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Sample records for nuclear pore ranbp2

  1. Infection-Triggered Familial or Recurrent Cases of Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy Caused by Mutations in a Component of the Nuclear Pore, RANBP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Derek E.; Adams, Mark D.; Orr, Caitlin M.D.; Schelling, Deborah K.; Eiben, Robert M.; Kerr, Douglas S.; Anderson, Jane; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Bye, Ann M.; Childs, Anne-Marie; Clarke, Antonia; Crow, Yanick J.; Di Rocco, Maja; Dohna-Schwake, Christian; Dueckers, Gregor; Fasano, Alfonso E.; Gika, Artemis D.; Gionnis, Dimitris; Gorman, Mark P.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic J.; Hackenberg, Annette; Kuster, Alice; Lentschig, Markus G.; Lopez-Laso, Eduardo; Marco, Elysa J.; Mastroyianni, Sotiria; Perrier, Julie; Schmitt-Mechelke, Thomas; Servidei, Serenella; Skardoutsou, Angeliki; Uldall, Peter; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Goglin, Karrie C.; Tefft, David L.; Aubin, Cristin; de Jager, Philip; Hafler, David; Warman, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rapidly progressive encephalopathy that can occur in otherwise healthy children after common viral infections such as influenza and parainfluenza. Most ANE is sporadic and nonrecurrent (isolated ANE). However, we identified a 7 Mb interval containing a susceptibility locus (ANE1) in a family segregating recurrent ANE as an incompletely penetrant, autosomal-dominant trait. We now report that all affected individuals and obligate carriers in this family are heterozygous for a missense mutation (c.1880C→T, p.Thr585Met) in the gene encoding the nuclear pore protein Ran Binding Protein 2 (RANBP2). To determine whether this mutation is the susceptibility allele, we screened controls and other patients with ANE who are unrelated to the index family. Patients from 9 of 15 additional kindreds with familial or recurrent ANE had the identical mutation. It arose de novo in two families and independently in several other families. Two other patients with familial ANE had different RANBP2 missense mutations that altered conserved residues. None of the three RANBP2 missense mutations were found in 19 patients with isolated ANE or in unaffected controls. We conclude that missense mutations in RANBP2 are susceptibility alleles for familial and recurrent cases of ANE. PMID:19118815

  2. RanBP2/Nup358 potentiates the translation of a subset of mRNAs encoding secretory proteins.

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    Kohila Mahadevan

    Full Text Available In higher eukaryotes, most mRNAs that encode secreted or membrane-bound proteins contain elements that promote an alternative mRNA nuclear export (ALREX pathway. Here we report that ALREX-promoting elements also potentiate translation in the presence of upstream nuclear factors. These RNA elements interact directly with, and likely co-evolved with, the zinc finger repeats of RanBP2/Nup358, which is present on the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore. Finally we show that RanBP2/Nup358 is not only required for the stimulation of translation by ALREX-promoting elements, but is also required for the efficient global synthesis of proteins targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and likely the mitochondria. Thus upon the completion of export, mRNAs containing ALREX-elements likely interact with RanBP2/Nup358, and this step is required for the efficient translation of these mRNAs in the cytoplasm. ALREX-elements thus act as nucleotide platforms to coordinate various steps of post-transcriptional regulation for the majority of mRNAs that encode secreted proteins.

  3. Human nucleoporins promote HIV-1 docking at the nuclear pore, nuclear import and integration.

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    Francesca Di Nunzio

    Full Text Available The nuclear pore complex (NPC mediates nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of macromolecules and is an obligatory point of passage and functional bottleneck in the replication of some viruses. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV has evolved the required mechanisms for active nuclear import of its genome through the NPC. However the mechanisms by which the NPC allows or even assists HIV translocation are still unknown. We investigated the involvement of four key nucleoporins in HIV-1 docking, translocation, and integration: Nup358/RanBP2, Nup214/CAN, Nup98 and Nup153. Although all induce defects in infectivity when depleted, only Nup153 actually showed any evidence of participating in HIV-1 translocation through the nuclear pore. We show that Nup358/RanBP2 mediates docking of HIV-1 cores on NPC cytoplasmic filaments by interacting with the cores and that the C-terminus of Nup358/RanBP2 comprising a cyclophilin-homology domain contributes to binding. We also show that Nup214/CAN and Nup98 play no role in HIV-1 nuclear import per se: Nup214/CAN plays an indirect role in infectivity read-outs through its effect on mRNA export, while the reduction of expression of Nup98 shows a slight reduction in proviral integration. Our work shows the involvement of nucleoporins in diverse and functionally separable steps of HIV infection and nuclear import.

  4. In situ structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex.

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    von Appen, Alexander; Kosinski, Jan; Sparks, Lenore; Ori, Alessandro; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Vollmer, Benjamin; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Banterle, Niccolo; Parca, Luca; Kastritis, Panagiotis; Buczak, Katarzyna; Mosalaganti, Shyamal; Hagen, Wim; Andres-Pons, Amparo; Lemke, Edward A; Bork, Peer; Antonin, Wolfram; Glavy, Joseph S; Bui, Khanh Huy; Beck, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pore complexes are fundamental components of all eukaryotic cells that mediate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Determining their 110-megadalton structure imposes a formidable challenge and requires in situ structural biology approaches. Of approximately 30 nucleoporins (Nups), 15 are structured and form the Y and inner-ring complexes. These two major scaffolding modules assemble in multiple copies into an eight-fold rotationally symmetric structure that fuses the inner and outer nuclear membranes to form a central channel of ~60 nm in diameter. The scaffold is decorated with transport-channel Nups that often contain phenylalanine-repeat sequences and mediate the interaction with cargo complexes. Although the architectural arrangement of parts of the Y complex has been elucidated, it is unclear how exactly it oligomerizes in situ. Here we combine cryo-electron tomography with mass spectrometry, biochemical analysis, perturbation experiments and structural modelling to generate, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive architectural model of the human nuclear pore complex to date. Our data suggest previously unknown protein interfaces across Y complexes and to inner-ring complex members. We show that the transport-channel Nup358 (also known as Ranbp2) has a previously unanticipated role in Y-complex oligomerization. Our findings blur the established boundaries between scaffold and transport-channel Nups. We conclude that, similar to coated vesicles, several copies of the same structural building block--although compositionally identical--engage in different local sets of interactions and conformations.

  5. RanBP2 modulates Cox11 and hexokinase I activities and haploinsufficiency of RanBP2 causes deficits in glucose metabolism.

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    Azamat Aslanukov

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ran-binding protein 2 (RanBP2 is a large multimodular and pleiotropic protein. Several molecular partners with distinct functions interacting specifically with selective modules of RanBP2 have been identified. Yet, the significance of these interactions with RanBP2 and the genetic and physiological role(s of RanBP2 in a whole-animal model remain elusive. Here, we report the identification of two novel partners of RanBP2 and a novel physiological role of RanBP2 in a mouse model. RanBP2 associates in vitro and in vivo and colocalizes with the mitochondrial metallochaperone, Cox11, and the pacemaker of glycolysis, hexokinase type I (HKI via its leucine-rich domain. The leucine-rich domain of RanBP2 also exhibits strong chaperone activity toward intermediate and mature folding species of Cox11 supporting a chaperone role of RanBP2 in the cytosol during Cox11 biogenesis. Cox11 partially colocalizes with HKI, thus supporting additional and distinct roles in cell function. Cox11 is a strong inhibitor of HKI, and RanBP2 suppresses the inhibitory activity of Cox11 over HKI. To probe the physiological role of RanBP2 and its role in HKI function, a mouse model harboring a genetically disrupted RanBP2 locus was generated. RanBP2(-/- are embryonically lethal, and haploinsufficiency of RanBP2 in an inbred strain causes a pronounced decrease of HKI and ATP levels selectively in the central nervous system. Inbred RanBP2(+/- mice also exhibit deficits in growth rates and glucose catabolism without impairment of glucose uptake and gluconeogenesis. These phenotypes are accompanied by a decrease in the electrophysiological responses of photosensory and postreceptoral neurons. Hence, RanBP2 and its partners emerge as critical modulators of neuronal HKI, glucose catabolism, energy homeostasis, and targets for metabolic, aging disorders and allied neuropathies.

  6. Critical role of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of Small Heterodimer Partner in maintaining bile acid homeostasis

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    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kwon, Sanghoon; Byun, Sangwon; Xiao, Zhen; Park, Sean; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are recently recognized signalling molecules that profoundly affect metabolism. Because of detergent-like toxicity, BA levels must be tightly regulated. An orphan nuclear receptor, Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP), plays a key role in this regulation, but how SHP senses the BA signal for feedback transcriptional responses is not clearly understood. We show an unexpected function of a nucleoporin, RanBP2, in maintaining BA homoeostasis through SUMOylation of SHP. Upon BA signalling, RanBP2 co-localizes with SHP at the nuclear envelope region and mediates SUMO2 modification at K68, which facilitates nuclear transport of SHP and its interaction with repressive histone modifiers to inhibit BA synthetic genes. Mice expressing a SUMO-defective K68R SHP mutant have increased liver BA levels, and upon BA- or drug-induced biliary insults, these mice exhibit exacerbated cholestatic pathologies. These results demonstrate a function of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of SHP in maintaining BA homoeostasis and protecting from the BA hepatotoxicity. PMID:27412403

  7. Infection-triggered familial or recurrent cases of acute necrotizing encephalopathy caused by mutations in a component of the nuclear pore, RANBP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neilson, Derek E; Adams, Mark D; Orr, Caitlin M D

    2009-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rapidly progressive encephalopathy that can occur in otherwise healthy children after common viral infections such as influenza and parainfluenza. Most ANE is sporadic and nonrecurrent (isolated ANE). However, we identified a 7 Mb interval containing a ...

  8. Infection-triggered familial or recurrent cases of acute necrotizing encephalopathy caused by mutations in a component of the nuclear pore, RANBP2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neilson, Derek E.; Adams, Mark D.; Orr, Caitlin M. D.; Schelling, Deborah K.; Eiben, Robert M.; Kerr, Douglas S.; Anderson, Jane; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Bye, Ann M.; Childs, Anne-Marie; Clarke, Antonia; Crow, Yanick J.; Di Rocco, Maja; Dohna-Schwake, Christian; Dueckers, Gregor; Fasano, Alfonso E.; Gika, Artemis D.; Gionnis, Dimitris; Gorman, Mark P.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic J.; Hackenberg, Annette; Kuster, Alice; Lentschig, Markus G.; Lopez-Laso, Eduardo; Marco, Elysa J.; Mastroyianni, Sotiria; Perrier, Julie; Schmitt-Mechelke, Thomas; Servidei, Serenella; Skardoutsou, Angeliki; Uldall, Peter; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Goglin, Karrie C.; Tefft, David L.; Aubin, Cristin; de Jager, Philip; Hafler, David; Warman, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rapidly progressive encephalopathy that can occur in otherwise healthy children after common viral infections such as influenza and parainfluenza. Most ANE is sporadic and nonrecurrent (isolated ANE). However, we identified a 7 Mb interval containing a

  9. Loss of Ranbp2 in motoneurons causes disruption of nucleocytoplasmic and chemokine signaling, proteostasis of hnRNPH3 and Mmp28, and development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-like syndromes

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    Kyoung-in Cho

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic drivers of sporadic and familial motor neuron disease (MND, such amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, are unknown. MND impairs the Ran GTPase cycle, which controls nucleocytoplasmic transport, ribostasis and proteostasis; however, cause-effect mechanisms of Ran GTPase modulators in motoneuron pathobiology have remained elusive. The cytosolic and peripheral nucleoporin Ranbp2 is a crucial regulator of the Ran GTPase cycle and of the proteostasis of neurological disease-prone substrates, but the roles of Ranbp2 in motoneuron biology and disease remain unknown. This study shows that conditional ablation of Ranbp2 in mouse Thy1 motoneurons causes ALS syndromes with hypoactivity followed by hindlimb paralysis, respiratory distress and, ultimately, death. These phenotypes are accompanied by: a decline in the nerve conduction velocity, free fatty acids and phophatidylcholine of the sciatic nerve; a reduction in the g-ratios of sciatic and phrenic nerves; and hypertrophy of motoneurons. Furthermore, Ranbp2 loss disrupts the nucleocytoplasmic partitioning of the import and export nuclear receptors importin β and exportin 1, respectively, Ran GTPase and histone deacetylase 4. Whole-transcriptome, proteomic and cellular analyses uncovered that the chemokine receptor Cxcr4, its antagonizing ligands Cxcl12 and Cxcl14, and effector, latent and activated Stat3 all undergo early autocrine and proteostatic deregulation, and intracellular sequestration and aggregation as a result of Ranbp2 loss in motoneurons. These effects were accompanied by paracrine and autocrine neuroglial deregulation of hnRNPH3 proteostasis in sciatic nerve and motoneurons, respectively, and post-transcriptional downregulation of metalloproteinase 28 in the sciatic nerve. Mechanistically, our results demonstrate that Ranbp2 controls nucleocytoplasmic, chemokine and metalloproteinase 28 signaling, and proteostasis of substrates that are crucial to motoneuronal homeostasis and

  10. Bicaudal D2, dynein, and kinesin-1 associate with nuclear pore complexes and regulate centrosome and nuclear positioning during mitotic entry.

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    Daniël Splinter

    Full Text Available BICD2 is one of the two mammalian homologues of the Drosophila Bicaudal D, an evolutionarily conserved adaptor between microtubule motors and their cargo that was previously shown to link vesicles and mRNP complexes to the dynein motor. Here, we identified a G2-specific role for BICD2 in the relative positioning of the nucleus and centrosomes in dividing cells. By combining mass spectrometry, biochemical and cell biological approaches, we show that the nuclear pore complex (NPC component RanBP2 directly binds to BICD2 and recruits it to NPCs specifically in G2 phase of the cell cycle. BICD2, in turn, recruits dynein-dynactin to NPCs and as such is needed to keep centrosomes closely tethered to the nucleus prior to mitotic entry. When dynein function is suppressed by RNA interference-mediated depletion or antibody microinjection, centrosomes and nuclei are actively pushed apart in late G2 and we show that this is due to the action of kinesin-1. Surprisingly, depletion of BICD2 inhibits both dynein and kinesin-1-dependent movements of the nucleus and cytoplasmic NPCs, demonstrating that BICD2 is needed not only for the dynein function at the nuclear pores but also for the antagonistic activity of kinesin-1. Our study demonstrates that the nucleus is subject to opposing activities of dynein and kinesin-1 motors and that BICD2 contributes to nuclear and centrosomal positioning prior to mitotic entry through regulation of both dynein and kinesin-1.

  11. Nuclear pore structure: warming up the core.

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    Harel, Amnon; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2011-07-22

    Structural determination of the nuclear pore complex has been limited by the complexity and size of this cellular megalith. By taking advantage of exceptionally stable nucleoporins from the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum, Amlacher et al. (2011) provide new insight into a core element of the nuclear pore scaffold. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nuclear pore complex tethers to the cytoskeleton.

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    Goldberg, Martin W

    2017-08-01

    The nuclear envelope is tethered to the cytoskeleton. The best known attachments of all elements of the cytoskeleton are via the so-called LINC complex. However, the nuclear pore complexes, which mediate the transport of soluble and membrane bound molecules, are also linked to the microtubule network, primarily via motor proteins (dynein and kinesins) which are linked, most importantly, to the cytoplasmic filament protein of the nuclear pore complex, Nup358, by the adaptor BicD2. The evidence for such linkages and possible roles in nuclear migration, cell cycle control, nuclear transport and cell architecture are discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Mimicking the nuclear pore complex using nanopores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ananth, A.N.

    2018-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes acts as a gatekeeper for molecular transport between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in eukaryotic cells. The central NPC channel is filled with intrinsically disordered FG domains (phenylalanine (F), glycine (G)) that are responsible for the fascinating selectivity of NPCs, for

  14. Current concepts in nuclear pore electrophysiology.

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    Bustamante, José Omar

    2006-01-01

    Over 4 decades ago, microelectrode studies of in situ nuclei showed that, under certain conditions, the nuclear envelope (NE) behaves as a barrier opposing the nucleocytoplasmic flow of physiological ions. As the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) of the NE are the only pathways for direct nucleocytoplasmic flow, those experiments implied that the NPCs are capable of restricting ion flow. These early studies validated electrophysiology as a useful approach to quantify some of the mechanisms by which NPCs mediate gene activity and expression. Since electron microscopy (EM) and other non-electrophysiological investigations, showed that the NPC lumen is a nanochannel, the opinion prevailed that the NPC could not oppose the flow of ions and, therefore, that electrophysiological observations resulted from technical artifacts. Consequently, the initial enthusiasm with nuclear electrophysiology faded out in less than a decade. In 1990, nuclear electrophysiology was revisited with patch-clamp, the most powerful electrophysiological technique to date. Patch-clamp has consistently demonstrated that the NE has intrinsic ion channel activity. Direct demonstrations of the NPC on-off ion channel gating behavior were published for artificial conditions in 1995 and for intact living nuclei in 2002. This on-off switching/gating behavior can be interpreted in terms of a metastable energy barrier. In the hope of advancing nuclear electrophysiology, and to complement the other papers contained in this special issue of the journal, here I review some of the main technical, experimental, and theoretical issues of the field, with special focus on NPCs.

  15. Integrative structure and functional anatomy of a nuclear pore complex

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    Kim, Seung Joong; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Nudelman, Ilona; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Wenzhu; Raveh, Barak; Herricks, Thurston; Slaughter, Brian D.; Hogan, Joanna A.; Upla, Paula; Chemmama, Ilan E.; Pellarin, Riccardo; Echeverria, Ignacia; Shivaraju, Manjunatha; Chaudhury, Azraa S.; Wang, Junjie; Williams, Rosemary; Unruh, Jay R.; Greenberg, Charles H.; Jacobs, Erica Y.; Yu, Zhiheng; de La Cruz, M. Jason; Mironska, Roxana; Stokes, David L.; Aitchison, John D.; Jarrold, Martin F.; Gerton, Jennifer L.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Akey, Christopher W.; Chait, Brian T.; Sali, Andrej; Rout, Michael P.

    2018-03-01

    Nuclear pore complexes play central roles as gatekeepers of RNA and protein transport between the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm. However, their large size and dynamic nature have impeded a full structural and functional elucidation. Here we determined the structure of the entire 552-protein nuclear pore complex of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae at sub-nanometre precision by satisfying a wide range of data relating to the molecular arrangement of its constituents. The nuclear pore complex incorporates sturdy diagonal columns and connector cables attached to these columns, imbuing the structure with strength and flexibility. These cables also tie together all other elements of the nuclear pore complex, including membrane-interacting regions, outer rings and RNA-processing platforms. Inwardly directed anchors create a high density of transport factor-docking Phe-Gly repeats in the central channel, organized into distinct functional units. This integrative structure enables us to rationalize the architecture, transport mechanism and evolutionary origins of the nuclear pore complex.

  16. Acute Hemorrhagic Encephalitis Responding to Combined Decompressive Craniectomy, Intravenous Immunoglobulin, and Corticosteroid Therapies: Association with Novel RANBP2 Variant

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    Abdulla Alawadhi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAcute hemorrhagic encephalomyelitis (AHEM is considered as a rare form of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis characterized by fulminant encephalopathy with hemorrhagic necrosis and most often fatal outcome.ObjectiveTo report the association with Ran Binding Protein (RANBP2 gene variant and the response to decompressive craniectomy and high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone (IVMP in life-threatening AHEM.DesignSingle case study.Case reportA 6-year-old girl known to have sickle cell disease (SCD presented an acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS with diplopia due to sudden unilateral fourth nerve palsy. She received five pulses of IVMP (30 mg/kg/day. Two weeks after steroid weaning, she developed right hemiplegia and coma. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a left frontal necrotico-hemorrhagic lesion and new multifocal areas of demyelination. She underwent decompressive craniotomy and evacuation of an ongoing left frontoparietal hemorrhage. Comprehensive investigations ruled out vascular and infectious process. The neurological deterioration stopped concomitantly with combined neurosurgical drainage of the hematoma, decompressive craniotomy, IVMP, and intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG. She developed during the following months Crohn disease and sclerosing cholangitis. After 2-year follow-up, there was no new neurological manifestation. The patient still suffered right hemiplegia and aphasia, but was able to walk. Cognitive/behavioral abilities significantly recovered. A heterozygous novel rare missense variant (c.4993A>G, p.Lys1665Glu was identified in RANBP2, a gene associated with acute necrotizing encephalopathy. RANBP2 is a protein playing an important role in the energy homeostasis of neuronal cells.ConclusionIn any ADS occurring in the context of SCD and/or autoimmune condition, we recommend to slowly wean steroids and to closely monitor the patient after weaning to quickly treat any recurrence of neurological symptom

  17. Nuclear pore complexes as hubs for gene regulation.

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    D'Angelo, Maximiliano A

    2018-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), the channels connecting the nucleus with the cytoplasm, are the largest protein structures of the nuclear envelope. In addition to their role in regulating nucleocytoplasmic transport, increasing evidence shows that these multiprotein structures play central roles in the regulation of gene activity. In light of recent discoveries, NPCs are emerging as scaffolds that mediate the regulation of specific gene sets at the nuclear periphery. The function of NPCs as genome organizers and hubs for transcriptional regulation provides additional evidence that the compartmentalization of genes and transcriptional regulators within the nuclear space is an important mechanism of gene expression regulation.

  18. Distinct and atypical intrinsic and extrinsic cell death pathways between photoreceptor cell types upon specific ablation of Ranbp2 in cone photoreceptors.

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    Kyoung-In Cho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-autonomous cell-death is a cardinal feature of the disintegration of neural networks in neurodegenerative diseases, but the molecular bases of this process are poorly understood. The neural retina comprises a mosaic of rod and cone photoreceptors. Cone and rod photoreceptors degenerate upon rod-specific expression of heterogeneous mutations in functionally distinct genes, whereas cone-specific mutations are thought to cause only cone demise. Here we show that conditional ablation in cone photoreceptors of Ran-binding protein-2 (Ranbp2, a cell context-dependent pleiotropic protein linked to neuroprotection, familial necrotic encephalopathies, acute transverse myelitis and tumor-suppression, promotes early electrophysiological deficits, subcellular erosive destruction and non-apoptotic death of cones, whereas rod photoreceptors undergo cone-dependent non-autonomous apoptosis. Cone-specific Ranbp2 ablation causes the temporal activation of a cone-intrinsic molecular cascade highlighted by the early activation of metalloproteinase 11/stromelysin-3 and up-regulation of Crx and CoREST, followed by the down-modulation of cone-specific phototransduction genes, transient up-regulation of regulatory/survival genes and activation of caspase-7 without apoptosis. Conversely, PARP1+ -apoptotic rods develop upon sequential activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 and loss of membrane permeability. Rod photoreceptor demise ceases upon cone degeneration. These findings reveal novel roles of Ranbp2 in the modulation of intrinsic and extrinsic cell death mechanisms and pathways. They also unveil a novel spatiotemporal paradigm of progression of neurodegeneration upon cell-specific genetic damage whereby a cone to rod non-autonomous death pathway with intrinsically distinct cell-type death manifestations is triggered by cell-specific loss of Ranbp2. Finally, this study casts new light onto cell-death mechanisms that may be shared by human dystrophies with distinct

  19. Gas release from pressurized closed pores in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, P.; Donnelly, S.E.; Armour, D.G.; Matzke, H.

    1988-01-01

    Gas release from the nuclear fuels UO 2 and UN out of pressurized closed pores produced by autoclave anneals has been studied by Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS). Investigation of gas release during heating and cooling has indicated stress related mechanical effects leading to gas release. This release occurred in a narrow temperature range between about 1000 and 1500 K for UO 2 , but it continued down to ambient temperature for UN. No burst release was observed above 1500 K for UO 2 . (orig.)

  20. Force Triggers YAP Nuclear Entry by Regulating Transport across Nuclear Pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Andreu, Ion; Beedle, Amy E M; Lezamiz, Ainhoa; Uroz, Marina; Kosmalska, Anita J; Oria, Roger; Kechagia, Jenny Z; Rico-Lastres, Palma; Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Shanahan, Catherine M; Trepat, Xavier; Navajas, Daniel; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2017-11-30

    YAP is a mechanosensitive transcriptional activator with a critical role in cancer, regeneration, and organ size control. Here, we show that force applied to the nucleus directly drives YAP nuclear translocation by decreasing the mechanical restriction of nuclear pores to molecular transport. Exposure to a stiff environment leads cells to establish a mechanical connection between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton, allowing forces exerted through focal adhesions to reach the nucleus. Force transmission then leads to nuclear flattening, which stretches nuclear pores, reduces their mechanical resistance to molecular transport, and increases YAP nuclear import. The restriction to transport is further regulated by the mechanical stability of the transported protein, which determines both active nuclear transport of YAP and passive transport of small proteins. Our results unveil a mechanosensing mechanism mediated directly by nuclear pores, demonstrated for YAP but with potential general applicability in transcriptional regulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Inner/Outer nuclear membrane fusion in nuclear pore assembly: biochemical demonstration and molecular analysis.

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    Fichtman, Boris; Ramos, Corinne; Rasala, Beth; Harel, Amnon; Forbes, Douglass J

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large proteinaceous channels embedded in double nuclear membranes, which carry out nucleocytoplasmic exchange. The mechanism of nuclear pore assembly involves a unique challenge, as it requires creation of a long-lived membrane-lined channel connecting the inner and outer nuclear membranes. This stabilized membrane channel has little evolutionary precedent. Here we mapped inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion in NPC assembly biochemically by using novel assembly intermediates and membrane fusion inhibitors. Incubation of a Xenopus in vitro nuclear assembly system at 14°C revealed an early pore intermediate where nucleoporin subunits POM121 and the Nup107-160 complex were organized in a punctate pattern on the inner nuclear membrane. With time, this intermediate progressed to diffusion channel formation and finally to complete nuclear pore assembly. Correct channel formation was blocked by the hemifusion inhibitor lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), but not if a complementary-shaped lipid, oleic acid (OA), was simultaneously added, as determined with a novel fluorescent dextran-quenching assay. Importantly, recruitment of the bulk of FG nucleoporins, characteristic of mature nuclear pores, was not observed before diffusion channel formation and was prevented by LPC or OA, but not by LPC+OA. These results map the crucial inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion event of NPC assembly downstream of POM121/Nup107-160 complex interaction and upstream or at the time of FG nucleoporin recruitment.

  2. Characterization of a nuclear pore protein sheds light on the roles and composition of the Toxoplasma gondii nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courjol, Flavie; Mouveaux, Thomas; Lesage, Kevin; Saliou, Jean-Michel; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Bonabaud, Maurine; Rohmer, Marine; Slomianny, Christian; Lafont, Franck; Gissot, Mathieu

    2017-06-01

    The nuclear pore is a key structure in eukaryotes regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic transport as well as a wide range of cellular processes. Here, we report the characterization of the first Toxoplasma gondii nuclear pore protein, named TgNup302, which appears to be the orthologue of the mammalian Nup98-96 protein. We produced a conditional knock-down mutant that expresses TgNup302 under the control of an inducible tetracycline-regulated promoter. Under ATc treatment, a substantial decrease of TgNup302 protein in inducible knock-down (iKD) parasites was observed, causing a delay in parasite proliferation. Moreover, the nuclear protein TgENO2 was trapped in the cytoplasm of ATc-treated mutants, suggesting that TgNup302 is involved in nuclear transport. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that TgNup302 is essential for 18S RNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, while global mRNA export remains unchanged. Using an affinity tag purification combined with mass spectrometry, we identified additional components of the nuclear pore complex, including proteins potentially interacting with chromatin. Furthermore, reverse immunoprecipitation confirmed their interaction with TgNup302, and structured illuminated microscopy confirmed the NPC localization of some of the TgNup302-interacting proteins. Intriguingly, facilitates chromatin transcription complex (FACT) components were identified, suggesting the existence of an NPC-chromatin interaction in T. gondii. Identification of TgNup302-interacting proteins also provides the first glimpse at the NPC structure in Apicomplexa, suggesting a structural conservation of the NPC components between distant eukaryotes.

  3. Influence factors on etching rate of PET nuclear pore membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Zhenzhong; Wu Zhendong; Liang Haiying; Ju Wei; Chen Dongfeng; Fu Yuanyong; Qu Guopu

    2014-01-01

    Background: The nuclear pore membrane is a kind of liquid filtration material manufactured by irradiation and chemical etching. Various conditions in etch process have a great influence on etch rate. Purpose: The influence factors of concentration and temperature of etch solution and the irradiation energy of heavy ions on etch rate was studied. Methods: Four layers of PET (polyethylene terephthalate) films were stacked together and were irradiated with 140-MeV 32 S ions at room temperature under vacuum conditions. Utilizing conductivity measurement technique, the electrical current changes through the u:radiated PET film were monitored during etching, from which the breakthrough time and therefore the track etching rate was calculated. Results: The results show that there is an exponential correlation between etch rate and temperature, and a linear correlation between etch rate and concentration. The track etching rate increases linearly with energy loss rate. Empirical formula for the bulk etching rate as a function of etchant concentration and temperature was also established via fitting of measurements. Conclusion: It is concluded that by using 1.6-MeV·u -1 32 S ions, PET nuclear pore membrane with cylindrical pore shape can be prepared at 85℃ with etchant concentration of l mol·L -1 . (authors)

  4. Structure and gating of the nuclear pore complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibauer, Matthias; Pellanda, Mauro; Turgay, Yagmur; Dubrovsky, Anna; Wild, Annik; Medalia, Ohad

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) perforate the nuclear envelope and allow the exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. To acquire a deeper understanding of this transport mechanism, we analyse the structure of the NPC scaffold and permeability barrier, by reconstructing the Xenopus laevis oocyte NPC from native nuclear envelopes up to 20 Å resolution by cryo-electron tomography in conjunction with subtomogram averaging. In addition to resolving individual protein domains of the NPC constituents, we propose a model for the architecture of the molecular gate at its central channel. Furthermore, we compare and contrast this native NPC structure to one that exhibits reduced transport activity and unveil the spatial properties of the NPC gate.

  5. The Yeast Nuclear Pore Complex and Transport Through It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitchison, John D.; Rout, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm is a key regulatory event in the expression of a cell’s genome. This exchange requires a dedicated transport system: (1) nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), embedded in the nuclear envelope and composed of proteins termed nucleoporins (or “Nups”), and (2) nuclear transport factors that recognize the cargoes to be transported and ferry them across the NPCs. This transport is regulated at multiple levels, and the NPC itself also plays a key regulatory role in gene expression by influencing nuclear architecture and acting as a point of control for various nuclear processes. Here we summarize how the yeast Saccharomyces has been used extensively as a model system to understand the fundamental and highly conserved features of this transport system, revealing the structure and function of the NPC; the NPC’s role in the regulation of gene expression; and the interactions of transport factors with their cargoes, regulatory factors, and specific nucleoporins. PMID:22419078

  6. Energetics of Transport through the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghavami

    Full Text Available Molecular transport across the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells is solely controlled by the nuclear pore complex (NPC. The NPC provides two types of nucleocytoplasmic transport: passive diffusion of small molecules and active chaperon-mediated translocation of large molecules. It has been shown that the interaction between intrinsically disordered proteins that line the central channel of the NPC and the transporting cargoes is the determining factor, but the exact mechanism of transport is yet unknown. Here, we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to quantify the energy barrier that has to be overcome for molecules to pass through the NPC. We focus on two aspects of transport. First, the passive transport of model cargo molecules with different sizes is studied and the size selectivity feature of the NPC is investigated. Our results show that the transport probability of cargoes is significantly reduced when they are larger than ∼5 nm in diameter. Secondly, we show that incorporating hydrophobic binding spots on the surface of the cargo effectively decreases the energy barrier of the pore. Finally, a simple transport model is proposed which characterizes the energy barrier of the NPC as a function of diameter and hydrophobicity of the transporting particles.

  7. Cytosol-dependent membrane fusion in ER, nuclear envelope and nuclear pore assembly: biological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafikova, Elvira R; Melikov, Kamran; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2010-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope rearrangements after mitosis are often studied in the reconstitution system based on Xenopus egg extract. In our recent work we partially replaced the membrane vesicles in the reconstitution mix with protein-free liposomes to explore the relative contributions of cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. Here we discuss our finding that cytosolic proteins mediate fusion between membranes lacking functional transmembrane proteins and the role of membrane fusion in endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope reorganization. Cytosol-dependent liposome fusion has allowed us to restore, without adding transmembrane nucleoporins, functionality of nuclear pores, their spatial distribution and chromatin decondensation in nuclei formed at insufficient amounts of membrane material and characterized by only partial decondensation of chromatin and lack of nuclear transport. Both the mechanisms and the biological implications of the discovered coupling between spatial distribution of nuclear pores, chromatin decondensation and nuclear transport are discussed.

  8. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and the Nuclear Pore Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Rey, Carolina; Bogdanos, Dimitrios; Yang, Chen-Yen; Roberts, Krista; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Worman, Howard J.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2012-01-01

    Experimental models of autoimmune diseases have led to the conclusion that an immune response to nuclear antigens is a sentinel marker for loss of tolerance and potential tissue damage. Various proteins are targets of antinuclear antibodies in a variety of autoimmune diseases, ranging from systemic rheumatologic disorders to diseases affecting specific organs such as the liver. Autoantibodies against specific nuclear constituents have also been used as probes to understand the structure and the function of the targeted components and their relevance to disease pathogenesis. Approximately a quarter of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) have antibodies targeting proteins of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), a multi-protein structure that mediates molecular transport across the nuclear envelope. Autoantibodies against the integral membrane glycoprotein gp210 and nucleoporin p62 appear to be highly specific for PBC, an autoimmune disease characterized by progressive destruction of intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells. This review discusses the diagnostic and clinical relevance of anti-NPC antibodies in PBC and the possibility that this autoimmune response may arise as a result of molecular mimicry. PMID:22487189

  9. Cell-fusion method to visualize interphase nuclear pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Funakoshi, Tomoko; Imamoto, Naoko

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the nucleus is a complex and sophisticated organelle that organizes genomic DNA to support essential cellular functions. The nuclear surface contains many nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), channels for macromolecular transport between the cytoplasm and nucleus. It is well known that the number of NPCs almost doubles during interphase in cycling cells. However, the mechanism of NPC formation is poorly understood, presumably because a practical system for analysis does not exist. The most difficult obstacle in the visualization of interphase NPC formation is that NPCs already exist after nuclear envelope formation, and these existing NPCs interfere with the observation of nascent NPCs. To overcome this obstacle, we developed a novel system using the cell-fusion technique (heterokaryon method), previously also used to analyze the shuttling of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, to visualize the newly synthesized interphase NPCs. In addition, we used a photobleaching approach that validated the cell-fusion method. We recently used these methods to demonstrate the role of cyclin-dependent protein kinases and of Pom121 in interphase NPC formation in cycling human cells. Here, we describe the details of the cell-fusion approach and compare the system with other NPC formation visualization methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure of the nuclear pore complex in mammalian cells. Two annular components.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J.H.N. Schel; F. Wanka

    1974-01-01

    textabstractThe ultrastructure of the nuclear pore complex has been investigated in isolated nuclei of an in vitro cultured bovine liver cell line. In shadow-cast replicas of the surface of nuclei isolated in Tris buffer containing low K+ and Mg2+ concentrations (RSB) the rims of the pores appeared

  11. Single-molecule transport across an individual biomimetic nuclear pore complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Stefan W.; Kapinos, Larisa; Blosser, Timothy R.; Magalhães, Tomás; van Nies, Pauline; Lim, Roderick Y. H.; Dekker, Cees

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear pore complexes regulate the selective exchange of RNA and proteins across the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. Biomimetic strategies offer new opportunities to investigate this remarkable transport phenomenon. Here, we show selective transport of proteins across individual biomimetic nuclear pore complexes at the single-molecule level. Each biomimetic complex is constructed by covalently tethering either Nup98 or Nup153 (phenylalanine-glycine (FG) nucleoporins) to a solid-state nanopore. Individual translocation events are monitored using ionic current measurements with sub-millisecond temporal resolution. Transport receptors (Impβ) proceed with a dwell time of ~2.5 ms for both Nup98- and Nup153-coated pores, whereas the passage of non-specific proteins is strongly inhibited with different degrees of selectivity. For pores up to ~25 nm in diameter, Nups form a dense and low-conducting barrier, whereas they adopt a more open structure in larger pores. Our biomimetic nuclear pore complex provides a quantitative platform for studying nucleocytoplasmic transport phenomena at the single-molecule level in vitro.

  12. Early localization of NPA58, a rat nuclear pore-associated protein, to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    and assembled using Adobe Photoshop 5⋅0. 3. Results. 3.1 Association of NPA58 with the nuclear pore complex. The vertebrate nucleoporins that have been identified so far exhibit characteristic punctate staining of the peri- phery of the nucleus due to the perforation of the nuclear membranes at intervals by the NPCs.

  13. Systematic analysis of barrier-forming FG hydrogels from Xenopus nuclear pore complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labokha, A.A.; Gradmann, S.H.E.; Frey, S.; Hülsmann, B.B.; Urlaub, H.; Baldus, M.; Görlich, D.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) control the traffic between cell nucleus and cytoplasm. While facilitating translocation of nuclear transport receptors (NTRs) and NTR·cargo complexes, they suppress passive passage of macromolecules ⩾30 kDa. Previously, we reconstituted the NPC barrier as hydrogels

  14. DNA origami scaffold for studying intrinsically disordered proteins of the nuclear pore complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketterer, Philip; Ananth, Adithya N; Laman Trip, Diederik S; Mishra, Ankur; Bertosin, Eva; Ganji, Mahipal; van der Torre, Jaco; Onck, Patrick; Dietz, Hendrik; Dekker, Cees

    2018-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the gatekeeper for nuclear transport in eukaryotic cells. A key component of the NPC is the central shaft lined with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) known as FG-Nups, which control the selective molecular traffic. Here, we present an approach to realize

  15. Nup98 Localizes to Both Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Sides of the Nuclear Pore and Binds to Two Distinct Nucleoporin Subcomplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffis, Eric R.; Xu, Songli; Powers, Maureen A.

    2003-01-01

    The vertebrate nuclear pore is an enormous structure that spans the double membrane of the nuclear envelope. In yeast, most nucleoporins are found symmetrically on both the nuclear and cytoplasmic sides of the structure. However, in vertebrates most nucleoporins have been localized exclusively to one side of the nuclear pore. Herein, we show, by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy, that Nup98 is found on both sides of the pore complex. Additionally, we find that the pore-targeting domain of Nup98 interacts directly with the cytoplasmic nucleoporin Nup88, a component of the Nup214, Nup88, Nup62 subcomplex. Nup98 was previously described to interact with the nuclear-oriented Nup160, 133, 107, 96 complex through direct binding to Nup96. Interestingly, the same site within Nup98 is involved in binding to both Nup88 and Nup96. Autoproteolytic cleavage of the Nup98 C terminus is required for both of these binding interactions. When cleavage is blocked by a point mutation, a minimal eight amino acids downstream of the cleavage site is sufficient to prevent most binding to either Nup96 or Nup88. Thus, Nup98 interacts with both faces of the nuclear pore, a localization in keeping with its previously described nucleocytoplasmic shuttling activity. PMID:12589057

  16. Nano-Pore Characterization of Shale Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Cryoporometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Tong, S.

    2016-12-01

    Considering that most matrix pore sizes of shale rock are at scales of a few nanometers to microns, charactering nano-pore the pore structure are therefore significant and imperative for shale gas production. However, to accurately characterize the pore structure of shale remains a challenging task in geoscience community due to the complexity and heterogeneity of the shale pore structure. Various techniques such as Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry (MIP), Nitrogen Adsorption Method (NAM) and X-ray Computerized Tomography (XCT) all have a limited measuring range and could not cover the entire nanometer-range. This work reported nano-pore characterization of shale rock in Sichuan, China using nuclear magnetic resonance cryoporometry (NMRC), a novel and emerging technique which can probe pore size distributions from nano- to micro- scales. First, the method was validated using two materials with pre-known pore structures, a molecular sieve SBA-15 with a pore diameter of 8 nm and a controlled pore glass with a pore diameter of 24 nm. The NMRC results of two martials show a good accuracy for quantifying pore size distribution. Both bulk matrix specimens and pulverized shale samples were tested using NMRC, and two liquids, water and cyclohexane, were used to saturate the samples for NMRC experiments. MIP, NAM as well as NanoCT were also employed to validate the NMRC results. The results show that MIP was comparable to NMRC with bulk sample and NAM was similar to NMRC with pulverized sample. The porosity for bulk and pulverized sample is 3.2% and 5.7% respectively, showing that a lot of pores were connected during pulverizing process. The results for samples saturated with water and cyclohexane are similar, which demonstrates that water-rock interaction was not active during experiment due to the low temperature. However, cyclohexane has a greater Gibbs-Thomoson coefficient than water, meaning that NMRC with cyclohexane has a better

  17. 3D nuclear architecture reveals coupled cell cycle dynamics of chromatin and nuclear pores in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Allon; Dahan-Pasternak, Noa; Shimoni, Eyal; Shinder, Vera; von Huth, Palle; Elbaum, Michael; Dzikowski, Ron

    2011-07-01

    The deadliest form of human malaria is caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The complex life cycle of this parasite is associated with tight transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Nuclear positioning and chromatin dynamics may play an important role in regulating P. falciparum virulence genes. We have applied an emerging technique of electron microscopy to construct a 3D model of the parasite nucleus at distinct stages of development within the infected red blood cell. We have followed the distribution of nuclear pores and chromatin throughout the intra-erythrocytic cycle, and have found a striking coupling between the distributions of nuclear pores and chromatin organization. Pore dynamics involve clustering, biogenesis, and division among daughter cells, while chromatin undergoes stage-dependent changes in packaging. Dramatic changes in heterochromatin distribution coincide with a previously identified transition in gene expression and nucleosome positioning during the mid-to-late schizont phase. We also found a correlation between euchromatin positioning at the nuclear envelope and the local distribution of nuclear pores, as well as a dynamic nuclear polarity during schizogony. These results suggest that cyclic patterns in gene expression during parasite development correlate with gross changes in cellular and nuclear architecture. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Components of coated vesicles and nuclear pore complexes share a common molecular architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Devos

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous features distinguish prokaryotes from eukaryotes, chief among which are the distinctive internal membrane systems of eukaryotic cells. These membrane systems form elaborate compartments and vesicular trafficking pathways, and sequester the chromatin within the nuclear envelope. The nuclear pore complex is the portal that specifically mediates macromolecular trafficking across the nuclear envelope. Although it is generally understood that these internal membrane systems evolved from specialized invaginations of the prokaryotic plasma membrane, it is not clear how the nuclear pore complex could have evolved from organisms with no analogous transport system. Here we use computational and biochemical methods to perform a structural analysis of the seven proteins comprising the yNup84/vNup107-160 subcomplex, a core building block of the nuclear pore complex. Our analysis indicates that all seven proteins contain either a beta-propeller fold, an alpha-solenoid fold, or a distinctive arrangement of both, revealing close similarities between the structures comprising the yNup84/vNup107-160 subcomplex and those comprising the major types of vesicle coating complexes that maintain vesicular trafficking pathways. These similarities suggest a common evolutionary origin for nuclear pore complexes and coated vesicles in an early membrane-curving module that led to the formation of the internal membrane systems in modern eukaryotes.

  19. Nuclear Track-Etched Pore Membrane Production Using OAEP's Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chittrakarn, Thawat; Bhongsuwan, Tripob; Wanichapichart, Pikul; Nuanuin, Paiboon; Chongkum, Somporn; Khonduangkaew, Areerat; Bordeepong, Sunaree

    2003-10-01

    Result of this study shows that the OAEP's nuclear research reactor is a good source of both fast and thermal neutrons for pore piercing process on polycarbonate thin film. With our experimental design, the fast neutron provides better results in pore piercing comparing with thermal neutron bombardment. This can be explained that most of the latent tracks that occur by thermal neutron bombardment do not piercing through the thin film. Chemical etching process using NaOH solution with an appropriated time, concentration and temperature was employed to enlarge the latent tracks in the bombarded film by fast neutrons. Fast neutron bombardment with 5, 10 and 20 minutes bombarding time successfully produces the nuclear track membrane. Pore size and pore density of the produced membranes examined by SEM were 0.24-1.01 μm and 4.67 - 245 x 10 6 pore/cm 2 , respectively. Bubble point test showed the maximum pore diameter of the produced membrane ranged between 1.18 - 3.25 μm. Water permeability was studied and compared between the produced and commercial membranes

  20. Single-molecule conductance measurements of biomolecule translocation across biomimetic nuclear pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Cees

    2012-02-01

    After a brief overview of our recent work on solid-state nanopores, I will present single-molecule transport data across biomimetic nanopores that contain the key regulating parts of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). The mechanism for the remarkable selectivity of NPCs has remained unclear in a large part due to difficulties in designing experiments that can probe the transport at the relevant length and time scales. Building and measuring on biomimetic NPCs provides new opportunities to address this long-standing problem. covalently tether the natively unfolded Phe-Gly rich domains (FG-domains) of human nuclear binding proteins to a solid-state nanopore (a 10-100 nm sized hole in a SiN membrane). Ionic current measurements provide a probe to monitor single molecules that traverse the pore. Translocation events are observed for transport receptors (Impβ), whereas transport of passive molecules (BSA) is found to be blocked. Interestingly, a single type of nuclear pore proteins appears already sufficient to form a selective barrier for transport. A translocation time of about 2.5 ms is measured for Impβ. This time is found to be similar for transport across Nup153 and Nup98 coated pores, although the observed ionic conductance differs between these two types of pores. We compare two simple models for the pore conductance and find, for both Nups, that the data fits best to a model with an open central channel and a condensed layer along the outer circumference of the pore. reproducing the key features of the NPC, our biomimetic approach opens the way to study a wide variety of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport processes at the single-molecule level in vitro.

  1. Recombinational DNA repair is regulated by compartmentalization of DNA lesions at the nuclear pore complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Géli, Vincent; Lisby, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is emerging as a center for recruitment of a class of "difficult to repair" lesions such as double-strand breaks without a repair template and eroded telomeres in telomerase-deficient cells. In addition to such pathological situations, a recent study by Su and colle...

  2. Nuclear pore protein NUP88 activates anaphase-promoting complex to promote aneuploidy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naylor, R.M.; Jeganathan, K.B.; Cao, X.; Deursen, J.M. van

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex protein NUP88 is frequently elevated in aggressive human cancers and correlates with reduced patient survival; however, it is unclear whether and how NUP88 overexpression drives tumorigenesis. Here, we show that mice overexpressing NUP88 are cancer prone and form intestinal

  3. Nuclear pores and perinuclear expression sites of var and ribosomal DNA genes correspond to physically distinct regions in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guizetti, Julien; Martins, Rafael Miyazawa; Guadagnini, Stéphanie; Claes, Aurélie; Scherf, Artur

    2013-05-01

    The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum modifies the erythrocyte it infects by exporting variant proteins to the host cell surface. The var gene family that codes for a large, variant adhesive surface protein called P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) plays a particular role in this process, which is linked to pathogenesis and immune evasion. A single member of this gene family is highly transcribed while the other 59 members remain silenced. Importantly, var gene transcription occurs at a spatially restricted, but yet undefined, perinuclear site that is distinct from repressed var gene clusters. To advance our understanding of monoallelic expression, we investigated whether nuclear pores associate with the var gene expression site. To this end, we studied the nuclear pore organization during the asexual blood stage using a specific antibody directed against a subunit of the nuclear pore, P. falciparum Nup116 (PfNup116). Ring and schizont stage parasites showed highly polarized nuclear pore foci, whereas in trophozoite stage nuclear pores redistributed over the entire nuclear surface. Colocalization studies of var transcripts and anti-PfNup116 antibodies showed clear dissociation between nuclear pores and the var gene expression site in ring stage. Similar results were obtained for another differentially transcribed perinuclear gene family, the ribosomal DNA units. Furthermore, we show that in the poised state, the var gene locus is not physically linked to nuclear pores. Our results indicate that P. falciparum does form compartments of high transcriptional activity at the nuclear periphery which are, unlike the case in yeast, devoid of nuclear pores.

  4. Misdelivery at the Nuclear Pore Complex—Stopping a Virus Dead in Its Tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W. Flatt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Many viruses deliver their genomes into the host cell’s nucleus before they replicate. While onco-retroviruses and papillomaviruses tether their genomes to host chromatin upon mitotic breakdown of the nuclear envelope, lentiviruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus, adenoviruses, herpesviruses, parvoviruses, influenza viruses, hepatitis B virus, polyomaviruses, and baculoviruses deliver their genomes into the nucleus of post-mitotic cells. This poses the significant challenge of slipping a DNA or RNA genome past the nuclear pore complex (NPC embedded in the nuclear envelope. Quantitative fluorescence imaging is shedding new light on this process, with recent data implicating misdelivery of viral genomes at nuclear pores as a bottleneck to virus replication. Here, we infer NPC functions for nuclear import of viral genomes from cell biology experiments and explore potential causes of misdelivery, including improper virus docking at NPCs, incomplete translocation, virus-induced stress and innate immunity reactions. We conclude by discussing consequences of viral genome misdelivery for viruses and host cells, and lay out future questions to enhance our understanding of this phenomenon. Further studies into viral genome misdelivery may reveal unexpected aspects about NPC structure and function, as well as aid in developing strategies for controlling viral infections to improve human health.

  5. Scyl1 Facilitates Nuclear tRNA Export in Mammalian Cells by Acting at the Nuclear Pore Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafe, Shawn C.

    2010-01-01

    Scyl1 is an evolutionarily conserved N-terminal protein kinase-like domain protein that plays a role in COP1-mediated retrograde protein trafficking in mammalian cells. Furthermore, loss of Scyl1 function has been shown to result in neurodegenerative disorders in mice. Here, we report that Scyl1 is also a cytoplasmic component of the mammalian nuclear tRNA export machinery. Like exportin-t, overexpression of Scyl1 restored export of a nuclear export-defective serine amber suppressor tRNA mutant in COS-7 cells. Scyl1 binds tRNA saturably, and associates with the nuclear pore complex by interacting, in part, with Nup98. Scyl1 copurifies with the nuclear tRNA export receptors exportin-t and exportin-5, the RanGTPase, and the eukaryotic elongation factor eEF-1A, which transports aminoacyl-tRNAs to the ribosomes. Scyl1 interacts directly with exportin-t and RanGTP but not with eEF-1A or RanGDP in vitro. Moreover, exportin-t containing tRNA, Scyl1, and RanGTP form a quaternary complex in vitro. Biochemical characterization also suggests that the nuclear aminoacylation-dependent pathway is primarily responsible for tRNA export in mammalian cells. These findings together suggest that Scyl1 participates in the nuclear aminoacylation-dependent tRNA export pathway and may unload aminoacyl-tRNAs from the nuclear tRNA export receptor at the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore complex and channels them to eEF-1A. PMID:20505071

  6. Molecular Architecture of the Major Membrane Ring Component of the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upla, Paula; Kim, Seung Joong; Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Dutta, Kaushik; Cahill, Sean M; Chemmama, Ilan E; Williams, Rosemary; Bonanno, Jeffrey B; Rice, William J; Stokes, David L; Cowburn, David; Almo, Steven C; Sali, Andrej; Rout, Michael P; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier

    2017-03-07

    The membrane ring that equatorially circumscribes the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in the perinuclear lumen of the nuclear envelope is composed largely of Pom152 in yeast and its ortholog Nup210 (or Gp210) in vertebrates. Here, we have used a combination of negative-stain electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and small-angle X-ray scattering methods to determine an integrative structure of the ∼120 kDa luminal domain of Pom152. Our structural analysis reveals that the luminal domain is formed by a flexible string-of-pearls arrangement of nine repetitive cadherin-like Ig-like domains, indicating an evolutionary connection between NPCs and the cell adhesion machinery. The 16 copies of Pom152 known to be present in the yeast NPC are long enough to form the observed membrane ring, suggesting how interactions between Pom152 molecules help establish and maintain the NPC architecture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nuclear Pores Regulate Muscle Development and Maintenance by Assembling a Localized Mef2C Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raices, Marcela; Bukata, Lucas; Sakuma, Stephen; Borlido, Joana; Hernandez, Leanora S; Hart, Daniel O; D'Angelo, Maximiliano A

    2017-06-05

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are multiprotein channels connecting the nucleus with the cytoplasm. NPCs have been shown to have tissue-specific composition, suggesting that their function can be specialized. However, the physiological roles of NPC composition changes and their impacts on cellular processes remain unclear. Here we show that the addition of the Nup210 nucleoporin to NPCs during myoblast differentiation results in assembly of an Mef2C transcriptional complex required for efficient expression of muscle structural genes and microRNAs. We show that this NPC-localized complex is essential for muscle growth, myofiber maturation, and muscle cell survival and that alterations in its activity result in muscle degeneration. Our findings suggest that NPCs regulate the activity of functional gene groups by acting as scaffolds that promote the local assembly of tissue-specific transcription complexes and show how nuclear pore composition changes can be exploited to regulate gene expression at the nuclear periphery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Multiscale Pore Throat Network Reconstruction of Tight Porous Media Constrained by Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, R.; Prodanovic, M.

    2017-12-01

    Due to the low porosity and permeability of tight porous media, hydrocarbon productivity strongly depends on the pore structure. Effective characterization of pore/throat sizes and reconstruction of their connectivity in tight porous media remains challenging. Having a representative pore throat network, however, is valuable for calculation of other petrophysical properties such as permeability, which is time-consuming and costly to obtain by experimental measurements. Due to a wide range of length scales encountered, a combination of experimental methods is usually required to obtain a comprehensive picture of the pore-body and pore-throat size distributions. In this work, we combine mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements by percolation theory to derive pore-body size distribution, following the work by Daigle et al. (2015). However, in their work, the actual pore-throat sizes and the distribution of coordination numbers are not well-defined. To compensate for that, we build a 3D unstructured two-scale pore throat network model initialized by the measured porosity and the calculated pore-body size distributions, with a tunable pore-throat size and coordination number distribution, which we further determine by matching the capillary pressure vs. saturation curve from MICP measurement, based on the fact that the mercury intrusion process is controlled by both the pore/throat size distributions and the connectivity of the pore system. We validate our model by characterizing several core samples from tight Middle East carbonate, and use the network model to predict the apparent permeability of the samples under single phase fluid flow condition. Results show that the permeability we get is in reasonable agreement with the Coreval experimental measurements. The pore throat network we get can be used to further calculate relative permeability curves and simulate multiphase flow behavior, which will provide valuable

  9. Translocation through the nuclear pore complex: selectivity and speed by reduction-of-dimensionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Reiner

    2005-05-01

    Translocation through the nuclear pore complex (NPC), a large transporter spanning the nuclear envelope, is a passive, diffusion-driven process, paradoxically enhanced by binding. To account for this mystery, several models have been suggested. However, recent experiments with modified NPCs make reconsideration necessary. Here, we suggest that nuclear transport receptors (NTRs) such as the karyopherins, in accordance with their peculiar boat-like structure, act as nanoscopic ferries transporting cargos through the NPC by sliding on a surface of phenylalanine glycine (FG) motifs. The dense array of FG motifs that covers the cytoplasmic filaments of the NPC is thought to continue on the wall of the large channel permeating the central framework of the NPC and on parts of the nuclear filaments to yield a coherent FG surface. Nuclear transport receptors are assumed to bind to the FG surface at filaments or at the channel entrance and then to rapidly search the FG surface by a two-dimensional random walk for the channel exit where they are released. The passage of neutral molecules is restricted to a narrow tube in the center of the central channel by a loose network of peptide chains. The model features virtual gating, is compatible with but not dependent on FG affinity gradients and tolerates deletions and transpositions of FG motifs. Implications of the model are discussed and tests are suggested.

  10. High-Resolution Imaging Reveals New Features of Nuclear Export of mRNA through the Nuclear Pore Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Kelich

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear envelope (NE of eukaryotic cells provides a physical barrier for messenger RNA (mRNA and the associated proteins (mRNPs traveling from sites of transcription in the nucleus to locations of translation processing in the cytoplasm. Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs embedded in the NE serve as a dominant gateway for nuclear export of mRNA. However, the fundamental characterization of export dynamics of mRNPs through the NPC has been hindered by several technical limits. First, the size of NPC that is barely below the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy requires a super-resolution microscopy imaging approach. Next, the fast transit of mRNPs through the NPC further demands a high temporal resolution by the imaging approach. Finally, the inherent three-dimensional (3D movements of mRNPs through the NPC demand the method to provide a 3D mapping of both transport kinetics and transport pathways of mRNPs. This review will highlight the recently developed super-resolution imaging techniques advanced from 1D to 3D for nuclear export of mRNPs and summarize the new features in the dynamic nuclear export process of mRNPs revealed from these technical advances.

  11. Nuclear distributions of NUP62 and NUP214 suggest architectural diversity and spatial patterning among nuclear pore complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yayoi Kinoshita

    Full Text Available The shape of nuclei in many adherent cultured cells approximates an oblate ellipsoid, with contralateral flattened surfaces facing the culture plate or the medium. Observations of cultured cell nuclei from orthogonal perspectives revealed that nucleoporin p62 (NUP62 and nucleoporin 214 (NUP214 are differentially distributed between nuclear pore complexes on the flattened surfaces and peripheral rim of the nucleus. High resolution stimulated emission depletion (STED immunofluorescence microscopy resolved individual NPCs, and suggested both heterogeneity and microheterogeneity in NUP62 and NUP214 immunolabeling among in NPC populations. Similar to nuclear domains and interphase chromosome territories, architectural diversity and spatial patterning of NPCs may be an intrinsic property of the nucleus that is linked to the functions and organization of underlying chromatin.

  12. Daughter-cell-specific modulation of nuclear pore complexes controls cell cycle entry during asymmetric division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Sharma, Priyanka; Gomar-Alba, Mercè; Shcheprova, Zhanna; Daulny, Anne; Sanmartín, Trinidad; Matucci, Irene; Funaya, Charlotta; Beato, Miguel; Mendoza, Manuel

    2018-04-01

    The acquisition of cellular identity is coupled to changes in the nuclear periphery and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Whether and how these changes determine cell fate remain unclear. We have uncovered a mechanism that regulates NPC acetylation to direct cell fate after asymmetric division in budding yeast. The lysine deacetylase Hos3 associates specifically with daughter cell NPCs during mitosis to delay cell cycle entry (Start). Hos3-dependent deacetylation of nuclear basket and central channel nucleoporins establishes daughter-cell-specific nuclear accumulation of the transcriptional repressor Whi5 during anaphase and perinuclear silencing of the G1/S cyclin gene CLN2 in the following G1 phase. Hos3-dependent coordination of both events restrains Start in daughter, but not in mother, cells. We propose that deacetylation modulates transport-dependent and transport-independent functions of NPCs, leading to differential cell cycle progression in mother and daughter cells. Similar mechanisms might regulate NPC functions in specific cell types and/or cell cycle stages in multicellular organisms.

  13. Domain topology of nucleoporin Nup98 within the nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatel, Guillaume; Desai, Sachin H; Mattheyses, Alexa L; Powers, Maureen A; Fahrenkrog, Birthe

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) facilitate selective transport of macromolecules across the nuclear envelope in interphase eukaryotic cells. NPCs are composed of roughly 30 different proteins (nucleoporins) of which about one third are characterized by the presence of phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeat domains that allow the association of soluble nuclear transport receptors with the NPC. Two types of FG (FG/FxFG and FG/GLFG) domains are found in nucleoporins and Nup98 is the sole vertebrate nucleoporin harboring the GLFG-type repeats. By immuno-electron microscopy using isolated nuclei from Xenopus oocytes we show here the localization of distinct domains of Nup98. We examined the localization of the C- and N-terminal domain of Nup98 by immunogold-labeling using domain-specific antibodies against Nup98 and by expressing epitope tagged versions of Nup98. Our studies revealed that anchorage of Nup98 to NPCs through its C-terminal autoproteolytic domain occurs in the center of the NPC, whereas its N-terminal GLFG domain is more flexible and is detected at multiple locations within the NPC. Additionally, we have confirmed the central localization of Nup98 within the NPC using super resolution structured illumination fluorescence microscopy (SIM) to position Nup98 domains relative to markers of cytoplasmic filaments and the nuclear basket. Our data support the notion that Nup98 is a major determinant of the permeability barrier of NPCs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Three-Dimensional Mapping of mRNA Export through the Nuclear Pore Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Schnell

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The locations of transcription and translation of mRNA in eukaryotic cells are spatially separated by the nuclear envelope (NE. Plenty of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs embedded in the NE function as the major gateway for the export of transcribed mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Whereas the NPC, perhaps one of the largest protein complexes, provides a relatively large channel for macromolecules to selectively pass through it in inherently three-dimensional (3D movements, this channel is nonetheless below the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy. A full understanding of the mRNA export mechanism urgently requires real-time mapping of the 3D dynamics of mRNA in the NPC of live cells with innovative imaging techniques breaking the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy. Recently, super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and single-particle tracking (SPT techniques have been applied to the study of nuclear export of mRNA in live cells. In this review, we emphasize the necessity of 3D mapping techniques in the study of mRNA export, briefly summarize the feasibility of current 3D imaging approaches, and highlight the new features of mRNA nuclear export elucidated with a newly developed 3D imaging approach combining SPT-based super-resolution imaging and 2D-to-3D deconvolution algorithms.

