuel cycle quantifies the limits of a possible deployment from the present French power stock, and finally shows that a rational management of the available plutonium would be necessary in any case. (author)

  9. Potential of human saliva for nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics and for health-related biomarker identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Eggers, Nina; Eller, Nanna

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the ability of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for metabolic profiling of human saliva samples was investigated. High-resolution (1)H NMR spectra were obtained, and signals were assigned to various metabolites mainly representing small organic acids and amino acids...... in intensities of several metabolites including trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), choline, propionate, alanine, methanol, and N-acetyl groups. No effects of gender and body mass index (BMI) on the salivary metabolite profile were detected. The relationships between the salivary metabolome and glycated hemoglobin...

  10. High-level nuclear waste transport and storage assessment of potential impacts on tourism in the Las Vegas area. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    The literature review and empirical analyses presented in this report were undertaken, for the most part, between August and October 1983. They are not comprehensive. No primary data were gathered, nor were any formal surveys conducted. Additionally, because construction of a repository at Yucca Mountain, if that site is selected for a repository, is not scheduled to begin until 1993, engineering design and planned physical appearance of the repository are very preliminary. Therefore, specific design features or visual appearance were not addressed in the analyses. Finally, because actual transportation routes have not been designated, impacts on tourism generated specifically by transportation activities are not considered separately. Chapter 2 briefly discusses possible means by which a repository could impact tourism in the Las Vegas area. Chapter 3 presents a review of previous research on alternative methods for predicting the response of people to potential hazards. A review of several published studies where these methods have been applied to facilities and activities associated with radioactive materials is included in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 contains five case studies of tourism impacts associated with past events that were perceived by the public to represent safety hazards. These perceptions of safety hazards were evidenced by news media coverage. These case studies were conducted specifically for this report. Conclusions of this preliminary analysis regarding the potential impact on tourism in the Las Vegas area of a repository at Yucca Mountain are in Chapter 5. Recommendations for further research are contained in Chapter 6

  11. High-level nuclear waste transport and storage assessment of potential impacts on tourism in the Las Vegas area. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-12-01

    The literature review and empirical analyses presented in this report were undertaken, for the most part, between August and October 1983. They are not comprehensive. No primary data were gathered, nor were any formal surveys conducted. Additionally, because construction of a repository at Yucca Mountain, if that site is selected for a repository, is not scheduled to begin until 1993, engineering design and planned physical appearance of the repository are very preliminary. Therefore, specific design features or visual appearance were not addressed in the analyses. Finally, because actual transportation routes have not been designated, impacts on tourism generated specifically by transportation activities are not considered separately. Chapter 2 briefly discusses possible means by which a repository could impact tourism in the Las Vegas area. Chapter 3 presents a review of previous research on alternative methods for predicting the response of people to potential hazards. A review of several published studies where these methods have been applied to facilities and activities associated with radioactive materials is included in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 contains five case studies of tourism impacts associated with past events that were perceived by the public to represent safety hazards. These perceptions of safety hazards were evidenced by news media coverage. These case studies were conducted specifically for this report. Conclusions of this preliminary analysis regarding the potential impact on tourism in the Las Vegas area of a repository at Yucca Mountain are in Chapter 5. Recommendations for further research are contained in Chapter 6.

  12. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2003-01-01

    This chapter discuss on nuclear power and its advantages. The concept of nucleus fission, fusion, electric generation are discussed in this chapter. Nuclear power has big potential to become alternative energy to substitute current conventional energy from coal, oil and gas

  13. The use of repassivation potential in predicting the performance of high-level nuclear waste container materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, N.; Dunn, D.; Cragnolino, G.

    1995-01-01

    Localized corrosion in aqueous environments forms an important bounding condition for the performance assessment of high-level waste (HLW) container materials. A predictive methodology using repassivation potential is examined in this paper. It is shown, based on long-term (continuing for over 11 months) testing of alloy 825, that repassivation potential of deep pits or crevices is a conservative and robust parameter for the prediction of localized corrosion. In contrast, initiation potentials measured by short-term tests are non-conservative and highly sensitive to several surface and environmental factors. Corrosion data from various field tests and plant equipment performance are analyzed in terms of the applicability of repassivation potential. The applicability of repassivation potential for predicting the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and intergranular corrosion in chloride containing environments is also examined

  14. Selection of candidate container materials for the conceptual waste package design for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Halsey, W.G.; McCright, R.D.; Clarke, W.L. Jr. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gdowski, G.E. [KMI, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-02-01

    Preliminary selection criteria have been developed, peer-reviewed, and applied to a field of 41 candidate materials to choose three alloys for further consideration during the advanced conceptual design phase of waste package development for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These three alloys are titanium grade 12, Alloy C-4, and Alloy 825. These selections are specific to the particular conceptual design outlined in the Site Characterization Plan. Other design concepts that may be considered in the advanced conceptual design phase may favor other materials choices.

  15. Selection of candidate container materials for the conceptual waste package design for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Halsey, W.G.; McCright, R.D.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Gdowski, G.E.

    1993-02-01

    Preliminary selection criteria have been developed, peer-reviewed, and applied to a field of 41 candidate materials to choose three alloys for further consideration during the advanced conceptual design phase of waste package development for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These three alloys are titanium grade 12, Alloy C-4, and Alloy 825. These selections are specific to the particular conceptual design outlined in the Site Characterization Plan. Other design concepts that may be considered in the advanced conceptual design phase may favor other materials choices

  16. Tennessee Valley region study: potential year 2000 radiological dose to population resulting from nuclear facility operations. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    A companion report, DOE/ET-0064/1, presents a geographic, cultural, and demographic profile of the Tennessee Valley Region study area. This report describes the calculations of radionuclide release and transport and of the resultant dose to the regional population, assuming a projected installed capacity of 220,000 MW in the year 2000, of which 144,000 MW would be nuclear. All elements of the fuel cycle were assumed to be in operation. The radiological dose was calculated as a one-year dose based on ingestion of 35 different food types as well as for nine non-food pathways, and was reported as dose to the total body and for six specific organs for each of four age groups (infant, child, teen, and adult). Results indicate that the average individual would receive an incremental dose of 7 x 10/sup -4/ millirems in the year 2000 from the operation of nuclear facilities within and adjacent to the region, five orders of magnitude smaller than the dose from naturally occurring radiation in the area. The major contributor to dose was found to be tritium, and the most significant pathways were immersion in air, inhalation of air, transpiration of tritium (absorption through the skin), and exposure radionuclide-containing soil. 60 references.

  17. Potential for Worldwide Displacement of Fossil-Fuel Electricity by Nuclear Energy in Three Decades Based on Extrapolation of Regional Deployment Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvist, Staffan A.; Brook, Barry W.

