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Sample records for nuclear polya polymerase

  1. Canonical Poly(A Polymerase Activity Promotes the Decay of a Wide Variety of Mammalian Nuclear RNAs.

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    Stefan M Bresson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human nuclear poly(A-binding protein PABPN1 has been implicated in the decay of nuclear noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs. In addition, PABPN1 promotes hyperadenylation by stimulating poly(A-polymerases (PAPα/γ, but this activity has not previously been linked to the decay of endogenous transcripts. Moreover, the mechanisms underlying target specificity have remained elusive. Here, we inactivated PAP-dependent hyperadenylation in cells by two independent mechanisms and used an RNA-seq approach to identify endogenous targets. We observed the upregulation of various ncRNAs, including snoRNA host genes, primary miRNA transcripts, and promoter upstream antisense RNAs, confirming that hyperadenylation is broadly required for the degradation of PABPN1-targets. In addition, we found that mRNAs with retained introns are susceptible to PABPN1 and PAPα/γ-mediated decay (PPD. Transcripts are targeted for degradation due to inefficient export, which is a consequence of reduced intron number or incomplete splicing. Additional investigation showed that a genetically-encoded poly(A tail is sufficient to drive decay, suggesting that degradation occurs independently of the canonical cleavage and polyadenylation reaction. Surprisingly, treatment with transcription inhibitors uncouples polyadenylation from decay, leading to runaway hyperadenylation of nuclear decay targets. We conclude that PPD is an important mammalian nuclear RNA decay pathway for the removal of poorly spliced and nuclear-retained transcripts.

  2. Characterization of genes encoding poly(A polymerases in plants: evidence for duplication and functional specialization.

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    Lisa R Meeks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poly(A polymerase is a key enzyme in the machinery that mediates mRNA 3' end formation in eukaryotes. In plants, poly(A polymerases are encoded by modest gene families. To better understand this multiplicity of genes, poly(A polymerase-encoding genes from several other plants, as well as from Selaginella, Physcomitrella, and Chlamydomonas, were studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using bioinformatics tools, poly(A polymerase-encoding genes were identified in the genomes of eight species in the plant lineage. Whereas Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was found to possess a single poly(A polymerase gene, other species possessed between two and six possible poly(A polymerase genes. With the exception of four intron-lacking genes, all of the plant poly(A polymerase genes (but not the C. reinhardtii gene possessed almost identical intron positions within the poly(A polymerase coding sequences, suggesting that all plant poly(A polymerase genes derive from a single ancestral gene. The four Arabidopsis poly(A polymerase genes were found to be essential, based on genetic analysis of T-DNA insertion mutants. GFP fusion proteins containing three of the four Arabidopsis poly(A polymerases localized to the nucleus, while one such fusion protein was localized in the cytoplasm. The fact that this latter protein is largely pollen-specific suggests that it has important roles in male gametogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that poly(A polymerase genes have expanded from a single ancestral gene by a series of duplication events during the evolution of higher plants, and that individual members have undergone sorts of functional specialization so as to render them essential for plant growth and development. Perhaps the most interesting of the plant poly(A polymerases is a novel cytoplasmic poly(A polymerase that is expressed in pollen in Arabidopsis; this is reminiscent of spermatocyte-specific cytoplasmic poly(A polymerases in

  3. A new yeast poly(A polymerase complex involved in RNA quality control.

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    Stepánka Vanácová

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells contain several unconventional poly(A polymerases in addition to the canonical enzymes responsible for the synthesis of poly(A tails of nuclear messenger RNA precursors. The yeast protein Trf4p has been implicated in a quality control pathway that leads to the polyadenylation and subsequent exosome-mediated degradation of hypomethylated initiator tRNAMet (tRNAiMet. Here we show that Trf4p is the catalytic subunit of a new poly(A polymerase complex that contains Air1p or Air2p as potential RNA-binding subunits, as well as the putative RNA helicase Mtr4p. Comparison of native tRNAiMet with its in vitro transcribed unmodified counterpart revealed that the unmodified RNA was preferentially polyadenylated by affinity-purified Trf4 complex from yeast, as well as by complexes reconstituted from recombinant components. These results and additional experiments with other tRNA substrates suggested that the Trf4 complex can discriminate between native tRNAs and molecules that are incorrectly folded. Moreover, the polyadenylation activity of the Trf4 complex stimulated the degradation of unmodified tRNAiMet by nuclear exosome fractions in vitro. Degradation was most efficient when coupled to the polyadenylation activity of the Trf4 complex, indicating that the poly(A tails serve as signals for the recruitment of the exosome. This polyadenylation-mediated RNA surveillance resembles the role of polyadenylation in bacterial RNA turnover.

  4. A New Yeast Poly(A Polymerase Complex Involved in RNA Quality Control

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    Vanácová Stepánka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells contain several unconventional poly(A polymerases in addition to the canonical enzymes responsible for the synthesis of poly(A tails of nuclear messenger RNA precursors. The yeast protein Trf4p has been implicated in a quality control pathway that leads to the polyadenylation and subsequent exosome-mediated degradation of hypomethylated initiator tRNAMet (tRNAiMet. Here we show that Trf4p is the catalytic subunit of a new poly(A polymerase complex that contains Air1p or Air2p as potential RNA-binding subunits, as well as the putative RNA helicase Mtr4p. Comparison of native tRNAiMet with its in vitro transcribed unmodified counterpart revealed that the unmodified RNA was preferentially polyadenylated by affinity-purified Trf4 complex from yeast, as well as by complexes reconstituted from recombinant components. These results and additional experiments with other tRNA substrates suggested that the Trf4 complex can discriminate between native tRNAs and molecules that are incorrectly folded. Moreover, the polyadenylation activity of the Trf4 complex stimulated the degradation of unmodified tRNAiMet by nuclear exosome fractions in vitro. Degradation was most efficient when coupled to the polyadenylation activity of the Trf4 complex, indicating that the poly(A tails serve as signals for the recruitment of the exosome. This polyadenylation-mediated RNA surveillance resembles the role of polyadenylation in bacterial RNA turnover.

  5. A novel nuclear-encoded mitochondrial poly(A polymerase PAPD1 is a potential candidate gene for the extreme obesity related phenotypes in mammals

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    Qianjun Xiao, Xiao-Lin Wu, Jennifer J. Michal, Jerry J. Reeves, Jan R. Busboom, Gary H. Thorgaard, Zhihua Jiang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available People with obesity, especially extreme obesity, are at risk for many health problems. However, the responsible genes remain unknown in >95% of severe obesity cases. Our previous genome-wide scan of Wagyu x Limousin F2 cattle crosses with extreme phenotypes revealed a molecular marker significantly associated with intramuscular fat deposition. Characterization of this marker showed that it is orthologous to the human gene KIAA1462 located on HSA10p11.23, where a major quantitative trait locus for morbid obesity has been reported. The newly identified mitochondrial poly(A polymerase associated domain containing 1 (PAPD1 gene, which is located near this marker, is particularly interesting because the polymerase is required for the polyadenylation and stabilization of mammalian mitochondrial mRNAs. In the present study, both cDNA and genomic DNA sequences were annotated for the bovine PAPD1 gene and ten genetic markers were detected in the promoter and exon 1 region. Among seven markers assayed on ~ 250 Wagyu x Limousin F2 animals, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the promoter region were significantly associated with intramuscular fat (P<0.05. However, there was a significant interaction (P<0.05 between a third SNP, which causes an amino acid change in coding exon 1, and each of these two promoter SNPs on intramuscular fat deposition. In particular, the differences between double heterozygous animals at two polymorphic sites and the slim genotype animals exceeded 2.3 standard deviations for the trait in both cases. Our study provides evidence for a new mechanism – the involvement of compound heterosis in extreme obesity, which warrants further examination.

  6. The cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerases GLD-2 and GLD-4 promote general gene expression via distinct mechanisms

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    Nousch, M.; Yeroslaviz, A.; Habermann, B; Eckmann, C

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional gene regulation mechanisms decide on cellular mRNA activities. Essential gatekeepers of post-transcriptional mRNA regulation are broadly conserved mRNA-modifying enzymes, such as cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerases (cytoPAPs). Although these non-canonical nucleotidyltransferases efficiently elongate mRNA poly(A) tails in artificial tethering assays, we still know little about their global impact on poly(A) metabolism and their individual molecular roles in promoting protein p...

  7. Endosymbiont gene functions impaired and rescued by polymerase infidelity at poly(A) tracts

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    Tamas, Ivica; Wernegreen, Jennifer J.; Nystedt, Björn; Kauppinen, Seth N.; Darby, Alistair C.; Gomez-Valero, Laura; Lundin, Daniel; Poole, Anthony M.; Andersson, Siv G. E.

    2008-01-01

    Among host-dependent bacteria that have evolved by extreme reductive genome evolution, long-term bacterial endosymbionts of insects have the smallest (160–790 kb) and most A + T-rich (>70%) bacterial genomes known to date. These genomes are riddled with poly(A) tracts, and 5–50% of genes contain tracts of 10 As or more. Here, we demonstrate transcriptional slippage at poly(A) tracts within genes of Buchnera aphidicola associated with aphids and Blochmannia pennsylvanicus associated with ants. Several tracts contain single frameshift deletions; these apparent pseudogenes showed patterns of constraint consistent with purifying selection on the encoded proteins. Transcriptional slippage yielded a heterogeneous population of transcripts with variable numbers of As in the tract. Across several frameshifted genes, including B. aphidicola cell wall biosynthesis genes and a B. pennsylvanicus histidine biosynthesis gene, 12–50% of transcripts contained corrected reading frames that could potentially yield full-length proteins. In situ immunostaining confirmed the production of the cell wall biosynthetic enzyme UDP-N-acetylmuramyl pentapeptide synthase encoded by the frameshifted murF gene. Simulation studies indicated an overrepresentation of poly(A) tracts in endosymbiont genomes relative to other A + T-rich bacterial genomes. Polymerase infidelity at poly(A) tracts rescues the functionality of genes with frameshift mutations and, conversely, reduces the efficiency of expression for in-frame genes carrying poly(A) regions. These features of homopolymeric tracts could be exploited to manipulate gene expression in small synthetic genomes. PMID:18815381

  8. Poly(A) binding proteins located at the inner surface of resealed nuclear envelopes.

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    Prochnow, D; Riedel, N; Agutter, P S; Fasold, H

    1990-04-25

    We have used a photoreactive cross-linking reagent, poly(A/8-N3-A) (a poly(A) of average molecular mass of 100 kDa in which 5-10% of the A residues are replaced by 8-N3-A), to label poly(A) binding proteins of rat liver nuclear envelopes. This reagent was prepared by polymerizing a mixture of ADP and 8-N3-ADP with polynucleotide phosphorylase. The purified poly(A) was labeled in the 5'-position with a 32P group. In nuclear envelopes prepared by a low salt DNase I procedure, the poly(A/8-N3-A) labeled a protein-nucleic acid complex of approximately 270 kDa, which on degradation with RNase U2 or NaOH at pH 10 yielded two polypeptides of approximately 50 and 30 kDa. These photoreaction products were markedly decreased when resealed nuclear envelopes or non-nuclear envelope proteins were irradiated in the presence of poly(A/8-N3-A). The affinity labeling was intensified when resealed vesicles were made leaky by freezing or ultrasonication, suggesting that the poly(A) binding proteins are accessible from the nucleoplasmic but not the cytoplasmic face of the envelope. Moreover binding was specific for poly(A). Alternative reagents, random poly(A/8-N3-A,C,G,U) of about 100 kDa and poly(dA) (molecular mass between 350 and 515 kDa), showed a very low affinity for poly(A) recognition proteins in the low salt DNase I-treated nuclear envelopes; the 270-kDa band was labeled only weakly. The binding site was not protected by poly(A,C,G,U), weakly by poly(dA), and distinctly by poly(A).

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel isoform of the non-canonical poly(A) polymerase PAPD7

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    Ogami, Koichi; Cho, Rihe [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Hoshino, Shin-ichi, E-mail: hoshino@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► So far, only an enzymatically inactive isoform of PAPD7 was reported. ► The novel isoform: PAPD7 l shows robust nucleotidyl transferase activity. ► The newly identified amino terminal region is required for the activity. ► PAPD7 l localizes to the nucleoplasm. ► The N terminal region identified is also required for the nuclear localization. - Abstract: Non-canonical poly(A) polymerases (ncPAPs) catalyze the addition of poly(A) tail to the 3′ end of RNA to play pivotal roles in the regulation of gene expression and also in quality control. Here we identified a novel isoform of the 7th member of ncPAPs: PAPD7 (PAPD7 l), which contains 230 extra amino acids at the amino terminus of the previously identified PAPD7 (PAPD7 s). In sharp contrast to the inactive PAPD7 s, PAPD7 l showed robust nucleotidyl transferase activity when tethered to an RNA. A region required for the activity was localized to 187–219 aa, and this region was also required for the nuclear retention of PAPD7 l. Western blot analysis revealed that 94 kDa band (corresponding to PAPD7 l) but not 62 kDa band (corresponding to PAPD7 s) detected by PAPD7 antibody was specifically depleted by treatment with PAPD7 siRNA in both HeLa and U2OS cells. These results suggest that PAPD7 l is the major and active isoform of PAPD7 expressed in cells.

  10. Structural Basis for Dimerization and Activity of Human PAPD1 a Noncanonical Poly(A) Polymerase

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    Y Bai; S Srivastava; J Chang; J Manley; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Poly(A) polymerases (PAPs) are found in most living organisms and have important roles in RNA function and metabolism. Here, we report the crystal structure of human PAPD1, a noncanonical PAP that can polyadenylate RNAs in the mitochondria (also known as mtPAP) and oligouridylate histone mRNAs (TUTase1). The overall structure of the palm and fingers domains is similar to that in the canonical PAPs. The active site is located at the interface between the two domains, with a large pocket that can accommodate the substrates. The structure reveals the presence of a previously unrecognized domain in the N-terminal region of PAPD1, with a backbone fold that is similar to that of RNP-type RNA binding domains. This domain (named the RL domain), together with a {beta}-arm insertion in the palm domain, contributes to dimerization of PAPD1. Surprisingly, our mutagenesis and biochemical studies show that dimerization is required for the catalytic activity of PAPD1.

  11. The cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerases GLD-2 and GLD-4 promote general gene expression via distinct mechanisms.

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    Nousch, Marco; Yeroslaviz, Assa; Habermann, Bianca; Eckmann, Christian R

    2014-10-01

    Post-transcriptional gene regulation mechanisms decide on cellular mRNA activities. Essential gatekeepers of post-transcriptional mRNA regulation are broadly conserved mRNA-modifying enzymes, such as cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerases (cytoPAPs). Although these non-canonical nucleotidyltransferases efficiently elongate mRNA poly(A) tails in artificial tethering assays, we still know little about their global impact on poly(A) metabolism and their individual molecular roles in promoting protein production in organisms. Here, we use the animal model Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the global mechanisms of two germline-enriched cytoPAPs, GLD-2 and GLD-4, by combining polysome profiling with RNA sequencing. Our analyses suggest that GLD-2 activity mediates mRNA stability of many translationally repressed mRNAs. This correlates with a general shortening of long poly(A) tails in gld-2-compromised animals, suggesting that most if not all targets are stabilized via robust GLD-2-mediated polyadenylation. By contrast, only mild polyadenylation defects are found in gld-4-compromised animals and few mRNAs change in abundance. Interestingly, we detect a reduced number of polysomes in gld-4 mutants and GLD-4 protein co-sediments with polysomes, which together suggest that GLD-4 might stimulate or maintain translation directly. Our combined data show that distinct cytoPAPs employ different RNA-regulatory mechanisms to promote gene expression, offering new insights into translational activation of mRNAs.

  12. The 25 kDa subunit of cleavage factor Im Is a RNA-binding protein that interacts with the poly(A polymerase in Entamoeba histolytica.

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    Marisol Pezet-Valdez

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, polyadenylation of pre-mRNA 3' end is essential for mRNA export, stability and translation. Taking advantage of the knowledge of genomic sequences of Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, we previously reported the putative polyadenylation machinery of this parasite. Here, we focused on the predicted protein that has the molecular features of the 25 kDa subunit of the Cleavage Factor Im (CFIm25 from other organisms, including the Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate linked to another moiety X domain, as well as the RNA binding domain and the PAP/PAB interacting region. The recombinant EhCFIm25 protein (rEhCFIm25 was expressed in bacteria and used to generate specific antibodies in rabbit. Subcellular localization assays showed the presence of the endogenous protein in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. In RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays, rEhCFIm25 was able to form specific RNA-protein complexes with the EhPgp5 mRNA 3´ UTR used as probe. In addition, Pull-Down and LC/ESI-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry assays evidenced that the putative EhCFIm25 was able to interact with the poly(A polymerase (EhPAP that is responsible for the synthesis of the poly(A tail in other eukaryotic cells. By Far-Western experiments, we confirmed the interaction between the putative EhCFIm25 and EhPAP in E. histolytica. Taken altogether, our results showed that the putative EhCFIm25 is a conserved RNA binding protein that interacts with the poly(A polymerase, another member of the pre-mRNA 3' end processing machinery in this protozoan parasite.

  13. Poly(A) polymerase I participates in the indole regulatory pathway of Pantoea agglomerans YS19.

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    Li, Zihua; Jiang, Jing; Yu, Xuemei; Wu, Cunxiang; Shen, Delong; Feng, Yongjun

    2017-02-01

    Pantoea agglomerans YS19 is a preponderant endophytic bacterium isolated from rice. It is characterized by the formation of symplasmata, a type of multicellular aggregate structure, contributing to a strong stress resistance and specific adaptation of YS19 in endophyte-host associations. Indole is an important signal molecule in intra- or interspecies relationships, regulating a variety of bacterial behaviours such as cell aggregation and stress resistance; however, the regulatory mechanism remains an ongoing area of investigation. This study selected YS19 as a model strain to construct a mutant library, utilizing the mTn5 transposon mutagenesis method, thus obtaining a positive mutant with an indole-inhibited mutation gene. Via thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, the mutational site was identified as the gene of pcnB, which encodes the poly(A) polymerase I to catalyse the polyadenylation of RNAs. The full length of the pcnB sequence was 1332 bp, and phylogenetic analysis revealed that pcnB is extremely conserved among strains of P. agglomerans. The expression of the gene was significantly inhibited (by 36.6 % as detected via quantitative PCR) by indole (0.5 mM). Many physiological behaviours of YS19 were affected by this mutation: the cell decay rate in the post-stationary growth phase was promoted, symplasmata formation and motility were inhibited in the late stationary growth phase and the colonization ability and growth-promoting effect of YS19 on the host plant were also inhibited. This study discusses the indole regulatory pathways from the point of RNA post-transcriptional modification, thus enriching our knowledge of polyadenylation and expanding current research ideas of indole regulation.