  15. Disruption of the FG nucleoporin NUP98 causes selective changes in nuclear pore complex stoichiometry and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaosheng; Kasper, Lawryn H.; Mantcheva, Ralitsa T.; Mantchev, George T.; Springett, Margaret J.; van Deursen, Jan M. A.

    2001-01-01

    The NUP98 gene encodes precursor proteins that generate two nucleoplasmically oriented nucleoporins, NUP98 and NUP96. By using gene targeting, we have selectively disrupted the murine NUP98 protein, leaving intact the expression and localization of NUP96. We show that NUP98 is essential for mouse gastrulation, a developmental stage that is associated with rapid cell proliferation, but dispensable for basal cell growth. NUP98−/− cells had an intact nuclear envelope with a normal number of embedded nuclear pore complexes. Typically, NUP98-deficient cells contained on average approximately 5-fold more cytoplasmic annulate lamellae than control cells. We found that a set of cytoplasmically oriented nucleoporins, including NUP358, NUP214, NUP88, and p62, assembled inefficiently into nuclear pores of NUP98−/− cells. Instead, these nucleoporins were prominently associated with the annulate lamellae. By contrast, a group of nucleoplasmically oriented nucleoporins, including NUP153, NUP50, NUP96, and NUP93, had no affinity for annulate lamellae and assembled normally into nuclear pores. Mutant pores were significantly impaired in transport receptor-mediated docking of proteins with a nuclear localization signal or M9 import signal and showed weak nuclear import of such substrates. In contrast, the ability of mutant pores to import ribosomal protein L23a and spliceosome protein U1A appeared intact. These observations show that NUP98 disruption selectively impairs discrete protein import pathways and support the idea that transport of distinct import complexes through the nuclear pore complex is mediated by specific subsets of nucleoporins. PMID:11248054

  16. Nuclear pore protein NUP88 activates anaphase-promoting complex to promote aneuploidy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Ryan M.; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Cao, Xiuqi; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex protein NUP88 is frequently elevated in aggressive human cancers and correlates with reduced patient survival; however, it is unclear whether and how NUP88 overexpression drives tumorigenesis. Here, we show that mice overexpressing NUP88 are cancer prone and form intestinal tumors. To determine whether overexpression of NUP88 drives tumorigenesis, we engineered transgenic mice with doxycycline-inducible expression of Nup88. Surprisingly, NUP88 overexpression did not alter global nuclear transport, but was a potent inducer of aneuploidy and chromosomal instability. We determined that NUP88 and the nuclear transport factors NUP98 and RAE1 comprise a regulatory network that inhibits premitotic activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). When overexpressed, NUP88 sequesters NUP98-RAE1 away from APC/CCDH1, triggering proteolysis of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), a tumor suppressor and multitasking mitotic kinase. Premitotic destruction of PLK1 disrupts centrosome separation, causing mitotic spindle asymmetry, merotelic microtubule-kinetochore attachments, lagging chromosomes, and aneuploidy. These effects were replicated by PLK1 insufficiency, indicating that PLK1 is responsible for the mitotic defects associated with NUP88 overexpression. These findings demonstrate that the NUP88-NUP98-RAE1-APC/CCDH1 axis contributes to aneuploidy and suggest that it may be deregulated in the initiating stages of a broad spectrum of human cancers. PMID:26731471

  17. Aberrant distributions of nuclear pore complex proteins in ALS mice and ALS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jingwei; Yamashita, Toru; Nakano, Yumiko; Morihara, Ryuta; Li, Xianghong; Feng, Tian; Liu, Xia; Huang, Yong; Fukui, Yusuke; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Abe, Koji

    2017-05-14

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) play important roles in traffic of molecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm, aberrant distributions of components of NPCs were demonstrated in C9orf72 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (C9-ALS) patients, but it is elusive whether such abnormities are also the case with other cause of ALS disease. In the present study, we investigated the spatiotemporal distributions of RanGAP1 and 4 representative nucleoporins (GP210, NUP205, NUP107 and NUP50) of NPCs in human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase-1 mutation transgenic (SOD1-Tg) mice and sporadic ALS patients. Compared with wild type (WT), these proteins displayed age-dependent and progressive nuclear precipitations, and cytoplasmic aberrant expressions in motor neurons of lumbar cord in SOD1-Tg mice from 10 to 18weeks (W). Double immunofluorescent analysis showed abnormal nuclear retention and apparent co-localizations of RanGAPl with NUP205 and NUP205 with NUPl07, meanwhile, GP210 with NUP205 mainly co-localized in the nuclear envelope (NE) of motor neurons. Furthermore, RanGAP1, GP210 and NUP50 showed similarly abnormal nuclear precipitations and cytoplasmic upregulations in SOD1-Tg mice and ALS patients, moreover, aberrant co-localizations of RanGAP1 with TDP-43 and NUP205 with TDP-43 were also observed in motor neurons. The present study indicated that the mislocalization of these proteins of NPCs may underlie the pathogenesis of ALS both in SOD1-Tg mice and human sporadic ALS patients, and these dysfunctions may be a fundamental pathway for ALS that is not specific only in C9-ALS but also in SOD1-ALS, which may be amenable to pharmacotherapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chromatin-bound nuclear pore components regulate gene expression in higher eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelson, Maya; Liang, Yun; Schulte, Roberta; Mair, William; Wagner, Ulrich; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes have recently been shown to play roles in gene activation, however their potential involvement in metazoan transcription remains unclear. Here we show that the nucleoporins Sec13, Nup98 and Nup88, as well as a group of FG-repeat nucleoporins, bind to the Drosophila genome at functionally distinct loci that often do not represent NE contact sites. While Nup88 localizes to silent loci, Sec13, Nup98 and a subset of FG-repeat nucleoporins bind to developmentally regulated genes undergoing transcription induction. Strikingly, RNAi-mediated knockdown of intranuclear Sec13 and Nup98 specifically inhibits transcription of their target genes and prevents efficient reactivation of transcription after heat shock, suggesting an essential role of NPC components in regulating complex gene expression programs of multicellular organisms. PMID:20144761

  19. AFM visualization of sub-50nm polyplex disposition to the nuclear pore complex without compromising the integrity of the nuclear envelope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helene; Parhamifar, Ladan; Hunter, A Christy

    2016-01-01

    that were microinjected into the oocytes of Xenopus laevis, as an example of a non-dividing cell, is exclusive to the nuclear pore complex (NPC). AFM images show NPCs clogged only with sub-50nm polyplexes. This mode of disposition neither altered the morphology/integrity of the nuclear membrane nor the NPC...

  20. Channel Nucleoporins Recruit PLK-1 to Nuclear Pore Complexes to Direct Nuclear Envelope Breakdown in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Lisa; Morchoisne-Bolhy, Stéphanie; Cheerambathur, Dhanya K; Van Hove, Lucie; Dumont, Julien; Joly, Nicolas; Desai, Arshad; Doye, Valérie; Pintard, Lionel

    2017-10-23

    In animal cells, nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) is required for proper chromosome segregation. Whereas mitotic kinases have been implicated in NEBD, how they coordinate their activity to trigger this event is unclear. Here, we show that both in human cells and Caenorhabditis elegans, the Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK-1) is recruited to the nuclear pore complexes, just prior to NEBD, through its Polo-box domain (PBD). We provide evidence that PLK-1 localization to the nuclear envelope (NE) is required for efficient NEBD. We identify the central channel nucleoporins NPP-1/Nup58, NPP-4/Nup54, and NPP-11/Nup62 as the critical factors anchoring PLK-1 to the NE in C. elegans. In particular, NPP-1, NPP-4, and NPP-11 primed at multiple Polo-docking sites by Cdk1 and PLK-1 itself physically interact with the PLK-1 PBD. We conclude that nucleoporins play an unanticipated regulatory role in NEBD, by recruiting PLK-1 to the NE thereby facilitating phosphorylation of critical downstream targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nuclear routing networks span between nuclear pore complexes and genomic DNA to guide nucleoplasmic trafficking of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecki, Marek; Malecki, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    In health and disease, biomolecules, which are involved in gene expression, recombination, or reprogramming have to traffic through the nucleoplasm, between nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and genomic DNA (gDNA). This trafficking is guided by the recently revealed nuclear routing networks (NRNs). In this study, we aimed to investigate, if the NRNs have established associations with the genomic DNA in situ and if the NRNs have capabilities to bind the DNA de novo. Moreover, we aimed to study further, if nucleoplasmic trafficking of the histones, rRNA, and transgenes’ vectors, between the NPCs and gDNA, is guided by the NRNs. We used Xenopus laevis oocytes as the model system. We engineered the transgenes’ DNA vectors equipped with the SV40 LTA nuclear localization signals (NLS) and/or HIV Rev nuclear export signals (NES). We purified histones, 5S rRNA, and gDNA. We rendered all these molecules superparamagnetic and fluorescent for detection with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The NRNs span between the NPCs and genomic DNA. They form firm bonds with the gDNA in situ. After complete digestion of the nucleic acids with the RNases and DNases, the newly added DNA - modified with the dNTP analogs, bonds firmly to the NRNs. Moreover, the NRNs guide the trafficking of the DNA transgenes’ vectors - modified with the SV40 LTA NLS, following their import into the nuclei through the NPCs. The pathway is identical to that of histones. The NRNs also guide the trafficking of the DNA transgenes’ vectors, modified with the HIV Rev NES, to the NPCs, followed by their export out of the nuclei. Ribosomal RNAs follow the same pathway. To summarize, the NRNs are the structures connecting the NPCs and the gDNA. They guide the trafficking of the biomolecules between the NPCs and the gDNA. PMID:23275893

  2. The nuclear import of ribosomal proteins is regulated by mTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazyken, Dubek; Kaz, Yelimbek; Kiyan, Vladimir; Zhylkibayev, Assylbek A.; Chen, Chien-Hung; Agarwal, Nitin K.; Sarbassov, Dos D.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central component of the essential signaling pathway that regulates cell growth and proliferation by controlling anabolic processes in cells. mTOR exists in two distinct mTOR complexes known as mTORC1 and mTORC2 that reside mostly in cytoplasm. In our study, the biochemical characterization of mTOR led to discovery of its novel localization on nuclear envelope where it associates with a critical regulator of nuclear import Ran Binding Protein 2 (RanBP2). We show that association of mTOR with RanBP2 is dependent on the mTOR kinase activity that regulates the nuclear import of ribosomal proteins. The mTOR kinase inhibitors within thirty minutes caused a substantial decrease of ribosomal proteins in the nuclear but not cytoplasmic fraction. Detection of a nuclear accumulation of the GFP-tagged ribosomal protein rpL7a also indicated its dependence on the mTOR kinase activity. The nuclear abundance of ribosomal proteins was not affected by inhibition of mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1) by rapamycin or deficiency of mTORC2, suggesting a distinctive role of the nuclear envelope mTOR complex in the nuclear import. Thus, we identified that mTOR in association with RanBP2 mediates the active nuclear import of ribosomal proteins. PMID:25294810

  3. Natively Unfolded FG Repeats Stabilize the Structure of the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onischenko, Evgeny; Tang, Jeffrey H; Andersen, Kasper R; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Vallotton, Pascal; Derrer, Carina P; Kralt, Annemarie; Mugler, Christopher F; Chan, Leon Y; Schwartz, Thomas U; Weis, Karsten

    2017-11-02

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are ∼100 MDa transport channels assembled from multiple copies of ∼30 nucleoporins (Nups). One-third of these Nups contain phenylalanine-glycine (FG)-rich repeats, forming a diffusion barrier, which is selectively permeable for nuclear transport receptors that interact with these repeats. Here, we identify an additional function of FG repeats in the structure and biogenesis of the yeast NPC. We demonstrate that GLFG-containing FG repeats directly bind to multiple scaffold Nups in vitro and act as NPC-targeting determinants in vivo. Furthermore, we show that the GLFG repeats of Nup116 function in a redundant manner with Nup188, a nonessential scaffold Nup, to stabilize critical interactions within the NPC scaffold needed for late steps of NPC assembly. Our results reveal a previously unanticipated structural role for natively unfolded GLFG repeats as Velcro to link NPC subcomplexes and thus add a new layer of connections to current models of the NPC architecture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Systematic analysis of barrier-forming FG hydrogels from Xenopus nuclear pore complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labokha, Aksana A; Gradmann, Sabine; Frey, Steffen; Hülsmann, Bastian B; Urlaub, Henning; Baldus, Marc; Görlich, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) control the traffic between cell nucleus and cytoplasm. While facilitating translocation of nuclear transport receptors (NTRs) and NTR·cargo complexes, they suppress passive passage of macromolecules ⩾30 kDa. Previously, we reconstituted the NPC barrier as hydrogels comprising S. cerevisiae FG domains. We now studied FG domains from 10 Xenopus nucleoporins and found that all of them form hydrogels. Related domains with low FG motif density also substantially contribute to the NPC's hydrogel mass. We characterized all these hydrogels and observed the strictest sieving effect for the Nup98-derived hydrogel. It fully blocks entry of GFP-sized inert objects, permits facilitated entry of the small NTR NTF2, but arrests importin β-type NTRs at its surface. O-GlcNAc modification of the Nup98 FG domain prevented this arrest and allowed also large NTR·cargo complexes to enter. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy revealed that the O-GlcNAc-modified Nup98 gel lacks amyloid-like β-structures that dominate the rigid regions in the S. cerevisiae Nsp1 FG hydrogel. This suggests that FG hydrogels can assemble through different structural principles and yet acquire the same NPC-like permeability. PMID:23202855

  5. Insight into structure and assembly of the nuclear pore complex by utilizing the genome of a eukaryotic thermophile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amlacher, Stefan; Sarges, Phillip; Flemming, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the structure and assembly of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which is composed of ~30 nucleoporins (Nups), remain elusive. Here, we report the genome of the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum (ct) and identify the complete repertoire of Nups therein. The the...... of a thermophilic eukaryote for studying complex molecular machines....

  6. Outsourcing the Nucleus: Nuclear Pore Complex Genes are no Longer Encoded in Nucleomorph Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Neumann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear pore complex (NPC facilitates transport between nucleus and cytoplasm. The protein constituents of the NPC, termed nucleoporins (Nups, are conserved across a wide diversity of eukaryotes. In apparent exception to this, no nucleoporin genes have been identified in nucleomorph genomes. Nucleomorphs, nuclear remnants of once free-living eukaryotes, took up residence as secondary endosymbionts in cryptomonad and chlorarachniophyte algae. As these genomes are highly reduced, Nup genes may have been lost, or relocated to the host nucleus. However, Nup genes are often poorly conserved between species, so absence may be an artifact of low sequence similarity. We therefore constructed an evolutionary bioinformatic screen to establish whether the apparent absence of Nup genes in nucleomorph genomes is due to genuine absence or the inability of current methods to detect homologues. We searched green plant (Arabidopsis and rice, green alga (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and red alga (Cyanidioschyzon merolae genomes, plus two nucleomorph genomes (Bigelowiella natans and Guillardia theta with profile hidden Markov models (HMMs from curated alignments of known vertebrate/yeast Nups. Since the plant, algal and nucleomorph genomes all belong to the kingdom Plantae, and are evolutionarily distant from the outgroup (vertebrate/yeast training set, we use the plant and algal genomes as internal positive controls for the sensitivity of the searches in nucleomorph genomes. We fi nd numerous Nup homologues in all plant and free-living algal species, but none in either nucleomorph genome. BLAST searches using identified plant and algal Nups also failed to detect nucleomorph homologues. We conclude that nucleomorph Nup genes have either been lost, being replaced by host Nup genes, or, that nucleomorph Nup genes have been transferred to the host nucleus twice independently; once in the evolution of the red algal nucleomorph and once in the green algal nucleomorph.

  7. Thermodynamics of competitive molecular channel transport: application to artificial nuclear pores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang R Bauer

    Full Text Available In an analytical model channel transport is analyzed as a function of key parameters, determining efficiency and selectivity of particle transport in a competitive molecular environment. These key parameters are the concentration of particles, solvent-channel exchange dynamics, as well as particle-in-channel- and interparticle interaction. These parameters are explicitly related to translocation dynamics and channel occupation probability. Slowing down the exchange dynamics at the channel ends, or elevating the particle concentration reduces the in-channel binding strength necessary to maintain maximum transport. Optimized in-channel interaction may even shift from binding to repulsion. A simple equation gives the interrelation of access dynamics and concentration at this transition point. The model is readily transferred to competitive transport of different species, each of them having their individual in-channel affinity. Combinations of channel affinities are determined which differentially favor selectivity of certain species on the cost of others. Selectivity for a species increases if its in-channel binding enhances the species' translocation probability when compared to that of the other species. Selectivity increases particularly for a wide binding site, long channels, and fast access dynamics. Recent experiments on competitive transport of in-channel binding and inert molecules through artificial nuclear pores serve as a paradigm for our model. It explains qualitatively and quantitatively how binding molecules are favored for transport at the cost of the transport of inert molecules.

  8. Thermodynamics of competitive molecular channel transport: application to artificial nuclear pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Wolfgang R; Nadler, Walter

    2010-12-13

    In an analytical model channel transport is analyzed as a function of key parameters, determining efficiency and selectivity of particle transport in a competitive molecular environment. These key parameters are the concentration of particles, solvent-channel exchange dynamics, as well as particle-in-channel- and interparticle interaction. These parameters are explicitly related to translocation dynamics and channel occupation probability. Slowing down the exchange dynamics at the channel ends, or elevating the particle concentration reduces the in-channel binding strength necessary to maintain maximum transport. Optimized in-channel interaction may even shift from binding to repulsion. A simple equation gives the interrelation of access dynamics and concentration at this transition point. The model is readily transferred to competitive transport of different species, each of them having their individual in-channel affinity. Combinations of channel affinities are determined which differentially favor selectivity of certain species on the cost of others. Selectivity for a species increases if its in-channel binding enhances the species' translocation probability when compared to that of the other species. Selectivity increases particularly for a wide binding site, long channels, and fast access dynamics. Recent experiments on competitive transport of in-channel binding and inert molecules through artificial nuclear pores serve as a paradigm for our model. It explains qualitatively and quantitatively how binding molecules are favored for transport at the cost of the transport of inert molecules.

  9. Membrane-coating lattice scaffolds in the nuclear pore and vesicle coats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leksa, Nina C

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) regulates all traffic between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. It is a large protein assembly composed of multiple copies of ∼30 nucleoporins (nups). Structural studies of the NPC have been limited by its considerable size and complexity. Progress toward understanding the structure of this nanomachine has benefited from its modular nature, which allows for this 40–60 MDa assembly to be broken down into subcomplexes that can be studied individually. While recent work by both crystallographers and electron microscopists has greatly enhanced our model of the NPC, the resolution gap between crystal and EM structures remains too large to confidently place individual proteins within the context of the fully assembled NPC. In an effort to arrive at a veritable model of the NPC, we solved the structure of several scaffold nups and defined the ancestral coatomer element (ACE1) common to a set of nucleoporins and COPII vesicle coat proteins. Subsequently, we proposed a lattice-like model of the NPC, analogous to the COPII lattice, in which ACE1 proteins form the edge elements and β-propellers form the vertex elements. Here, we review our recent studies, speculate on how interactions between subcomplexes of the NPC are mediated, and outline the steps and challenges that lay ahead on the path to understanding this enormous assembly in molecular detail. PMID:21327078

  10. Heart failure induces significant changes in nuclear pore complex of human cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía Tarazón

    Full Text Available AIMS: The objectives of this study were to analyse the effect of heart failure (HF on several proteins of nuclear pore complex (NPC and their relationship with the human ventricular function. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 88 human heart samples from ischemic (ICM, n = 52 and dilated (DCM, n = 36 patients undergoing heart transplant and control donors (CNT, n = 9 were analyzed by Western blot. Subcellular distribution of nucleoporins was analysed by fluorescence and immunocytochemistry. When we compared protein levels according to etiology, ICM showed significant higher levels of NDC1 (65%, p<0.0001, Nup160 (88%, p<0.0001 and Nup153 (137%, p = 0.004 than those of the CNT levels. Furthermore, DCM group showed significant differences for NDC1 (41%, p<0.0001, Nup160 (65%, p<0.0001, Nup153 (155%, p = 0.006 and Nup93 (88%, p<0.0001 compared with CNT. However, Nup155 and translocated promoter region (TPR did not show significant differences in their levels in any etiology. Regarding the distribution of these proteins in cell nucleus, only NDC1 showed differences in HF. In addition, in the pathological group we obtained good relationship between the ventricular function parameters (LVEDD and LVESD and Nup160 (r = -0382, p = 0.004; r = -0.290, p = 0.033; respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows alterations in specific proteins (NDC1, Nup160, Nup153 and Nup93 that compose NPC in ischaemic and dilated human heart. These changes, related to ventricular function, could be accompanied by alterations in the nucleocytoplasmic transport. Therefore, our findings may be the basis for a new approach to HF management.

  11. SU-E-J-61: Electrodynamics and Nano-Scale Fluid Dynamics in Protein Localization of Nuclear Pore Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, J; Gatenby, R [Moffitt Cancer Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a simulation to catalyze a reevaluation of common assumptions about 3 dimensional diffusive processes and help cell biologists gain a more nuanced, intuitive understanding of the true physical hurdles of protein signaling cascades. Furthermore, to discuss the possibility of intracellular electrodynamics as a critical, unrecognized component of cellular biology and protein dynamics that is necessary for optimal information flow from the cell membrane to the nucleus. Methods: The Unity 3D gaming physics engine was used to build an accurate virtual scale model of the cytoplasm within a few hundred nanometers of the nuclear membrane. A cloud of simulated pERK proteins is controlled by the physics simulation, where diffusion is based on experimentally measured values and the electrodynamics are based on theoretical nano-fluid dynamics. The trajectories of pERK within the cytoplasm and through the 1250 nuclear pores on the nuclear surface is recorded and analyzed. Results: The simulation quickly demonstrates that pERKs moving solely by diffusion will rarely locate and come within capture distance of a nuclear pore. The addition of intracellular electrodynamics between charges on the nuclear pore complexes and on pERKs increases the number of successful translocations by allowing the electro-physical attractive effects to draw in pERKs from the cytoplasm. The effects of changes in intracellular shielding ion concentrations allowed for estimation of the “capture radius” under varying conditions. Conclusion: The simulation allows a shift in perspective that is paramount in attempting to communicate the scale and dynamics of intracellular protein cascade mechanics. This work has allowed researchers to more fully understand the parameters involved in intracellular electrodynamics, such as shielding anion concentration and protein charge. As these effects are still far below the spatial resolution of currently available measurement technology this

  12. Structures of the autoproteolytic domain from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear pore complex component, Nup145

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Ozyurt, Sinem A.; Do, Johnny; Bain, Kevin T.; Dickey, Mark; Rodgers, Logan A.; Gheyi, Tarun; Sali, Andrej; Kim, Seung Joong; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Martel, Anne; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K. (SLAC); (Rockefeller); (UCSF); (Lilly)

    2012-04-30

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large, octagonally symmetric dynamic macromolecular assemblies responsible for exchange of proteins and RNAs between the nucleus and cytoplasm. NPCs are made up of at least 456 polypeptides from {approx}30 distinct nucleoporins. Several of these components, sharing similar structural motifs, form stable subcomplexes that form a coaxial structure containing two outer rings (the nuclear and cytoplasmic rings), two inner rings, and a membrane ring. The yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Nup145 and its human counterpart are unique among the nucleoporins, in that they undergo autoproteolysis to generate functionally distinct proteins. The human counterpart of Nup145 is expressed as two alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts. The larger 190 kDa precursor undergoes post-translational autoproteolysis at the Phe863-Ser864 peptide bond yielding the 92 kDa Nup98 and the 96 kDa Nup96. The smaller 98 kDa precursor is also autoproteolysed at an analogous site giving 92 kDa Nup98-N and a 6 kDa C-terminal fragment, which may form a noncovalent complex. The yeast Nup145 precursor [Fig. 1(A)] contains twelve repeats of a 'GLFG' peptide motif (FG repeats) at its N-terminus, an internal autoproteolytic domain (a region of high conservation with the homologous yeast nucleoporins Nup110 and Nup116, neither of which undergo autoproteolysis), followed by the C-terminal domain. Various forms of the FG repeats are present in nearly half of all nucleoporins; they form intrinsically disordered regions implicated in gating mechanisms that control passage of macromolecules through NPCs. Nup145 undergoes autoproteolysis at the Phe605-Ser606 peptide bond to generate two functionally distinct proteins, Nup145N and Nup145C. Subsequently, Nup145C associates with six other proteins to form the heptameric Y-complex, a component of the outer rings of the NPC. Nup145N, on the other hand, can shuttle between the NPC and the nuclear interior. It has been suggested

  13. Early localization of NPA58, a rat nuclear pore-associated protein

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have studied the mitotic reassembly of the nuclear envelope, using antibodies to nuclear marker proteins and NPA58 in F-111 rat fibroblast cells. In earlier studies we have proposed that NPA58, a 58 kDa rat nuclear protein, is involved in nuclear protein import. In this report, NPA58 is shown to be localized on the ...

  14. Nup98 FG domains from diverse species spontaneously phase-separate into particles with nuclear pore-like permselectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hermann Broder; Görlich, Dirk

    2015-01-06

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) conduct massive transport mediated by shuttling nuclear transport receptors (NTRs), while keeping nuclear and cytoplasmic contents separated. The NPC barrier in Xenopus relies primarily on the intrinsically disordered FG domain of Nup98. We now observed that Nup98 FG domains of mammals, lancelets, insects, nematodes, fungi, plants, amoebas, ciliates, and excavates spontaneously and rapidly phase-separate from dilute (submicromolar) aqueous solutions into characteristic 'FG particles'. This required neither sophisticated experimental conditions nor auxiliary eukaryotic factors. Instead, it occurred already during FG domain expression in bacteria. All Nup98 FG phases rejected inert macromolecules and yet allowed far larger NTR cargo complexes to rapidly enter. They even recapitulated the observations that large cargo-domains counteract NPC passage of NTR⋅cargo complexes, while cargo shielding and increased NTR⋅cargo surface-ratios override this inhibition. Their exquisite NPC-typical sorting selectivity and strong intrinsic assembly propensity suggest that Nup98 FG phases can form in authentic NPCs and indeed account for the permeability properties of the pore.

  15. Nucleoporin's Like Charge Regions Are Major Regulators of FG Coverage and Dynamics Inside the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyro, Mohaddeseh; Soheilypour, Mohammad; Ghavami, Ali; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2015-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic transport has been the subject of a large body of research in the past few decades. Recently, the focus of investigations in this field has shifted from studies of the overall function of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) to the examination of the role of different domains of phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporin (FG Nup) sequences on the NPC function. In our recent bioinformatics study, we showed that FG Nups have some evolutionarily conserved sequence-based features that might govern their physical behavior inside the NPC. We proposed the 'like charge regions' (LCRs), sequences of charged residues with only one type of charge, as one of the features that play a significant role in the formation of FG network inside the central channel. In this study, we further explore the role of LCRs in the distribution of FG Nups, using a recently developed coarse-grained molecular dynamics model. Our results demonstrate how LCRs affect the formation of two transport pathways. While some FG Nups locate their FG network at the center of the NPC forming a homogeneous meshwork of FG repeats, other FG Nups cover the space adjacent to the NPC wall. LCRs in the former group, i.e. FG Nups that form an FG domain at the center, tend to regulate the size of the highly dense, doughnut-shaped FG meshwork and leave a small low FG density area at the center of the pore for passive diffusion. On the other hand, LCRs in the latter group of FG Nups enable them to maximize their interactions and cover a larger space inside the NPC to increase its capability to transport numerous cargos at the same time. Finally, a new viewpoint is proposed that reconciles different models for the nuclear pore selective barrier function.

  16. Nucleoporin's Like Charge Regions Are Major Regulators of FG Coverage and Dynamics Inside the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohaddeseh Peyro

    Full Text Available Nucleocytoplasmic transport has been the subject of a large body of research in the past few decades. Recently, the focus of investigations in this field has shifted from studies of the overall function of the nuclear pore complex (NPC to the examination of the role of different domains of phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporin (FG Nup sequences on the NPC function. In our recent bioinformatics study, we showed that FG Nups have some evolutionarily conserved sequence-based features that might govern their physical behavior inside the NPC. We proposed the 'like charge regions' (LCRs, sequences of charged residues with only one type of charge, as one of the features that play a significant role in the formation of FG network inside the central channel. In this study, we further explore the role of LCRs in the distribution of FG Nups, using a recently developed coarse-grained molecular dynamics model. Our results demonstrate how LCRs affect the formation of two transport pathways. While some FG Nups locate their FG network at the center of the NPC forming a homogeneous meshwork of FG repeats, other FG Nups cover the space adjacent to the NPC wall. LCRs in the former group, i.e. FG Nups that form an FG domain at the center, tend to regulate the size of the highly dense, doughnut-shaped FG meshwork and leave a small low FG density area at the center of the pore for passive diffusion. On the other hand, LCRs in the latter group of FG Nups enable them to maximize their interactions and cover a larger space inside the NPC to increase its capability to transport numerous cargos at the same time. Finally, a new viewpoint is proposed that reconciles different models for the nuclear pore selective barrier function.

  17. Nuclear pore complex evolution: a trypanosome Mlp analogue functions in chromosomal segregation but lacks transcriptional barrier activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Jennifer M; Koreny, Ludek; Obado, Samson; Ratushny, Alexander V; Chen, Wei-Ming; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Kelly, Steven; Chait, Brian T; Aitchison, John D; Rout, Michael P; Field, Mark C

    2014-05-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) has dual roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport and chromatin organization. In many eukaryotes the coiled-coil Mlp/Tpr proteins of the NPC nuclear basket have specific functions in interactions with chromatin and defining specialized regions of active transcription, whereas Mlp2 associates with the mitotic spindle/NPC in a cell cycle-dependent manner. We previously identified two putative Mlp-related proteins in African trypanosomes, TbNup110 and TbNup92, the latter of which associates with the spindle. We now provide evidence for independent ancestry for TbNup92/TbNup110 and Mlp/Tpr proteins. However, TbNup92 is required for correct chromosome segregation, with knockout cells exhibiting microaneuploidy and lowered fidelity of telomere segregation. Further, TbNup92 is intimately associated with the mitotic spindle and spindle anchor site but apparently has minimal roles in control of gene transcription, indicating that TbNup92 lacks major barrier activity. TbNup92 therefore acts as a functional analogue of Mlp/Tpr proteins, and, together with the lamina analogue NUP-1, represents a cohort of novel proteins operating at the nuclear periphery of trypanosomes, uncovering complex evolutionary trajectories for the NPC and nuclear lamina.

  18. Venezuelan equine Encephalitis virus capsid protein forms a tetrameric complex with CRM1 and importin alpha/beta that obstructs nuclear pore complex function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atasheva, Svetlana; Fish, Alexander; Fornerod, Maarten; Frolova, Elena I

    2010-05-01

    Development of the cellular antiviral response requires nuclear translocation of multiple transcription factors and activation of a wide variety of cellular genes. To counteract the antiviral response, several viruses have developed an efficient means of inhibiting nucleocytoplasmic traffic. In this study, we demonstrate that the pathogenic strain of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) has developed a unique mechanism of nuclear import inhibition. Its capsid protein forms a tetrameric complex with the nuclear export receptor CRM1 and the nuclear import receptor importin alpha/beta. This unusual complex accumulates in the center channel of the nuclear pores and blocks nuclear import mediated by different karyopherins. The inhibitory function of VEEV capsid protein is determined by a short 39-amino-acid-long peptide that contains both nuclear import and supraphysiological nuclear export signals. Mutations in these signals or in the linker peptide attenuate or completely abolish capsid-specific inhibition of nuclear traffic. The less pathogenic VEEV strains contain a wide variety of mutations in this peptide that affect its inhibitory function in nuclear import. Thus, these mutations appear to be the determinants of this attenuated phenotype. This novel mechanism of inhibiting nuclear transport also shows that the nuclear pore complex is vulnerable to unusual cargo receptor complexes and sheds light on the importance of finely adjusted karyopherin-nucleoporin interactions for efficient cargo translocation.

  19. Biallelic Mutations in Nuclear Pore Complex Subunit NUP107 Cause Early-Childhood-Onset Steroid-Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Noriko; Tsukaguchi, Hiroyasu; Koshimizu, Eriko; Shono, Akemi; Matsunaga, Satoko; Shiina, Masaaki; Mimura, Yasuhiro; Imamura, Shintaro; Hirose, Tomonori; Okudela, Koji; Nozu, Kandai; Akioka, Yuko; Hattori, Motoshi; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Kitamura, Akiko; Cheong, Hae Il; Kagami, Shoji; Yamashita, Michiaki; Fujita, Atsushi; Miyatake, Satoko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Ohashi, Kenichi; Imamoto, Naoko; Ryo, Akihide; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Iijima, Kazumoto; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2015-10-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a huge protein complex embedded in the nuclear envelope. It has central functions in nucleocytoplasmic transport, nuclear framework, and gene regulation. Nucleoporin 107 kDa (NUP107) is a component of the NPC central scaffold and is an essential protein in all eukaryotic cells. Here, we report on biallelic NUP107 mutations in nine affected individuals who are from five unrelated families and show early-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). These individuals have pathologically focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, a condition that leads to end-stage renal disease with high frequency. NUP107 is ubiquitously expressed, including in glomerular podocytes. Three of four NUP107 mutations detected in the affected individuals hamper NUP107 binding to NUP133 (nucleoporin 133 kDa) and NUP107 incorporation into NPCs in vitro. Zebrafish with nup107 knockdown generated by morpholino oligonucleotides displayed hypoplastic glomerulus structures and abnormal podocyte foot processes, thereby mimicking the pathological changes seen in the kidneys of the SRNS individuals with NUP107 mutations. Considering the unique properties of the podocyte (highly differentiated foot-process architecture and slit membrane and the inability to regenerate), we propose a "podocyte-injury model" as the pathomechanism for SRNS due to biallelic NUP107 mutations. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural and functional analysis of an essential nucleoporin heterotrimer on the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Kimihisa; Seo, Hyuk-Soo; Debler, Erik W.; Blobel, Günter; Hoelz, André (Rockefeller)

    2012-07-25

    So far, only a few of the interactions between the {approx}30 nucleoporins comprising the modular structure of the nuclear pore complex have been defined at atomic resolution. Here we report the crystal structure, at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution, of a heterotrimeric complex, composed of fragments of three cytoplasmically oriented nucleoporins of yeast: Nup82, Nup116, and Nup159. Our data show that the Nup82 fragment, representing more than the N-terminal half of the molecule, folds into an extensively decorated, seven-bladed {beta}-propeller that forms the centerpiece of this heterotrimeric complex and anchors both a C-terminal fragment of Nup116 and the C-terminal tail of Nup159. Binding between Nup116 and Nup82 is mutually reinforced via two loops, one emanating from the Nup82 {beta}-propeller and the other one from the {beta}-sandwich fold of Nup116, each contacting binding pockets in their counterparts. The Nup82-Nup159 interaction occurs through an amphipathic {alpha}-helix of Nup159, which is cradled in a large hydrophobic groove that is generated from several large surface decorations of the Nup82 {beta}-propeller. Although Nup159 and Nup116 fragments bind to the Nup82 {beta}-propeller in close vicinity, there are no direct contacts between them, consistent with the noncooperative binding that was detected biochemically. Extensive mutagenesis delineated hot-spot residues for these interactions. We also showed that the Nup82 {beta}-propeller binds to other yeast Nup116 family members, Nup145N, Nup100 and to the mammalian homolog, Nup98. Notably, each of the three nucleoporins contains additional nuclear pore complex binding sites, distinct from those that were defined here in the heterotrimeric Nup82 {center_dot} Nup159 {center_dot} Nup116 complex.

  1. Early localization of NPA58, a rat nuclear pore-associated protein, to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    to the reforming nuclear envelope during mitosis. RADHIKA GANESHAN, NANDINI RANGARAJ and VEENA K PARNAIK*. Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500 007, India. *Corresponding author (Fax, + 91-40-7171195; Email, veenap@ccmb.ap.nic.in). We have studied the mitotic ...

  2. Atomic structure of the nuclear pore complex targeting domain of a Nup116 homologue from the yeast, Candida glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Manglicmot, Danalyn; Bain, Kevin T.; Gilmore, Jeremiah; Gheyi, Tarun; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J. Michael; Almo, Steven C.; Burley, Stephen K. (Einstein); (SLAC); (Rockefeller); (UCSF); (Lilly)

    2012-10-23

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), embedded in the nuclear envelope, is a large, dynamic molecular assembly that facilitates exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The yeast NPC is an eightfold symmetric annular structure composed of {approx}456 polypeptide chains contributed by {approx}30 distinct proteins termed nucleoporins. Nup116, identified only in fungi, plays a central role in both protein import and mRNA export through the NPC. Nup116 is a modular protein with N-terminal 'FG' repeats containing a Gle2p-binding sequence motif and a NPC targeting domain at its C-terminus. We report the crystal structure of the NPC targeting domain of Candida glabrata Nup116, consisting of residues 882-1034 [CgNup116(882-1034)], at 1.94 {angstrom} resolution. The X-ray structure of CgNup116(882-1034) is consistent with the molecular envelope determined in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering. Structural similarities of CgNup116(882-1034) with homologous domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup116, S. cerevisiae Nup145N, and human Nup98 are discussed.

  3. Molecular basis for the anchoring of proto-oncoprotein Nup98 to the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuwe, Tobias; von Borzyskowski, Lennart Schada; Davenport, Andrew M; Hoelz, André

    2012-06-22

    The cytoplasmic filament nucleoporins of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) are critically involved in nuclear export and remodeling of mRNA ribonucleoprotein particles and are associated with various human malignancies. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Nup98 C-terminal autoproteolytic domain, frequently missing from leukemogenic forms of the protein, in complex with the N-terminal domain of Nup82 and the C-terminal tail fragment of Nup159. The Nup82 β propeller serves as a noncooperative binding platform for both binding partners. Interaction of Nup98 with Nup82 occurs through a reciprocal exchange of loop structures. Strikingly, the same Nup98 groove promiscuously interacts with Nup82 and Nup96 in a mutually excusive fashion. Simultaneous disruption of both Nup82 interactions in yeast causes severe defects in mRNA export, while the severing of a single interaction is tolerated. Thus, the cytoplasmic filament network of the NPC is robust, consistent with its essential function in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Super-resolution imaging visualizes the eightfold symmetry of gp210 proteins around the nuclear pore complex and resolves the central channel with nanometer resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löschberger, A.; Van de Linde, S.; Debauvalle, M.C.; Rieger, B.; Heilemann, M.; Krohne, G.; Sauer, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most complex molecular machines of cells is the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which controls all trafficking of molecules in and out of the nucleus. Because of their importance for cellular processes such as gene expression and cytoskeleton organization, the structure of NPCs has been

  5. B-type nuclear lamin and the nuclear pore complex Nup107-160 influences maintenance of the spindle envelope required for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Hayashi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In higher eukaryotes, nuclear envelope (NE disassembly allows chromatin to condense and spindle microtubules to access kinetochores. The nuclear lamina, which strengthens the NE, is composed of a polymer meshwork made of A- and B-type lamins. We found that the B-type lamin (Lam is not fully disassembled and continues to localize along the spindle envelope structure during Drosophila male meiosis I, while the A-type lamin (LamC is completely dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. Among the nuclear pore complex proteins, Nup107 co-localized with Lam during this meiotic division. Surprisingly, Lam depletion resulted in a higher frequency of cytokinesis failure in male meiosis. We also observed the similar meiotic phenotype in Nup107-depleted cells. Abnormal localization of Lam was found in the Nup-depleted cells at premeiotic and meiotic stages. The central spindle microtubules became abnormal and recruitment of a contractile ring component to the cleavage sites was disrupted in Lam-depleted cells and Nup107-depleted cells. Therefore, we speculate that both proteins are required for a reinforcement of the spindle envelope, which supports the formation of central spindle microtubules essential for cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiosis.

  6. Deguelin regulates nuclear pore complex proteins Nup98 and Nup88 in U937 cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-li; Chen, Yan; Cui, Guo-hui; Wu, Qiu-ling; He, Jing; Chen, Wei-hua; Zhou, Jian-feng

    2005-10-01

    To investigate the anticancer effects and the molecular mechanisms of deguelin on human U937 leukemia cells, and to explore the underlying mechanism regulating nucleoporin 98 (Nup98) and nucleoporin 88 (Nup88) in vitro. The effects of deguelin on the growth of U937 cells were studied by MTT assay. The effect of deguelin on the cell cycle of U937 cells was studied by using a propidium iodide method. The localization of the nuclear pore complex proteins Nup98 and Nup88 was investigated by using immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. The expression of Nup98 and Nup88 in U937 cells was investigated by using flow cytometry and Western blot. The proliferation of U937 cells was inhibited in the deguelin-treated group, with a 24-h IC(50) value of 21.61 nmol/L and a 36-h IC(50) value of 17.07 nmol/L. U937 cells treated with deguelin had reduced percentages of cells in the G(0)/G(1) phase, whereas cells accumulated in the S and G(2)/M phases. Nup88 and Nup98 were found on both the nuclear and cytoplasmic sides of the U937 cells by using immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. The expression of Nup98 was upregulated and that of the Nup88 protein was downregulated in U937 cells treated with deguelin. Deguelin is able to inhibit the proliferation of U937 cells by regulating the cell cycle such that cells are arrested at the S and G(2)/M phases, so that the proportion of cells in the G(0)/G(1) phase decreases. The antitumor effects of deguelin are related to upregulating the expression of Nup98 and downregulating the expression of Nup88 protein in U937 cells.

  7. Analysis of Lotus japonicus nuclear pore NUP107-160 subcomplex mutants reveals pronounced structural plasticity and functional redundancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eBinder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the Lotus japonicus nucleoporin genes, NUP85, NUP133 and NENA (SEH1, lead to defects in plant-microbe symbiotic signaling. The homologous proteins in yeast and vertebrates are part of the conserved NUP84/NUP107-160 sub-complex, which is an essential component of the nuclear pore scaffold and has a pivotal role in NPC assembly. Loss and down-regulation of NUP84/NUP107-160 members has previously been correlated with a variety of growth and molecular defects, however, in L. japonicus only surprisingly specific phenotypes have been reported. We investigated whether Lotus nup85, nup133 and nena mutants exhibit general defects in NPC composition and distribution. Whole mount immunofluorescence confirmed a typical nucleoporin-like localization for NUP133, which was unchanged in the nup85-1 mutant. Severe NPC clustering and aberrations in the nuclear envelope have been reported for Saccharomyces cerevisiae nup85 and nup133 mutants. However, upon transmission electron microscopy analysis, we did not detect any significant changes in L. japonicus nup85 and nena, and only a slight reduction in the average distances between neighboring NPCs in nup133. Using quantitative immunodetection on protein-blots we observed that loss of individual nucleoporins affected the protein levels of other NUP107-160 complex members. Unlike the single mutants, nup85/nup133 double mutants exhibited severe temperature dependent growth and developmental defects, suggesting that the loss of more than one NUP107-160 member affects basal functions of the NPC.

  8. Evolutionarily Conserved Sequence Features Regulate the Formation of the FG Network at the Center of the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyro, M; Soheilypour, M; Lee, B L; Mofrad, M R K

    2015-11-06

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is the portal for bidirectional transportation of cargos between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. While most of the structural elements of the NPC, i.e. nucleoporins (Nups), are well characterized, the exact transport mechanism is still under much debate. Many of the functional Nups are rich in phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats and are believed to play the key role in nucleocytoplasmic transport. We present a bioinformatics study conducted on more than a thousand FG Nups across 252 species. Our results reveal the regulatory role of polar residues and specific sequences of charged residues, named 'like charge regions' (LCRs), in the formation of the FG network at the center of the NPC. Positively charged LCRs prepare the environment for negatively charged cargo complexes and regulate the size of the FG network. The low number density of charged residues in these regions prevents FG domains from forming a relaxed coil structure. Our results highlight the significant role of polar interactions in FG network formation at the center of the NPC and demonstrate that the specific localization of LCRs, FG motifs, charged, and polar residues regulate the formation of the FG network at the center of the NPC.

  9. NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion is required for nuclear envelope formation and completion of nuclear pore complex assembly in Xenopus laevis egg extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Tina; Ramadan, Kristijan; Schlundt, Andreas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Meyer, Hemmo H

    2007-08-15

    Despite the progress in understanding nuclear envelope (NE) reformation after mitosis, it has remained unclear what drives the required membrane fusion and how exactly this is coordinated with nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. Here, we show that, like other intracellular fusion reactions, NE fusion in Xenopus laevis egg extracts is mediated by SNARE proteins that require activation by NSF. Antibodies against Xenopus NSF, depletion of NSF or the dominant-negative NSF(E329Q) variant specifically inhibited NE formation. Staging experiments further revealed that NSF was required until sealing of the envelope was completed. Moreover, excess exogenous alpha-SNAP that blocks SNARE function prevented membrane fusion and caused accumulation of non-flattened vesicles on the chromatin surface. Under these conditions, the nucleoporins Nup107 and gp210 were fully recruited, whereas assembly of FxFG-repeat-containing nucleoporins was blocked. Together, we define NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events as essential steps during NE formation downstream of Nup107 recruitment, and upstream of membrane flattening and completion of NPC assembly.

  10. The C Terminus of the Herpes Simplex Virus UL25 Protein Is Required for Release of Viral Genomes from Capsids Bound to Nuclear Pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Jamie B; Daniel, Gina R; Falck-Pedersen, Erik; Huet, Alexis; Smith, Greg A; Conway, James F; Homa, Fred L

    2017-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) capsid is released into the cytoplasm after fusion of viral and host membranes, whereupon dynein-dependent trafficking along microtubules targets it to the nuclear envelope. Binding of the capsid to the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is mediated by the capsid protein pUL25 and the capsid-tethered tegument protein pUL36. Temperature-sensitive mutants in both pUL25 and pUL36 dock at the NPC but fail to release DNA. The uncoating reaction has been difficult to study due to the rapid release of the genome once the capsid interacts with the nuclear pore. In this study, we describe the isolation and characterization of a truncation mutant of pUL25. Live-cell imaging and immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that the mutant was not impaired in penetration of the host cell or in trafficking of the capsid to the nuclear membrane. However, expression of viral proteins was absent or significantly delayed in cells infected with the pUL25 mutant virus. Transmission electron microscopy revealed capsids accumulated at nuclear pores that retained the viral genome for at least 4 h postinfection. In addition, cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstructions of virion capsids did not detect any obvious differences in the location or structural organization for the pUL25 or pUL36 proteins on the pUL25 mutant capsids. Further, in contrast to wild-type virus, the antiviral response mediated by the viral DNA-sensing cyclic guanine adenine synthase (cGAS) was severely compromised for the pUL25 mutant. These results demonstrate that the pUL25 capsid protein has a critical role in releasing viral DNA from NPC-bound capsids. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is the causative agent of several pathologies ranging in severity from the common cold sore to life-threatening encephalitic infection. Early steps in infection include release of the capsid into the cytoplasm, docking of the capsid at a nuclear pore, and release of the viral genome into the nucleus

  11. Hydrogen solubility in pore water of partially saturated argillites: Application to Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock in the context of a nuclear waste geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassin, A.; Dymitrowska, M.; Azaroual, M.

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear waste geological disposals, large amounts of hydrogen (H 2 ) are expected to be produced by different (bio-)geochemical processes. Depending on the pressure generated by such a process, H 2 could be produced as a gas phase and displace the neighbouring pore water. As a consequence, a water-unsaturated zone could be created around the waste and possibly affect the physical and physic-chemical properties of the disposal and the excavation disturbed zone around it. The present study is the first part of an ongoing research program aimed at evaluating the possible chemical evolution of the pore water-minerals-gas system in such a context. The goal of this study was to evaluate, in terms of thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, the geochemical disturbance of the pore water due to variations in hydrogen pressure, temperature and relative humidity. No heterogeneous reactions involving mineral phases of the clay-rock or reactive surface sites were taken into account in the thermodynamic analysis. In the case sulphate reduction reaction is allowed, geochemical modelling results indicate that the main disturbance is the increase in pH (from around 7 up to more than 10) and an important decrease in the redox potential (Eh) related to hydrogen dissolution. This occurs from relatively low H 2 partial pressures (∼1 bar and above). Then, temperature and relative humidity (expressed in terms of capillary pressure) further displace the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, namely the pH and the aqueous speciation as well as saturation indices of mineral phases. Finally, the results suggest that the generation of hydrogen, combined with an increase in temperature (between 30 deg. C and 80 deg. C) and a decrease in relative humidity (from 100% to 30%), should increase the chemical reactivity of the pore water-rock-gas system. (authors)

  12. RAE1 Is a Shuttling mRNA Export Factor That Binds to a GLEBS-like NUP98 Motif at the Nuclear Pore Complex through Multiple Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Colin E.J.; Fornerod, Maarten; Kasper, Lawryn H.; van Deursen, Jan M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Gle2p is implicated in nuclear export of poly(A)+ RNA and nuclear pore complex (NPC) structure and distribution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Gle2p is anchored at the nuclear envelope (NE) via a short Gle2p-binding motif within Nup116p called GLEBS. The molecular mechanism by which Gle2p and the Gle2p–Nup116p interaction function in mRNA export is unknown. Here we show that RAE1, the mammalian homologue of Gle2p, binds to a GLEBS-like NUP98 motif at the NPC through multiple domains that include WD-repeats and a COOH-terminal non–WD-repeat extension. This interaction is direct, as evidenced by in vitro binding studies and chemical cross-linking. Microinjection experiments performed in Xenopus laevis oocytes demonstrate that RAE1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and is exported from the nucleus in a temperature-dependent and RanGTP-independent manner. Docking of RAE1 to the NE is highly dependent on new mRNA synthesis. Overexpression of the GLEBS-like motif also inhibits NE binding of RAE1 and induces nuclear accumulation of poly(A)+ RNA. Both effects are abrogated either by the introduction of point mutations in the GLEBS-like motif or by overexpression of RAE1, indicating a direct role for RAE1 and the NUP98–RAE1 interaction in mRNA export. Together, our data suggest that RAE1 is a shuttling transport factor that directly contributes to nuclear export of mRNAs through its ability to anchor to a specific NUP98 motif at the NPC. PMID:10209021

  13. Quantitative mineralogy and preliminary pore-water chemistry of candidate buffer and backfill materials for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigley, R.M.

    1984-07-01

    The quantitative mineralogy of seven candidate buffer and backfill materials for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault is presented. Two of the materials were coarse grained: one a blended very pure silica sand, and the other a crushed plagioclase-rich granite or granodiorite. Five materials were fine-grained soils containing abundant clay minerals. Of these, three were fairly pure, Cretaceous, ash-derived bentonites that contained up to 3 percent of soluble sulphates; one was a freshwater glacial clay containing 59 percent interlayered smectite-illite; and one was a crushed Paleozoic shale containing abundant illite and chlorite. The adsorbed cation regimes and the pore-water chemistry of the clays are discussed

  14. Super-resolution imaging visualizes the eightfold symmetry of gp210 proteins around the nuclear pore complex and resolves the central channel with nanometer resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löschberger, Anna; van de Linde, Sebastian; Dabauvalle, Marie-Christine; Rieger, Bernd; Heilemann, Mike; Krohne, Georg; Sauer, Markus

    2012-02-01

    One of the most complex molecular machines of cells is the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which controls all trafficking of molecules in and out of the nucleus. Because of their importance for cellular processes such as gene expression and cytoskeleton organization, the structure of NPCs has been studied extensively during the last few decades, mainly by electron microscopy. We have used super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) to investigate the structure of NPCs in isolated Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclear envelopes, with a lateral resolution of ~15 nm. By generating accumulated super-resolved images of hundreds of NPCs we determined the diameter of the central NPC channel to be 41 ± 7 nm and demonstrate that the integral membrane protein gp210 is distributed in an eightfold radial symmetry. Two-color dSTORM experiments emphasize the highly symmetric NPCs as ideal model structures to control the quality of corrections to chromatic aberration and to test the capability and reliability of super-resolution imaging methods.

  15. Phosphomimetic mutation of the mitotically phosphorylated serine 1880 compromises the interaction of the transmembrane nucleoporin gp210 with the nuclear pore complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onischenko, Evgeny A.; Crafoord, Ellinor; Hallberg, Einar

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) reversibly disassemble and reassemble during mitosis. Disassembly of the NPC is accompanied by phosphorylation of many nucleoporins although the function of this is not clear. It was previously shown that in the transmembrane nucleoporin gp210 a single serine residue at position 1880 is specifically phosphorylated during mitosis. Using amino acid substitution combined with live cell imaging, time-lapse microscopy and FRAP, we investigated the role of serine 1880 in binding of gp210 to the NPC in vivo. An alanine substitution mutant (S1880A) was significantly more dynamic at the NPC compared to the wild-type protein, suggesting that serine 1880 is important for binding of gp210 to the NPC. Moreover a glutamate substitution (S1880E) closely mimicking phosphorylated serine specifically interfered with incorporation of gp210 into the NPC and compromised its post-mitotic recruitment to the nuclear envelope of daughter nuclei. Our findings are consistent with the idea that mitotic phosphorylation acts to dissociate gp210 from the structural elements of the NPC

  16. SUMO modification through rapamycin-mediated heterodimerization reveals a dual role for Ubc9 in targeting RanGAP1 to nuclear pore complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shanshan; Zhang Hong; Matunis, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    SUMOs (small ubiquitin-related modifiers) are eukaryotic proteins that are covalently conjugated to other proteins and thereby regulate a wide range of important cellular processes. The molecular mechanisms by which SUMO modification influences the functions of most target proteins and cellular processes, however, remain poorly defined. A major obstacle to investigating the effects of SUMO modification is the availability of a system for selectively inducing the modification or demodification of an individual protein. To address this problem, we have developed a procedure using the rapamycin heterodimerizer system. This procedure involves co-expression of rapamycin-binding domain fusion proteins of SUMO and candidate SUMO substrates in living cells. Treating cells with rapamycin induces a tight association between SUMO and a single SUMO substrate, thereby allowing specific downstream effects to be analyzed. Using RanGAP1 as a model SUMO substrate, the heterodimerizer system was used to investigate the molecular mechanism by which SUMO modification targets RanGAP1 from the cytoplasm to nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our results revealed a dual role for Ubc9 in targeting RanGAP1 to NPCs: In addition to conjugating SUMO-1 to RanGAP1, Ubc9 is also required to form a stable ternary complex with SUMO-1 modified RanGAP1 and Nup358. As illustrated by our studies, the rapamycin heterodimerizer system represents a novel tool for studying the molecular effects of SUMO modification

  17. A broad requirement for TLS polymerases η and κ, and interacting sumoylation and nuclear pore proteins, in lesion bypass during C. elegans embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roerink, Sophie F; Koole, Wouter; Stapel, L Carine; Romeijn, Ron J; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2012-06-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases are specialized DNA polymerases capable of inserting nucleotides opposite DNA lesions that escape removal by dedicated DNA repair pathways. TLS polymerases allow cells to complete DNA replication in the presence of damage, thereby preventing checkpoint activation, genome instability, and cell death. Here, we characterize functional knockouts for polh-1 and polk-1, encoding the Caenorhabditis elegans homologs of the Y-family TLS polymerases η and κ. POLH-1 acts at many different DNA lesions as it protects cells against a wide range of DNA damaging agents, including UV, γ-irradiation, cisplatin, and methyl methane sulphonate (MMS). POLK-1 acts specifically but redundantly with POLH-1 in protection against methylation damage. Importantly, both polymerases play a prominent role early in embryonic development to allow fast replication of damaged genomes. Contrary to observations in mammalian cells, we show that neither POLH-1 nor POLK-1 is required for homologous recombination (HR) repair of DNA double-strand breaks. A genome-wide RNAi screen for genes that protect the C. elegans genome against MMS-induced DNA damage identified novel components in DNA damage bypass in the early embryo. Our data suggest SUMO-mediated regulation of both POLH-1 and POLK-1, and point towards a previously unrecognized role of the nuclear pore in regulating TLS.

  18. A broad requirement for TLS polymerases η and κ, and interacting sumoylation and nuclear pore proteins, in lesion bypass during C. elegans embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie F Roerink

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Translesion synthesis (TLS polymerases are specialized DNA polymerases capable of inserting nucleotides opposite DNA lesions that escape removal by dedicated DNA repair pathways. TLS polymerases allow cells to complete DNA replication in the presence of damage, thereby preventing checkpoint activation, genome instability, and cell death. Here, we characterize functional knockouts for polh-1 and polk-1, encoding the Caenorhabditis elegans homologs of the Y-family TLS polymerases η and κ. POLH-1 acts at many different DNA lesions as it protects cells against a wide range of DNA damaging agents, including UV, γ-irradiation, cisplatin, and methyl methane sulphonate (MMS. POLK-1 acts specifically but redundantly with POLH-1 in protection against methylation damage. Importantly, both polymerases play a prominent role early in embryonic development to allow fast replication of damaged genomes. Contrary to observations in mammalian cells, we show that neither POLH-1 nor POLK-1 is required for homologous recombination (HR repair of DNA double-strand breaks. A genome-wide RNAi screen for genes that protect the C. elegans genome against MMS-induced DNA damage identified novel components in DNA damage bypass in the early embryo. Our data suggest SUMO-mediated regulation of both POLH-1 and POLK-1, and point towards a previously unrecognized role of the nuclear pore in regulating TLS.

  19. The effect of divalent ions on the elasticity and pore collapse of chalk evaluated from compressional wave velocity and low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Addassi, Mouadh; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul

    2015-01-01

    density and ultrasonic velocities measured on core plugs. Low-field NMR spectroscopy was used in addition to the mechanical testing to prove any changes observed after the saturation related to the surface-to-volume ratio of the pore space in each of the samples or to surface relaxivity. Backscatter...... rich in magnesium and calcium ions softens the contact among the mineral grains. Pore collapse strength is deteriorating after the saturation of chalk with water rich in divalent ions. The presence of calcium and sulfate ions in the saturating fluid results in pore collapse at lower stresses than...

  20. The application of the pore population balance method to the calculation of the radiolytic weight loss and gas transport property changes of nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.A.V.

    1982-01-01

    A pore population balance equation, previously used to describe the physical property changes of porous carbons during thermal oxidation in carbon dioxide, has been modified to treat the radiolytic oxidation of graphite in CO 2 /CO/CH 4 gas mixtures. Good agreement has been obtained between theory and experiment for the variation in the gas transport coefficients B, K and lambda of gilsonite graphite with absorbed radiation dose. Calculations indicate that the addition of blind pores to the transport porosity, and an allowance for the opening of closed pores with burn-off, do not account for the experimental fractional weight loss curve. An excellent fit is obtained, however, if a small volume of cylindrical pores of a mean radius approximately equal to the diffusion length of oxidising species in the coolant are present in the pore size spectrum. Gilsonite graphite therefore behaves as if the pore size distribution function is trimodal, with mean radii at about 0.5μm, 2.48μm and greater than or equal to 10.57μm. (author)

  1. IRAK2 directs stimulus-dependent nuclear export of inflammatory mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Bulek, Katarzyna; Li, Xiao; Herjan, Tomasz; Yu, Minjia; Qian, Wen; Wang, Han; Zhou, Gao; Chen, Xing; Yang, Hui; Hong, Lingzi; Zhao, Junjie; Qin, Luke; Fukuda, Koichi; Flotho, Annette; Gao, Ji; Dongre, Ashok; Carman, Julie A; Kang, Zizhen; Su, Bing; Kern, Timothy S; Smith, Jonathan D; Hamilton, Thomas A; Melchior, Frauke; Fox, Paul L; Li, Xiaoxia

    2017-10-09

    Expression of inflammatory genes is determined in part by post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA metabolism but how stimulus- and transcript-dependent nuclear export influence is poorly understood. Here, we report a novel pathway in which LPS/TLR4 engagement promotes nuclear localization of IRAK2 to facilitate nuclear export of a specific subset of inflammation-related mRNAs for translation in murine macrophages. IRAK2 kinase activity is required for LPS-induced RanBP2-mediated IRAK2 sumoylation and subsequent nuclear translocation. Array analysis showed that an SRSF1-binding motif is enriched in mRNAs dependent on IRAK2 for nuclear export. Nuclear IRAK2 phosphorylates SRSF1 to reduce its binding to target mRNAs, which promotes the RNA binding of the nuclear export adaptor ALYREF and nuclear export receptor Nxf1 loading for the export of the mRNAs. In summary, LPS activates a nuclear function of IRAK2 that facilitates the assembly of nuclear export machinery to export selected inflammatory mRNAs to the cytoplasm for translation.