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the deployment rates and composition of alternative energy plans that could feasibly displace fossil fuels globally by mid-century, as required to avoid the more extreme impacts of climate change. Here we demonstrate the potential for a large-scale expansion of global nuclear power to replace fossil-fuel electricity production, based on empirical data from the Swedish and French light water reactor programs of the 1960s to 1990s. Analysis of these historical deployments show that if the world built nuclear power at no more than the per capita rate of these exemplar nations during their national expansion, then coal- and gas-fired electricity could be replaced worldwide in less than a decade. Under more conservative projections that take into account probable constraints and uncertainties such as differing relative economic output across regions, current and past unit construction time and costs, future electricity demand growth forecasts and the retiring of existing aging nuclear plants, our modelling estimates that the global share of fossil-fuel-derived electricity could be replaced within 25–34 years. This would allow the world to meet the most stringent greenhouse-gas mitigation targets. PMID:25970621

  18. Potential for worldwide displacement of fossil-fuel electricity by nuclear energy in three decades based on extrapolation of regional deployment data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvist, Staffan A; Brook, Barry W

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the deployment rates and composition of alternative energy plans that could feasibly displace fossil fuels globally by mid-century, as required to avoid the more extreme impacts of climate change. Here we demonstrate the potential for a large-scale expansion of global nuclear power to replace fossil-fuel electricity production, based on empirical data from the Swedish and French light water reactor programs of the 1960s to 1990s. Analysis of these historical deployments show that if the world built nuclear power at no more than the per capita rate of these exemplar nations during their national expansion, then coal- and gas-fired electricity could be replaced worldwide in less than a decade. Under more conservative projections that take into account probable constraints and uncertainties such as differing relative economic output across regions, current and past unit construction time and costs, future electricity demand growth forecasts and the retiring of existing aging nuclear plants, our modelling estimates that the global share of fossil-fuel-derived electricity could be replaced within 25-34 years. This would allow the world to meet the most stringent greenhouse-gas mitigation targets.

  19. Potential for worldwide displacement of fossil-fuel electricity by nuclear energy in three decades based on extrapolation of regional deployment data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan A Qvist

    Full Text Available There is an ongoing debate about the deployment rates and composition of alternative energy plans that could feasibly displace fossil fuels globally by mid-century, as required to avoid the more extreme impacts of climate change. Here we demonstrate the potential for a large-scale expansion of global nuclear power to replace fossil-fuel electricity production, based on empirical data from the Swedish and French light water reactor programs of the 1960s to 1990s. Analysis of these historical deployments show that if the world built nuclear power at no more than the per capita rate of these exemplar nations during their national expansion, then coal- and gas-fired electricity could be replaced worldwide in less than a decade. Under more conservative projections that take into account probable constraints and uncertainties such as differing relative economic output across regions, current and past unit construction time and costs, future electricity demand growth forecasts and the retiring of existing aging nuclear plants, our modelling estimates that the global share of fossil-fuel-derived electricity could be replaced within 25-34 years. This would allow the world to meet the most stringent greenhouse-gas mitigation targets.

  20. Discordance Between Appropriate Use Criteria for Nuclear Myocardial Perfusion Imaging From Different Specialty Societies: A Potential Concern for Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, David E; Wolinsky, David; Beyth, Rebecca J; Shaw, Leslee J

    2016-05-01

    Appropriate use criteria (AUC) assist health care professionals in making decisions about procedures and diagnostic testing. In some cases, multiple AUC exist for a single procedure or test. To date, the extent of agreement between multiple AUC has not been evaluated. To measure discordance between the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) AUC and the American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria for gauging the appropriateness of nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging. Retrospective cohort study at an academically affiliated Veterans Affairs medical center. Participants were Veteran patients who underwent nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging between December 2010 and July 2011 with rating of appropriateness by the ACCF and ACR criteria. Analysis was performed in March 2015. The primary outcome was the agreement of appropriateness category as measured by κ statistic. The secondary outcome was a comparison of nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging results and frequency of ischemia across appropriateness categories for the 2 rating methods. Of 67 indications in the ACCF AUC, 35 (52.2%) could not be matched to an ACR rating, 18 (26.9%) had the same appropriateness category, and 14 (20.9%) disagreed on appropriateness. The study cohort comprised 592 individuals. Their mean (SD) age was 62.6 (9.4) years, and 570 of 592 (96.2%) were male. When applied to the patient cohort, 111 patients (18.8%) could not be matched to an ACR rating, 349 patients (59.0%) had the same appropriateness category for the ACR and ACCF methods, and 132 patients (22.3%) were discordant. Overall, the agreement of appropriateness between the 2 methods was poor (κ = 0.34, P < .001). Ischemia was rare among patients rated as "inappropriate" by the ACCF AUC (1 of 39 patients [2.6%]), while ischemia was more common among patients rated as "usually not appropriate" by the ACR Appropriateness Criteria (14 of 80 patients [17.5%]). Substantial discordance may exist between

  1. Cyclophilin A potentiates TRIM5α inhibition of HIV-1 nuclear import without promoting TRIM5α binding to the viral capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallori Burse

    Full Text Available The host immunophilin cyclophilin A (CypA binds to the capsid protein (CA of HIV-1 and regulates its infectivity. Depending on the target cell type, CypA can either promote or inhibit HIV-1 infection. The ability of CypA to promote HIV-1 infection has been extensively studied and linked to several steps in early replication including uncoating, reverse transcription and nuclear import. By contrast, the mechanism by which CypA inhibits infection is less well understood. We investigated the mechanism by which CypA potentiates restriction of HIV-1 by the tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5α. Depletion of TRIM5α in the African green monkey cell line Vero, resulted in a loss of inhibition of infection by CypA, demonstrating that inhibition by CypA is mediated by TRIM5α. Complementary genetic and biochemical assays failed to demonstrate an ability of CypA to promote binding of TRIM5α to the viral capsid. TRIM5α inhibits HIV-1 reverse transcription in a proteasome-dependent manner; however, we observed that inhibition of proteasome activity did not reduce the ability of CypA to inhibit infection, suggesting that CypA acts at a step after reverse transcription. Accordingly, we observed a CypA-dependent reduction in the accumulation of nuclear HIV-1 DNA, indicating that CypA specifically promotes TRIM5α inhibition of HIV-1 nuclear import. We also observed that the ability of CypA to inhibit HIV-1 infection is abolished by amino acid substitutions within the conserved CPSF6-binding surface in CA. Our results indicate that CypA inhibits HIV-1 infection in Vero cells not by promoting TRIM5α binding to the capsid but by blocking nuclear import of the HIV-1 preintegration complex.

  2. An Approach for Assessing Consequences of Potential Supply Chain and Insider Contributed Cyber Attacks on Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Tsong L.