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis of PAPS1-Dependent Polyadenylation Identifies Novel Roles for Functionally Specialized Poly(A Polymerases in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Christian Kappel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The poly(A tail at 3' ends of eukaryotic mRNAs promotes their nuclear export, stability and translational efficiency, and changes in its length can strongly impact gene expression. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes three canonical nuclear poly(A polymerases, PAPS1, PAPS2 and PAPS4. As shown by their different mutant phenotypes, these three isoforms are functionally specialized, with PAPS1 modifying organ growth and suppressing a constitutive immune response. However, the molecular basis of this specialization is largely unknown. Here, we have estimated poly(A-tail lengths on a transcriptome-wide scale in wild-type and paps1 mutants. This identified categories of genes as particularly strongly affected in paps1 mutants, including genes encoding ribosomal proteins, cell-division factors and major carbohydrate-metabolic proteins. We experimentally verified two novel functions of PAPS1 in ribosome biogenesis and redox homoeostasis that were predicted based on the analysis of poly(A-tail length changes in paps1 mutants. When overlaying the PAPS1-dependent effects observed here with coexpression analysis based on independent microarray data, the two clusters of transcripts that are most closely coexpressed with PAPS1 show the strongest change in poly(A-tail length and transcript abundance in paps1 mutants in our analysis. This suggests that their coexpression reflects at least partly the preferential polyadenylation of these transcripts by PAPS1 versus the other two poly(A-polymerase isoforms. Thus, transcriptome-wide analysis of poly(A-tail lengths identifies novel biological functions and likely target transcripts for polyadenylation by PAPS1. Data integration with large-scale co-expression data suggests that changes in the relative activities of the isoforms are used as an endogenous mechanism to co-ordinately modulate plant gene expression.

  15. Poly(A) Polymerase Modification and Reverse Transcriptase PCR Amplification of Environmental RNA

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    Botero, Lina M.; D'Imperio, Seth; Burr, Mark; McDermott, Timothy R.; Young, Mark; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a combination of two established techniques for a novel application for constructing full-length cDNA clone libraries from environmental RNA. The cDNA was cloned without the use of prescribed primers that target specific genes, and the procedure did not involve random priming. Purified RNA was first modified by addition of a poly(A) tail and then was amplified by using a commercially available reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) cDNA synthesis kit. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, a cDNA clone library was constructed from size-fractionated RNA (targeting 16S rRNA) purified from a geothermally heated soil in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. The resulting cDNA library contained clones representing Bacteria and Eukarya taxa and several mRNAs. There was no exact clone match between this library and a separate cDNA library generated from an RT-PCR performed with unmodified rRNA and Bacteria-specific forward and universal reverse primers that were designed from cultivated organisms; however, both libraries contained representatives of the Firmicutes and the α-Proteobacteria. Unexpectedly, there were no Archaea clones in the library generated from poly(A)-modified RNA. Additional RT-PCRs performed with universal and Archaea-biased primers and unmodified RNA demonstrated the presence of novel Archaea in the soil. Experiments with pure cultures of Sulfolobus solfataricus and Halobacterium halobium revealed that some Archaea rRNA may not be a suitable substrate for the poly(A) tail modification step. The protocol described here demonstrates the feasibility of directly accessing prokaryote RNA (rRNA and/or mRNA) in environmental samples, but the results also illustrate potentially important problems. PMID:15746328

  16. Star-PAP, a poly(A) polymerase, functions as a tumor suppressor in an orthotopic human breast cancer model.

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    Yu, C; Gong, Y; Zhou, H; Wang, M; Kong, L; Liu, J; An, T; Zhu, H; Li, Y

    2017-02-02

    Star-PAP is a noncanonical poly(A) polymerase and required for the expression of a select set of mRNAs. However, the pathological role of Star-PAP in cancer largely remains unknown. In this study, we observed decreased expression of Star-PAP in breast cancer cell lines and tissues. Ectopic Star-PAP expression inhibited proliferation as well as colony-forming ability of breast cancer cells. In breast cancer patients, high levels of Star-PAP correlated with an improved prognosis. Moreover, by regulating the expression of BIK (BCL2-interacting killer), Star-PAP induced apoptosis of breast cancer cells through the mitochondrial pathway. The growth of breast cancer xenografts in NOD/SCID mice was also inhibited by the doxycycline-induced Star-PAP overexpression. Furthermore, Star-PAP sensitized breast cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs both in vitro and in vivo. In mammary epithelial cells, Star-PAP knockdown partially transformed these cells and induced them to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These findings suggested that Star-PAP possesses tumor-suppressing activity and can be a valuable target for developing new cancer therapeutic strategies.

  17. Kinetic studies of yeast polyA polymerase indicate an induced fit mechanism for nucleotide specificity.

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    Balbo, Paul B; Meinke, Gretchen; Bohm, Andrew

    2005-05-31

    Polyadenylate polymerase (PAP) catalyzes the synthesis of 3'-polyadenylate tails onto mRNA. A comprehensive steady-state kinetic analysis of PAP was conducted which included initial velocity studies of the forward and reverse reactions, inhibition studies, and the use of alternative substrates. The reaction (A(n) + ATP A(n+1) + PP(i)) is adequately described by a rapid equilibrium random mechanism. Several thermodynamic parameters for the reaction were determined or calculated, including the overall equilibrium constant (K(eq) = 84) and the apparent equilibrium constant of the internal step (K(int) = 4) which involves the rate-determining interconversion of central complexes. A large (100-fold) difference in Vmax accounts for nucleotide specificity (ATP vs CTP), despite an only 3-fold difference in Km. Comparison of the sulfur elemental effect on Vmax for ATP and CTP suggests that the chemical step is rate-determining for both reactions. Comparison of the sulfur elemental effect on Vmax/Km revealed differences in the mechanism by which either nucleotide is incorporated. Consistent with these data, an induced fit mechanism for nucleotide specificity is proposed whereby PAP couples a uniform binding mechanism, which selects for ATP, with a ground-state destabilization mechanism, which serves to accelerate the velocity for the correct substrate.

  18. Persistent nuclear actin filaments inhibit transcription by RNA polymerase II.

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    Serebryannyy, Leonid A; Parilla, Megan; Annibale, Paolo; Cruz, Christina M; Laster, Kyle; Gratton, Enrico; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kosak, Steven T; Gottardi, Cara J; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2016-09-15

    Actin is abundant in the nucleus and it is clear that nuclear actin has important functions. However, mystery surrounds the absence of classical actin filaments in the nucleus. To address this question, we investigated how polymerizing nuclear actin into persistent nuclear actin filaments affected transcription by RNA polymerase II. Nuclear filaments impaired nuclear actin dynamics by polymerizing and sequestering nuclear actin. Polymerizing actin into stable nuclear filaments disrupted the interaction of actin with RNA polymerase II and correlated with impaired RNA polymerase II localization, dynamics, gene recruitment, and reduced global transcription and cell proliferation. Polymerizing and crosslinking nuclear actin in vitro similarly disrupted the actin-RNA-polymerase-II interaction and inhibited transcription. These data rationalize the general absence of stable actin filaments in mammalian somatic nuclei. They also suggest a dynamic pool of nuclear actin is required for the proper localization and activity of RNA polymerase II.

  19. Arabidopsis poly(A) polymerase PAPS1 limits founder-cell recruitment to organ primordia and suppresses the salicylic acid-independent immune response downstream of EDS1/PAD4.

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    Trost, Gerda; Vi, Son Lang; Czesnick, Hjördis; Lange, Peggy; Holton, Nick; Giavalisco, Patrick; Zipfel, Cyril; Kappel, Christian; Lenhard, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Polyadenylation of pre-mRNAs by poly(A) polymerase (PAPS) is a critical process in eukaryotic gene expression. As found in vertebrates, plant genomes encode several isoforms of canonical nuclear PAPS enzymes. In Arabidopsis thaliana these isoforms are functionally specialized, with PAPS1 affecting both organ growth and immune response, at least in part by the preferential polyadenylation of subsets of pre-mRNAs. Here, we demonstrate that the opposite effects of PAPS1 on leaf and flower growth reflect the different identities of these organs, and identify a role for PAPS1 in the elusive connection between organ identity and growth patterns. The overgrowth of paps1 mutant petals is due to increased recruitment of founder cells into early organ primordia, and suggests that PAPS1 activity plays unique roles in influencing organ growth. By contrast, the leaf phenotype of paps1 mutants is dominated by a constitutive immune response that leads to increased resistance to the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis and reflects activation of the salicylic acid-independent signalling pathway downstream of ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1)/PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4). These findings provide an insight into the developmental and physiological basis of the functional specialization amongst plant PAPS isoforms.

  20. Site-specific terminal and internal labeling of RNA by poly(A) polymerase tailing and copper-catalyzed or copper-free strain-promoted click chemistry.

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    Winz, Marie-Luise; Samanta, Ayan; Benzinger, Dirk; Jäschke, Andres

    2012-05-01

    The modification of RNA with fluorophores, affinity tags and reactive moieties is of enormous utility for studying RNA localization, structure and dynamics as well as diverse biological phenomena involving RNA as an interacting partner. Here we report a labeling approach in which the RNA of interest--of either synthetic or biological origin--is modified at its 3'-end by a poly(A) polymerase with an azido-derivatized nucleotide. The azide is later on conjugated via copper-catalyzed or strain-promoted azide-alkyne click reaction. Under optimized conditions, a single modified nucleotide of choice (A, C, G, U) containing an azide at the 2'-position can be incorporated site-specifically. We have identified ligases that tolerate the presence of a 2'-azido group at the ligation site. This azide is subsequently reacted with a fluorophore alkyne. With this stepwise approach, we are able to achieve site-specific, internal backbone-labeling of de novo synthesized RNA molecules.

  1. Site-specific terminal and internal labeling of RNA by poly(A) polymerase tailing and copper-catalyzed or copper-free strain-promoted click chemistry

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    Winz, Marie-Luise; Samanta, Ayan; Benzinger, Dirk; Jäschke, Andres

    2012-01-01

    The modification of RNA with fluorophores, affinity tags and reactive moieties is of enormous utility for studying RNA localization, structure and dynamics as well as diverse biological phenomena involving RNA as an interacting partner. Here we report a labeling approach in which the RNA of interest—of either synthetic or biological origin—is modified at its 3′-end by a poly(A) polymerase with an azido-derivatized nucleotide. The azide is later on conjugated via copper-catalyzed or strain-promoted azide–alkyne click reaction. Under optimized conditions, a single modified nucleotide of choice (A, C, G, U) containing an azide at the 2′-position can be incorporated site-specifically. We have identified ligases that tolerate the presence of a 2′-azido group at the ligation site. This azide is subsequently reacted with a fluorophore alkyne. With this stepwise approach, we are able to achieve site-specific, internal backbone-labeling of de novo synthesized RNA molecules. PMID:22344697

  2. Poly(A) RNAs including coding proteins RNAs occur in plant Cajal bodies.

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    Niedojadło, Janusz; Kubicka, Ewa; Kalich, Beata; Smoliński, Dariusz J

    2014-01-01

    The localisation of poly(A) RNA in plant cells containing either reticular (Allium cepa) or chromocentric (Lupinus luteus, Arabidopsis thaliana) nuclei was studied through in situ hybridisation. In both types of nuclei, the amount of poly(A) RNA was much greater in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm. In the nuclei, poly(A) RNA was present in structures resembling nuclear bodies. The molecular composition as well as the characteristic ultrastructure of the bodies containing poly(A) RNA demonstrated that they were Cajal bodies. We showed that some poly(A) RNAs in Cajal bodies code for proteins. However, examination of the localisation of active RNA polymerase II and in situ run-on transcription assays both demonstrated that CBs are not sites of transcription and that BrU-containing RNA accumulates in these structures long after synthesis. In addition, it was demonstrated that accumulation of poly(A) RNA occurs in the nuclei and CBs of hypoxia-treated cells. Our findings indicated that CBs may be involved in the later stages of poly(A) RNA metabolism, playing a role storage or retention.

  3. Poly(A RNAs including coding proteins RNAs occur in plant Cajal bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Niedojadło

    Full Text Available The localisation of poly(A RNA in plant cells containing either reticular (Allium cepa or chromocentric (Lupinus luteus, Arabidopsis thaliana nuclei was studied through in situ hybridisation. In both types of nuclei, the amount of poly(A RNA was much greater in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm. In the nuclei, poly(A RNA was present in structures resembling nuclear bodies. The molecular composition as well as the characteristic ultrastructure of the bodies containing poly(A RNA demonstrated that they were Cajal bodies. We showed that some poly(A RNAs in Cajal bodies code for proteins. However, examination of the localisation of active RNA polymerase II and in situ run-on transcription assays both demonstrated that CBs are not sites of transcription and that BrU-containing RNA accumulates in these structures long after synthesis. In addition, it was demonstrated that accumulation of poly(A RNA occurs in the nuclei and CBs of hypoxia-treated cells. Our findings indicated that CBs may be involved in the later stages of poly(A RNA metabolism, playing a role storage or retention.

  4. A viral nuclear noncoding RNA binds re-localized poly(A binding protein and is required for late KSHV gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Borah

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available During the lytic phase of infection, the gamma herpesvirus Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV expresses a highly abundant, 1.1 kb nuclear noncoding RNA of unknown function. We observe that this polyadenylated nuclear (PAN RNA avidly binds host poly(A-binding protein C1 (PABPC1, which normally functions in the cytoplasm to bind the poly(A tails of mRNAs, regulating mRNA stability and translation efficiency. During the lytic phase of KSHV infection, PABPC1 is re-localized to the nucleus as a consequence of expression of the viral shutoff exonuclease (SOX protein; SOX also mediates the host shutoff effect in which host mRNAs are downregulated while viral mRNAs are selectively expressed. We show that whereas PAN RNA is not required for the host shutoff effect or for PABPC1 re-localization, SOX strongly upregulates the levels of PAN RNA in transient transfection experiments. This upregulation is destroyed by the same SOX mutation that ablates the host shutoff effect and PABPC1 nuclear re-localization or by removal of the poly(A tail of PAN. In cells induced into the KSHV lytic phase, depletion of PAN RNA using RNase H-targeting antisense oligonucleotides reveals that it is necessary for the production of late viral proteins from mRNAs that are themselves polyadenylated. Our results add to the repertoire of functions ascribed to long noncoding RNAs and suggest a mechanism of action for nuclear noncoding RNAs in gamma herpesvirus infection.

  5. RNA Polymerase III Subunit POLR3G Regulates Specific Subsets of PolyA(+) and SmallRNA Transcriptomes and Splicing in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Riikka J; Rahkonen, Nelly; Malonzo, Maia; Kauko, Leni; Emani, Maheswara Reddy; Kivinen, Virpi; Närvä, Elisa; Kemppainen, Esko; Laiho, Asta; Skottman, Heli; Hovatta, Outi; Rasool, Omid; Nykter, Matti; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2017-05-09

    POLR3G is expressed at high levels in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and is required for maintenance of stem cell state through mechanisms not known in detail. To explore how POLR3G regulates stem cell state, we carried out deep-sequencing analysis of polyA(+) and smallRNA transcriptomes present in hPSCs and regulated in POLR3G-dependent manner. Our data reveal that POLR3G regulates a specific subset of the hPSC transcriptome, including multiple transcript types, such as protein-coding genes, long intervening non-coding RNAs, microRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs, and affects RNA splicing. The primary function of POLR3G is in the maintenance rather than repression of transcription. The majority of POLR3G polyA(+) transcriptome is regulated during differentiation, and the key pluripotency factors bind to the promoters of at least 30% of the POLR3G-regulated transcripts. Among the direct targets of POLR3G, POLG is potentially important in sustaining stem cell status in a POLR3G-dependent manner. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Oncogenic Fusion Proteins SET-Nup214 and Sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1)-Nup214 Form Dynamic Nuclear Bodies and Differentially Affect Nuclear Protein and Poly(A)+ RNA Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Sarah A; Mendes, Adélia; Valkova, Christina; Spillner, Christiane; Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Kaether, Christoph; Kehlenbach, Ralph H

    2016-10-28

    Genetic rearrangements are a hallmark of several forms of leukemia and can lead to oncogenic fusion proteins. One example of an affected chromosomal region is the gene coding for Nup214, a nucleoporin that localizes to the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). We investigated two such fusion proteins, SET-Nup214 and SQSTM1 (sequestosome)-Nup214, both containing C-terminal portions of Nup214. SET-Nup214 nuclear bodies containing the nuclear export receptor CRM1 were observed in the leukemia cell lines LOUCY and MEGAL. Overexpression of SET-Nup214 in HeLa cells leads to the formation of similar nuclear bodies that recruit CRM1, export cargo proteins, and certain nucleoporins and concomitantly affect nuclear protein and poly(A)(+) RNA export. SQSTM1-Nup214, although mostly cytoplasmic, also forms nuclear bodies and inhibits nuclear protein but not poly(A)(+) RNA export. The interaction of the fusion proteins with CRM1 is RanGTP-dependent, as shown in co-immunoprecipitation experiments and binding assays. Further analysis revealed that the Nup214 parts mediate the inhibition of nuclear export, whereas the SET or SQSTM1 part determines the localization of the fusion protein and therefore the extent of the effect. SET-Nup214 nuclear bodies are highly mobile structures, which are in equilibrium with the nucleoplasm in interphase and disassemble during mitosis or upon treatment of cells with the CRM1-inhibitor leptomycin B. Strikingly, we found that nucleoporins can be released from nuclear bodies and reintegrated into existing NPC. Our results point to nuclear bodies as a means of preventing the formation of potentially insoluble and harmful protein aggregates that also may serve as storage compartments for nuclear transport factors.