  2. Reconstituted Fusion Pore

    OpenAIRE

    Jeremic, Aleksandar; Kelly, Marie; Cho, Sang-Joon; Stromer, Marvin H.; Jena, Bhanu P.

    2003-01-01

    Fusion pores or porosomes are basket-like structures at the cell plasma membrane, at the base of which, membrane-bound secretory vesicles dock and fuse to release vesicular contents. Earlier studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated the presence of fusion pores at the cell plasma membrane in a number of live secretory cells, revealing their morphology and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time. ImmunoAFM studies demonstrated the release of vesicular contents through the por...

  3. The pore space scramble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormally, Alexandra; Bentham, Michelle; Vermeylen, Saskia; Markusson, Nils

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and energy security continue to be the context of the transition to a secure, affordable and low carbon energy future, both in the UK and beyond. This is reflected in for example, binding climate policy targets at the EU level, the introduction of renewable energy targets, and has also led to an increasing interest in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology with its potential to help mitigate against the effects of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning. The UK has proposed a three phase strategy to integrate CCS into its energy system in the long term focussing on off-shore subsurface storage (DECC, 2014). The potential of CCS therefore, raises a number of challenging questions and issues surrounding the long-term storage of CO2 captured and injected into underground spaces and, alongside other novel uses of the subsurface, contributes to opening a new field for discussion on the governance of the subsurface. Such 'novel' uses of the subsurface have lead to it becoming an increasingly contested space in terms of its governance, with issues emerging around the role of ownership, liability and property rights of subsurface pore space. For instance, questions over the legal ownership of pore space have arisen with ambiguity over the legal standpoint of the surface owner and those wanting to utilise the pore space for gas storage, and suggestions of whether there are depths at which legal 'ownership' becomes obsolete (Barton, 2014). Here we propose to discuss this 'pore space scramble' and provide examples of the competing trajectories of different stakeholders, particularly in the off-shore context given its priority in the UK. We also propose to highlight the current ambiguity around property law of pore space in the UK with reference to approaches currently taken in different national contexts. Ultimately we delineate contrasting models of governance to illustrate the choices we face and consider the ethics of these models for the common good

  4. Pore roller filtration apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of filtering, more precisely the present invention concerns an apparatus and a method for the separation of dry matter from a medium and the use of said apparatus. One embodiment discloses an apparatus for the separation of dry matter from a medium, comp...... of a pore roller and one other roller, means for establishing a pressure difference across the filter, means for passing filter and filter cake through the set of rollers, and a closure mechanism configured to control the transverse tension between the rollers......., comprising a pressure regulated separation chamber defined, in cross section, by a plurality of rollers mounted between opposing sidewalls, each of said rollers having a shaft adapted to be engaged with the sidewalls, a filter arranged so that it passes between at least one set of said rollers consisting...

  5. A pore water conductivity sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The electrical permittivity and conductivity of the bulk soil are a function of the permittivity and conductivity of the pore water. For soil water contents higher than 0.10 both functions are equal, facilitating in situ conductivity measurements of the pore water. A novel method is described, based

  6. Laboratory characterization of shale pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur Listiyowati, Lina

    2018-02-01

    To estimate the potential of shale gas reservoir, one needs to understand the characteristics of pore structures. Characterization of shale gas reservoir microstructure is still a challenge due to ultra-fine grained micro-fabric and micro level heterogeneity of these sedimentary rocks. The sample used in the analysis is a small portion of any reservoir. Thus, each measurement technique has a different result. It raises the question which methods are suitable for characterizing pore shale. The goal of this paper is to summarize some of the microstructure analysis tools of shale rock to get near-real results. The two analyzing pore structure methods are indirect measurement (MIP, He, NMR, LTNA) and direct observation (SEM, TEM, Xray CT). Shale rocks have a high heterogeneity; thus, it needs multiscale quantification techniques to understand their pore structures. To describe the complex pore system of shale, several measurement techniques are needed to characterize the surface area and pore size distribution (LTNA, MIP), shapes, size and distribution of pore (FIB-SEM, TEM, Xray CT), and total porosity (He pycnometer, NMR). The choice of techniques and methods should take into account the purpose of the analysis and also the time and budget.

  7. Metal structures with parallel pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherfey, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Four methods of fabricating metal plates having uniformly sized parallel pores are studied: elongate bundle, wind and sinter, extrude and sinter, and corrugate stack. Such plates are suitable for electrodes for electrochemical and fuel cells.

  8. An investigation into the effects of pore connectivity on T2 NMR relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghomeshi, Shahin; Kryuchkov, Sergey; Kantzas, Apostolos

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a powerful technique used to characterize fluids and flow in porous media. The NMR relaxation curves are closely related to pore geometry, and the inversion of the NMR relaxometry data is known to give useful information with regards to pore size distribution (PSD) through the relative amplitudes of the fluids stored in the small and large pores. While this information is crucial, the main challenge for the successful use of the NMR measurements is the proper interpretation of the measured signals. Natural porous media patterns consist of complex pore structures with many interconnected or "coupled" regions, as well as isolated pores. This connectivity along the throats changes the relaxation distribution and in order to properly interpret this data, a thorough understanding of the effects of pore connectivity on the NMR relaxation distribution is warranted. In this paper we address two main points. The first pertains to the fact that there is a discrepancy between the relaxation distribution obtained from experiments, and the ones obtained from solving the mathematical models of diffusion process in the digitized images of the pore space. There are several reasons that may attribute to this such as the lack of a proper incorporation of surface roughness into the model. However, here we are more interested in the effects of pore connectivity and to understand why the typical NMR relaxation distribution obtained from experiments are wider, while the numerical simulations predict that a wider NMR relaxation distribution may indicate poor connectivity. Secondly, by not taking into account the pore coupling effects, from our experience in interpreting the data, we tend to underestimate the pore volume of small pores and overestimate the amplitudes in the large pores. The role of pore coupling becomes even more prominent in rocks with small pore sizes such as for example in shales, clay in sandstones, and in the microstructures of

  9. Ion track pores in intelligent films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Masaharu; Yoshida, Masaru; Omichi, Hideki; Nagaoka, Noriyasu; Kubota, Hitoshi; Katakai, Ryoichi; Reber, N.; Spohr, R.

    1996-01-01

    To create an intelligent chemical valve which behaves to biological membranes, we combined the following technologies: (1) creation of intelligent gels based on pendant α-amino acids or their oligomers, (2) preparation of nuclear track films by etching chemically after heavy ion irradiation, especially preparation of cylindrical pores passed through the film, and (3) a combination of (1) and (2). The two factors, REL (Restricted Energy Loss) and radiation sensitivity [(V t /V b )-1] play an important role in formation of such cylindrical track films. In the case of CR-39 film, there were found to be REL>1.6x10 4 MeV cm 2 g -1 and (V t /V b )-1>100, respectively. The cylindrical tracks films with intelligent functions, which consist of a combination of (1) and (2), can be fabricated by two techniques, copolymerization and grafting. (author)

  10. Antera 3D capabilities for pore measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messaraa, C; Metois, A; Walsh, M; Flynn, J; Doyle, L; Robertson, N; Mansfield, A; O'Connor, C; Mavon, A

    2018-04-29

    The cause of enlarged pores remains obscure but still remains of concern for women. To complement subjective methods, bioengineered methods are needed for quantification of pores visibility following treatments. The study objective was to demonstrate the suitability of pore measurements from the Antera 3D. Pore measurements were collected on 22 female volunteers aged 18-65 years with the Antera 3D, the DermaTOP and image analysis on photographs. Additionally, 4 raters graded pore size on photographs on a scale 0-5. Repeatability of Antera 3D parameters was ascertained and the benefit of a pore minimizer product on the cheek was assessed on a sub panel of seven female volunteers. Pore parameters using the Antera were shown to depict pore severity similar to raters on photographs, except for Max Depth. Mean pore volume, mean pore area and count were moderately correlated with DermaTOP parameters (up to r = .50). No relationship was seen between the Antera 3D and pore visibility analysis on photographs. The most repeatable parameters were found to be mean pore volume, mean pore area and max depth, especially for the small and medium filters. The benefits of a pore minimizer product were the most striking for mean pore volume and mean pore area when using the small filter for analysis, rather than the medium/large ones. Pore measurements with the Antera 3D represent a reliable tool for efficacy and field studies, with an emphasis of the small filter for analysis for the mean pore volume/mean pore area parameters. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Multiple Approaches to Characterizing Nano-Pore Structure of Barnett Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Gao, Z.; Ewing, R. P.; Dultz, S.; Kaufmann, J.; Hamamoto, S.; Webber, B.; Ding, M.

    2013-12-01

    Microscopic characteristics of porous media - pore shape, pore-size distribution, and pore connectivity - control fluid flow and mass transport. This presentation discusses various approaches to investigating nano-pore structure of Barnett shale, with its implications in gas production behavior. The innovative approaches include imbibition, tracer diffusion, edge-accessible porosity, porosimetry (mercury intrusion porosimetry, nitrogen and water vapor sorption isotherms, and nuclear magnetic resonance cyroporometry), and imaging (Wood's metal impregnation followed with laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy, and small angle neutron scattering). Results show that the shale pores are predominantly in the nm size range, with measured median pore-throat diameters about 5 nm. But small pore size is not the major contributor to low gas recovery; rather, the low mass diffusivity appears to be caused by low pore connectivity of Barnett shale. Chemical diffusion in sparsely-connected pore spaces is not well described by classical Fickian behavior; anomalous behavior is suggested by percolation theory, and confirmed by results of imbibition and diffusion tests. Our evolving complementary approaches, with their several advantages and disadvantages, provide a rich toolbox for tackling the nano-pore structure characteristics of shales and other natural rocks.

  12. Nuclear networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Burke, Brian

    2017-07-04

    Nuclear lamins are intermediate filament proteins that represent important structural components of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs). By combining proteomics and superresolution microscopy, we recently reported that both A- and B-type nuclear lamins form spatially distinct filament networks at the nuclear periphery of mouse fibroblasts. In particular, A-type lamins exhibit differential association with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our studies reveal that the nuclear lamina network in mammalian somatic cells is less ordered and more complex than that of amphibian oocytes, the only other system in which the lamina has been visualized at high resolution. In addition, the NPC component Tpr likely links NPCs to the A-type lamin network, an association that appears to be regulated by C-terminal modification of various A-type lamin isoforms. Many questions remain, however, concerning the structure and assembly of lamin filaments, as well as with their mode of association with other nuclear components such as peripheral chromatin.

  13. Pore volume is most highly correlated with the visual assessment of skin pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S J; Shin, M K; Back, J H; Koh, J S

    2014-11-01

    Many studies have been focused on evaluating assessment techniques for facial pores amid growing attention on skin care. Ubiquitous techniques used to assess the size of facial pores include visual assessment, cross-section images of the skin surface, and profilometric analysis of silicone replica of the facial skin. In addition, there are indirect assessment methods, including observation of pores based on confocal laser scanning microscopy and the analysis of sebum secretion and skin elasticity. The aim of this study was to identify parameters useful in estimating pore of surface in normal skin. The severity of pores on the cheek area by frontal optical images was divided on a 0-6 scale with '0' being faint and small pore and '6' being obvious and large pore. After the photos of the frontal cheek of 32 women aged between 35 and 49 were taken, the size of their pores was measured on a 0-6 scale; and the correlation between visual grading of pore and various evaluations (pore volume by 3-D image, pore area and number by Optical Image Analyzer) contributing to pore severity investigated using direct, objective, and noninvasive evaluations. The visual score revealed that the size of pores was graded on a 1-6 scale. Visual grading of pore was highly correlated with pore volume measured from 3-D images and pore area measured from 2-D optical images in the order (P pore was also slightly correlated with the number of pores in size of over 0.04 mm(2) (P pore score and pore volume can be explained by 3-D structural characteristics of pores. It is concluded that pore volume and area serve as useful parameters in estimating pore of skin surface. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Pore Pressure Measurements Inside Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgason, Einar; Burcharth, H. F.; Grüne, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    The present paper presents pore pressure measurements from large scale model tests performed at the Large Wave Channel, Hannover, Germany and small scale model test performed at the Hydraulic & Coastal Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University, Denmark. Information on pore pressure attenuation...

  15. Multifractal Characterization of Soil Pore Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Daniel; Posadas, Adolfo; Cooper, Miguel

    2010-05-01

    Two dimensional (2-D) images representing pores and solids are used for direct quantification of soil structure using tools that are sensitive to the spatial arrangement of pores or by grouping pores by morphological properties such as shape and size. Pore shapes and sizes are related and have been used to interpret soil processes. Fractal and multifractal methods of pore characterization have been applied separately to spatial arrangement of soil pores and to pore size distributions derived from 2-D images. The objective of this work was to estimate fractal dimensions of spatial arrangement of soil pores of predetermined shapes. Images covering a range of soil structures were analyzed. Pore shape was classified using a shape factor S that quantifies the circularity of pores (S=1 for circular pores). Images containing only pores with S values smaller than 0.1, between 0.1 and 0.2, 0.2 and 0.5, 0.5 and 0.7 and greater than 0.7 were derived from the initial images and analyzed with a multifractal algorithm. The findings of this work will be discussed in relation to models of soil hydraulic properties.

  16. Facial Pores: Definition, Causes, and Treatment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ju; Seok, Joon; Jeong, Se Yeong; Park, Kui Young; Li, Kapsok; Seo, Seong Jun

    2016-03-01

    Enlarged skin pores refer to conditions that present with visible topographic changes of skin surfaces. Although not a medical concern, enlarged pores are a cosmetic concern for a large number of individuals. Moreover, clear definition and possible causes of enlarged pores have not been elucidated. To review the possible causes and treatment options for skin pores. This article is based on a review of the medical literature and the authors' clinical experience in investigating and treating skin pores. There are 3 major clinical causes of enlarged facial pores, namely high sebum excretion, decreased elasticity around pores, and increased hair follicle volume. In addition, chronic recurrent acne, sex hormones, and skin care regimen can affect pore size. Given the different possible causes for enlarged pores, therapeutic modalities must be individualized for each patient. Potential factors that contribute to enlarged skin pores include excessive sebum, decreased elasticity around pores, and increased hair follicle volume. Because various factors cause enlarged facial pores, it might be useful to identify the underlying causes to be able to select the appropriate treatment.

  17. Elemental, mineralogical, and pore-solution compositions of selected Canadian clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oscarson, D.W.; Dixon, D.A.

    1989-03-01

    Clay materials will be an important component of a barrier and sealing system in a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault in Canada. In this report the elemental, mineralogical, and pore-solution compositions of candidate clay sealing materials for the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program are presented

  18. Confocal pore size measurement based on super-resolution image restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dali; Wang, Yun; Qiu, Lirong; Mao, Xinyue; Zhao, Weiqian

    2014-09-01

    A confocal pore size measurement based on super-resolution image restoration is proposed to obtain a fast and accurate measurement for submicrometer pore size of nuclear track-etched membranes (NTEMs). This method facilitates the online inspection of the pore size evolution during etching. Combining confocal microscopy with super-resolution image restoration significantly improves the lateral resolution of the NTEM image, yields a reasonable circle edge-setting criterion of 0.2408, and achieves precise pore edge detection. Theoretical analysis shows that the minimum measuring diameter can reach 0.19 μm, and the root mean square of the residuals is only 1.4 nm. Edge response simulation and experiment reveal that the edge response of the proposed method is better than 80 nm. The NTEM pore size measurement results obtained by the proposed method agree well with that obtained by scanning electron microscopy.

  19. Structural basis for cargo binding and autoinhibition of Bicaudal-D1 by a parallel coiled-coil with homotypic registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terawaki, Shin-ichi; Yoshikane, Asuka; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Wakamatsu, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Bicaudal-D1 (BICD1) is an α-helical coiled-coil protein mediating the attachment of specific cargo to cytoplasmic dynein. It plays an essential role in minus end-directed intracellular transport along microtubules. The third C-terminal coiled-coil region of BICD1 (BICD1 CC3) has an important role in cargo sorting, including intracellular vesicles associating with the small GTPase Rab6 and the nuclear pore complex Ran binding protein 2 (RanBP2), and inhibiting the association with cytoplasmic dynein by binding to the first N-terminal coiled-coil region (CC1). The crystal structure of BICD1 CC3 revealed a parallel homodimeric coiled-coil with asymmetry and complementary knobs-into-holes interactions, differing from Drosophila BicD CC3. Furthermore, our binding study indicated that BICD1 CC3 possesses a binding surface for two distinct cargos, Rab6 and RanBP2, and that the CC1-binding site overlaps with the Rab6-binding site. These findings suggest a molecular basis for cargo recognition and autoinhibition of BICD proteins during dynein-dependent intracellular retrograde transport. - Highlights: • BICD1 CC3 is a parallel homodimeric coiled-coil with axial asymmetry. • The coiled-coil packing of BICD1 CC3 is adapted to the equivalent heptad position. • BICD1 CC3 has distinct binding sites for two classes of cargo, Rab6 and RanBP2. • The CC1-binding site of BICD1 CC3 overlaps with the Rab6-binding site

  20. Structural basis for cargo binding and autoinhibition of Bicaudal-D1 by a parallel coiled-coil with homotypic registry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terawaki, Shin-ichi, E-mail: terawaki@gunma-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); SPring-8 Center, RIKEN, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Yoshikane, Asuka [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); SPring-8 Center, RIKEN, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Higuchi, Yoshiki [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Life Science, University of Hyogo, 3-2-1 Koto, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Department of Picobiology, Graduate School of Life Science, University of Hyogo, 3-2-1 Koto, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); SPring-8 Center, RIKEN, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Wakamatsu, Kaori [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); SPring-8 Center, RIKEN, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Bicaudal-D1 (BICD1) is an α-helical coiled-coil protein mediating the attachment of specific cargo to cytoplasmic dynein. It plays an essential role in minus end-directed intracellular transport along microtubules. The third C-terminal coiled-coil region of BICD1 (BICD1 CC3) has an important role in cargo sorting, including intracellular vesicles associating with the small GTPase Rab6 and the nuclear pore complex Ran binding protein 2 (RanBP2), and inhibiting the association with cytoplasmic dynein by binding to the first N-terminal coiled-coil region (CC1). The crystal structure of BICD1 CC3 revealed a parallel homodimeric coiled-coil with asymmetry and complementary knobs-into-holes interactions, differing from Drosophila BicD CC3. Furthermore, our binding study indicated that BICD1 CC3 possesses a binding surface for two distinct cargos, Rab6 and RanBP2, and that the CC1-binding site overlaps with the Rab6-binding site. These findings suggest a molecular basis for cargo recognition and autoinhibition of BICD proteins during dynein-dependent intracellular retrograde transport. - Highlights: • BICD1 CC3 is a parallel homodimeric coiled-coil with axial asymmetry. • The coiled-coil packing of BICD1 CC3 is adapted to the equivalent heptad position. • BICD1 CC3 has distinct binding sites for two classes of cargo, Rab6 and RanBP2. • The CC1-binding site of BICD1 CC3 overlaps with the Rab6-binding site.

  1. Coating of silicon pore optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Ackermann, M.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2009-01-01

    For the International X-ray observatory (IXO), a mirror module with an effective area of 3 m2 at 1.25 keV and at least 0.65 m2 at 6 keV has to be realized. To achieve this goal, coated silicon pore optics has been developed over the last years. One of the challenges is to coat the Si plates...... and still to realize Si-Si bonding. It has been demonstrated that ribbed silicon plates can be produced and assembled into stacks. All previously work has been done using uncoated Si plates. In this paper we describe how to coat the ribbed Si plates with an Ir coating and a top C coating through a mask so...

  2. Wet winter pore pressures in railway embankments

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs, Kevin M; Smethurst, Joel A; Powrie, William; O'Brien, Anthony S

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the influence of extreme wet winter weather on pore water pressures within clay fill railway embankments, using field monitoring data and numerical modelling. Piezometer readings taken across the London Underground Ltd network following the wet winter of 2000/2001 were examined, and showed occurrences of hydrostatic pore water pressure within embankments but also many readings below this. A correlation was found between the maximum pore water pressures and the permeabi...

  3. Electroosmotic pore transport in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uitto, Olivia D; White, Henry S

    2003-04-01

    To determine the pathways and origin of electroosmotic flow in human skin. Iontophoretic transport of acetaminophen in full thickness human cadaver skin was visualized and quantified by scanning electrochemical microscopy. Electroosmotic flow in the shunt pathways of full thickness skin was compared to flow in the pores of excised stratum corneum and a synthetic membrane pore. The penetration of rhodamine 6G into pore structures was investigated by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Electroosmotic transport is observed in shunt pathways in full thickness human skin (e.g., hair follicles and sweat glands), but not in pore openings of freestanding stratum corneum. Absolute values of the diffusive and iontophoretic pore fluxes of acetaminophen in full thickness human skin are also reported. Rhodamine 6G is observed to penetrate to significant depths (approximately 200 microm) along pore pathways. Iontophoresis in human cadaver skin induces localized electroosmotic flow along pore shunt paths. Electroosmotic forces arise from the passage of current through negatively charged mesoor nanoscale pores (e.g., gap functions) within cellular regions that define the pore structure beneath the stratum corneum.

  4. Automatic facial pore analysis system using multi-scale pore detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J Y; Kim, S W; Lee, S H; Choi, J E; Ko, S J

    2017-08-01

    As facial pore widening and its treatments have become common concerns in the beauty care field, the necessity for an objective pore-analyzing system has been increased. Conventional apparatuses lack in usability requiring strong light sources and a cumbersome photographing process, and they often yield unsatisfactory analysis results. This study was conducted to develop an image processing technique for automatic facial pore analysis. The proposed method detects facial pores using multi-scale detection and optimal scale selection scheme and then extracts pore-related features such as total area, average size, depth, and the number of pores. Facial photographs of 50 subjects were graded by two expert dermatologists, and correlation analyses between the features and clinical grading were conducted. We also compared our analysis result with those of conventional pore-analyzing devices. The number of large pores and the average pore size were highly correlated with the severity of pore enlargement. In comparison with the conventional devices, the proposed analysis system achieved better performance showing stronger correlation with the clinical grading. The proposed system is highly accurate and reliable for measuring the severity of skin pore enlargement. It can be suitably used for objective assessment of the pore tightening treatments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The Effect of the Pore Entrance on Particle Motion in Slit Pores: Implications for Ultrathin Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavari, Armin; Baltus, Ruth

    2017-08-10

    Membrane rejection models generally neglect the effect of the pore entrance on intrapore particle transport. However, entrance effects are expected to be particularly important with ultrathin membranes, where membrane thickness is typically comparable to pore size. In this work, a 2D model was developed to simulate particle motion for spherical particles moving at small Re and infinite Pe from the reservoir outside the pore into a slit pore. Using a finite element method, particles were tracked as they accelerated across the pore entrance until they reached a steady velocity in the pore. The axial position in the pore where particle motion becomes steady is defined as the particle entrance length (PEL). PELs were found to be comparable to the fluid entrance length, larger than the pore size and larger than the thickness typical of many ultrathin membranes. Results also show that, in the absence of particle diffusion, hydrodynamic particle-membrane interactions at the pore mouth result in particle "funneling" in the pore, yielding cross-pore particle concentration profiles focused at the pore centerline. The implications of these phenomena on rejection from ultrathin membranes are examined.

  6. Gas transport and subsoil pore characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berisso, Feto Esimo; Schjønning, Per; Keller, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Arrangements of elementary soil particles during soil deposition and subsequent biological and physical processes in long-term pedogenesis are expected to lead to anisotropy of the non-tilled subsoil pore system. Soil compaction by agricultural machinery is known to affect soil pore characteristi...

  7. The lower limit of the flowing pore throat radius in the extra-low permeability reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Junhui; Yin, Daiyin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a method for determining the lower limit of flowing pore throat radius of the extra low permeability reservoir in the periphery of Changyuan Oil Fields is given. The capillary pressure curve is divided into linear type and concave type. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) T2 spectrum is divided into 3 types: the left peak is greater than the right peak, the left peak is equal to the right one, and the left peak is smaller than the right one. The method for determining the lower limit of flowing pore throat radius is, first, converting the nuclear magnetic resonance T2 spectrum to the capillary pressure curve calculated, then fitting the capillary pressure curves measured by the constant speed mercury injection experiment and the capillary pressure curve calculated. After finding the relevant parameters, converting the horizontal axis of the NMR T2 spectra from relaxation time to pore throat radius, and the pore throat radius corresponding to the T2 cutoff value is the lower limit of the flowing pore throat radius. The lower limit of the flowing pore throat radius of the extra low permeability Fuyang Oil Reservoir in the periphery of Changyuan Oil Fields is about 0.68μm

  8. FINGERPRINT MATCHING BASED ON PORE CENTROIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Malathi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been exponential growth in the use of bio- metrics for user authentication applications. Automated Fingerprint Identification systems have become popular tool in many security and law enforcement applications. Most of these systems rely on minutiae (ridge ending and bifurcation features. With the advancement in sensor technology, high resolution fingerprint images (1000 dpi pro- vide micro level of features (pores that have proven to be useful fea- tures for identification. In this paper, we propose a new strategy for fingerprint matching based on pores by reliably extracting the pore features The extraction of pores is done by Marker Controlled Wa- tershed segmentation method and the centroids of each pore are con- sidered as feature vectors for matching of two fingerprint images. Experimental results shows that the proposed method has better per- formance with lower false rates and higher accuracy.

  9. Enlarged facial pores: an update on treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Joanna; Lanoue, Julien; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-07-01

    Enlarged facial pores remain a common dermatologic and cosmetic concern from acne and rosacea, among other conditions, that is difficult to treat due to the multifactorial nature of their pathogenesis and negative impact on patients' quality of life. Enlarged facial pores are primarily treated through addressing associative factors, such as increased sebum production and cutaneous aging. We review the current treatment modalities for enlarged or dense facial pores, including topical retinoids, chemical peels, oral antiandrogens, and lasers and devices, with a focus on newer therapies.

  10. Particle diffusion in complex nanoscale pore networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müter, Dirk; Sørensen, Henning Osholm; Bock, H.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the diffusion of particles in the highly irregular pore networks of chalk, a very fine-grained rock, by combining three-dimensional X-ray imaging and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. X-ray imaging data were collected at 25 nm voxel dimension for two chalk samples...... with very different porosities (4% and 26%). The three-dimensional pore systems derived from the tomograms were imported into DPD simulations and filled with spherical particles of variable diameter and with an optional attractive interaction to the pore surfaces. We found that diffusion significantly...

  11. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Lee, Elizabeth (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Kallam, Alekhya (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Majumdar, Partha (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J. (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Celina, Mathias C.; Bahr, James (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  12. Estimation of pore pressure from seismic velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Zayra; Ojeda, German Y; Mateus, Darwin

    2009-01-01

    On pore pressure calculations it is common to obtain a profile in a well bore, which is then extrapolated toward offset wells. This practice might generate mistakes on pore pressure measurements, since geological conditions may change from a well bore to another, even into the same basin. Therefore, it is important to use other tools which allow engineers not only to detect and estimate in an indirect way overpressure zones, but also to keep a lateral tracking of possible changes that may affect those values in the different formations. Taking into account this situation, we applied a methodology that estimates formation pressure from 3D seismic velocities by using the Eaton method. First, we estimated formation pore pressure; then, we identified possible overpressure zones. Finally, those results obtained from seismic information were analyzed involving well logs and pore pressure tests, in order to compare real data with prediction based on seismic information from the Colombian foothill.

  13. Block copolymer structures in nano-pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Marco; Guo, Xiaohu; Zvelindovsky, Andrei

    2010-03-01

    We present results of coarse-grained computer modelling of block copolymer systems in cylindrical and spherical nanopores on Cell Dynamics Simulation. We study both cylindrical and spherical pores and systematically investigate structures formed by lamellar, cylinders and spherical block copolymer systems for various pore radii and affinity of block copolymer blocks to the pore walls. The obtained structures include: standing lamellae and cylinders, ``onions,'' cylinder ``knitting balls,'' ``golf-ball,'' layered spherical, ``virus''-like and mixed morphologies with T-junctions and U-type defects [1]. Kinetics of the structure formation and the differences with planar films are discussed. Our simulations suggest that novel porous nano-containers can be formed by confining block copolymers in pores of different geometries [1,2]. [4pt] [1] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, Polymer 49, 2797 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 214902 (2009).

  14. Pore structure in blended cement pastes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canut, Mariana Moreira Cavalcanti

    Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), such as slag and fly ash, are increasingly used as a substitute for Portland cement in the interests of improvement of engineering properties and sustainability of concrete. According to studies improvement of engineering properties can be explained...... supplement each other. Cement pastes (w/b=0.4) with and without slag and fly ash cured at two moisture (sealed and saturated) and temperature (20 and 55ºC) conditions were used to investigate the combined impact of SCMs addition and curing on the pore structure of pastes cured up to two years. Also...... volume and threshold pore size were found when comparing with plain cement paste at the same curing conditions. The porosity methods MIP, LTC and SEM have been shown to be suitable to characterise pore parameters of the pastes. MIP is a simple and fast method which covers a large range of pore sizes...

  15. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2015-04-01

    In extremely dynamic microhabitats as bio-pores made by earthworm, the in situ enzyme activities are assumed as a footprint of complex biotic interactions. Our study focused on the effect of earthworm on the enzyme activities inside bio-pores and visualizing the differences between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil by zymography technique (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013). For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in bio-pores. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworms, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phosphatase. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. However, the differences in activity of cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase between bio-pore and bulk soil were less pronounced. This demonstrated an applicability of zymography approach to monitor and to distinguish the in situ activity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil biopores.

  16. Single Particle Tracking to Characterize the Mechanism of Pore Formation by Pore Forming Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Subburaj, Yamunadevi

    2014-01-01

    Pore formation is a common natural mechanism occurring in large number of organisms where proteins are involved as toxins, effectors in immune response or apoptosis. Despite intense research, the structural and dynamic aspects of oligomerization and membrane permeabilization by pore forming proteins remains poorly understood. In this work we have aimed to provide a better understanding on dynamics, oligomerization and pore forming process of two proteins; a) Equinatoxin II, b) Bax (Bcl2 famil...

  17. Pore REconstruction and Segmentation (PORES) method for improved porosity quantification of nanoporous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Eyndhoven, G., E-mail: geert.vaneyndhoven@uantwerpen.be [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Kurttepeli, M. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Van Oers, C.J.; Cool, P. [Laboratory of Adsorption and Catalysis, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Bals, S. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Batenburg, K.J. [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Science Park 123, NL-1090 GB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mathematical Institute, Universiteit Leiden, Niels Bohrweg 1, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Sijbers, J. [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2015-01-15

    Electron tomography is currently a versatile tool to investigate the connection between the structure and properties of nanomaterials. However, a quantitative interpretation of electron tomography results is still far from straightforward. Especially accurate quantification of pore-space is hampered by artifacts introduced in all steps of the processing chain, i.e., acquisition, reconstruction, segmentation and quantification. Furthermore, most common approaches require subjective manual user input. In this paper, the PORES algorithm “POre REconstruction and Segmentation” is introduced; it is a tailor-made, integral approach, for the reconstruction, segmentation, and quantification of porous nanomaterials. The PORES processing chain starts by calculating a reconstruction with a nanoporous-specific reconstruction algorithm: the Simultaneous Update of Pore Pixels by iterative REconstruction and Simple Segmentation algorithm (SUPPRESS). It classifies the interior region to the pores during reconstruction, while reconstructing the remaining region by reducing the error with respect to the acquired electron microscopy data. The SUPPRESS reconstruction can be directly plugged into the remaining processing chain of the PORES algorithm, resulting in accurate individual pore quantification and full sample pore statistics. The proposed approach was extensively validated on both simulated and experimental data, indicating its ability to generate accurate statistics of nanoporous materials. - Highlights: • An electron tomography reconstruction/segmentation method for nanoporous materials. • The method exploits the porous nature of the scanned material. • Validated extensively on both simulation and real data experiments. • Results in increased image resolution and improved porosity quantification.

  18. Effect of pore size on the calculated pressure at biological cells pore wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hag, Ayman H; Zheng, Zhong; Boggs, Steven A; Jayaram, Shesha H

    2006-09-01

    A transient nonlinear finite-element program has been used to calculate the electric field distribution as a function of time for a spherical cell with a pore in a conducting medium during application of a subnanosecond rise time "step" wave, including the effects of dipolar saturation in the water-based cytoplasm and cell medium. The time-dependent pressure on the pore wall has been computed as a function of time as the system polarizes from the change of the energy in the electric field to the left (inside the pore) and to the right (inside the membrane) of the pore wall. The computations suggest that dipolar saturation, while significant, has little effect on the time-dependent electric field distribution but a substantial effect on the field-induced pore wall pressure. Also, the effect of pore size on both the computed electric field and field-induced pressure was studied. As the pore size increases, a collapse in both the electric field and field-induced pressure has been noticed. This suggests that as the pore size increases, the driving force for further opening the pore is not electrical.

  19. Investigating the pore-water chemistry effects on the volume change behaviour of Boom clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y. F.; Cui, Y. J.; Tang, A. M.; Nguyen, X. P.; Li, X. L.; Van Geet, M.

    The Essen site has been chosen as an alternative site for nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. The soil formation involved at this site is the same as at Mol site: Boom clay. However, owing to its geographical situation closer to the sea, Boom clay at Essen presents a pore water salinity 4-5 times higher than Boom clay at Mol. This study aims at studying the effects of pore water salinity on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom clay. Specific oedometer cells were used allowing “flushing” the pore water in soil specimen by synthetic pore water or distilled water. The synthetic pore water used was prepared with the chemistry as that for the site water: 5.037 g/L for core Ess83 and 5.578 g/L for core Ess96. Mechanical loading was then carried out on the soil specimen after flushing. The results show that water salinity effect on the liquid limit is negligible. The saturation or pore water replacement under the in situ effective stress of 2.4 MPa does not induce significant volume change. For Ess83, hydro-mechanical behaviour was found to be slightly influenced by the water salinity; on the contrary, no obvious effect was identified on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Ess96. This can be attributed to the higher smectite content in Ess83 than in Ess96.

  20. Investigating the pore-water chemistry effects on the volume change behaviour of Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Y. F.; Cui, Y. J.; Tang, A. M.; Nguyen, X. P.; Li, X. L.; Van Geet, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Essen site has been chosen as an alternative site for nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. The soil formation involved at this site is the same as at Mol site: Boom clay. However, owing to its geographical situation closer to the sea, Boom clay at Essen presents a pore water salinity 4-5 times higher than Boom clay at Mol. This study aims at studying the effects of pore water salinity on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom clay. Specific odometer cells were used allowing 'flushing' the pore water in soil specimen by synthetic pore water or distilled water. The synthetic pore water used was prepared with the chemistry as that for the site water: 5.037 g/L for core Ess83 and 5.578 g/L for core Ess96. Mechanical loading was then carried out on the soil specimen after flushing. The results show that water salinity effect on the liquid limit is negligible. The saturation or pore water replacement under the in situ effective stress of 2.4 MPa does not induce significant volume change. For Ess83, hydro-mechanical behaviour was found to be slightly influenced by the water salinity; on the contrary, no obvious effect was identified on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Ess96. This can be attributed to the higher smectite content in Ess83 than in Ess96. (authors)

  1. New bimodal pore catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinoda, Misao; Zhang, Yi; Yoneyama, Yoshiharu; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Tsubaki, Noritatsu [Department of Material System and Life Science, School of Engineering, Toyama University, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2004-11-15

    A simple preparation method of bimodal pore supports was developed by introducing SiO{sub 2} or ZrO{sub 2} sols into large pores of SiO{sub 2} gel pellets directly. The pores of the obtained bimodal pore supports distributed distinctly as two kinds of main pores. On the other hand, the increased BET surface area and decreased pore volume, compared to those of original silica gel, indicated that the obtained bimodal pore supports formed according to the designed route. The obtained bimodal pore supports were applied in liquid-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) where cobalt was supported. The bimodal pore catalysts presented the best reaction performance in liquid-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) as higher reaction rate and lower methane selectivities, because the spatial promotional effect of bimodal pore structure and chemical effect of the porous zirconia behaved inside the large pores of original silica gel.

  2. Facial skin pores: a multiethnic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, Frederic; Francois, Ghislain; Qiu, Huixia; Ye, Chengda; Hanaya, Tomoo; Batisse, Dominique; Cointereau-Chardon, Suzy; Seixas, Mirela Donato Gianeti; Dal Belo, Susi Elaine; Bazin, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Skin pores (SP), as they are called by laymen, are common and benign features mostly located on the face (nose, cheeks, etc) that generate many aesthetic concerns or complaints. Despite the prevalence of skin pores, related literature is scarce. With the aim of describing the prevalence of skin pores and anatomic features among ethnic groups, a dermatoscopic instrument, using polarized lighting, coupled to a digital camera recorded the major features of skin pores (size, density, coverage) on the cheeks of 2,585 women in different countries and continents. A detection threshold of 250 μm, correlated to clinical scorings by experts, was input into a specific software to further allow for automatic counting of the SP density (N/cm(2)) and determination of their respective sizes in mm(2). Integrating both criteria also led to establishing the relative part of the skin surface (as a percentage) that is actually covered by SP on cheeks. The results showed that the values of respective sizes, densities, and skin coverage: 1) were recorded in all studied subjects; 2) varied greatly with ethnicity; 3) plateaued with age in most cases; and 4) globally refected self-assessment by subjects, in particular those who self-declare having "enlarged pores" like Brazilian women. Inversely, Chinese women were clearly distinct from other ethnicities in having very low density and sizes. Analyzing the present results suggests that facial skin pore's morphology as perceived by human eye less result from functional criteria of associated appendages such as sebaceous glands. To what extent skin pores may be viewed as additional criteria of a photo-altered skin is an issue to be further addressed.

  3. Pore fluid pressure and the seismic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, M. E.; Zhu, W.; Hirth, G.; Belzer, B.

    2017-12-01

    In the brittle crust, the critical shear stress required for fault slip decreases with increasing pore fluid pressures according to the effective stress criterion. As a result, higher pore fluid pressures are thought to promote fault slip and seismogenesis, consistent with observations that increasing fluid pressure as a result of wastewater injection is correlated with increased seismicity. On the other hand, elevated pore fluid pressure is also proposed to promote slow stable failure rather than seismicity along some fault zones, including during slow slip in subduction zones. Here we review recent experimental evidence for the roles that pore fluid pressure and the effective stress play in controlling fault slip behavior. Using two sets of experiments on serpentine fault gouge, we show that increasing fluid pressure does decrease the shear stress for reactivation under brittle conditions. However, under semi-brittle conditions as expected near the base of the seismogenic zone, high pore fluid pressures are much less effective at reducing the shear stress of reactivation even though deformation is localized and frictional. We use an additional study on serpentinite to show that cohesive fault rocks, potentially the product of healing and cementation, experience an increase in fracture energy during faulting as fluid pressures approach lithostatic, which can lead to more stable failure. Structural observations show that the increased fracture energy is associated with a greater intensity of transgranular fracturing and delocalization of deformation. Experiments on several lithologies indicate that the stabilizing effect of fluid pressure occurs independent of rock composition and hydraulic properties. Thus, high pore fluid pressures have the potential to either enhance seismicity or promote stable faulting depending on pressure, temperature, and fluid pressure conditions. Together, the results of these studies indicate that pore fluid pressure promotes

  4. Pore Structure Characterization of Indiana Limestone and Pink Dolomite from Pore Network Reconstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freire-Gormaly Marina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon sequestration in deep underground saline aquifers holds significant promise for reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions (CO2. However, challenges remain in predicting the long term migration of injected CO2. Addressing these challenges requires an understanding of pore-scale transport of CO2 within existing brine-filled geological reservoirs. Studies on the transport of fluids through geological porous media have predominantly focused on oil-bearing formations such as sandstone. However, few studies have considered pore-scale transport within limestone and other carbonate formations, which are found in potential storage sites. In this work, high-resolution micro-Computed Tomography (microCT was used to obtain pore-scale structural information of two model carbonates: Indiana Limestone and Pink Dolomite. A modified watershed algorithm was applied to extract pore network from the reconstructed microCT volumetric images of rock samples and compile a list of pore-scale characteristics from the extracted networks. These include statistical distributions of pore size and radius, pore-pore separation, throat radius, and network coordination. Finally, invasion percolation algorithms were applied to determine saturation-pressure curves for the rock samples. The statistical distributions were comparable to literature values for the Indiana Limestone. This served as validation for the network extraction approach for Pink Dolomite, which has not been considered previously. Based on the connectivity and the pore-pore separation, formations such as Pink Dolomite may present suitable storage sites for carbon storage. The pore structural distributions and saturation curves obtained in this study can be used to inform core- and reservoir-scale modeling and experimental studies of sequestration feasibility.

  5. Submicroscopic pores grafted using the residual sites produced by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzei, R.; Betz, N.; Bermudez, G. Garcia; Massa, G.; Smolko, E.

    2005-01-01

    To produce nuclear track membranes (NTM) with submicroscopic pores poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) foils were irradiated with Cl, Ag and Pb ions. Then they were chemically etched for different times and grafted with acrylic acid. The grafting yields were determined by weight measurements as a function of ion fluence, etching time and also analysed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Both measurements suggest that the acrylic acid was grafted on the pore wall of the NTM using the active sites left by the ion beam

  6. Modeling branching pore structures in membrane filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaei, Pejman; Cummings, Linda J.

    2016-11-01

    Membrane filters are in widespread industrial use, and mathematical models to predict their efficacy are potentially very useful, as such models can suggest design modifications to improve filter performance and lifetime. Many models have been proposed to describe particle capture by membrane filters and the associated fluid dynamics, but most such models are based on a very simple structure in which the pores of the membrane are assumed to be simple circularly-cylindrical tubes spanning the depth of the membrane. Real membranes used in applications usually have much more complex geometry, with interconnected pores which may branch and bifurcate. Pores are also typically larger on the upstream side of the membrane than on the downstream side. We present an idealized mathematical model, in which a membrane consists of a series of bifurcating pores, which decrease in size as the membrane is traversed. Feed solution is forced through the membrane by applied pressure, and particles are removed from the feed either by sieving, or by particle adsorption within pores (which shrinks them). Thus the membrane's permeability decreases as the filtration progresses, ultimately falling to zero. We discuss how filtration efficiency depends on the characteristics of the branching structure. Partial support from NSF DMS 1261596 is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Modeling Tissue Growth Within Nonwoven Scaffolds Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jeffrey S.; Alexander, David L.J.; Russell, Stephen J.; Ingham, Eileen; Ramshaw, John A.M.; Werkmeister, Jerome A.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we present a novel approach for predicting tissue growth within the pores of fibrous tissue engineering scaffolds. Thin nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate scaffolds were prepared to characterize tissue growth within scaffold pores, by mouse NR6 fibroblast cells. On the basis of measurements of tissue lengths at fiber crossovers and along fiber segments, mathematical models were determined during the proliferative phase of cell growth. Tissue growth at fiber crossovers decreased with increasing interfiber angle, with exponential relationships determined on day 6 and 10 of culture. Analysis of tissue growth along fiber segments determined two growth profiles, one with enhanced growth as a result of increased tissue lengths near the fiber crossover, achieved in the latter stage of culture. Derived mathematical models were used in the development of a software program to visualize predicted tissue growth within a pore. This study identifies key pore parameters that contribute toward tissue growth, and suggests models for predicting this growth, based on fibroblast cells. Such models may be used in aiding scaffold design, for optimum pore infiltration during the tissue engineering process. PMID:20687775

  8. Unplugging the callose plug from sieve pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bo; Hong, Zonglie

    2011-04-01

    The presence of callose in sieve plates has been known for a long time, but how this polysaccharide plug is synthesized has remained unsolved. Two independent laboratories have recently reported the identification of callose synthase 7 (CalS7), also known as glucan synthase-like 7 (GSL7), as the enzyme responsible for callose deposition in sieve plates. Mutant plants defective in this enzyme failed to synthesize callose in developing sieve plates during phloem formation and were unable to accumulate callose in sieve pores in response to stress treatments. The mutant plants developed less open pores per sieve plate and the pores were smaller in diameter. As a result, phloem conductivity was reduced significantly and the mutant plants were shorter and set fewer seeds.

  9. Pore-forming toxins in Cnidaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobnik, Marjetka; Anderluh, Gregor

    2017-12-01

    The ancient phylum of Cnidaria contains many aquatic species with peculiar lifestyle. In order to survive, these organisms have evolved attack and defense mechanisms that are enabled by specialized cells and highly developed venoms. Pore-forming toxins are an important part of their venomous arsenal. Along some other types, the most representative are examples of four protein families that are commonly found in other kingdoms of life: actinoporins, Cry-like proteins, aerolysin-like toxins and MACPF/CDC toxins. Some of the homologues of pore-forming toxins may serve other functions, such as in food digestion, development and response against pathogenic organisms. Due to their interesting physico-chemical properties, the cnidarian pore-forming toxins may also serve as tools in medical research and nanobiotechnological applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Moving Magnetic Features Around a Pore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaithakkal, A. J.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.; Lagg, A.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; VanNoort, M. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, Göttingen D-37077 (Germany); Rodríguez, J. Blanco [Grupo de Astronomía y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, E-46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Iniesta, J. C. Del Toro; Suárez, D. Orozco [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Schmidt, W. [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Schöneckstr. 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Pillet, V. Martínez [National Solar Observatory, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Knölker, M., E-mail: anjali@mps.mpg.de [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations from Sunrise/IMaX, obtained in 2013 June, are used for a statistical analysis to determine the physical properties of moving magnetic features (MMFs) observed near a pore. MMFs of the same and opposite polarity, with respect to the pore, are found to stream from its border at an average speed of 1.3 km s{sup −1} and 1.2 km s{sup −1}, respectively, with mainly same-polarity MMFs found further away from the pore. MMFs of both polarities are found to harbor rather weak, inclined magnetic fields. Opposite-polarity MMFs are blueshifted, whereas same-polarity MMFs do not show any preference for up- or downflows. Most of the MMFs are found to be of sub-arcsecond size and carry a mean flux of ∼1.2 × 10{sup 17} Mx.

  11. A new way to parameterize hydraulic conductances of pore elements: A step towards creating pore-networks without pore shape simplifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiuxiu; Gerke, Kirill M.; Sizonenko, Timofey O.

    2017-07-01

    Pore-network models were found useful in describing important flow and transport mechanisms and in predicting flow properties of different porous media relevant to numerous fundamental and industrial applications. Pore-networks provide very fast computational framework and permit simulations on large volumes of pores. This is possible due to significant pore space simplifications and linear/exponential relationships between effective properties and geometrical characteristics of the pore elements. To make such relationships work, pore-network elements are usually simplified by circular, triangular, square and other basic shapes. However, such assumptions result in inaccurate prediction of transport properties. In this paper, we propose that pore-networks can be constructed without pore shape simplifications. To test this hypothesize we extracted 3292 2D pore element cross-sections from 3D X-ray microtomography images of sandstone and carbonate rock samples. Based on the circularity, convexity and elongation of each pore element we trained neural networks to predict the dimensionless hydraulic conductance. The optimal neural network provides 90% of predictions lying within the 20% error bounds compared against direct numerical simulation results. Our novel approach opens a new way to parameterize pore-networks and we outlined future improvements to create a new class of pore-network models without pore shape simplifications.

  12. Porous media fluid transport and pore structure

    CERN Document Server

    Dullien, F A L

    1992-01-01

    This book examines the relationship between transport properties and pore structure of porous material. Models of pore structure are presented with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict the transport properties of porous media. Portions of the book are devoted to interpretations of experimental results in this area and directions for future research. Practical applications are given where applicable, and are expected to be useful for a large number of different fields, including reservoir engineering, geology, hydrogeology, soil science, chemical process engineering, biomedica

  13. Pore-scale modeling of pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zizhen; Wang, Ruihe; Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks.

  14. New approach to increase the gas throughput through mica track microfilters by changing their pore structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi-lun Guo; Tress, G.; Vater, P.; Khan, E.U.; Dersch, R.; Plachky, M.; Brandt, R.; Khan, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    A new approach has been developed to increase the gas throughput of nuclear track microfilters by changing the structure of the etched channels. This can be achieved by reducing the pore length of the filters and by changing the etched channel to two open funnels with a short neck in-between. The mica track microfilters are etched with hot concentrated NaOH solution only. The bulk etch rate is found to be 100 A h -1 . The structure of the mica pores has been studied in detail with optical and scanning electron microscopes. We find that the etching behavior of mica is anisotropic in several directions. A ''funnel-neck-funnel'' structure has been formed in mica by etching in NaOH. The gas throughput increase has been calculated from the modified structure of the mica pore. (author)

  15. Dynamics of polynucleotide transport through nanometre-scale pores

    CERN Document Server

    Meller, A

    2003-01-01

    The transport of biopolymers through large membrane channels is a ubiquitous process in biology. It is central to processes such as gene transfer by transduction and RNA transport through nuclear pore complexes. The transport of polymers through nanoscopic channels is also of interest to physicists and chemists studying the effects of steric, hydrodynamic, and electrostatic interactions between polymers and confining walls. Single-channel ion current measurements have been recently used to study the transport of biopolymers, and in particular single-stranded DNA and RNA molecules, through nanometre-size channels. Under the influence of an electric field, the negatively charged polynucleotides can be captured and drawn through the channel in a process termed 'translocation'. During translocation, the ion current flowing through the channel is mostly blocked, indicating the presence of the polymer inside the channel. The current blockades were found to be sensitive to the properties of the biopolymers such as t...

  16. Double urine circulation: importance of pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonello, Augusto; D'Angelo, Angela; Nalesso, Federico; Capezzi, Maria; Malagoli, Andrea; Pastori, Giordano; Lazzarin, Roberta; Calò, Lorenzo; Bonfante, Luciana; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    The authors examine a presentation to the Royal Academy of Sciences of Paris by L. Morin, French physician and meteorologist. In this communication the presence of "pores" in the stomach and the bladder, which would allow a quick elimination of the urines on the occasion of an abundant fluid intake.

  17. Induction of nano pore in Agrobacterial hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Tousheh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A variety of oxygen-transport and -binding proteins exist in organisms including bacteria, protozoans, and fungi all have hemoglobin-like proteins. In addition to dealing with transport and sensing of oxygen, they may also deal with NO2, CO2, sulfide compounds, and even O2 scavenging in environments. Also they detoxified chlorinated materials like P450 enzymes and peroxidases and use as a detector of nitrate and hydrogen peroxide. Pore-forming bacterial globins are interested for filtration. Materials and methods: Although there are data for bacterial toxin as a filter, here we used Agrobacterial hem to induce nano pore in the heme structure using point mutation. Results: Investigations showed that three amino acids leucine 76, alanine 83 and histidine 80 are important for pore formation in Agrobacterium hemoglobin. A point mutation on leucine 76 to glycine, histidine 80 to asparagine and alanine 83 to lysine step by step led to create the nano pore 0.7- 0.8 nm in the globin. Discussion and conclusion: These mutations in bacterial hemoglobin increase the stability when mutation is with it’s at pH7. This mutation decreases the aliphatic index however increase the stability index.

  18. Temperature and Pressure from Collapsing Pores in HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, D. Barrett

    2017-06-01

    The thermal and mechanical response of collapsing voids in HMX is analyzed. In this work, the focus is simulating the temperature and pressure fields arising from isolated, idealized pores as they collapse in the presence of a shock. HMX slabs are numerically generated which contain a single pore, isolated from the boundaries to remove all wave reflections. In order to understand the primary pore characteristics leading to temperature rise, a series of 2D, plane strain simulations are conducted on HMX slabs containing both cylindrical and elliptical pores of constant size equal to the area of a circular pore with a 1 micron diameter. Each of these pore types is then subjected to shock pressures ranging from a weak shock that is unable to fully collapse the pore to a strong shock which overwhelms the tendency for localization. Results indicate that as shock strength increases, pore collapse phenomenology for a cylindrical pore transitions from a mode dominated by localized melt cracking to an idealized hydrodynamic pore collapse. For the case of elliptical pores, the orientation causing maximum temperature and pressure rise is found. The relative heating in elliptical pores is then quantified as a function of pore orientation and aspect ratio for a pore of a given area. Distribution A: Distribution unlimited. (96TW 2017-0036).

  19. Influence of pore fluid and frequency on elastic properties of greensand as interpreted using NMR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Zakir; Mukerj, Tapan; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to discuss the influence of pore fluid on elastic properties of greensand. Gassmann’s equations generally work at low frequency and do not take into consideration the fluid related dispersion. In some cases Biot’s theory is used to describe the fluid related...... to a local stiffening pressure gradient in the fluid. Then fluid flow in greensand could then be described as a kind of squirt flow. Greensand data from the North Nini filed was included in this study. Gassmann’s, Biot’s and squirt models were used to discuss the influence of pore fluid on elastic moduli....... Biot’s critical frequency and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) T2 spectrum were combined to describe the differences in fluid flow within macro-pores and within micro-pores. NMR data show that Biot’s flow should occur only in large pores in the greensand while, Biot’s flow should not occur in micro...

  20. Multiscale pore networks and their effect on deformation and transport property alteration associated with hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Hugh; Hayman, Nicholas; Jiang, Han; Tian, Xiao; Jiang, Chunbi

    2017-04-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that, during a hydraulic fracture stimulation, the permeability of the unfractured matrix far from the main, induced tensile fracture increases by one to two orders of magnitude. This permeability enhancement is associated with pervasive shear failure in a large region surrounding the main induced fracture. We have performed low-pressure gas sorption, mercury intrusion, and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements along with high-resolution scanning electron microscope imaging on several preserved and unpreserved shale samples from North American basins before and after inducing failure in confined compressive strength tests. We have observed that the pore structure in intact samples exhibits multiscale behavior, with sub-micron-scale pores in organic matter connected in isolated, micron-scale clusters which themselves are connected to each other through a network of microcracks. The organic-hosted pore networks are poorly connected due to a significant number of dead-end pores within the organic matter. Following shear failure, we often observe an increase in pore volume in the sub-micron range, which appears to be related to the formation of microcracks that propagate along grain boundaries and other planes of mechanical strength contrast. This is consistent with other experimental and field evidence. In some cases these microcracks cross or terminate in organic matter, intersecting the organic-hosted pores. The induced microcrack networks typically have low connectivity and do not appreciably increase the connectivity of the overall pore network. However, in other cases the shear deformation results in an overall pore volume decrease; samples which exhibit this behavior tend to have more clay minerals. Our interpretation of these phenomena is as follows. As organic matter is converted to hydrocarbons, organic-hosted pores develop, and the hydrocarbons contained in these pores are overpressured. The disconnected nature of these

  1. Revealing the influence of water-cement ratio on the pore size distribution in hydrated cement paste by using cyclohexane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bede, Andrea; Ardelean, Ioan

    2017-12-01

    Varying the amount of water in a concrete mix will influence its final properties considerably due to the changes in the capillary porosity. That is why a non-destructive technique is necessary for revealing the capillary pore distribution inside hydrated cement based materials and linking the capillary porosity with the macroscopic properties of these materials. In the present work, we demonstrate a simple approach for revealing the differences in capillary pore size distributions introduced by the preparation of cement paste with different water-to-cement ratios. The approach relies on monitoring the nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation distribution of cyclohexane molecules confined inside the cement paste pores. The technique reveals the whole spectrum of pores inside the hydrated cement pastes, allowing a qualitative and quantitative analysis of different pore sizes. The cement pastes with higher water-to-cement ratios show an increase in capillary porosity, while for all the samples the intra-C-S-H and inter-C-S-H pores (also known as gel pores) remain unchanged. The technique can be applied to various porous materials with internal mineral surfaces.

  2. Protoparvovirus Knocking at the Nuclear Door.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäntylä, Elina; Kann, Michael; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija

    2017-10-02

    Protoparvoviruses target the nucleus due to their dependence on the cellular reproduction machinery during the replication and expression of their single-stranded DNA genome. In recent years, our understanding of the multistep process of the capsid nuclear import has improved, and led to the discovery of unique viral nuclear entry strategies. Preceded by endosomal transport, endosomal escape and microtubule-mediated movement to the vicinity of the nuclear envelope, the protoparvoviruses interact with the nuclear pore complexes. The capsids are transported actively across the nuclear pore complexes using nuclear import receptors. The nuclear import is sometimes accompanied by structural changes in the nuclear envelope, and is completed by intranuclear disassembly of capsids and chromatinization of the viral genome. This review discusses the nuclear import strategies of protoparvoviruses and describes its dynamics comprising active and passive movement, and directed and diffusive motion of capsids in the molecularly crowded environment of the cell.

  3. Pores and Void in Asclepiades’ Physical Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines a fundamental, though relatively understudied, aspect of the physical theory of the physician Asclepiades of Bithynia, namely his doctrine of pores. My principal thesis is that this doctrine is dependent on a conception of void taken directly from Epicurean physics. The paper falls into two parts: the first half addresses the evidence for the presence of void in Asclepiades’ theory, and concludes that his conception of void was basically that of Epicurus; the second half focuses on the precise nature of Asclepiadean pores, and seeks to show that they represent void interstices between the primary particles of matter which are the constituents of the human body, and are thus exactly analogous to the void interstices between atoms within solid objects in Epicurus’ theory. PMID:22984299

  4. Pore-Scale Model for Microbial Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, G.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Scheibe, T. D.

    2011-12-01

    A lagrangian particle model based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is used to simulate pore-scale flow, reactive transport and biomass growth which is controlled by the mixing of an electron donor and acceptor, in a microfluidic porous cell. The experimental results described in Ch. Zhang et al "Effects of pore-scale heterogeneity and transverse mixing on bacterial growth in porous media" were used for this study. The model represents the homogeneous pore structure of a uniform array of cylindrical posts with microbes uniformly distributed on the grain surfaces. Each one of the two solutes (electron donor and electron acceptor) enters the domain unmixed through separate inlets. In the model, pair-wise particle-particle interactions are used to simulate interactions within the biomass, and both biomass-fluid and biomass-soil grain interactions. The biomass growth rate is described by double Monod kinetics. For the set of parameters used in the simulations the model predicts that: 1) biomass grows in the shape of bridges connecting soil grains and oriented in the direction of flow so as to minimize resistance to the fluid flow; and 2) the biomass growth occurs only in the mixing zone. Using parameters available in the literature, the biomass growth model agrees qualitatively with the experimental results. In order to achieve quantitative agreement, model calibration is required.

  5. Real-Time Pore Pressure Detection: Indicators and Improved Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Jincai Zhang; Shangxian Yin

    2017-01-01

    High uncertainties may exist in the predrill pore pressure prediction in new prospects and deepwater subsalt wells; therefore, real-time pore pressure detection is highly needed to reduce drilling risks. The methods for pore pressure detection (the resistivity, sonic, and corrected d-exponent methods) are improved using the depth-dependent normal compaction equations to adapt to the requirements of the real-time monitoring. A new method is proposed to calculate pore pressure from the connecti...

  6. Facial skin pores: a multiethnic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flament F

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Frederic Flament,1 Ghislain Francois,1 Huixia Qiu,2 Chengda Ye,2 Tomoo Hanaya,3 Dominique Batisse,3 Suzy Cointereau-Chardon,1 Mirela Donato Gianeti Seixas,4 Susi Elaine Dal Belo,4 Roland Bazin5 1Department of Applied Research and Development, L’Oreal Research and Innovation, Paris, France; 2Department of Applied Research and Development, L’Oreal Research and Innovation, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Applied Research and Development, L’Oreal Research and Innovation, Tokyo, Japan; 4Department of Applied Research and Development, L’Oreal Research and Innovation, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 5RB Consult, Bievres, France Abstract: Skin pores (SP, as they are called by laymen, are common and benign features mostly located on the face (nose, cheeks, etc that generate many aesthetic concerns or complaints. Despite the prevalence of skin pores, related literature is scarce. With the aim of describing the prevalence of skin pores and anatomic features among ethnic groups, a dermatoscopic instrument, using polarized lighting, coupled to a digital camera recorded the major features of skin pores (size, density, coverage on the cheeks of 2,585 women in different countries and continents. A detection threshold of 250 µm, correlated to clinical scorings by experts, was input into a specific software to further allow for automatic counting of the SP density (N/cm2 and determination of their respective sizes in mm2. Integrating both criteria also led to establishing the relative part of the skin surface (as a percentage that is actually covered by SP on cheeks. The results showed that the values of respective sizes, densities, and skin coverage: 1 were recorded in all studied subjects; 2 varied greatly with ethnicity; 3 plateaued with age in most cases; and 4 globally reflected self-assessment by subjects, in particular those who self-declare having “enlarged pores” like Brazilian women. Inversely, Chinese women were clearly

  7. Estimation of adsorption-induced pore pressure and confinement in a nanoscopic slit pore by a density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, David; Malheiro, Carine; Miqueu, Christelle

    2018-03-01

    This study aims at characterising the adsorption-induced pore pressure and confinement in nanoscopic pores by molecular non-local density functional theory (DFT). Considering its important potential industrial applications, the adsorption of methane in graphitic slit pores has been selected as the test case. While retaining the accuracy of molecular simulations at pore scale, DFT has a very low computational cost that allows obtaining highly resolved pore pressure maps as a function of both pore width and thermodynamic conditions. The dependency of pore pressure on these parameters (pore width, pressure and temperature) is carefully analysed in order to highlight the effect of each parameter on the confined fluid properties that impact the solid matrix.