    2016-11-06

    The Stuxnet attack at the Natanz facility is an example of a targeted and successful cyber attack on a nuclear facility. Snowden's release of National Security Agency documents demonstrated the consequences of the insider threat. More recently, the United States tried to attack North Korea but failed, South Korea was attempting to attack North Korea, and both applied Stuxnet-like approaches. These sophisticated targeted attacks differ from web-site hacking events that are reported almost daily in the news mainly because targeted attacks require detailed design and operation information of the systems attacked and/or are often carried out by insiders. For instance, in order to minimize disruption of facilities around the world, Stuxnet remained idle until it recognized the specific configuration of the Natanz facility, demonstrating that the attackers possessed extremely detailed information about the facility. Such targeted cyber attacks could become a national-level military weapon and be used in coercion of hostile countries.

  3. Potential role of nuclear receptor ligand all-trans retinoic acids in the treatment of fungal keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yan Zhou

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fungal keratitis (FK is a worldwide visual impairment disease. This infectious fungus initiates the primary innate immune response and, later the adaptive immune response. The inflammatory process is related to a variety of immune cells, including macrophages, helper T cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and Treg cells, and is associated with proinflammatory, chemotactic and regulatory cytokines. All-trans retinoic acids (ATRA have diverse immunomodulatory actions in a number of inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. These retinoids regulate the transcriptional levels of target genes through the activation of nuclear receptors. Retinoic acid receptor α (RAR α, retinoic acid receptor γ (RAR γ, and retinoid X receptor α (RXR α are expressed in the cornea and immune cells. This paper summarizes new findings regarding ATRA in immune and inflammatory diseases and analyzes the perspective application of ATRA in FK.

  4. An Empirical Study on Human Performance according to the Physical Environment (Potential Human Error Hazard) in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ar Ryum; Jang, In Seok; Seong, Proong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The management of the physical environment for safety is more effective than a nuclear industry. Despite the physical environment such as lighting, noise satisfy with management standards, it can be background factors may cause human error and affect human performance. Because the consequence of extremely human error and human performance is high according to the physical environment, requirement standard could be covered with specific criteria. Particularly, in order to avoid human errors caused by an extremely low or rapidly-changing intensity illumination and masking effect such as power disconnection, plans for better visual environment and better function performances should be made as a careful study on efficient ways to manage and continue the better conditions is conducted

  5. Potential seismic structural failure modes associated with the Zion Nuclear Plant. Seismic safety margins research program (Phase I). Project VI. Fragilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    The Zion 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Plant consists of a number of structures. The most important of these from the viewpoint of safety are the containment buildings, the auxiliary building, the turbine building, and the crib house (or intake structure). The evaluation of the potential seismic failure modes and determination of the ultimate seismic capacity of the structures is a complex undertaking which will require a large number of detailed calculations. As the first step in this evaluation, a number of potential modes of structural failure have been determined and are discussed. The report is principally directed towards seismically induced failure of structures. To some extent, modes involving soil foundation failures are discussed in so far as they affect the buildings. However, failure modes involving soil liquefaction, surface faulting, tsunamis, etc., are considered outside the scope of this evaluation

  6. Links among available integral benchmarks and differential date evaluations, computational biases and uncertainties, and nuclear criticality safety biases on potential MOX production throughput

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goluoglu, S.; Hopper, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    Through the use of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's recently developed and applied sensitivity and uncertainty computational analysis techniques, this paper presents the relevance and importance of available and needed integral benchmarks and differential data evaluations impacting potential MOX production throughput determinations relative to low-moderated MOX fuel blending operations. The relevance and importance in the availability of or need for critical experiment benchmarks and data evaluations are presented in terms of computational biases as influenced by computational and experimental sensitivities and uncertainties relative to selected MOX production powder blending processes. Recent developments for estimating the safe margins of subcriticality for assuring nuclear criticality safety for process approval are presented. In addition, the impact of the safe margins (due to computational biases and uncertainties) on potential MOX production throughput will also be presented. (author)

  7. Sunken nuclear submarines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, V.O.

    1990-01-01

    The increasing number of accidents with nuclear submarines is a worriment to the general public. Five nuclear submarines are resting on the bottom of the North Atlantic. Design information on nuclear propulsion plants for submarines is classified. The author describes a potential generic nuclear submarine propulsion plant. Design information from the civilian nuclear industry, nuclear power plants, research reactors, nuclear cargo vessels and nuclear propelled icebreakers are used for illustration of relevant problems. A survey is given of nuclear submarines. Factors influencing the accident risks and safety characteristics of nuclear submarines are considered, and potential accident scenarios are described. The fission product content of the nuclear plant can be estimated, '' source terms'' can be guessed and potential release rates can be judged. The mechanisms of dispersion in the oceans is reviewed and compared with the dumping of radioactive waste in the Atlantic and other known releases. 46 refs., 49 figs., 14 tabs

  8. Nuclear nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubert, M.

    1992-01-01

    The following motion was put before the United Kingdom House of Commons on 3rd February 1992 and agreed; that this House, recognising the potential dangers of the rapidly changing world order, welcomes the recent proposals for substantial reductions in nuclear weaponry, the growing support for the non-proliferation treaty and progress in the implementation of the United Nations Security Council Resolutions concerning the dismantling of Iraqi nuclear, chemical and biological capabilities; urges the Government to play their full part in helping the relevant authorities in the Commonwealth of Independent States to dismantle their nuclear devices, to safeguard their nuclear components and to discourage the proliferation of nuclear expertise; and believes it is of the first importance that Britain retains an effective and credible minimum nuclear deterrent as security in a world where there remain many sources of instability. The record of arguments for and against the motion in the debate is presented. (author)

  9. Characterization of natural organic matter in bentonite clays for potential use in deep geological repositories for used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Michaela H.M.; McKelvie, Jennifer R.; Simpson, André J.; Simpson, Myrna J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied the composition of natural organic matter in bentonite clay. • Biomarker results indicate a predominance of plant-derived organic matter. • Aromatic and aliphatic compounds were observed in NMR spectra. • Degradation ratios suggest that organic matter is highly altered. • The natural organic matter in bentonite clay is predominantly recalcitrant. - Abstract: The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is developing a Deep Geological Repository (DGR) to contain and isolate used nuclear fuel in a suitable rock formation at a depth of approximately 500 m. The design concept employs a multibarrier system, including the use of copper-coated used fuel containers, surrounded by a low-permeability, swelling clay buffer material within a low permeability, stable host rock environment. The natural organic matter (NOM) composition of the bentonite clays being considered for the buffer material is largely uncharacterized at the molecular-level. To gain a better understanding of the NOM in target clays from Wyoming and Saskatchewan, molecular-level methods (biomarker analysis, solid-state 13 C NMR and solution-state 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)) were used to elucidate the structure and sources of NOM. Organic carbon content in three commercially available bentonites analyzed was low (0.11–0.41%). The aliphatic lipid distribution of the clay samples analyzed showed a predominance of higher concentration of lipids from vascular plants and low concentrations of lipids consistent with microbial origin. The lignin phenol vanillyl acid to aldehyde ratio (Ad/Al) for the National sample indicated an advanced state of lignin oxidation and NOM diagenesis. The 13 C NMR spectra were dominated by signals in the aromatic and aliphatic regions. The ratio of alkyl/O-alkyl carbon ranged from 7.6 to 9.7, indicating that the NOM has undergone advanced diagenetic alteration. The absence lignin-derived phenols commonly observed in CuO oxidation