  7. A triple helix stabilizes the 3' ends of long noncoding RNAs that lack poly(A) tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilusz, Jeremy E; JnBaptiste, Courtney K; Lu, Laura Y; Kuhn, Claus-D; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Sharp, Phillip A

    2012-11-01

    The MALAT1 (metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1) locus is misregulated in many human cancers and produces an abundant long nuclear-retained noncoding RNA. Despite being transcribed by RNA polymerase II, the 3' end of MALAT1 is produced not by canonical cleavage/polyadenylation but instead by recognition and cleavage of a tRNA-like structure by RNase P. Mature MALAT1 thus lacks a poly(A) tail yet is expressed at a level higher than many protein-coding genes in vivo. Here we show that the 3' ends of MALAT1 and the MEN β long noncoding RNAs are protected from 3'-5' exonucleases by highly conserved triple helical structures. Surprisingly, when these structures are placed downstream from an ORF, the transcript is efficiently translated in vivo despite the lack of a poly(A) tail. The triple helix therefore also functions as a translational enhancer, and mutations in this region separate this translation activity from simple effects on RNA stability or transport. We further found that a transcript ending in a triple helix is efficiently repressed by microRNAs in vivo, arguing against a major role for the poly(A) tail in microRNA-mediated silencing. These results provide new insights into how transcripts that lack poly(A) tails are stabilized and regulated and suggest that RNA triple-helical structures likely have key regulatory functions in vivo.

  8. Polya Theory for Orbiquotient Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Blandin, Hector; Diaz, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    Replacing the usual notion of quotient sets by the notion of orbiquotient sets we obtain a generalization of P\\'olya theory. The key ingredient of our extended theory is the definition of the orbicycle index polynomial which we compute in several examples. We apply our theory to the study of orbicycles on orbiquotient sets. Keywords: Orbifolds, P\\'olya Theory, Partition Lattice.

  9. Rubbery Polya Tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Barajas, Luis E; Müller, Peter

    2012-03-01

    Polya trees (PT) are random probability measures which can assign probability 1 to the set of continuous distributions for certain specifications of the hyperparameters. This feature distinguishes the PT from the popular Dirichlet process (DP) model which assigns probability 1 to the set of discrete distributions. However, the PT is not nearly as widely used as the DP prior. Probably the main reason is an awkward dependence of posterior inference on the choice of the partitioning subsets in the definition of the PT. We propose a generalization of the PT prior that mitigates this undesirable dependence on the partition structure, by allowing the branching probabilities to be dependent within the same level. The proposed new process is not a PT anymore. However, it is still a tail-free process and many of the prior properties remain the same as those for the PT.

  10. Positive and Negative Regulation of Poly(A) Nuclease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangus, David A.; Evans, Matthew C.; Agrin, Nathan S.; Smith, Mandy; Gongidi, Preetam; Jacobson, Allan

    2004-01-01

    PAN, a yeast poly(A) nuclease, plays an important nuclear role in the posttranscriptional maturation of mRNA poly(A) tails. The activity of this enzyme is dependent on its Pan2p and Pan3p subunits, as well as the presence of poly(A)-binding protein (Pab1p). We have identified and characterized the associated network of factors controlling the maturation of mRNA poly(A) tails in yeast and defined its relevant protein-protein interactions. Pan3p, a positive regulator of PAN activity, interacts with Pab1p, thus providing substrate specificity for this nuclease. Pab1p also regulates poly(A) tail trimming by interacting with Pbp1p, a factor that appears to negatively regulate PAN. Pan3p and Pbp1p both interact with themselves and with the C terminus of Pab1p. However, the domains required for Pan3p and Pbp1p binding on Pab1p are distinct. Single amino acid changes that disrupt Pan3p interaction with Pab1p have been identified and define a binding pocket in helices 2 and 3 of Pab1p's carboxy terminus. The importance of these amino acids for Pab1p-Pan3p interaction, and poly(A) tail regulation, is underscored by experiments demonstrating that strains harboring substitutions in these residues accumulate mRNAs with long poly(A) tails in vivo. PMID:15169912

  11. Immunological evidence for the localization of a 110 kDa poly(A) binding protein from rat liver in nuclear envelopes and its phosphorylation by protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, P; Aitken, S J; Bachmann, M; Agutter, P S; Müller, W E; Prochnow, D

    1993-11-01

    We have purified a 110 kDa poly(A) binding protein (P110) from rat liver which is thought to be involved in mRNA translocation through the nuclear pores and have demonstrated its localisation in the nuclear envelope using polyclonal antibodies and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Although P110 was prepared from highly purified nuclear envelopes, the polyclonal antibodies raised against them bind to nucleo- and cytoplasmic structures to a minor extent, but not to nucleolar structures. P110 decays spontaneously into several fragments which are also recognized by the polyclonal antibodies. The 110 kDa polypeptide and its fragments were phosphorylated by a nuclear envelope kinase and this phosphorylation was inhibited by a monoclonal antibody against protein kinase C and by a specific protein kinase C inhibitor obtained from bovine brain. Scatchard analysis was used to determine the influence of protein kinase C activators and inhibitors on nuclear envelope protein phosphorylation and RNA binding. The data indicate a close association between the RNA translocation machinery (the 110 kDa protein) and protein kinase C within the nuclear envelope. We suggest that the fragmentation of P110 is triggered before or during mRNA export and is not due to nonspecific proteolysis.

  12. Validation of artificial microRNA expression by poly(A) tailing-based RT-PCR

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Rui Shi, Chenmin Yang, Ronald Sederoff & Vincent Chiang ### Abstract Here we describe a protocol for validating expression of artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) by poly(A) tailing-based RT-PCR. Total RNAs, including amiRNA, are poly(A) tailed using E.coli. poly(A) polymerase. Poly(A) tailed amiRNA can be converted into cDNA along with mRNAs in a reverse transcription reaction primed by a standard poly(T) anchor adaptor. AmiRNA can then be amplified and quantitated by real-tim...

  13. The Pseudorabies Virus DNA Polymerase Accessory Subunit UL42 Directs Nuclear Transport of the Holoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Ping; Du, Wen-Juan; Huang, Li-Ping; Wei, Yan-Wu; Wu, Hong-Li; Feng, Li; Liu, Chang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) DNA replication occurs in the nuclei of infected cells and requires the viral DNA polymerase. The PRV DNA polymerase comprises a catalytic subunit, UL30, and an accessory subunit, UL42, that confers processivity to the enzyme. Its nuclear localization is a prerequisite for its enzymatic function in the initiation of viral DNA replication. However, the mechanisms by which the PRV DNA polymerase holoenzyme enters the nucleus have not been determined. In this study, we characterized the nuclear import pathways of the PRV DNA polymerase catalytic and accessory subunits. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that UL42 localizes independently in the nucleus, whereas UL30 alone predominantly localizes in the cytoplasm. Intriguingly, the localization of UL30 was completely shifted to the nucleus when it was coexpressed with UL42, demonstrating that nuclear transport of UL30 occurs in an UL42-dependent manner. Deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis of the two proteins showed that UL42 contains a functional and transferable bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) at amino acids 354-370 and that K(354), R(355), and K(367) are important for the NLS function, whereas UL30 has no NLS. Coimmunoprecipitation assays verified that UL42 interacts with importins α3 and α4 through its NLS. In vitro nuclear import assays demonstrated that nuclear accumulation of UL42 is a temperature- and energy-dependent process and requires both importins α and β, confirming that UL42 utilizes the importin α/β-mediated pathway for nuclear entry. In an UL42 NLS-null mutant, the UL42/UL30 heterodimer was completely confined to the cytoplasm when UL42 was coexpressed with UL30, indicating that UL30 utilizes the NLS function of UL42 for its translocation into the nucleus. Collectively, these findings suggest that UL42 contains an importin α/β-mediated bipartite NLS that transports the viral DNA polymerase holoenzyme into the nucleus in an in vitro expression

  14. Dissecting mechanisms of nuclear mRNA surveillance in THO/sub2 complex mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougemaille, Mathieu; Gudipati, Rajani K; Olesen, Jens Raabjerg

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear exosome is involved in numerous RNA metabolic processes. Exosome degradation of rRNA, snoRNA, snRNA and tRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by TRAMP complexes, containing either the Trf4p or Trf5p poly(A) polymerase. These enzymes are presumed to facilitate exosome access...

  15. The Influence of SV40 polyA on Gene Expression of Baculovirus Expression Vector Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Z Salem

    Full Text Available The simian virus 40 polyadenylation signal (SV40 polyA has been routinely inserted downstream of the polyhedrin promoter in many baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS. In the baculovirus prototype Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV, the polyhedrin promoter (very late promoter transcribes its gene by a viral RNA polymerase therefore there is no supporting evidence that SV40 polyA is required for the proper gene expression under the polyhedrin promoter. Moreover, the effect of the SV40 polyA sequence on the polyhedrin promoter activity has not been tested either at its natural polyhedrin locus or in other loci in the viral genome. In order to test the significance of adding the SV40 polyA sequence on gene expression, the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp was evaluated with and without the presence of SV40 polyA under the control of the polyhedrin promoter at different genomic loci (polyherin, ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase (egt, and gp37. In this study, spectrofluorometry and western blot showed reduction of EGFP protein for all recombinant viruses with SV40 polyA, whereas qPCR showed an increase in the egfp mRNA levels. Therefore, we conclude that SV40 polyA increases mRNA levels but decreases protein production in the BEVS when the polyhedrin promoter is used at different loci. This work suggests that SV40 polyA in BEVSs should be replaced by an AcMNPV late gene polyA for optimal protein production or left untouched for optimal RNA production (RNA interference applications.

  16. The Influence of SV40 polyA on Gene Expression of Baculovirus Expression Vector Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Tamer Z; Seaborn, Craig P; Turney, Colin M; Xue, Jianli; Shang, Hui; Cheng, Xiao-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The simian virus 40 polyadenylation signal (SV40 polyA) has been routinely inserted downstream of the polyhedrin promoter in many baculovirus expression vector systems (BEVS). In the baculovirus prototype Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), the polyhedrin promoter (very late promoter) transcribes its gene by a viral RNA polymerase therefore there is no supporting evidence that SV40 polyA is required for the proper gene expression under the polyhedrin promoter. Moreover, the effect of the SV40 polyA sequence on the polyhedrin promoter activity has not been tested either at its natural polyhedrin locus or in other loci in the viral genome. In order to test the significance of adding the SV40 polyA sequence on gene expression, the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) was evaluated with and without the presence of SV40 polyA under the control of the polyhedrin promoter at different genomic loci (polyherin, ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase (egt), and gp37). In this study, spectrofluorometry and western blot showed reduction of EGFP protein for all recombinant viruses with SV40 polyA, whereas qPCR showed an increase in the egfp mRNA levels. Therefore, we conclude that SV40 polyA increases mRNA levels but decreases protein production in the BEVS when the polyhedrin promoter is used at different loci. This work suggests that SV40 polyA in BEVSs should be replaced by an AcMNPV late gene polyA for optimal protein production or left untouched for optimal RNA production (RNA interference applications).

  17. Poly(A) RNA a new component of Cajal bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołowerzo, Agnieszka; Smoliński, Dariusz Jan; Bednarska, Elzbieta

    2009-07-01

    In European larch microsporocytes, spherical structures 0.5 to 6 microm in diameter are present in which poly(A) RNA accumulates. There were one to several bodies per cell and they were often present in the vicinity of the nucleolus. No nascent transcripts were observed within them. Splicing factors of the SR family, including protein SC35, which participates in bringing the 3' and 5' sites closer in the splicing reaction, were also not observed. The absence of the above-mentioned elements within bodies containing poly(A) RNA disqualifies them as sites of synthesis and preliminary stages of primary transcript maturation. However, they contained abundant elements of the splicing machinery commonly occurring in Cajal bodies, i.e., Sm proteins or small nuclear RNA (snRNA). The molecular composition as well as the characteristic ultrastructure of bodies containing poly(A) RNA proves that these were Cajal bodies. This is the first report of such poly(A) RNA localization.

  18. Characterization of a nuclear localization signal in the foot-and-mouth disease virus polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Aparicio, Maria Teresa; Rosas, Maria Flora [Centro de Biología Molecular, “Severo Ochoa” (CSIC-UAM), Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Sobrino, Francisco, E-mail: fsobrino@cbm.uam.es [Centro de Biología Molecular, “Severo Ochoa” (CSIC-UAM), Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Centro de Investigación en Sanidad Animal, INIA, Valdeolmos, 28130 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    We have experimentally tested whether the MRKTKLAPT sequence in FMDV 3D protein (residues 16 to 24) can act as a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Mutants with substitutions in two basic residues within this sequence, K18E and K20E, were generated. A decreased nuclear localization was observed in transiently expressed 3D and its precursor 3CD, suggesting a role of K18 and K20 in nuclear targeting. Fusion of MRKTKLAPT to the green fluorescence protein (GFP) increased the nuclear localization of GFP, which was not observed when GFP was fused to the 3D mutated sequences. These results indicate that the sequence MRKTKLAPT can be functionally considered as a NLS. When introduced in a FMDV full length RNA replacements K18E and K20E led to production of revertant viruses that replaced the acidic residues introduced (E) by K, suggesting that the presence of lysins at positions 18 and 20 of 3D is essential for virus multiplication. - Highlights: • The FMDV 3D polymerase contains a nuclear localization signal. • Replacements K18E and K20E decrease nuclear localization of 3D and its precursor 3CD. • Fusion of the MRKTKLAPT 3D motif to GFP increases the nuclear localization of GFP. • Replacements K18E and K20E abolish the ability of MRKTKLAPT to relocate GFP. • RNAs harboring replacements K18E and K20E lead to recovery of revertant FMDVs.

  19. On Polya-Friedman random walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huillet, Thierry [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, CNRS-UMR 8089 et Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 2 Avenue Adolphe Chauvin, 95032, Cergy-Pontoise (France)], E-mail: Thierry.Huillet@u-cergy.fr

    2008-12-19

    The Polya process is an urn scheme arising in the context of contagion spreading. It exhibits unstable persistence effects. The Friedman urn process is dual to the Polya one with antipersistent stabilizing effects. It appears in a safety campaign problem. A Polya-Friedman urn process is investigated with a tuning persistence parameter extrapolating the latter two extreme processes. The study includes the diffusion approximations of both the Polya-Friedman proportion process and the population gap random walk. The structure of the former is a generalized Wright-Fisher diffusion appearing in population genetics. The correlation structure of the latter presents an anomalous character at a critical value of the persistence parameter.

  20. Influenza polymerase encoding mRNAs utilize atypical mRNA nuclear export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sean; Bui, Steven; Perez, Veronica; Mohammad, Adeba; Medina-Ramirez, Hilario; Newcomb, Laura L

    2014-08-28

    Influenza is a segmented negative strand RNA virus. Each RNA segment is encapsulated by influenza nucleoprotein and bound by the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) to form viral ribonucleoproteins responsible for RNA synthesis in the nucleus of the host cell. Influenza transcription results in spliced mRNAs (M2 and NS2), intron-containing mRNAs (M1 and NS1), and intron-less mRNAs (HA, NA, NP, PB1, PB2, and PA), all of which undergo nuclear export into the cytoplasm for translation. Most cellular mRNA nuclear export is Nxf1-mediated, while select mRNAs utilize Crm1. Here we inhibited Nxf1 and Crm1 nuclear export prior to infection with influenza A/Udorn/307/1972(H3N2) virus and analyzed influenza intron-less mRNAs using cellular fractionation and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). We examined direct interaction between Nxf1 and influenza intron-less mRNAs using immuno purification of Nxf1 and RT-PCR of associated RNA. Inhibition of Nxf1 resulted in less influenza intron-less mRNA export into the cytoplasm for HA and NA influenza mRNAs in both human embryonic kidney cell line (293 T) and human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A549). However, in 293 T cells no change was observed for mRNAs encoding the components of the viral ribonucleoproteins; NP, PA, PB1, and PB2, while in A549 cells, only PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNAs, encoding the RdRP, remained unaffected; NP mRNA was reduced in the cytoplasm. In A549 cells NP, NA, HA, mRNAs were found associated with Nxf1 but PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNAs were not. Crm1 inhibition also resulted in no significant difference in PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNA nuclear export. These results further confirm Nxf1-mediated nuclear export is functional during the influenza life cycle and hijacked for select influenza mRNA nuclear export. We reveal a cell type difference for Nxf1-mediated nuclear export of influenza NP mRNA, a reminder that cell type can influence molecular mechanisms. Importantly, we

  1. A New Look at a Polya Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Real, Francis

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses one of George Polya's geometrical problems. The author offers Polya's solution to the problem, given in the book, "How to Solve It." The reason for its relevance today and alternative solutions to the problem together with an extension are discussed. (Contains 10 figures.)

  2. Human GTPases associate with RNA polymerase II to mediate its nuclear import.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carré, Clément; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2011-10-01

    Small GTPases share a biochemical mechanism and act as binary molecular switches. One important function of small GTPases in the cell is nucleocytoplasmic transport of both proteins and RNA. Here, we show the stable association of human GPN1 and GPN3, small GTPases related to Ran, with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) isolated from either the cytoplasmic or nuclear fraction. GPN1 and GPN3 directly interact with RNAPII subunit 7 (RPB7)/RPB4 and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII. Depletion of GPN1 or GPN3 using small interfering RNAs led to decreased RNAPII levels in the nucleus and an accumulation of this enzyme in the cytoplasm of human cells. Furthermore, isolation of a GPN1/GPN3/RNAPII complex from stable cell lines expressing a dominant negative GPN1 harboring mutations in the GTP-binding pocket demonstrated a role for these proteins in nuclear import of RNAPII. Thus, GPN1/GPN3 define a new family of small GTPases that are specialized for the transport of RNA polymerase II into the nucleus.