  8. Multiscale pore structure and constitutive models of fine-grained rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, J. E.; Dewers, T. A.; Shields, E. A.; Yoon, H.; Milliken, K. L.

    2017-12-01

    A foundational concept of continuum poromechanics is the representative elementary volume or REV: an amount of material large enough that pore- or grain-scale fluctuations in relevant properties are dissipated to a definable mean, but smaller than length scales of heterogeneity. We determine 2D-equivalent representative elementary areas (REAs) of pore areal fraction of three major types of mudrocks by applying multi-beam scanning electron microscopy (mSEM) to obtain terapixel image mosaics. Image analysis obtains pore areal fraction and pore size and shape as a function of progressively larger measurement areas. Using backscattering imaging and mSEM data, pores are identified by the components within which they occur, such as in organics or the clastic matrix. We correlate pore areal fraction with nano-indentation, micropillar compression, and axysimmetic testing at multiple length scales on a terrigenous-argillaceous mudrock sample. The combined data set is used to: investigate representative elementary volumes (and areas for the 2D images); determine if scale separation occurs; and determine if transport and mechanical properties at a given length scale can be statistically defined. Clear scale separation occurs between REAs and observable heterogeneity in two of the samples. A highly-laminated sample exhibits fine-scale heterogeneity and an overlapping in scales, in which case typical continuum assumptions on statistical variability may break down. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International Inc. for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525.

  9. Capillary pressure in a porous medium with distinct pore surface and pore volume fractal dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinert, M R; Dathe, A; Parlange, J-Y; Cady, K B

    2008-02-01

    The relationship between capillary pressure and saturation in a porous medium often exhibits a power-law dependence. The physical basis for this relation has been substantiated by assuming that capillary pressure is directly related to the pore radius. When the pore space of a medium exhibits fractal structure this approach results in a power-law relation with an exponent of 3-D(v), where D(v) is the pore volume fractal dimension. However, larger values of the exponent than are realistically allowed by this result have long been known to occur. Using a thermodynamic formulation for equilibrium capillary pressure we show that the standard result is a special case of the more general exponent (3-D(v))(3-D(s)) where D(s) is the surface fractal dimension of the pores. The analysis reduces to the standard result when D(s)=2, indicating a Euclidean relationship between a pore's surface area and the volume it encloses, and allows for a larger value for the exponent than the standard result when D(s)>2 .

  10. Effects of management and pore characteristics on organic matter composition of macroaggregates: evidence from characterization of organic matter and imaging: Pore characteristics and OM composition of macroaggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toosi, E. R. [Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Michigan State University, 1066 Bogue St., East Lansing MI 48823 USA; Kravchenko, A. N. [Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Michigan State University, 1066 Bogue St., East Lansing MI 48823 USA; Mao, J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Old Dominion University, 4541 Hampton Blvd, Norfolk VA 23529 USA; Quigley, M. Y. [Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Michigan State University, 1066 Bogue St., East Lansing MI 48823 USA; Rivers, M. L. [Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, Argonne National Laboratory, The University of Chicago, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne IL 60439 USA

    2017-02-07

    Macroaggregates are of interest because of their fast response to land management and their role in the loss or restoration of soil organic carbon (SOC). The study included two experiments. In Experiment I, we investigated the effect of long-term (27 years) land management on the chemical composition of organic matter (OM) of macroaggregates. Macroaggregates were sampled from topsoil under conventional cropping, cover cropping and natural succession systems. The OM of macroaggregates from conventional cropping was more decomposed than that of cover cropping and especially natural succession, based on larger δ15N values and decomposition indices determined by multiple magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (13C CP/MAS NMR) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Previous research at the sites studied suggested that this was mainly because of reduced diversity and activity of the decomposer community, change in nutrient stoichiometry from fertilization and contrasting formation pathways of macroaggregates in conventional cropping compared with cover cropping and, specifically, natural succession. In Experiment II, we investigated the relation between OM composition and pore characteristics of macroaggregates. Macroaggregates from the natural succession system only were studied. We determined 3-D pore-size distribution of macroaggregates with X-ray microtomography, for which we cut the macroaggregates into sections that had contrasting dominant pore sizes. Then, we characterized the OM of macroaggregate sections with FTIR and δ15N methods. The results showed that within a macroaggregate, the OM was less decomposed in areas where the small (13–32 µm) or large (136–260 µm) pores were abundant. This was attributed to the role of large pores in supplying fresh OM and small pores in the effective protection of OM in macroaggregates. Previous research at the site studied had shown increased abundance of large and small

  11. Energy conversion device with support member having pore channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routkevitch, Dmitri [Longmont, CO; Wind, Rikard A [Johnstown, CO

    2014-01-07

    Energy devices such as energy conversion devices and energy storage devices and methods for the manufacture of such devices. The devices include a support member having an array of pore channels having a small average pore channel diameter and having a pore channel length. Material layers that may include energy conversion materials and conductive materials are coaxially disposed within the pore channels to form material rods having a relatively small cross-section and a relatively long length. By varying the structure of the materials in the pore channels, various energy devices can be fabricated, such as photovoltaic (PV) devices, radiation detectors, capacitors, batteries and the like.

  12. Reactive transport in porous media: Pore-network model approach compared to pore-scale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varloteaux, Clément; Vu, Minh Tan; Békri, Samir; Adler, Pierre M.

    2013-02-01

    Accurate determination of three macroscopic parameters governing reactive transport in porous media, namely, the apparent solute velocity, the dispersion, and the apparent reaction rate, is of key importance for predicting solute migration through reservoir aquifers. Two methods are proposed to calculate these parameters as functions of the Péclet and the Péclet-Dahmköhler numbers. In the first method called the pore-scale model (PSM), the porous medium is discretized by the level set method; the Stokes and convection-diffusion equations with reaction at the wall are solved by a finite-difference scheme. In the second method, called the pore-network model (PNM), the void space of the porous medium is represented by an idealized geometry of pore bodies joined by pore throats; the flow field is computed by solving Kirchhoff's laws and transport calculations are performed in the asymptotic regime where the solute concentration undergoes an exponential evolution with time. Two synthetic geometries of porous media are addressed by using both numerical codes. The first geometry is constructed in order to validate the hypotheses implemented in PNM. PSM is also used for a better understanding of the various reaction patterns observed in the asymptotic regime. Despite the PNM approximations, a very good agreement between the models is obtained, which shows that PNM is an accurate description of reactive transport. PNM, which can address much larger pore volumes than PSM, is used to evaluate the influence of the concentration distribution on macroscopic properties of a large irregular network reconstructed from microtomography images. The role of the dimensionless numbers and of the location and size of the largest pore bodies is highlighted.

  13. Quantifying similarity of pore-geometry in nanoporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongjin; Barthel, Senja D.; Dłotko, Paweł; Moosavi, S. Mohamad; Hess, Kathryn; Smit, Berend

    2017-05-01

    In most applications of nanoporous materials the pore structure is as important as the chemical composition as a determinant of performance. For example, one can alter performance in applications like carbon capture or methane storage by orders of magnitude by only modifying the pore structure. For these applications it is therefore important to identify the optimal pore geometry and use this information to find similar materials. However, the mathematical language and tools to identify materials with similar pore structures, but different composition, has been lacking. We develop a pore recognition approach to quantify similarity of pore structures and classify them using topological data analysis. This allows us to identify materials with similar pore geometries, and to screen for materials that are similar to given top-performing structures. Using methane storage as a case study, we also show that materials can be divided into topologically distinct classes requiring different optimization strategies.

  14. Rock Physics of Reservoir Rocks with Varying Pore Water Saturation and Pore Water Salinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina

    the mechanical or physical properties of the rock during waterflooding experiments. The phenomena include decreased pore stiffness and subsequent compaction and can be related to a variety of parameters; including precipitation and dissolution reactions, as well as adsorption reactions and changes in wettability...... to understand the potential mechanisms behind the action of ions in high concentration on the chalk surface; such as precipitation and dissolution. The effect of the divalent ions on the elasticity and pore collapse of this rock was observed and validated from the ultrasonic velocity data. Low field NMR...

  15. Silicon pore optics developments and status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric; Wallace, Kotska

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) is a lightweight high performance X-ray optics technology being developed in Europe, driven by applications in observatory class high energy astrophysics missions. An example of such application is the former ESA science mission candidate ATHENA (Advanced Telescope...... for High Energy Astrophysics), which uses the SPO technology for its two telescopes, in order to provide an effective area exceeding 1 m2 at 1 keV, and 0.5 m2 at 6 keV, featuring an angular resolution of 10" or better [1 to 24]. This paper reports on the development activities led by ESA, and the status...

  16. Hydrophobic polymers modification of mesoporous silica with large pore size for drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Shenmin, E-mail: smzhu@sjtu.edu.c [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites (China); Zhang Di; Yang Na [Fudan University, Ministry of Education, Key Lab of Molecular Engineering of Polymers (China)

    2009-04-15

    Mesostructure cellular foam (MCF) materials were modified with hydrophobic polyisoprene (PI) through free radical polymerization in the pores network, and the resulting materials (MCF-PI) were investigated as matrices for drug storage. The successful synthesis of PI inside MCF was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR), X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements. It was interesting to find the resultant system held a relatively large pore size (19.5 nm) and pore volume (1.02 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}), which would benefit for drug storage. Ibuprofen (IBU) and vancomycin were selected as model drugs and loaded onto unmodified MCF and modified MCF (MCF-PI). The adsorption capacities of these model drugs on MCF-PI were observed increase as compared to that of on pure MCF, due to the trap effects induced by polyisoprene chains inside the pores. The delivery system of MCF-PI was found to be more favorable for the adsorption of IBU (31 wt%, IBU/silica), possibly attributing to the hydrophobic interaction between IBU and PI formed on the internal surface of MCF matrix. The release of drug through the porous network was investigated by measuring uptake and release of IBU.

  17. Visualization of PML nuclear import complexes reveals FG-repeat nucleoporins at cargo retrieval sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lång, Anna; Eriksson, Jens; Schink, Kay Oliver; Lång, Emma; Blicher, Pernille; Połeć, Anna; Brech, Andreas; Dalhus, Bjørn; Bøe, Stig Ove

    2017-07-04

    Selective nuclear import in eukaryotic cells involves sequential interactions between nuclear import receptors and phenylalanine-glycine (FG)-repeat nucleoporins. Traditionally, binding of cargoes to import receptors is perceived as a nuclear pore complex independent event, while interactions between import complexes and nucleoporins are thought to take place at the nuclear pores. However, studies have shown that nucleoporins are mobile and not static within the nuclear pores, suggesting that they may become engaged in nuclear import before nuclear pore entry. Here we have studied post-mitotic nuclear import of the tumor suppressor protein PML. Since this protein forms nuclear compartments called PML bodies that persist during mitosis, the assembly of putative PML import complexes can be visualized on the surface of these protein aggregates as the cell progress from an import inactive state in mitosis to an import active state in G1. We show that these post-mitotic cytoplasmic PML bodies incorporate a multitude of peripheral nucleoporins, but not scaffold or nuclear basket nucleoporins, in a manner that depends on FG-repeats, the KPNB1 import receptor, and the PML nuclear localization signal. The study suggests that nucleoporins have the ability to target certain nuclear cargo proteins in a nuclear pore-uncoupled state, before nuclear pore entry.

  18. [A photographic scale for evaluating facial pores and analysis of factors associated with pore widening in Chengdu].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Zhou, Cheng-xia; Meng, Hui-min; Wang, Xi; Li, Li

    2010-09-01

    To develop a photographic scale for grading widening of pores, and to identify the factors associated with pore widening. People with widened pores were recruited, with photographs taken on their nasal tips, nasal alas and cheeks. A questionnaire survey was undertaken by dermatologists to assess the severity of pore widening. A Cumulative Logit Model was established to identify factors that were associated with pore widening. A total of 115 people participated in the study and 562 photographs were taken. The photographic scale was highly consistent with the clinical judgment. Another 1011 residents aged from 18 to 70 years old in Chengdu were surveyed. The logit model revealed that facial pore widening were associated with gender, age, oily skin, sun protection and anti-aging cosmetic. The photographic scale is reliable and easy to use. Gender, age and oily skin are risk factors, and sun protection and anti-aging cosmetic are protective factors with related to pore widening.

  19. Performance characterization of silicon pore optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collon, M. J.; Kraft, S.; Günther, R.; Maddox, E.; Beijersbergen, M.; Bavdaz, M.; Lumb, D.; Wallace, K.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Freyberg, M.

    2006-06-01

    The characteristics of the latest generation of assembled silicon pore X-ray optics are discussed in this paper. These very light, stiff and modular high performance pore optics (HPO) have been developed [1] for the next generation of astronomical X-ray telescopes, which require large collecting areas whilst achieving angular resolutions better than 5 arcseconds. The suitability of 12 inch silicon wafers as high quality optical mirrors and the automated assembly process are discussed elsewhere in this conference. HPOs with several tens of ribbed silicon plates are assembled by bending the plates into an accurate cylindrical shape and directly bonding them on top of each other. The achievable figure accuracy is measured during assembly and in test campaigns at X-ray testing facilities like BESSY-II and PANTER. Pencil beam measurements allow gaining information on the quality achieved by the production process with high spatial resolution. In combination with full beam illumination a complete picture of the excellent performance of these optics can be derived. Experimental results are presented and discussed in detail. The results of such campaigns are used to further improve the production process in order to match the challenging XEUS requirements [2] for imaging resolution and mass.

  20. Multiple Approaches to Characterizing Pore Structure in Natural Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Dultz, S.; Hamamoto, S.; Ewing, R. P.

    2012-12-01

    Microscopic characteristics of porous media - pore shape, pore-size distribution, and pore connectivity - control fluid flow and chemical transport, and are important in hydrogeological studies of rock formations in the context of energy, environmental, and water resources management. This presentation discusses various approaches to investigating pore structure of rock, with a particular focus on the Barnett Shale in north Texas used for natural gas production. Approaches include imbibition, tracer diffusion, porosimetry (MIP, vapor adsorption/desorption isotherms, NMR cyroporometry), and imaging (μ-tomography, Wood's metal impregnation, FIB/SEM). Results show that the Barnett Shale pores are predominantly in the nm size range, with a measured median pore-throat diameter of 6.5 nm. But small pore size is not the major contributor to low gas recovery; rather, the low gas diffusivity appears to be caused by low pore connectivity. Chemical diffusion in sparsely-connected pore spaces is not well described by classical Fickian behavior; anomalous behavior is suggested by percolation theory, and confirmed by results of imbibition tests. Our evolving complementary approaches, with their several advantages and disadvantages, provide a rich toolbox for tackling the pore structure characteristics in the Barnett Shale and other natural rocks.

  1. A Stereolithography Pore-Throat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, D.; Ahmadi, G.; Ferer, M.; Smith, D. H.

    2007-12-01

    A new experimental, heterogeneous pore-throat model has been designed and fabricated using stereolithography (SL). In SL production, a laser cures a thin layer of photo-sensitive resin on the surface of a vat of liquid resin; a moveable platform then submerges the cured layer and a new layer is cured on top of the previous one, creating a physical model from a computer generated model. This layered fabrication of a computer generated model has enabled the production of an experimental porous medium with improved fluid resistance properties, as compared to previously studied, constant-height etched cells. A uniform distribution of throat widths was randomly placed throughout the pore-throat matrix and the throat height of each throat was assigned to increase the range of viscous and capillary resistances within the physical model. This variation in both throat height and width generated a porous medium with fairly low porosity (43%), permeability (~400 D), and wide range of geometric resistance properties. Experimental, two-phase immiscible drainage studies in the porous flowcell were performed. Analysis of the captured images was performed with open-source image processing software. These analysis techniques utilized the capability of both ImageJ and the Gnu Image Manipulation Program to be customized with ancillary codes. This enabled batch procedures to be created that converted the original grey-scale bitmaps to binary data sets, which were then analyzed with in-house codes. The fractal dimension, Df, (measured with box-counting) and percent saturation of these experiments were calculated and shown to compare favorably to fractal predictions and previous flowcell studies. Additionally, using the computer generated pore-throat geometry, a computational fluid dynamics model of two- phase flow through the porous medium was created. This model was created using FLUENT code and the Volume of Fluid method. The percent saturation of the less-viscous invading fluid

  2. P2X7R large pore is partially blocked by pore forming proteins antagonists in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Robson X; Reis, Ricardo A M; Ferreira, Leonardo G B; Cezar-de-Mello, Paula F T; Moraes, Milton O

    2016-06-01

    The ATP-gated P2X7R (P2X7R) is a channel, which is involved in events, such as inflammation, cell death, and pain. The most intriguing event concerning P2X7R functions is the phenomenon of pore dilation. Once P2X7R is activated, the permeability of the plasma membrane becomes higher, leading to the permeation of 1000 Da-weight solutes. The mechanisms involved in this process remain unclear. Nevertheless, this event is not exclusively through P2X7R, as other proteins may form large pores in the plasma membrane. Recent evidence concerning pore formation reveals putative P2X7R and other pores-associated protein complexes, revealing cross-interactive pharmacological and biophysical issues. In this work, we showed results that corroborated with cross-interactive aspects with P2X7R and pores in astrocytes. These cells expressed most of the pores, including P2X7R. We discovered that different pore types open with peculiar characteristics, as both anionic and cationic charged solutes permeate the plasma membrane, following P2X7R activation. Moreover, we showed that both synergic and additive relationships are found within P2X7, cationic, and anionic large pores. Therefore, our data suggest that other protein-related pores are assembled following the formation of P2X7R pore.

  3. The Pore Structure of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Peter Brilner

    2005-01-01

    The pore structure and morphology of direct methanol fuel cell electrodes are characterized using mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that the pore size distributions of printed primer and catalyst layers are largely dictated by the powders used to make...... the printing ink. The extent to which the pore structure is modified by changing several parameters in the membrane electrode assembly MEA manufacturing process is discussed. The pore structure of the printed layers is found to be invariant with respect to changes in powder loading or in choice of printing...... substrate, and is relatively undisturbed by MEA hot-pressing. Changing the source of the primer powder and adding a pore-forming agent to the catalyst ink are found to be successful methods of creating a more open pore structure in the printed layers....

  4. Preparation of micro-pored silicone elastomer through radiation crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiaoling; Gu Mei; Xie Xubing; Huang Wei

    2013-01-01

    The radiation crosslinking was adopted to prepare the micro-pored silicone elastomer, which was performed by vulcanization and foaming respectively. Radiation crosslinking is a new method to prepare micro-pored material with high performance by use of radiation technology. Silicon dioxide was used as filler, and silicone elastomer was vulcanized by electron beams, then the micro-pored material was made by heating method at a high temperature. The effects of absorbed dose and filler content on the performance and morphology were investigated. The structure and distribution of pores were observed by SEM. The results show that the micro-pored silicon elastomer can be prepared successfully by controlling the absorbed dose and filler content. It has a smooth surface similar to a rubber meanwhile the pores are round and unconnected to each other with the minimum size of 14 μm. And the good mechanical performance can be suitable for further uses. (authors)

  5. Factors Determining the Pore Shape in Polycarbonate Track Membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, P Yu; Orelovich, O L; Akimenko, S N; Sartowska, B; Dmitriev, S N

    2004-01-01

    The process of pore formation in ion-irradiated polycarbonate films on treatment with alkali solutions in the presence of a surfactant is studied. It is found that the pore shape depends on both the structure of the initial films and the peculiarities of the interaction of the surfactant with the polymer surface and the transport of the surfactant into tracks. Due to heterogeneity of the films the cross-section of a track pore channel changes along its length. The presence of the surfactant results in a further effect. Surfactant molecules adsorb on the polymer surface at the pore entries and reduce the etch rate which leads to formation of cigar-like pore channels. The use of surfactant as a component of chemical etchant enables one to control the pore shape in track membranes thus optimizing their retention and permeation characteristics.

  6. Pore size matters for potassium channel conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldenhauer, Hans; Pincuntureo, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that mediate efficient ion transport across the hydrophobic core of cell membranes, an unlikely process in their absence. K+ channels discriminate K+ over cations with similar radii with extraordinary selectivity and display a wide diversity of ion transport rates, covering differences of two orders of magnitude in unitary conductance. The pore domains of large- and small-conductance K+ channels share a general architectural design comprising a conserved narrow selectivity filter, which forms intimate interactions with permeant ions, flanked by two wider vestibules toward the internal and external openings. In large-conductance K+ channels, the inner vestibule is wide, whereas in small-conductance channels it is narrow. Here we raise the idea that the physical dimensions of the hydrophobic internal vestibule limit ion transport in K+ channels, accounting for their diversity in unitary conductance. PMID:27619418

  7. Deciphering pore-level precipitation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasianakis, N I; Curti, E; Kosakowski, G; Poonoosamy, J; Churakov, S V

    2017-10-23

    Mineral precipitation and dissolution in aqueous solutions has a significant effect on solute transport and structural properties of porous media. The understanding of the involved physical mechanisms, which cover a large range of spatial and temporal scales, plays a key role in several geochemical and industrial processes. Here, by coupling pore scale reactive transport simulations with classical nucleation theory, we demonstrate how the interplay between homogeneous and heterogeneous precipitation kinetics along with the non-linear dependence on solute concentration affects the evolution of the system. Such phenomena are usually neglected in pure macroscopic modelling. Comprehensive parametric analysis and comparison with laboratory experiments confirm that incorporation of detailed microscale physical processes in the models is compulsory. This sheds light on the inherent coupling mechanisms and bridges the gap between atomistic processes and macroscopic observations.

  8. Joint inversion of NMR and SIP data to estimate pore size distribution of geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Qifei; Zhang, Chi

    2018-03-01

    There are growing interests in using geophysical tools to characterize the microstructure of geomaterials because of the non-invasive nature and the applicability in field. In these applications, multiple types of geophysical data sets are usually processed separately, which may be inadequate to constrain the key feature of target variables. Therefore, simultaneous processing of multiple data sets could potentially improve the resolution. In this study, we propose a method to estimate pore size distribution by joint inversion of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) T2 relaxation and spectral induced polarization (SIP) spectra. The petrophysical relation between NMR T2 relaxation time and SIP relaxation time is incorporated in a nonlinear least squares problem formulation, which is solved using Gauss-Newton method. The joint inversion scheme is applied to a synthetic sample and a Berea sandstone sample. The jointly estimated pore size distributions are very close to the true model and results from other experimental method. Even when the knowledge of the petrophysical models of the sample is incomplete, the joint inversion can still capture the main features of the pore size distribution of the samples, including the general shape and relative peak positions of the distribution curves. It is also found from the numerical example that the surface relaxivity of the sample could be extracted with the joint inversion of NMR and SIP data if the diffusion coefficient of the ions in the electrical double layer is known. Comparing to individual inversions, the joint inversion could improve the resolution of the estimated pore size distribution because of the addition of extra data sets. The proposed approach might constitute a first step towards a comprehensive joint inversion that can extract the full pore geometry information of a geomaterial from NMR and SIP data.

  9. Measure of pore size in micro filtration polymeric membrane using ultrasonic technique and artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, Carla de Souza

    2009-01-01

    This work presents a study of the pore size in micro filtration polymeric membranes, used in the nuclear area for the filtration of radioactive liquid effluent, in the residual water treatment of the petrochemical industry, in the electronic industry for the ultrapure water production for the manufacture of conductors and laundering of microcircuits and in many other processes of separation. Diverse processes for measures of pores sizes in membranes exist, amongst these, electronic microscopy, of bubble point and mercury intrusion porosimetry, however the majority of these uses destructive techniques, of high cost or great time of analysis. The proposal of this work is to measure so great of pore being used ultrasonic technique in the time domain of the frequency and artificial neural networks. A receiving/generator of ultrasonic pulses, a immersion transducer of 25 MHz was used, a tank of immersion and microporous membranes of pores sizes of 0,2 μm, 0,4 μm, 0,6 μm, 8 μm, 10 μm and 12 μm. The ultrasonic signals after to cover the membrane, come back to the transducer (emitting/receiving) bringing information of the interaction of the signal with the membranes. These signals had been used for the training of neural networks, and these had supplied the necessary precision the distinction of the same ones. Soon after, technique with the one of electronic microscopy of sweepings was made the comparison of this. The experiment showed very resulted next to the results gotten with the MEV, what it indicated that the studied technique is ideal for measure of pore size in membranes for being not destructive and of this form to be able to be used also on-line of production. (author)

  10. Preferential flow from pore to landscape scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koestel, J. K.; Jarvis, N.; Larsbo, M.

    2017-12-01

    In this presentation, we give a brief personal overview of some recent progress in quantifying preferential flow in the vadose zone, based on our own work and those of other researchers. One key challenge is to bridge the gap between the scales at which preferential flow occurs (i.e. pore to Darcy scales) and the scales of interest for management (i.e. fields, catchments, regions). We present results of recent studies that exemplify the potential of 3-D non-invasive imaging techniques to visualize and quantify flow processes at the pore scale. These studies should lead to a better understanding of how the topology of macropore networks control key state variables like matric potential and thus the strength of preferential flow under variable initial and boundary conditions. Extrapolation of this process knowledge to larger scales will remain difficult, since measurement technologies to quantify macropore networks at these larger scales are lacking. Recent work suggests that the application of key concepts from percolation theory could be useful in this context. Investigation of the larger Darcy-scale heterogeneities that generate preferential flow patterns at the soil profile, hillslope and field scales has been facilitated by hydro-geophysical measurement techniques that produce highly spatially and temporally resolved data. At larger regional and global scales, improved methods of data-mining and analyses of large datasets (machine learning) may help to parameterize models as well as lead to new insights into the relationships between soil susceptibility to preferential flow and site attributes (climate, land uses, soil types).

  11. X-ray microtomography application in pore space reservoir rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, M F S; Lima, I; Borghi, L; Lopes, R T

    2012-07-01

    Characterization of porosity in carbonate rocks is important in the oil and gas industry since a major hydrocarbons field is formed by this lithology and they have a complex media porous. In this context, this research presents a study of the pore space in limestones rocks by x-ray microtomography. Total porosity, type of porosity and pore size distribution were evaluated from 3D high resolution images. Results show that carbonate rocks has a complex pore space system with different pores types at the same facies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of the synaptobrevin C terminus in fusion pore formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngatchou, Annita N; Kisler, Kassandra; Fang, Qinghua

    2010-01-01

    stimulation, the SNARE complex pulls the C terminus of sybII deeper into the vesicle membrane. We propose that this movement disrupts the vesicular membrane continuity leading to fusion pore formation. In contrast to current models, the experiments suggest that fusion pore formation begins with molecular......Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the SNARE proteins synaptobrevin II (sybII, also known as VAMP2), syntaxin, and SNAP-25, generating a force transfer to the membranes and inducing fusion pore formation. However, the molecular mechanism by which this force leads to opening of a fusion pore...

  13. Fusion Pore Diameter Regulation by Cations Modulating Local Membrane Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron Kabaso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fusion pore is an aqueous channel that is formed upon the fusion of the vesicle membrane with the plasma membrane. Once the pore is open, it may close again (transient fusion or widen completely (full fusion to permit vesicle cargo discharge. While repetitive transient fusion pore openings of the vesicle with the plasma membrane have been observed in the absence of stimulation, their frequency can be further increased using a cAMP-increasing agent that drives the opening of nonspecific cation channels. Our model hypothesis is that the openings and closings of the fusion pore are driven by changes in the local concentration of cations in the connected vesicle. The proposed mechanism of fusion pore dynamics is considered as follows: when the fusion pore is closed or is extremely narrow, the accumulation of cations in the vesicle (increased cation concentration likely leads to lipid demixing at the fusion pore. This process may affect local membrane anisotropy, which reduces the spontaneous curvature and thus leads to the opening of the fusion pore. Based on the theory of membrane elasticity, we used a continuum model to explain the rhythmic opening and closing of the fusion pore.

  14. Experimental study on pore structure and performance of sintered porous wick

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Da; Wang, Shufan; Liu, Rutie; Wang, Zhubo; Xiong, Xiang; Zou, Jianpeng

    2018-02-01

    Porous wicks were prepared via powder metallurgy using NH4HCO3 powders as pore-forming agent. The pore-forming agent particle size was varied to control the pore structure and equivalent pore size distribution feature of porous wick. The effect of pore-forming agent particle size on the porosity, pore structures, equivalent pore size distribution and capillary pumping performance were investigated. Results show that with the particle size of pore-forming agent decrease, the green density and the volume shrinkage of the porous wicks gradually increase and the porosity reduces slightly. There are two types of pores inside the porous wick, large-sized prefabricated pores and small-sized gap pores. With the particle size of pore-forming agent decrease, the size of the prefabricated pores becomes smaller and the distribution tends to be uniform. Gap pores and prefabricated pores inside the wick can make up different types of pore channels. The equivalent pore size of wick is closely related to the structure of pore channels. Furthermore, the equivalent pore size distribution of wick shows an obvious double-peak feature when the pore-forming agent particle size is large. With the particle size of pore-forming agent decrease, the two peaks of equivalent pore size distribution approach gradually to each other, resulting in a single-peak feature. Porous wick with single-peak feature equivalent pore size distribution possesses the better capillary pumping performances.

  15. Entropy of Shortest Distance (ESD as Pore Detector and Pore-Shape Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Oleschko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The entropy of shortest distance (ESD between geographic elements (“elliptical intrusions”, “lineaments”, “points” on a map, or between "vugs", "fractures" and "pores" in the macro- or microscopic images of triple porosity naturally fractured vuggy carbonates provides a powerful new tool for the digital processing, analysis, classification and space/time distribution prognostic of mineral resources as well as the void space in carbonates, and in other rocks. The procedure is applicable at all scales, from outcrop photos, FMI, UBI, USI (geophysical imaging techniques to micrographs, as we shall illustrate through some examples. Out of the possible applications of the ESD concept, we discuss in details the sliding window entropy filtering for nonlinear pore boundary enhancement, and propose this procedure as unbiased thresholding technique.

  16. Pore morphologies of root induced biopores from single pore to network scale investigated by XRCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peth, Stephan; Wittig, Marlen C.; Uteau Puschmann, Daniel; Pagenkemper, Sebastian; Haas, Christoph; Holthusen, Dörthe; Horn, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    Biopores are assumed to be an important factor for nutrient acquisition by providing biologically highly active soil-root interfaces to re-colonizing roots and controlling oxygen and water flows at the pedon scale and within the rhizosphere through the formation of branching channel networks which potentially enhance microbial turnover processes. Characteristic differences in pore morphologies are to be expected depending on the genesis of biopores which, for example, can be earthworm-induced or root-induced or subsequently modified by one of the two. Our understanding of biophysical interactions between plants and soil can be significantly improved by quantifying 3D biopore architectures across scales ranging from single biopores to pedon scale pore networks and linking pore morphologies to microscale measurements of transport processes (e.g. oxygen diffusion). While a few studies in the past have investigated biopore networks on a larger scale yet little is known on the micro-morphology of root-induces biopores and their associated rhizosphere. Also little data is available on lateral transport of oxygen through the rhizosphere which will strongly influence microbial turnover processes and consequently control the release and uptake of nutrients. This paper highlights results gathered within a research unit on nutrient acquisition from the subsoil. Here we focus on X-ray microtomography (XRCT) studies ranging from large soil columns (70 cm length and 20 cm diameter) to individual biopores and its surrounding rhizosphere. Samples were collected from sites with different preceding crops (fescue, chicory, alfalfa) and various cropping durations (1-3 years). We will present an approach for quantitative image analysis combined with micro-sensor measurements of oxygen diffusion and spatial gradients of O2 partial pressures to relate pore structure with transport functions. Implications of various biopore architectures for the accessibility of nutrient resources in

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hydrophilic Pores in Lipid Bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leontiadou, Hari; Mark, Alan E.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    Hydrophilic pores are formed in peptide free lipid bilayers under mechanical stress. It has been proposed that the transport of ionic species across such membranes is largely determined by the existence of such meta-stable hydrophilic pores. To study the properties of these structures and understand

  18. The study of the relationship between pore structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Two kinds of channels, straight channels made of cylindrical capillaries and curved channels made of slit-shaped pores, exist in the bulk materials. The influence of the pore structure of mesoporous TiO2 on its photocatalytic performance was studied. The sample with higher porosity, better textural properties and straight ...

  19. Significant improvement in the pore properties of SBA-15 brought ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Presence of carboxylic acids as well as hydrothermal treatment improves the pore properties of SBA-15. Keywords. SBA-15; mesoporous; carboxylic acids; adsorption; hydrothermal treatment; morphology. 1. Introduction. Molecular sieves with large pores have been of great use in carrying out reactions and separation proc-.

  20. Pore fluids from the argillaceous rocks of the Harwell region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brightman, M.A.; Bath, A.H.; Cave, M.R.; Darling, W.G.

    1985-06-01

    The aim of this work was to obtain samples of pore water from argillaceous formations in the Harwell area for chemical analysis to provide a background for radionuclide migration studies and regional groundwater flow pattern. This report describes the samples, development of a pore-water squeezing cell and its operation. Chemical and analytical studies are summarized. (UK)

  1. The study of the relationship between pore structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Mesoporous titania was synthesized by a sol–gel method using the surfactants Span85 and. X114 as the template. The pore structure was determined by the N2 adsorption/desorption method below. 73 K and calculated using the BJH model. TEM characterizations show that the pores are formed through.

  2. Pore size determination from charged particle energy loss measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, F.P.; Armitage, B.H.

    1977-01-01

    A new method aimed at measuring porosity and mean pore size in materials has been developed at Harwell. The energy width or variance of a transmitted or backscattered charged particle beam is measured and related to the mean pore size via the assumption that the variance in total path length in the porous material is given by (Δx 2 )=na 2 , where n is the mean number of pores and a the mean pore size. It is shown on the basis of a general and rigorous theory of total path length distribution that this approximation can give rise to large errors in the mean pore size determination particularly in the case of large porosities (epsilon>0.5). In practice it is found that it is not easy to utilize fully the general theory because accurate measurements of the first four moments are required to determine the means and variances of the pore and inter-pore length distributions. Several models for these distributions are proposed. When these are incorporated in the general theory the determinations of mean pore size from experimental measurements on powder samples are in good agreement with values determined by other methods. (Auth.)

  3. Bacteriocins : mechanism of membrane insertion and pore formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, G.N.; Konings, W.N; Driessen, A.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria produce several types of pore forming peptides. Class I bacteriocins are lantibiotics that contain (methyl)lanthionine residues that may form intramolecular thioether rings. These peptides generally have a broad spectrum of activity and form unstable pores. Class II bacteriocins

  4. Small angle neutron scattering study of pore microstructure in ceria ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    fractal morphology of the pore space with fractal dimensionality lying between 2.70 and. 2.76. Keywords. Ceria; sintering ... This paper deals with SANS investigation of internal pore microstructure of sintered compacts of ceria over ... compaction pressure of 200 MPa and sintered at 1250◦C for 2 h. Pramana – J. Phys., Vol.

  5. Analysis Of Pore Pressure Using Geophysical Methods | Dosumnu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many methods have been devised for predicting and evaluating the values of pore pressure in oil and gas formations. The present work employs geophysical approach for prediction of formation pore pressure in Niger Delta. This involved the use of seismic derived data before drilling operation, which was correlated with ...

  6. Pore structure and growth kinetics in carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, S.

    1978-04-01

    Pore structure of glassy carbon (GC) and pyrolytic graphite (PG) have been investigated. GC is one of the most impervious of solids finding applications in prosthetic devices and fuel cells while PG is used extensively in the aerospace industry. One third of the microstructure of GC consists of closed pores inaccessible to fluids. The microstructure of this material has been characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution electron microscopy. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) has been used to measure the angstrom sized pores and to follow the evolution of pore surface area as a function of heat treatment temperature (HTT) and heat treatment time (HTt) at constant temperature. From these measurements an analysis of the surface area kinetics was made to find out if rate processes are involved and to locate graphitization occurring at pore surfaces. PG on the other hand has been found to have larger sized pores that comprise five percent of its volume. In addition to being closed these pores are oriented. Some pore models are proposed for PG and the existing scattering theory from oriented ellipsoids is modified to include the proposed shapes.

  7. Nuclear law - Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontier, Jean-Marie; Roux, Emmanuel; Leger, Marc; Deguergue, Maryse; Vallar, Christian; Pissaloux, Jean-Luc; Bernie-Boissard, Catherine; Thireau, Veronique; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Spencer, Mary; Zhang, Li; Park, Kyun Sung; Artus, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    This book contains the contributions presented during a one-day seminar. The authors propose a framework for a legal approach to nuclear safety, a discussion of the 2009/71/EURATOM directive which establishes a European framework for nuclear safety in nuclear installations, a comment on nuclear safety and environmental governance, a discussion of the relationship between citizenship and nuclear, some thoughts about the Nuclear Safety Authority, an overview of the situation regarding the safety in nuclear waste burying, a comment on the Nome law with respect to electricity price and nuclear safety, a comment on the legal consequences of the Fukushima accident on nuclear safety in the Japanese law, a presentation of the USA nuclear regulation, an overview of nuclear safety in China, and a discussion of nuclear safety in the medical sector

  8. Performance of multilayer coated silicon pore optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M. D.; Collon, M. J.; Jensen, C. P.; Christensen, F. E.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Marggraf, S.; Bavdaz, M.; Lumb, D.; Shortt, B.

    2010-07-01

    The requirements for the IXO (International X-ray Observatory) telescope are very challenging in respect of angular resolution and effective area. Within a clear aperture with 1.7 m > R > 0.25 m that is dictated by the spacecraft envelope, the optics technology must be developed to satisfy simultaneously requirements for effective area of 2.5 m2 at 1.25 keV, 0.65 m2 at 6 keV and 150 cm2 at 30 keV. The reflectivity of the bare mirror substrate materials does not allow these requirements to be met. As such the IXO baseline design contains a coating layout that varies as a function of mirror radius and in accordance with the variation in grazing incidence angle. The higher energy photon response is enhanced through the use of depth-graded multilayer coatings on the inner radii mirror modules. In this paper we report on the first reflectivity measurements of wedged ribbed silicon pore optics mirror plates coated with a depth graded W/Si multilayer. The measurements demonstrate that the deposition and performance of the multilayer coatings is compatible with the SPO production process.

  9. Water nanodroplets confined in zeolite pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudert, François-Xavier; Cailliez, Fabien; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Fuchs, Alain H; Boutin, Anne

    2009-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive depiction of the behaviour of a nanodroplet of approximately equal to 20 water molecules confined in the pores of a series of 3D-connected isostructural zeolites with varying acidity, by means of molecular simulations. Both grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations using classical interatomic forcefields and first-principles Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics were used in order to characterise the behaviour of confined water by computing a range of properties, from thermodynamic quantities to electronic properties such as dipole moment, including structural and dynamical information. From the thermodynamic point of view, we have identified the all-silica zeolite as hydrophobic, and the cationic zeolites as hydrophilic; the condensation transition in the first case was demonstrated to be of first order. Furthermore, in-depth analysis of the dynamical and electronic properties of water showed that water in the hydrophobic zeolite behaves as a nanodroplet trying to close its hydrogen-bond network onto itself, with a few short-lived dangling OH groups, while water in hydrophilic zeolites "opens up" to form weak hydrogen bonds with the zeolite oxygen atoms. Finally, the dipole moment of confined water is studied and the contributions of water self-polarisation and the zeolite electric field are discussed.

  10. Measurements of pore-scale flow through apertures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojnicki, Kirsten [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Pore-scale aperture effects on flow in pore networks was studied in the laboratory to provide a parameterization for use in transport models. Four cases were considered: regular and irregular pillar/pore alignment with and without an aperture. The velocity field of each case was measured and simulated, providing quantitatively comparable results. Two aperture effect parameterizations were considered: permeability and transmission. Permeability values varied by an order of magnitude between the cases with and without apertures. However, transmission did not correlate with permeability. Despite having much greater permeability the regular aperture case permitted less transmission than the regular case. Moreover, both irregular cases had greater transmission than the regular cases, a difference not supported by the permeabilities. Overall, these findings suggest that pore-scale aperture effects on flow though a pore-network may not be adequately captured by properties such as permeability for applications that are interested in determining particle transport volume and timing.

  11. Characterization of pore volume of cumulative water injection distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Feng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pore volume of Cumulative water injection is one of the factors for evaluating water flood effect in a water flood oil field. In previous study, there were limited lab studies for evaluating oil displacement efficiency. A method to characterize the distribution of pore volume of cumulative water injection is proposed in this paper, and it is verified by a five-spot water flooding streamline simulation model. The logarithmic relation between pore volume of cumulative water injection and water saturation is established by regression. An inflection point and limit point of cumulative water injection pore volume are identified. Current simulation model indicates inflection point appears after 2–5 pore volume (PV injection, and limit point appears after 15–25 PV injection. Both inflection and limit point vary in different regions of reservoir.

  12. Surfactant-enhanced control of track-etch pore morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel', P.Yu.; Blonskaya, I.V.; Didyk, A.Yu.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Orelovich, O.L.; Samojlova, L.I.; Vutsadakis, V.A.; Root, D.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of surfactants on the process of chemical development of ion tracks in polymers is studied. Based on the experimental data, a mechanism of the surfactant effect on the track-etch pore morphology is proposed. In the beginning of etching the surfactant is adsorbed on the surface and creates a layer that is quasi-solid and partially protects the surface from the etching agent. However, some etchant molecules diffuse through the barrier and react with the polymer surface. This results in the formation of a small hole at the entrance to the ion track. After the hole has attained a few annometers in diameter, the surfactant molecules penetrate into the track and cover its walls. Further diffusion of the surfactant into the growing pore is hindered. The adsorbed surfactant layer is not permeable for large molecules. In contrast, small alkali molecules and water molecules diffuse into the track and provide the etching process enlarging the pore. At this stage the transport of the surfactant into the pore channel can proceed only due to the lateral diffusion in the adsorbed layer. The volume inside the pore is free of surfactant molecules and grows at a higher rate than pore entrance. After a more prolonged etching the bottle-like (or 'cigar-like') pore channels are formed. The bottle-like shape of the pore channels depends on the etching conditions such as alkali and surfactant concentration, temperature, and type of the surfactant. The use of surfactants enables one to produce track-etch membranes with improved flow rate characteristics compared with those having cylindrical pores with the same nominal pore diameters

  13. Biophysics, Pathophysiology and Pharmacology of Ion Channel Gating Pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien eMoreau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Voltage sensor domain (VSDs are a feature of voltage gated ion channel (VGICs and voltage sensitive proteins. They are composed of four transmembrane (TM segments (S1 to S4. Currents leaking through VSDs are called omega or gating pore currents.Gating pores are caused by mutations of the highly conserved positively charged amino acids in the S4 segment that disrupt interactions between the S4 segment and the gating charge transfer center (GCTC. The GCTC separates the intracellular and extracellular water crevices. The disruption of S4–GCTC interactions allows these crevices to communicate and create a fast activating and non-inactivating alternative cation-selective permeation pathway of low conductance, or a gating pore.Gating pore currents have recently been shown to cause periodic paralysis phenotypes. There is also increasing evidence that gating pores are linked to several other familial diseases. For example, gating pores in Nav1.5 and Kv7.2 channels may underlie mixed arrhythmias associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM phenotypes and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH respectively. There is little evidence for the existence of gating pore blockers. Moreover, it is known that a number of toxins bind to the VSD of a specific domain of Na+ channels. These toxins may thus modulate gating pore currents. This focus on the VSD motif opens up a new area of research centered on developing molecules to treat a number of cell excitability disorders such as epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmias, and pain.The purpose of the present review is to summarize existing knowledge of the pathophysiology, biophysics, and pharmacology of gating pore currents and to serve as a guide for future studies aimed at improving our understanding of gating pores and their pathophysiological roles.

  14. HYDROXYETHYL METHACRYLATE BASED NANOCOMPOSITE HYDROGELS WITH TUNABLE PORE ARCHITECTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Bat

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA based hydrogels have found increasing number of applications in areas such as chromatographic separations, controlled drug release, biosensing, and membrane separations. In all these applications, the pore size and pore interconnectivity are crucial for successful application of these materials as they determine the rate of diffusion through the matrix. 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate is a water soluble monomer but its polymer, polyHEMA, is not soluble in water. Therefore, during polymerization of HEMA in aqueous media, a porous structure is obtained as a result of phase separation. Pore size and interconnectivity in these hydrogels is a function of several variables such as monomer concentration, cross-linker concentration, temperature etc. In this study, we investigated the effect of monomer concentration, graphene oxide addition or clay addition on hydrogel pore size, pore interconnectivity, water uptake, and thermal properties. PolyHEMA hydrogels have been prepared by redox initiated free radical polymerization of the monomer using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a cross-linker. As a nanofiller, a synthetic hectorite Laponite® XLG and graphene oxide were used. Graphene oxide was prepared by the Tour Method. Pore morphology of the pristine HEMA based hydrogels and nanocomposite hydrogels were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The formed hydrogels were found to be highly elastic and flexible. A dramatic change in the pore structure and size was observed in the range between 22 to 24 wt/vol monomer at 0.5 % of cross-linker. In this range, the hydrogel morphology changes from typical cauliflower architecture to continuous hydrogel with dispersed water droplets forming the pores where the pores are submicron in size and show an interconnected structure. Such controlled pore structure is highly important when these hydrogels are used for solute diffusion or when there’s flow through monolithic hydrogels

  15. Effects of pore size on the adsorption of hydrogen in slit pores of constant width and varying height

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culp, J.T.; Natesakhawat, S.; Smith, M.R.; Bittner, E.W.; Matranga, C.S.; Bockrath, B.C.

    2007-08-01

    The effects of pore size on the hydrogen storage properties of a series of pillared layered solids were investigated at 77 K and 87 K up to a pressure of 1 atm. The isotherms were fit to the Langmuir-Freundlich equation and extrapolated to determine saturation values. The materials studied are based on the M(L)[M'(CN)4] structural motif, where M = Co or Ni, L = pyrazine (pyz), 4,4'bipyridine (bpy) or 4,4'-dipyridylacetylene (dpac), and M' = Ni, Pd or Pt. The compounds all possess slit like pores with constant inplane dimensions and pore heights that vary as a function of (L). The pyz pillared materials with the smallest pore dimensions store hydrogen at a pore density similar to the bulk liquid. The adsorbed hydrogen density drops by a factor of two as the relative pore size is tripled in the dpac material. The decreased storage efficiency diminishes the expected gravimetric gain in capacity for the larger pore materials. The heats of adsorption were found to range from 6 to 8 kJ/mol in the series, and weakly correlate with pore size.

  16. The pore-fracture system properties of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Panguan Syncline, Guizhou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Li

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Panguan Syncline contains abundant coal resources, which may be a potential source of coalbed methane. In order to evaluate the coalbed methane production potential in this area, we investigated the pore-fracture system of coalbed methane reservoirs, and analyzed the gas sorption and seepage capacities by using various analytical methods, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, optical microscopy, mercury-injection test, low-temperature N2 isotherm adsorption/desorption analyses, low-field nuclear magnetic resonance and methane isothermal adsorption measurements. The results show that the samples of the coal reservoirs in the Panguan Syncline have moderate gas sorption capacity. However, the coals in the study area have favorable seepage capacities, and are conductive for the coalbed methane production. The physical properties of the coalbed methane reservoirs in the Panguan Syncline are generally controlled by coal metamorphism: the low rank coal usually has low methane sorption capacity and its pore and microfractures are poorly developed; while the medium rank coal has better methane sorption capacity, and its seepage pores and microfractures are well developed, which are sufficient for the coalbed methane’s gathering and exploration. Therefore, the medium rank coals in the Panguan Syncline are the most prospective targets for the coalbed methane exploration and production.

  17. Data Qualification Report: Pore Water Data for Use on the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Miller; R. Monks; C. Warren; W. Wowak

    2000-06-09

    Pore water data associated with Data Tracking Number (DTN) No.LL990702804244.100 are referenced in the Analysis and Model Reports (AMRs) prepared to support the Site Recommendation in determining the suitability of the Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a repository for high-level nuclear waste. It has been determined, in accordance with procedure AP-3.15Q Rev. 1, ICN 1, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs'', Attachment 6 , that the DTN-referenced data are used in AMRs that provide a direct calculation of ''Principal Factors'' for the Post-closure Safety Case or Potentially Disruptive Processes or Events. Therefore, in accordance with the requirements of procedure AP-SIII.2Q, Rev 0, ICN 2, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data and the Documentation of Rationale for Accepted Data'', Section 5.3.1 .a, a Data Qualification Report has been prepared for submittal to the Assistant Manager, Office of Project Execution for concurrence. This report summarizes the findings of the Data Qualification Team assembled to evaluate unqualified ''pore water data'' represented by DTN No. LL990702804244.100. This DTN is currently used in the following AMRs: Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models (CRWMS M&O 2000a), Environment of the Surfaces of the Drip Shield and Waste Package Outer Barrier (CRWMS M&O 2000b), and Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model (CRWMS M&O 2000c). Mineral composition of pore water submitted to the Technical Data Management System (TDMS) using the subject DTN were acquired data from the analysis pore water samples sent to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) by UFA Ventures, Inc. and analyzed by LLNL's Analytical Sciences/Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ASD). The purpose and scope of the AMRs that reference the subject DTN and the potential application of pore water data is described below. These AMRs use only that

  18. Impact of pore and pore-throat distributions on porosity-permeability evolution in heterogeneous mineral dissolution and precipitation scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckingham, L. E.; Bensinger, J.; Steinwinder, J.

    2017-12-01

    Porosity and permeability in porous media can be altered by mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions, such as those following CO2 injection in saline aquifers. While the extent of reaction controls changes in porosity, the spatial location of geochemical reactions in individual pores and throats and in the greater pore network controls the evolution of permeability. Geochemical reactions have been observed to occur uniformly on all grain surfaces and non-uniformly, controlled by pore size, PeDa, or mineral distribution, for example. These discrete reaction patterns result in variations in pore scale porosity and corresponding differences in permeability. Macroscopic porosity-permeability relationships are often used to predict the evolution of permeability. These relationships, however, are unable to reflect non-uniform structure modifications. Using pore network modeling simulations, the permeability evolution for a range of uniform and non-uniform mineral reaction scenarios and the applicability of common macroscopic porosity—permeability relationships is investigated. The impact of variations in pore and pore-throat size distributions is evaluated using distributions for real sandstone samples complemented with synthetic distributions. Simulated permeability varies greatly for different reaction patterns. For an Alberta basin sandstone sample, macroscopic relationships are only able to reflect permeability alteration given a uniform reaction scenario where the extent of reaction is related to pore and pore-throat size. For this same sample, simulated permeability for uniform reactions with a fixed reaction thickness and all non-uniform reaction scenarios are unable to be captured using common porosity-permeability relationships. Size-dependent reaction scenarios, where reactions initiate in small or large pores, have the largest disagreement with the porosity-permeability relationships. In these scenarios, porosity-permeability resembles a step function

  19. Impedance nanopore biosensor: influence of pore dimensions on biosensing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Krishna; Yu, Jingxian; Priest, Craig; Shapter, Joe G; Losic, Dusan

    2014-03-07

    Knowledge about electrochemical and electrical properties of nanopore structures and the influence of pore dimensions on these properties is important for the development of nanopore biosensing devices. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of nanopore dimensions (diameter and length) on biosensing performance using non-faradic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Nanoporous alumina membranes (NPAMs) prepared by self-ordered electrochemical anodization of aluminium were used as model nanopore sensing platforms. NPAMs with different pore diameters (25-65 nm) and lengths (4-18 μm) were prepared and the internal pore surface chemistry was modified by covalently attaching streptavidin and biotin. The performance of this antibody nanopore biosensing platform was evaluated using various concentrations of biotin as a model analyte. EIS measurements of pore resistivity and conductivity were carried out for pores with different diameters and lengths. The results showed that smaller pore dimensions of 25 nm and pore lengths up to 10 μm provide better biosensing performance.

  20. Pore formation by actinoporins, cytolysins from sea anemones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojko, Nejc; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Maček, Peter; Anderluh, Gregor

    2016-03-01

    Actinoporins (APs) from sea anemones are ~20 kDa pore forming toxins with a β-sandwich structure flanked by two α-helices. The molecular mechanism of APs pore formation is composed of several well-defined steps. APs bind to membrane by interfacial binding site composed of several aromatic amino acid residues that allow binding to phosphatidylcholine and specific recognition of sphingomyelin. Subsequently, the N-terminal α-helix from the β-sandwich has to be inserted into the lipid/water interphase in order to form a functional pore. Functional studies and single molecule imaging revealed that only several monomers, 3-4, oligomerise to form a functional pore. In this model the α-helices and surrounding lipid molecules build toroidal pore. In agreement, AP pores are transient and electrically heterogeneous. On the contrary, crystallized oligomers of actinoporin fragaceatoxin C were found to be composed of eight monomers with no lipids present between the adjacent α-helices. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pore-Forming Toxins edited by Maur Dalla Serra and Franco Gambale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Imaging Slit Pores Under Delaminated Splats by White Light Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Gao, Li-li; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2018-01-01

    The slit pores under delaminated films significantly contribute to the properties of the film and the coating. In the present study, a novel and practical technique, the white light interference method, is proposed to characterize the slit pores covered by the 8YSZ and LZ splats. In this method, only an ordinary optical microscopy (OM) is used. Interestingly, colorful Newton's rings and parabolic shapes of the slit pores were clearly observed by OM. The crack spacing and the shapes of the slit pores captured by OM were in good agreement with those obtained by scanning electron microscopy and focus ion beam. Moreover, this is the first time when successful quantitative imaging of the slit pores under the thermal spray splats is achieved. Besides, mechanical analyses were carried out, and the results were consistent with those obtained by OM. In addition, the essential fact that the slit pores were mainly caused by transverse cracking/delamination in the thermal spray coatings was clarified. These results indicate that white light interference is an excellent method to characterize the slit pores under smooth and transparent films.

  2. Imaging Slit Pores Under Delaminated Splats by White Light Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Gao, Li-li; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2018-02-01

    The slit pores under delaminated films significantly contribute to the properties of the film and the coating. In the present study, a novel and practical technique, the white light interference method, is proposed to characterize the slit pores covered by the 8YSZ and LZ splats. In this method, only an ordinary optical microscopy (OM) is used. Interestingly, colorful Newton's rings and parabolic shapes of the slit pores were clearly observed by OM. The crack spacing and the shapes of the slit pores captured by OM were in good agreement with those obtained by scanning electron microscopy and focus ion beam. Moreover, this is the first time when successful quantitative imaging of the slit pores under the thermal spray splats is achieved. Besides, mechanical analyses were carried out, and the results were consistent with those obtained by OM. In addition, the essential fact that the slit pores were mainly caused by transverse cracking/delamination in the thermal spray coatings was clarified. These results indicate that white light interference is an excellent method to characterize the slit pores under smooth and transparent films.

  3. Superplastically foaming method to make closed pores inclusive porous ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Akira; Hayashi, Hidetaka

    2011-01-01

    Porous ceramics incorporates pores to improve several properties including thermal insulation maintaining inherenet ceramic properties such as corrosion resistance and large mechanical strength. Conventional porous ceramics is usually fabricated through an insufficient sintering. Since the sintering accompanies the exclusion of pores, it must be terminated at the early stage to maintain the high porosity, leading to degraded strength and durability. Contrary to this, we have innovated superplastically foaming method to make ceramic foams only in the solid state. In this method, the previously inserted foam agent evaporates after the full densification of matrix at around the sintering temperature. Closed pores expand utilizing the superplastic deformation driven by the evolved gas pressure. The typical features of this superplastically foaming method are listed as follows, 1. The pores are introduced after sintering the solid polycrystal. 2. Only closed pores are introduced, improving the insulation of gas and sound in addition to heat. 3. The pore walls are fully densified expecting a large mechanical strength. 4. Compared with the melt foaming method, this method is practical because the fabrication temperature is far below the melting point and it does not need molds. 5. The size and the location pores can be controlled by the amount and position of the foam agent.

  4. A mesoporous silica nanoparticle with charge-convertible pore walls for efficient intracellular protein delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Sung; Kwon, Ick Chan [Biomedical Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Woo; Lee, Hong Jae; Yun, Young-Pil; Lee, Sang Cheon [Department of Maxillofacial Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ji Hye [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se Geun [Department of Nano Technology, Advanced Nano Materials Research Team, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu 704-230 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Jin [Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seo Young, E-mail: syjeong@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: schlee@khu.ac.kr [Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-04

    We report a smart mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) with a pore surface designed to undergo charge conversion in intracellular endosomal condition. The surface of mesopores in the silica nanoparticles was engineered to have pH-hydrolyzable citraconic amide. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses confirmed the successful modification of the pore surfaces. MSNs (MSN-Cit) with citraconic amide functionality on the pore surfaces exhibited a negative zeta potential (-10 mV) at pH 7.4 because of the presence of carboxylate end groups. At cellular endosomal pH ({approx}5.0), MSN-Cit have a positive zeta potential (16 mV) indicating the dramatic charge conversion from negative to positive by hydrolysis of surface citraconic amide. Cytochrome c (Cyt c) of positive charges could be incorporated into the pores of MSN-Cit by electrostatic interactions. The release of Cyt c can be controlled by adjusting the pH of the release media. At pH 7.4, the Cyt c release was retarded, whereas, at pH 5.0, MSN-Cit facilitated the release of Cyt c. The released Cyt c maintained the enzymatic activity of native Cyt c. Hemolytic activity of MSN-Cit over red blood cells (RBCs) was more pronounced at pH 5.0 than at pH 7.0, indicating the capability of intracellular endosomal escape of MSN carriers. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies showed that MSN-Cit effectively released Cyt c in endosomal compartments after uptake by cancer cells. The MSN developed in this work may serve as efficient intracellular carriers of many cell-impermeable therapeutic proteins.

  5. Novel Techniques to Characterize Pore Size of Porous Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulghani, Ali J.

    2016-04-24

    Porous materials are implemented in several industrial applications such as water desalination, gas separation and pharmaceutical care which they are mainly governed by the pore size and the PSD. Analyzing shale reservoirs are not excluded from these applications and numerous advantages can be gained by evaluating the PSD of a given shale reservoir. Because of the limitations of the conventional characterization techniques, novel methods for characterizing the PSD have to be proposed in order to obtain better characterization results for the porous materials, in general, and shale rocks in particular. Thus, permporosimetry and evapoporometry (EP) technologies were introduced, designed and utilized for evaluating the two key parameters, pore size and pore size distribution. The pore size and PSD profiles of different shale samples from Norway and Argentina were analyzed using these technologies and then confirmed by mercury intrusion porosimeter (MIP). Norway samples showed an average pore diameter of 12.94 nm and 19.22 nm with an average diameter of 13.77 nm and 23.23 nm for Argentina samples using permporosimetry and EP respectively. Both techniques are therefore indicative of the heterogeneity of the shales. The results from permporosimetry are in good agreement with those obtained from MIP technique, but EP for most part over-estimates the average pore size. The divergence of EP results compared to permporosimetry results is referred to the fact that the latter technique measures only the active pores which is not the case with the former technique. Overall, both techniques are complementary to each other which the results from both techniques seem reasonable and reliable and provide two simple techniques to estimate the pore size and pore size distributions for shale rocks.

  6. Time evolution of pore system in lime - Pozzolana composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doleželová, Magdaléna; Čáchová, Monika; Scheinherrová, Lenka; Keppert, Martin

    2017-11-01

    The lime - pozzolana mortars and plasters are used in restoration works on building cultural heritage but these materials are also following the trend of energy - efficient solutions in civil engineering. Porosity and pore size distribution is one of crucial parameters influencing engineering properties of porous materials. The pore size distribution of lime based system is changing in time due to chemical processes occurring in the material. The present paper describes time evolution of pore system in lime - pozzolana composites; the obtained results are useful in prediction of performance of lime - pozzolana systems in building structures.

  7. Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.; Huang, Yin-Yan

    1998-01-01

    Methods for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physisorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics.

  8. A FILTRATION METHOD AND APPARATUS INCLUDING A ROLLER WITH PORES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention offers a method for separating dry matter from a medium. A separation chamber is at least partly defined by a plurality of rollers (2,7) and is capable of being pressure regulated. At least one of the rollers is a pore roller (7) having a surface with pores allowing...... permeability for the medium covered with a filter (3) and furthermore having at least one' channel in fluid contact with the pores of the surface. A pressure difference is established across the filter (3) and both, the filter (3) and the filter cake is passed through the rollers (2,7), whereby the medium...

  9. Scaling theory of pore growth in a reactive solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstein, A.R.; Bug, A.L.R.

    1986-01-01

    Pores in a reactive solid are modeled as a randomly selected fraction p of the bonds of a lattice. Solid bonds adjacent to the open porosity are consumed, leading to the opening of previously closed pores. Just above the pore percolation threshold p/sub c/, exact analysis of the Bethe lattice indicates that the solid is consumed in a time t 0 --ln[ln(1/epsilon)], where epsilon = p-p/sub c/. A scaling argument, supported by computational results, gives t 0 --ln(1/epsilon) for finite-dimensional lattices. Aspects of the time-varying morphology of the solid are examined analytically and computationally

  10. Relationship between pore structure and compressive strength of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Pore structure; compressive strength; concrete; statistical model; mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) ... Author Affiliations. J BU1 Z TIAN. College of Water Conservancy and Hydropower Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210098, People's Republic of China ...