  10. Corrosion of similar and dissimilar metal crevices in the engineered barrier system of a potential nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, X.; Dunn, D.S.; Csontos, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Crevice corrosion is considered possible if the corrosion potential (E corr ) exceeds the repassivation potential for crevice corrosion (E rcrev ). In this study, potentiodynamic polarization and potentiostatic hold were used to determine the E rcrev of similar and dissimilar metal crevices in the engineered barrier system of the potential Yucca Mountain repository in 0.5 M NaCl, 4 M NaCl, and 4 M MgCl 2 solutions at 95 deg. C. The results were compared with data previously obtained using crevices formed between Alloy 22 and polytetrafluoroethylene. It was observed that, except for Type 316L stainless steel, all other metal-to-metal crevices were less susceptible to crevice corrosion than the corresponding metal-to-polytetrafluoroethylene crevices. Measurements of galvanic coupling were used to evaluate the crevice corrosion propagation behavior in 5 M NaCl solution at 95 deg. C. The crevice specimens were coupled to either an Alloy 22 or a Titanium Grade 7 plate using metal or polytetrafluoroethylene crevice washers. Crevice corrosion of Type 316L stainless steel propagated without repassivation. For all the tests using a polytetrafluoroethylene crevice washer, crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 was initiated at open circuit potential by the addition of CuCl 2 as an oxidant, whereas no crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 was initiated for all the tests using Alloy 22 or Titanium Grade 7 metals as crevice washer. However, crevice corrosion propagation was found to be very limited under such test conditions

  11. Potential impact of Andrassy bentonite microbial diversity in the long-term performance of a deep nuclear waste repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadza, M. Y. Mohd; Tadza, M. A. Mohd; Bag, R.; Harith, N. S. H.

    2018-01-01

    Copper and steel canning and bentonite buffer are normally forseen as the primary containment component of a deep nuclear waste repository. Distribution of microbes in subsurface environments have been found to be extensive and directly or indirectly may exert influence on waste canister corrosion and the mobility of radionuclides. The understanding of clays and microbial interaction with radionuclides will be useful in predicting the microbial impacts on the performance of the waste repositories. The present work characterizes the culture-dependent microbial diversity of Andrassy bentonite recovered from Tawau clay deposits. The evaluation of microbial populations shows the presence of a number of cultivable microbes (e.g. Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Achromobacter, Bacillus, Paecilomyces, Trichoderma, and Fusarium). Additionally, a pigmented yeast strain Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was also recovered from the formation. Both Bacillus and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa have high tolerance towards U radiation and toxicity. The presence of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in Andrassy bentonite might be able to change the speciation of radionuclides (e.g. uranium) in a future deep repository. However, concern over the presence of Fe (III) reduction microbes such as Bacillus also found in the formation could lead to corrosion of copper steel canister and affect the overall performance of the containment system.

  12. Investigation of the potential of silica-bonded macrocyclic ligands for separation of metal ions from nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Colton, N.G.; Bruening, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the testing of some novel separations materials known as SuperLig trademark materials for their ability to separate efficiently and selectively certain metal ions from a synthetic, nonradioactive nuclear waste solution. The materials, developed and patented by IBC Advanced Technologies, are highly selective macrocyclic ligands that have been covalently bonded to silica gel. The SuperLig trademark materials that were tested are: (1) SuperLig trademark 601 for barium (Ba 2+ ) and strontium (Sr 2+ ) separation, (2) SuperLig trademark 602 for cesium (Cs + ) and rubidium (Rb + ) separation, (3) SuperLig trademark 27 for palladium (Pd 2+ ) separation, and (4) SuperLig trademark II for silver (Ag + ) and ruthenium (Ru 3+ ) separation. Our observations show that the technology for separating metal ions using silica-bonded macrocycles is essentially sound and workable to varying degrees of success that mainly depend on the affinity of the macrocycle for the metal ion of interest. It is expected that ligands will be discovered or synthesized that are amenable to separating metal ions of interest using this technology. Certainly more development, testing, and evaluation is warranted. 3 figs., 11 tabs

  13. Potential hazards and artifacts of ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic surgical and dental materials and devices in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New, P.F.J.; Rosen, B.R.; Brady, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    The risks to patients with metal surgical implants who are undergoing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging and the artifacts caused by such implants were studied. Twenty-one aneurysm and other hemostatic clips and a variety of other materials (e.g., dental amalgam, 14 karat gold) were used. Longitudinal forces and torques were found to be exerted upon 16 of the 21 clips. With five aneurysm clips, forces and torques sufficient to produce risk of hemorrhage from dislocation of the clip from the vessel or aneurysm, or cerebral injury by clip displacement without dislodgement were identified. The induced ferromagnetism was shown to be related to the composition of the alloys from which the clips were manufactured. Clips with 10-14% nickel are evidently without sufficient induced ferromagnetism to cause hazard. The extent of NMR imaging artifacts was greater for materials with measurable ferromagnetic properties, but metals without measurable ferromagnetism in our tests also resulted in significant artifacts. Dental amalgam and 14 karat gold produced no imaging artifacts, but stainless steels in dentures and orthodontic braces produced extensive artifacts in the facial region

  14. A system for radiation monitoring at the site for emergency planning and response in a nuclear station potentialities and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakov, V.; Moskovska, N.; Madzharov, M.; Angelov, V.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the existing system for radiation monitoring of the NPP region. The location of the devices puts a number of problems as maintenance of the radiometric equipment and urgent collecting and processing of the measuring data. Undeniably, to get an effective and timely decision, it is necessary to have on hand information as complete and prompt as possible, about the radiological situation in the regions, towns, villages and sites. As a result of daily observation and registration, an amount of enough in volume data could be accumulated. This data may be used as a base in case of a sudden change of the radiological situation and/or in case of arising of some local contaminations as a result of a volley type of emission, accidents at the nuclear power stations and releases fractions of radioactive and rare gases. The data obtained for a comparatively large region (about 700 square kilometers) with a high degree of gamma detectors distribution density are discussed. In the conditions of a progressively complicating radiological situation, they allow to determine the possible directions of the emission and also to undertake some response actions for protection of the population in time. (author)

  15. Analysis of present water usage and management practice in nuclear recycle plants and potential ways to minimize environmental burden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, B.V.