  3. Mitochondrial polymerase gamma dysfunction and aging cause cardiac nuclear DNA methylation changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczor, Christopher A; Ludlow, Ivan; Fields, Earl; Jiao, Zhe; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Lewis, William

    2016-04-01

    Cardiomyopathy (CM) is an intrinsic weakening of myocardium with contractile dysfunction and congestive heart failure (CHF). CHF has been postulated to result from decreased mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. Effects of decreased mitochondrial oxygen consumption also can accelerate with aging. We previously showed DNA methylation changes in human hearts with CM. This was associated with mitochondrial DNA depletion, being another molecular marker of CM. We examined the relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiac epigenetic DNA methylation changes in both young and old mice. We used genetically engineered C57Bl/6 mice transgenic for a cardiac-specific mutant of the mitochondrial polymerase-γ (termed Y955C). Y955C mice undergo left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) at a young age (∼ 94 days old), and LVH decompensated to CHF at old age (∼ 255 days old). Results found 95 genes differentially expressed as a result of Y955C expression, while 4,452 genes were differentially expressed as a result of aging hearts. Moreover, cardiac DNA methylation patterns differed between Y955C (4,506 peaks with 68.5% hypomethylation) and aged hearts (73,286 peaks with 80.2% hypomethylated). Correlatively, of the 95 Y955C-dependent differentially expressed genes, 30 genes (31.6%) also displayed differential DNA methylation; in the 4,452 age-dependent differentially expressed genes, 342 genes (7.7%) displayed associated DNA methylation changes. Both Y955C and aging demonstrated significant enrichment of CACGTG-associated E-box motifs in differentially methylated regions. Cardiac mitochondrial polymerase dysfunction alters nuclear DNA methylation. Furthermore, aging causes a robust change in cardiac DNA methylation that is partially associated with mitochondrial polymerase dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. The human nuclear poly(a-binding protein promotes RNA hyperadenylation and decay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M Bresson

    Full Text Available Control of nuclear RNA stability is essential for proper gene expression, but the mechanisms governing RNA degradation in mammalian nuclei are poorly defined. In this study, we uncover a mammalian RNA decay pathway that depends on the nuclear poly(A-binding protein (PABPN1, the poly(A polymerases (PAPs, PAPα and PAPγ, and the exosome subunits RRP6 and DIS3. Using a targeted knockdown approach and nuclear RNA reporters, we show that PABPN1 and PAPα, redundantly with PAPγ, generate hyperadenylated decay substrates that are recognized by the exosome and degraded. Poly(A tail extension appears to be necessary for decay, as cordycepin treatment or point mutations in the PAP-stimulating domain of PABPN1 leads to the accumulation of stable transcripts with shorter poly(A tails than controls. Mechanistically, these data suggest that PABPN1-dependent promotion of PAP activity can stimulate nuclear RNA decay. Importantly, efficiently exported RNAs are unaffected by this decay pathway, supporting an mRNA quality control function for this pathway. Finally, analyses of both bulk poly(A tails and specific endogenous transcripts reveals that a subset of nuclear RNAs are hyperadenylated in a PABPN1-dependent fashion, and this hyperadenylation can be either uncoupled or coupled with decay. Our results highlight a complex relationship between PABPN1, PAPα/γ, and nuclear RNA decay, and we suggest that these activities may play broader roles in the regulation of human gene expression.

  5. Higher cytoplasmic and nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase expression in familial than in sporadic breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klauke, M.L.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Budczies, J.; Bult, P.; Prinzler, J.; Radke, C.; Krieken, J.H. van; Dietel, M.; Denkert, C.; Muller, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP) is a key element of the single-base excision pathway for repair of DNA single-strand breaks. To compare the cytoplasmic and nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) expression between familial (BRCA1, BRCA2, or non BRCA1/2) and sporadic breast cancer, we investigated 39 sporadic

  6. Dragon polya spotter: Predictor of poly(A) motifs within human genomic DNA sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal Matoq Saeed

    2011-11-15

    Motivation: Recognition of poly(A) signals in mRNA is relatively straightforward due to the presence of easily recognizable polyadenylic acid tail. However, the task of identifying poly(A) motifs in the primary genomic DNA sequence that correspond to poly(A) signals in mRNA is a far more challenging problem. Recognition of poly(A) signals is important for better gene annotation and understanding of the gene regulation mechanisms. In this work, we present one such poly(A) motif prediction method based on properties of human genomic DNA sequence surrounding a poly(A) motif. These properties include thermodynamic, physico-chemical and statistical characteristics. For predictions, we developed Artificial Neural Network and Random Forest models. These models are trained to recognize 12 most common poly(A) motifs in human DNA. Our predictors are available as a free web-based tool accessible at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dps. Compared with other reported predictors, our models achieve higher sensitivity and specificity and furthermore provide a consistent level of accuracy for 12 poly(A) motif variants. The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  7. Ending the message: poly(A) signals then and now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudfoot, Nick J.

    2011-01-01

    Polyadenylation [poly(A)] signals (PAS) are a defining feature of eukaryotic protein-coding genes. The central sequence motif AAUAAA was identified in the mid-1970s and subsequently shown to require flanking, auxiliary elements for both 3′-end cleavage and polyadenylation of premessenger RNA (pre-mRNA) as well as to promote downstream transcriptional termination. More recent genomic analysis has established the generality of the PAS for eukaryotic mRNA. Evidence for the mechanism of mRNA 3′-end formation is outlined, as is the way this RNA processing reaction communicates with RNA polymerase II to terminate transcription. The widespread phenomenon of alternative poly(A) site usage and how this interrelates with pre-mRNA splicing is then reviewed. This shows that gene expression can be drastically affected by how the message is ended. A central theme of this review is that while genomic analysis provides generality for the importance of PAS selection, detailed mechanistic understanding still requires the direct analysis of specific genes by genetic and biochemical approaches. PMID:21896654

  8. Spatial Reasoning and Polya's Five Planes Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Sean P.; Diaz, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Middle and High school students of the twenty-first century possess surprising powers of spatial reasoning. They are assisted by technologies not available to earlier generations. Both of these assertions are demonstrated by students who are challenged with George Polya's classic Five Planes Problem. (Contains 5 figures.)

  9. Seeing the Problem: An Explanation from Polya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinhardt, Gaea; Schwarz, Baruch B.

    1997-01-01

    Examines guessing as a heuristic for problem-solving presented in a taped lesson by George Polya. Analogical models transformed a complex problem to a simpler one and maintained problem identification. Instructional explanations fulfilled two goals simultaneously: (1) teach students how to use guessing as a problem-solving strategy to solve the…

  10. Association of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase with nuclear subfractions catalyzed with sodium tetrathionate and hydrogene peroxide crosslinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnoyers, S; Kirkland, J B; Poirier, G G

    1996-06-21

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a nuclear enzyme which catalyzes the transfer of ADP-ribose units from NAD+ to a variety of nuclear proteins under the stimulation of DNA strand break. To examine its role in DNA repair, we have been studying the interaction of PARP with other nuclear proteins using disulfide cross-linking, initiated by sodium tetrathionate (NaTT). Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were extracted sequentially with Nonidet P40 (detergent), nucleases (DNase+RNase), and high salt (1.6 M NaCl) with and without the addition of a sulfhydryl reducing agent. The residual structures are referred to as the nuclear matrix, and are implicated in the organization of DNA repair and replication. Treatment of the cells with NaTT causes the crosslinking of PARP to the nuclear matrix. Activating PARP by pretreating the cells with H2O2 did not increase the cross-linking of PARP with the nuclear matrix, suggesting a lack of additional interaction of the enzyme with the nuclear matrix during DNA repair. Both NaTT and H2O2 induced crosslinks of PARP that were extractable with high salt. To shorten the procedure, these crosslinks were extracted from cells without nucleases and high salt treatment, using phosphate buffer. Using western blotting, these crosslinks appeared as a smear of high molecular weight species including a possible dimer of PARP at 230 kDa, which return to 116 kDa following reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol.

  11. Crystal structure of the shrimp proliferating cell nuclear antigen: structural complementarity with WSSV DNA polymerase PIP-box.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus S Carrasco-Miranda

    Full Text Available DNA replication requires processivity factors that allow replicative DNA polymerases to extend long stretches of DNA. Some DNA viruses encode their own replicative DNA polymerase, such as the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV that infects decapod crustaceans but still require host replication accessory factors. We have determined by X-ray diffraction the three-dimensional structure of the Pacific white leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (LvPCNA. This protein is a member of the sliding clamp family of proteins, that binds DNA replication and DNA repair proteins through a motif called PIP-box (PCNA-Interacting Protein. The crystal structure of LvPCNA was refined to a resolution of 3 Å, and allowed us to determine the trimeric protein assembly and details of the interactions between PCNA and the DNA. To address the possible interaction between LvPCNA and the viral DNA polymerase, we docked a theoretical model of a PIP-box peptide from the WSSV DNA polymerase within LvPCNA crystal structure. The theoretical model depicts a feasible model of interaction between both proteins. The crystal structure of shrimp PCNA allows us to further understand the mechanisms of DNA replication processivity factors in non-model systems.

  12. Dissecting mechanisms of nuclear mRNA surveillance in THO/sub2 complex mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougemaille, Mathieu; Gudipati, Rajani Kanth; Olesen, Jens Raabjerg

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear exosome is involved in numerous RNA metabolic processes. Exosome degradation of rRNA, snoRNA, snRNA and tRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by TRAMP complexes, containing either the Trf4p or Trf5p poly(A) polymerase. These enzymes are presumed to facilitate exosome access...... by appending oligo(A)-tails onto structured substrates. Another role of the nuclear exosome is that of mRNA surveillance. In strains harboring a mutated THO/Sub2p system, involved in messenger ribonucleoprotein particle biogenesis and nuclear export, the exosome-associated 3' 5' exonuclease Rrp6p is required...

  13. Journey into Problem Solving: A Gift from Polya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In "How to Solve It", accomplished mathematician and skilled communicator George Polya describes a four-step universal solving technique designed to help students develop mathematical problem-solving skills. By providing a glimpse at the grace with which experts solve problems, Polya provides definable methods that are not exclusive to…

  14. Journey into Problem Solving: A Gift from Polya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In "How to Solve It", accomplished mathematician and skilled communicator George Polya describes a four-step universal solving technique designed to help students develop mathematical problem-solving skills. By providing a glimpse at the grace with which experts solve problems, Polya provides definable methods that are not exclusive to…

  15. Regression analysis using dependent Polya trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schörgendorfer, Angela; Branscum, Adam J

    2013-11-30

    Many commonly used models for linear regression analysis force overly simplistic shape and scale constraints on the residual structure of data. We propose a semiparametric Bayesian model for regression analysis that produces data-driven inference by using a new type of dependent Polya tree prior to model arbitrary residual distributions that are allowed to evolve across increasing levels of an ordinal covariate (e.g., time, in repeated measurement studies). By modeling residual distributions at consecutive covariate levels or time points using separate, but dependent Polya tree priors, distributional information is pooled while allowing for broad pliability to accommodate many types of changing residual distributions. We can use the proposed dependent residual structure in a wide range of regression settings, including fixed-effects and mixed-effects linear and nonlinear models for cross-sectional, prospective, and repeated measurement data. A simulation study illustrates the flexibility of our novel semiparametric regression model to accurately capture evolving residual distributions. In an application to immune development data on immunoglobulin G antibodies in children, our new model outperforms several contemporary semiparametric regression models based on a predictive model selection criterion. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. GTP-dependent binding and nuclear transport of RNA polymerase II by Npa3 protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staresincic, Lidija; Walker, Jane; Dirac-Svejstrup, A Barbara

    2011-01-01

    transport of RNAPII. Surprisingly, we were unable to detect interactions between Npa3 and proteins in the classical importin a/ß pathway for nuclear import. Interestingly, Npa3-RNAPII binding is significantly increased by the addition of GTP or its slowly hydrolyzable analogue guanosine 5'-3-O...

  17. Poly(A) RNA-binding proteins and polyadenosine RNA: new members and novel functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigington, Callie P; Williams, Kathryn R; Meers, Michael P; Bassell, Gary J; Corbett, Anita H

    2014-01-01

    Poly(A) RNA-binding proteins (Pabs) bind with high affinity and specificity to polyadenosine RNA. Textbook models show a nuclear Pab, PABPN1, and a cytoplasmic Pab, PABPC, where the nuclear PABPN1 modulates poly(A) tail length and the cytoplasmic PABPC stabilizes poly(A) RNA in the cytoplasm and also enhances translation. While these conventional roles are critically important, the Pab family has expanded recently both in number and in function. A number of novel roles have emerged for both PAPBPN1 and PABPC that contribute to the fine-tuning of gene expression. Furthermore, as the characterization of the nucleic acid binding properties of RNA-binding proteins advances, additional proteins that show high affinity and specificity for polyadenosine RNA are being discovered. With this expansion of the Pab family comes a concomitant increase in the potential for Pabs to modulate gene expression. Further complication comes from an expansion of the potential binding sites for Pab proteins as revealed by an analysis of templated polyadenosine stretches present within the transcriptome. Thus, Pabs could influence mRNA fate and function not only by binding to the nontemplated poly(A) tail but also to internal stretches of adenosine. Understanding the diverse functions of Pab proteins is not only critical to understand how gene expression is regulated but also to understand the molecular basis for tissue-specific diseases that occur when Pab proteins are altered. Here we describe both conventional and recently emerged functions for PABPN1 and PABPC and then introduce and discuss three new Pab family members, ZC3H14, hnRNP-Q1, and LARP4.

  18. Fully Analyzing an Algebraic Polya Urn Model

    CERN Document Server

    Morcrette, Basile

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces and analyzes a particular class of Polya urns: balls are of two colors, can only be added (the urns are said to be additive) and at every step the same constant number of balls is added, thus only the color compositions varies (the urns are said to be balanced). These properties make this class of urns ideally suited for analysis from an "analytic combinatorics" point-of-view, following in the footsteps of Flajolet-Dumas-Puyhaubert, 2006. Through an algebraic generating function to which we apply a multiple coalescing saddle-point method, we are able to give precise asymptotic results for the probability distribution of the composition of the urn, as well as local limit law and large deviation bounds.

  19. Primers and polymerase chain reaction conditions for DNA barcoding teleost fish based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b and nuclear rhodopsin genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevilla, R.G.; Diez, A.; Noren, M.; Mouchel, O.; Jerome, M.; Verrez-Bagnis, V.; Pelt-Heerschap, van H.M.L.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes a set of 21 polymerase chain reaction primers and amplification conditions developed to barcode practically any teleost fish species according to their mitochondrial cytochrome b and nuclear rhodopsin gene sequences. The method was successfully tested in more than 200 marine

  20. Primers and polymerase chain reaction conditions for DNA barcoding teleost fish based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b and nuclear rhodopsin genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevilla, R.G.; Diez, A.; Noren, M.; Mouchel, O.; Jerome, M.; Verrez-Bagnis, V.; Pelt-Heerschap, van H.M.L.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes a set of 21 polymerase chain reaction primers and amplification conditions developed to barcode practically any teleost fish species according to their mitochondrial cytochrome b and nuclear rhodopsin gene sequences. The method was successfully tested in more than 200 marine fi

  1. Behavior of adsorbed Poly-A onto sodium montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomino-Aquino, Nayeli [Facultad de Estudios Superiores Iztacala, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico); Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia, E-mail: negron@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico)

    2015-07-23

    The adsorption of Poly-A (a polynucleotide consisting of adenine, ribose and a phosphate group), onto a clay mineral, was studied to investigate the extent of adsorption, the site of binding, and the capacity of the clay to protect Poly-A, while it is adsorbed onto the clay, from external sources of energy. The results showed that Poly-A presented a high percentage of adsorption at the edges of the clay and that the survival of the polynucleotide was superior to irradiating the polymer in the absence of the clay.

  2. Phylogenetic study on structural elements of HIV-1 poly(A region. 1. PolyA and DSE hairpins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarudnaya M. I.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Genome of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is highly heterogeneous. The aim of this work was a phylogenetic study on structural elements of the HIV-1 poly(A region, in particular polyA and DSE hairpins which compose a core poly(A site. Methods. The secondary structure of the HIV-1 core poly(A site has been predicted by the UNAFold program. Results. The structure of the polyA and DSE hairpins has been analysed in 1679 HIV-1 genomes of group M and 18 genomes of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVcpzPtt. We found 244 and 171 different sequences for the HIV-1 polyA and DSE hairpins, respectively. However 70 % of the HIV-1 isolates studied contain one of 7 variants of the polyA hairpin which occur with a frequency 5 % (main variants and 79 % of the isolates contain one of 7 main variants of the DSE hairpin. We also revealed subtype and country specific mutations in these hairpins. We found that the SIV polyA hairpin most closely resembles that found in HIV-1 genomes of B/C subtypes. Conclusions. The results of our large-scale phylogenetic study support some structural models of the HIV-1 5' UTR, in particular the tertiary interaction between the polyA hairpin and the matrix region in HIV-1 gRNA. Possibly, the DSE hairpin appeared in the course of viral evolution of the HIV-1 group M. An exposure of the U/GU-rich element in the apical loop of DSE hairpin could significantly increase the efficiency of pre-mRNA polyadenylation in this HIV-1 group.

  3. Suzuki Meets Polya: Teaching Mathematics to Young Pupils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlewood, Donald G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes how Suzuki's methods of teaching young pupils to play the violin can be combined with Polya's ideas on problem solving to teach mathematics to elementary school pupils. Six references are listed. (YP)

  4. Base-pair-resolution genome-wide mapping of active RNA polymerases using precision nuclear run-on (PRO-seq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat, Dig Bijay; Kwak, Hojoong; Booth, Gregory T; Jonkers, Iris H; Danko, Charles G; Patel, Ravi K; Waters, Colin T; Munson, Katie; Core, Leighton J; Lis, John T

    2016-08-01

    We provide a protocol for precision nuclear run-on sequencing (PRO-seq) and its variant, PRO-cap, which map the location of active RNA polymerases (PRO-seq) or transcription start sites (TSSs) (PRO-cap) genome-wide at high resolution. The density of RNA polymerases at a particular genomic locus directly reflects the level of nascent transcription at that region. Nuclei are isolated from cells and, under nuclear run-on conditions, transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases incorporate one or, at most, a few biotin-labeled nucleotide triphosphates (biotin-NTPs) into the 3' end of nascent RNA. The biotin-labeled nascent RNA is used to prepare sequencing libraries, which are sequenced from the 3' end to provide high-resolution positional information for the RNA polymerases. PRO-seq provides much higher sensitivity than ChIP-seq, and it generates a much larger fraction of usable sequence reads than ChIP-seq or NET-seq (native elongating transcript sequencing). Similarly to NET-seq, PRO-seq maps the RNA polymerase at up to base-pair resolution with strand specificity, but unlike NET-seq it does not require immunoprecipitation. With the protocol provided here, PRO-seq (or PRO-cap) libraries for high-throughput sequencing can be generated in 4-5 working days. The method has been applied to human, mouse, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans cells and, with slight modifications, to yeast.