  11. Microfiltration of distillery stillage: Influence of membrane pore size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Vesna M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stillage is one of the most polluted waste products of the food industry. Beside large volume, the stillage contains high amount of suspended solids, high values of chemical oxygen demand and biological oxygen demand, so it should not be discharged in the nature before previous purification. In this work, three ceramic membranes for microfiltration with different pore sizes were tested for stillage purification in order to find the most suitable membrane for the filtration process. Ceramic membranes with a nominal pore size of 200 nm, 450 nm and 800 nm were used for filtration. The influence of pore size on permeate flux and removal efficiency was investigated. A membrane with the pore size of 200 nm showed the best filtration performance so it was chosen for the microfiltration process.

  12. Straight Pore Microfilter with Efficient Regeneration, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is directed toward development of a novel microfiltration filter that has distinctively narrow pore size...

  13. Straight Pore Microfilter with Efficient Regeneration, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project is directed toward development of a novel microfiltration filter that has distinctively narrow pore size...

  14. Nano pores evolution in hydroxyapatite microsphere during spark plasma sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin C.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Micron-spherical granules of hydroxyapatite (HAp nanoparticles were prepared by powder granulation methods. Through subsequent sintering, porous HAp microspheres with tailored pore and grain framework structures were obtained. Detailed microstructure investigation by SEM and TEM revealed the correlation of the pore structure and the necking strength with the sintering profiles that determine the coalescence features of the nanoparticles. The partially sintered porous HAp microspheres containing more than 50% porosity consisting of pores and grains both in nano-scale are active in inducing the precipitation of HAp in simulated body fluid. The nano-porous HAp microspheres with an extensive surface and interconnecting pores thus demonstrate the potential of stimulating the formation of collagen and bone and the integration with the newly formed bones during physiological bone remodeling.

  15. Bilayer Deformation, Pores, and Micellation Induced by Oxidized Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonnoy, Phansiri; Jarerattanachat, Viwan; Karttunen, Mikko; Wong-Ekkabut, Jirasak

    2015-12-17

    The influence of different oxidized lipids on lipid bilayers was investigated with 16 individual 1 μs atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Binary mixtures of lipid bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PLPC) and its peroxide and aldehyde products were performed at different concentrations. In addition, an asymmetrical short chain lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PDPC), was used to compare the effects of polar/apolar groups in the lipid tail on lipid bilayer. Although water defects occurred with both aldehyde and peroxide lipids, full pore formation was observed only for aldehyde lipids. At medium concentrations the pores were stable. At higher concentrations, however, the pores became unstable and micellation occurred. Data analysis shows that aldehyde lipids' propensity for pore formation is due to their shorter and highly mobile tail. The highly polar peroxide lipids are stabilized by strong hydrogen bonds with interfacial water.

  16. Diffusion in the pore water of compacted crushed salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluegge, Judith; Herr, Sebastian; Lauke, Thomas; Meleshyn, Artur; Miehe, Ruediger; Ruebel, Andre

    2016-07-15

    Diffusion of dissolved radionuclides in the pore water of compacted crushed salt in the long-term is the most relevant process for the release of radionuclides from a dedicated repository for high-level waste in a salt formation as has been shown in latest safety assessments and research projects /BUH 16/. So far, diffusion coefficients for free water have been applied for the diffusion in pore water in models for long-term safety assessments. This conservative assumption was used, because data on the diffusion coefficient of dissolved substances in crushed salt have been missing. Furthermore, the diffusion coefficient in the pore water was assumed to be constant and independent from the degree of compaction of the crushed salt. The work presented in this report was intended to contribute to fill this gap of knowledge about how the diffusion of radionuclides takes place in the compacted backfill of a repository in salt. For the first time, the pore diffusion coefficient as well as its dependence on the porosity of the crushed salt was determined experimentally by means of through-diffusion experiments using caesium as tracer. The results achieved in this project suggest that the diffusion in compacted crushed salt is not fully comparable to that in a homogeneous, temporally stable porous medium like sand or clay. The results obtained from four diffusion experiments show a remarkably different behaviour and all yield unique concentration versus time plots which includes highly temporal variable tracer fluxes with even full interruptions of the flux for longer periods of time. This effect cannot be explained by assuming a tracer transport by diffusion in a temporarily invariant pore space and / or under temporally invariant experimental conditions. From our point of view, a restructuring of the pore space seems to lead to closed areas of pore water in the sample which may open up again after some time, leading to a variable pore space and hence variable diffusive

  17. Pore shapes, volume distribution and orientations in monodisperse granular assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Sufian, Adnan; Russell, Adrian R.; Saadatfar, Mohammad; Whittle, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The complex mechanical behaviour of granular materials is commonly studied by considering the evolving particle contact network. An often overlooked feature is the influence of micro-scale geometric configuration of pores on the macroscopic response. This paper presents a series of tools to quantify the shape, volume distribution and orientation characteristics of the pore space. The proposed approach is compared against data extracted from physical and numerical experiments with monodisperse...

  18. Relationship between pore structure and compressive strength of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J BU

    [16] Shi C 1996 Strength, pore structure and permeability of alkali-activated slag mortars. Cem. Concr. Res. 26(10): 1789–. 1799. [17] O'Farrell M, Wild S and Sabir B B 2001 Pore size distribution and compressive strength of waste clay brick mortar. Cem. Concr. Res. 23(1): 81–91. [18] Wen C E, Yamada Y, Shimojima K, ...

  19. Pore Scale Analysis of Oil Shale/Sands Pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chen-Luh [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Miller, Jan [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2011-03-01

    There are important questions concerning the quality and volume of pore space that is created when oil shale is pyrolyzed for the purpose of producing shale oil. In this report, 1.9 cm diameter cores of Mahogany oil shale were pyrolyzed at different temperatures and heating rates. Detailed 3D imaging of core samples was done using multiscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) before and after pyrolysis to establish the pore structure. The pore structure of the unreacted material was not clear. Selected images of a core pyrolyzed at 400oC were obtained at voxel resolutions from 39 microns (Οm) to 60 nanometers (nm). Some of the pore space created during pyrolysis was clearly visible at these resolutions and it was possible to distinguish between the reaction products and the host shale rock. The pore structure deduced from the images was used in Lattice Boltzmann simulations to calculate the permeability in the pore space. The permeabilities of the pyrolyzed samples of the silicate-rich zone were on the order of millidarcies, while the permeabilities of the kerogen-rich zone after pyrolysis were very anisotropic and about four orders of magnitude higher.

  20. Pore growth in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Soo, E-mail: yskim@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Jeong, G.Y.; Sohn, D.-S. [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, 50 UNIST-gil, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan, 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Jamison, L.M. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel is currently under development in the DOE’s Material Management and Minimization program to convert HEU-fueled research reactors to LEU-fueled reactors. In some demanding conditions in high-power and high-performance reactors, large pores form in the interaction layers between the U-Mo fuel particles and the Al matrix, which pose a potential to cause fuel failure. In this study, comprehension of the formation and growth of these pores was explored. As a product, a model to predict pore growth and porosity increase was developed. The model includes three major topics: fission gas release from the U-Mo and the IL to the pores, stress evolution in the fuel meat, and the effect of amorphous IL growth. Well-characterized in-pile data from reduced-size plates were used to fit the model parameters. A data set from full-sized plates, independent and distinctively different from those used to fit the model parameters, was used to examine the accuracy of the model. The model showed fair agreement with the measured data. The model suggested that the growth of the IL has a critical effect on pore growth, as both its material properties and energetics are favorable to pore formation. Therefore, one area of the current effort, focused on suppressing IL growth, appears to be on the right track to improve the performance of this fuel.

  1. Software Image J to study soil pore distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Passoni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the soil science, a direct method that allows the study of soil pore distribution is the bi-dimensional (2D digital image analysis. Such technique provides quantitative results of soil pore shape, number and size. The use of specific softwares for the treatment and processing of images allows a fast and efficient method to quantify the soil porous system. However, due to the high cost of commercial softwares, public ones can be an interesting alternative for soil structure analysis. The objective of this work was to evaluate the quality of data provided by the Image J software (public domain used to characterize the voids of two soils, characterized as Geric Ferralsol and Rhodic Ferralsol, from the southeast region of Brazil. The pore distribution analysis technique from impregnated soil blocks was utilized for this purpose. The 2D image acquisition was carried out by using a CCD camera coupled to a conventional optical microscope. After acquisition and treatment of images, they were processed and analyzed by the software Noesis Visilog 5.4® (chosen as the reference program and ImageJ. The parameters chosen to characterize the soil voids were: shape, number and pore size distribution. For both soils, the results obtained for the image total porosity (%, the total number of pores and the pore size distribution showed that the Image J is a suitable software to be applied in the characterization of the soil sample voids impregnated with resin.

  2. Pore opening dynamics in the exocytosis of serotonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo; Cercos, Montserrat G.; Martinez-Valencia, Alejandro; Salinas Hernandez, Israel; Rodríguez-Sosa, Leonardo; de-Miguel, Francisco F.

    2015-03-01

    The current view of the exocytosis of transmitter molecules is that it starts with the formation of a fusion pore that connects the intravesicular and the extracellular spaces, and is completed by the release of the rest of the transmitter contained in the vesicle upon the full fusion and collapse of the vesicle with the plasma membrane. However, under certain circumstances, a rapid closure of the pore before the full vesicle fusion produces only a partial release of the transmitter. Here we show that whole release of the transmitter occurs through fusion pores that remain opened for tens of milliseconds without vesicle collapse. This was demonstrated through amperometric measurements of serotonin release from electrodense vesicles in the axon of leech Retzius neurons and mathematical modelling. By modeling transmitter release with a diffusion equation subjected to boundary conditions that are defined by the experiment, we showed that those pores with a fast half rise time constant remained opened and allowed the full quantum release without vesicle collapse, whereas pores with a slow rise time constant closed rapidly, thus producing partial release. We conclude that a full transmitter release may occur through the fusion pore in the absence of vesicle collapse. This work was founded by a DGAPA-UNAM grants IN200914 and IN118410 CONACYT GRANT 130031, and CONACyT doctoral fellowships.

  3. The nuclear envelope environment and its cancer connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Kin-Hoe; Factor, Rachel E.; Ullman, Katharine S.

    2014-01-01

    Because of the association between aberrant nuclear structure and tumour grade, nuclear morphology is an indispensible criterion in the current pathological assessment of cancer. Components of the nuclear envelope environment have central roles in many aspects of cell function that affect tumour development and progression. As the roles of the nuclear envelope components, including nuclear pore complexes and nuclear lamina, are being deciphered in molecular detail there are opportunities to harness this knowledge for cancer therapeutics and biomarker development. In this Review, we summarize the progress that has been made in our understanding of the nuclear envelope and the implications of changes in this environment for cancer biology. PMID:22337151

  4. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    OpenAIRE

    Eder, Anja; Bading, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nuc...

  5. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  6. Chemotherapy Drugs Thiocolchicoside and Taxol Permeabilize Lipid Bilayer Membranes by Forming Ion Pores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md; Tuszynski, J A; Duszyk, M

    2011-01-01

    We report ion channel formation by chemotherapy drugs: thiocolchicoside (TCC) and taxol (TXL) which primarily target tubulin but not only. For example, TCC has been shown to interact with GABA A , nuclear envelope and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. TXL interferes with the normal breakdown of microtubules inducing mitotic block and apoptosis. It also interacts with mitochondria and found significant chemotherapeutic applications for breast, ovarian and lung cancer. In order to better understand the mechanisms of TCC and TXL actions, we examined their effects on phospholipid bilayer membranes. Our electrophysiological recordings across membranes constructed in NaCl aqueous phases consisting of TCC or TXL under the influence of an applied transmembrane potential (V) indicate that both molecules induce stable ion flowing pores/channels in membranes. Their discrete current versus time plots exhibit triangular shapes which is consistent with a spontaneous time-dependent change of the pore conductance in contrast to rectangular conductance events usually induced by ion channels. These events exhibit conductance (∼0.01-0.1 pA/mV) and lifetimes (∼5-30 ms) within the ranges observed in e.g., gramicidin A and alamethicin channels. The channel formation probability increases linearly with TCC/TXL concentration and V and is not affected by pH (5.7 - 8.4). A theoretical explanation on the causes of chemotherapy drug induced ion pore formation and the pore stability has also been found using our recently discovered binding energy between lipid bilayer and the bilayer embedded ion channels using gramicidin A channels as tools. This picture of energetics suggests that as the channel forming agents approach to the lipids on bilayer the localized charge properties in the constituents of both channel forming agents (e.g., chemotherapy drugs in this study) and the lipids determine the electrostatic drug-lipid coupling energy through screened Coulomb interactions between

  7. Long-pore Electrostatics in Inward-rectifier Potassium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Janice L.; Palmer, Lawrence G.; Roux, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    Inward-rectifier potassium (Kir) channels differ from the canonical K+ channel structure in that they possess a long extended pore (∼85 Å) for ion conduction that reaches deeply into the cytoplasm. This unique structural feature is presumably involved in regulating functional properties specific to Kir channels, such as conductance, rectification block, and ligand-dependent gating. To elucidate the underpinnings of these functional roles, we examine the electrostatics of an ion along this extended pore. Homology models are constructed based on the open-state model of KirBac1.1 for four mammalian Kir channels: Kir1.1/ROMK, Kir2.1/IRK, Kir3.1/GIRK, and Kir6.2/KATP. By solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the electrostatic free energy of a K+ ion is determined along each pore, revealing that mammalian Kir channels provide a favorable environment for cations and suggesting the existence of high-density regions in the cytoplasmic domain and cavity. The contribution from the reaction field (the self-energy arising from the dielectric polarization induced by the ion's charge in the complex geometry of the pore) is unfavorable inside the long pore. However, this is well compensated by the electrostatic interaction with the static field arising from the protein charges and shielded by the dielectric surrounding. Decomposition of the static field provides a list of residues that display remarkable correspondence with existing mutagenesis data identifying amino acids that affect conduction and rectification. Many of these residues demonstrate interactions with the ion over long distances, up to 40 Å, suggesting that mutations potentially affect ion or blocker energetics over the entire pore. These results provide a foundation for understanding ion interactions in Kir channels and extend to the study of ion permeation, block, and gating in long, cation-specific pores. PMID:19001143

  8. Detecting pore-lining regions in transmembrane protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Timothy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-helical transmembrane channel and transporter proteins play vital roles in a diverse range of essential biological processes and are crucial in facilitating the passage of ions and molecules across the lipid bilayer. However, the experimental difficulties associated with obtaining high quality crystals has led to their significant under-representation in structural databases. Computational methods that can identify structural features from sequence alone are therefore of high importance. Results We present a method capable of automatically identifying pore-lining regions in transmembrane proteins from sequence information alone, which can then be used to determine the pore stoichiometry. By labelling pore-lining residues in crystal structures using geometric criteria, we have trained a support vector machine classifier to predict the likelihood of a transmembrane helix being involved in pore formation. Results from testing this approach under stringent cross-validation indicate that prediction accuracy of 72% is possible, while a support vector regression model is able to predict the number of subunits participating in the pore with 62% accuracy. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first tool capable of identifying pore-lining regions in proteins and we present the results of applying it to a data set of sequences with available crystal structures. Our method provides a way to characterise pores in transmembrane proteins and may even provide a starting point for discovering novel routes of therapeutic intervention in a number of important diseases. This software is freely available as source code from: http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/downloads/memsat-svm/.

  9. Invisible nuclear; converting nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jongmoon

    1993-03-01

    This book consists of 14 chapters which are CNN era and big science, from East and West to North and South, illusory nuclear strategy, UN and nuclear arms reduction, management of armaments, advent of petroleum period, the track of nuclear power generation, view of energy, internationalization of environment, the war over water in the Middle East, influence of radiation and an isotope technology transfer and transfer armament into civilian industry, the end of nuclear period and the nuclear Nonproliferation, national scientific and technological power and political organ and executive organ.

  10. Three-Dimensional Quantification of Pore Space in Flocculated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Tom; Spencer, Kate; Bushby, Andy; Manning, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Flocculated sediment structure plays a vital role in determining sediment dynamics within the water column in fresh and saline water bodies. The porosity of flocs contributes to their specific density and therefore their settling characteristics, and can also affect settling characteristics via through-flow. The process of settling and resuspension of flocculated material causes the formation of larger and more complex individual flocs, about which little is known quantitatively of the internal micro-structure and therefore porosity. Hydrological and sedimentological modelling software currently uses estimations of porosity, because it is difficult to capture and analyse flocs. To combat this, we use a novel microscopy method usually performed on biological material to scan the flocs, the output of which can be used to quantify the dimensions and arrangement of pores. This involves capturing flocculated sediment, staining the sample with heavy metal elements to highlight organic content in the Scanning Electron Microscope later, and finally setting the sample in resin. The overall research aim is to quantitatively characterise the dimensions and distribution of pore space in flocs in three dimensions. In order to gather data, Scanning Electron Microscopy and micro-Computed Tomography have been utilised to produce the necessary images to identify and quantify the pore space. The first objective is to determine the dimensional limits of pores in the structure (i.e. what area do they encapsulate? Are they interconnected or discreet?). This requires a repeatable definition to be established, so that all floc pore spaces can be quantified using the same parameters. The LabSFLOC settling column and dyes will be used as one possible method of determining the outer limits of the discreet pore space. LabSFLOC is a sediment settling column that uses a camera to record the flocs, enabling analysis of settling characteristics. The second objective is to develop a reliable

  11. Idealized Shale Sorption Isotherm Measurements to Determine Pore Volume, Pore Size Distribution, and Surface Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, R.; Wang, B.; Aljama, H.; Rupp, E.; Wilcox, J.

    2014-12-01

    One method for mitigating the impacts of anthropogenic CO2-related climate change is the sequestration of CO2 in depleted gas and oil reservoirs, including shale. The accurate characterization of the heterogeneous material properties of shale, including pore volume, surface area, pore size distributions (PSDs) and composition is needed to understand the interaction of CO2 with shale. Idealized powdered shale sorption isotherms were created by varying incremental amounts of four essential components by weight. The first two components, organic carbon and clay, have been shown to be the most important components for CO2 uptake in shales. Organic carbon was represented by kerogen isolated from a Silurian shale, and clay groups were represented by illite from the Green River shale formation. The rest of the idealized shale was composed of equal parts by weight of SiO2 to represent quartz and CaCO3 to represent carbonate components. Baltic, Eagle Ford, and Barnett shale sorption measurements were used to validate the idealized samples. The idealized and validation shale sorption isotherms were measured volumetrically using low pressure N2 (77K) and CO2 (273K) adsorbates on a Quantachrome Autosorb IQ2. Gravimetric isotherms were also produced for a subset of these samples using CO2 and CH4adsorbates under subsurface temperature and pressure conditions using a Rubotherm magnetic suspension balance. Preliminary analyses were inconclusive in validating the idealized samples. This could be a result of conflicting reports of total organic carbon (TOC) content in each sample, a problem stemming from the heterogeneity of the samples and different techniques used for measuring TOC content. The TOC content of the validation samples (Eagle Ford and Barnett) was measured by Rock-Eval pyrolysis at Weatherford Laboratories, while the TOC content in the Baltic validation samples was determined by LECO TOC. Development of a uniform process for measuring TOC in the validation samples is

  12. Final Report for Subcontract B541028, Pore-Scale Modeling to Support 'Pore Connectivity' Research Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    This report covers modeling aspects of a combined experimental and modeling task in support of the DOE Science and Technology Program (formerly OSTI) within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). Research Objectives The research for this project dealt with diffusive retardation: solute moving through a fracture diffuses into and out of the rock matrix. This diffusive exchange retards overall solute movement, and retardation both dilutes waste being released, and allows additional decay. Diffusive retardation involves not only fracture conductivity and matrix diffusion, but also other issues and processes: contaminants may sorb to the rock matrix, fracture flow may be episodic, a given fracture may or may not flow depending on the volume of flow and the fracture's connection to the overall fracture network, the matrix imbibes water during flow episodes and dries between episodes, and so on. The objective of the project was to improve understanding of diffusive retardation of radionuclides due to fracture / matrix interactions. Results from combined experimental/modeling work were to (1) determine whether the current understanding and model representation of matrix diffusion is valid, (2) provide insights into the upscaling of laboratory-scale diffusion experiments, and (3) help in evaluating the impact on diffusive retardation of episodic fracture flow and pore connectivity in Yucca Mountain tuffs. Questions explored included the following: (1) What is the relationship between the diffusion coefficient measured at one scale, to that measured or observed at a different scale? In classical materials this relationship is trivial; in low-connectivity materials it is not. (2) Is the measured diffusivity insensitive to the shape of the sample? Again, in classical materials there should be no sample shape effect. (3) Does sorption affect diffusive exchange in low-connectivity media differently than in classical media? (4) What is the effect of matrix

  13. Final Report for Subcontract B541028, Pore-Scale Modeling to Support "Pore Connectivity" Research Work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R P

    2009-02-25

    This report covers modeling aspects of a combined experimental and modeling task in support of the DOE Science and Technology Program (formerly OSTI) within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). Research Objectives The research for this project dealt with diffusive retardation: solute moving through a fracture diffuses into and out of the rock matrix. This diffusive exchange retards overall solute movement, and retardation both dilutes waste being released, and allows additional decay. Diffusive retardation involves not only fracture conductivity and matrix diffusion, but also other issues and processes: contaminants may sorb to the rock matrix, fracture flow may be episodic, a given fracture may or may not flow depending on the volume of flow and the fracture's connection to the overall fracture network, the matrix imbibes water during flow episodes and dries between episodes, and so on. The objective of the project was to improve understanding of diffusive retardation of radionuclides due to fracture / matrix interactions. Results from combined experimental/modeling work were to (1) determine whether the current understanding and model representation of matrix diffusion is valid, (2) provide insights into the upscaling of laboratory-scale diffusion experiments, and (3) help in evaluating the impact on diffusive retardation of episodic fracture flow and pore connectivity in Yucca Mountain tuffs. Questions explored included the following: (1) What is the relationship between the diffusion coefficient measured at one scale, to that measured or observed at a different scale? In classical materials this relationship is trivial; in low-connectivity materials it is not. (2) Is the measured diffusivity insensitive to the shape of the sample? Again, in classical materials there should be no sample shape effect. (3) Does sorption affect diffusive exchange in low-connectivity media differently than in classical media? (4) What is the effect of

  14. Multifractal Characteristics of Bimodal Mercury Pore Size Distribution Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Bonini, C.; Alves, M. C.; Paz González, A.

    2012-04-01

    Characterization of Hg pore size distribution (PSDs) curves by monofractal or multifractal analysis has been demonstrated to be an useful tool, which allows a better understanding of the organization of the soil pore space. There are also evidences that multiscale analysis of different segments found in bimodal pore size distributions measured by Hg intrusion can provide further valuable information. In this study we selected bimodal PSDs from samples taken from an experimental area in São Paulo state, Brazil, where a revegetation trial was set up over saprolitic material. The saprolite was left abandoned after decapitation of an Oxisol for building purposes. The field trial consisted of various treatments with different grass species and amendments. Pore size distribution of the sampled aggregates was measured in the equivalent diameter range from 0.005 to about 50 μm and it was characterized by a bimodal pattern, so that two compartments, i.e. 0.005 to 0.2 μm and 0.2 to 50 μm, could be distinguished. The multifractal theory was used to analyse both segments. The scaling properties of these two segments could be fitted reasonably well with multifractal models. Multifractal parameters obtained for equivalent diameters for the segments > 0.2 and pore size distributions studied.

  15. The Bicomponent Pore-Forming Leucocidins of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Francis

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to produce water-soluble proteins with the capacity to oligomerize and form pores within cellular lipid bilayers is a trait conserved among nearly all forms of life, including humans, single-celled eukaryotes, and numerous bacterial species. In bacteria, some of the most notable pore-forming molecules are protein toxins that interact with mammalian cell membranes to promote lysis, deliver effectors, and modulate cellular homeostasis. Of the bacterial species capable of producing pore-forming toxic molecules, the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most notorious. S. aureus can produce seven different pore-forming protein toxins, all of which are believed to play a unique role in promoting the ability of the organism to cause disease in humans and other mammals. The most diverse of these pore-forming toxins, in terms of both functional activity and global representation within S. aureus clinical isolates, are the bicomponent leucocidins. From the first description of their activity on host immune cells over 100 years ago to the detailed investigations of their biochemical function today, the leucocidins remain at the forefront of S. aureus pathogenesis research initiatives. Study of their mode of action is of immediate interest in the realm of therapeutic agent design as well as for studies of bacterial pathogenesis. This review provides an updated perspective on our understanding of the S. aureus leucocidins and their function, specificity, and potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:24847020

  16. Why liquid displacement methods are sometimes wrong in estimating the pore-size distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbertsen-Abrahamse, A.J.; Boom, R.M.; Padt, van der A.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid displacement method is a commonly used method to determine the pore size distribution of micro- and ultrafiltration membranes. One of the assumptions for the calculation of the pore sizes is that the pores are parallel and thus are not interconnected. To show that the estimated pore size

  17. Nuclear Structures Surrounding Internal Lamin Invaginations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Legartová, Soňa; Stixová, Lenka; Laur, O.; Kozubek, Stanislav; Sehnalová, Petra; Bártová, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 3 (2014), s. 476-487 ISSN 0730-2312 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD11020 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : LAMINS * NUCLEAR PORES * CHROMATIN Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.263, year: 2014

  18. Multifractal Characterization of Pore Size Distributions of Peat Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Sampurno

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a multifractal analysis of the microscopic structure of peat soil. The aim of this study was to apply the multifractal technique to analyze the properties of five slices of peat soil (L1-L5. Binary images (220 x 220 pixels, with a conversion value of 9.41 μm/pixel were made from the thin slices and then analyzed. This analysis was conducted to obtain the relationship between physical parameters and complexity parameters. The results showed that the spectrum of f(α can describe well the pore size distribution and average size of pores correlated with the value of D(0. A high value of the average pore size is followed by a low D value and vice versa.

  19. Two-phase flow simulations in pore-geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimann, F.; Engwer, C.; Bastian, P.; Ippisch, O.

    2012-04-01

    Pore scale simulations of multi phase flow in porous media present a promising approach in the development and verification of continuum scale models as well as in the understanding of the underlying processes of flow phenomena like hysteresis or the peculiarities of the capillary fringe. As typical pore geometries involve complicated geometries with peculiar topological properties, the generation of a computational mesh, required by finite element (FE) based simulation approaches, becomes a limiting obstacle. We present a numerical discretization based on discontinuous Galerkin methods which does not require a grid which is fitted to the computational domain. In this approach, the resolution of the domain boundaries may be chosen independent of the FE basis. Furthermore, we will present discretization techniques allowing for an accurate representation of the interface conditions i.e. the jump in the pressure and the velocity derivatives. First results of simulations for two-phase flow in pore geometries are discussed.

  20. Highly Aminated Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles with Cubic Pore Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Suteewong, Teeraporn

    2011-01-19

    Mesoporous silica with cubic symmetry has attracted interest from researchers for some time. Here, we present the room temperature synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles possessing cubic Pm3n symmetry with very high molar ratios (>50%) of 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane. The synthesis is robust allowing, for example, co-condensation of organic dyes without loss of structure. By means of pore expander molecules, the pore size can be enlarged from 2.7 to 5 nm, while particle size decreases. Adding pore expander and co-condensing fluorescent dyes in the same synthesis reduces average particle size further down to 100 nm. After PEGylation, such fluorescent aminated mesoporous silica nanoparticles are spontaneously taken up by cells as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy.

  1. Fines classification based on sensitivity to pore-fluid chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Junbong; Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The 75-μm particle size is used to discriminate between fine and coarse grains. Further analysis of fine grains is typically based on the plasticity chart. Whereas pore-fluid-chemistry-dependent soil response is a salient and distinguishing characteristic of fine grains, pore-fluid chemistry is not addressed in current classification systems. Liquid limits obtained with electrically contrasting pore fluids (deionized water, 2-M NaCl brine, and kerosene) are combined to define the soil “electrical sensitivity.” Liquid limit and electrical sensitivity can be effectively used to classify fine grains according to their fluid-soil response into no-, low-, intermediate-, or high-plasticity fine grains of low, intermediate, or high electrical sensitivity. The proposed methodology benefits from the accumulated experience with liquid limit in the field and addresses the needs of a broader range of geotechnical engineering problems.

  2. Formation of protein induced micro-pores in Chitosan membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, S. N. Suraiya; Aswal, V. K.; Ramasamy, Radha Perumal

    2017-05-01

    Polymer based nanocomposites are important class of materials and have wide applications. Blending two biopolymers can lead to the development of new materials with tailored properties. Chitosan is a naturally occurring polysaccharide with useful properties such as biodegradability and excellent film forming capacity. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) is a abundantly available globular protein. In our research the interaction of chitosan with BSA and the effect of formation of Au nanoparticles on chitosan-BSA system were investigated. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) of the films showed formation of micron sized pores and these pores were hindered with formation of Au nanoparticles. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis showed that BSA interacts with chitosan chain and affects the Rg value of chitosan. The formation of micro pores decreases the conductivity values (σ'), while the formation of Au nanoparticles increases σ'.

  3. Influence of crosslinking agents on the pore structure of skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, N Nishad; Dhathathreyan, Aruna; Ramasami, T

    2007-05-15

    Analysis of pore structure of skin is important to understand process of diffusion and adsorption involved during any application of the skin matrix. In this study, the effect of thermal shrinkage on the pore structure of chromium and vegetable treated skin has been analyzed as these tanning agents are known to bring about thermal stability to the matrix. The changes brought about in the pore structure have been studied using mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. Response of the chromium treated and vegetable tanning treated skin structure to heat has been found to be quite different from each other. About 41% decrease in porosity is observed for chromium treated skin as against 97% decrease for the skin treated with vegetable tannins. This is primarily attributed to the basic nature of these materials and the nature of interaction of them towards skin.

  4. Fines Classification Based on Sensitivity to Pore-Fluid Chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Junbong

    2015-12-28

    The 75-μm particle size is used to discriminate between fine and coarse grains. Further analysis of fine grains is typically based on the plasticity chart. Whereas pore-fluid-chemistry-dependent soil response is a salient and distinguishing characteristic of fine grains, pore-fluid chemistry is not addressed in current classification systems. Liquid limits obtained with electrically contrasting pore fluids (deionized water, 2-M NaCl brine, and kerosene) are combined to define the soil "electrical sensitivity." Liquid limit and electrical sensitivity can be effectively used to classify fine grains according to their fluid-soil response into no-, low-, intermediate-, or high-plasticity fine grains of low, intermediate, or high electrical sensitivity. The proposed methodology benefits from the accumulated experience with liquid limit in the field and addresses the needs of a broader range of geotechnical engineering problems. © ASCE.

  5. Evaluation of Colloid Retention Site Dominance in Variably Saturated Porous Media: An All Pores Pore-Scale Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Veronica; Perez-Reche, Francisco; Holzner, Markus; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    It is well accepted that colloid and nanoparticle transport processes in porous media differ substantially between water saturated and unsaturated conditions. Differences are frequently ascribed to particle immobilization by association with interfaces with the gas, as well as to restrictions of the liquid medium through which colloids are transported. Yet, the current understanding of the importance of particle retention at gas interfaces is based on observations of single pores or two-dimensional pore network representations, leaving open the question of their statistical significance when all pores in the medium are considered. In order to address this question, column experiments were performed using a model porous medium of glass beads through which Silver particles were transported for conditions of varying water content and water chemistry. X-ray microtomography was subsequently employed as a non-destructive imaging technique to obtain pore-scale information of the entire column regarding: i) the presence and distribution of the main locations where colloids can become retained (interfaces with the water-solid, air-water, air-solid, and air-water-solid, grain-grain contacts, and the bulk liquid), ii) deposition profiles of colloids along the column classified by the available retention location, and iii) channel widths of 3-dimensional pore-water network representations. The results presented provide a direct statistical evaluation on the significance of colloid retention by attachment to interfaces or by strainig at contact points where multiple interfaces meet.

  6. Nuclear liability - nuclear insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesch, H.

    1981-01-01

    In the fourth concluding article on this subject (following articles in VW 1981 pp. 483, 552 and 629), the author explains procedures, duties and obligations according to the Para. Para. 5, 6 and 7 of the AHBKA. These obligations are to be observed before or after the occurrence of damages. In addition, legal consequences following violations of duties - loss of right - joint, insurance, transfer ban, period for filing suit, duty to notify, 'The German Nuclear Reactor Insurance and Reinsurance Community', the insurance according to the 'General terms and conditions governing the liability insurance of licensed activities involving nuclear fuels and other radioactive substances outside nuclear installations (AHBStr.)', object, beginning and exclusion of coverage, 'Special conditions governing the transport of nuclear fuels according to Para. 25 (2) of the Atomic Energy Law' are attached to the General Terms and Conditions governing the liability insurance of licenced activities involving nuclear fuels and other radioactive substances outside nuclear installations. (HSCH) [de

  7. RNase A does not translocate the alpha-hemolysin pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besnik Krasniqi

    Full Text Available The application of nanopore sensing utilizing the α-hemolysin pore to probe proteins at single-molecule resolution has expanded rapidly. In some studies protein translocation through the α-hemolysin has been reported. However, there is no direct evidence, as yet, that proteins can translocate the α-hemolysin pore. The biggest challenge to obtaining direct evidence is the lack of a highly sensitive assay to detect very low numbers of protein molecules. Furthermore, if an activity based assay is applied then the proteins translocating by unfolding should refold back to an active confirmation for the assay technique to work. To overcome these challenges we selected a model enzyme, ribonuclease A, that readily refolds to an active conformation even after unfolding it with denaturants. In addition we have developed a highly sensitive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction based activity assay for ribonuclease A. Initially, ribonuclease A, a protein with a positive net charge and dimensions larger than the smallest diameter of the pore, was subjected to nanopore analysis under different experimental conditions. Surprisingly, although the protein was added to the cis chamber (grounded and a positive potential was applied, the interaction of ribonuclease A with α-hemolysin pore induced small and large blockade events in the presence and the absence of a reducing and/or denaturing agent. Upon measuring the zeta potential, it was found that the protein undergoes a charge reversal under the experimental conditions used for nanopore sensing. From the investigation of the effect of voltage on the interaction of ribonuclease A with the α-hemolysin pore, it was impossible to conclude if the events observed were translocations. However, upon testing for ribonuclease A activity on the trans chamber it was found that ribonuclease A does not translocate the α-hemolysin pore.

  8. Microfluidic Experiments Studying Pore Scale Interactions of Microbes and Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Kocar, B. D.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding how physical phenomena, chemical reactions, and microbial behavior interact at the pore-scale is crucial to understanding larger scale trends in groundwater chemistry. Recent studies illustrate the utility of microfluidic devices for illuminating pore-scale physical-biogeochemical processes and their control(s) on the cycling of iron, uranium, and other important elements 1-3. These experimental systems are ideal for examining geochemical reactions mediated by microbes, which include processes governed by complex biological phenomenon (e.g. biofilm formation, etc.)4. We present results of microfluidic experiments using a model metal reducing bacteria and varying pore geometries, exploring the limitations of the microorganisms' ability to access tight pore spaces, and examining coupled biogeochemical-physical controls on the cycling of redox sensitive metals. Experimental results will provide an enhanced understanding of coupled physical-biogeochemical processes transpiring at the pore-scale, and will constrain and compliment continuum models used to predict and describe the subsurface cycling of redox-sensitive elements5. 1. Vrionis, H. A. et al. Microbiological and geochemical heterogeneity in an in situ uranium bioremediation field site. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 71, 6308-6318 (2005). 2. Pearce, C. I. et al. Pore-scale characterization of biogeochemical controls on iron and uranium speciation under flow conditions. Environ. Sci. Technol. 46, 7992-8000 (2012). 3. Zhang, C., Liu, C. & Shi, Z. Micromodel investigation of transport effect on the kinetics of reductive dissolution of hematite. Environ. Sci. Technol. 47, 4131-4139 (2013). 4. Ginn, T. R. et al. Processes in microbial transport in the natural subsurface. Adv. Water Resour. 25, 1017-1042 (2002). 5. Scheibe, T. D. et al. Coupling a genome-scale metabolic model with a reactive transport model to describe in situ uranium bioremediation. Microb. Biotechnol. 2, 274-286 (2009).

  9. Hydrochromic conjugated polymers for human sweat pore mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joosub; Pyo, Minkyeong; Lee, Sang-hwa; Kim, Jaeyong; Ra, Moonsoo; Kim, Whoi-Yul; Park, Bum Jun; Lee, Chan Woo; Kim, Jong-Man

    2014-04-29

    Hydrochromic materials have been actively investigated in the context of humidity sensing and measuring water contents in organic solvents. Here we report a sensor system that undergoes a brilliant blue-to-red colour transition as well as 'Turn-On' fluorescence upon exposure to water. Introduction of a hygroscopic element into a supramolecularly assembled polydiacetylene results in a hydrochromic conjugated polymer that is rapidly responsive (polymer. As a result, the sensor can be used to construct a precise map of active sweat pores on fingertips. The sensor technology, developed in this study, has the potential of serving as new method for fingerprint analysis and for the clinical diagnosis of malfunctioning sweat pores.

  10. Silicon pore optics for future x-ray telescopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wille, Eric; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wallace, Kotska

    2017-01-01

    Lightweight X-ray Wolter optics with a high angular resolution will enable the next generation of X-ray telescopes in space. The candidate mission ATHENA (Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics) required a mirror assembly of 1 m2 effective area (at 1 keV) and an angular resolution of 10...... arcsec or better. These specifications can only be achieved with a novel technology like Silicon Pore Optics, which is being developed by ESA together with a consortium of European industry. Silicon Pore Optics are made of commercial Si wafers using process technology adapted from the semiconductor...

  11. Probing single nanometer-scale pores with polymeric molecular rulers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Sarah E.; DiMarzio, Edmund A.; Wang, Qian; Stanford, Vincent M.; Kasianowicz, John J.

    2010-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that individual molecules of single-stranded DNA can be driven electrophoretically through a single Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin ion channel. Polynucleotides thread through the channel as extended chains and the polymer-induced ionic current blockades exhibit stable modes during the interactions. We show here that polynucleotides can be used to probe structural features of the α-hemolysin channel itself. Specifically, both the pore length and channel aperture profile can be estimated. The results are consistent with the channel crystal structure and suggest that polymer-based "molecular rulers" may prove useful in deducing the structures of nanometer-scale pores in general.

  12. Local Pore Size Correlations Determine Flow Distributions in Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alim, Karen; Parsa, Shima; Weitz, David A; Brenner, Michael P

    2017-10-06

    The relationship between the microstructure of a porous medium and the observed flow distribution is still a puzzle. We resolve it with an analytical model, where the local correlations between adjacent pores, which determine the distribution of flows propagated from one pore downstream, predict the flow distribution. Numerical simulations of a two-dimensional porous medium verify the model and clearly show the transition of flow distributions from δ-function-like via Gaussians to exponential with increasing disorder. Comparison to experimental data further verifies our numerical approach.

  13. Role of scaffold mean pore size in meniscus regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng-Zheng; Jiang, Dong; Ding, Jian-Xun; Wang, Shao-Jie; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ji-Ying; Qi, Yan-Song; Chen, Xue-Si; Yu, Jia-Kuo

    2016-10-01

    Recently, meniscus tissue engineering offers a promising management for meniscus regeneration. Although rarely reported, the microarchitectures of scaffolds can deeply influence the behaviors of endogenous or exogenous stem/progenitor cells and subsequent tissue formation in meniscus tissue engineering. Herein, a series of three-dimensional (3D) poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds with three distinct mean pore sizes (i.e., 215, 320, and 515μm) were fabricated via fused deposition modeling. The scaffold with the mean pore size of 215μm significantly improved both the proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) production/deposition of mesenchymal stem cells compared to all other groups in vitro. Moreover, scaffolds with mean pore size of 215μm exhibited the greatest tensile and compressive moduli in all the acellular and cellular studies. In addition, the relatively better results of fibrocartilaginous tissue formation and chondroprotection were observed in the 215μm scaffold group after substituting the rabbit medial meniscectomy for 12weeks. Overall, the mean pore size of 3D-printed PCL scaffold could affect cell behavior, ECM production, biomechanics, and repair effect significantly. The PCL scaffold with mean pore size of 215μm presented superior results both in vitro and in vivo, which could be an alternative for meniscus tissue engineering. Meniscus tissue engineering provides a promising strategy for meniscus regeneration. In this regard, the microarchitectures (e.g., mean pore size) of scaffolds remarkably impact the behaviors of cells and subsequent tissue formation, which has been rarely reported. Herein, three three-dimensional poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds with different mean pore sizes (i.e., 215, 320, and 515μm) were fabricated via fused deposition modeling. The results suggested that the mean pore size significantly affected the behaviors of endogenous or exogenous stem/progenitor cells and subsequent tissue formation. This study furthers

  14. Pore facies analysis: incorporation of rock properties into pore geometry based classes in a Permo-Triassic carbonate reservoir in the Persian Gulf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimpour-Bonab, H; Aliakbardoust, E

    2014-01-01

    Pore facies analysis is a useful method for the classification of reservoir rocks according to pore geometry characteristics. The importance of this method is related to the dependence of the dynamic behaviour of the reservoir rock on the pore geometry. In this study, pore facies analysis was performed by the quantification and classification of the mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves applying the multi-resolution graph-based clustering (MRGC) method. Each pore facies includes a limited variety of rock samples with different depositional fabrics and diagenetic histories, which are representative of one type of pore geometry. The present pore geometry is the result of the interaction between the primary rock fabric and its diagenetic overprint. Thus the variations in petrographic properties can be correlated with the pore geometry characteristics. Accordingly, the controlling parameters in the pore geometry characteristics were revealed by detailed petrographic analysis in each pore facies. The reservoir rock samples were then classified using the determined petrographic properties which control the pore system quality. This method is proposed for the classification of reservoir rocks in complicated carbonate reservoirs, in order to reduce the incompatibility of traditional facies analysis with pore system characteristics. The method is applicable where enough capillary pressure data is not available. (papers)

  15. NMR Pore Structure and Dynamic Characteristics of Sandstone Caused by Ambient Freeze-Thaw Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For a deeper understanding of the freeze-thaw weathering effects on the microstructure evolution and deterioration of dynamic mechanical properties of rock, the present paper conducted the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR tests and impact loading experiments on sandstone under different freeze-thaw cycles. The results of NMR test show that, with the increase of freeze-thaw cycles, the pores expand and pores size tends to be uniform. The experimental results show that the stress-strain curves all go through four stages, namely, densification, elasticity, yielding, and failure. The densification curve is shorter, and the slope of elasticity curve decreases as the freeze-thaw cycles increase. With increasing freeze-thaw cycles, the dynamic peak stress decreases and energy absorption of sandstone increases. The dynamic failure form is an axial splitting failure, and the fragments increase and the size diminishes with increasing freeze-thaw cycles. The higher the porosity is, the more severe the degradation of dynamic characteristics is. An increase model for the relationships between the porosity or energy absorption and freeze-thaw cycles number was built to reveal the increasing trend with the freeze-thaw cycles increase; meanwhile, a decay model was built to predict the dynamic compressive strength degradation of rock after repeated freeze-thaw cycles.

  16. [Nuclear theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion

  17. Nuclear Exodus: Herpesviruses Lead the Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, Janna M; Heldwein, Ekaterina E

    2016-09-29

    Most DNA viruses replicate in the nucleus and exit it either by passing through the nuclear pores or by rupturing the nuclear envelope. Unusually, herpesviruses have evolved a complex mechanism of nuclear escape whereby nascent capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane to form perinuclear virions that subsequently fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing capsids into the cytosol. Although this general scheme is accepted in the field, the players and their roles are still debated. Recent studies illuminated critical mechanistic features of this enigmatic process and uncovered surprising parallels with a novel cellular nuclear export process. This review summarizes our current understanding of nuclear egress in herpesviruses, examines the experimental evidence and models, and outlines outstanding questions with the goal of stimulating new research in this area.

  18. Nuclear Exodus: Herpesviruses Lead the Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, Janna M.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2016-01-01

    Most DNA viruses replicate in the nucleus and exit it either by passing through the nuclear pores or by rupturing the nuclear envelope. Unusually, herpesviruses have evolved a complex mechanism of nuclear escape whereby nascent capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane to form perinuclear virions that subsequently fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, releasing capsids into the cytosol. Although this general scheme is accepted in the field, the players and their roles are still debated. Recent studies illuminated critical mechanistic features of this enigmatic process and uncovered surprising parallels with a novel cellular nuclear export process. This review summarizes our current understanding of nuclear egress in herpesviruses, examines the experimental evidence and models, and outlines outstanding questions with the goal of stimulating new research in this area. PMID:27482898

  19. Using pore-scale imaging and modeling to provide new insights in multi-phase flow, transport and reaction phenomena in porous media (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijeljic, B.; Andrew, M. G.; Menke, H. P.; Blunt, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Advances in X ray imaging techniques made it possible not only to accurately describe solid and fluid(s) distributions in the pore space but also to study dynamics of multi-phase flow and reactive transport in-situ. This has opened up a range of new opportunities to better understand fundamental physics at the pore scale by experiment, and test and validate theoretical models in order to develop predictive tools at the pore scale and use it for upscaling. Firstly, we illustrate this concept by describing a new methodology for predicting non-Fickian transport in millimeter-sized three-dimensional micro-CT images of a beadpack, a sandstone, and a carbonate, representing porous media with an increasing degree of pore-scale complexity. The key strategy is to retain the full information on flow and transport signature of a porous medium by using probability distribution functions (PDFs) of voxel velocities for flow, and both PDFs of particle displacements and PDFs of particle transit times between voxels for transport. For this purpose, direct-simulation flow and transport model is used to analyse the relationship between pore structure, velocity, and the dynamics of the evolving plume. The model predictions for PDFs of particle displacements obtained by the model are in excellent agreement with those measured on similar cores in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. A key determinant for non-Fickian transport is the spread in velocity distribution in the pore space. Further, we present micro-CT imaging of capillary trapping of scCO2 at reservoir conditions in a range of carbonates and sandstones having different pore structure and demonstrate that substantial quantities of scCO2 can be trapped in the pore space. Higher residual scCO2 saturations are found in sandstones compared to carbonates. The trapped ganglia exhibit different distribution of size, related to the inherent structure of pore space. Pore structures with large, open pores that are well connected lead

  20. Capillary pressure-saturation relationships for porous granular materials: Pore morphology method vs. pore unit assembly method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweijen, Thomas; Aslannejad, Hamed; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    2017-09-01

    In studies of two-phase flow in complex porous media it is often desirable to have an estimation of the capillary pressure-saturation curve prior to measurements. Therefore, we compare in this research the capability of three pore-scale approaches in reproducing experimentally measured capillary pressure-saturation curves. To do so, we have generated 12 packings of spheres that are representative of four different glass-bead packings and eight different sand packings, for which we have found experimental data on the capillary pressure-saturation curve in the literature. In generating the packings, we matched the particle size distributions and porosity values of the granular materials. We have used three different pore-scale approaches for generating the capillary pressure-saturation curves of each packing: i) the Pore Unit Assembly (PUA) method in combination with the Mayer and Stowe-Princen (MS-P) approximation for estimating the entry pressures of pore throats, ii) the PUA method in combination with the hemisphere approximation, and iii) the Pore Morphology Method (PMM) in combination with the hemisphere approximation. The three approaches were also used to produce capillary pressure-saturation curves for the coating layer of paper, used in inkjet printing. Curves for such layers are extremely difficult to determine experimentally, due to their very small thickness and the presence of extremely small pores (less than one micrometer in size). Results indicate that the PMM and PUA-hemisphere method give similar capillary pressure-saturation curves, because both methods rely on a hemisphere to represent the air-water interface. The ability of the hemisphere approximation and the MS-P approximation to reproduce correct capillary pressure seems to depend on the type of particle size distribution, with the hemisphere approximation working well for narrowly distributed granular materials.

  1. Modification of polymer films by the nuclear track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akap'ev, G.N.; Apel', P.Yu.; Vorob'ev, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    Some possibilities of the nuclear track method are shown: for example, the nuclear membranes with biporous structure in a monolithic polymer film. The permeability of this membranes is 2-5 times higher compared with the conventional nuclear membranes. The nuclear membranes with conical or funnel-shaped pores allow to increase the permeability of membranes (∼30-50%) for certain ratios between the pore radii on the two sides of the membrane (r 1 /r 2 =1.5-4.0). The composite nuclear membrane consisting of a thin selective layer and of a high porosity support allow one to solve the problem of increasing the permeability of the nuclear membranes. 6 refs.; 3 figs

  2. Pore Size Distribution and Methane Equilibrium Conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihani, A. D.; Daigle, H.; Cook, A.; Glosser, D.; Shushtarian, A.

    2015-12-01

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  3. Pore size distribution and methane equilibrium conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bihani, Abhishek [University of Texas at Austin; Daigle, Hugh [University of Texas at Austin; Cook, Ann [Ohio State University; Glosser, Deborah [Ohio State University; Shushtarian, Arash [University of Texas at Austin

    2015-12-15

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  4. Plastic strain caused by contraction of pores in polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Yoda, Shinichi; Konishi, Takashi.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of porosity on mechanical properties and deformation behavior of four isotropic polycrystalline graphites were studied. The pore size distributions of the graphites were measured using a conventional mercury penetration technique. The average pore radius of ISO-88 graphite was about one-tenth of that of ISEM-1, IG-11 or IG-15 graphites. Young's modulus of the graphites decreased with increasing porosity. The stress-strain curve of each graphite was measured in its lateral and axial directions. Young's modulus of graphite decreased with increasing load. The plastic strain at a given compressive load was calculated from the stress-strain curve and the initial gradient of the unloading curve at the load. The ratio of lateral plastic strain to axial plastic strain for the graphites was less than 0.5, indicating that the volume of the graphites decreased during compressive loading. By assuming that the volume change was caused by contraction of pores, plastic strain associated with contraction of pores was calculated from the axial plastic strain and lateral plastic strain by slips along the basal planes. The plastic strain increased with increasing axial plastic strain and porosity of graphite. (author)

  5. The study of the relationship between pore structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    *For correspondence. The study of the relationship between pore structure and photocatalysis of mesoporous TiO2. BING GUO a. , HANGYAN SHEN a,. *, KANGYING SHU a. , YAOWU ZENG b and. WENSHENG NING c a. College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018, China b.

  6. Low atomic number coating for XEUS silicon pore optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lumb, D.H.; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Krumrey, M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a set of measurements on coated silicon substrates that are representative of the material to be used for the XEUS High Performance Pore Optics (HPO) technology. X-ray angular reflectance measurements at 2.8 and 8 keV, and energy scans of reflectance at a fixed angle representative of...

  7. Pore formation by T3SS translocators: liposome leakage assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faudry, Eric; Perdu, Caroline; Attrée, Ina

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize a dedicated membrane-embedded apparatus, the type III secretion system (T3SS), to inject proteins into host cells. The passage of the proteins across the target membrane is accomplished by a proteinaceous pore-the translocon-formed within the host-cell cytoplasmic membrane. Translocators bound to their chaperones can be expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently dissociated from the chaperone by guanidine treatment. The pore formation properties of the translocators can then be studied by an in-vitro liposome leakage assay. Sulforhodamine-B is encapsulated within lipid vesicles during liposome preparation. At high concentration, this fluorochrome exhibits self-quenching limiting fluorescence emission. Upon pore formation, liposome leakage leads to the dilution of Sulforhodamine-B in the medium and fluorescence emission increases. Alternatively, fluorochromes coupled to large dextran molecules can be encapsulated in order to estimate pore dimensions. Here we describe protein expression and purification, dye-liposome preparation, and leakage assay conditions.

  8. Septal Pore Caps in Basidiomycetes, Composition and Ultrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, K.G.A. van

    2007-01-01

    Filamentous fungi, including Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, form mycelia that consist of a network of apical growing hyphae. These hyphae are separated into cellular compartments by septa that have pores of about 70 to 500 nm in diameter. The cytoplasm within the mycelium is thus continuous

  9. Investigation on pore structure and small-scale agglomeration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The increase in the additives results in the modification in the pore size distribution and to some extent the total porosity. SANS revealed a mass fractal nature of the agglomerated matrix microstructure. The fractal dimension of the matrix does not change appreciably with the additives although the upper cut-off value of the ...

  10. Alumina ceramics prepared with new pore-forming agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Živcová

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Porous ceramics have a wide range of applications at all length scales, ranging from fi ltration membranes and catalyst supports to biomaterials (scaffolds for bone ingrowths and thermally or acoustically insulating bulk materials or coating layers. Organic pore-forming agents (PFAs of biological origin can be used to control porosity, pore size and pore shape. This work concerns the characterization and testing of several less common pore-forming agents (lycopodium, coffee, fl our and semolina, poppy seed, which are of potential interest from the viewpoint of size, shape or availability. The performance of these new PFAs is compared to that of starch, which has become a rather popular PFA for ceramics during the last decade. The PFAs investigated in this work are in the size range from 5 μm (rice starch to approximately 1 mm (poppy seed, all with more or less isometric shape. The burnout behavior of PFAs is studied by thermal analysis, i.e. thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis. For the preparation of porous alumina ceramics from alumina suspensions containing PFAs traditional slip casting (into plaster molds and starch consolidation casting (using metal molds are used in this work. The resulting microstructures are investigated using optical microscopy, combined with image analysis, as well as other methods (Archimedes method of double-weighing in water, mercury intrusion porosimetry.

  11. Compaction and Porosity Based Pore Pressure Prediction in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2: A reversal in the trend (well 3; 5450-9658ft, r = -0.89) indicated by an increase in porosity as a result of overpressure. A number of factors such as compaction, fluid content and pore pressure affect the porosity-depth trends of the Agbada Formation. A decrease in porosity with depth generally holds true for shales (well 1: ...

  12. Concentration Polarization to Measure Nano-pore Accessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solsona, Miguel; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Olthuis, Wouter; Papadimitriou, Vasileios; van den Berg, Albert; Abelmann, Leon; Weckhuysen, Bert M.; Nieuwelink, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the deactivation process in porous catalysts is of tremendous economic significance. We demonstrate the feasibility of using the concentration polarization method to obtain the pore accessibility distribution at single particle level for the first time. By using this technique we could

  13. A simulation of earthquake induced undrained pore pressure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 112; Issue 3. A simulation of earthquake induced undrained pore pressure changes with bearing on some soil liquefaction observations following the 2001 Bhuj earthquake. Irene Sarkar Ramesh Chander. Volume 112 Issue 3 September 2003 pp 471-477 ...

  14. On the Mechanism of Pore Formation by Melittin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaart, Geert; Guzman, Jeanette Velasquez; Mika, Jacek T.; Poolman, Bert

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of pore formation of lytic peptides, such as melittin from bee venom, is thought to involve binding to the membrane surface, followed by insertion at threshold levels of bound peptide. We show that in membranes composed of zwitterionic lipids, i.e. phosphatidylcholine, melittin not

  15. Small angle neutron scattering study of pore microstructure in ceria ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The SANS profiles indicate surface fractal morphology of the pore space with fractal dimensionality lying between 2.70 and 2.76. ... Bedekar2 A K Tyagi2. Solid State Physics Division; Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India; Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India ...

  16. The hydraulic conductivity of sediments: A pore size perspective

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, X.W.

    2017-12-06

    This article presents an analysis of previously published hydraulic conductivity data for a wide range of sediments. All soils exhibit a prevalent power trend between the hydraulic conductivity and void ratio. Data trends span 12 orders of magnitude in hydraulic conductivity and collapse onto a single narrow trend when the hydraulic conductivity data are plotted versus the mean pore size, estimated using void ratio and specific surface area measurements. The sensitivity of hydraulic conductivity to changes in the void ratio is higher than the theoretical value due to two concurrent phenomena: 1) percolating large pores are responsible for most of the flow, and 2) the larger pores close first during compaction. The prediction of hydraulic conductivity based on macroscale index parameters in this and similar previous studies has reached an asymptote in the range of kmeas/5≤kpredict≤5kmeas. The remaining uncertainty underscores the important role of underlying sediment characteristics such as pore size distribution, shape, and connectivity that are not measured with index properties. Furthermore, the anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity cannot be recovered from scalar parameters such as index properties. Overall, results highlight the robustness of the physics inspired data scrutiny based Hagen–Poiseuille and Kozeny-Carman analyses.

  17. Multi-Material Tissue Engineering Scaffold with Hierarchical Pore Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Kathy Ye; Sklaviadis, Demetra; Tochka, Zachary L; Fischer, Kristin M; Hearon, Keith; Morgan, Thomas D; Langer, Robert; Freed, Lisa E

    2016-08-23

    Multi-material polymer scaffolds with multiscale pore architectures were characterized and tested with vascular and heart cells as part of a platform for replacing damaged heart muscle. Vascular and muscle scaffolds were constructed from a new material, poly(limonene thioether) (PLT32i), which met the design criteria of slow biodegradability, elastomeric mechanical properties, and facile processing. The vascular-parenchymal interface was a poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) porous membrane that met different criteria of rapid biodegradability, high oxygen permeance, and high porosity. A hierarchical architecture of primary (macroscale) and secondary (microscale) pores was created by casting the PLT32i prepolymer onto sintered spheres of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) within precisely patterned molds followed by photocuring, de-molding, and leaching out the PMMA. Pre-fabricated polymer templates were cellularized, assembled, and perfused in order to engineer spatially organized, contractile heart tissue. Structural and functional analyses showed that the primary pores guided heart cell alignment and enabled robust perfusion while the secondary pores increased heart cell retention and reduced polymer volume fraction.

  18. Pore-scale Modelling of Capillarity in Swelling Granular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Sweijen, T.; Nikooee, E.; Chareyre, B.

    2015-12-01

    Capillarity in granular porous media is a common and important phenomenon in earth materials and industrial products, and therefore has been studied extensively. To model capillarity in granular porous media, one needs to go beyond current models which simulate either two-phase flow in porous media or mechanical behaviour in granular media. Current pore-scale models for two-phase flow such as pore-network models are tailored for rigid pore-skeletons, even though in many applications, namely hydro-mechanical coupling in soils, printing, and hygienic products, the porous structure does change during two-phase flow. On the other hand, models such as Discrete Element Method (DEM), which simulate the deformable porous media, have mostly been employed for dry or saturated granular media. Here, the effects of porosity change and swelling on the retention properties was studied, for swelling granular materials. A pore-unit model that was capable to construct the capillary pressure - saturation curve was coupled to DEM. Such that the capillary pressure - saturation curve could be constructed for varying porosities and amounts of absorbed water. The study material was super absorbent polymer particles, which are capable to absorb water 10's to 200 times their initial weight. We have simulated quasi-static primary imbibition for different porosities and amounts of absorbed water. The results reveal a 3 dimensional surface between capillary pressure, saturation, and porosity, which can be normalized by means of the entry pressure and the effective water saturation to a unique curve.

  19. SANS investigation on evolution of pore morphology for varying ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    application as hosts for catalysts in automobile exhaust. It has been observed that by suitably tailoring the sintering conditions (temperature, time and ... As the distance at which mass transport has to take place during sintering is less for finer pores, the kinetics of their elimination is faster than that of the coarser ones.

  20. Enhanced water transport and salt rejection through hydrophobic zeolite pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humplik, Thomas; Lee, Jongho; O’Hern, Sean; Laoui, Tahar; Karnik, Rohit; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2017-12-01

    The potential of improvements to reverse osmosis (RO) desalination by incorporating porous nanostructured materials such as zeolites into the selective layer in the membrane has spurred substantial research efforts over the past decade. However, because of the lack of methods to probe transport across these materials, it is still unclear which pore size or internal surface chemistry is optimal for maximizing permeability and salt rejection. We developed a platform to measure the transport of water and salt across a single layer of zeolite crystals, elucidating the effects of internal wettability on water and salt transport through the ≈5.5 Å pores of MFI zeolites. MFI zeolites with a more hydrophobic (i.e., less attractive) internal surface chemistry facilitated an approximately order of magnitude increase in water permeability compared to more hydrophilic MFI zeolites, while simultaneously fully rejecting both potassium and chlorine ions. However, our results also demonstrated approximately two orders of magnitude lower permeability compared to molecular simulations. This decreased performance suggests that additional transport resistances (such as surface barriers, pore collapse or blockages due to contamination) may be limiting the performance of experimental nanostructured membranes. Nevertheless, the inclusion of hydrophobic sub-nanometer pores into the active layer of RO membranes should improve both the water permeability and salt rejection of future RO membranes (Fasano et al 2016 Nat. Commun. 7 12762).