    2008-01-01

    Water input and output balance along with its composition around Nuclear Recycle Plants (NRP) will give the environmental burden, however including intermediate steps required for its treatment or usage or to qualify for discharge to environment will give more holistic and real environmental burden. Major water uses in order of their consumption in one part of NRP called reprocessing plant are: 1. Production of steam mainly for evaporation and which is used in open loop. 2. For making process solution mainly 0.01N strip 1-2N scrub. 3. Wash and cleaning usage. To reduce the environmental burden of chemical and activity discharge through water, a large amount of water, fuel, chemical and capital investment in form of various system are used in general and at present NRP is no exception. Better processes and management practice could be evolved around proven method of recover and reuse near the source. Root cause of present large usage of water is in general and specifically NRP is extra safe approach in reuse. Recover quality can never meet fresh quality criteria and hence reuse is not permitted or avoided taking cover of some hypothetical scenario conditions. Thus a major contribution can come from more practical, realistic and objectively evolved management policy on reuse criteria or guidelines. In this situation, development effort and investment can be prioritized for development of recovery processes or proven or developed system get application in plant scale and benefit can start accruing in the form of reduced environmental burden

  16. An Approach for Assessing Consequences of Potential Supply Chain and Insider Contributed Cyber Attacks on Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Tsong-Lun [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Varuttamaseni, Athi [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Baek, Joo-Seok [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pepper, Susan [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This paper provides an approach for developing potential attacks on I and C systems of NPPs and assessing their consequences. An important concept is that the NPPs were not designed to cope with Stuxnet-type of attacks (and any other cyber attacks). That is, the plants were only designed for design basis accidents. The safety margins and redundancies built in the design are all based on design basis accidents. They may be helpful in mitigating cyberattacks, but may not be adequate.

  17. An Approach for Assessing Consequences of Potential Supply Chain and Insider Contributed Cyber Attacks on Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Tsong-Lun; Varuttamaseni, Athi; Baek, Joo-Seok; Pepper, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an approach for developing potential attacks on I and C systems of NPPs and assessing their consequences. An important concept is that the NPPs were not designed to cope with Stuxnet-type of attacks (and any other cyber attacks). That is, the plants were only designed for design basis accidents. The safety margins and redundancies built in the design are all based on design basis accidents. They may be helpful in mitigating cyberattacks, but may not be adequate.

  18. Determination of potential radiation exposure via terrestrial food chains by the release of radioactive material from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handge, P.; Meurin, G.

    1978-01-01

    The radiation exposure level caused by consumption of vegetable and animal products in the environment of nuclear power plants is determined to a large extent by the release of 90 Sr, 134 Cs, and 137 Cs. For long-lived nuclides, especially 90 Sr, transfer from the soil into vegetation makes the essential contribution to plant contamination after several years of power plant operation. The relevant transfer coefficients for the different plant species vary, depending on the soil properties, between 0.02 and 6.0 [pCi/kg fresh weigth of vegetation : pCi/kg dry weight of soil] for Sr and between 1.10 -3 and 0.2 [pCi/kg fresh weight of vegetation : pCi/kg dry weight of soil] for Cs. The sensitivity analysis shows that already a variation of the transfer coefficients for Sr from 0.5 up to 2.5 [pCi/kg fresh weight of vegetation : pCi/kg dry weight of soil] and for Cs from 3.10 -2 up to 2.10 -1 cause variations in the level of radiation exposure for individual exposure pathways by factors fo 2 to 4. Correspondingly higher values are to be expected by still larger transfer of Sr and Cs from the ground to vegetation. For transfer coefficients >- 2.5 [pCi/kg fresh weight of vegetation : pCi/kg dry weight of soil], however, removal of radioactive substances from the ground by the plants must not remain without consideration any longer. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Nuclear violence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    A great deal of attention has been paid in the past decade or so to the characteristics of terrorists and their apparent goals and objectives, capabilities, and evolving strategy and tactics with respect to nuclear terrorism. In contrast, little has been said about the procedural aspects of nuclear terrorism, and even less about the way in which such endeavors can fail. This latter omission is important because it bears directly on the ability to evaluate credibly the potential for nuclear terrorism. Here, the author addresses the requirements inherent in acquiring a nuclear explosive capability by three routes: separation of plutonium from irradiated light or heavy water reactor (LWR or HWR) fuel, processing, or use of separated fissile material, and theft of a nuclear weapon. In addition, he deals with other potential acts of nuclear terrorism: sabotage of power reactors, uranium enrichment facilities and spent nuclear fuel in transport, and dispersal of radioactive materials, in particular, plutonium. He specifically does not look at the design or production of a nuclear weapon. Finally, the discussion here assumes that the terrorist is subnational; that is, a nation is not involved. Also, the discussion of subnational participation does not address the possibility of collusion with insiders

  20. Tapping hidden hydropower potential in Swiss Alpine catchments in the context of the planned nuclear power phase out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana Clara; Schaefli, Bettina; Manso, Pedro; Schleiss, Anton; Portela, Maria Manuela; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    In its Energy Strategy 2050, Switzerland is revising its energy perspectives with a strong focus on renewable sources of energy and in particular hydropower. In this context, the Swiss Government funded a number of competence centers for energy research (SCCERs), including one on the Supply of Energy (SCCER-SoE), which develops fundamental research and innovative solutions in geoenergies and hydropower . Hydropower is already the major energy source in Switzerland, corresponding to approximately 55% of the total national electricity production (which was 69 TWh in 2014). The Energy Strategy 2050 foresees at least a net increase by 1.53 TWh/year in average hydrological conditions, in a context were almost all major river systems are already exploited and a straightforward application of recent environmental laws will impact (reduce) current hydropower production. In this contribution, we present the roadmap of the SCCER-SoE and an overview of our strategy to unravel currently non-exploited hydropower potential, in particular in river systems that are already used for hydropower production. The aim is hereby to quantify non-exploited natural flows, unnecessary water spills or storage volume deficits, whilst considering non-conventional approaches to water resources valuation and management. Such a better understanding of the current potential is paramount to justify future scenarios of adaptation of the existing hydropower infrastructure combining the increase of storage capacity with new connections between existing reservoirs, heightening or strengthening existing dams, increasing the operational volume of natural lakes (including new glacier lakes), or by building new dams. Tapping hidden potential shall also require operational changes to benefit from new flow patterns emerging under an evolving climate and in particular in the context of the ongoing glacier retreat. The paper shall present a broad view over the mentioned issues and first conclusions of ongoing

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Shielding Constants from Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Calculations Using Polarizable Embedding: Role of the Embedding Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmann, Casper; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Kongsted, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    We present NMR shielding constants obtained through quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) embedding calculations. Contrary to previous reports, we show that a relatively small QM region is sufficient, provided that a high-quality embedding potential is used. The calculated averaged NMR...... shielding constants of both acrolein and acetone solvated in water are based on a number of snapshots extracted from classical molecular dynamics simulations. We focus on the carbonyl chromophore in both molecules, which shows large solvation effects, and we study the convergence of shielding constants...