  5. Regulation of coronaviral poly(A tail length during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Yi Wu

    Full Text Available The positive-strand coronavirus genome of ~30 kilobase in length and subgenomic (sg mRNAs of shorter lengths, are 5' and 3'-co-terminal by virtue of a common 5'-capped leader and a common 3'-polyadenylated untranslated region. Here, by ligating head-to-tail viral RNAs from bovine coronavirus-infected cells and sequencing across the ligated junctions, it was learned that at the time of peak viral RNA synthesis [6 hours postinfection (hpi] the 3' poly(A tail on genomic and sgmRNAs is ~65 nucleotides (nt in length. Surprisingly, this length was found to vary throughout infection from ~45 nt immediately after virus entry (at 0 to 4 hpi to ~65 nt later on (at 6 h to 9 hpi and from ~65 nt (at 6 h to 9 hpi to ~30 nt (at 120-144 hpi. With the same method, poly(U sequences of the same lengths were simultaneously found on the ligated viral negative-strand RNAs. Functional analyses of poly(A tail length on specific viral RNA species, furthermore, revealed that translation, in vivo, of RNAs with the longer poly(A tail was enhanced over those with the shorter poly(A. Although the mechanisms by which the tail lengths vary is unknown, experimental results together suggest that the length of the poly(A and poly(U tails is regulated. One potential function of regulated poly(A tail length might be that for the coronavirus genome a longer poly(A favors translation. The regulation of coronavirus translation by poly(A tail length resembles that during embryonal development suggesting there may be mechanistic parallels.

  6. Higher cytoplasmic and nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase expression in familial than in sporadic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Marie-Luise; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Budczies, Jan; Bult, Peter; Prinzler, Judith; Radke, Cornelia; van Krieken, J Han J M; Dietel, Manfred; Denkert, Carsten; Müller, Berit Maria

    2012-10-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP) is a key element of the single-base excision pathway for repair of DNA single-strand breaks. To compare the cytoplasmic and nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) expression between familial (BRCA1, BRCA2, or non BRCA1/2) and sporadic breast cancer, we investigated 39 sporadic and 39 familial breast cancer cases. The two groups were matched for hormone receptor status and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status. Additionally, they were matched by grading with a maximum difference of ±1 degree (e.g., G2 instead of G3). Cytoplasmic PARP (cPARP) expression was significantly higher in familial compared to sporadic breast cancer (P = 0.008, chi-squared test for trends) and a high nuclear PARP expression (nPARP) was significantly more frequently observed in familial breast cancer (64 %) compared with sporadic breast cancer (36 %) (P = 0.005, chi-squared test). The overall PARP expression was significantly higher in familial breast cancer (P = 0.042, chi-squared test). In familial breast cancer, a combination of high cPARP and high nPARP expression is the most common (33 %), whereas in sporadic breast cancer, a combination of low cPARP and intermediate nPARP expression is the most common (39 %). Our results show that the overall PARP expression in familial breast cancer is higher than in sporadic breast cancer which might suggest they might respond better to treatment with PARP inhibitors.

  7. Do nuclear bodies in oocytes of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Polyphaga, Tenebrionidae) contain two forms of RNA polymerase II?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogolyubov, D; Parfenov, V

    2004-02-01

    Late vitellogenic oocytes of the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, which are transcriptionally inert, contain numerous fibrogranular nuclear bodies (NBs). Previously, we have shown that these NBs contain both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of RNA polymerase II (pol II) [Tissue Cell 33 (2001) 549]. The conclusion on the presence of phosphorylated pol II was based on our immunoelectron experiments with monoclonal antibody (mAb) H5 against the phosphorylated serine-2 of the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of pol II. Because the specificity of mAb H5 was recently questioned by demonstration of its cross-reaction with SR-proteins [J. Struct. Biol. 140 (2002) 154], we re-examined here the occurence of pol II in T. molitor oocyte NBs using other appropriate antibodies. We confirm the presence of phosphorylated pol II in NBs using the affinity-purified polyclonal antibody against the phosphorylated CTD. Using double immunogold labeling with this antibody plus mAb 8WG16 against the unphosphorylated CTD, we confirm the presence of two forms of pol II in NBs. Additionally, the presence of pol II in NBs was verified here using mAb ARNA3 against the epitope outside CTD. We suggest that at the transcriptionally inactive stage, T. molitor oocyte NBs represent storage domains for pol II disengaged from the transcription.

  8. Poly(A) Tail Recognition by a Viral RNA Element Through Assembly of a Triple Helix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Mitton-Fry; S DeGregorio; J Wang; T Steitz; J Steitz

    2011-12-31

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus produces a highly abundant, nuclear noncoding RNA, polyadenylated nuclear (PAN) RNA, which contains an element that prevents its decay. The 79-nucleotide expression and nuclear retention element (ENE) was proposed to adopt a secondary structure like that of a box H/ACA small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA), with a U-rich internal loop that hybridizes to and protects the PAN RNA poly(A) tail. The crystal structure of a complex between the 40-nucleotide ENE core and oligo(A){sub 9} RNA at 2.5 angstrom resolution reveals that unlike snoRNAs, the U-rich loop of the ENE engages its target through formation of a major-groove triple helix. A-minor interactions extend the binding interface. Deadenylation assays confirm the functional importance of the triple helix. Thus, the ENE acts as an intramolecular RNA clamp, sequestering the PAN poly(A) tail and preventing the initiation of RNA decay.

  9. DNA Polymerases BI and D from the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus Both Bind to Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen with Their C-Terminal PIP-Box Motifs▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tori, Kazuo; Kimizu, Megumi; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2007-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the sliding clamp that is essential for the high processivity of DNA synthesis during DNA replication. Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon, has at least two DNA polymerases, polymerase BI (PolBI) and PolD. Both of the two DNA polymerases interact with the archaeal P. furiosus PCNA (PfuPCNA) and perform processive DNA synthesis in vitro. This phenomenon, in addition to the fact that both enzymes display 3′-5′ exonuclease activity, suggests that both DNA polymerases work in replication fork progression. We demonstrated here that both PolBI and PolD functionally interact with PfuPCNA at their C-terminal PIP boxes. The mutant PolBI and PolD enzymes lacking the PIP-box sequence do not respond to the PfuPCNA at all in an in vitro primer extension reaction. This is the first experimental evidence that the PIP-box motif, located at the C termini of the archaeal DNA polymerases, is actually critical for PCNA binding to form a processive DNA-synthesizing complex. PMID:17496095

  10. DNA polymerases BI and D from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus both bind to proliferating cell nuclear antigen with their C-terminal PIP-box motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tori, Kazuo; Kimizu, Megumi; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2007-08-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the sliding clamp that is essential for the high processivity of DNA synthesis during DNA replication. Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon, has at least two DNA polymerases, polymerase BI (PolBI) and PolD. Both of the two DNA polymerases interact with the archaeal P. furiosus PCNA (PfuPCNA) and perform processive DNA synthesis in vitro. This phenomenon, in addition to the fact that both enzymes display 3'-5' exonuclease activity, suggests that both DNA polymerases work in replication fork progression. We demonstrated here that both PolBI and PolD functionally interact with PfuPCNA at their C-terminal PIP boxes. The mutant PolBI and PolD enzymes lacking the PIP-box sequence do not respond to the PfuPCNA at all in an in vitro primer extension reaction. This is the first experimental evidence that the PIP-box motif, located at the C termini of the archaeal DNA polymerases, is actually critical for PCNA binding to form a processive DNA-synthesizing complex.

  11. Structural differentiation of the HIV-1 polyA signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Alan H; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2006-02-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) encodes the polyadenylation (polyA) signal (AAUAAA) within the highly conserved untranslated region (UTR) at both 5' and 3' terminals of the viral transcript. In polyadenylation, an RNA transcript is cleaved and then elongated with adenine nucleotides while repression of the 5' signal and utilization of the 3' signal occurs. Because experimental studies have yet to analyze the structures of both 5' and 3' signals from a global perspective, other structural conformations involving these signals may exist and could be pivotal to understanding key functional processes. To distinguish the differential regulation of the 5' and 3' polyA signals, we studied the structural tendencies of both the 5' and 3' UTR in HIV-1. Through computational folding predictions of multiple HIV-1 strains using the Massively Parallel Genetic Algorithm (MPGAfold) capable of dynamically elucidating key alternative conformations, the 5' polyA signal was found to be dominantly occluded in a hairpin loop while the 3' polyA signal showed variability between hairpin and linear conformations with a propensity for the linear structure with an asymmetric internal loop. Furthermore, the energies and predictions of these structures indicate that the polyA signals have some metastable characteristics indicating an ability to switch into different conformations that can regulate viral function.

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction reveals the role of mRNA poly(A tail regulation in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymeric Chartier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD, a late-onset disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of specific muscles, results from the extension of a polyalanine tract in poly(A binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1. While the roles of PABPN1 in nuclear polyadenylation and regulation of alternative poly(A site choice are established, the molecular mechanisms behind OPMD remain undetermined. Here, we show, using Drosophila and mouse models, that OPMD pathogenesis depends on affected poly(A tail lengths of specific mRNAs. We identify a set of mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins that are down-regulated starting at the earliest stages of OPMD progression. The down-regulation of these mRNAs correlates with their shortened poly(A tails and partial rescue of their levels when deadenylation is genetically reduced improves muscle function. Genetic analysis of candidate genes encoding RNA binding proteins using the Drosophila OPMD model uncovers a potential role of a number of them. We focus on the deadenylation regulator Smaug and show that it is expressed in adult muscles and specifically binds to the down-regulated mRNAs. In addition, the first step of the cleavage and polyadenylation reaction, mRNA cleavage, is affected in muscles expressing alanine-expanded PABPN1. We propose that impaired cleavage during nuclear cleavage/polyadenylation is an early defect in OPMD. This defect followed by active deadenylation of specific mRNAs, involving Smaug and the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complex, leads to their destabilization and mitochondrial dysfunction. These results broaden our understanding of the role of mRNA regulation in pathologies and might help to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders that involve mitochondrial dysfunction.

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction reveals the role of mRNA poly(A) tail regulation in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Aymeric; Klein, Pierre; Pierson, Stéphanie; Barbezier, Nicolas; Gidaro, Teresa; Casas, François; Carberry, Steven; Dowling, Paul; Maynadier, Laurie; Bellec, Maëlle; Oloko, Martine; Jardel, Claude; Moritz, Bodo; Dickson, George; Mouly, Vincent; Ohlendieck, Kay; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Trollet, Capucine; Simonelig, Martine

    2015-03-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD), a late-onset disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of specific muscles, results from the extension of a polyalanine tract in poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). While the roles of PABPN1 in nuclear polyadenylation and regulation of alternative poly(A) site choice are established, the molecular mechanisms behind OPMD remain undetermined. Here, we show, using Drosophila and mouse models, that OPMD pathogenesis depends on affected poly(A) tail lengths of specific mRNAs. We identify a set of mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins that are down-regulated starting at the earliest stages of OPMD progression. The down-regulation of these mRNAs correlates with their shortened poly(A) tails and partial rescue of their levels when deadenylation is genetically reduced improves muscle function. Genetic analysis of candidate genes encoding RNA binding proteins using the Drosophila OPMD model uncovers a potential role of a number of them. We focus on the deadenylation regulator Smaug and show that it is expressed in adult muscles and specifically binds to the down-regulated mRNAs. In addition, the first step of the cleavage and polyadenylation reaction, mRNA cleavage, is affected in muscles expressing alanine-expanded PABPN1. We propose that impaired cleavage during nuclear cleavage/polyadenylation is an early defect in OPMD. This defect followed by active deadenylation of specific mRNAs, involving Smaug and the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complex, leads to their destabilization and mitochondrial dysfunction. These results broaden our understanding of the role of mRNA regulation in pathologies and might help to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders that involve mitochondrial dysfunction.

  14. On the Exact Solution of a Generalized Polya Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Konno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There are two types of master equations in describing nonequilibrium phenomena with memory effect: (i the memory function type and (ii the nonstationary type. A generalized Polya process is studied within the framework of a non-stationary type master equation approach. For a transition-rate with an arbitrary time-dependent relaxation function, the exact solution of a generalized Polya process is obtained. The characteristic features of temporal variation of the solution are displayed for some typical time-dependent relaxation functions reflecting memory in the systems.

  15. Association of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase with the nuclear matrix: the role of intermolecular disulfide bond formation, RNA retention, and cell type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, S H; Brunet, G; Talbot, B; Lamarr, D; Dumas, C; Shaper, J H; Poirier, G

    1991-02-01

    The recovery of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (pADPRp) in the nuclease- and 1.6 M NaCl-resistant nuclear subfraction prepared from a number of different sources was assessed by Western blotting. When rat liver nuclei were treated with DNase I and RNase A followed by 1.6 M NaCl, approximately 10% of the nuclear pADPRp was recovered in the sedimentable fraction. The proportion of pADPRp recovered with the residual fraction decreased to less than 5% of the total nuclear polymerase when nuclei were prepared in the presence of the sulfhydryl blocking reagent iodoacetamide and increased to approximately 50% of the total nuclear pADPRp when nuclei were treated with the sulfhydryl cross-linking reagent sodium tetrathionate (NaTT) prior to fractionation. To determine whether this effect of disulfide bond formation was unique to rat liver nuclei, nuclear matrix/cytoskeleton structures were prepared in situ by sequentially treating monolayers of tissue culture cells with Nonidet-P40, DNase I and RNase A, and 1.6 M NaCl (S.H. Kaufmann and J.H. Shaper (1991) Exp. Cell Res. 192, 511-523). When nuclear monolayers were prepared from HTC rat hepatoma cells, CaLu-1 human lung carcinoma cells, and CHO hamster ovary cells in the absence of NaTT, pADPRp was undetectable in the nuclease- and 1.6 M NaCl-resistant fraction. In contrast, when nuclear monolayers were isolated in the presence of NaTT, from 5% (CaLu-1) to 26% (HTC cells) of the total nuclear pADPRp was recovered with the nuclease- and salt-resistant fraction. Examination of these residual structures by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nonreducing conditions suggested that pADPRp was present as a component of disulfide cross-linked complexes. Further analysis by immunofluorescence revealed that the pADPRp was diffusely distributed throughout the CaLu-1 or CHO nuclear matrix. In addition, when matrices were prepared in the absence of RNase A, pADPRp was also observed in the residual nucleoli. These

  16. Reviving Polya's "Look Back" in a Singapore School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Yew Hoong; Tay, Eng Guan; Toh, Tin Lam; Quek, Khiok Seng; Dindyal, Jaguthsing

    2011-01-01

    This study is based on the stance that Polya's "Look Back," though understudied, remains relevant to Mathematics curricula that place emphasis on problem solving. Although the Singapore Mathematics curriculum adopts the goal of teaching Look Back, research about how it is carried out in actual classroom practice is rare. In our project,…

  17. Problem Solving: Polya's Heuristic Applied to Psychological Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damarin, Suzanne K.

    Using the "How to Solve It" list developed by Polya as a vehicle of comparison, research findings and key concepts from the psychological study of problem solving are applied to mathematical problem solving. Hypotheses concerning the interpretation of psychological phenomena for mathematical problem situations are explored. Several areas…

  18. Structural biology of poly(A) site definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qin; Doublié, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    3' processing is an essential step in the maturation of all messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and is a tightly coupled two-step reaction: endonucleolytic cleavage at the poly(A) site is followed by the addition of a poly(A) tail, except for metazoan histone mRNAs, which are cleaved but not polyadenylated. The recognition of a poly(A) site is coordinated by the sequence elements in the mRNA 3' UTR and associated protein factors. In mammalian cells, three well-studied sequence elements, UGUA, AAUAAA, and GU-rich, are recognized by three multisubunit factors: cleavage factor I(m) (CFI(m) ), cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF), and cleavage stimulation factor (CstF), respectively. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, UA repeats and A-rich sequence elements are recognized by Hrp1p and cleavage factor IA. Structural studies of protein-RNA complexes have helped decipher the mechanisms underlying sequence recognition and shed light on the role of protein factors in poly(A) site selection and 3' processing machinery assembly. In this review we focus on the interactions between the mRNA cis-elements and the protein factors (CFI(m) , CPSF, CstF, and homologous factors from yeast and other eukaryotes) that define the poly(A) site. WIREs RNA 2011 2 732-747 DOI: 10.1002/wrna.88 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Control of translation and miRNA-dependent repression by a novel poly(A binding protein, hnRNP-Q.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri V Svitkin

    Full Text Available Translation control often operates via remodeling of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles. The poly(A binding protein (PABP simultaneously interacts with the 3' poly(A tail of the mRNA and the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G to stimulate translation. PABP also promotes miRNA-dependent deadenylation and translational repression of target mRNAs. We demonstrate that isoform 2 of the mouse heterogeneous nuclear protein Q (hnRNP-Q2/SYNCRIP binds poly(A by default when PABP binding is inhibited. In addition, hnRNP-Q2 competes with PABP for binding to poly(A in vitro. Depleting hnRNP-Q2 from translation extracts stimulates cap-dependent and IRES-mediated translation that is dependent on the PABP/poly(A complex. Adding recombinant hnRNP-Q2 to the extracts inhibited translation in a poly(A tail-dependent manner. The displacement of PABP from the poly(A tail by hnRNP-Q2 impaired the association of eIF4E with the 5' m(7G cap structure of mRNA, resulting in the inhibition of 48S and 80S ribosome initiation complex formation. In mouse fibroblasts, silencing of hnRNP-Q2 stimulated translation. In addition, hnRNP-Q2 impeded let-7a miRNA-mediated deadenylation and repression of target mRNAs, which require PABP. Thus, by competing with PABP, hnRNP-Q2 plays important roles in the regulation of global translation and miRNA-mediated repression of specific mRNAs.