  1. Host defenses against bacterial pore-forming toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, F.C.O.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFTs), the most common bacterial toxins, contribute to infection by perforating host cell membranes. Excessive use and lack of new development of antibiotics are causing increasing numbers of drug-resistant bacteria, like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and

  2. Development of Pore Pressure and Material Damping during Cyclic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1994-01-01

    The behaviour of sand during cyclic loading can be characterized as "stabilization", "instant stabilization". "pore pressure buildup" and "liquefaction". The terminologies can be defined exactly by a simple mathematical formulation based on the existence of a cyclic stable state. By introducing...

  3. Investigation on pore structure and small-scale agglomeration ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Investigation on pore structure and small-scale agglomeration behaviour in liquid phase sintered. SiC using small angle neutron scattering. D SEN1,∗, J BAHADUR1, S MAZUMDER1, T MAHATA2, M SYAMBABU2 and. P K SINHA2. 1Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India.

  4. Pore-scale uncertainty quantification with multilevel Monte Carlo

    KAUST Repository

    Icardi, Matteo

    2014-01-06

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of pore-scale transport processes in porous media have recently gained large popularity. However the geometrical details of the pore structures can be known only in a very low number of samples and the detailed flow computations can be carried out only on a limited number of cases. The explicit introduction of randomness in the geometry and in other setup parameters can be crucial for the optimization of pore-scale investigations for random homogenization. Since there are no generic ways to parametrize the randomness in the porescale structures, Monte Carlo techniques are the most accessible to compute statistics. We propose a multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) technique to reduce the computational cost of estimating quantities of interest within a prescribed accuracy constraint. Random samples of pore geometries with a hierarchy of geometrical complexities and grid refinements, are synthetically generated and used to propagate the uncertainties in the flow simulations and compute statistics of macro-scale effective parameters.

  5. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described

  6. Structural Insights into Clostridium perfringens Delta Toxin Pore Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Huyet

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens Delta toxin is one of the three hemolysin-like proteins produced by C. perfringens type C and possibly type B strains. One of the others, NetB, has been shown to be the major cause of Avian Nectrotic Enteritis, which following the reduction in use of antibiotics as growth promoters, has become an emerging disease of industrial poultry. Delta toxin itself is cytotoxic to the wide range of human and animal macrophages and platelets that present GM2 ganglioside on their membranes. It has sequence similarity with Staphylococcus aureus β-pore forming toxins and is expected to heptamerize and form pores in the lipid bilayer of host cell membranes. Nevertheless, its exact mode of action remains undetermined. Here we report the 2.4 Å crystal structure of monomeric Delta toxin. The superposition of this structure with the structure of the phospholipid-bound F component of S. aureus leucocidin (LukF revealed that the glycerol molecules bound to Delta toxin and the phospholipids in LukF are accommodated in the same hydrophobic clefts, corresponding to where the toxin is expected to latch onto the membrane, though the binding sites show significant differences. From structure-based sequence alignment with the known structure of staphylococcal α-hemolysin, a model of the Delta toxin pore form has been built. Using electron microscopy, we have validated our model and characterized the Delta toxin pore on liposomes. These results highlight both similarities and differences in the mechanism of Delta toxin (and by extension NetB cytotoxicity from that of the staphylococcal pore-forming toxins.

  7. Predicting Reactive Transport Dynamics in Carbonates using Initial Pore Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, H. P.; Nunes, J. P. P.; Blunt, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding rock-fluid interaction at the pore-scale is imperative for accurate predictive modelling of carbon storage permanence. However, coupled reactive transport models are computationally expensive, requiring either a sacrifice of resolution or high performance computing to solve relatively simple geometries. Many recent studies indicate that initial pore structure many be the dominant mechanism in determining the dissolution regime. Here we investigate how well the initial pore structure is predictive of distribution and amount of dissolution during reactive flow using particle tracking on the initial image. Two samples of carbonate rock with varying initial pore space heterogeneity were reacted with reservoir condition CO2-saturated brine and scanned dynamically during reactive flow at a 4-μm resolution between 4 and 40 times using 4D X-ray micro-tomography over the course of 1.5 hours using μ-CT. Flow was modelled on the initial binarized image using a Navier-Stokes solver. Particle tracking was then run on the velocity fields, the streamlines were traced, and the streamline density was calculated both on a voxel-by-voxel and a channel-by-channel basis. The density of streamlines was then compared to the amount of dissolution in subsequent time steps during reaction. It was found that for the flow and transport regimes studied, the streamline density distribution in the initial image accurately predicted the dominant pathways of dissolution and gave good indicators of the type of dissolution regime that would later develop. This work suggests that the eventual reaction-induced changes in pore structure are deterministic rather than stochastic and can be predicted with high resolution imaging of unreacted rock.

  8. FG repeats facilitate integral protein trafficking to the inner nuclear membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, Alastair RW; Schirmer, Eric C

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism for nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of integral membrane proteins is poorly understood compared to transport of soluble molecules. We recently demonstrated that at least four distinct mechanisms can contribute to transport of integral proteins through the peripheral channels of the nuclear pore complex. One of these requires having multiple phenylalanine-glycine (FG) pairings on the integral protein. It also requires the nuclear pore complex protein Nup35, which separately contains...

  9. The Controls of Pore-Throat Structure on Fluid Performance in Tight Clastic Rock Reservoir: A Case from the Upper Triassic of Chang 7 Member, Ordos Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of porosity and permeability in tight clastic rock reservoir have significant difference from those in conventional reservoir. The increased exploitation of tight gas and oil requests further understanding of fluid performance in the nanoscale pore-throat network of the tight reservoir. Typical tight sandstone and siltstone samples from Ordos Basin were investigated, and rate-controlled mercury injection capillary pressure (RMICP and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR were employed in this paper, combined with helium porosity and air permeability data, to analyze the impact of pore-throat structure on the storage and seepage capacity of these tight oil reservoirs, revealing the control factors of economic petroleum production. The researches indicate that, in the tight clastic rock reservoir, largest throat is the key control on the permeability and potentially dominates the movable water saturation in the reservoir. The storage capacity of the reservoir consists of effective throat and pore space. Although it has a relatively steady and significant proportion that resulted from the throats, its variation is still dominated by the effective pores. A combination parameter (ε that was established to be as an integrated characteristic of pore-throat structure shows effectively prediction of physical capability for hydrocarbon resource of the tight clastic rock reservoir.

  10. An instrument to measure differential pore pressures in deep ocean sediments: Pop-Up-Pore-Pressure-Instrument (PUPPI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultheiss, P.J.; McPhail, S.D.; Packwood, A.R.; Hart, B.

    1985-01-01

    A Pop-Up-Pore-Pressure-Instrument (PUPPI) has been developed to measure differential pore pressures in sediments. The differential pressure is the pressure above or below normal hydrostatic pressure at the depth of the measurement. It is designed to operate in water depths up to 6000 metres for periods of weeks or months, if required, and measures differential pore pressures at depths of up to 3 metres into the sediments with a resolution of 0.05 kPa. It is a free-fall device with a lance which penetrates the sediments. This lance and the ballast weight is disposed when the PUPPI is acoustically released from the sea floor. When combined with permeability and porosity values of deep-sea sediments the pore pressure measurements made using the PUPPI suggest advection velocities as low as 8.8 mm/yr. The mechanical, electrical and acoustic systems are described together with data obtained from both shallow and deep water trials. (author)

  11. Capillary pressure–saturation relationships for porous granular materials : Pore morphology method vs. pore unit assembly method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweijen, Thomas; Aslannejad, Hamed; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    2017-01-01

    In studies of two-phase flow in complex porous media it is often desirable to have an estimation of the capillary pressure–saturation curve prior to measurements. Therefore, we compare in this research the capability of three pore-scale approaches in reproducing experimentally measured capillary

  12. Applying the squeezing technique to highly consolidated clayrocks for pore water characterisation: Lessons learned from experiments at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández, A.M.; Sánchez-Ledesma, D.M.; Tournassat, C.; Melón, A.; Gaucher, E.C.; Astudillo, J.; Vinsot, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Critical assessment of the squeezing technique for pore water extraction in consolidated clayrocks. • Evolution of the chemistry of extracted water as a function of pressure. • Evaluation of artifacts on pore water composition. • Determination of the anion-accessible porosity by means of squeezing and leaching data. - Abstract: Knowledge of the pore water chemistry in clayrock formations plays an important role in determining radionuclide chemical speciation and migration in the context of nuclear waste disposal. Among the different in situ and ex situ techniques for pore water sampling in clay sediments and soils, the squeezing technique dates back 115 years. Although different studies have been conducted on the reliability and representativeness of squeezed pore waters, most of these involved high-porosity, high water content and unconsolidated clay sediments. Very few of them analysed squeezed pore water from low-porosity, low water content and highly consolidated clayrocks. In this paper, a specially designed and fabricated one-dimensional compression, two-directional fluid flow cell was used to extract and analyse the pore water composition of Opalinus Clay core samples from Mont Terri (Switzerland) with water contents between 6.2 and 7.8 wt.%. A study of the influence of the squeezing pressure on the chemistry of the pore water was performed at pressures of up to 200 MPa. To validate and demonstrate the validity of the squeezing technique for obtaining reliable pore water, different tests were performed at various pressures and the squeezed waters were compared with those obtained by other methods, such as in situ collected borehole waters. The reproducibility and quality of the squeezing method was also checked, as well as different artifacts which could affect the reliability of the pore water data. The results show that the reproducibility of the technique is good and no membrane effect (ionic ultrafiltration, chemical fractionation

  13. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  14. Fabrication of nanoporous nuclear track membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Liangqiang; Wang Shicheng; Ju Xin; Masaru Yoshida; Yasunari Maekawa

    2001-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) films were irradiated by S, Kr and Xe ions and were illuminated with ultraviolet light. The normalized track etch rate for PET and PC films etched in different conditions were measured by conductometric experiments. It is shown that normalized track etch rate can be over 1000 for PET films, 2000 for PC films under optimized condition. TEM photographs of copper nanowires electroplated into nanoporous nuclear track membranes show that the narrowest wire diameter of copper nanowires is 20 nm and that the pore diameter calculated by conductometric experiments is in agreement with the wire diameter measured by TEM when the pore diameter is over 30 nm

  15. Fugitive binder for nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallivan, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    A compound consisting of ammonium cations and carbonate, bicarbonate, or carbamate anions, or a mixture of such compounds, is useful as a binder for uranium dioxide fuel pellets for which it is desired to maintain a certain degree of porosity, uniformity of pore size, a lack of interconnections between the pores, and the shape or configuration of the base material particles in the final article after sintering. Upon heating, these binders decompose into gases and leave substantially no impurities. A process for sintering green nuclear fuel pellets using these binders is provided. (LL)

  16. Nuclear moments

    CERN Document Server

    Kopferman, H; Massey, H S W

    1958-01-01

    Nuclear Moments focuses on the processes, methodologies, reactions, and transformations of molecules and atoms, including magnetic resonance and nuclear moments. The book first offers information on nuclear moments in free atoms and molecules, including theoretical foundations of hyperfine structure, isotope shift, spectra of diatomic molecules, and vector model of molecules. The manuscript then takes a look at nuclear moments in liquids and crystals. Discussions focus on nuclear paramagnetic and magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance. The text discusses nuclear moments and nucl

  17. Rock Pore Structure as Main Reason of Rock Deterioration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrášik, Martin; Kopecký, Miloslav

    2014-03-01

    Crashed or dimensional rocks have been used as natural construction material, decoration stone or as material for artistic sculptures. Especially old historical towns not only in Slovakia have had experiences with use of stones for construction purposes for centuries. The whole buildings were made from dimensional stone, like sandstone, limestone or rhyolite. Pavements were made especially from basalt, andesite, rhyolite or granite. Also the most common modern construction material - concrete includes large amounts of crashed rock, especially limestone, dolostone and andesite. However, rock as any other material if exposed to exogenous processes starts to deteriorate. Especially mechanical weathering can be very intensive if rock with unsuitable rock properties is used. For long it had been believed that repeated freezing and thawing in relation to high absorption is the main reason of the rock deterioration. In Slovakia for many years the high water absorption was set as exclusion criterion for use of rocks and stones in building industry. Only after 1989 the absorption was accepted as merely informational rock property and not exclusion. The reason of the change was not the understanding of the relationship between the porosity and rock deterioration, but more or less good experiences with some high porous rocks used in constructions exposed to severe weather conditions and proving a lack of relationship between rock freeze-thaw resistivity and water absorption. Results of the recent worldwide research suggest that understanding a resistivity of rocks against deterioration is hidden not in the absorption but in the structure of rock pores in relation to thermodynamic properties of pore water and tensile strength of rocks and rock minerals. Also this article presents some results of research on rock deterioration and pore structure performed on 88 rock samples. The results divide the rocks tested into two groups - group N in which the pore water does not freeze

  18. A random-walk model for pore pressure accumulation in marine soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Cheng, Niang-Sheng

    1999-01-01

    A numerical random-walk model has been developed for the pore-water pressure. The model is based on the analogy between the variation of the pore pressure and the diffusion process of any passive quantity such as concentration. The pore pressure in the former process is analogous to the concentra......A numerical random-walk model has been developed for the pore-water pressure. The model is based on the analogy between the variation of the pore pressure and the diffusion process of any passive quantity such as concentration. The pore pressure in the former process is analogous...

  19. Monte-Carlo simulation of crystallographical pore growth in III-V-semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leisner, Malte; Carstensen, Juergen; Foell, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    The growth of crystallographical pores in III-V-semiconductors can be understood in the framework of a simple model, which is based on the assumption that the branching of pores is proportional to the current density at the pore tips. The stochastic nature of this model allows its implementation into a three-dimensional Monte-Carlo-simulation of pore growth. The simulation is able to reproduce the experimentally observed crysto pore structures in III-V-semiconductors in full quantitative detail. The different branching probabilities for different semiconductors, as well as doping levels, can be deduced from the specific passivation behavior of the semiconductor-electrolyte-interface at the pore tips.

  20. Regulation of Exocytotic Fusion Pores by SNARE Protein Transmembrane Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyong Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-triggered exocytotic release of neurotransmitters and hormones from neurons and neuroendocrine cells underlies neuronal communication, motor activity and endocrine functions. The core of the neuronal exocytotic machinery is composed of soluble N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs. Formation of complexes between vesicle-attached v- and plasma-membrane anchored t-SNAREs in a highly regulated fashion brings the membranes into close apposition. Small, soluble proteins called Complexins (Cpx and calcium-sensing Synaptotagmins cooperate to block fusion at low resting calcium concentrations, but trigger release upon calcium increase. A growing body of evidence suggests that the transmembrane domains (TMDs of SNARE proteins play important roles in regulating the processes of fusion and release, but the mechanisms involved are only starting to be uncovered. Here we review recent evidence that SNARE TMDs exert influence by regulating the dynamics of the fusion pore, the initial aqueous connection between the vesicular lumen and the extracellular space. Even after the fusion pore is established, hormone release by neuroendocrine cells is tightly controlled, and the same may be true of neurotransmitter release by neurons. The dynamics of the fusion pore can regulate the kinetics of cargo release and the net amount released, and can determine the mode of vesicle recycling. Manipulations of SNARE TMDs were found to affect fusion pore properties profoundly, both during exocytosis and in biochemical reconstitutions. To explain these effects, TMD flexibility, and interactions among TMDs or between TMDs and lipids have been invoked. Exocytosis has provided the best setting in which to unravel the underlying mechanisms, being unique among membrane fusion reactions in that single fusion pores can be probed using high-resolution methods. An important role will likely be played by methods that can probe single fusion pores

  1. Correlation between gas permeability and pore structure of coal matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Yang, J.; Gao, F.; Li, Y.; Niu, H.; Gao, H.

    2012-04-01

    The sequestration of CO2 in unminable coal seams represents a promising option for CO2 geologic storage, because the injected CO2 may enhance coalbed methane recovery (CO2-ECBM), which could partly offset the costs of the storage process. The CO2-ECBM technology is based on the relative affinity of CO2 and CH4 to coals under given pressure and temperature conditions. The excess sorption capacity of coals for CO2 is generally higher than the sorption capacity for methane. The coal seams are characterized by a dual porosity structure including cleat and matrix pores. The cleats in the coal seams are considered as highways for gas and water flow, while the matrix is the storage location of gas by adsorption. The slow transport process of gas in coal matrix may constrain the efficiency of the displacement of CH4 by CO2 due to the compacted pore structure of the coal matrix. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the correlation between permeability of gas and pore structure in coal matrix is crucial for the CO2-ECBM processes. Yangquan coals originating from the Qingshui basin, which contains gas-rich coals in China, were selected for the tests in this study. Yangquan coals are classified as anthracite. In order to avoid the influence of coal cleats on fluid flow, small coal plugs (~6 mm in diameter, ~13 mm in length) were selected and fixed in the sample compartment by special glue. A test system for simultaneously measuring adsorption-porosity-permeability on the coal matrix blocks in its free state is constructed. The permeability of gas and porosity in coal plugs to He under different gas pressure and temperature conditions were simultaneously investigated. The permeability and excess sorption capacity of the coal plugs to He, N2, CH4 and CO2 were compared at a constant gas pressure and temperature. It is expected that gas break through a cleat-plug is much faster than that through a coal matrix-plug. Different sample plugs with the different pore structure results

  2. Pore structure of natural and regenerated soil aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Arthur, Emmanuel; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative characterization of aggregate pore structure can reveal the evolution of aggregates under different land use and management practices and their effects on soil processes and functions. Advances in X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) provide powerful means to conduct such characterization....... This study examined aggregate pore structure of three differently managed same textured Danish soils (mixed forage cropping, MFC; mixed cash cropping, MCC; cereal cash cropping, CCC) for (i) natural aggregates, and (ii) aggregates regenerated after 20 months of incubation. In total, 27 aggregates (8-16 mm......) were sampled from nine different treatments; 3 natural soils and 3 repacked lysimeters without and 3 with organic matter (ground rape) amendment. Three dimensional X-ray CT images, tensile strength, and organic carbon were obtained for each aggregate. Aggregate-associated organic carbon differed...

  3. Soil Pore Network Visualisation and Quantification using ImageJ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garbout, Amin; Pajor, Radoslaw; Otten, Wilfred

    Abstract Soil is one of the most complex materials on the earth, within which many biological, physical and chemical processes that support life and affect climate change take place. A much more detailed knowledge of the soil system is required to improve our ability to develop soil management...... strategies to preserve this limited resource. Many of those processes occur at micro scales. For long our ability to study soils non-destructively at microscopic scales has been limited, but recent developments in the use of X-ray Computed Tomography has offered great opportunities to quantify the 3-D...... geometry of soil pores. In this study we look at how networks that summarize the geometry of pores in soil are affected by soil structure. One of the objectives is to develop a robust and reproducible image analysis technique to produce quantitative knowledge on soil architecture from high resolution 3D...

  4. A general route towards defect and pore engineering in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guibai; Yang, Rong; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Xuezeng; Wu, Shuang; Zhao, Jing; Cheng, Meng; Yang, Wei; Wang, Duoming; He, Congli; Bai, Xuedong; Shi, Dongxia; Zhang, Guangyu

    2014-06-12

    Defect engineering in graphene is important for tailoring graphene's properties thus applicable in various applications such as porous membranes and ultra-capacitors. In this paper, we report a general route towards defect- and pore- engineering in graphene through remote plasma treatments. Oxygen plasma irradiation was employed to create homogenous defects in graphene with controllable density from a few to ≈10(3) (μm(-2)). The created defects can be further enlarged into nanopores by hydrogen plasma anisotropic etching with well-defined pore size of a few nm or above. The achieved smallest nanopores are ≈2 nm in size, showing the potential for ultra-small graphene nanopores fabrication. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Fabrication, properties, and applications of porous metals with directional pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAKAJIMA, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Lotus-type porous metals with aligned long cylindrical pores are fabricated by unidirectional solidification from the melt with a dissolved gas such as hydrogen, nitrogen, or oxygen. The gas atoms can be dissolved into the melt via a pressurized gas atmosphere or thermal decomposition of gaseous compounds. Three types of solidification techniques have been developed: mold casting, continuous zone melting, and continuous casting techniques. The last method is superior from the viewpoint of mass production of lotus metals. The observed anisotropic behaviors of the mechanical properties, sound absorption, and thermal conductivity are inherent to the anisotropic porous structure. In particular, the remarkable anisotropy in the mechanical strength is attributed to the stress concentration around the pores aligned perpendicular to the loading direction. Heat sinks are a promising application of lotus metals due to the high cooling performance with a large heat transfer. PMID:21084772

  6. Chromatography of humic substances on controlled pore glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danneberg, O.H.

    1977-01-01

    To check the suitability of controlled pore glass (CPG) for the chromatography of humic substances, a soil extract from an Austrian chernozem and humic fractions prepared from the extract were chromatographed using a column filled with CPG of a pore diameter of 156A. The chromatograms obtained were reproducible, and showed the expected sequence of elution, grey humic acids (GHA) being eluted before brown humic acids (BHA) and fulvic acids (FA). Chromatograms of complex humic systems agreed well with the computed sums of the chromatograms of all its components. This means that all humic substances moved through the column independently of the presence or absence of others. From these findings, the suitability of CPG for chromatography of humic substances was concluded. A structural alteration of GHA during the preparation was detected. This was accompanied by a decrease in molecular weight and an increase in colour intensity. (author)

  7. Pore structure of the activated coconut shell charcoal carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, E.; Nasbey, H.; Yuniarti, B. D. P.; Nurmayatri, Y.; Fahdiana, J.; Budi, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    The development of activated carbon from coconut shell charcoal has been investigated by using physical method to determine the influence of activation parameters in term of temperature, argon gas pressure and time period on the pore structure of the activated carbon. The coconut shell charcoal was produced by pyrolisis process at temperature of about 75 - 150 °C for 6 hours. The charcoal was activated at various temperature (532, 700 and 868 °C), argon gas pressure (6.59, 15 and 23.4 kgf/cm2) and time period of (10, 60 and 120 minutes). The results showed that the pores size were reduced and distributed uniformly as the activation parameters are increased.

  8. A mechanistic view of mitochondrial death decision pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Belizário

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria increase their outer and inner membrane permeability to solutes, protons and metabolites in response to a variety of extrinsic and intrinsic signaling events. The maintenance of cellular and intraorganelle ionic homeostasis, particularly for Ca2+, can determine cell survival or death. Mitochondrial death decision is centered on two processes: inner membrane permeabilization, such as that promoted by the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, formed across inner membranes when Ca2+ reaches a critical threshold, and mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, in which the pro-apoptotic proteins BID, BAX, and BAK play active roles. Membrane permeabilization leads to the release of apoptogenic proteins: cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor, Smac/Diablo, HtrA2/Omi, and endonuclease G. Cytochrome c initiates the proteolytic activation of caspases, which in turn cleave hundreds of proteins to produce the morphological and biochemical changes of apoptosis. Voltage-dependent anion channel, cyclophilin D, adenine nucleotide translocase, and the pro-apoptotic proteins BID, BAX, and BAK may be part of the molecular composition of membrane pores leading to mitochondrial permeabilization, but this remains a central question to be resolved. Other transporting pores and channels, including the ceramide channel, the mitochondrial apoptosis-induced channel, as well as a non-specific outer membrane rupture may also be potential release pathways for these apoptogenic factors. In this review, we discuss the mechanistic models by which reactive oxygen species and caspases, via structural and conformational changes of membrane lipids and proteins, promote conditions for inner/outer membrane permeabilization, which may be followed by either opening of pores or a rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane.

  9. Membranes with functionalized carbon nanotube pores for selective transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakajin, Olgica; Noy, Aleksandr; Fornasiero, Francesco; Park, Hyung Gyu; Holt, Jason K; Kim, Sangil

    2015-01-27

    Provided herein composition and methods for nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, or multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material. Average pore size of the carbon nanotube can be 6 nm or less. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  10. Pore Space Connectivity and the Transport Properties of Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabé Yves

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pore connectivity is likely one of the most important factors affecting the permeability of reservoir rocks. Furthermore, connectivity effects are not restricted to materials approaching a percolation transition but can continuously and gradually occur in rocks undergoing geological processes such as mechanical and chemical diagenesis. In this study, we compiled sets of published measurements of porosity, permeability and formation factor, performed in samples of unconsolidated granular aggregates, in which connectivity does not change, and in two other materials, sintered glass beads and Fontainebleau sandstone, in which connectivity does change. We compared these data to the predictions of a Kozeny-Carman model of permeability, which does not account for variations in connectivity, and to those of Bernabé et al. (2010, 2011 model, which does [Bernabé Y., Li M., Maineult A. (2010 Permeability and pore connectivity: a new model based on network simulations, J. Geophys. Res. 115, B10203; Bernabé Y., Zamora M., Li M., Maineult A., Tang Y.B. (2011 Pore connectivity, permeability and electrical formation factor: a new model and comparison to experimental data, J. Geophys. Res. 116, B11204]. Both models agreed equally well with experimental data obtained in unconsolidated granular media. But, in the other materials, especially in the low porosity samples that had undergone the greatest amount of sintering or diagenesis, only Bernabé et al. model matched the experimental data satisfactorily. In comparison, predictions of the Kozeny-Carman model differed by orders of magnitude. The advantage of the Bernabé et al. model was its ability to account for a continuous, gradual reduction in pore connectivity during sintering or diagenesis. Although we can only speculate at this juncture about the mechanisms responsible for the connectivity reduction, we propose two possible mechanisms, likely to be active at different stages of sintering and diagenesis

  11. compaction and porosity based pore pressure prediction in the

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    A number of factors such as compaction, fluid content and pore pressure affect the porosity-depth trends of the Agbada Formation. A decrease in porosity with depth generally holds true for shales (well. 1: r2 = 0.74 and well 2: r2 = 0.81) except for an increase in porosity (r2 = -0.596) observed in well 3. Compaction factor is.

  12. Optimization of transdermal delivery using magainin pore-forming peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yeu-Chun; Ludovice, Peter J.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    The skin's outer layer of stratum corneum, which is a thin tissue containing multilamellar lipid bilayers, is the main barrier to drug delivery to the skin. To increase skin permeability, our previous work has shown large enhancement of transdermal permeation using a pore-forming peptide, magainin, which was formulated with N-lauroyl sarcosine (NLS) in 50% ethanol-in-PBS. Mechanistic analysis suggested that magainin and NLS can increase skin permeability by disrupting stratum corneum lipid st...

  13. Understanding the mechanisms behind coking pressure: Relationship to pore structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Duffy; M. Castro Diaz; Colin E. Snape; Karen M. Steel; Merrick R. Mahoney [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

    2007-09-15

    Three low volatile coals A, B and C with oven wall pressures of 100 kPa, 60 kPa and 20 kPa respectively were investigated using high-temperature rheometry, {sup 1}H NMR, thermogravimetric analysis and SEM, with the primary aim to better understand the mechanisms behind the coking pressure phenomenon. Rheometer plate displacement measurements ({Delta}L) have shown differences in the expansion and contraction behaviour of the three coals, which seem to correlate with changes in rheological properties; while SEM images have shown that the expansion process coincides with development of pore structure. It is considered that the point of maximum plate height ({Delta}L{sub max}) prior to contraction may be indicative of a cell opening or pore network forming process, based on analogies with other foam systems. Such a process may be considered important for coking pressure since it provides a potential mechanism for volatile escape, relieving internal gas pressure and inducing charge contraction. For coal C, which has the highest fluidity {delta}L{sub max} occurs quite early in the softening process and consequently a large degree of contraction is observed; while for the lower fluidity coal B, the process is delayed since pore development and consequently wall thinning progress at a slower rate. When {Delta}L{sub max} is attained, a lower degree of contraction is observed because the event occurs closer to resolidification where the increasing viscosity/elasticity can stabilise the expanded pore structure. For coal A which is relatively high fluidity, but also high coking pressure, a greater degree of swelling is observed prior to cell rupture, which may be due to greater fluid elasticity during the expansion process. This excessive expansion is considered to be a potential reason for its high coking pressure. 58 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions ...

  15. Capillary pressure at irregularly shaped pore throats: Implications for water retention characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Hyoung Suk; Kang, Dong Hun; Jang, Jaewon; Kim, Kwang Yeom; Yun, Tae Sup

    2017-12-01

    The random shapes of pore throats in geomaterials hinder accurate estimation of capillary pressure, and conventional pore network models that simply use the Young-Laplace equation assuming circular pore throats overestimate the capillary pressure. As a solution to this problem that does not complicate the pore network model or slow its implementation, we propose a new morphological analysis method to correlate the capillary pressure at an irregular pore channel with its cross-sectional geometry using lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulation and Mayer and Stowe-Princen theory. Geometry-based shape factors for pore throats are shown here to correlate strongly with the capillary pressure obtained by LB simulation. Water retention curves obtained by incorporating the morphological calibration into conventional pore network simulation and their correlative scheme agree well with experimental data. The suggested method is relevant to pore-scale processes such as geological CO2 sequestration, methane bubbling from wetlands, and enhanced carbon recovery.

  16. Difficulties of supercurrents in narrow pores of 3He-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thuneberg, E.V.; Kurkijaervi, J.

    1980-01-01

    We consider resistanceless supercurrents through narrow pores and find such currents to vanish in most cases because of end effects at the entries and exists of the pores. Under pressure dc-supercurrents are found to arise. (author)

  17. Pore morphology: a vital factor in determining electrochemical properties of electrical double layer capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yeru; Li, Zhenghui; Yang, Xiaoqing; Fu, Ruowen; Wu, Dingcai

    2013-11-04

    The ordered 2D reverse hexagonal pore morphology facilitates rapid ion diffusion more than the disordered wormhole-like pore morphology, thus leading to superior electrochemical properties such as rate capabilities.

  18. High-pressure alchemy on a small-pore zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.

    2011-12-01

    While an ever-expanding variety of zeolites with a wide range of framework topology is available, it is desirable to have a way to tailor the chemistry of the zeolitic nanopores for a given framework topology via controlling both the coordination-inclusion chemistry and framework distortion/relaxation. This is, however, subjected to the ability of a zeolitic nanopore to allow the redistribution of cations-water assembly and/or insertion of foreign molecules into the pores and channels. Small-pore zeolites such as natrolite (Na16Al16Si24O80x16H2O), however, have been known to show very limited capacity for any changes in the confinement chemistry. We have recently shown that various cation-exchanged natrolites can be prepared under modest conditions from natural sodium natrolite and exhibit cation-dependent volume expansions by up to 18.5% via converting the elliptical channels into progressively circular ones. Here, we show that pressure can be used as a unique and clean tool to further manipulate the chemistry of the natrolite nanopores. Our recent crystallographic and spectroscopic studies of pressure-insertion of foreign molecules, trivalent-cation exchange under pressure, and pressure-induced inversion of cation-water coordination and pore geometry in various cation-exchanged natrolites will be presented.

  19. Through pore diameter in the cell wall of Chara corallina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berestovsky, G N; Ternovsky, V I; Kataev, A A

    2001-06-01

    Determination of pore size of the cell wall of Chara corallina has been made by using the polyethylene glycol (PEG) series as the hydrophilic probing molecules. In these experiments, the polydispersity of commercial preparation of PEGs was allowed for. The mass share (gamma(p)) of polyethylene glycol preparation fractions penetrating through the pores was determined using a cellular 'ghost', i.e. fragments of internodal cell walls filled with a 25% solution of non-penetrating PEG 6000 and tied up at the ends. In water, such a 'ghost' developed a hydrostatic pressure close to the cell turgor which persisted for several days. The determination of gamma(p), for polydisperse polyethylene glycols with different average molecular mass (M) was calculated from the degree of pressure restoration after water was replaced by a 5-10% polymer solution. Pressure was recorded using a dynamometer, which measures, in the quasi-isometric mode, the force necessary for the partial compression of the 'ghost' in its small fragment. By utilizing the data on the distribution of PEG 1000, 1450, 2000, and 3350 fractions over molecular mass (M), it was found that gamma(p), for these polyethylene glycols corresponded to the upper limit of ML=800-1100 D (hydrodynamic radius of molecules, r(h)=0.85-1.05 nm). Thus, the effective diameter of the pores in the cell wall of Chara did not exceed 2.1 nm.

  20. Integrated pore blockage-cake filtration model for crossflow filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Russell, Renee L.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Smith, Harry D.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2011-01-01

    Crossflow filtration is to be a key process in the treatment and disposal of approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level radioactive waste stored at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is assessing filter performance with waste simulant materials that mimic the chemical and physical properties of Hanford tank waste. Prior simulant studies indicated that waste filtration performance may be limited by pore and cake fouling. To limit the shutdown of waste treatment operations, the pre-treatment facility plans to recover filter flux losses from cake formation and filter fouling by frequently backpulsing the filter elements. The objective of the current paper is to develop a simple model of flux decline resulting from cake and pore fouling and potential flux recovery through backpulsing of the filters for Hanford waste filtration operations. To this end, a model capable of characterizing the decline in waste-simulant filter flux as a function of both irreversible pore blockage and reversible cake formation is proposed. This model is used to characterize the filtration behavior of Hanford waste simulants in both continuous and backpulsed operations. The model is then used to infer the optimal backpulse frequency under specific operating conditions.

  1. A user-friendly modified pore-solid fractal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dian-Yuan; Zhao, Ying; Feng, Hao; Si, Bing-Cheng; Hill, Robert Lee

    2016-12-20

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate a range of calculation points on water retention curves (WRC) instead of the singularity point at air-entry suction in the pore-solid fractal (PSF) model, which additionally considered the hysteresis effect based on the PSF theory. The modified pore-solid fractal (M-PSF) model was tested using 26 soil samples from Yangling on the Loess Plateau in China and 54 soil samples from the Unsaturated Soil Hydraulic Database. The derivation results showed that the M-PSF model is user-friendly and flexible for a wide range of calculation point options. This model theoretically describes the primary differences between the soil moisture desorption and the adsorption processes by the fractal dimensions. The M-PSF model demonstrated good performance particularly at the calculation points corresponding to the suctions from 100 cm to 1000 cm. Furthermore, the M-PSF model, used the fractal dimension of the particle size distribution, exhibited an accepted performance of WRC predictions for different textured soils when the suction values were ≥100 cm. To fully understand the function of hysteresis in the PSF theory, the role of allowable and accessible pores must be examined.

  2. Influence of pore pressure change on coseismic volumetric strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. Y.; Barbour, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    Coseismic strain is fundamentally important for understanding crustal response to transient changes of stress. The elastic dislocation model has been widely applied to interpreting observed shear deformation caused by earthquakes. The application of this model to interpreting volumetric strain, however, has met with difficulty, especially in the far field of earthquakes. Predicted volumetric strain with dislocation model often differs substantially, and sometimes of opposite signs, from observed coseismic volumetric strains. The disagreement suggests that some processes unaccounted for by the dislocation model may occur during earthquakes. Several hypotheses have been suggested, but none have been tested quantitatively. In this study we first assemble published data to highlight the significant difference between the measured and predicted coseismic volumetric strains from the dislocation theory. We then show that the disagreement may largely be explained by coseismic change of pore pressure in the shallow crust. We provide a quantitative test of the model with the assembled data, which allows us to conclude that coseismic change of pore pressure may be an important mechanism for coseismic crustal strain and, in the far field, may even be the controlling mechanism. Thus in the interpretation of observed coseismic crustal strain, one needs to account not only for the elastic strain due to fault rupture but also for the strain due to coseismic change of pore pressure.

  3. Effects of pore design on mechanical properties of nanoporous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Nicholas; Becton, Matthew; Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2017-01-01

    Nanoporous silicon has been emerging as a powerful building block for next-generation sensors, catalysts, transistors, and tissue scaffolds. The capability to design novel devices with desired mechanical properties is paramount to their reliability and serviceability. In order to bring further resolution to the highly variable mechanical characteristics of nanoporous silicon, here we perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the effects of ligament thickness, relative density, and pore geometry/orientation on the mechanical properties of nanoporous silicon, thereby determining its Young's modulus, ultimate strength, and toughness as well as the scaling laws versus the features of interior ligaments. Results show that pore shape and pattern dictate stress accumulation inside the designed structure, leading to the corresponding failure signature, such as stretching-dominated, bending-dominated, or stochastic failure signatures, in nanoporous silicon. The nanostructure of the material is also seen to drive or mute size effects such as “smaller is stronger” and “smaller is ductile”. This investigation provides useful insight into the behavior of nanoporous silicon and how one might leverage its promising applications. - Graphical abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the effects of ligament thickness, relative density, and pore geometry/orientation on the mechanical properties of nanoporous silicon, thereby determining its Young's modulus, ultimate strength, and toughness as well as the scaling trends versus the features of interior ligaments.

  4. Scale and distribution of marine carbonate burial dissolution pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjiang Shen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is gradually accepted that porosity can be created in burial settings via dissolution by organic acid; TSR derived or hydrothermal fluids. The role of deep-buried carbonate reservoirs is becoming more and more important since the degree and difficulty in petroleum exploration of shallow strata are increasing. A profound understanding of the development scale and prediction of the deep-buried carbonate reservoirs is economically crucial. In addition to the formation mechanism, scale and distribution of burial dissolution pores in burial settings are focused on in recent studies. This paper is based on case studies of deep-buried (>4500 m carbonate reservoirs from the Tarim Basin and Sichuan Basin. Case studies mentioned includes dissolution simulation experiments proposes that an open system is of crucial importance in the development of large-scale burial dissolution pores, the distribution pattern of which is controlled by lithology, pre-existing porosity, and pore throat structures. These findings provided the basis for evaluation and prediction of deep-buried carbonate reservoirs.

  5. Structure of Staphylococcal α-Hemolysin, a Heptameric Transmembrane Pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Langzhou; Hobaugh, Michael R.; Shustak, Christopher; Cheley, Stephen; Bayley, Hagan; Gouaux, J. Eric

    1996-12-01

    The structure of the Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin pore has been determined to 1.9 overset{circ}{mathrm A} resolution. Contained within the mushroom-shaped homo-oligomeric heptamer is a solvent-filled channel, 100 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in length, that runs along the sevenfold axis and ranges from 14 overset{circ}{mathrm A} to 46 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in diameter. The lytic, transmembrane domain comprises the lower half of a 14-strand antiparallel β barrel, to which each protomer contributes two β strands, each 65 overset{circ}{mathrm A} long. The interior of the β barrel is primarily hydrophilic, and the exterior has a hydrophobic belt 28 overset{circ}{mathrm A} wide. The structure proves the heptameric subunit stoichiometry of the α-hemolysin oligomer, shows that a glycine-rich and solvent-exposed region of a water-soluble protein can self-assemble to form a transmembrane pore of defined structure, and provides insight into the principles of membrane interaction and transport activity of β barrel pore-forming toxins.

  6. Integration of pore features into the evaluation of fingerprint evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthonioz, Alexandre; Champod, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Fingerprint practitioners rely on level 3 features to make decisions in relation to the source of an unknown friction ridge skin impression. This research proposes to assess the strength of evidence associated with pores when shown in (dis)agreement between a mark and a reference print. Based upon an algorithm designed to automatically detect pores, a metric is defined in order to compare different impressions. From this metric, the weight of the findings is quantified using a likelihood ratio. The results obtained on four configurations and 54 donors show the significant contribution of the pore features and translate into statistical terms what latent fingerprint examiners have developed holistically through experience. The system provides LRs that are indicative of the true state under both the prosecution and the defense propositions. Not only such a system brings transparency regarding the weight to assign to such features, but also forces a discussion in relation to the risks of such a model to mislead. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. In situ temperature tunable pores of shape memory polyurethane membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Joon-Sung; Yu, Woong-Ryeol; Youk, Ji Ho; Ryu, Hee Youk

    2011-01-01

    Conventional shape memory polymers, such as shape memory polyurethanes (SMPU), can exhibit net two-way shape memory behavior (2WSM), i.e., upon heating and subsequent cooling, their macroscopic shapes change reversibly under an applied bias load. This paper is aimed at reporting similar 2WSM behavior, especially by focusing on the size of nanopores/micropores in SMPU membranes, i.e., the size of the pores can be reversibly changed by up to about 300 nm upon repeated heating and cooling. The SMPU membranes were prepared by electrospinning and elongated at temperatures higher than the transition temperature of the SMPU. Under the constant stress, the size change of the pores in the membranes was measured by applying cyclic temperature change. It was observed that the pore size changed from 150 to 440 nm according to the temperature change, demonstrating that the SMPU membrane can be utilized as a smart membrane to selectively separate substances according to their sizes by just controlling temperature

  8. Influence of pore pressure change on coseismic volumetric strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi-Yuen; Barbour, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Coseismic strain is fundamentally important for understanding crustal response to changes of stress after earthquakes. The elastic dislocation model has been widely applied to interpreting observed shear deformation caused by earthquakes. The application of the same theory to interpreting volumetric strain, however, has met with difficulty, especially in the far field of earthquakes. Predicted volumetric strain with dislocation model often differs substantially, and sometimes of opposite signs, from observed coseismic volumetric strains. The disagreement suggests that some processes unaccounted for by the dislocation model may occur during earthquakes. Several hypotheses have been suggested, but none have been tested quantitatively. In this paper we first examine published data to highlight the difference between the measured and calculated static coseismic volumetric strains; we then use these data to provide quantitative test of the model that the disagreement may be explained by the change of pore pressure in the shallow crust. The test allows us to conclude that coseismic change of pore pressure may be an important mechanism for coseismic crustal strain and, in the far field, may even be the dominant mechanism. Thus in the interpretation of observed coseismic crustal strain, one needs to account not only for the elastic strain due to fault rupture but also for the strain due to coseismic change of pore pressure.

  9. Pore Topology Effects in Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy of Zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubiaga, Asier; Warringham, Robbie; Mitchell, Sharon; Gerchow, Lars; Cooke, David; Crivelli, Paolo; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2017-03-03

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is a powerful method to study the size and connectivity of pores in zeolites. The lifetime of positronium within the host material is commonly described by the Tao-Eldrup model. However, one of its largest limitations arises from the simple geometries considered for the shape of the pores, which cannot describe accurately the complex topologies in zeolites. Here, an atomic model that combines the Tao potential with the crystallographic structure is introduced to calculate the distribution and lifetime of Ps intrinsic to a given framework. A parametrization of the model is undertaken for a set of widely applied zeolite framework types (*BEA, FAU, FER, MFI, MOR, UTL), before extending the model to all known structures. The results are compared to structural and topological descriptors, and to the Tao-Eldrup model adapted for zeolites, demonstrating the intricate dependence of the lifetime on the pore architecture. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Nuclear power

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    David Waller and Alan McDonald ask whether a nuclear renaissance can be predicted; Judith M. Greenwald discusses keeping the nuclear power option open; Paul Mobbs considers the availability of uranium and the future of nuclear energy.

  11. Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  12. Studying Pore Structure of Nonwovens with 3D Imaging and Modeling Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradari, Mehdi Gholipour

    Nonwovens are classified as a porous material and pore structure is named as the most important and complex feature of them. Since pore structure is out of control during any nonwovens manufacturing processes, many attempts have been made to measure the major characteristics of a pore network including: pore size, pore volume, pore surface area and pore shape. Among all pore characteristics, pore size due to its significant influence on many nonwovens applications such as filtration is counted as the most significant one. Generally, experiment, theoretical modeling and image analysis are the most common methods to measure pore size of nonwovens. Normally, pores in nonwovens make many convergences and divergences along the length and for this reason, many pore diameters could be assigned for a media. Due to inefficiency of the aforementioned techniques to measure all these diameters, they are not precise enough to study pore structure. The initial objective of this research is obtaining information of the pore structure, especially pore sizes, by applying image analysis techniques to a 3D image of nonwovens obtained through 3D imaging techniques such as DVI and micro CT. This 3D structure of the nonwoven media will be transformed to a graph, employing skeletonization through AvizoRTM software. The obtained graph exhibits topology, shape and connectivity of the pore structure for the utilized nonwoven. In this graph, each node and link would be a representative for pores intersection and body of pore, respectively. Saving the information of this graph results to some matrices/vectors including nodes coordinated, connectivity and nodes thickness, which exhibits the pore size. Therefore, all the pore sizes available in the structure will be extracted through this method. As expected, the information obtained from pore network is very complex consisting many numbers, so analyse them would be very difficult. Therefore, it was tried to use the saved information to model

  13. Nuclear radiation application to nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarvarti, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    Out of the numerous uses and applications of nuclear radiation, in particular heavy ions, the interaction of radiation with materials have culminated into a gamut of fine tools and technologies for taming the synergetic potential of the interaction. One such field of the immense importance is nanotechnology through nuclear radiation via use of ion-crafted polymeric membranes- so called 'Template Synthesis'. This talk will be addressed to the users of membranes - organic (polymeric) in general, formed through irradiation of polymeric foils with heavy and energetic ions followed by chemical processing leading finally to what is known as 'Track Etch Membranes (TEMs)', and present the review of the innovative uses of these membranes from filtration to electro-kinetic based applications and nano-/micro fabrication of devices- the potent aspect of emerging technologies. The emphasis would be on the dependence of useful and novel usages including applications in nano devices' fabrication. A membrane, with its most comprehensive and clear definition, is an intervening phase separating two phases and/or acting as an active or passive barrier to the transport of matter between phases. The very existence of a membrane relies upon the functionality domain of the pores contained therein. The geometrical traits and morphology of the pore ensembles dictate the applications, which any membrane can serve to. There are variety of membranes being developed and used in myriad of applications in diverse fields of science and technology. The range of commercially available membrane materials is quiet diverse and varies widely in terms of composition, and physical structure. The creation of pores, whether through natural self-assembling phenomenon or man-made processes, might itself be an issue of interest but these are the pore-traits which are fundamentally more important, whether the membrane is being used for sieving-one of the ever most important applications the mankind has been

  14. Pore characteristics of shale gas reservoirs from the Lower Paleozoic in the southern Sichuan Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianqing Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Data was acquired from both the drillings and core samples of the Lower Paleozoic Qiongzhusi and Longmaxi Formations' marine shale gas reservoirs in the southern Sichuan Basin by means of numerous specific experimental methods such as organic geochemistry, organic petrology, and pore analyses. Findings helped determine the characteristics of organic matter, total porosity, microscopic pore, and pore structure. The results show that the Lower Paleozoic marine shale in the south of the Sichuan Basin are characterized by high total organic carbon content (most TOC>2.0%, high thermal maturity level (RO = 2.3%–3.8%, and low total porosity (1.16%–6.87%. The total organic carbon content and thermal maturity level of the Qiongzhusi Formation shale are higher than those of the Longmaxi Formation shale, while the total porosity of the Qiongzhusi Formation shale is lower than that of the Longmaxi Formation shale. There exists intergranular pore, dissolved pore, crystal particle pore, particle edge pore, and organic matter pore in the Lower Paleozoic Qiongzhusi Formation and Longmaxi Formation shale. There are more micro-nano pores developed in the Longmaxi Formation shales than those in the Qiongzhusi Formation shales. Intergranular pores, dissolved pores, as well as organic matter pores, are the most abundant, these are primary storage spaces for shale gas. The microscopic pores in the Lower Paleozoic shales are mainly composed of micropores, mesopores, and a small amount of macropores. The micropore and mesopore in the Qiongzhusi Formation shale account for 83.92% of the total pore volume. The micropore and mesopore in the Longmaxi Formation shale accounts for 78.17% of the total pore volume. Thus, the micropores and mesopores are the chief components of microscopic pores in the Lower Paleozoic shale gas reservoirs in the southern Sichuan Basin.

  15. Three-dimensional pore structure and ion conductivity of porous ceramic diaphragms

    OpenAIRE

    Wiedenmann, Daniel; Keller, Lukas; Holzer, Lorenz; Stojadinović, Jelena; Münch, Beat; Suarez, Laura; Fumey, Benjamin; Hagendorfer, Harald; Brönnimann, Rolf; Modregger, Peter; Gorbar, Michal; Vogt, Ulrich F.; Züttel, Andreas; Mantia, Fabio La; Wepf, Roger

    2013-01-01

    The ion conductivity of two series of porous ceramic diaphragms impregnated with caustic potash was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. To understand the impact of the pore structure on ion conductivity, the three-dimensional (3-D) pore geometry of the diaphragms was characterized with synchrotron x-ray absorption tomography. Ion migration was calculated based on an extended pore structure model, which includes the electrolyte conductivity and geometric pore parameters, fo...

  16. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degueldre, Claude, E-mail: c.degueldre@lancaster.ac.uk [Engineering Department, University of Lancaster, LA1 4YW Lancaster (United Kingdom); ChiAM & Institute of Environment, University of Geneva, 1211 Genève 4, Swizerland (Switzerland); Earlier, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Cloet, Veerle [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland)

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  17. Sebum output as a factor contributing to the size of facial pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, M; Han, M; Kim, D; Chung, K

    2006-11-01

    Many endogenous and exogenous factors are known to cause enlarged pilosebaceous pores. Such factors include sex, genetic predisposition, ageing, chronic ultraviolet light exposure, comedogenic xenobiotics, acne and seborrhoea. This study was an attempt to determine the factors related to enlarged pores. To assess the relationship of sebum output, age, sex, hormonal factors and severity of acne with pore size. A prospective, randomized, controlled study was designed. A total of 60 volunteers, 30 males and 30 females, were recruited for this study. Magnified images of pores were taken using a dermoscopic video camera and measured using an image analysis program. The sebum output level was measured with a Sebumeter. Using multiple linear regression analysis, increased pore size was significantly associated with increased sebum output level, sex and age. Among the variables, sebum output level correlated most with the pore size followed by male sex. In comparing male and female participants, males had higher correlation between the sebum output level and the pore size (male: r = 0.47, female: r = 0.38). Thus, additional factors seem to influence pore size in females. Pore size was significantly increased during the ovulation phase (P = 0.008), but severity of acne was not significantly associated with the pore size. Enlarged pore sizes are associated with increased sebum output level, age and male sex. In female patients, additional hormonal factors, such as those of the menstrual cycle, affect the pore size.

  18. Sebum, acne, skin elasticity, and gender difference - which is the major influencing factor for facial pores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B Y; Choi, J W; Park, K C; Youn, S W

    2013-02-01

    Enlarged facial pores have been esthetic problems and have become a matter of cosmetic concern. Several factors are supposed to be related to the enlargement of facial pores, although scientific evaluations were not performed yet. To assess the correlation between facial pores and possible relating factors such as age, gender, sebum secretion, skin elasticity, and the presence of acne, using objective bioengineering instruments. Sixty volunteers, 30 males and 30 females, participated in this study. Various parameters of facial pores were assessed using the Robo Skin Analyzer. The facial sebum secretion and skin elasticity were measured using the Sebumeter and the Cutometer, respectively. These data were compared and correlated to examine the possible relationship between facial pores and age, sebum secretion and skin elasticity, according to gender and the presence of acne. Male gender and the existence of acne were correlated with higher number of facial pores. Sebum secretion levels showed positive correlation with facial pores. The R7 parameter of skin elasticity was negatively correlated with facial pores, suggesting increased facial pores with decreased skin elasticity. However, the age and the severity of acne did not show a definite relationship with facial pores. Male, increased sebum and decreased skin elasticity were mostly correlated with facial pore development. Further studies on population with various demographic profiles and more severe acne may be helpful to elucidate the potential effect of aging and acne severity on facial pores. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Weakly nonlinear thermoacoustics for stacks with slowly varying pore cross-sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panhuis, in 't P.H.M.W.; Rienstra, S.W.; Molenaar, J.; Slot, J.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    A general theory of thermoacoustics is derived for arbitrary stack pores. Previous theoretical treatments of porous media are extended by considering arbitrarily shaped pores with the only restriction that the pore cross-sections vary slowly in the longitudinal direction. No boundary-layer

  20. Effect of pore formers on properties of tape cast porous sheets for electrochemical flue gas purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Cristine Grings; Kammer Hansen, Kent; Andersen, Kjeld Bøhm

    2016-01-01

    permeability measurements, mercury porosimetry and pore orientation measurements, to investigate the role of the different pore formers on the properties after sintering at a temperature of 1250°C. Those tapes prepared from different non-spherical pore formers with comparable porosity of about 43%, showed...

  1. Quantification of soil pore network complexity with X-ray computed tomography and gas transport measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, Sheela; Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, M.

    2015-01-01

    Flow and transport of gases through soils are largely controlled by pore structural attributes. The quantification of pore network characteristics is therefore essential for accurate prediction of air permeability and gas diffusivity. In this study, the pore network characteristics of seven diffe...

  2. Effect of pore fluid on the cyclic behavior of laterally loaded offshore piles modelled in centrifuge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askarinejad, A.; Philia Boru Sitanggang, Anggi; Schenkeveld, Ferry; Lee, W.; Lee, J-S.; Kim, H-K.; kim, D-S.

    The common practice in centrifuge modelling of dynamic processes is to use high-viscosity pore fluids to unify the time scaling factors for the generation and dissipation of pore pressures. This paper focuses on the effects of the density and viscosity of the pore fluid on the behaviour of an

  3. Pore-scale modeling of moving contact line problems in immiscible two-phase flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucala, A.; Noble, D.; Martinez, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    Two immiscible fluids in static equilibrium form a common interface along a solid surface, characterized as the static contact (wetting) angle and is a function of surface geometry, intermolecular forces, and interfacial surface energies manifested as interfacial tension. This static configuration may become perturbed due to external force imbalances (mass injection, pressure gradients, buoyancy, etc.) and the contact line location and interface curvature becomes dynamic. Accurate modeling of moving contact line (MCL) problems is imperative in predicting capillary pressure vs. saturation curves, permeability, and preferential flow paths for a variety of applications, including geological carbon storage (GCS) and enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Here, we present a model for the moving contact line using pore-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) which solves the full, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations using the Galerkin finite-element method. The MCL is modeled as a surface traction force proportional to the surface tension, dependent on the static properties of the immiscible fluid/solid system. The moving two-phase interface is tracked using the level set method and discretized with the conformal decomposition finite element method (CDFEM), allowing for surface tension effects to be computed at the exact interface location. We present a variety of verification test cases for simple two- and three-dimensional geometries to validate the current model, including threshold pressure predictions in flows through pore-throats for a variety of wetting angles. Simulations involving more complex geometries are also presented to be used in future simulations for GCS and EOR problems. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000

  4. Involvement of IGF-1/IGFBP-3 signaling on the conspicuousness of facial pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama-Nakagiri, Yoriko; Ohuchi, Atsushi; Hachiya, Akira; Kitahara, Takashi

    2010-11-01

    Conspicuous facial pores are one type of serious esthetic defects for many women. We previously reported that the severity of impairment of skin architecture around facial pores correlates well with the appearance of facial pores in several ethnic groups. In our last report, we showed that serum levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) correlate well with facial pore size and with the severity of impairment of epidermal architecture around facial pores. However, our results could not fully explain the implication between facial pores and IGF signaling. In this study, we conducted a histological analysis of facial skin to determine whether potential changes in IGF-1 availability occur in the skin with or without conspicuous pores. Immunohistochemical observations showed that expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is limited to the suprapapillary epidermis around facial pores and to basal cells of rete pegs without tips in epidermis with conspicuous pores. In contrast, in basal cells of skin without conspicuous pores, IGFBP-3 expression is very low. Ki-67 and IGF-1 receptor-positive cells are abundant in basal cells in the tips of the rete pegs in skin with typical epidermal architecture around facial pores. No obvious differences were observed in the expression of filaggrin, involucrin, K1, K6 or K17 in skin with or without conspicuous pores. However, increased expression of K16 was observed in skin with conspicuous pores suggesting hyperproliferation. These results suggest that the IGF-1/IGFBP-3 signaling pathway is involved in the formation of conspicuous facial pores due to the epidermal architecture around facial pores.

  5. The DNA damage response at eroded telomeres and tethering to the nuclear pore complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khadaroo, Basheer; Teixeira, M Teresa; Luciano, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    to induce the recruitment of checkpoint and recombination proteins. Notably, a DNA damage response at eroded telomeres starts many generations before senescence and is characterized by the recruitment of Cdc13 (cell division cycle 13), replication protein A, DNA damage checkpoint proteins and the DNA repair......The ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes are protected by telomeres, which serve to ensure proper chromosome replication and to prevent spurious recombination at chromosome ends. In this study, we show by single cell analysis that in the absence of telomerase, a single short telomere is sufficient...

  6. Abnormal Nuclear Pore Formation Triggers Apoptosis in the Intestinal Epithelium of elys-Deficient Zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong-Curtain, Tanya A.; Parslow, Adam C.; Trotter, Andrew J.; Hall, Nathan E.; Verkade, Heather; Tabone, Tania; Christie, Elizabeth L.; Crowhurst, Meredith O.; Layton, Judith E.; Shepherd, Iain T.; Nixon, Susan J.; Parton, Robert G.; Zon, Leonard I.; Stainier, Didier Y. R.; Lieschke, Graham J.; Heath, Joan K.

    Background & Aims: Zebrafish mutants generated by ethylnitrosourea-mutagenesis provide a powerful toot for dissecting the genetic regulation of developmental processes, including organogenesis. One zebrafish mutant, "flotte lotte" (flo), displays striking defects in intestinal, liver, pancreas, and

  7. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation of transport through the nuclear pore complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghavami, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Dit proefschrift is gewijd aan het mechanisme van Nucleo - cytoplasmatisch transport openbaren door grofkorrelige moleculaire dynamica simulaties van ontvouwen eiwitten in de nucleaire porie complex (NPC) . NPC's zijn zeer selectief poorten, die alle transporten over nucleaire envelop controleren .

  8. The transport of integral membrane proteins across the nuclear pore complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinema, Anne Cornelis

    2012-01-01

    Levende organismen, zoals mensen, dieren en planten bestaan uit cellen. De cel wordt gezien als het kleinste levende onderdeel van een organisme. De mens bestaat uit ongeveer 50 biljoen cellen (dat zijn er 50 keer miljoen keer miljoen), maar er zijn ook hele kleine organismen, die uit één cel

  9. Nuclear pore complex assembly and maintenance in POM121- and gp210-deficient cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stavru, Fabrizia; Nautrup-Pedersen, Gitte; Cordes, Volker C

    2006-01-01

    nucleoporins, such as Nup62 or Nup358, to ectopic assembly sites. It thus appears to act as a nucleation site for the assembly of NPC substructures. Nonetheless, we observed functional NPCs and intact NEs in severely POM121-depleted cells. Double knockdowns of gp210 and POM121 in HeLa cells, as well...

  10. Diode-like properties of single- and multi-pore asymmetric track membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinska, K.; Gapeeva, A. R.; Orelovich, O. L.; Apel, P. Yu.

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we investigated the ionic transport properties of asymmetric polyethylene terephthalate (PET) track membranes with the thickness of 5 μm. The samples containing single pores and arrays of many pores were fabricated by irradiation with accelerated ions and subsequent physicochemical treatment. The method of etching in the presence of a surface-active agent was used to prepare the pores with highly-tapered tip. The transport of monovalent inorganic ions through the nano-scale holes was studied in a conductivity cell. The effective pore radii, electrical conductance and rectification ratios of pores were measured. The geometric characteristics of nanopores were investigated using FESEM.

  11. Conical tungsten stamps for the replication of pore arrays in anodic aluminium oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeClere, D. J.; Thompson, G. E.; Derby, B.

    2009-06-01

    A tungsten master stamp has been generated by applying a novel procedure that includes two-step anodizing, followed by sequential anodizing and pore widening to develop nominally funnelled pores. These conical-shaped pores were filled with tungsten by sputter coating to manufacture a master stamp. Under a pressure of 65 MPa, the master stamp successfully embossed the surface of annealed and electropolished aluminium. The embossed surface was then used to control the position of pores created by anodizing under the conditions used to produce the original pore array.

  12. Pore-forming proteins with built-in triggers and switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Hagan

    1996-02-01

    Genetic engineering and targeted chemical modification are being used to produce polypeptides with pore-forming activity that can be triggered or switched on-and-off by biochemical, chemical or physical stimuli. The principal target of our studies has been the (alpha) -hemolysin ((alpha) HL) from the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. The remodeled hemolysins include protease-activated pores, metal-regulated pores, pores that are activated by chemical alkylation and pores that are turned on with light. These polypeptides have several potential applications. For example, they might serve as components of sensors or they might be useful for mediating the controlled release of encapsulated drugs.

  13. Experimental Study and Numerical Modeling of Wave Induced Pore Pressure Attenuation Inside a Rubble Mound Breakwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troch, Peter; Rouck, Julien De; Burcharth, Hans Falk

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to study the attenuation of the wave induced pore pressures inside the core of a rubble mound breakwater. The knowledge of the distribution and the attenuation of the pore pressures is important for the design of a stable and safe breakwater. The pore pressure...... and have been re-analysed in detail with respect to the attenuation characteristics. The analysis follows the method by Burcharth et al. (1999) and confirms the practical calculation method for the attenuation of the pore pressure in the core given in this reference. The attenuation of pore pressures...