  2. Evaluation of the radiologic potential due to the nuclear submarine visits to the Rio de Janeiro port; Avaliacao do impacto radiologico potencial relativo a visita de submarinos nucleares ao Porto do Rio de Janeiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Jose Francisco

    2004-07-01

    Brazil is signatory of international protocols related to the visit of nuclear-powered vessels, aircraft carriers and submarines to Brazilian ports. The submarines, during their stay in Brazilian ports, inform that there is no release of radioactive material to the environment. However, the possibility of occurrence of accidents with environmental releases from PWR reactors is real. Between 1993 and 2003, 13 nuclear submarines visited Brazilian ports. This work aimed to evaluate the potential impact due to the visits of nuclear-powered ships and submarines to the port of the city of Rio de Janeiro, in relation to releases of radioactive materials to the environment, considering both routine releases and accidental situations. The models selected to perform the assessments took into account the scenarios to be simulated. Simple, but conservative methodologies were used for the evaluation of routine releases. For accidental releases, the dynamics of the materials dispersion into the environment were considered. The present study was mainly focalized on the initial phase of an accident. The doses for the crew of the Brazilian navy ships, for IRD teams performing environmental monitoring, and for the population around the Guanabara Bay, close to the points of anchorage, were assessed. The results indicated that, in normal operational conditions, no significant radiological impact due to the visit of nuclear submarines to the port of the city of Rio de Janeiro is expected, even considering the occurrence of small routine radionuclide releases. The analysis of accidental releases, however, indicated that the submarines should be located at a minimum distance of 2,5 km from inhabited areas in the coast of the Guanabara Bay. The need for environmental control and training of the teams involved in the attendance of the submarines, during the period of their visit, was also considered. The need for revising the procedures for the preoperational surveys to be performed at the

  3. Atmospheric stability effects on potential radiological releases at a nuclear research facility in Romania: Characterising the atmospheric mixing state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, Scott D.; Galeriu, Dan; Williams, Alastair G.; Melintescu, Anca; Griffiths, Alan D.; Crawford, Jagoda; Dyer, Leisa; Duma, Marin; Zorila, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    A radon-based nocturnal stability classification scheme is developed for a flat inland site near Bucharest, Romania, characterised by significant local surface roughness heterogeneity, and compared with traditional meteorologically-based techniques. Eight months of hourly meteorological and atmospheric radon observations from a 60 m tower at the IFIN-HH nuclear research facility are analysed. Heterogeneous surface roughness conditions in the 1 km radius exclusion zone around the site hinder accurate characterisation of nocturnal atmospheric mixing conditions using conventional meteorological techniques, so a radon-based scheme is trialled. When the nocturnal boundary layer is very stable, the Pasquill–Gifford “radiation” scheme overestimates the atmosphere's capacity to dilute pollutants with near-surface sources (such as tritiated water vapour) by 20% compared to the radon-based scheme. Under these conditions, near-surface wind speeds drop well below 1 m s"−"1 and nocturnal mixing depths vary from ∼25 m to less than 10 m above ground level (a.g.l.). Combining nocturnal radon with daytime ceilometer data, we were able to reconstruct the full diurnal cycle of mixing depths. Average daytime mixing depths at this flat inland site range from 1200 to 1800 m a.g.l. in summer, and 500–900 m a.g.l. in winter. Using tower observations to constrain the nocturnal radon-derived effective mixing depth, we were able to estimate the seasonal range in the Bucharest regional radon flux as: 12 mBq m"−"2 s"−"1 in winter to 14 mBq m"−"2 s"−"1 in summer. - Highlights: • Site climatology accurately characterised by season and atmospheric stability class. • Comparison of "2"2"2Rn-based, Pasquill–Gifford and Richardson number stability indices. • Seasonal mixing depth estimates over the whole diurnal cycle by ceilometer and radon. • Seasonal variability in the regional radon source function well constrained.

  4. Biological Sexing of a 4000-Year-Old Egyptian Mummy Head to Assess the Potential of Nuclear DNA Recovery from the Most Damaged and Limited Forensic Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreille, Odile; Ratnayake, Shashikala; Bazinet, Adam L; Stockwell, Timothy B; Sommer, Daniel D; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Johnson, Philip L F; Skoglund, Pontus; Onorato, Anthony J; Bergman, Nicholas H; Reich, David; Irwin, Jodi A

    2018-03-01

    High throughput sequencing (HTS) has been used for a number of years in the field of paleogenomics to facilitate the recovery of small DNA fragments from ancient specimens. Recently, these techniques have also been applied in forensics, where they have been used for the recovery of mitochondrial DNA sequences from samples where traditional PCR-based assays fail because of the very short length of endogenous DNA molecules. Here, we describe the biological sexing of a ~4000-year-old Egyptian mummy using shotgun sequencing and two established methods of biological sex determination (R X and R Y ), by way of mitochondrial genome analysis as a means of sequence data authentication. This particular case of historical interest increases the potential utility of HTS techniques for forensic purposes by demonstrating that data from the more discriminatory nuclear genome can be recovered from the most damaged specimens, even in cases where mitochondrial DNA cannot be recovered with current PCR-based forensic technologies. Although additional work remains to be done before nuclear DNA recovered via these methods can be used routinely in operational casework for individual identification purposes, these results indicate substantial promise for the retrieval of probative individually identifying DNA data from the most limited and degraded forensic specimens.

  5. Biological Sexing of a 4000-Year-Old Egyptian Mummy Head to Assess the Potential of Nuclear DNA Recovery from the Most Damaged and Limited Forensic Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odile Loreille

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High throughput sequencing (HTS has been used for a number of years in the field of paleogenomics to facilitate the recovery of small DNA fragments from ancient specimens. Recently, these techniques have also been applied in forensics, where they have been used for the recovery of mitochondrial DNA sequences from samples where traditional PCR-based assays fail because of the very short length of endogenous DNA molecules. Here, we describe the biological sexing of a ~4000-year-old Egyptian mummy using shotgun sequencing and two established methods of biological sex determination (RX and RY, by way of mitochondrial genome analysis as a means of sequence data authentication. This particular case of historical interest increases the potential utility of HTS techniques for forensic purposes by demonstrating that data from the more discriminatory nuclear genome can be recovered from the most damaged specimens, even in cases where mitochondrial DNA cannot be recovered with current PCR-based forensic technologies. Although additional work remains to be done before nuclear DNA recovered via these methods can be used routinely in operational casework for individual identification purposes, these results indicate substantial promise for the retrieval of probative individually identifying DNA data from the most limited and degraded forensic specimens.

  6. A review of potential uses for fiber optic sensors in nuclear power plants, with attendant benefits in plant safety and operational efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, D.E.; Antonescu, C.

    1994-01-01

    Fiber optic-based sensing has a wide range of potential applications in nuclear power plants, and a fiber optic analog presently exists for virtually every conventional nuclear power plant sensing system. Fiber optic-based sensors are likely to eventually supplant many conventional sensors because of their inherent advantages-reduced mass, reduced size, ruggedness to vibration and shock, physical flexibility, high sensitivity, electrical isolation, extreme resistance to electromagnetic interference, high temperature resistance, reduced calibration requirements, passive operation, and high radiation resistance. In addition, fiber optic-based sensors exist which are capable of measuring parameters important to safety and performance which cannot be conventionally measured (high electromagnetic field, in-core, and distributed measurements). However, fiber optic sensors remain at too low a level of development for immediate application in safety-critical systems. Moreover, fiber optic sensors have different failure modes and mechanisms than conventional sensors; hence, considerable regulatory research will be necessary to establish the technical basis for the use of fiber optic sensors in safety-critical systems

  7. A review of the available technologies for sealing a potential underground nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.A.; Richardson, A.M.