  20. DNA Polymerase e - More Than a Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Pospiech

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive review of the structure and function of DNA polymerase e. Together with DNA polymerases a and d, this enzyme replicates the nuclear DNA in the eukaryotic cell. During this process, DNA polymerase a lays down RNA-DNA primers that are utilized by DNA polymerases d and e for the bulk DNA synthesis. Attempts have been made to assign these two enzymes specifically to the synthesis of the leading and the lagging strand. Alternatively, the two DNA polymerases may be needed to replicate distinct regions depending on chromatin structure. Surprisingly, the essential function of DNA polymerase e does not depend on its catalytic activity, but resides in the nonenzymatic carboxy-terminal domain. This domain not only mediates the interaction of the catalytic subunit with the three smaller regulatory subunits, but also links the replication machinery to the S phase checkpoint. In addition to its role in DNA replication, DNA polymerase e fulfils roles in the DNA synthesis step of nucleotide excision and base excision repair, and has been implicated in recombinational processes in the cell.

  1. A comparative study of microbial diversity and community structure in marine sediments using poly(A tailing and reverse transcription PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiko eHoshino

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a better understanding of metabolically active microbial communities, we tested a molecular ecological approach using poly(A tailing of environmental 16S rRNA, followed by full-length complementary DNA (cDNA synthesis and sequencing to eliminate potential biases caused by mismatching of PCR primer sequences. The RNA pool tested was extracted from marine sediments of the Yonaguni Knoll IV hydrothermal field in the southern Okinawa Trough. The sequences obtained using the ploy(A tailing method were compared statistically and phylogenetically with those obtained using conventional reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR with published domain-specific primers. Both methods indicated that Deltaproteobacteria are predominant in sediment (>85% of the total sequence read. The poly(A tailing method indicated that Desulfobacterales were the predominant deltaproteobacteria, while most of the sequences in libraries constructed using RT-PCR were derived from Desulfuromonadales. This discrepancy may have been due to low coverage of Desulfobacterales by the primers used. A comparison of library diversity indices indicated that the poly(A tailing method retrieves more phylogenetically diverse sequences from the environment. The four archaeal 16S rRNA sequences that were obtained using the poly(A tailing method formed deeply branching lineages that were related to Candidatus Parvarchaeum and the Ancient Archaeal Group. These results clearly demonstrate that poly(A tailing followed by cDNA sequencing is a powerful and less biased molecular ecological approach for the study of metabolically active microbial communities.

  2. Localization of nuclear retained mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune; Libri, Domenico; Boulay, Jocelyne

    2003-01-01

    in the rat7–1 strain colocalize predominantly with nucleolar antigens. Bulk poly(A)+ RNA, on the other hand, is localized primarily to the nuclear rim. Interestingly, the RNA binding nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Npl3p shows strong colocalization with bulk poly(A)+ RNA, regardless of its nuclear location...

  3. Boltzmann Samplers, P\\'olya Theory, and Cycle Pointing

    CERN Document Server

    Bodirsky, Manuel; Kang, Mihyun; Vigerske, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a general method to count unlabeled combinatorial structures and to efficiently generate them at random. The approach is based on pointing unlabeled structures in an "unbiased" way that a structure of size n gives rise to n pointed structures. We extend Polya theory to the corresponding pointing operator, and present a random sampling framework based on both the principles of Boltzmann sampling and on P\\'olya operators. All previously known unlabeled construction principles for Boltzmann samplers are special cases of our new results. Our method is illustrated on several examples: in each case, we provide enumerative results and efficient random samplers. The approach applies to unlabeled families of plane and nonplane unrooted trees, and tree-like structures in general, but also to families of graphs (such as cacti graphs and outerplanar graphs) and families of planar maps.

  4. On Polya's inequality for torsional rigidity and first Dirichlet eigenvalue

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, M. van den; Ferone, V.; Nitsch, C.; Trombetti, C.

    2016-01-01

    Let $\\Omega$ be an open set in Euclidean space with finite Lebesgue measure $|\\Omega|$. We obtain some properties of the set function $F:\\Omega\\mapsto \\R^+$ defined by $$ F(\\Omega)=\\frac{T(\\Omega)\\lambda_1(\\Omega)}{|\\Omega|} ,$$ where $T(\\Omega)$ and $\\lambda_1(\\Omega)$ are the torsional rigidity and the first eigenvalue of the Dirichlet Laplacian respectively. We improve the classical P\\'olya bound $F(\\Omega)\\le 1,$ and show that $$F(\\Omega)\\le 1- \

  5. A multiple more accurate Hardy-Littlewood-Polya inequality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiliang Huang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available By introducing multi-parameters and conjugate exponents and using Euler-Maclaurin’s summation formula, we estimate the weight coefficient and prove a multiple more accurate Hardy-Littlewood-Polya (H-L-P inequality, which is an extension of some earlier published results. We also prove that the constant factor in the new inequality is the best possible, and obtain its equivalent forms.

  6. LARP1 specifically recognizes the 3' terminus of poly(A) mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Kazuma; Adachi, Shungo; Homoto, Masae; Kusano, Hideo; Koike, Katsuyuki; Natsume, Tohru

    2013-07-11

    A poly(A) tail functions in mRNA turnover and in facilitating translation as a ribonucleoprotein complex with poly(A) binding proteins (PABPs). However, factors that associate with the poly(A) tail other than PABPs have not been described. Using proteomics, we identified candidate proteins that interact to the 3' terminus of the poly(A) tail. Among these proteins, we focused on La motif-related protein 1 (LARP1) and found that LARP1 specifically recognizes the 3' termini of normal poly(A) tails. We also reveal that LARP1 stabilizes multiple mRNAs carrying 5' terminal oligopyrimidine tract (5'TOP). Our findings suggest that LARP1 may be involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, at least in several 5'TOP mRNAs, through the binding to 3' terminus of the poly(A) tail.

  7. Apparent Polyploidization after Gamma Irradiation: Pitfalls in the Use of Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) for the Estimation of Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Gene Copy Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Winnie W. Y.; Lake, Vanessa; Banos, Connie; Davies, Justin; Banati, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has been widely used to quantify changes in gene copy numbers after radiation exposure. Here, we show that gamma irradiation ranging from 10 to 100 Gy of cells and cell-free DNA samples significantly affects the measured qPCR yield, due to radiation-induced fragmentation of the DNA template and, therefore, introduces errors into the estimation of gene copy numbers. The radiation-induced DNA fragmentation and, thus, measured qPCR yield varies with temperature not only in living cells, but also in isolated DNA irradiated under cell-free conditions. In summary, the variability in measured qPCR yield from irradiated samples introduces a significant error into the estimation of both mitochondrial and nuclear gene copy numbers and may give spurious evidence for polyploidization. PMID:23722662

  8. A Conserved Nuclear Cyclophilin Is Required for Both RNA Polymerase II Elongation and Co-transcriptional Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong H Ahn

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The elongation phase of transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II involves numerous events that are tightly coordinated, including RNA processing, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. RNA splicing factors are associated with elongating Pol II, and the interdependent coupling of splicing and elongation has been documented in several systems. Here we identify a conserved, multi-domain cyclophilin family member, SIG-7, as an essential factor for both normal transcription elongation and co-transcriptional splicing. In embryos depleted for SIG-7, RNA levels for over a thousand zygotically expressed genes are substantially reduced, Pol II becomes significantly reduced at the 3' end of genes, marks of transcription elongation are reduced, and unspliced mRNAs accumulate. Our findings suggest that SIG-7 plays a central role in both Pol II elongation and co-transcriptional splicing and may provide an important link for their coordination and regulation.

  9. A Conserved Nuclear Cyclophilin Is Required for Both RNA Polymerase II Elongation and Co-transcriptional Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeong H.; Rechsteiner, Andreas; Strome, Susan; Kelly, William G.

    2016-01-01

    The elongation phase of transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) involves numerous events that are tightly coordinated, including RNA processing, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. RNA splicing factors are associated with elongating Pol II, and the interdependent coupling of splicing and elongation has been documented in several systems. Here we identify a conserved, multi-domain cyclophilin family member, SIG-7, as an essential factor for both normal transcription elongation and co-transcriptional splicing. In embryos depleted for SIG-7, RNA levels for over a thousand zygotically expressed genes are substantially reduced, Pol II becomes significantly reduced at the 3’ end of genes, marks of transcription elongation are reduced, and unspliced mRNAs accumulate. Our findings suggest that SIG-7 plays a central role in both Pol II elongation and co-transcriptional splicing and may provide an important link for their coordination and regulation. PMID:27541139

  10. Roles of POLD4, smallest subunit of DNA polymerase {delta}, in nuclear structures and genomic stability of human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qin Miao [Division of Molecular Carcinogenesis, Center for Neurological Diseases and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Akashi, Tomohiro [Division of Molecular Mycology and Medicine, Center for Neurological Diseases and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Masuda, Yuji; Kamiya, Kenji [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Takahashi, Takashi [Division of Molecular Carcinogenesis, Center for Neurological Diseases and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Suzuki, Motoshi, E-mail: msuzuki@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular Carcinogenesis, Center for Neurological Diseases and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian DNA polymerase {delta} (pol {delta}) is essential for DNA replication, though the functions of this smallest subunit of POLD4 have been elusive. We investigated pol {delta} activities in vitro and found that it was less active in the absence of POLD4, irrespective of the presence of the accessory protein PCNA. shRNA-mediated reduction of POLD4 resulted in a marked decrease in colony formation activity by Calu6, ACC-LC-319, and PC-10 cells. We also found that POLD4 reduction was associated with an increased population of karyomere-like cells, which may be an indication of DNA replication stress and/or DNA damage. The karyomere-like cells retained an ability to progress through the cell cycle, suggesting that POLD4 reduction induces modest genomic instability, while allowing cells to grow until DNA damage reaches an intolerant level. Our results indicate that POLD4 is required for the in vitro pol {delta} activity, and that it functions in cell proliferation and maintenance of genomic stability of human cells.

  11. Compliance of POLYAS with the Common Criteria Protection Profile

    CERN Document Server

    Menke, Niels

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, the German Federal Office for Information Security issued the common criteria protection profile for Online Voting Products (PP-0037). Accord- ingly, we evaluated the Polyas electronic voting system, which is used for legally binding elections in several international organizations (German Gesellschaft for Informatik, GI, among others), for compliance with the common criteria protection profile and worked toward fulfilling the given requirements. In this article we pre- sent the findings of the process of creating a compliant security target, necessary restrictions and assumptions to the system design as well as the workings of the committee, and architectural and procedural changes made necessary.

  12. PACdb: PolyA Cleavage Site and 3'-UTR Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockman, J Michael; Singh, Priyam; Liu, Donglin; Quinlan, Sean; Salisbury, Jesse; Graber, Joel H

    2005-09-15

    The PolyA Cleavage Site and 3'-UTR Database (PACdb) is a web-accessible database that catalogs putative 3'-processing sites and 3'-UTR sequences for multiple organisms. Sites have been identified primarily via expressed sequence tag-genome alignments, enabling delineation of both the specificities and heterogeneity of 3'-processing events. By web browser or CGI: PACdb: http://harlequin.jax.org/pacdb/; AtPACdb: http://harlequin.jax.org/atpacdb/. Available online at http://harlequin.jax.org/pacdb/supplemental.php.

  13. An analogue of Polya's theorem for piecewise holomorphic functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buslaev, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    A well-known result due to Polya for a function given by its holomorphic germ at z=∞ is extended to the case of a piecewise holomorphic function on an arbitrary compact set in \\overline{ C}. This result is applied to the problem of the existence of compact sets that have the minimum transfinite diameter in the external field of the logarithmic potential of a negative unit charge among all compact sets such that a certain multivalued analytic function is single-valued and piecewise holomorphic on their complement. Bibliography: 13 titles.

  14. POLYAR, a new computer program for prediction of poly(A sites in human sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qamar Raheel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background mRNA polyadenylation is an essential step of pre-mRNA processing in eukaryotes. Accurate prediction of the pre-mRNA 3'-end cleavage/polyadenylation sites is important for defining the gene boundaries and understanding gene expression mechanisms. Results 28761 human mapped poly(A sites have been classified into three classes containing different known forms of polyadenylation signal (PAS or none of them (PAS-strong, PAS-weak and PAS-less, respectively and a new computer program POLYAR for the prediction of poly(A sites of each class was developed. In comparison with polya_svm (till date the most accurate computer program for prediction of poly(A sites while searching for PAS-strong poly(A sites in human sequences, POLYAR had a significantly higher prediction sensitivity (80.8% versus 65.7% and specificity (66.4% versus 51.7% However, when a similar sort of search was conducted for PAS-weak and PAS-less poly(A sites, both programs had a very low prediction accuracy, which indicates that our knowledge about factors involved in the determination of the poly(A sites is not sufficient to identify such polyadenylation regions. Conclusions We present a new classification of polyadenylation sites into three classes and a novel computer program POLYAR for prediction of poly(A sites/regions of each of the class. In tests, POLYAR shows high accuracy of prediction of the PAS-strong poly(A sites, though this program's efficiency in searching for PAS-weak and PAS-less poly(A sites is not very high but is comparable to other available programs. These findings suggest that additional characteristics of such poly(A sites remain to be elucidated. POLYAR program with a stand-alone version for downloading is available at http://cub.comsats.edu.pk/polyapredict.htm.

  15. Involvement of non-polyalanine (polyA) residues in aggregation of polyA proteins: Clue for inhibition of aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vandna; Ghosh, Kalyan Sundar

    2014-11-20

    Presence of polyalanine (polyA) stretches in some proteins is found to be associated with their aggregation, which causes disorders in various developmental processes. In this work, inherent propensities towards aggregation of some residues, which are not part of the polyA stretches, have been identified by using the primary sequences of seven polyA proteins with the help of Betascan, PASTA and Tango programs and explored unambiguously. This provides a basis for proposing molecular mechanism of this type of aggregation. Reported suppression of aggregation of polyA proteins by chaperones like HSP40 and HSP70 is substantiated through molecular docking. The hydrophobic residues of identified aggregating region are found to be interacting with hydrophobic surface of chaperones. This suggests a crucial clue for possible way to inhibit the aggregation of such proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Polya's Legacy: Fully Forgotten or Getting a New Perspective in Theory and Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Problem solving and student-centred learning have received a great deal of attention in mathematics curricula for schools and in some universities. Much of this emphasis developed from the pioneering work of George Polya in heuristics, problem solving, and mathematics education. In this study, the author reviews Polya's work, and some of its later…

  17. Polya conditions for multivariate Birkhoff interpolation: from general to rectangular sets of nodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crainic, M.; Crainic, N.

    2010-01-01

    Polya conditions are certain algebraic inequalities that regular Birkhoff interpolation schemes must satisfy, and they are useful in deciding if a given scheme is regular or not. Here we review the classical Polya condition and then we show how it can be strengthened in the case of rectangular

  18. Spatially dependent polya tree modeling for survival data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Luping; Hanson, Timothy E

    2011-06-01

    With the proliferation of spatially oriented time-to-event data, spatial modeling in the survival context has received increased recent attention. A traditional way to capture a spatial pattern is to introduce frailty terms in the linear predictor of a semiparametric model, such as proportional hazards or accelerated failure time. We propose a new methodology to capture the spatial pattern by assuming a prior based on a mixture of spatially dependent Polya trees for the baseline survival in the proportional hazards model. Thanks to modern Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, this approach remains computationally feasible in a fully hierarchical Bayesian framework. We compare the spatially dependent mixture of Polya trees (MPT) approach to the traditional spatial frailty approach, and illustrate the usefulness of this method with an analysis of Iowan breast cancer survival data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program of the National Cancer Institute. Our method provides better goodness of fit over the traditional alternatives as measured by log pseudo marginal likelihood (LPML), the deviance information criterion (DIC), and full sample score (FSS) statistics. © 2010, The International Biometric Society.

  19. Efflux of RNA from resealed nuclear envelope ghosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnow, D; Thomson, M; Schröder, H C; Müller, W E; Agutter, P S

    1994-08-01

    mRNA translocation across the nuclear envelope and the appropriate signal-receptor interactions have been studied using resealed rat liver nuclear envelope ghosts (RNEG). We compared export kinetics of nonadenylated (tRNAs, histone-2 poly(A)- mRNA), and adenylated RNAs (poly(A)+ tRNAs, synthetic histone-2 poly(A) +mRNA, albumin mRNA, beta-globin poly(A) +mRNA and a total poly(A) + mRNA extract from rat liver cells). ATP-dependent export of mRNAs and of total poly(A)+ RNA was prevented by inhibitors of a nuclear envelope NTPase. All adenylated RNA species competed with each other for export, but nonadenylated RNAs did not. This indicates the existence of different translocation mechanisms for different RNA species with their appropriate nuclear envelope associated RNA receptors involved in export. The attachment of a poly(A)250 sequence at the 3'-end of tRNA or histone messenger masks the intrinsic RNA export signal of nonadenylated RNAs and results in efflux comparable to that of beta-globin poly(A)+ mRNA. The attachment on oligo(A)5 does not have any comparable effect of nonadenylated RNA translocation. Export of all polyadenylated RNAs from RNEGs is blocked by a monoclonal antibody, which is directed against an intranuclear envelope poly(A) binding protein. The results suggest that the pore complexes do not select RNAs for export to the cytoplasm and are therefore not responsible for nuclear restriction of mRNA precursors.

  20. Dissecting mechanisms of nuclear mRNA surveillance in THO/sub2 complex mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougemaille, Mathieu; Gudipati, Rajani Kanth; Olesen, Jens Raabjerg

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear exosome is involved in numerous RNA metabolic processes. Exosome degradation of rRNA, snoRNA, snRNA and tRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by TRAMP complexes, containing either the Trf4p or Trf5p poly(A) polymerase. These enzymes are presumed to facilitate exosome access...... for both retention and degradation of nuclear restricted mRNAs. We show here that Trf4p, in the context of TRAMP, is an mRNA surveillance factor. However, unlike Rrp6p, Trf4p only partakes in RNA degradation and not in transcript retention. Surprisingly, a polyadenylation-defective Trf4p protein is fully...... active, suggesting polyadenylation-independent mRNA degradation. Transcription pulse–chase experiments show that HSP104 molecules undergoing quality control in THO/sub2 mutant strains fall into two distinct populations: One that is quickly degraded after transcription induction and another that escapes...