  14. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    Several growth areas for nuclear medicine were defined. Among them were: cardiac nuclear medicine, neuro-psychiatric nuclear medicine, and cancer diagnosis through direct tumor imaging. A powerful new tool, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was lauded as the impetus for new developments in nuclear medicine. The political environment (funding, degree of autonomy) was discussed, as were the economic and scientific environments

  15. A method of evaluating facial pores using optical 2D images and analysis of age-dependent changes in facial pores in Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, S I; Kim, E J; Lee, H K

    2018-05-01

    Enlarged facial pores and changes in pore area are of concern for cosmetic reasons. To evaluate pores, measuring tools based on 3D methodology are used. Yet, these methods are limited by their measuring ranges. In this study, we performed pore analysis by measuring the whole face using 2D optical images. We further sought to understand how the pores of Korean women change with age. One hundred sixteen Korean female subjects aged 20-60 years were recruited for this study. Facial images were taken using the VISIA-CR ® adjusted light source. Images were processed using Image-Pro Plus 9.2. Statistical significance was assumed when P pore area, as indicated by pixel count, gradually increased in patients through their 40s, but decreased through their 50s and 60s. Facial pores generally exhibited directionality through the patients' 30s, but this isotropic feature was more prominent in their 50s. Pore elongation increased stepwise. The first increase occurred during the transition from patients' 30s to their 40s and the second increase occurred during the transition from patients' 50s to their 60s. This indicated that the pores deformed from a circular shape to a long elliptic shape over time. A new evaluation method using 2D optical images facilitates the analysis of pore distribution and elongation throughout the entire cheek. This is an improvement over an analysis of pores over a narrow region of interest. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Boom clay pore water, home of a diverse microbial community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wouters, Katinka; Moors, Hugo; Leys, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Boom Clay pore water (BCPW) has been studied in the framework of geological disposal of nuclear waste for over two decades, thereby mainly addressing its geochemical properties. A reference composition for synthetic clay water has been derived earlier by modelling and spatial calibration efforts, mainly based on interstitial water sampled from different layers within the Boom clay. However, since microbial activity is found in a range of extreme circumstances, the possibility of microbes interacting with future radioactive waste in a host formation like Boom Clay, cannot be ignored. In this respect, BCPW was sampled from different Boom Clay layers using the Morpheus piezometer and subsequently analysed by a complementary set of microbiological and molecular techniques, in search for overall shared and abundant microorganisms. Similar to the previous characterization of the 'average' BCPW chemical composition, the primary aim of this microbiological study is to determine a representative BCPW microbial community which can be used in laboratory studies. Secondly, the in situ activity and the metabolic properties of members of this community were addressed, aiming to assess their survival and proliferation chances in repository conditions. In a first approach, total microbial DNA of the community was extracted from the BCPW samples. This molecular approach allows a broad insight in the total microbial ecology of the BCPW samples. By polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on the highly conserved 16S rRNA genes in this DNA pool and subsequent sequencing and bio-informatics analysis, operational taxonomic units (OTUs) could be assigned to the microbial community. The bacterial community was found to be quite diverse, with OTUs belonging to 8 different phyla (Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Chlorobi, Spirochetes, Chloroflexi and Deinococcus-Thermus). These results provide an overall view of the

  17. Nuclear links

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The subject is dealt with in sections: introduction; energy and the third world; world energy consumption 1978; oil -the energy dilemma; nuclear chains - introduction; uranium; Namibia; enrichment and reprocessing; countries with enrichment and reprocessing facilities; waste; conclusion; why take the nuclear option; third world countries with nuclear reactors; the arms connection; government spending and human resources 1977 (by countries); nuclear power - the final solution; the fascists; world bank; campaigns; community action in Plogoff; Australian labour movement; NUM against nuclear power; Scottish campaign; students against nuclear energy; anti-nuclear campaign; partizans; 3W1 disarmament and development; campaign ATOM; CANUC; 3W1; SANE. (U.K.)

  18. Open pore biodegradable matrices formed with gas foaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, L D; Kim, B S; Mooney, D J

    1998-12-05

    Engineering tissues utilizing biodegradable polymer matrices is a promising approach to the treatment of a number of diseases. However, processing techniques utilized to fabricate these matrices typically involve organic solvents and/or high temperatures. Here we describe a process for fabricating matrices without the use of organic solvents and/or elevated temperatures. Disks comprised of polymer [e.g., poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)] and NaCl particles were compression molded at room temperature and subsequently allowed to equilibrate with high pressure CO2 gas (800 psi). Creation of a thermodynamic instability led to the nucleation and growth of gas pores in the polymer particles, resulting in the expansion of the polymer particles. The polymer particles fused to form a continuous matrix with entrapped salt particles. The NaCl particles subsequently were leached to yield macropores within the polymer matrix. The overall porosity and level of pore connectivity were regulated by the ratio of polymer/salt particles and the size of salt particles. Both the compressive modulus (159+/-130 kPa versus 289+/-25 kPa) and the tensile modulus (334+/-52 kPa versus 1100+/-236 kPa) of the matrices formed with this approach were significantly greater than those formed with a standard solvent casting/particulate leaching process. The utility of these matrices was demonstrated by engineering smooth muscle tissue in vitro with them. This novel process, a combination of high pressure gas foaming and particulate leaching techniques, allows one to fabricate matrices with a well controlled porosity and pore structure. This process avoids the potential negatives associated with the use of high temperatures and/or organic solvents in biomaterials processing.

  19. Arsenic readily released to pore waters from buried mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, John; Langmuir, Donald; Gosselin, Neil; Rowson, John

    2005-01-01

    At the McClean Lake Operation in the Athabasca Basin of northern Saskatchewan, the untreated acid raffinate solutions associated with U mill tailings contain up to 700 mg/L dissolved As. To reduce the concentration of As and other contaminants in acid tailing slurries at the JEB mill at McClean Lake, ferric sulfate may be added to the acid raffinates to assure that their molar Fe/As ratio equals or exceeds 3. Tailings slurries are then neutralized with lime to pH 4, and subsequently to pH 7-8. The neutralized tailings contain minerals from the original ore, which are chiefly quartz, illite, kaolinite and chlorite, and precipitated (secondary) minerals that include gypsum, scorodite, annabergite, hydrobasaluminite and ferrihydrite. Most of the As is associated with the secondary arsenate minerals, scorodite and annabergite. However, a few percent is adsorbed and/or co-precipitated, mainly by ferrihydrite. Of major concern to provincial and federal regulators is the risk that significant amounts of As might be released from the tailings to pore waters after their subaqueous disposal in the tailings management facility. A laboratory study was performed to address this issue, measuring readily desorbed As using a method known as equilibrium partitioning in closed systems (EPICS). The EPICS method was selected because it employs a leaching solution that, except for its As concentration, is identical in composition to the neutralized raffinate in contact with the tailings. Laboratory experiments and modeling results demonstrated that the As that could be readily released to pore waters is about 0.2% of the total As in the tailings. Long-term, such releases may contribute no more than a few mg/L of dissolved As to tailings pore waters

  20. NLDFT Pore Size Distribution in Amorphous Microporous Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupgan, Grit; Liyana-Arachchi, Thilanga P; Colina, Coray M

    2017-10-24

    The pore size distribution (PSD) is one of the most important properties when characterizing and designing materials for gas storage and separation applications. Experimentally, one of the current standards for determining microscopic PSD is using indirect molecular adsorption methods such as nonlocal density functional theory (NLDFT) and N 2 isotherms at 77 K. Because determining the PSD from NLDFT is an indirect method, the validation can be a nontrivial task for amorphous microporous materials. This is especially crucial since this method is known to produce artifacts. In this work, the accuracy of NLDFT PSD was compared against the exact geometric PSD for 11 different simulated amorphous microporous materials. The geometric surface area and micropore volumes of these materials were between 5 and 1698 m 2 /g and 0.039 and 0.55 cm 3 /g, respectively. N 2 isotherms at 77 K were constructed using Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) simulations. Our results show that the discrepancies between NLDFT and geometric PSD are significant. NLDFT PSD produced several artificial gaps and peaks that were further confirmed by the coordinates of inserted particles of a specific size. We found that dominant peaks from NLDFT typically reported in the literature do not necessarily represent the truly dominant pore size within the system. The confirmation provides concrete evidence for artifacts that arise from the NLDFT method. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis was performed to show the high dependency of PSD as a function of the regularization parameter, λ. A higher value of λ produced a broader and smoother PSD that closely resembles geometric PSD. As an alternative, a new criterion for choosing λ, called here the smooth-shift method (SSNLDFT), is proposed that tuned the NLDFT PSD to better match the true geometric PSD. Using the geometric pore size distribution as our reference, the smooth-shift method reduced the root-mean-square deviation by ∼70% when the geometric

  1. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  2. Automatic measurement of contact angle in pore-space images

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlRatrout, Ahmed; Raeini, Ali Q.; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2017-11-01

    A new approach is presented to measure the in-situ contact angle (θ) between immiscible fluids, applied to segmented pore-scale X-ray images. We first identify and mesh the fluid/fluid and fluid/solid interfaces. A Gaussian smoothing is applied to this mesh to eliminate artifacts associated with the voxelized nature of the image, while preserving large-scale features of the rock surface. Then, for the fluid/fluid interface we apply an additional smoothing and adjustment of the mesh to impose a constant curvature. We then track the three-phase contact line, and the two vectors that have a direction perpendicular to both surfaces: the contact angle is found from the dot product of these vectors where they meet at the contact line. This calculation can be applied at every point on the mesh at the contact line. We automatically generate contact angle values representing each invaded pore-element in the image with high accuracy. To validate the approach, we first study synthetic three-dimensional images of a spherical droplet of oil residing on a tilted flat solid surface surrounded by brine and show that our results are accurate to within 3° if the sphere diameter is 2 or more voxels. We then apply this method to oil/brine systems imaged at ambient temperature and reservoir pressure (10MPa) using X-ray microtomography (Singh et al., 2016). We analyse an image volume of diameter approximately 4.6 mm and 10.7 mm long, obtaining hundreds of thousands of values from a dataset with around 700 million voxels. We show that in a system of altered wettability, contact angles both less than and greater than 90° can be observed. This work provides a rapid method to provide an accurate characterization of pore-scale wettability, which is important for the design and assessment of hydrocarbon recovery and carbon dioxide storage.

  3. Thermodynamic and kinetic supercooling of liquid in a wedge pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Dominika; Heuberger, Manfred; Zäch, Michael; Christenson, Hugo K

    2008-10-21

    Cyclohexane allowed to capillary condense from vapor in an annular wedge pore of mica in a surface force apparatus (SFA) remains liquid down to at least 14 K below the bulk melting-point T(m). This is an example of supercooling of a liquid due to confinement, like melting-point depression in porous media. In the wedge pore, however, the supercooled liquid is in equilibrium with vapor, and the amount of liquid (and thereby the radius of curvature r of the liquid-vapor interface) depends on the surface tension gamma(LV) of the liquid, not the interfacial tension between the solid and liquid. At coexistence r is inversely proportional to the temperature depression DeltaT below T(m), in accordance with a recently proposed model [P. Barber, T. Asakawa, and H. K. Christenson, J. Phys. Chem. C 111, 2141 (2007)]. We have now extended this model to include effects due to the temperature dependence of both the surface tension and the enthalpy of melting. The predictions of the improved model have been quantitatively verified in experiments using both a Mark IV SFA and an extended surface force apparatus (eSFA). The three-layer interferometer formed by the two opposing, backsilvered mica surfaces in a SFA was analyzed by conventional means (Mark IV) and by fast spectral correlation of up to 40 fringes (eSFA). We discuss the absence of freezing in the outermost region of the wedge pore down to 14 K below T(m) and attribute it to nonequilibrium (kinetic) supercooling, whereas the inner region of the condensate is thermodynamically supercooled.

  4. Thermodynamic and kinetic supercooling of liquid in a wedge pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Dominika; Heuberger, Manfred; Zäch, Michael; Christenson, Hugo K.

    2008-10-01

    Cyclohexane allowed to capillary condense from vapor in an annular wedge pore of mica in a surface force apparatus (SFA) remains liquid down to at least 14K below the bulk melting-point Tm. This is an example of supercooling of a liquid due to confinement, like melting-point depression in porous media. In the wedge pore, however, the supercooled liquid is in equilibrium with vapor, and the amount of liquid (and thereby the radius of curvature r of the liquid-vapor interface) depends on the surface tension γLV of the liquid, not the interfacial tension between the solid and liquid. At coexistence r is inversely proportional to the temperature depression ΔT below Tm, in accordance with a recently proposed model [P. Barber, T. Asakawa, and H. K. Christenson, J. Phys. Chem. C 111, 2141 (2007)]. We have now extended this model to include effects due to the temperature dependence of both the surface tension and the enthalpy of melting. The predictions of the improved model have been quantitatively verified in experiments using both a Mark IV SFA and an extended surface force apparatus (eSFA). The three-layer interferometer formed by the two opposing, backsilvered mica surfaces in a SFA was analyzed by conventional means (Mark IV) and by fast spectral correlation of up to 40 fringes (eSFA). We discuss the absence of freezing in the outermost region of the wedge pore down to 14K below Tm and attribute it to nonequilibrium (kinetic) supercooling, whereas the inner region of the condensate is thermodynamically supercooled.

  5. Description and reconstruction of the soil pore space using correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, K. M.; Karsanina, M. V.; Skvortsova, E. B.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper a method for the description and reconstruction of the soil pore space using correlation functions has been examined. The reconstruction procedure employed here is the best way of verification of the potential descriptor of the soil pore space. Thin sections representing eight major types of pore space in zonal loamy soils and parent materials of the Russian Plain with pores of different shapes and orientations have been chosen for this study. Comparison based on the morphological analysis of the original pore space images and their correlation function reconstructions obtained using simulated annealing technique indicates that this method of reconstruction adequately describes the isometric soil pore space with isometric dissected, isometric slightly dissected, and rounded pores. The two-point correlation functions calculated with the use of the orthogonal method proved to be different for the examined types of soil pore space; they reflect the soil porosity, specific surface, and pore structure correlations at different lengths. The results of this study allow us to conclude that the description of the soil pore space with the help of correlation functions is a promising approach, but requires more development. Further directions of the development of this method for describing the soil pore space and determining the soil physical processes are outlined.

  6. Multi-tests for pore structure characterization-A case study using lamprophyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Feng, Guorui; Luo, Yi; Hu, Shengyong; Qi, Tingye; Jiang, Haina; Guo, Jun; Bai, Jinwen; Du, Xianjie; Kang, Lixun

    2017-08-01

    The pore structure plays an important role to understand methane adsorption, storage and flow behavior of geological materials. In this paper, the multi-tests including N2 adsorption, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and CT reconstruction have been proposed on Tashan lamprophyre samples. The main findings are listed: (1) The pore size distribution has a broad range ranging from 2-100000nm, among which the adsorption pores (100nm) only account for 34% of total pore volume. (2) The lamprophyre open pores are mainly slit-like/plate-like and ink-bottle-shaped pores on a two-dimensional level. The lamprophyre 3D pore structure shows more stochastic and anisotropic extension on the z axis to form a complex pore system on a three-dimensional level. (3) The closed pores (>647nm) occupy averaged 74.86% and 72.75% of total pores (>647nm) volume and specific surface area indicating a poor connectivity pore system. The revealed results provide basic information for understanding the abnormal methane emission reasons in similar geological conditions with lamprophyre invasions.

  7. Multi-tests for pore structure characterization-A case study using lamprophyre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The pore structure plays an important role to understand methane adsorption, storage and flow behavior of geological materials. In this paper, the multi-tests including N2 adsorption, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP and CT reconstruction have been proposed on Tashan lamprophyre samples. The main findings are listed: (1 The pore size distribution has a broad range ranging from 2-100000nm, among which the adsorption pores (100nm only account for 34% of total pore volume. (2 The lamprophyre open pores are mainly slit-like/plate-like and ink-bottle-shaped pores on a two-dimensional level. The lamprophyre 3D pore structure shows more stochastic and anisotropic extension on the z axis to form a complex pore system on a three-dimensional level. (3 The closed pores (>647nm occupy averaged 74.86% and 72.75% of total pores (>647nm volume and specific surface area indicating a poor connectivity pore system. The revealed results provide basic information for understanding the abnormal methane emission reasons in similar geological conditions with lamprophyre invasions.

  8. A new collector for in situ pore water sampling in wetland sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Deng, Jiancai; Li, Qinqin; Hu, Liuming; Zhu, Jinge; Hang, Hongjuan; Hu, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Currently available pore water samplers generally do not allow continuous monitoring of temporal variations in pore water composition. Therefore, a new type of pore water collector was designed and constructed. These collectors were constructed of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) materials, including PVC tubing with one end sealed and another end topped with a removable PVC screw-cap. A row of holes was drilled 10 cm from the sealed end of each collector. These new collectors were deployed in different layers of the sediment in a constructed wetland in Lake Taihu, China, to reveal variations in the nutrient composition of pore water with high spatial and temporal resolution. Specifically, the collectors were driven into the sediment, and the pore water flowed into the tubing via gravity. The pore water was then sampled from the PVC tubing using a portable vacuum pump, and then was taken to the lab within 20 min for analysis of the dissolved oxygen (DO) and nutrient concentration. The DO concentration of the pore water was below the detection limit for all samples, indicating that the pore water was probably not influenced by the air and that the water in the collector tube was representative of the pore water. These findings suggest that the collector is capable of measuring the temporal and spatial variations in the nutrient concentrations in pore water. Furthermore, the inexpensive material, ease of construction, minimal disturbance to the sediment and applicability for wetland sediments are advantages of the collector presented here compared with traditional pore water sampling techniques.

  9. Pore Structure Control of Ordered Mesoporous Silica Film Using Mixed Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Jung Ha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials with nanosized and well-arranged pores have been researched actively in order to be applied to new technology fields. Especially, mesoporous material containing various pore structures is expected to have different pore structure. To form a mixed pore structure, ordered mesoporous silica films were prepared with a mixture of surfactant; Brij-76 and P-123 block copolymer. In mixed surfactant system, mixed pore structure was observed in the region of P-123/(Brij-76 + P-123 with about 50.0 wt.% while a single pore structure was observed in regions which have large difference in ratio between Brij-76 and P-123 through the X-ray diffraction analysis. Regardless of surfactant ratio, porosity was retained almost the same. It is expected that ordered mesoporous silica film with mixed pore structure can be one of the new materials which has distinctive properties.

  10. Tension-induced vesicle fusion: pathways and pore dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of tension-induced fusion of two vesicles is studied using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The vesicle membranes use an improved DPD parameter set that results in their sustaining only a 10–30% relative area stretch before rupturing on the microsecond timescale...... fusion time on membrane tension implies that the fusion process is completed by overcoming two energy barriers with scales of 13kBT and 11kBT. The fusion pore radius as a function of time has also been extracted from the simulations, and provides a quantitative measure of the fusion dynamics which...

  11. Dynamics of pore synthesis and degradation in protocells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubitschke, H.; Fütterer, C.

    2012-10-01

    Liposomes have found countless applications as microreactors or for studying the evolution of protocells. However, to keep reactions ongoing, exchange with the environment is required. Based on experiments with nanopores expressed by an enclosed gene expression system, we developed a model describing the observed growth dynamics quantitatively. The model depends on one parameter only and allowed estimations of hitherto unknown parameters: the diffusion coefficient of amino acids through a single pore and the initial amino acid concentration. The long-term consequences of different degradation mechanisms are also discussed: we found a surprisingly sharp threshold deciding on the question of survival of the protocell.

  12. Long n-alkanes isomerization by medium pore zeolites with pore mouth and key lock mechanisms; Isomerisation des paraffines longues par des zeolithes a pores moyens selon les mecanismes ouverture de pore et cle serrure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claude, M.

    1999-10-01

    Skeletal isomerization of long n-alkanes is practiced to improve cold flow properties of diesel and lubricant fractions. In this work, model long n-alkanes (n-C{sub 10} - n-C{sub 24}) were hydro-isomerized in a fixed bed down flow vapour phase reactor loaded with bifunctional Pt/H-ZSM-22 zeolite catalyst. The skeletal isomers were analysed and identified with GC/MS. High isomer yields were obtained. The distribution of positional mono-methyl-branched isomers obtained from n-C{sub 12} to n-C{sub 24} are typically bimodal. This is explained by adsorption and reaction of the alkanes in pore mouths and locks on the external surface of the zeolite crystals. The pore mouth mode favours branching at C{sub 2} and C{sub 3}. The 'key lock' type proceeds by penetration of the two ends of the hydrocarbon chain into a different pore opening and favours more central mono-branching of the chain. The contribution of the key lock mode increases with increasing chain length and with the reaction temperature. The preferentially formed dimethyl-branched isomers have a separation between branchings of three up to fourteen carbon atoms. The formation of the second methyl-branching occurs preferentially from a centrally branched mono-methyl-branched isomer, so that the second branching is generated always more toward the end of the chain. Owing to the differences in adsorption entropy among the locks, at higher temperatures the largest lock is preferred and the distance between the two branching along the carbon chain in the preferred isomers is biggest. Thus the work resulted in the formulation of structure-selectivity relationships. n-C{sub 18} was hydro-isomerized on other zeolites. The nature and distribution of the isomers obtained suggest that the tubular 10-ring zeolites ZSM-23, ZSM-35 and SAPO-11 also operate according to pore mouth and key lock concepts. Zeolites with 12-rings show typical product patterns for catalysis in absence of steric hindrance. (author)

  13. Explicit Pore Pressure Material Model in Carbon-Cloth Phenolic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Lemini, Danton; Ehle, Curt

    2003-01-01

    An explicit material model that uses predicted pressure in the pores of a carbon-cloth phenolic (CCP) composite has been developed. This model is intended to be used within a finite-element model to predict phenomena specific to CCP components of solid-fuel-rocket nozzles subjected to high operating temperatures and to mechanical stresses that can be great enough to cause structural failures. Phenomena that can be predicted with the help of this model include failures of specimens in restrained-thermal-growth (RTG) tests, pocketing erosion, and ply lifting

  14. The pore structure in processed Victorian Brown coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, P J; Snook, I K; Treimer, W

    2002-08-01

    Changes in the pore structure of Victorian Brown coal when upgraded with heated gases under pressure are investigated. We show that the results obtained from ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) measurements agree with previous results using small-angle X-ray scattering results but that USANS may also be used to investigate the meso porosity. Findings from small-angle scattering are confirmed using electron microscopy. We also show evidence from electron diffraction that thermal conditions within the brown coals during the upgrade procedure may be far more extreme than previously thought.

  15. The pore structure in processed Victorian brown coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, P.J.; Snook, I.K.; Treimer, W. [University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic. (Australia). School of Physics

    2002-07-01

    Changes in the pore structure of Victorian Brown coal when upgraded with heated gases under pressure are investigated. It is shown that the results obtained from ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) measurements agree with previous results using small-angle X-ray scattering results but that USANS may also be used to investigate the meso porosity. Findings from small-angle scattering are confirmed using electron microscopy. Evidence is given from electron diffraction that thermal conditions within the brown coals during the upgrade procedure may be far more extreme than previously thought.

  16. Characterizing gas permeability and pore properties of Czech granitic rocks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konečný, Pavel; Kožušníková, Alena

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2016), s. 331-338 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/09/0089; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : granitic rocks * permeability * pore properties Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.699, year: 2016 https://www.irsm.cas.cz/materialy/acta_content/2016_doi/Konecny_AGG_2016_0015.pdf

  17. Formation and pore structure of boron nitride aerogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindquist, D.H.; Borek, T.T.; Kramer, S.J.; Kramer, S.J.; Naruta, C.K.; Johnson, G.; Schaeffer, R.; Smith, D.M.; Paine, R.T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports gels containing a poly(borazinyl amine) and tetrahydrofuran processed by CO 2 supercritical drying techniques followed by pyrolysis. The resulting BN ceramic aerogels are highly porous, and the microstructure, porosity, and surface area characteristics have been examined. The aerogels show excellent thermal stability exhibiting surface areas in excess of 350 m 2 /g and porosities greater than 0.8 even when heated in argon at 1500 degrees C for 8 h. By removing solvent via evaporation before supercritical drying, the mean pore radius can be varied between 3.6 and 10 nm

  18. Nuclear terrorism

    OpenAIRE

    RUTIC SRDJAN Z.

    2016-01-01

    The paper has analyzed different manifestations of terrorism with nuclear weapons and ionizing radiation as a special kind of terrorism. Possibilities that terrorist groups come into possession of nuclear weapons and apply them for terrorist purposes have been analysed. The forms and methods of terrorist activities with nuclear means have been given as well. It has been concluded that nuclear terrorism includes various forms of threats, including not only nuclear weapons but also the sources ...

  19. Application of nuclear magnetic resonance in osteoporosis evaluation; Aplicacoes de ressonancia magnetica nuclear na avaliacao de osteoporose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannoni, Ricardo A., E-mail: giannoni@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Montrazi, Elton T.; Bonagamba, Tito J., E-mail: elton.montrazi@gmail.com, E-mail: tito@ifsc.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Cesar, Reinaldo, E-mail: reinaldofisica@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2013-07-01

    In this work, initially ceramic samples of known porosity were used. These ceramic samples were saturated with water. The nuclear magnetic resonance signal due to relaxation processes that the hydrogen nucleus water contained in the pores of this ceramic material was measured. Then these samples were subjected to a process of drying and measures successively. As the water contained in pores greater evaporates the intensity of signal decreases and shows the sign because of the smaller pores. The analysis of this drying process gives a qualitative assessment of the pore size of the material. In a second step, bones of animals of unknown porosity underwent the same methodology for evaluating osteoporosis. Also a sample of human vertebra in a unique manner, with the same purpose was measured. Combined with other techniques is a quantitative evaluation of the possible porosity.

  20. Pore-scale supercritical CO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chun; Zhou, Quanlin; Oostrom, Mart; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Mehta, Hardeep

    2017-02-01

    Abstract: Recently, both core- and pore-scale imbibition experiments have shown non-equilibrium dissolution of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2. In this study, pore-scale scCO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions were investigated using a two-dimensional heterogeneous micromodel and a novel fluorescent water dye with a sensitive pH range between 3.7 and 6.5. Drainage experiments were conducted at 9 MPa and 40 °C by injecting scCO2 into the sandstone-analogue pore network initially saturated by water without dissolved CO2 (dsCO2). During the experiments, time-lapse images of dye intensity, reflecting water pH, were obtained. These images show non-uniform pH in individual pores and pore clusters, with average pH levels gradually decreasing with time. Further analysis on selected pores and pore clusters shows that (1) rate-limited mass transfer prevails with slowly decreasing pH over time when the scCO2-water interface area is low with respect to the volume of water-filled pores and pore clusters, (2) fast scCO2 dissolution and phase equilibrium occurs when scCO2 bubbles invade into water-filled pores, significantly enhancing the area-to-volume ratio, and (3) a transition from rate-limited to diffusion-limited mass transfer occurs in a single pore when a medium area-to-volume ratio is prevalent. The analysis also shows that two fundamental processes – scCO2 dissolution at phase interfaces and diffusion of dsCO2 at the pore scale (10-100 µm) observed after scCO2 bubble invasion into water-filled pores without pore throat constraints – are relatively fast. The overall slow dissolution of scCO2 in the millimeter-scale micromodel can be attributed to the small area-to-volume ratios that represent pore-throat configurations and characteristics of phase

  1. Nuclear safeguards and nuclear shutdowns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worthington, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The issues involved in the California nuclear initiative (Proposition 15) are described. Some of the characteristics of the anti-nuclear lobby are outlined. Some do's and don'ts for the nuclear group are listed. The nuclear shutdown effort was concentrated on the safeguards and high-level waste disposal issues

  2. Bentonite pore structure based on SAXS, chloride exclusion and NMR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Carlsson, T.

    2013-11-01

    Water-saturated bentonite is planned to be used in many countries as an important barrier component in high-level nuclear waste (HLW) repositories. Knowledge about the microstructure of the bentonite and the distribution of water between interlayer and non-interlayer pores is important for modelling of long-term processes. In this work the microstructure of water-saturated samples prepared from Na montmorillonite, Ca-montmorillonite, sodium bentonite MX-80 and calcium bentonite Deponit CaN were studied with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small-angle xray scattering spectroscopy (SAXS). The sample dry densities ranged between 0.3 and 1.6 g/cm 3 . The NMR technique was used to get information about the volumes of different water types in the bentonite samples. The results were obtained using 1H NMR spin-lattice T 1ρ relaxation time measurements using the short inter-pulse method. The interpretation of the NMR results was made by fitting distributions of exponentials to observed decay curves. The SAXS measurements were used to get information about the size distribution of the interlayer distance of montmorillonite. The chloride porosity measurements and Donnan exclusion calculations were used together with the SAXS results for evaluation of the bentonite microstructure. The NMR studies and SAXS studies coupled with Cl porosity measurements provided very similar pictures of how the porewater is divided in interlayer and non-interlayer water in MX-80 bentonite. In the case where MX-80 of a dry density 1.6 g/cm 3 was equilibrated with 0.1 M NaCl solution, the results indicated an interlayer porosity of 30 % and non-interlayer porosity of 12 %. The interlayer space mainly contained two water layers but also spaces with more water layers were present. The average size of the non-interlayer pores was evaluated to be 120 - 150 A. From the montmorillonite surface area 98 % was interlayer and 2 % non-interlayer. Evaluation of the interlayer and non

  3. Measurement and modelling of reactive transport in geological barriers for nuclear waste containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qingrong; Joseph, Claudia; Schmeide, Katja; Jivkov, Andrey P

    2015-11-11

    Compacted clays are considered as excellent candidates for barriers to radionuclide transport in future repositories for nuclear waste due to their very low hydraulic permeability. Diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism, controlled by a nano-scale pore system. Assessment of the clays' long-term containment function requires adequate modelling of such pore systems and their evolution. Existing characterisation techniques do not provide complete pore space information for effective modelling, such as pore and throat size distributions and connectivity. Special network models for reactive transport are proposed here using the complimentary character of the pore space and the solid phase. This balances the insufficient characterisation information and provides the means for future mechanical-physical-chemical coupling. The anisotropy and heterogeneity of clays is represented using different length parameters and percentage of pores in different directions. Resulting networks are described as mathematical graphs with efficient discrete calculus formulation of transport. Opalinus Clay (OPA) is chosen as an example. Experimental data for the tritiated water (HTO) and U(vi) diffusion through OPA are presented. Calculated diffusion coefficients of HTO and uranium species are within the ranges of the experimentally determined data in different clay directions. This verifies the proposed pore network model and validates that uranium complexes are diffusing as neutral species in OPA. In the case of U(vi) diffusion the method is extended to account for sorption and convection. Rather than changing pore radii by coarse grained mathematical formula, physical sorption is simulated in each pore, which is more accurate and realistic.

  4. Open pore structure analysis of lithium bearing ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbel, H.

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of the open pore structure includes mercury porosimetry, helium stereopycnometry, gas permeability and specific surface area measurements. These methods were used in the analysis of different types of Li 2 SiO 3 and Li j SiO 4 specimens whose behaviour is tested under operation conditions in various irradiation experiments. Mercury porosimetry yielded density of the specimens, size distribution of the channels and amount of the open porosity. The correlation between mercury pressure and channel diameter was approximated by the Washburn equation. Density determinations by means of helium stereopycnometry demonstrated the existence of open pore volume below the mercury porosimetry detection. Additional information about the structure of open porosity was obtained by gas permeability measurements evaluated using the Carman relation, which is a generalization of the Hagen-Poiseuille law. This approach correlates structure parameters of the open porosity with permeability coefficients. The specific surface area was determined by applying the BET theory to volumetric nitrogen gas adsorption. (orig.)

  5. Sieving experiments and pore diameter: it's not a simple relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Daniel; Gillespie, Dirk

    2010-10-01

    The classic sieving experiment for estimating an ion channel's diameter with successively larger ions is re-examined. Using a very reduced model of a calcium channel, it is shown that sieving experiments measure a combination of three mechanisms: the cross-sectional area available to the sieving ions (the classic interpretation), the exclusion of the sieving ions from a pore crowded with amino acid side chains that protrude into the permeation pathway, and competitive selectivity of the sieving ions with other ions in the bath (even if those are present only at trace concentrations). The latter two can be called sieving-by-crowding because they stem from the excluded volume of the amino acids in the permeation pathway. The model shows that--to a first--order approximation-sieving experiments measure the available volume inside a selectivity filter, rather than the available cross-sectional area. The two are only the same if the narrow part of the pore does not have flexible amino acid side chains interacting directly with the permeant ions; this may be true of potassium channels, but not calcium, sodium, and other channels with "crowded" selectivity filters.

  6. Toward highly stable electrocatalysts via nanoparticle pore confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Carolina; Meier, Josef C; Peinecke, Volker; Bongard, Hans; Katsounaros, Ioannis; Topalov, Angel A; Lu, Anhui; Mayrhofer, Karl J J; Schüth, Ferdi

    2012-12-19

    The durability of electrode materials is a limiting parameter for many electrochemical energy conversion systems. In particular, electrocatalysts for the essential oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) present some of the most challenging instability issues shortening their practical lifetime. Here, we report a mesostructured graphitic carbon support, Hollow Graphitic Spheres (HGS) with a specific surface area exceeding 1000 m(2) g(-1) and precisely controlled pore structure, that was specifically developed to overcome the long-term catalyst degradation, while still sustaining high activity. The synthetic pathway leads to platinum nanoparticles of approximately 3 to 4 nm size encapsulated in the HGS pore structure that are stable at 850 °C and, more importantly, during simulated accelerated electrochemical aging. Moreover, the high stability of the cathode electrocatalyst is also retained in a fully assembled polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Identical location scanning and scanning transmission electron microscopy (IL-SEM and IL-STEM) conclusively proved that during electrochemical cycling the encapsulation significantly suppresses detachment and agglomeration of Pt nanoparticles, two of the major degradation mechanisms in fuel cell catalysts of this particle size. Thus, beyond providing an improved electrocatalyst, this study describes the blueprint for targeted improvement of fuel cell catalysts by design of the carbon support.

  7. NMDA receptor structures reveal subunit arrangement and pore architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Lü, Wei; Michel, Jennifer Carlisle; Goehring, April; Du, Juan; Song, Xianqiang; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-07-10

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are Hebbian-like coincidence detectors, requiring binding of glycine and glutamate in combination with the relief of voltage-dependent magnesium block to open an ion conductive pore across the membrane bilayer. Despite the importance of the NMDA receptor in the development and function of the brain, a molecular structure of an intact receptor has remained elusive. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of the Xenopus laevis GluN1-GluN2B NMDA receptor with the allosteric inhibitor, Ro25-6981, partial agonists and the ion channel blocker, MK-801. Receptor subunits are arranged in a 1-2-1-2 fashion, demonstrating extensive interactions between the amino-terminal and ligand-binding domains. The transmembrane domains harbour a closed-blocked ion channel, a pyramidal central vestibule lined by residues implicated in binding ion channel blockers and magnesium, and a ∼twofold symmetric arrangement of ion channel pore loops. These structures provide new insights into the architecture, allosteric coupling and ion channel function of NMDA receptors.

  8. NMDA receptor structures reveal subunit arrangement and pore architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Lü, Wei; Michel, Jennifer Carlisle; Goehring, April; Du, Juan; Song, Xianqiang; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Summary N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are Hebbian-like coincidence detectors, requiring binding of glycine and glutamate in combination with the relief of voltage-dependent magnesium block to open an ion conductive pore across the membrane bilayer. Despite the importance of the NMDA receptor in the development and function of the brain, a molecular structure of an intact receptor has remained elusive. Here we present x-ray crystal structures of the GluN1/GluN2B NMDA receptor with the allosteric inhibitor, Ro25-6981, partial agonists and the ion channel blocker, MK-801. Receptor subunits are arranged in a 1-2-1-2 fashion, demonstrating extensive interactions between the amino terminal and ligand binding domains. The transmembrane domains harbor a closed-blocked ion channel, a pyramidal central vestibule lined by residues implicated in binding ion channel blockers and magnesium, and a ~2-fold symmetric arrangement of ion channel pore loops. These structures provide new insights into the architecture, allosteric coupling and ion channel function of NMDA receptors. PMID:25008524

  9. Modeling and Simulating Asymmetrical Conductance Changes in Gramicidin Pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Shixin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gramicidin A is a small and well characterized peptide that forms an ion channel in lipid membranes. An important feature of gramicidin A (gA pore is that its conductance is affected by the electric charges near the its entrance. This property has led to the application of gramicidin A as a biochemical sensor for monitoring and quantifying a number of chemical and enzymatic reactions. Here, a mathematical model of conductance changes of gramicidin A pores in response to the presence of electrical charges near its entrance, either on membrane surface or attached to gramicidin A itself, is presented. In this numerical simulation, a two dimensional computational domain is set to mimic the structure of a gramicidin A channel in the bilayer surrounded by electrolyte. The transport of ions through the channel is modeled by the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP equations that are solved by Finite Element Method (FEM. Preliminary numerical simulations of this mathematical model are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results in the literature. In addition to the model and simulations, we also present the analysis of the stability of the solution to the boundary conditions and the convergence of FEM method for the two dimensional PNP equations in our model.

  10. PORE: Positive-Only Relation Extraction from Wikipedia Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Yu, Yong; Zhu, Haiping

    Extracting semantic relations is of great importance for the creation of the Semantic Web content. It is of great benefit to semi-automatically extract relations from the free text of Wikipedia using the structured content readily available in it. Pattern matching methods that employ information redundancy cannot work well since there is not much redundancy information in Wikipedia, compared to the Web. Multi-class classification methods are not reasonable since no classification of relation types is available in Wikipedia. In this paper, we propose PORE (Positive-Only Relation Extraction), for relation extraction from Wikipedia text. The core algorithm B-POL extends a state-of-the-art positive-only learning algorithm using bootstrapping, strong negative identifi cation, and transductive inference to work with fewer positive training exam ples. We conducted experiments on several relations with different amount of training data. The experimental results show that B-POL can work effectively given only a small amount of positive training examples and it significantly out per forms the original positive learning approaches and a multi-class SVM. Furthermore, although PORE is applied in the context of Wiki pedia, the core algorithm B-POL is a general approach for Ontology Population and can be adapted to other domains.

  11. Wave-induced stresses and pore pressures near a mudline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Sawicki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional methods for the determination of water-wave induced stresses inseabeds composed of granular soils are based on Biot-type models, in which the soilskeleton is treated as an elastic medium. Such methods predict effective stressesin the soil that are unacceptable from the physical point of view, as they permittensile stresses to occur near the upper surface of the seabed. Therefore, in thispaper the granular soil is assumed to behave as an elastic-ideally plastic material,with the Coulomb-Mohr yield criterion adopted to bound admissible stress states inthe seabed. The governing equations are solved numerically by a~finite differencemethod. The results of simulations, carried out for the case of time-harmonicwater waves, illustrate the depth distributions of the excess pore pressures and theeffective stresses in the seabed, and show the shapes of zones of soil in the plastic state.~In particular, the effects on the seabed behaviour of suchparameters as the degree of pore water saturation, the soil permeability, and theearth pressure coefficient, are illustrated.

  12. A Dynamic Pore-Scale Model of Imbibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kristian; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1998-01-01

    We present a dynamic pore-scale network model of imbibition, capable of calculating residual oil saturation for any given capillary number, viscosity ratio, contact angle and aspect ratio. Our goal is not to predict the outcome of core floods, but rather to perform a sensitivity analysis of the a......We present a dynamic pore-scale network model of imbibition, capable of calculating residual oil saturation for any given capillary number, viscosity ratio, contact angle and aspect ratio. Our goal is not to predict the outcome of core floods, but rather to perform a sensitivity analysis...... of the above-mentioned parameters, except the viscosity ratio. We find that contact angle, aspect ratio and capillary number all have a significant influence on the competition between piston-like advance, leading to high recovery, and snap-off, causing oil entrapment. Due to enormous CPU-time requirements we...... been entirely inhibited, in agreement with results obtained by Blunt using a quasi-static model. For higher aspect ratios, the effect of rate and contact angle is more pronounced. Many core floods are conducted at capillary numbers in the range 10 to10.6. We believe that the excellent recoveries...

  13. Micro/Nano-pore Network Analysis of Gas Flow in Shale Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengwei; Hu, Liming; Meegoda, Jay N; Gao, Shengyan

    2015-08-27

    The gas flow in shale matrix is of great research interests for optimized shale gas extraction. The gas flow in the nano-scale pore may fall in flow regimes such as viscous flow, slip flow and Knudsen diffusion. A 3-dimensional nano-scale pore network model was developed to simulate dynamic gas flow, and to describe the transient properties of flow regimes. The proposed pore network model accounts for the various size distributions and low connectivity of shale pores. The pore size, pore throat size and coordination number obey normal distribution, and the average values can be obtained from shale reservoir data. The gas flow regimes were simulated using an extracted pore network backbone. The numerical results show that apparent permeability is strongly dependent on pore pressure in the reservoir and pore throat size, which is overestimated by low-pressure laboratory tests. With the decrease of reservoir pressure, viscous flow is weakening, then slip flow and Knudsen diffusion are gradually becoming dominant flow regimes. The fingering phenomenon can be predicted by micro/nano-pore network for gas flow, which provides an effective way to capture heterogeneity of shale gas reservoir.

  14. Analysis of the number of enlarged pores according to site, age, and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, H J; Ahn, J Y; Lee, J I; Bae, J Y; Kim, H L; Suh, H Y; Youn, J I; Park, M Y

    2018-02-02

    Increasing the number of enlarged pores causes cosmetic problems. The difference in the number of enlarged pores according to facial site, age, and sex is unclear. To analyze the distribution of the number of enlarged pores according to facial site, age, and sex. We analyzed the number of the enlarged pores and the percentage of wrinkles in the nose, forehead, and cheek from 434 polarized images. The measurement results were analyzed according to site, age, and sex. Relationship between enlarged pore counts and wrinkle severity was also analyzed. The study was conducted by using DermaVision,™ which can take cross-polarization, parallel polarization, and ultraviolet light images. The enlarged pores of the nose and forehead were more prominent than in the cheeks. Pore counts were increased with age, and the increment was significant between the 30's and 40's. There was no significant difference by gender. Enlarged pore counts were related to wrinkle severity. The number of enlarged pores differs depending on body site and increased with age. The enlarged pore counts correlate with wrinkle severity and the correlation varies depending on the body site. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effect of Pore Geometry on Gas Adsorption: Grand Canonical Monte Carlo Simulation Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eon Ji; Chang, Rak Woo; Han, Ji Hyung; Chung, Taek Dong

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the pure geometrical effect of porous materials in gas adsorption using the grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of primitive gas-pore models with various pore geometries such as planar, cylindrical, and random pore geometries. Although the model does not possess atomistic level details of porous materials, our simulation results provided many insightful information in the effect of pore geometry on the adsorption behavior of gas molecules. First, the surface curvature of porous materials plays a significant role in the amount of adsorbed gas molecules: the concave surface such as in cylindrical pores induces more attraction between gas molecules and pore, which results in the enhanced gas adsorption. On the contrary, the convex surface of random pores gives the opposite effect. Second, this geometrical effect shows a nonmonotonic dependence on the gas-pore interaction strength and length. Third, as the external gas pressure is increased, the change in the gas adsorption due to pore geometry is reduced. Finally, the pore geometry also affects the collision dynamics of gas molecules. Since our model is based on primitive description of fluid molecules, our conclusion can be applied to any fluidic systems including reactant-electrode systems

  16. Effects of pore structure and distribution on strength of porous Cu-Sn-Ti alumina composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao ZHAO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Porous Cu-Sn-Ti alumina composites were fabricated by sintering Cu-Sn-Ti alloy powders, graphite particles, and alumina hollow particles agent. The effects of the pore structure and distribution on the composites strength were evaluated. Different pore distributions were modeled by using finite element analysis to investigate the tensile strength of the composites. Furthermore, a fractal analysis-based box-covering algorithm was used on the Cu-Sn-Ti alumina composites topology graphs to better investigate the pore structure and distribution. Results obtained show that different sizes and concentrations of alumina hollow particles could result in different porosities from 20% to 50%. A larger pore size and a higher pore concentration reduce the strength, but provide more space for chip formation as a bonding material of a grinding wheel. The body-centered pore structure of the composites shows the highest stress under a tension load. The original composites topology graphs have been transformed to ordered distributed pore graphs based on the total pore area conservation. The information dimension magnitude difference between the original topology graphs and the ordered distributed circulars graphs is found to be linear with the Cu-Sn-Ti alumina composites strength. A larger difference renders a lower flexural strength, which indicates that uniform ordered distributed pores could benefit the composites strength. Keywords: Finite element analysis (FEA, Metal-matrix composites (MMCs, Microstructural analysis, Pore structure, Strength

  17. Simulations of skin barrier function: free energies of hydrophobic and hydrophilic transmembrane pores in ceramide bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notman, Rebecca; Anwar, Jamshed; Briels, W J; Noro, Massimo G; den Otter, Wouter K

    2008-11-15

    Transmembrane pore formation is central to many biological processes such as ion transport, cell fusion, and viral infection. Furthermore, pore formation in the ceramide bilayers of the stratum corneum may be an important mechanism by which penetration enhancers such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) weaken the barrier function of the skin. We have used the potential of mean constraint force (PMCF) method to calculate the free energy of pore formation in ceramide bilayers in both the innate gel phase and in the DMSO-induced fluidized state. Our simulations show that the fluid phase bilayers form archetypal water-filled hydrophilic pores similar to those observed in phospholipid bilayers. In contrast, the rigid gel-phase bilayers develop hydrophobic pores. At the relatively small pore diameters studied here, the hydrophobic pores are empty rather than filled with bulk water, suggesting that they do not compromise the barrier function of ceramide membranes. A phenomenological analysis suggests that these vapor pores are stable, below a critical radius, because the penalty of creating water-vapor and tail-vapor interfaces is lower than that of directly exposing the strongly hydrophobic tails to water. The PMCF free energy profile of the vapor pore supports this analysis. The simulations indicate that high DMSO concentrations drastically impair the barrier function of the skin by strongly reducing the free energy required for pore opening.

  18. Compressive behavior of pervious concretes and a quantification of the influence of random pore structure features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deo, Omkar; Neithalath, Narayanan

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Identified the relevant pore structure features of pervious concretes, provided methodologies to extract those, and quantified the influence of these features on compressive response. → A model for stress-strain relationship of pervious concretes, and relationship between model parameters and parameters of the stress-strain relationship developed. → Statistical model for compressive strength as a function of pore structure features; and a stochastic model for the sensitivity of pore structure features in strength prediction. - Abstract: Properties of a random porous material such as pervious concrete are strongly dependent on its pore structure features, porosity being an important one among them. This study deals with developing an understanding of the material structure-compressive response relationships in pervious concretes. Several pervious concrete mixtures with different pore structure features are proportioned and subjected to static compression tests. The pore structure features such as pore area fractions, pore sizes, mean free spacing of the pores, specific surface area, and the three-dimensional pore distribution density are extracted using image analysis methods. The compressive stress-strain response of pervious concretes, a model to predict the stress-strain response, and its relationship to several of the pore structure features are outlined. Larger aggregate sizes and increase in paste volume fractions are observed to result in increased compressive strengths. The compressive response is found to be influenced by the pore sizes, their distributions and spacing. A statistical model is used to relate the compressive strength to the relevant pore structure features, which is then used as a base model in a Monte-Carlo simulation to evaluate the sensitivity of the predicted compressive strength to the model terms.

  19. Upscaling of nanoparticle transport in porous media under unfavorable conditions: Pore scale to Darcy scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetha, N.; Raoof, Amir; Mohan Kumar, M. S.; Majid Hassanizadeh, S.

    2017-05-01

    Transport and deposition of nanoparticles in porous media is a multi-scale problem governed by several pore-scale processes, and hence, it is critical to link the processes at pore scale to the Darcy-scale behavior. In this study, using pore network modeling, we develop correlation equations for deposition rate coefficients for nanoparticle transport under unfavorable conditions at the Darcy scale based on pore-scale mechanisms. The upscaling tool is a multi-directional pore-network model consisting of an interconnected network of pores with variable connectivities. Correlation equations describing the pore-averaged deposition rate coefficients under unfavorable conditions in a cylindrical pore, developed in our earlier studies, are employed for each pore element. Pore-network simulations are performed for a wide range of parameter values to obtain the breakthrough curves of nanoparticle concentration. The latter is fitted with macroscopic 1-D advection-dispersion equation with a two-site linear reversible deposition accounting for both equilibrium and kinetic sorption. This leads to the estimation of three Darcy-scale deposition coefficients: distribution coefficient, kinetic rate constant, and the fraction of equilibrium sites. The correlation equations for the Darcy-scale deposition coefficients, under unfavorable conditions, are provided as a function of measurable Darcy-scale parameters, including: porosity, mean pore throat radius, mean pore water velocity, nanoparticle radius, ionic strength, dielectric constant, viscosity, temperature, and surface potentials of the particle and grain surfaces. The correlation equations are found to be consistent with the available experimental results, and in qualitative agreement with Colloid Filtration Theory for all parameters, except for the mean pore water velocity and nanoparticle radius.

  20. Upscaling of nanoparticle transport in porous media under unfavorable conditions: Pore scale to Darcy scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetha, N; Raoof, Amir; Mohan Kumar, M S; Majid Hassanizadeh, S

    2017-05-01

    Transport and deposition of nanoparticles in porous media is a multi-scale problem governed by several pore-scale processes, and hence, it is critical to link the processes at pore scale to the Darcy-scale behavior. In this study, using pore network modeling, we develop correlation equations for deposition rate coefficients for nanoparticle transport under unfavorable conditions at the Darcy scale based on pore-scale mechanisms. The upscaling tool is a multi-directional pore-network model consisting of an interconnected network of pores with variable connectivities. Correlation equations describing the pore-averaged deposition rate coefficients under unfavorable conditions in a cylindrical pore, developed in our earlier studies, are employed for each pore element. Pore-network simulations are performed for a wide range of parameter values to obtain the breakthrough curves of nanoparticle concentration. The latter is fitted with macroscopic 1-D advection-dispersion equation with a two-site linear reversible deposition accounting for both equilibrium and kinetic sorption. This leads to the estimation of three Darcy-scale deposition coefficients: distribution coefficient, kinetic rate constant, and the fraction of equilibrium sites. The correlation equations for the Darcy-scale deposition coefficients, under unfavorable conditions, are provided as a function of measurable Darcy-scale parameters, including: porosity, mean pore throat radius, mean pore water velocity, nanoparticle radius, ionic strength, dielectric constant, viscosity, temperature, and surface potentials of the particle and grain surfaces. The correlation equations are found to be consistent with the available experimental results, and in qualitative agreement with Colloid Filtration Theory for all parameters, except for the mean pore water velocity and nanoparticle radius. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1989-01-01

    Partial Contents: Nuclear Weapons, Nuclear Development, Nuclear Power Plant, Uranium, Missiles, Space Firm Protested, Satellite, Rocket Launching, Nuclear Submarine, Environmental, Radioactivity, Nuclear Plant...

  2. Nuclear protein import is reduced in cells expressing nuclear envelopathy-causing lamin A mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, Albert; Kiel, Tilman; Heupel, Wolfgang-M.; Wehnert, Manfred; Huebner, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, not only constitute an important determinant of nuclear architecture, but additionally play essential roles in many nuclear functions. Mutations in A-type lamins cause a wide range of human genetic disorders (laminopathies). The importance of lamin A (LaA) in the spatial arrangement of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) prompted us to study the role of LaA mutants in nuclear protein transport. Two mutants, causing prenatal skin disease restrictive dermopathy (RD) and the premature aging disease Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome, were used for expression in HeLa cells to investigate their impact on the subcellular localization of NPC-associated proteins and nuclear protein import. Furthermore, dynamics of the LaA mutants within the nuclear lamina were studied. We observed affected localization of NPC-associated proteins, diminished lamina dynamics for both LaA mutants and reduced nuclear import of representative cargo molecules. Intriguingly, both LaA mutants displayed similar effects on nuclear morphology and functions, despite their differences in disease severity. Reduced nuclear protein import was also seen in RD fibroblasts and impaired lamina dynamics for the nucleoporin Nup153. Our data thus represent the first study of a direct link between LaA mutant expression and reduced nuclear protein import.

  3. Nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal, V.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear forensics is the analysis of nuclear materials recovered from either the capture of unused materials, or from the radioactive debris following a nuclear explosion and can contribute significantly to the identification of the sources of the materials and the industrial processes used to obtain them. In the case of an explosion, nuclear forensics can also reconstruct key features of the nuclear device. Nuclear forensic analysis works best in conjunction with other law enforcement, radiological protection dosimetry, traditional forensics, and intelligence work to provide the basis for attributing the materials and/or nuclear device to its originators. Nuclear forensics is a piece of the overall attribution process, not a stand-alone activity

  4. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  5. Pore-scale modeling of capillary trapping in water-wet porous media: A new cooperative pore-body filling model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruspini, L. C.; Farokhpoor, R.; Øren, P. E.

    2017-10-01

    We present a pore-network model study of capillary trapping in water-wet porous media. The amount and distribution of trapped non-wetting phase is determined by the competition between two trapping mechanisms - snap-off and cooperative pore-body filling. We develop a new model to describe the pore-body filling mechanism in geologically realistic pore-networks. The model accounts for the geometrical characteristics of the pore, the spatial location of the connecting throats and the local fluid topology at the time of the displacement. We validate the model by comparing computed capillary trapping curves with published data for four different water-wet rocks. Computations are performed on pore-networks extracted from micro-CT images and process-based reconstructions of the actual rocks used in the experiments. Compared with commonly used stochastic models, the new model describes more accurately the experimental measurements, especially for well connected porous systems where trapping is controlled by subtleties of the pore structure. The new model successfully predicts relative permeabilities and residual saturation for Bentheimer sandstone using in-situ measured contact angles as input to the simulations. The simulated trapped cluster size distributions are compared with predictions from percolation theory.

  6. Nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, D.A.; Joy, T.

    1986-01-01

    The paper on 'nuclear structure' is the Appendix to the Daresbury (United Kingdom) Annual Report 1985/86, and contains the research work carried out at the Nuclear Structure Facility, Daresbury, within that period. During the year a total of 74 experiments were scheduled covering the main areas of activity including: nuclear collective motion, nuclei far from stability, and nuclear collisions. The Appendix contains brief reports on these experiments and associated theory. (U.K.)

  7. Development of a New Analog Test System Capable of Modeling Tectonic Deformation Incorporating the Effects of Pore Fluid Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Nakajima, H.; Takeda, M.; Aung, T. T.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding and predicting the tectonic deformation within geologic strata has been a very important research subject in many fields such as structural geology and petroleum geology. In recent years, such research has also become a fundamental necessity for the assessment of active fault migration, site selection for geological disposal of radioactive nuclear waste and exploration for methane hydrate. Although analog modeling techniques have played an important role in the elucidation of the tectonic deformation mechanisms, traditional approaches have typically used dry materials and ignored the effects of pore fluid pressure. In order for analog models to properly depict the tectonic deformation of the targeted, large-prototype system within a small laboratory-scale configuration, physical properties of the models, including geometry, force, and time, must be correctly scaled. Model materials representing brittle rock behavior require an internal friction identical to the prototype rock and virtually zero cohesion. Granular materials such as sand, glass beads, or steel beads of dry condition have been preferably used for this reason in addition to their availability and ease of handling. Modeling protocols for dry granular materials have been well established but such model tests cannot account for the pore fluid effects. Although the concept of effective stress has long been recognized and the role of pore-fluid pressure in tectonic deformation processes is evident, there have been few analog model studies that consider the effects of pore fluid movement. Some new applications require a thorough understanding of the coupled deformation and fluid flow processes within the strata. Taking the field of waste management as an example, deep geological disposal of radioactive waste has been thought to be an appropriate methodology for the safe isolation of the wastes from the human environment until the toxicity of the wastes decays to non-hazardous levels. For the

  8. Preferred Orientation and Anisotropy of Clay minerals and Pores in Posidonia Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitpanyacharoen, W.; Chen, K.; Wenk, H.

    2010-12-01

    Shales compose a large part of sedimentary basins and form the seal and source rocks for hydrocarbon reservoirs. They are also of great interest in context of repositories for nuclear waste and carbon sequestration. A comprehensive study of shale properties is thus crucial for seismic prospecting, particularly due to high elastic anisotropy that is contributed by the alignment of constituent clay minerals during compaction and diagenesis. In this study, we quantitatively analyze composition, crystal preferred orientation (or texture), and the 3D porosity structure in four Posidonia shales from Germany using high energy synchrotron x-rays. We can infer texture information from x-ray diffraction images relying on the Rietveld method, as well as determine the 3D porosity structure from tomography images. We observed that quartz and calcite are dominating phases while illite-smectite, illite-mica and kaolinite are the major clay minerals. The texture strength of clays range from 4.22 to 6.12 m.r.d. A comparison of shallow Posidonia shales with deep shales from the North Sea, Saudi Arabia, and the Gulf of Mexico documents that P-wave anisotropy increases with increasing phyllosilicate content (mainly illite-smectite and kaolinite) and increasing burial. Low absorption features in microtomography images indicate porosity (including kerogen and fractures), which is estimated at 1 vol% and observed to be anisotropic, mainly organized parallel to bedding with little connectivity of flat pores in direction perpendicular to the bedding plane.

  9. Diffusive release of uranium from contaminated sediments into capillary fringe pore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rod, Kenton A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M.; Harsh, James B.

    2012-10-01

    Despite remediation efforts at the former nuclear weapons facility, leaching of uranium (U) from contaminated sediments to the ground water persists at the Hanford site 300 Area. Flooding of contaminated capillary fringe sediments due to seasonal changes in the Columbia River stage has been identified as a source for U supply to ground water. We investigated U release from Hanford capillary fringe sediments by packing sediments into reservoirs of centrifugal filter devices and saturating them with Columbia River water for 3 to 84 days at varying solution-to-solid ratios. After specified times, samples were centrifuged. Within the first three days, there was an initial rapid release of 6-9% of total U, independent of the solution-to-solid ratio. After 14 days of reaction, however, the experiments with the narrowest solution-to-solid ratios showed a decline in dissolved U concentrations. The removal of U from the solution phase was accompanied by removal of Ca and HCO3-. Geochemical modeling indicated that calcite could precipitate in the narrowest solution-to-solid ratio experiment. After the rapid initial release in the first three days for the wide solution-to-solid ratio experiments, there was sustained release of U into the pore water. This sustained release of U from the sediments had diffusion-limited kinetics.

  10. Diffusive release of uranium from contaminated sediments into capillary fringe pore water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rod, Kenton A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Flury, Markus; Pierce, Eric M.; Harsh, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite remediation efforts at the former nuclear weapons facility, leaching of uranium (U) from contaminated sediments to the ground water persists at the Hanford site 300 Area. Flooding of contaminated capillary fringe sediments due to seasonal changes in the Columbia River stage has been identified as a source for U supply to ground water. We investigated U release from Hanford capillary fringe sediments by packing sediments into reservoirs of centrifugal filter devices and saturated with Columbia River water for 3 to 84 days at varying solution-to-solid ratios. After specified times, samples were centrifuged. Within the first three days, there was an initial rapid release of 6-9% of total U, independent of the solution-to-solid ratio. After 14 days of reaction, however, the experiments with the narrowest solution-to-solid ratios showed a decline in dissolved U concentrations. The removal of U from the solution phase was accompanied by removal of Ca and HCO3-. Geochemical modeling indicated that calcite could precipitate in the narrowest solution-to-solid ratio experiment. After the rapid initial release in the first three days for the wide solution-to-solid ratio experiments, there was sustained release of U into the pore water. This sustained release of U from the sediments had diffusion-limited kinetics.

  11. Pore structure, mechanical properties and polymer characteristics of porous materials impregnated with methylmethacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastrup, K.

    1976-05-01

    The pore structure of porous materials plays a decisive role with regard to many properties of the materials. One therefore expects property improvement due to impregnation to be mostly brought about as a result of pore structure modification. This supposition formed the basis for the project here presented, which had the main aim of investigating polymer impregnation in relation to pore structure. Objectives were: 1) to examine the pore structure of hardened cement paste, beech wood and porous glass before and after gas-phase impregnation with methyl-methacrylate monomer and in situ polymerization, 2) to investigate the influence of the pore structure on the molecular weight of the polymer, 3) to investigate the influence of the degree of pore filling on the elastic modulus, damping coefficient and bending strength. (author)

  12. Impact of pore size variability and network coupling on electrokinetic transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Shima; Bazant, Martin Z.; Mani, Ali

    2016-11-01

    We have developed and validated an efficient and robust computational model to study the coupled fluid and ion transport through electrokinetic porous media, which are exposed to external gradients of pressure, electric potential, and concentration. In our approach a porous media is modeled as a network of many pores through which the transport is described by the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes equations. When the pore sizes are random, the interactions between various modes of transport may provoke complexities such as concentration polarization shocks and internal flow circulations. These phenomena impact mixing and transport in various systems including deionization and filtration systems, supercapacitors, and lab-on-a-chip devices. In this work, we present simulations of massive networks of pores and we demonstrate the impact of pore size variation, and pore-pore coupling on the overall electrokinetic transport in porous media.