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess the availability of technologies to seal underground openings. The technologies are needed to seal the potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Technologies are evaluated for three basic categories of seal components: backfill (general fill and graded fill), bulkheads, and grout curtains. Not only is placement of seal components assessed, but also preconditioning of the placement area and seal component durability. The approach taken was: First, review selected sealing case histories (literature searches and site visits) from the mining, civil, and defense industries; second, determine whether reasonably available technologies to seal the potential repository exist; and finally, identify deficiencies in existing technologies. It is concluded that reasonably available technologies do exist to place backfill, bulkheads, and grout curtains. Technologies also exist to precondition areas where seal components are to be placed. However, if final performance requirements are stringent for these engineered structures, some existing technologies may need to be developed. Deficiencies currently do exist in technologies that demonstrate the long-term durability and performance of seal components. Case histories do not currently exist that demonstrate the placement of seal components in greatly elevated thermal and high-radiation environments and in areas where ground support (rock bolts and concrete liners) has been removed. The as-placed, in situ material properties for sealing materials appropriate to Yucca Mountain are not available

  8. Transposing an active fault database into a seismic hazard fault model for nuclear facilities. Pt. 1. Building a database of potentially active faults (BDFA) for metropolitan France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jomard, Herve; Cushing, Edward Marc; Baize, Stephane; Chartier, Thomas [IRSN - Institute of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Palumbo, Luigi; David, Claire [Neodyme, Joue les Tours (France)

    2017-07-01

    The French Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), with the support of the Ministry of Environment, compiled a database (BDFA) to define and characterize known potentially active faults of metropolitan France. The general structure of BDFA is presented in this paper. BDFA reports to date 136 faults and represents a first step toward the implementation of seismic source models that would be used for both deterministic and probabilistic seismic hazard calculations. A robustness index was introduced, highlighting that less than 15% of the database is controlled by reasonably complete data sets. An example of transposing BDFA into a fault source model for PSHA (probabilistic seismic hazard analysis) calculation is presented for the Upper Rhine Graben (eastern France) and exploited in the companion paper (Chartier et al., 2017, hereafter Part 2) in order to illustrate ongoing challenges for probabilistic fault-based seismic hazard calculations.

  9. Use of an analog site near Raymond, California, to develop equipment and methods for characterizing a potential high-level, nuclear waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umari, A.M.J.; Geldon, A.; Patterson, G.; Gemmell, J.; Earle, J.; Darnell, J.

    1994-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, currently is being investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Planned hydraulic-stress and tracer tests in fractured, tuffaceous rocks below the water table at Yucca Mountain will require work at depths in excess of 1,300 feet. To facilitate prototype testing of equipment and methods to be used in aquifer tests at Yucca Mountain, an analog site was selected in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada near Raymond, California. Two of nine 250- to 300-feet deep wells drilled into fractured, granitic rocks at the Raymond site have been instrumented with packers, pressure transducers, and other equipment that will be used at Yucca Mountain. Aquifer tests conducted at the Raymond site to date have demonstrated a need to modify some of the equipment and methods conceived for use at Yucca Mountain

  10. Methyl parathion inhibits the nuclear maturation, decreases the cytoplasmic quality in oocytes and alters the developmental potential of embryos of Swiss albino mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Ramya; Singh, Vikram Jeet; Salian, Sujith Raj [Division of Clinical Embryology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Kalthur, Sneha Guruprasad; D' Souza, Antony Sylvan [Department of Anatomy, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Shetty, Pallavi K.; Mutalik, Srinivas [Department of Pharmaceutics, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Kalthur, Guruprasad, E-mail: guru.kalthur@manipal.edu [Division of Clinical Embryology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Adiga, Satish Kumar [Division of Clinical Embryology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Methyl parathion (MP) is one of the most commonly used and extremely toxic organophosphorous group of pesticide. A large number of studies in the literature suggest that it has adverse effects on the male reproductive system. However, there is limited information about its toxicity to the female reproductive system. In the present study we report the toxic effects of methyl parathion on the female reproductive system using Swiss albino mice as the experimental model. The female mice were administered orally with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of MP. One week later, the mice were superovulated with pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) to study the quality of the oocytes, spindle organization, developmental potential of early embryos and the DNA integrity in blastocysts. MP exposure resulted in a non-significant decrease in the number of primordial follicles and increased DNA damage in granulosa cells. Though MP did not have any effect on the ovulation it had a significant inhibitory effect on the nuclear maturity of oocytes which was associated with spindle deformity. In addition, the oocytes had higher cytoplasmic abnormalities with depleted glutathione level. Even though it did not have any effect on the fertilization and blastocyst rate at lower doses, at 20 mg/kg MP it resulted in a significant decrease in blastocyst hatching, decrease in cell number and high DNA damage. While low body weight gain was observed in F1 generation from 5 mg/kg group, at higher dose, the body weight in F1 generation was marginally higher than control. Post-natal death in F1 generation was observed only in mice treated with 20 mg/kg MP. In conclusion, we report that MP has adverse effects on the oocyte quality, developmental potential of the embryo and reproductive outcome. - Highlights: • Methyl parathion induces severe cytoplasmic abnormalities in oocytes. • Inhibits nuclear maturation and spindle damage • Poor blastocyst quality and high DNA

  11. Methyl parathion inhibits the nuclear maturation, decreases the cytoplasmic quality in oocytes and alters the developmental potential of embryos of Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, Ramya; Singh, Vikram Jeet; Salian, Sujith Raj; Kalthur, Sneha Guruprasad; D'Souza, Antony Sylvan; Shetty, Pallavi K.; Mutalik, Srinivas; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Methyl parathion (MP) is one of the most commonly used and extremely toxic organophosphorous group of pesticide. A large number of studies in the literature suggest that it has adverse effects on the male reproductive system. However, there is limited information about its toxicity to the female reproductive system. In the present study we report the toxic effects of methyl parathion on the female reproductive system using Swiss albino mice as the experimental model. The female mice were administered orally with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of MP. One week later, the mice were superovulated with pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) to study the quality of the oocytes, spindle organization, developmental potential of early embryos and the DNA integrity in blastocysts. MP exposure resulted in a non-significant decrease in the number of primordial follicles and increased DNA damage in granulosa cells. Though MP did not have any effect on the ovulation it had a significant inhibitory effect on the nuclear maturity of oocytes which was associated with spindle deformity. In addition, the oocytes had higher cytoplasmic abnormalities with depleted glutathione level. Even though it did not have any effect on the fertilization and blastocyst rate at lower doses, at 20 mg/kg MP it resulted in a significant decrease in blastocyst hatching, decrease in cell number and high DNA damage. While low body weight gain was observed in F1 generation from 5 mg/kg group, at higher dose, the body weight in F1 generation was marginally higher than control. Post-natal death in F1 generation was observed only in mice treated with 20 mg/kg MP. In conclusion, we report that MP has adverse effects on the oocyte quality, developmental potential of the embryo and reproductive outcome. - Highlights: • Methyl parathion induces severe cytoplasmic abnormalities in oocytes. • Inhibits nuclear maturation and spindle damage • Poor blastocyst quality and high DNA