  1. Dissecting mechanisms of nuclear mRNA surveillance in THO/sub2 complex mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougemaille, Mathieu; Gudipati, Rajani K; Olesen, Jens Raabjerg

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear exosome is involved in numerous RNA metabolic processes. Exosome degradation of rRNA, snoRNA, snRNA and tRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by TRAMP complexes, containing either the Trf4p or Trf5p poly(A) polymerase. These enzymes are presumed to facilitate exosome access...... is required for both retention and degradation of nuclear restricted mRNAs. We show here that Trf4p, in the context of TRAMP, is an mRNA surveillance factor. However, unlike Rrp6p, Trf4p only partakes in RNA degradation and not in transcript retention. Surprisingly, a polyadenylation-defective Trf4p protein...... is fully active, suggesting polyadenylation-independent mRNA degradation. Transcription pulse-chase experiments show that HSP104 molecules undergoing quality control in THO/sub2 mutant strains fall into two distinct populations: One that is quickly degraded after transcription induction and another...

  2. The nuclear protein Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 3 (AtPARP3) is required for seed storability in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissel, D; Losch, J; Peiter, E

    2014-11-01

    The deterioration of seeds during prolonged storage results in a reduction of viability and germination rate. DNA damage is one of the major cellular defects associated with seed deterioration. It is provoked by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) even in the quiescent state of the desiccated seed. In contrast to other stages of seed life, DNA repair during storage is hindered through the low seed water content; thereby DNA lesions can accumulate. To allow subsequent seedling development, DNA repair has thus to be initiated immediately upon imbibition. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are important components in the DNA damage response in humans. Arabidopsis thaliana contains three homologues to the human HsPARP1 protein. Of these three, only AtPARP3 was very highly expressed in seeds. Histochemical GUS staining of embryos and endosperm layers revealed strong promoter activity of AtPARP3 during all steps of germination. This coincided with high ROS activity and indicated a role of the nuclear-localised AtPARP3 in DNA repair during germination. Accordingly, stored parp3-1 mutant seeds lacking AtPARP3 expression displayed a delay in germination as compared to Col-0 wild-type seeds. A controlled deterioration test showed that the mutant seeds were hypersensitive to unfavourable storage conditions. The results demonstrate that AtPARP3 is an important component of seed storability and viability.

  3. [Analysis of polyA, polyU and double-stranded complex polyA x polyU via Raman spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yu-bo; Meng, Yao-yong; Lei, Hao-dong; Wang, Ying

    2007-05-01

    The Raman spectra of PolyA, PolyU and their double-stranded complex were measured, and the spectral changes upon the formation of double-stranded complex were studied. The experimental results show: (1) Under the experimental conditions used in the present work (0.14 mol x L(-1) NaCl, 1 mmol x L(-1) Tris solution, neutral pH and 15 degrees C), PolyU, PolyA and PolyA x PolyU occur as random-coiled, A-single-stranded helical and A-double-stranded helical conformations, respectively. One of the main spectral differences between the latter two conformations and the former one is the Raman band near 814 cm(-1) of ordered structures. Another difference is in the full width at half the maximum (i.e. FWHM) of the band near 1100 cm(-1). The FWHM of the band 1100 cm(-1) of PolyA is the same as that of PolyA x PolyU, while the band of PolyU shows remarkable broadening. In addition, we found that the conformation of PolyA is somewhat not so ordered as that of its duplex, which can be concluded from the value of I814/I1100 of the two polynucleotides. (2) The formation of duplex makes base-base stacking interactions much stronger, and the conformation of the backbone more ordered, which leads to obvious Raman hypochromic effect with some corresponding band shift. In this process, PolyU underwent more significant spectral changes than PolyA. As spectral markers, these results can be of great importance in Raman spectral signal detection of gene-chips.

  4. Mixtures of Polya trees for flexible spatial frailty survival modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Luping; Hanson, Timothy E; Carlin, Bradley P

    2009-06-01

    Mixtures of Polya trees offer a very flexible nonparametric approach for modelling time-to-event data. Many such settings also feature spatial association that requires further sophistication, either at the point level or at the lattice level. In this paper, we combine these two aspects within three competing survival models, obtaining a data analytic approach that remains computationally feasible in a fully hierarchical Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. We illustrate our proposed methods with an analysis of spatially oriented breast cancer survival data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program of the National Cancer Institute. Our results indicate appreciable advantages for our approach over competing methods that impose unrealistic parametric assumptions, ignore spatial association or both.

  5. Alphavirus polymerase and RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietilä, Maija K; Hellström, Kirsi; Ahola, Tero

    2017-01-16

    Alphaviruses are typically arthropod-borne, and many are important pathogens such as chikungunya virus. Alphaviruses encode four nonstructural proteins (nsP1-4), initially produced as a polyprotein P1234. nsP4 is the core RNA-dependent RNA polymerase but all four nsPs are required for RNA synthesis. The early replication complex (RC) formed by the polyprotein P123 and nsP4 synthesizes minus RNA strands, and the late RC composed of fully processed nsP1-nsP4 is responsible for the production of genomic and subgenomic plus strands. Different parts of nsP4 recognize the promoters for minus and plus strands but the binding also requires the other nsPs. The alphavirus polymerase has been purified and is capable of de novo RNA synthesis only in the presence of the other nsPs. The purified nsP4 also has terminal adenylyltransferase activity, which may generate the poly(A) tail at the 3' end of the genome. Membrane association of the nsPs is vital for replication, and alphaviruses induce membrane invaginations called spherules, which form a microenvironment for RNA synthesis by concentrating replication components and protecting double-stranded RNA intermediates. The RCs isolated as crude membrane preparations are active in RNA synthesis in vitro, but high-resolution structure of the RC has not been achieved, and thus the arrangement of viral and possible host components remains unknown. For some alphaviruses, Ras-GTPase-activating protein (Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain)-binding proteins (G3BPs) and amphiphysins have been shown to be essential for RNA replication and are present in the RCs. Host factors offer an additional target for antivirals, as only few alphavirus polymerase inhibitors have been described.

  6. Differential transactivation by orphan nuclear receptor NOR1 and its fusion gene product EWS/NOR1: possible involvement of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase I, PARP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Naganari; Nagamura, Yuko; Tsukada, Toshihiko

    2008-10-15

    In extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, a chromosomal translocation creates a gene fusion between EWS and an orphan nuclear receptor, NOR1. The resulting fusion protein EWS/NOR1 has been believed to lead to malignant transformation by functioning as a transactivator for NOR1-target genes. By comparing the gene expression profiles of NOR1- and EWS/NOR1-overexpressing cells, we found that they largely shared up-regulated genes, but no significant correlation was observed with respect to the transactivation levels of each gene. In addition, the proteins associated with NOR1 and EWS/NOR1 were mostly the same in these cells. The results suggest that these proteins differentially transactivate overlapping target genes through a similar transcriptional machinery. To clarify the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional divergence between NOR1 and EWS/NOR1, we searched for alternatively associated proteins, and identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase I (PARP-1) as an NOR1-specific binding protein. Consistent with its binding properties, PARP-1 acted as a transcriptional repressor of NOR1, but not EWS/NOR1, in a luciferase reporter assay employing PARP-1(-/-) fibroblasts. Interestingly, suppressive activity of PARP-1 was observed in a DNA response element-specific manner, and in a subtype-specific manner toward the NR4A family (Nur77, Nurr1, and NOR1), suggesting that PARP-1 plays a role in the diversity of transcriptional regulation mediated by the NR4A family in normal cells. Altogether, our findings suggest that NOR1 and EWS/NOR1 regulate overlapping target genes differently by utilizing associated proteins, including PARP-1; and that EWS/NOR1 may acquire oncogenic activities by avoiding (or gaining) transcription factor-specific modulation by the associated proteins.

  7. The Polya Tree Sampler: Towards Efficient and Automatic Independent Metropolis-Hastings Proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Timothy E; Monteiro, João V D; Jara, Alejandro

    2011-03-01

    We present a simple, efficient, and computationally cheap sampling method for exploring an un-normalized multivariate density on ℝ(d), such as a posterior density, called the Polya tree sampler. The algorithm constructs an independent proposal based on an approximation of the target density. The approximation is built from a set of (initial) support points - data that act as parameters for the approximation - and the predictive density of a finite multivariate Polya tree. In an initial "warming-up" phase, the support points are iteratively relocated to regions of higher support under the target distribution to minimize the distance between the target distribution and the Polya tree predictive distribution. In the "sampling" phase, samples from the final approximating mixture of finite Polya trees are used as candidates which are accepted with a standard Metropolis-Hastings acceptance probability. Several illustrations are presented, including comparisons of the proposed approach to Metropolis-within-Gibbs and delayed rejection adaptive Metropolis algorithm.

  8. Comparison Theorems for Eigenvalues of Elliptic Operators and the Generalized Polya Conjecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Qiaoling, E-mail: wang@impa.br; Xia, Changyu, E-mail: xia@mat.unb.b [UnB, Departamento de Matematica (Brazil)

    2010-09-15

    We establish comparison theorems for eigenvalues between higher order elliptic equations on compact manifolds with boundary. As an application, it follows that if the Polya conjecture is true then so is the generalized Polya conjecture proposed by Ku et al. (J Differ Equ 97:127-139, 1992). We also obtain new lower bound for the eigenvalues of higher order elliptic equations on bounded domains in a Euclidean space.

  9. Autoregulation of TDP-43 mRNA levels involves interplay between transcription, splicing, and alternative polyA site selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño-Vázquez, S Eréndira; Dhir, Ashish; Bembich, Sara; Buratti, Emanuele; Proudfoot, Nicholas; Baralle, Francisco E

    2012-08-01

    TDP-43 is a critical RNA-binding factor associated with pre-mRNA splicing in mammals. Its expression is tightly autoregulated, with loss of this regulation implicated in human neuropathology. We demonstrate that TDP-43 overexpression in humans and mice activates a 3' untranslated region (UTR) intron, resulting in excision of the proximal polyA site (PAS) pA(1). This activates a cryptic PAS that prevents TDP-43 expression through a nuclear retention mechanism. Superimposed on this process, overexpression of TDP-43 blocks recognition of pA(1) by competing with CstF-64 for PAS binding. Overall, we uncover complex interplay between transcription, splicing, and 3' end processing to effect autoregulation of TDP-43.

  10. Nuclear structures in Tribolium castaneum oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogolyubov, Dmitry S; Batalova, Florina M; Kiselyov, Artyom M; Stepanova, Irina S

    2013-10-01

    The first ultrastructural and immunomorphological characteristics of the karyosphere (karyosome) and extrachromosomal nuclear bodies in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, are presented. The karyosphere forms early in the diplotene stage of meiotic prophase by the gathering of all oocyte chromosomes in a limited nuclear volume. Using the BrUTP assay, T. castaneum oocyte chromosomes united in the karyosphere maintain their transcriptional activity until the end of oocyte growth. Hyperphosphorylated RNA polymerase II and basal transcription factors (TFIID and TFIIH) were detected in the perichromatin region of the karyosphere. The T. castaneum karyosphere has an extrachromosomal capsule that separates chromosomes from the rest of the nucleoplasm. Certain structural proteins (F-actin, lamin B) were found in the capsule. Unexpectedly, the karyosphere capsule in T. castaneum oocytes was found to be enriched in TMG-capped snRNAs, which suggests that the capsule is not only a structural support for the karyosphere, but may be involved in biogenesis of snRNPs. We also identified the counterparts of 'universal' extrachromosomal nuclear domains, Cajal bodies (CBs) and interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs). Nuclear bodies containing IGC marker protein SC35 display some features unusual for typical IGCs. SC35 domains in T. castaneum oocytes are predominantly fibrillar complex bodies that do not contain trimethyl guanosine (TMG)-capped small nuclear (sn) RNAs. Microinjections of 2'-O-methyl (U)22 probes into the oocytes allowed revealing poly(A)+ RNAs in these nuclear domains. Several proteins related to mRNA export (heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein core protein A1, export adapters Y14 and Aly and export receptor NXF1) were also detected there. We believe that unusual SC35 nuclear domains of T. castaneum oocytes are possibly involved in mRNP but not snRNP biogenesis.

  11. Bayesian nonparametric meta-analysis using Polya tree mixture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branscum, Adam J; Hanson, Timothy E

    2008-09-01

    Summary. A common goal in meta-analysis is estimation of a single effect measure using data from several studies that are each designed to address the same scientific inquiry. Because studies are typically conducted in geographically disperse locations, recent developments in the statistical analysis of meta-analytic data involve the use of random effects models that account for study-to-study variability attributable to differences in environments, demographics, genetics, and other sources that lead to heterogeneity in populations. Stemming from asymptotic theory, study-specific summary statistics are modeled according to normal distributions with means representing latent true effect measures. A parametric approach subsequently models these latent measures using a normal distribution, which is strictly a convenient modeling assumption absent of theoretical justification. To eliminate the influence of overly restrictive parametric models on inferences, we consider a broader class of random effects distributions. We develop a novel hierarchical Bayesian nonparametric Polya tree mixture (PTM) model. We present methodology for testing the PTM versus a normal random effects model. These methods provide researchers a straightforward approach for conducting a sensitivity analysis of the normality assumption for random effects. An application involving meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies designed to characterize the association between alcohol consumption and breast cancer is presented, which together with results from simulated data highlight the performance of PTMs in the presence of nonnormality of effect measures in the source population.

  12. Targeting the nuclear RNA exosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meola, Nicola; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2017-01-01

    Centrally positioned in nuclear RNA metabolism, the exosome deals with virtually all transcript types. This 3'-5' exo- and endo-nucleolytic degradation machine is guided to its RNA targets by adaptor proteins that enable substrate recognition. Recently, the discovery of the 'Poly(A) tail exosome...

  13. Effect of the regimen of Gaoshan Hongjingtian on the mechanism of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase regulation of nuclear factor kappa B in the experimental diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hong-shu; SHI Xiang-yu; WEI Wen-bin; WANG Ning-li

    2013-01-01

    Background Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) plays an important role in the death of retinal capillary cells indiabetic retinopathy (DR) partly via its regulation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB).The current study investigated theeffect of the regimen of Gaoshan Hongjingtian (RG) on the mechanism of PARP regulation of NF-KB,and demonstratedthe possible impact of the RG and Gaoshan Hongjingtian (Rhodiola sachalinensis,RS) on diabetic retinopathy.Methods Wistar rats were made diabetic by administering streptozotocin.They were then assigned to three groups atrandom.After 2 months,the three groups of these diabetic rats were treated with RS or RG,or untreated.Analyses ofexpression levels of PARP,NF-κB,and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the retinas of rats in differentgroups were performed by Western blotting and immunohistochemical assays,and mRNA levels of NF-κB and ICAM-1were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR).In addition,the basement membranes of capillaries inthe rats' retinas were observed using electron microscopy,and diabetes-induced capillary degeneration (ghost pericytesand acellular capillaries) were quantitated.Results From the third month after the injection of streptozotocin,the diabetic rats were given daily RG,RS or tap water separately.The diabetic rats failed to gain weight compared with normal age-matched rats,whereas their glycated hemoglobin levels were significantly increased.After 5 months,the mRNA levels of NF-κB and ICAM-1 and the protein expression of PAPP,NF-κB,and ICAM-1 were significantly increased in the retinas of diabetic rats in the untreated group compared with the nondiabetic controls.After 8 months,the number of degenerated retinal capillaries (ghost pericytes and acellular capillaries) was significantly increased in the diabetic rats in the untreated group compared with normal age-matched rats.RG and RS inhibited diabetes-induced over-expression of PARP,NF-κB,and ICAM-1 in the retinas of

  14. Rrp6p controls mRNA poly(a) tail length and its decoration with poly(a) binding proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Manfred; Poulsen, Mathias Bach; Olszewski, Pawel;

    2012-01-01

    Poly(A) (pA) tail binding proteins (PABPs) control mRNA polyadenylation, stability, and translation. In a purified system, S. cerevisiae PABPs, Pab1p and Nab2p, are individually sufficient to provide normal pA tail length. However, it is unknown how this occurs in more complex environments. Here ...

  15. Characterization of the Role of Hexamer AGUAAA and Poly(A) Tail in Coronavirus Polyadenylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yu-Hui; Lin, Ching-Houng; Lin, Chao-Nan; Lo, Chen-Yu; Tsai, Tsung-Lin; Wu, Hung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Similar to eukaryotic mRNA, the positive-strand coronavirus genome of ~30 kilobases is 5’-capped and 3’-polyadenylated. It has been demonstrated that the length of the coronaviral poly(A) tail is not static but regulated during infection; however, little is known regarding the factors involved in coronaviral polyadenylation and its regulation. Here, we show that during infection, the level of coronavirus poly(A) tail lengthening depends on the initial length upon infection and that the minimum length to initiate lengthening may lie between 5 and 9 nucleotides. By mutagenesis analysis, it was found that (i) the hexamer AGUAAA and poly(A) tail are two important elements responsible for synthesis of the coronavirus poly(A) tail and may function in concert to accomplish polyadenylation and (ii) the function of the hexamer AGUAAA in coronaviral polyadenylation is position dependent. Based on these findings, we propose a process for how the coronaviral poly(A) tail is synthesized and undergoes variation. Our results provide the first genetic evidence to gain insight into coronaviral polyadenylation. PMID:27760233

  16. A 3' Poly(A) Tract Is Required for LINE-1 Retrotransposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Aurélien J; Wilusz, Jeremy E; Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Liu, Ying; Moran, John V

    2015-12-01

    L1 retrotransposons express proteins (ORF1p and ORF2p) that preferentially mobilize their encoding RNA in cis, but they also can mobilize Alu RNA and, more rarely, cellular mRNAs in trans. Although these RNAs differ in sequence, each ends in a 3' polyadenosine (poly(A)) tract. Here, we replace the L1 polyadenylation signal with sequences derived from a non-polyadenylated long non-coding RNA (MALAT1), which can form a stabilizing triple helix at the 3' end of an RNA. L1/MALAT RNAs accumulate in cells, lack poly(A) tails, and are translated; however, they cannot retrotranspose in cis. Remarkably, the addition of a 16 or 40 base poly(A) tract downstream of the L1/MALAT triple helix restores retrotransposition in cis. The presence of a poly(A) tract also allows ORF2p to bind and mobilize RNAs in trans. Thus, a 3' poly(A) tract is critical for the retrotransposition of sequences that comprise approximately one billion base pairs of human DNA.