  13. Mesoporous carbon synthesized from different pore sizes of SBA-15 for high density electrode supercapacitor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Farinaa Md; Sulaiman, Mohd Ali; Ibrahim, Suhaina Mohd; Masrom, Abdul Kadir; Yahya, Muhd Zu Azhan

    2017-12-01

    A series of mesoporous carbon sample was synthesized using silica template, SBA-15 with two different pore sizes. Impregnation method was applied using glucose as a precursor for converting it into carbon. An appropriate carbonization and silica removal process were carried out to produce a series of mesoporous carbon with different pore sizes and surface areas. Mesoporous carbon sample was then assembled as electrode and its performance was tested using cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy to study the effect of ion transportation into several pore sizes on electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) system. 6M KOH was used as electrolyte at various scan rates of 10, 20, 30 and 50 mVs-1. The results showed that the pore size of carbon increased as the pore size of template increased and the specific capacitance improved as the increasing of the pore size of carbon.

  14. Mechanical, Thermal and Acoustic Properties of Open-pore Phenolic Multi-structured Cryogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rui; Yao, Zhengjun; Zhou, Jintang; Liu, Peijiang; Lei, Yiming

    2017-09-01

    Open-pore phenolic cryogel acoustic multi-structured plates (OCMPs) were prepared via modified sol gel polymerization and freeze-dried methods. The pore morphology, mechanical, thermal and acoustic properties of the cryogels were investigated. From the experimental results, the cryogels exhibited a porous sandwich microstructure: A nano-micron double-pore structure was observed in the core layer of the plates, and nanosized pores were observed in the inner part of the micron pores. In addtion, compared with cryogel plates with uniform-pore (OCPs), the OCMPs had lower thermal conductivities. What’s more, the compressive and tensile strength of the OCMPs were much higher than those of OCPs. Finally, the OCMPs exhibited superior acoustic performances (20% solid content OCMPs performed the best) as compared with those of OCPs. Moreover, the sound insulation value and sound absorption bandwidth of OCMPs exhibited an improvement of approximately 3 and 2 times as compared with those of OCPs, respectively.

  15. Nuclear electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friese, T.

    1981-09-01

    A short survey is given on nuclear radiation detectors and nuclear electronics. It is written for newcomers and those, who are not very familiar with this technique. Some additional information is given on typical failures in nuclear measurement systems. (orig.) [de

  16. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    d'Easum, Lille.

    1976-03-01

    An environmentalist's criticism of nuclear energy is given, on a layman's level. Such subjects as conflict of interest in controlling bodies, low-level radiation, reactor safety, liability insurance, thermal pollution, economics, heavy water production, export of nuclear technology, and the history of the anti-nuclear movement are discussed in a sensationalistic tone. (E.C.B.)

  17. Nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Recent reports of alleged terrorist plans to build a 'dirty bomb' have heightened longstanding concerns about nuclear terrorism. This briefing outlines possible forms of attack, such as: detonation of a nuclear weapon; attacks involving radioactive materials; attacks on nuclear facilities. Legislation addressing these risks and the UK's strategy for coping with them are also considered

  18. Low atomic number coating for XEUS silicon pore optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, D. H.; Jensen, C. P.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Christensen, F.; Collon, M.; Bavdaz, M.

    2008-07-01

    We describe a set of measurements on coated silicon substrates that are representative of the material to be used for the XEUS High Performance Pore Optics (HPO) technology. X-ray angular reflectance measurements at 2.8 and 8 keV, and energy scans of reflectance at a fixed angle representative of XEUS graze angles are presented. Reflectance is significantly enhanced for low energies when a low atomic number over-coating is applied. Modeling of the layer thicknesses and roughness is used to investigate the dependence on the layer thicknesses, metal and over coat material choices. We compare the low energy effective area increase that could be achieved with an optimized coating design.

  19. Pathophysiological role of omega pore current in channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin eJurkat-Rott

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In voltage-gated cation channels, a recurrent pattern for mutations is the neutralization of positively charged residues in the voltage-sensing S4 transmembrane segments. These mutations cause dominant ion channelopathies affecting many tissues such as brain, heart, and skeletal muscle. Recent studies suggest that the pathogenesis of associated phenotypes is not limited to alterations in the gating of the ion-conducting alpha pore. Instead, aberrant so-called omega currents facilitated by the movement of the S4 segments during activation and during recovery are thought to cause symptoms. Surprisingly, these omega currents display uni- or bi-directionality and conduct cations with varying ion selectivity. Additionally, the voltage-sensitivity enables the channels to conduct different omega currents in the various voltage ranges. This review gives an overview of voltage sensor channelopathies in general and focuses on pathogenesis of skeletal muscle S4 disorders for which current knowledge is most advanced.

  20. The mitochondrial permeability transition pore: a mystery solved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The permeability transition (PT) denotes an increase of the mitochondrial inner membrane permeability to solutes with molecular masses up to about 1500 Da. It is presumed to be mediated by opening of a channel, the permeability transition pore (PTP), whose molecular nature remains a mystery. Here I briefly review the history of the PTP, discuss existing models, and present our new results indicating that reconstituted dimers of the FOF1 ATP synthase form a channel with properties identical to those of the mitochondrial megachannel (MMC), the electrophysiological equivalent of the PTP. Open questions remain, but there is now promise that the PTP can be studied by genetic methods to solve the large number of outstanding problems. PMID:23675351

  1. Multilayer approximation for a confined fluid in a slit pore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Kuz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple Lennard-Jones fluid confined in a slit nanopore with hard walls is studied on the basis of a multilayer structured model. Each layer is homogeneous and parallel to the walls of the pore. The Helmholtz energy of this system is constructed following van der Waals-like approximations, with the advantage that the model geometry permits to obtain analytical expressions for the integrals involved. Being the multilayer system in thermodynamic equilibrium, a system of non-linear equations is obtained for the densities and widths of the layers. A numerical solution of the equations gives the density profile and the longitudinal pressures. The results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations and with experimental data for Nitrogen, showing very good agreement.Received: 23 December 2009, Accepted: 24 February 2010; Edited by: D. A. Stariolo; DOI: 10.4279/PIP.020002

  2. Lipopeptide surfactants: Production, recovery and pore forming capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inès, Mnif; Dhouha, Ghribi

    2015-09-01

    Lipopeptides are microbial surface active compounds produced by a wide variety of bacteria, fungi and yeast. They are characterized by highly structural diversity and have the ability to decrease the surface and interfacial tension at the surface and interface, respectively. Surfactin, iturin and fengycin of Bacillus subtilis are among the most studied lipopeptides. This review will present the main factors encountering lipopeptides production along with the techniques developed for their extraction and purification. Moreover, we will discuss their ability to form pores and destabilize biological membrane permitting their use as antimicrobial, hemolytic and antitumor agents. These open great potential applications in biomediacal, pharmaceutic and agriculture fields. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Macroscopic ordering of helical pores for arraying guest molecules noncentrosymmetrically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunji; Cho, Joonil; Yamada, Kuniyo; Hashizume, Daisuke; Araoka, Fumito; Takezoe, Hideo; Aida, Takuzo; Ishida, Yasuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Helical nanostructures have attracted continuous attention, not only as media for chiral recognition and synthesis, but also as motifs for studying intriguing physical phenomena that never occur in centrosymmetric systems. To improve the quality of signals from these phenomena, which is a key issue for their further exploration, the most straightforward is the macroscopic orientation of helices. Here as a versatile scaffold to rationally construct this hardly accessible structure, we report a polymer framework with helical pores that unidirectionally orient over a large area (~10 cm2). The framework, prepared by crosslinking a supramolecular liquid crystal preorganized in a magnetic field, is chemically robust, functionalized with carboxyl groups and capable of incorporating various basic or cationic guest molecules. When a nonlinear optical chromophore is incorporated in the framework, the resultant complex displays a markedly efficient nonlinear optical output, owing to the coherence of signals ensured by the macroscopically oriented helical structure.

  4. Measurement of Restricted Atmospheric Barrier Discharge in Nonwoven Fiber Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Masaaki

    The restricted dielectric barrier discharge in nonwoven pores has been investigated by observation of the current pulse, the Lissajous figure and light emissions. The current pulse measurement revealed that homogeneity of the discharge was relatively high and the amount of individual pulse was quite small on the order of 0.01nC. Such a small current pulse demonstrates that nonwoven fiber is effective as a dielectric barrier. Analysis of the Lissajous figure, indicates the calculated value of the gap voltage for the discharge starting point of nonwoven fiber layers is close to what was predicted using the Paschen curve. On the other hand, the measured value of the gap voltage in the Lissajous figure is larger than its calculated value, so the surface charge on the dielectrics dissipated relatively fast. The observations of light emissions also showed a high homogeneity.

  5. Effect of pore structure on the seepage characteristics of tight sandstone reservoirs: A case study of Upper Jurassic Penglaizhen Fm reservoirs in the western Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang Sima

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tight sandstone reservoirs are characterized by complex pore structures and strong heterogeneity, and their seepage characteristics are much different from those of conventional sandstone reservoirs. In this paper, the tight sandstone reservoirs of Upper Jurassic Penglaizhen Fm in western Sichuan Basin were analyzed in terms of their pore structures by using the data about physical property, mercury injection and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR tests. Then, the seepage characteristics and the gas–water two-phase migration mechanisms and distribution of tight sandstone reservoirs with different types of pore structures in the process of hydrocarbon accumulation and development were simulated by combining the relative permeability experiment with the visual microscopic displacement model. It is shown that crotch-like viscous fingering occurs in the process of gas front advancing in reservoirs with different pore structures. The better the pore structure is, the lower the irreducible water saturation is; the higher the gas-phase relative permeability of irreducible water is, the more easily the gas reservoir can be developed. At the late stage of development, the residual gas is sealed in reservoirs in the forms of bypass, cutoff and dead end. In various reservoirs, the interference between gas and water is stronger, so gas and water tends to be produced simultaneously. The sealed gas may reduce the production rate of gas wells significantly, and the existence of water phase may reduce the gas permeability greatly; consequently, the water-bearing low-permeability tight sandstone gas reservoirs reveal serious water production, highly-difficult development and low-recovery percentage at the late stage, which have adverse impacts on the effective production and development of gas wells.

  6. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  7. Function of nuclear membrane proteins in shaping the nuclear envelope integrity during closed mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Ju; Iwamoto, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2017-06-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) not only protects the genome from being directly accessed by detrimental agents but also regulates genome organization. Breaches in NE integrity threaten genome stability and impede cellular function. Nonetheless, the NE constantly remodels, and NE integrity is endangered in dividing or differentiating cells. Specifically, in unicellular eukaryotes undergoing closed mitosis, the NE expands instead of breaking down during chromosome segregation. The newly assembling nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) penetrate the existing NE in interphase. A peculiar example of NE remodelling during nuclear differentiation in Tetrahymena involves formation of the redundant NE and clustered NPCs. Even under these conditions, the NE remains intact. Many recent studies on unicellular organisms have revealed that nuclear membrane proteins, such as LEM-domain proteins, play a role in maintaining NE integrity. This review summarizes and discusses how nuclear membrane proteins participate in NE integrity. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Defect evolution and pore collapse in crystalline energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Nathan R.; Winter, Nicholas W.; Reaugh, John E.

    2009-04-01

    This work examines the use of crystal based continuum mechanics in the context of dynamic loading. In particular, we examine model forms and simulations which are relevant to pore collapse in crystalline energetic materials. Strain localization and the associated generation of heat are important for the initiation of chemical reactions in this context. The crystal mechanics based model serves as a convenient testbed for the interactions among wave motion, slip kinetics, defect generation kinetics and physical length scale. After calibration to available molecular dynamics and single crystal gas gun data for HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine), the model is used to predict behaviors for the collapse of pores under various conditions. Implications for experimental observations are discussed. This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes.

  9. A Microfluidic Pore Network Approach to Investigate Water Transport in Fuel Cell Porous Transport Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Bazylak, A.; Berejnov, V.; Markicevic, B.; Sinton, D.; Djilali, N.

    2008-01-01

    Pore network modelling has traditionally been used to study displacement processes in idealized porous media related to geological flows, with applications ranging from groundwater hydrology to enhanced oil recovery. Very recently, pore network modelling has been applied to model the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Discrete pore network models have the potential to elucidate transport phenomena in the GDL with high computational efficiency, in cont...

  10. New Insights into Pore Characteristics and Hydrocarbon Generation of Shale Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, M.; Hartl, M.; Wang, Y.; Hjelm, R.

    2014-12-01

    Pore size, distribution, connectivity, and shape as well as hydrocarbon saturation and composition reflect the history of hydrocarbon maturation and migration. However, characterization of the underlying factors and processes controlling hydrocarbons behavior in tight rocks is extremely limited, especially lacking of direct experimental observations. We have studied the pore characteristics of marine and lacustrine shale from the Erdos basin, China during laboratory pyrolysis using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Our SANS results show that scattering intensity of smaller pores (industry.

  11. Simulations of Skin Barrier Function: Free Energies of Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Transmembrane Pores in Ceramide Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Notman, Rebecca; Anwar, Jamshed; Briels, W. J.; Noro, Massimo G.; den Otter, Wouter K.

    2008-01-01

    Transmembrane pore formation is central to many biological processes such as ion transport, cell fusion, and viral infection. Furthermore, pore formation in the ceramide bilayers of the stratum corneum may be an important mechanism by which penetration enhancers such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) weaken the barrier function of the skin. We have used the potential of mean constraint force (PMCF) method to calculate the free energy of pore formation in ceramide bilayers in both the innate gel pha...

  12. Fluids in micropores. II. Self-diffusion in a simple classical fluid in a slit pore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoen, M.; Cushman, J.H.; Diestler, D.J.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Self-diffusion coefficients D are computed for a model slit pore consisting of a rare-gas fluid confined between two parallel face-centered cubic (100) planes (walls) of rigidly fixed rare-gas atoms. By means of an optimally vectorized molecular-dynamics program for the CYBER 205, the dependence of D on the thermodynamic state (specified by the chemical potential μ, temperature T, and the pore width h) of the pore fluid has been explored. Diffusion is governed by Fick's law, even in pores as narrow as 2 or 3 atomic diameters. The diffusion coefficient oscillates as a function of h with fixed μ and T, vanishing at critical values of h, where fluid--solid phase transitions occur. A shift of the pore walls relative to one another in directions parallel with the walls can radically alter the structure of the pore fluid and consequently the magnitude of D. Since the pore fluid forms distinct layers parallel to the walls, a local diffusion coefficient D/sup (//sup i//sup )//sub parallel/ associated with a given layer i can be defined. D/sup (//sup i//sup )//sub parallel/ is least for the contact layer, even for pores as wide as 30 atomic diameters (∼100 A). Moreover, D/sup (//sup i//sup )//sub parallel/ increases with increasing distance of the fluid layer from the wall and, for pore widths between 16 and 30 atomic diameters, D/sup (//sup i//sup )//sub parallel/ is larger in the center of the pore than in the bulk fluid that is in equilibrium with the pore fluid. The opposite behavior is observed in corresponding smooth-wall pores, in which the discrete fluid--wall interactions have been averaged by smearing the wall atoms over the plane of the wall

  13. An evaluation of geochemical models of bentonite pore water evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, D.; Watson, C.E.; Wilson, J.C.; Arthur, R.C.; Stroemberg, B.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The understanding of the evolution of bentonite pore water composition with time underpins many EBS issues, such as: buffer erosion; canister corrosion; radionuclide solubility, sorption, diffusion; and plays a vital, if indirect, role in safety assessment. Models of bentonite-water interactions usually consider cation exchange, clay edge surface reactions, and the hydrolysis of calcite, gypsum, and quartz. Clay hydrolysis is usually ignored, which means that clay is assumed to be preserved indefinitely, even over million-year timescales. Unfortunately, this is contrary to evidence from natural systems, which indicates that smectites may be destroyed over safety-relevant timescales. Here, we present an alternative model that incorporates clay hydrolysis reactions, and which has been tested against laboratory data where Eh and pH have been measured directly in compacted bentonite. Simulations of 'end-point' pH measurements in batch bentonite-water slurry experiments showed different pH values according to the complexity of the system studied. The most complete system investigated (clay hydrolysis + cation exchange + trace mineral solubility + clay edge reactions) revealed pH values were a strong function of CO 2 (g) partial pressure, with pH increasing with decreasing pCO 2 (log pCO 2 values from -3.5 to -7.5 bars produced pH values from 7.9 to 9.6). A slightly less complex system excluding clay mineral hydrolysis produced essentially identical pH values ranging across the same values of pCO 2 . Therefore these 'end-point' calculations showed that the inclusion of clay mineral hydrolysis has an insignificant impact upon calculated pore fluid pH. Other simulations investigating disequilibrium between clay and pore fluid in lab squeezing cell tests with water (pH = 9.0) or a 1 M NaOH solution (pH = 12.1) ignored the presence of trace minerals, clay cation exchange, and clay edge reactions in the

  14. The effect of ethylene glycol on pore arrangement of anodic aluminium oxide prepared by hard anodization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yang; Zhang, Li; Han, Mangui; Wang, Xin; Xie, Jianliang; Deng, Longjiang

    2018-03-01

    The influence of the addition of ethylene glycol (EG) on the pore self-ordering process in anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes prepared by hard anodization (HA) was investigated. It was illustrated that EG has a substantial effect on the pore arrangement of AAO, and it was found that a smaller pore size can be obtained with an EG concentration reaching 20 wt% in aqueous electrolyte. The number of estimated defects of AAO increases significantly with an increase in EG concentration to 50 wt%. Excellent ordering of pores was realized when the samples were anodized in the 30 wt%-EG-containing aqueous electrolyte.

  15. Ultrastructural aspects in perithecia hyphae septal pores of Glomerella cingulata F. SP. Phaseoli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roca M. María Gabriela

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomerella cingulata (Stonem. Spauld. & Schrenk f. sp. phaseoli, better known in its anamorphic state Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. & Magn. Briosi & Cav., is a causal agent of anthracnose in beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. Ultrastructural aspects of the perithecial hyphae of this pathogen were studied. The perithecia hyphae septal pores were found either plugged by a vesicle or unplugged. Some perithecia hyphae septa presented no pore. The Woronin bodies, close to the septal pores, appeared as globose structures which were more electron dense than the occlusions plugging the septal pore.

  16. METHODS FOR PORE WATER EXTRACTION FROM UNSATURATED ZONE TUFF, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K.M. SCOFIELD

    2006-01-01

    Assessing the performance of the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, requires an understanding of the chemistry of the water that moves through the host rock. The uniaxial compression method used to extract pore water from samples of tuffaceous borehole core was successful only for nonwelded tuff. An ultracentrifugation method was adopted to extract pore water from samples of the densely welded tuff of the proposed repository horizon. Tests were performed using both methods to determine the efficiency of pore water extraction and the potential effects on pore water chemistry. Test results indicate that uniaxial compression is most efficient for extracting pore water from nonwelded tuff, while ultracentrifugation is more successful in extracting pore water from densely welded tuff. Pore water splits taken from a single nonwelded tuff core during uniaxial compression tests have shown changes in pore water chemistry with increasing pressure for calcium, chloride, sulfate, and nitrate, while the chemistry of pore water splits from welded and nonwelded tuffs using ultracentrifugation indicates that there is no significant fractionation of solutes

  17. A multiscale approach to accelerate pore-scale simulation of porous electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weibo; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2017-04-01

    A new method to accelerate pore-scale simulation of porous electrodes is presented. The method combines the macroscopic approach with pore-scale simulation by decomposing a physical quantity into macroscopic and local variations. The multiscale method is applied to the potential equation in pore-scale simulation of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) catalyst layer, and validated with the conventional approach for pore-scale simulation. Results show that the multiscale scheme substantially reduces the computational cost without sacrificing accuracy.

  18. Pore formation during C.W.Nd: YAG laser welding of aluminum alloys for automotive applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, M.; Zhao, H.; DebRoy, T.

    2000-01-01

    Pore formation is an important concern in laser welding of automotive aluminum alloys. This paper investigates the influence of the laser beam defocusing on pore formation during continuous wave Nd:YAG laser welding of aluminum automotive alloys 5182 and 5754. It was found that the instability of the keyhole during welding was a dominant cause of pore formation while hydrogen rejection played an insignificant role. The defocusing of the laser beam greatly affected the stability of the keyhole. Finally, the mechanism of the collapse of the keyhole and pore formation is proposed. (Author) 45 refs

  19. Influence of pore structure on solute transport in degraded and undegraded fen peat soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kleimeier

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In peat soils, decomposition and degradation reduce the proportion of large pores by breaking down plant debris into smaller fragments and infilling inter-particle pore spaces. This affects water flow and solute migration which, in turn, influence reactive transport processes and biogeochemical functions. In this study we conducted flow-through reactor experiments to investigate the interplay between pore structure and solute transport in samples of undegraded and degraded peat collected in Canada and Germany, respectively. The pore size distributions and transport parameters were characterised using the breakthrough curve and two-region non-equilibrium transport model analyses for a non-reactive solute. The results of transport characterisation showed a higher fraction of immobile pores in the degraded peat with higher diffusive exchanges of solutes between the mobile and immobile pores associated with the dual-porosity structure. The rates of steady-state potential nitrate reduction were compared with pore fractions and exchange coefficients to investigate the influence of pore structure on the rates of nitrate reduction. The results indicated that the degraded peat has potential to provide the necessary boundary conditions to support nitrate removal and serves as a favourable substrate for denitrification, due to the nature of its pore structure and its lower organic carbon content compared to undegraded peat.

  20. Hierarchically templated beads with tailored pore structure for phosphopeptide capture and phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicka, Celina; Torsetnes, Silje B.; Jensen, Ole N.

    2017-01-01

    Two templating approaches to produce imprinted phosphotyrosine capture beads with a controllable pore structure are reported and compared with respect to their ability to enrich phosphopeptides from a tryptic peptide mixture. The beads were prepared by the polymerization of urea-based host monomers...... and crosslinkers inside the pores of macroporous silica beads with both free and immobilized template. In the final step the silica was removed by fluoride etching resulting in mesoporous polymer replicas with narrow pore size distributions, pore diameters ≈ 10 nm and surface area > 260 m2 g-1. The beads displayed...

  1. Pore system characteristics of the Permian transitional shale reservoir in the Lower Yangtze Region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taotao Cao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Permian shale, a set of transitional shale reservoir, is considered to be an important shale gas exploration target in the Lower Yangtze region. Due to little research conducted on the pore system characteristic and its controlling factors of the shale gas reservoir, SEM, FE-SEM, low-pressure N2 adsorption, and mercury intrusion tests were carried out on the Permian shales from the outcrop and HC well in the southern Anhui. The results show that the Permian shales mainly consist of organic matter, quartz, illite, calcite, and pyrite, of which pyrite occurs as framboids coexisting with organic matter and the organic matter is distributed in shales in stripped, interstitial, thin film and shell shapes. The basic pore types are inorganic mineral pore (intercrystalline pore, intergranular edge pore, intergranular pore, and interlayer pore in clay minerals and the organic pore and microfracture, of which organic pore and microfracture are the dominating pore types. In shale, organic pores are not developed at all in some organic grains but are well developed in others, which may be related to the types of and maceral compositions of kerogen. Under tectonic stress, shale rocks could develop mylonitization phenomenon exhibiting organic grains well blend with clay minerals, and produce a mass of microfractures and nanopores between organic matter grains and clay minerals. Mercury intrusion tests show that the shale is mainly composed of micropore and transition pore with high porosity, good pore connectivity and high efficiency of mercury withdraw, while the shale that mainly dominated by mesopore and macropore has a low porosity, poor pore connectivity, and low efficiency of the mercury withdraw. The volume percentage of mesopore and marcopore is increasing with the increase of quartz, and that of micropore and transition pore has a decreased tendency along with the increase of soluble organic matter (S1. Organic matter is the main contributor to

  2. Analysis of the effect of pore geometry in the physical properties of rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alberto Oliveira Lima Roque

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pore geometry is one of the main factors influencing the flow of reservoir fluids under pressure. Pores with narrower formats are more easily compressed when subject to pressure. Pressure modifies pore geometry by opening or closing cracks, causing increase or decrease in the elastic modulus, porosity, permeability, and other parameters. Rock physical properties depend on the size and shape of pores. Thus, in order to analyze changes on the physical properties behavior according to the pores geometry, it is necessary to study and improve mathematical models of the porous media by taking into account the pore shape factor for estimating rock elastic properties. Differential effective medium model (DEM, Hertz-Mindlin theory and coherent potential approximation (CPA are some of the theoretical paradigms that take into account pore geometry in changes in elastic moduli. Given the importance of the pore structure effect on the behavior of physical parameters, this article proposes an analysis of some mathematical models that consider the influence of pore shapes in the physical properties of rocks.

  3. Antamanide, a derivative of Amanita phalloides, is a novel inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Azzolin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antamanide is a cyclic decapeptide derived from the fungus Amanita phalloides. Here we show that antamanide inhibits the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, a central effector of cell death induction, by targeting the pore regulator cyclophilin D. Indeed, (i permeability transition pore inhibition by antamanide is not additive with the cyclophilin D-binding drug cyclosporin A, (ii the inhibitory action of antamanide on the pore requires phosphate, as previously shown for cyclosporin A; (iii antamanide is ineffective in mitochondria or cells derived from cyclophilin D null animals, and (iv abolishes CyP-D peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity. Permeability transition pore inhibition by antamanide needs two critical residues in the peptide ring, Phe6 and Phe9, and is additive with ubiquinone 0, which acts on the pore in a cyclophilin D-independent fashion. Antamanide also abrogates mitochondrial depolarization and the ensuing cell death caused by two well-characterized pore inducers, clotrimazole and a hexokinase II N-terminal peptide. Our findings have implications for the comprehension of cyclophilin D activity on the permeability transition pore and for the development of novel pore-targeting drugs exploitable as cell death inhibitors.

  4. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Kunimitsu; Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-07-21

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ∼0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point.

  5. Hydrogen Storage Properties of Rigid Three-Dimensional Hofmann Clathrate Derivatives: The Effects of Pore Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culp, J.T.; Natesakhawat, Sittichai; Smith, M.R.; Bittner, E.; Matranga, C.S.; Bockrath, B.

    2008-05-01

    The effects of pore size on the hydrogen storage properties of a series of pillared layered solids based on the M(L)[M'(CN)4] structural motif, where M ) Co or Ni, L ) pyrazine (pyz), 4,4'-bipyridine (bpy), or 4,4'-dipyridylacetylene (dpac), and M' ) Ni, Pd, or Pt, has been investigated. The compounds all possess slitlike pores with constant in-plane dimensions and similar organic functionality. The pore heights vary as a function of L and provide a means for a systematic investigation of the effects of pore dimension on hydrogen storage properties in porous materials. Hydrogen isotherms were measured at 77 and 87 K up to a pressure of 1 atm. The pyz pillared materials with the smallest pore dimensions store hydrogen at a pore density similar to that of liquid hydrogen. The adsorbed hydrogen density drops by a factor of 2 as the relative pore size is tripled in the dpac material. The decreased storage efficiency diminishes the expected gravimetric gain in capacity for the larger pore materials. The heats of adsorption were found to range from 6 to 8 kJ/mol in the series and weakly correlate with pore size.

  6. Hydrogen Storage Properties of Rigid Three-Dimensional Hofmann Clathrate Derivatives: The Effects of Pore Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culp, Jeffery T. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Natesakhawat, Sittichai [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Smith, Milton R. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Bittner, Edward [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Matranga, Christopher [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Bockrath, Bradley [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2008-05-01

    The effects of pore size on the hydrogen storage properties of a series of pillared layered solids based on the M(L)[M'(CN)(4)] structural motif, where M = Co or Ni, L = pyrazine (pyz), 4,4'-bipyridine (bpy), or 4,4'-dipyridylacetylene (dpac), and M' = Ni, Pd, or Pt, has been investigated. The compounds all possess slitlike pores with constant in-plane dimensions and similar organic functionality. The pore heights vary as a function of L and provide a means for a systematic investigation of the effects of pore dimension on hydrogen storage properties in porous materials. Hydrogen isotherms were measured at 77 and 87 K up to a pressure of 1 atm. The pyz pillared materials with the smallest pore dimensions store hydrogen at a pore density similar to that of liquid hydrogen. The adsorbed hydrogen density drops by a factor of 2 as the relative pore size is tripled in the dpac material. The decreased storage efficiency diminishes the expected gravimetric gain in capacity for the larger pore materials. The heats of adsorption were found to range from 6 to 8 kJ/mol in the series and weakly correlate with pore size.

  7. Br2 induced oxidative pore modification of a porous coordination network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Hiroyoshi; Kawano, Masaki

    2016-01-14

    Iodinated pores of a Zn-based coordination network were modified by Br2 oxidation to produce brominated pores in a polycrystalline-to-polycrystalline manner while maintaining the same network topology. Ab initio X-ray powder diffraction analysis and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the brominated pore can trap Br2 or I2 by strong σ/π-type interactions. A kinetic study in solution revealed that the pore modification by Br2 oxidation is much faster than the Br2 encapsulation process.

  8. Origin of melting point depression for rare gas solids confined in carbon pores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishige, Kunimitsu; Kataoka, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    To obtain insights into the mechanism of the melting-point depression of rare gas solids confined in crystalline carbon pores, we examined the freezing and melting behavior of Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline pores of ordered mesoporous carbons as well as compressed exfoliated graphite compared to the amorphous pores of ordered mesoporous silicas, by means of X-ray diffraction. For the Xe and Ar confined to the crystalline carbon pores, there was no appreciable thermal hysteresis between freezing and melting. Furthermore, the position of the main diffraction peak did not change appreciably on freezing and melting. This strongly suggests that the liquids confined in the carbon pores form a multilayered structure parallel to the smooth walls. For the Xe and Ar confined to the amorphous silica pores, on the other hand, the position of the main diffraction peak shifted into higher scattering angle on freezing suggested that the density of the confined solid is distinctly larger than for the confined liquid. Using compressed exfoliated graphite with carbon walls of higher crystallinity, we observed that three-dimensional (3D) microcrystals of Xe confined in the slit-shaped pores melted to leave the unmelted bilayers on the pore walls below the bulk triple point. The lattice spacing of the 3D microcrystals confined is larger by ∼0.7% than that of the bilayer next to the pore walls in the vicinity of the melting point

  9. Optimization of hybrid laser arc welding of 42CrMo steel to suppress pore formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan [Hunan University, State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body, Changsha (China); Hunan Institute of Science and Technology, College of Mechanical Engineering, Yueyang (China); Chen, Genyu; Mao, Shuai; Zhou, Cong; Chen, Fei [Hunan University, State Key Laboratory of Advanced Design and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body, Changsha (China)

    2017-06-15

    The hybrid laser arc welding (HLAW) of 42CrMo quenched and tempered steel was conducted. The effect of the processing parameters, such as the relative positions of the laser and the arc, the shielding gas flow rate, the defocusing distance, the laser power, the wire feed rate and the welding speed, on the pore formation was analyzed, the morphological characteristics of the pores were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the majority of the pores were invasive. The pores formed at the leading a laser (LA) welding process were fewer than those at the leading a arc (AL) welding process. Increasing the shielding gas flow rate could also facilitate the reduction of pores. The laser power and the welding speed were two key process parameters to reduce the pores. The flow of the molten pool, the weld cooling rate and the pore escaping rate as a result of different parameters could all affect pore formation. An ideal pore-free weld was obtained for the optimal welding process parameters. (orig.)

  10. Software for micromorphometric characterization of soil pores obtained from 2-D image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Cooper

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Studies of soil porosity through image analysis are important to an understanding of how the soil functions. However, the lack of a simplified methodology for the quantification of the shape, number, and size of soil pores has limited the use of information extracted from images. The present work proposes a software program for the quantification and characterization of soil porosity from data derived from 2-D images. The user-friendly software was developed in C++ and allows for the classification of pores in terms of size, shape, and combinations of size and shape. Using raw data generated by image analysis systems, the software calculates the following parameters for the characterization of soil porosity: total area of pore (Tap, number of pores, pore shape, pore shape and pore area, and pore shape and equivalent pore diameter (EqDiam. In this paper, the input file with the raw soil porosity data was generated using the Noesis Visilog 5.4 image analysis system; however other image analysis programs can be used, in which case, the input file requires a standard format to permit processing by this software. The software also shows the descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation, variance, and the coefficient of variation of the parameters considering the total number of images evaluated. The results show that the software is a complementary tool to any analysis of soil porosity, allowing for a precise and quick analysis.

  11. Effect of support structure on CO2 adsorption properties of pore-expanded hyperbranched aminosilicas

    KAUST Repository

    Drese, Jeffrey H.

    2012-03-01

    Hyperbranched aminosilica (HAS) CO 2 adsorbents are prepared by the ring-opening polymerization of aziridine from SBA-15 mesoporous silica, as in the original synthesis of HAS materials, as well as over an array of new support materials with substantially larger average pore diameters to elucidate the effect of support porosity on final adsorbent properties. Pore-expanded hyperbranched aminosilica (PEHAS) CO 2 adsorbents are prepared from several different pore-expanded, ordered mesoporous silicas including pore-expanded SBA-15, mesocellular foam, and a large-pore commercial silica. The effect of the nature of the silica support is determined by examining the degree of aziridine polymerization and the CO 2 adsorption kinetics and capacities of the resulting organic/inorganic hybrid materials. Comparisons are made to non-pore-expanded SBA-15 based HAS adsorbents, reported previously, where pores become blocked at higher amine loadings. The PEHAS materials unexpectedly possess lower amine loadings than the previously reported HAS materials and do not exhibit pore blocking. The use of acetic acid as a catalyst during PEHAS synthesis only marginally increases amine loading. The adsorption kinetics of PEHAS adsorbents are similar to HAS adsorbents with low amine loadings and do not show the detrimental effects of pore-blocking. However, the inability to synthesize PEHAS adsorbents with high amine loadings via this approach limits the total amount of CO 2 captured per gram of material, compared to HAS adsorbents with high amine loadings. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling Oil Recovery for Mixed Macro- and Micro-Pore Carbonate Grainstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ye; Li, Qiuzi; King, Hubert E

    2017-08-29

    In general, modeling oil-recovery is a challenging problem involving detailed fluid flow calculations with required structural details that challenge current experimental resolution. Recent laboratory experiments on mixed micro- and macro-pore suggest that there is a systematic relationship between remaining oil saturation (ROS) and the fraction of micro-pores. Working with experimental measurements of the pores obtained from X-ray tomography and mercury intrusion capillary pressure porosimetry, we define a digital rock model exemplifying the key structural elements of these carbonate grainstones. We then test two fluid-flow models: invasion percolation model and effective medium model. Although invasion percolation identifies the important impact of macro-pore percolation on permeability, it does not describe the dependence of ROS on micro-pore percentage. We thus modified the effective medium model by introducing a single-parameter descriptor, r eff . Oil from pores r ≥ r eff is fully removed, while for the remaining pores with r pore size distributions for the mixed-pore grainstones reproduces the experimental ROS dependence.

  13. Effect of pore size and interpore distance on endothelial cell growth on polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, D; Venkatraman, S S

    2008-12-01

    The endothelization of polymers using surface modification has received great attention. In particular, creation of physical surface features such as craters or pores has been an active area of research. However, there have been no reported studies of the effects of pore sizes (wide range) and interpore distance on endothelial cell growth. This report details the study done on endothelial cell attachment on the surfaces of polymers modified by porogen leaching. The polymeric system studied includes PLLA and PLGA (80/20). Factors such as porogen type, pore size, and interpore distance were varied, and the surface was evaluated for its influence on endothelial cell growth. Three groups of pore sizes were evaluated: small (5-20 mum), medium (20-45 mum), and large pores (45-90 mum). Two porogens were evaluated: sugar and gelatin. In addition to counting the attached endothelial cells, their proliferation was also quantified. Pore size and interpore distances were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and cell morphology was studied by staining with crystal violet. Analysis of variance demonstrated that the main parameters, pore size and interpore distance were significant in endothelial cell growth. In PLGA (80/20), it was found that endothelial cell growth was enhanced by smaller pore size and lower interpore distance, whereas the growth was poor on PLLA regardless of pore features. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2008.

  14. Probing numerical Laplace inversion methods for two and three-site molecular exchange between interconnected pore structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silletta, Emilia V.; Franzoni, María B.; Monti, Gustavo A.; Acosta, Rodolfo H.

    2018-01-01

    Two-dimension (2D) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance relaxometry experiments are a powerful tool extensively used to probe the interaction among different pore structures, mostly in inorganic systems. The analysis of the collected experimental data generally consists of a 2D numerical inversion of time-domain data where T2-T2 maps are generated. Through the years, different algorithms for the numerical inversion have been proposed. In this paper, two different algorithms for numerical inversion are tested and compared under different conditions of exchange dynamics; the method based on Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithm and the fast-iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm (FISTA) method. By constructing a theoretical model, the algorithms were tested for a two- and three-site porous media, varying the exchange rates parameters, the pore sizes and the signal to noise ratio. In order to test the methods under realistic experimental conditions, a challenging organic system was chosen. The molecular exchange rates of water confined in hierarchical porous polymeric networks were obtained, for a two- and three-site porous media. Data processed with the BRD method was found to be accurate only under certain conditions of the exchange parameters, while data processed with the FISTA method is precise for all the studied parameters, except when SNR conditions are extreme.

  15. Spectral Induced Polarization of Low-pH Concrete. Influence of the Electrical Double Layer and Pore Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, P. G.; Gaboreau, S.; Zimmermann, E.; Hoerdt, A.; Claret, F.; Huisman, J. A.; Tournassat, C.

    2017-12-01

    Low-pH concretes are foreseen to be used in nuclear waste disposal. Understanding their reactivity upon the considered host-rock is a key point. Evolution of mineralogy, porosity, pore size distribution and connectivity can be monitored in situ using geophysical methods such as induced polarization (IP). This electrical method consists of injecting an alternating current and measuring the resulting voltage in the porous medium. Spectral IP (SIP) measurements in the 10 mHz to 10 kHz frequency range were carried out on low-pH concrete and cement paste first in equilibrium and then in contact with a CO2 enriched and diluted water. We observed a very high resistivity of the materials (> 10 kOhm m) and a strong phase shift between injected current and measured voltage (superior to 40 mrad and above 100 mrad for frequencies > 100 Hz). These observations were modelled by considering membrane polarization with ion exclusion in nanopores whose surface electrical properties were computed using a basic Stern model of the cement/water interface. Pore size distribution was deduced from SIP and was compared to the measured ones. In addition, we observed a decrease of the material resistivity due to the dissolution of cement in contact with external water. Our results show that SIP may be a valuable method to monitor the mineralogy and the petrophysical and transport properties of cements.

  16. Probing numerical Laplace inversion methods for two and three-site molecular exchange between interconnected pore structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silletta, Emilia V; Franzoni, María B; Monti, Gustavo A; Acosta, Rodolfo H

    2018-01-01

    Two-dimension (2D) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance relaxometry experiments are a powerful tool extensively used to probe the interaction among different pore structures, mostly in inorganic systems. The analysis of the collected experimental data generally consists of a 2D numerical inversion of time-domain data where T 2 -T 2 maps are generated. Through the years, different algorithms for the numerical inversion have been proposed. In this paper, two different algorithms for numerical inversion are tested and compared under different conditions of exchange dynamics; the method based on Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithm and the fast-iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm (FISTA) method. By constructing a theoretical model, the algorithms were tested for a two- and three-site porous media, varying the exchange rates parameters, the pore sizes and the signal to noise ratio. In order to test the methods under realistic experimental conditions, a challenging organic system was chosen. The molecular exchange rates of water confined in hierarchical porous polymeric networks were obtained, for a two- and three-site porous media. Data processed with the BRD method was found to be accurate only under certain conditions of the exchange parameters, while data processed with the FISTA method is precise for all the studied parameters, except when SNR conditions are extreme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This digest document was written by members of the union of associations of ex-members and retired people of the Areva group (UARGA). It gives a comprehensive overview of the nuclear industry world, starting from radioactivity and its applications, and going on with the fuel cycle (front-end, back-end, fuel reprocessing, transports), the nuclear reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu, HTR, generation 4 systems), the effluents from nuclear facilities, the nuclear wastes (processing, disposal), and the management and safety of nuclear activities. (J.S.)

  18. Nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, Anwar

    2014-01-01

    Explains the concepts in detail and in depth. Provides step-by-step derivations. Contains numerous tables and diagrams. Supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Sketches also the historical development of the subject. This textbook explains the experimental basics, effects and theory of nuclear physics. It supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Numerous tables and diagrams help to better understand the explanations. A better feeling to the subject of the book is given with sketches about the historical development of nuclear physics. The main topics of this book include the phenomena associated with passage of charged particles and radiation through matter which are related to nuclear resonance fluorescence and the Moessbauer effect., Gamov's theory of alpha decay, Fermi theory of beta decay, electron capture and gamma decay. The discussion of general properties of nuclei covers nuclear sizes and nuclear force, nuclear spin, magnetic dipole moment and electric quadrupole moment. Nuclear instability against various modes of decay and Yukawa theory are explained. Nuclear models such as Fermi Gas Model, Shell Model, Liquid Drop Model, Collective Model and Optical Model are outlined to explain various experimental facts related to nuclear structure. Heavy ion reactions, including nuclear fusion, are explained. Nuclear fission and fusion power production is treated elaborately.

  19. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The committee concludes that the nature of the proliferation problem is such that even stopping nuclear power completely could not stop proliferation completely. Countries can acquire nuclear weapons by means independent of commercial nuclear power. It is reasonable to suppose if a country is strongly motivated to acquire nuclear weapons, it will have them by 2010, or soon thereafter, no matter how nuclear power is managed in the meantime. Unilateral and international diplomatic measures to reduce the motivations that lead to proliferation should be high on the foreign policy agenda of the United States. A mimimum antiproliferation prescription for the management of nuclear power is to try to raise the political barriers against proliferation through misuse of nuclear power by strengthening the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and to seek to raise the technological barriers by placing fuel-cycle operations involving weapons-usable material under international control. Any such measures should be considered tactics to slow the spread of nuclear weapons and thus earn time for the exercise of statesmanship. The committee concludes the following about technical factors that should be considered in formulating nuclear policy: (1) rate of growth of electricity use is a primary factor; (2) growth of conventional nuclear power will be limited by producibility of domestic uranium sources; (3) greater contribution of nuclear power beyond 400 GWe past the year 2000 can only be supported by advanced reactor systems; and (4) several different breeder reactors could serve in principle as candidates for an indefinitely sustainable source of energy

  20. Nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadeniz, O.; Guenalp, G.

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses the methodology of nuclear forensics and illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. Nuclear forensics is relatively new scientific branch whose aim it is to read out material inherent from nuclear material. Nuclear forensics investigations have to be considered as part of a comprehensive set of measures for detection,interception, categorization and characterization of illicitly trafficking nuclear material. Prevention, detection and response are the main elements in combating illicit trafficking. Forensics is a key element in the response process. Forensic science is defined as the application of a broad spectrum of sciences to answer questions of interest to the legal system. Besides, in this study we will explain age determination of nuclear materials.

  1. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangwani, Saloni; Chakrabortty, Sumita

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fuel is a material that can be consumed to derive nuclear energy, by analogy to chemical fuel that is burned for energy. Nuclear fuels are the most dense sources of energy available. Nuclear fuel in a nuclear fuel cycle can refer to the fuel itself, or to physical objects (for example bundles composed of fuel rods) composed of the fuel material, mixed with structural, neutron moderating, or neutron reflecting materials. Long-lived radioactive waste from the back end of the fuel cycle is especially relevant when designing a complete waste management plan for SNF. When looking at long-term radioactive decay, the actinides in the SNF have a significant influence due to their characteristically long half-lives. Depending on what a nuclear reactor is fueled with, the actinide composition in the SNF will be different. The following paper will also include the uses. advancements, advantages, disadvantages, various processes and behavior of nuclear fuels

  2. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors. (Auth.)

  3. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors

  4. Integrating SANS and fluid-invasion methods to characterize pore structure of typical American shale oil reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Jin, Zhijun; Hu, Qinhong; Jin, Zhenkui; Barber, Troy J; Zhang, Yuxiang; Bleuel, Markus

    2017-11-13

    An integration of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), low-pressure N 2 physisorption (LPNP), and mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) methods was employed to study the pore structure of four oil shale samples from leading Niobrara, Wolfcamp, Bakken, and Utica Formations in USA. Porosity values obtained from SANS are higher than those from two fluid-invasion methods, due to the ability of neutrons to probe pore spaces inaccessible to N 2 and mercury. However, SANS and LPNP methods exhibit a similar pore-size distribution, and both methods (in measuring total pore volume) show different results of porosity and pore-size distribution obtained from the MICP method (quantifying pore throats). Multi-scale (five pore-diameter intervals) inaccessible porosity to N 2 was determined using SANS and LPNP data. Overall, a large value of inaccessible porosity occurs at pore diameters pores in these shales. While each method probes a unique aspect of complex pore structure of shale, the discrepancy between pore structure results from different methods is explained with respect to their difference in measurable ranges of pore diameter, pore space, pore type, sample size and associated pore connectivity, as well as theoretical base and interpretation.

  5. Nuclear renaissance and nuclear nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuno, Yusuke

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy would grow in response to climate change and the need for a stable energy supply even in an unstable global non-proliferation regime. Some emerging countries probably will try to acquire nuclear fuel cycle as a part of the peaceful use of nuclear energy. How to avoid the risk of proliferation of sensitive technologies is a crucial challenge for the international community. This paper describes the direction to peaceful use of nuclear technology, particularly nuclear fuel cycle, with appropriate non-proliferation measures. (author)

  6. Nuclear blackmail and nuclear balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    This book raises pointed questions about nuclear saber rattling. More than a dozen cases since the bombing of Hiroshima and Magasaki in which some sort of nuclear threat was used as a sparring technique in tense confrontations are cited. Each incident is described and analyzed. Two theories offered to explain America's use of nuclear threats, the balance of interest theory and the balance of power theory, are contrasted throughout the book. This book helps to fill the gap in the understanding of nuclear weapons and their uses, while pointing out that nuclear bravado could lead to an unintended unleashing of these weapons

  7. Experimental evidence of the role of pores on movement and distribution of bacteria in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Alexandra N.; Rose, Joan B.; Marsh, Terence L.; Guber, Andrey K.

    2014-05-01

    It has been generally recognized that micro-scale heterogeneity in soil environments can have a substantial effect on movement, fate, and survival of soil microorganisms. However, only recently the development of tools for micro-scale soil analyses, including X-ray computed micro-tomography (μ-CT), enabled quantitative analyses of these effects. The long-term goal of our work is to explore how differences in micro-scale characteristics of pore structures influence movement, spatial distribution patterns, and activities of soil microorganisms. Using X-ray μ-CT we found that differences in land use and management practices lead to development of contrasting patterns in pore size-distributions within intact soil aggregates. Then our experiments with Escherichia coli added to intact soil aggregates demonstrated that the differences in pore structures can lead to substantial differences in bacteria redistribution and movement within the aggregates. Specifically, we observed more uniform E.coli redistribution in aggregates with homogeneously spread pores, while heterogeneous pore structures resulted in heterogeneous E.coli patterns. Water flow driven by capillary forces through intact aggregate pores appeared to be the main contributor to the movement patterns of the introduced bacteria. Influence of pore structure on E.coli distribution within the aggregates further continued after the aggregates were subjected to saturated water flow. E. coli's resumed movement with saturated water flow and subsequent redistribution within the soil matrix was influenced by porosity, abundance of medium and large pores, pore tortuosity, and flow rates, indicating that greater flow accompanied by less convoluted pores facilitated E. coli transport within the intra-aggregate space. We also found that intra-aggregate heterogeneity of pore structures can have an effect on spatial distribution patterns of indigenous microbial populations. Preliminary analysis showed that in aggregates from

  8. Geometry-driven cell organization determines tissue growths in scaffold pores: consequences for fibronectin organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Joly

    Full Text Available To heal tissue defects, cells have to bridge gaps and generate new extracellular matrix (ECM. Macroporous scaffolds are frequently used to support the process of defect filling and thus foster tissue regeneration. Such biomaterials contain micro-voids (pores that the cells fill with their own ECM over time. There is only limited knowledge on how pore geometry influences cell organization and matrix production, even though it is highly relevant for scaffold design. This study hypothesized that 1 a simple geometric description predicts cellular organization during pore filling at the cell level and that 2 pore closure results in a reorganization of ECM. Scaffolds with a broad distribution of pore sizes (macroporous starPEG-heparin cryogel were used as a model system and seeded with primary fibroblasts. The strategies of cells to fill pores could be explained by a simple geometrical model considering cells as tensioned chords. The model matched qualitatively as well as quantitatively by means of cell number vs. open cross-sectional area for all pore sizes. The correlation between ECM location and cell position was higher when the pores were not filled with tissue (Pearson's coefficient ρ = 0.45±0.01 and reduced once the pores were closed (ρ = 0.26±0.04 indicating a reorganization of the cell/ECM network. Scaffold pore size directed the time required for pore closure and furthermore impacted the organization of the fibronectin matrix. Understanding how cells fill micro-voids will help to design biomaterial scaffolds that support the endogenous healing process and thus allow a fast filling of tissue defects.

  9. Silver Nanoparticle Transport Through Soil: Illuminating the Pore-Scale Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, I. L.; Willson, C. S.; Gerhard, J.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    For nanoparticle transport through soil, the pore-scale (i.e., tens to hundreds of grains and pores) is a crucial intermediate scale which links nanoparticle-surface interactions with field-scale transport behaviour. However, very little information exists on how nanoparticles behave within real three-dimensional pore spaces. As a result, pore-scale processes are poorly characterized for nanoparticle systems and, subsequently, continuum-scale transport models struggle to describe commonly observed 'anomalous' behaviour such as extended tailing. This knowledge gap is due to two primary factors: an inability to experimentally observe nanoparticles within real pore spaces, and the computationally expensive models required to simulate nanoparticle movement. However, due to recent advances in Synchrotron X-Ray Computed Microtomography (SXCMT), it is now possible to quantify in-situ pore-scale nanoparticle concentrations during transport through real 3-dimensional porous media [1]. Employing this SXCMT quantification method to examine real nanoparticle/soil transport experiments has yielded new insights into the pore-scale processes governing nanoparticle transport. By coupling SXCMT nanoparticle quantification method with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations we are able to construct a better picture of how nanoparticles flow through real pore spaces. This talk presents SXCMT/CFD analyses of three silver nanoparticle transport experiments. Silver nanoparticles were flushed through three different sands to characterize the influence of grain distribution and retention rates on pore-scale flow and transport processes. These CFD/SXCMT analyses illuminate how processes such as temporary hydraulic retention govern nanoparticle transport. In addition, the observed distributions of pore water velocities and nanoparticle mass flow rates challenge the standard conceptual model of nanoparticle transport, suggesting that pore-scale processes require explicit consideration

  10. Pore-to-Darcy Scale Hybrid Multiscale Finite Volume Model for Reactive Flow and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-Solano, D. A.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    In the present work we develop a hybrid scheme for the coupling and temporal integration of grid-based, continuum models for pore-scale and Darcy-scale flow and reactive transport. The hybrid coupling strategy consists on applying Darcy-scale and pore-scale flow and reactive transport models over overlapping subdomains Ω C and Ω F, and enforcing continuity of state and fluxes by means of restriction and prolongation operations defined over the overlap subdomain Ω hs ≡ Ω C \\cap Ω F. For the pore-scale model, we use a Multiscale Finite Volume (MsFV) characterization of the pore-scale state in terms of Darcy-scale degrees of freedom and local functions defined as the solution of pore-scale problems. The hybrid MsFV coupling results in a local-global combination of effective mass balance relations for the Darcy-scale degrees of freedom and local problems for the pore-scale degrees of freedom that capture pore-scale behavior. Our scheme allows for the rapid coarsening of pore-scale models and the adaptive enrichment of Darcy-scale models with pore-scale information. Additionally, we propose a strategy for modeling the dynamics of the pore-scale solid-liquid boundary due to precipitation and dissolution phenomena, based on the Diffuse Domain method (DDM), which is incorporated into the MsFV approximation of pore-scale states. We apply the proposed hybrid scheme to a reactive flow and transport problem in porous media subject to heterogeneous reactions and the corresponding precipitation and dissolution phenomena.

  11. Modulation of Asymmetric Flux in Heterotypic Gap Junctions by Pore Shape, Particle Size and Charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Abhijit; Sachse, Frank B; Moreno, Alonso P

    2017-01-01

    Gap junction channels play a vital role in intercellular communication by connecting cytoplasm of adjoined cells through arrays of channel-pores formed at the common membrane junction. Their structure and properties vary depending on the connexin isoform(s) involved in forming the full gap junction channel. Lack of information on the molecular structure of gap junction channels has limited the development of computational tools for single channel studies. Currently, we rely on cumbersome experimental techniques that have limited capabilities. We have earlier reported a simplified Brownian dynamics gap junction pore model and demonstrated that variations in pore shape at the single channel level can explain some of the differences in permeability of heterotypic channels observed in in vitro experiments. Based on this computational model, we designed simulations to study the influence of pore shape, particle size and charge in homotypic and heterotypic pores. We simulated dye diffusion under whole cell voltage clamping. Our simulation studies with pore shape variations revealed a pore shape with maximal flux asymmetry in a heterotypic pore. We identified pore shape profiles that match the in silico flux asymmetry results to the in vitro results of homotypic and heterotypic gap junction formed out of Cx43 and Cx45. Our simulation results indicate that the channel's pore-shape established flux asymmetry and that flux asymmetry is primarily regulated by the sizes of the conical and/or cylindrical mouths at each end of the pore. Within the set range of particle size and charge, flux asymmetry was found to be independent of particle size and directly proportional to charge magnitude. While particle charge was vital to creating flux asymmetry, charge magnitude only scaled the observed flux asymmetry. Our studies identified the key factors that help predict asymmetry. Finally, we suggest the role of such flux asymmetry in creating concentration imbalances of messenger

  12. Ångstrom-size exocytotic fusion pore: Implications for pituitary hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreft, Marko; Jorgačevski, Jernej; Stenovec, Matjaž; Zorec, Robert

    2018-03-05

    In the past, vesicle content release was thought to occur immediately and completely after triggering of exocytosis. However, vesicles may merge with the plasma membrane to form an Ångstrom diameter fusion pore that prevents the exit of secretions from the vesicle lumen. The advantage of such a narrow pore is to minimize the delay between the trigger and the release. Instead of stimulating a sequence of processes, leading to vesicle merger with the plasma membrane and a formation of a fusion pore, the stimulus only widens the pre-established fusion pore. The fusion pore may be stable and may exhibit repetitive opening of the vesicle lumen to the cell exterior accompanied by a content discharge. Such release of vesicle content is partial (subquantal), and depends on fusion pore open time, diameter and the diffusibility of the cargo. Such transient mode of fusion pore opening was not confirmed until the development of the membrane capacitance patch-clamp technique, which enables high-resolution measurement of changes in membrane surface area. It allows millisecond dwell-time measurements of fusion pores with subnanometer diameters. Currently, the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins are considered to be key entities in end-stage exocytosis, and the SNARE complex assembly/disassembly may regulate the fusion pore. Moreover, lipids or other membrane constituents with anisotropic (non-axisymmetric) geometry may also favour the establishment of stable narrow fusion pores, if positioned in the neck of the fusion pore. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nuclear energy and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.L.

    1983-06-01

    We all want to prevent the use of nuclear weapons. The issue before us is how best to achieve this objective; more specifically, whether the peaceful applications of nuclear energy help or hinder, and to what extent. Many of us in the nuclear industry are working on these applications from a conviction that without peaceful nuclear energy the risk of nuclear war would be appreciably greater. Others, however, hold the opposite view. In discussing the subject, a necessary step in allaying fears is understanding some facts, and indeed facing up to some unpalatable facts. When the facts are assessed, and a balance struck, the conclusion is that peaceful nuclear energy is much more part of the solution to preventing nuclear war than it is part of the problem

  14. Nuclear envelope remnants: fluid membranes enriched in sterols and polyphosphoinositides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Garnier-Lhomme

    Full Text Available The cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells is a highly dynamic compartment where membranes readily undergo fission and fusion to reorganize the cytoplasmic architecture, and to import, export and transport various cargos within the cell. The double membrane of the nuclear envelope that surrounds the nucleus, segregates the chromosomes from cytoplasm and regulates nucleocytoplasmic transport through pores. Many details of its formation are still unclear. At fertilization the sperm devoid of nuclear envelope pores enters the egg. Although most of the sperm nuclear envelope disassembles, remnants of the envelope at the acrosomal and centriolar fossae do not and are subsequently incorporated into the newly forming male pronuclear envelope. Remnants are conserved from annelid to mammalian sperm.Using lipid mass spectrometry and a new application of deuterium solid-state NMR spectroscopy we have characterized the lipid composition and membrane dynamics of the sperm nuclear envelope remnants in isolated sperm nuclei.We report nuclear envelope remnants are relatively fluid membranes rich in sterols, devoid of sphingomyelin, and highly enriched in polyphosphoinositides and polyunsaturated phospholipids. The localization of the polybasic effector domain of MARCKS illustrates the non-nuclear aspect of the polyphosphoinositides. Based on their atypical biophysical characteristics and phospholipid composition, we suggest a possible role for nuclear envelope remnants in membrane fusion leading to nuclear envelope assembly.

  15. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, P.

    1990-01-01

    Written from the basis of neutrality, neither for nor against nuclear power this book considers whether there are special features of nuclear power which mean that its development should be either promoted or restrained by the State. The author makes it dear that there are no easy answers to the questions raised by the intervention of nuclear power but calls for openness in the nuclear decision making process. First, the need for energy is considered; most people agree that energy is the power to progress. Then the historicalzed background to the current position of nuclear power is given. Further chapters consider the fuel cycle, environmental impacts including carbon dioxide emission and the greenhouse effect, the costs, safety and risks and waste disposal. No conclusion either for or against nuclear power is made. The various shades of opinion are outlined and the arguments presented so that readers can come to their own conclusions. (UK)

  16. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, Arthur.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter of the final report of the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning in Ontario updates its interim report on nuclear power in Ontario (1978) in the light of the Three Mile Island accident and presents the commission's general conclusions and recommendations relating to nuclear power. The risks of nuclear power, reactor safety with special reference to Three Mile Island and incidents at the Bruce generating station, the environmental effects of uranium mining and milling, waste management, nuclear power economics, uranium supplies, socio-political issues, and the regulation of nuclear power are discussed. Specific recommendations are made concerning the organization and public control of Ontario Hydro, but the commission concluded that nuclear power is acceptable in Ontario as long as satisfactory progress is made in the disposal of uranium mill tailings and spent fuel wastes. (LL)

  17. The effect of pore fluid chemistry on strength and stress-strain behaviour of light and dense backfill materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man, A.; Priyanto, D.; Siemens, G.; Blatz, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Canada's Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is investigating various concepts for isolation of Canada's used reactor fuel. These concepts include the In-floor Borehole (IFB), In-room and Horizontal Borehole geometries and geological environments being considered include crystalline bedrock of the Canadian Shield and low permeability sedimentary rocks such as limestone and shale. Regardless of geometry or geological environment, all options being considered will employ multiple clay-based barriers that include Highly Compacted Bentonite (HCB), Dense Backfill (DBF), Light Backfill (LBF), and Gap fill (GF). These materials will be initially placed in a repository in an unsaturated state, and will eventually become saturated with groundwater from the local geological environment. In both geological environments, the potential exists for the sealing materials to become saturated with high salinity groundwater. Quantitatively, the impact of high salinity on the strength and deformation performance of clay-based barriers is poorly understood although salinity is known to significantly affect the strength, compressibility, and hydraulic conductivity of clay-based barriers due to the suppression of the diffuse double layer. Understanding these potential changes in material properties is important in order to predict the overall performance of the clay barriers throughout the evolution of the system. This paper presents the results of a series of triaxial and one-dimensional oedometer tests conducted on LBF and DBF under various pore fluid conditions. Triaxial tests included isotropically consolidated drained (CID) and undrained (CIU-bar) tests. Testing was conducted collaboratively at the geotechnical laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), the University of Manitoba (U of M) and the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC). The LBF and DBF materials used in this testing programme were

  18. Periodic mesoporous organosilicas consisting of 3d hexagonally ordered interconnected globular pores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vercaemst, C.; Friedrich, H.; de Jongh, P.E.; Neimark, A.V.; Goderis, B.; Verpoort, F.; van der Voort, P.

    2009-01-01

    A new family of periodic mesoporous organosilicas with 100% E-configured ethenylene-bridges and controllable pore systems is presented. 2D hexagonally ordered hybrid nanocomposites consisting of cylindrical pores are obtained, of which some are filled with solid material. The architectural

  19. Pore-network modeling of solute transport and biofilm growth in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, Chao Zhong; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a pore-network (PN) model for solute transport and biofilm growth in porous media was developed. Compared to previous studies of biofilm growth, it has two new features. First, the constructed pore network gives a better representation of a porous medium. Second, instead of using a

  20. Effect of pore size on gas resistance of nanofiber membrane by the bubble electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Jing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the influence of pore size on gas resistance by comparing micron non-woven and nanofiber membrane. The result shows that membrane with a higher filtration and lower gas resistance can be received by controlling the pore size of nanofiber membrane.