  12. Evaluation of the Safety Issue Concerning the Potential for Loss of Decay Heat Removal Function due to Crude Oil Spill in the Ultimate Heat Sink of Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Roh, Kyung Wan; Yune, Young Gill; Kang, Dong Gu; Kim, Hho Jhung

    2008-01-01

    A barge crashed into a moored oil tanker at about 7:15 a.m., Dec. 12, 2007, dumping around 10,500 tons of crude oil into the sea in Korea. The incident took place about 15 kilometers northwest of Manripo beach in South Chungcheong where is Korea's west coast in the Yellow Sea. In a few days, the oil slicks spread to the northern and southern tips of the Taean Peninsula by strong winds and tides. As time went the spilled oil floating on the surface of sea water was volatilized to become tar-balls and lumps and drifted far away in the southern direction. 13 days after the incident, some of oil slicks and tar lumps were observed to flow in the service water intake at the Younggwang nuclear power plants (NPPs) operating 6 reactors, which are over 150 km away from the incident spot in the southeastern direction. According to the report by the Younggwang NPPs, a total weight 83 kg of tar lumps was removed for about 3 days. Oil spills in the sea can happen in any country or anytime due to human errors or mistakes, wars, terrors, intentional dumping of waste oils, and natural disasters like typhoon and tsunami. In fact, there have been 7 major oil spills over 10,000 tons that have occurred around the world since 1983. As such serious oil spill incidents may happen near the operating power plants using the sea water as ultimate heat sink. To ensure the safe operation of nuclear reactors it is required to evaluate the potential for loss of decay heat removal function of nuclear reactors due to the spilled oils flowing in the service water intake, from which the service water is pumped. Thus, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety identified this problem as one of the important safety. When an incident of crude oil spill from an oil carrier occurs in the sea near the nuclear power plants, the spilled oil can be transported to the intake pit, where all service water pumps locate, by sea current and wind drift (induced) current. The essential service water pumps take the service

  13. Evaluation of the Safety Issue Concerning the Potential for Loss of Decay Heat Removal Function due to Crude Oil Spill in the Ultimate Heat Sink of Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Roh, Kyung Wan; Yune, Young Gill; Kang, Dong Gu; Kim, Hho Jhung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    A barge crashed into a moored oil tanker at about 7:15 a.m., Dec. 12, 2007, dumping around 10,500 tons of crude oil into the sea in Korea. The incident took place about 15 kilometers northwest of Manripo beach in South Chungcheong where is Korea's west coast in the Yellow Sea. In a few days, the oil slicks spread to the northern and southern tips of the Taean Peninsula by strong winds and tides. As time went the spilled oil floating on the surface of sea water was volatilized to become tar-balls and lumps and drifted far away in the southern direction. 13 days after the incident, some of oil slicks and tar lumps were observed to flow in the service water intake at the Younggwang nuclear power plants (NPPs) operating 6 reactors, which are over 150 km away from the incident spot in the southeastern direction. According to the report by the Younggwang NPPs, a total weight 83 kg of tar lumps was removed for about 3 days. Oil spills in the sea can happen in any country or anytime due to human errors or mistakes, wars, terrors, intentional dumping of waste oils, and natural disasters like typhoon and tsunami. In fact, there have been 7 major oil spills over 10,000 tons that have occurred around the world since 1983. As such serious oil spill incidents may happen near the operating power plants using the sea water as ultimate heat sink. To ensure the safe operation of nuclear reactors it is required to evaluate the potential for loss of decay heat removal function of nuclear reactors due to the spilled oils flowing in the service water intake, from which the service water is pumped. Thus, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety identified this problem as one of the important safety. When an incident of crude oil spill from an oil carrier occurs in the sea near the nuclear power plants, the spilled oil can be transported to the intake pit, where all service water pumps locate, by sea current and wind drift (induced) current. The essential service water pumps take the

  14. The hydrothermal stability of cement sealing materials in the potential Yucca Mountain high level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, J.L.; Hinkebein, T.E.; Myers, J.

    1991-01-01

    Cementitious materials, together with other materials, are being considered to seal a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. A concern with cementitious materials is the chemical and mineralogic changes that may occur as these materials age while in contact with local ground waters. A combined theoretical and experimental approach was taken to determine the ability to theoretically predict mineralogic changes. The cementitious material selected for study has a relatively low Ca:Si ratio approaching that of the mineral tobermorite. Samples were treated hydrothermally at 200 degrees C with water similar to that obtained from the J-13 well on the Nevada Test Site. Post-test solutions were analyzed for pH as well as dissolved K, Na, Ca, Al, and Si. Solid phases formed during these experiments were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X- ray diffraction. These findings were compared with predictions made by the geochemical modeling code EQ3NR/E06. It was generally found that there was good agreement between predicted and experimental results

  15. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 3. Evaluation of potential for pipe breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-11-01

    The Executive Director for Operations (EDO) in establishing the Piping Review Committee concurred in its overall scope that included an evaluation of the potential for pipe breaks. The Pipe Break Task Group has responded to this directive. This report summarizes a review of regulatory documents and contains the Task Group's recommendations for application of the leak-before-break (LBB) approach to the NRC licensing process. The LBB approach means the application of fracture mechanics technology to demonstrate that high energy fluid piping is very unlikely to experience double-ended ruptures or their equivalent as longitudinal or diagonal splits. The Task Group's reommendations and discussion are founded on current and ongoing NRC staff actions as presented in Section 3.0 of this report. Additional more detailed comments and discussion are presented in Section 5.0 and in Appendices A and B. The obvious issues are the reexamination of the large pipe break criteria and the implications of any changes in the criteria as they influence items such as jet loads and pipe whip. The issues have been considered and the Task Group makes the following recommendations.

  16. Potential contribution of currently operating nuclear-fueled electric-generating units to reducing US oil consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppe, R.H.; Olson, E.A.J.; Van Howe, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    This study examines the prospect for performance improvement in the 62 light water reactors in operation in the US as of the end of last year and which are deemed to have current commercial design features. These units represent a total net capacity of 49,481 MW(e). In the last two years (1978 to 1979), total capacity factor losses for these units was 36.5%. This study finds that in the short-term, capacity factor i