  17. Stepwise deletions of polyA sequences in mismatch repair-deficient colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, C; Tsao, J L; Wu, A; Shibata, D

    2001-05-01

    PolyA simple repeat sequence deletions are common in tumors with microsatellite instability (MSI+). Such deletions occur one base at a time in DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient yeast suggesting larger deletions in human MSI+ tumors represent multiple sequential stepwise losses. Sum total deletions in four polyA repeats were variable (between -17 to -45 bp) in 20 sporadic MSI+ colorectal cancers. Progressive but less extensive total deletions (maximum of -12 bp) occurred in similar polyA sequences in MMR-deficient mice (mlh1-/-) up to 478 days old. PolyA repeat lengths were relatively stable but already shortened in the MMR-deficient cell line HCT116. A transgene with 26 A's transfected into HCT116 shortened an average of 3.8 bases pairs after 469 days in culture, less than average deletions of BAT25 (-5.3) or BAT26 (-9.0) in MSI+ cancers. These findings further suggest that extensive polyA deletions common in MSI+ tumors likely reflect multiple stepwise smaller deletions that accumulate more than hundreds of divisions after loss of MMR.

  18. Histone-poly(A) hybrid molecules as tools to block nuclear pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, G; Wojtech, E; Kalbas, M; Agutter, P S; Prochnow, D

    1995-04-01

    Histone-poly(A) hybrid molecules were used for transport experiments with resealed nuclear envelopes and after attachment of a cleavable cross-linker (SASD) to identify nuclear proteins. In contrast to histones, the hybrid molecules cannot be accumulated in resealed nuclear envelopes, and in contrast to poly(A), the export of hybrids from preloaded nuclear envelopes is completely impaired. The experiments strongly confirm the existence of poly(A) as an export signal in mRNA which counteracts the nuclear location signals (NLS) in histones. The contradicting transport signals in the hybrid molecules impair translocation through the nuclear pore complex. The failure to accumulate hybrid molecules into resealed nuclear envelopes results from the covalent attachment of polyadenylic acid to histones in a strict 1:1 molar ratio. This was demonstrated in control transport experiments where radiolabeled histones were simply mixed with nonlabeled poly(A) or radiolabeled poly(A) mixed with nonlabeled histones. In comparison, control uptake experiments with histones covalently linked to a single UMP-mononucleotide are strongly enhanced. Such controls exclude the conceivable possibility of a simple masking of the nuclear location signal in the histones by the covalent attached poly(A) moiety. Photoreactive histone-poly(A) hybrid analogs serve to identify nuclear envelope proteins--presumably in the nuclear pore--with molecular weights of 110, 80, and 71.4 kDa.

  19. The ticking tail: daily oscillations in mRNA poly(A) tail length drive circadian cycles in protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotic, Ivana; Schibler, Ueli

    2012-12-15

    In this issue of Genes & Development, Kojima and colleagues (pp. 2724-2736) examined the impact of mRNA poly(A) tail length on circadian gene expression. Their study demonstrates how dynamic changes in transcript poly(A) tail length can lead to rhythmic protein expression, irrespective of whether mRNA accumulation is circadian or constitutive.

  20. Poly(A) motif prediction using spectral latent features from human DNA sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Bo

    2013-06-21

    Motivation: Polyadenylation is the addition of a poly(A) tail to an RNA molecule. Identifying DNA sequence motifs that signal the addition of poly(A) tails is essential to improved genome annotation and better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms and stability of mRNA.Existing poly(A) motif predictors demonstrate that information extracted from the surrounding nucleotide sequences of candidate poly(A) motifs can differentiate true motifs from the false ones to a great extent. A variety of sophisticated features has been explored, including sequential, structural, statistical, thermodynamic and evolutionary properties. However, most of these methods involve extensive manual feature engineering, which can be time-consuming and can require in-depth domain knowledge.Results: We propose a novel machine-learning method for poly(A) motif prediction by marrying generative learning (hidden Markov models) and discriminative learning (support vector machines). Generative learning provides a rich palette on which the uncertainty and diversity of sequence information can be handled, while discriminative learning allows the performance of the classification task to be directly optimized. Here, we used hidden Markov models for fitting the DNA sequence dynamics, and developed an efficient spectral algorithm for extracting latent variable information from these models. These spectral latent features were then fed into support vector machines to fine-tune the classification performance.We evaluated our proposed method on a comprehensive human poly(A) dataset that consists of 14 740 samples from 12 of the most abundant variants of human poly(A) motifs. Compared with one of the previous state-of-the-art methods in the literature (the random forest model with expert-crafted features), our method reduces the average error rate, false-negative rate and false-positive rate by 26, 15 and 35%, respectively. Meanwhile, our method makes ?30% fewer error predictions relative to the other

  1. Generalized classical, quantum and intermediate statistics and the Polya urn model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niven, Robert K. [School of Aerospace, Civil and Mechanical Engineering, University of New South Wales at ADFA, Northcott Drive, Canberra, ACT, 2600 (Australia); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen O (Denmark)], E-mail: r.niven@adfa.edu.au; Grendar, Marian [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Bel University, Tajovskeho 40, 974 01 Banska Bystrica (Slovakia)], E-mail: marian.grendar@savba.sk

    2009-02-02

    Generalized probability distributions for Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics, with unequal source ('prior') probabilities q{sub i} for each level i, are obtained by combinatorial reasoning. For equiprobable degenerate sublevels, these reduce to those given by Brillouin in 1930, more commonly given as a statistical weight for each statistic. These distributions and corresponding cross-entropy (divergence) functions are shown to be special cases of the Polya urn model, involving neither independent nor identically distributed ('ninid') sampling. The most probable Polya distribution is shown to contain the Acharya-Swamy intermediate statistic.

  2. The Effects of Polya's Heuristic and Diary Writing on Children's Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensberry, Karina K. R.; Jacobbe, Tim

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study that aimed at increasing students' problem-solving skills. Polya's (1985) heuristic for problem solving was used and students were required to articulate their thought processes through the use of a structured diary. The diary prompted students to answer questions designed to engage them in the phases of…

  3. Effect of Polya Problem-Solving Model on Senior Secondary School Students' Performance in Current Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaniyan, Ademola Olatide; Omosewo, Esther O.; Nwankwo, Levi I.

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the Effect of Polya Problem-Solving Model on Senior School Students' Performance in Current Electricity. It was a quasi experimental study of non- randomized, non equivalent pre-test post-test control group design. Three research questions were answered and corresponding three research hypotheses were tested…

  4. Relooking "Look Back": A Student's Attempt at Problem Solving Using Polya's Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Yew Hoong; Toh, Tin Lam; Tay, Eng Guan; Quek, Khiok Seng; Dindyal, Jaguthsing

    2012-01-01

    Against the backdrop of half a century of research in mathematics problem solving, Polya's last stage is especially conspicuous--by the scarcity of research on it! Much of the research focused on the first three stages (J.M. Francisco and C.A. Maher, "Conditions for promoting reasoning in problem solving: Insights from a longitudinal…

  5. Contractions in the second polyA tract of ARX are rare, non-pathogenic polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Valerio; Marini, Carla; Mei, Davide; Falchi, Melania; Ferrari, Anna Rita; Guerrini, Renzo

    2011-01-01

    Aristaless related homeobox (ARX) is a transcription factor containing highly conserved octapeptide, homeobox, acidic, and aristaless domains, as well as four polyA tracts. The most frequent ARX mutation found to date in patients with X-linked infantile spasms, Partington syndrome or X-linked mental retardation, is a duplication of 24 bp in exon 2, resulting in the expansion of the second polyA tract. Although the pathogenic role of this expansion has been well characterized, the effect of contractions in the same polyA tract is still debated since different reports have associated contractions to either mental retardation or a normal phenotype. Here, we report two unrelated girls with epilepsy and mental retardation who inherited from their unaffected parents, of either sex, a deletion of 24 bp (c.441_464del), resulting in a contraction of eight alanines in the second polyA tract of ARX. Segregation studies revealed the c.441_464del also in two healthy relatives of one of the patients. This finding supports the hypothesis that this contraction represents a rare, benign polymorphism. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Students' Errors in Solving the Permutation and Combination Problems Based on Problem Solving Steps of Polya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukoriyanto; Nusantara, Toto; Subanji; Chandra, Tjang Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This article was written based on the results of a study evaluating students' errors in problem solving of permutation and combination in terms of problem solving steps according to Polya. Twenty-five students were asked to do four problems related to permutation and combination. The research results showed that the students still did a mistake in…

  7. Using Polya to Foster a Classroom Environment for Real-World Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masingila, Joanna O.; Moellwald, Francisco Egger

    1993-01-01

    Presents a model that relates Polya's ideas on problem solving to teaching practices that help create a mathematics learning environment in which students are actively involved in doing mathematics. Illustrates the model utilizing a high school geometry problem that asks students to measure the width of a river. (MDH)

  8. Mathematics in the Making: Mapping Verbal Discourse in Polya's "Let Us Teach Guessing" Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truxaw, Mary P.; DeFranco, Thomas C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a detailed analysis of verbal discourse within an exemplary mathematics lesson--that is, George Polya teaching in the Mathematics Association of America [MAA] video classic, "Let Us Teach Guessing" (1966). The results of the analysis reveal an inductive model of teaching that represents recursive cycles rather than linear…

  9. The Implementation of the Polya Method in Solving Euclidean Geometry Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    In'am, Akhsanul

    2014-01-01

    This research is aimed at analyzing the solutions of Euclidean Geometry problems using the Polya method. This present study was made through qualitative and quantitative approaches with 85 respondents of the second semester students at the Department of Mathematics Education, University of Muhammadiyah Malang Indonesia, in the 2012/2013 academic…

  10. An Appropriate Prompts System Based on the Polya Method for Mathematical Problem-Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien I.

    2017-01-01

    Current mathematics education emphasizes techniques, formulas, and procedures, neglecting the importance of understanding, presentation, and reasoning. This turns students into passive listeners that are well-practiced only in using formulas that they do not understand. We therefore adopted the Polya problem-solving method to provide students with…

  11. Mathematics in the Making: Mapping Verbal Discourse in Polya's "Let Us Teach Guessing" Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truxaw, Mary P.; DeFranco, Thomas C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a detailed analysis of verbal discourse within an exemplary mathematics lesson--that is, George Polya teaching in the Mathematics Association of America [MAA] video classic, "Let Us Teach Guessing" (1966). The results of the analysis reveal an inductive model of teaching that represents recursive cycles rather than linear…

  12. A poly(A) binding protein-specific sequence motif: MRTENGKSKGFGFVC binding to mRNA poly(A) and polynucleotides and its role on mRNA translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, H N; Halim, M N; Leavis, P C

    1994-06-01

    A consensus sequence (GKSKGFGFV) was recognized in all the sequenced poly(A) binding proteins. We synthesized a 15-amino acid peptide (corresponding to 354-368 in the yeast poly(A) binding protein) which includes the consensus sequence to test its binding affinity to different nucleotides, polynucleotides and mRNA with or without a poly(A) tail. Biochemical and biophysical studies revealed that the 15-amino acid peptide has a strong binding affinity to poly(A) alone or poly(A) attached at the 3' end of mRNA. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that the secondary structure of the 15-mer is consistent with that expected based on the structure of the native RNP domain. Furthermore, among the various mononucleotides performed in the present studies, ATP was preferentially found to bind to the 15-mer. To further examine the biological significance of the binding of the 15-mer to the poly(A) tail of mRNA, in vitro translation of the mRNA poly(A)+ in the presence of the 15-mer drastically increased globin synthesis by almost 2-fold, while translation of the deadenylated mRNA in the presence of the 15-mer almost did not alter the rate of incorporation of radiolabeled leucine into globin.

  13. A novel tandem reporter quantifies RNA polymerase II termination in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayan Banerjee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Making the correct choice between transcription elongation and transcription termination is essential to the function of RNA polymerase II, and fundamental to gene expression. This choice can be influenced by factors modifying the transcription complex, factors modifying chromatin, or signals mediated by the template or transcript. To aid in the study of transcription elongation and termination we have developed a transcription elongation reporter system that consists of tandem luciferase reporters flanking a test sequence of interest. The ratio of expression from the reporters provides a measure of the relative rates of successful elongation through the intervening sequence. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Size matched fragments containing the polyadenylation signal of the human beta-actin gene (ACTB and the human beta-globin gene (HBB were evaluated for transcription termination using this new ratiometric tandem reporter assay. Constructs bearing just 200 base pairs on either side of the consensus poly(A addition site terminated 98% and 86% of transcription for ACTB and HBB sequences, respectively. The nearly 10-fold difference in read-through transcription between the two short poly(A regions was eclipsed when additional downstream poly(A sequence was included for each gene. Both poly(A regions proved very effective at termination when 1100 base pairs were included, stopping 99.6% of transcription. To determine if part of the increased termination was simply due to the increased template length, we inserted several kilobases of heterologous coding sequence downstream of each poly(A region test fragment. Unexpectedly, the additional length reduced the effectiveness of termination of HBB sequences 2-fold and of ACTB sequences 3- to 5-fold. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The tandem construct provides a sensitive measure of transcription termination in human cells. Decreased Xrn2 or Senataxin levels produced only a modest release from

  14. Polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism analyses of nuclear and chloroplast DNA provide evidence for recombination, multiple introductions and nascent speciation in the Caulerpa taxifolia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusnier, I; Valero, M; Destombe, C; Godé, C; Desmarais, E; Bonhomme, F; Stam, W T; Olsen, J L

    2002-11-01

    Independent lines of evidence support an Australian origin for the Mediterranean populations of the tropical alga Caulerpa taxifolia. To complement previous biogeographical studies based on nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS), a new chloroplast marker was developed--the cp 16S rDNA intron-2. Sequence variability for both nuclear and chloroplast markers were assessed in 110 individuals using single strand conformation polymorphism. Comparison of intrapopulation genetic diversity between invasive Mediterranean and 'native' Australian populations revealed the occurrence of two divergent and widespread clades. The first clade grouped nontropical invasive populations with inshore-mainland populations from Australia, while the second clustered all offshore-island populations studied so far. Despite our finding of nine distinct nuclear and five distinct chloroplast profiles, a single nucleocytoplasmic combination was characteristic of the invasive populations and sexual reproduction was found to be very rare. C. taxifolia is clearly a complex of genetically and ecologically differentiated sibling species or subspecies.

  15. Polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism analyses of nuclear and chloroplast DNA provide evidence for recombination, multiple introductions and nascent speciation in the Caulerpa taxifolia complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meusnier, I; Valero, M; Destombe, C; Gode, E.; Desmarais, E.; Bonhomme, F.; Stam, W.T.; Olsen, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Independent lines of evidence support an Australian origin for the Mediterranean populations of the tropical alga Caulerpa taxifolia. To complement previous biogeographical studies based on nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS), a new chloroplast marker was developed - the cp 16S rDNA intro

  16. LINE-1-derived poly(A) microsatellites undergo rapid shortening and create somatic and germline mosaicism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandi, Fiorella C; Rosser, James M; An, Wenfeng

    2013-03-01

    Interspersed and tandem repeat sequences comprise the bulk of mammalian genomes. Interspersed repeats result from successive replication by transposable elements, such as Alu and long interspersed element type 1 (L1). Microsatellites are tandem repeats of 1-6 base pairs, among which poly(A) microsatellites are the most abundant in the human genome. The rise and fall of a microsatellite has been depicted as a life cycle. Previous studies have demonstrated that Alu and L1 insertions are a major source of A-rich microsatellites owing to the concurrent formation of a poly(A) DNA tract at the 3'-end of each insertion. The fate of such poly(A) tracts has been studied by surveying the length distribution of genomic resident Alu and L1 insertions. However, these cross-sectional studies provide no information about the tempo of mutation immediately after birth. In this study, de novo L1 insertions were created using a transgenic L1 mouse model and traced through generations to investigate the early life of poly(A) microsatellites. High frequencies of intra-individual and intergenerational shortening were observed for long poly(A) tracts, creating somatic and germline mosaicism at the insertion site, whereas little variation was observed for short poly(A) alleles. As poly(A) microsatellites are the major intrinsic signal for nucleosome positioning, their remarkable abundance and variability make them a significant source of epigenetic variation. Thus, the birth of poly(A) microsatellites from retrotransposons and the subsequent rapid and variable shortening represent a new way with which retrotransposons can modify the genetic and epigenetic architecture of our genome.

  17. Molecular recognition of single-stranded RNA: neomycin binding to poly(A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Hongjuan; Gray, David; Kumar, Sunil; Arya, Dev P

    2009-07-01

    Poly(A) is a relevant sequence in cell biology due to its importance in mRNA stability and translation initiation. Neomycin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic that is well known for its ability to target various nucleic acid structures. Here it is reported that neomycin is capable of binding tightly to a single-stranded oligonucleotide (A(30)) with a K(d) in the micromolar range. CD melting experiments support complex formation and indicate a melting temperature of 47 degrees C. The poly(A) duplex, which melts at 44 degrees C (pH 5.5), was observed to melt at 61 degrees C in the presence of neomycin, suggesting a strong stabilization of the duplex by the neomycin.

  18. pEVL: A Linear Plasmid for Generating mRNA IVT Templates With Extended Encoded Poly(A Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra E Grier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demand for large-scale synthesis of in vitro transcribed (IVT mRNA is being driven by the increasing use of mRNA for transient gene expression in cell engineering and therapeutic applications. An important determinant of IVT mRNA potency is the 3′ polyadenosine (poly(A tail, the length of which correlates with translational efficiency. However, present methods for generation of IVT mRNA rely on templates derived from circular plasmids or PCR products, in which homopolymeric tracts are unstable, thus limiting encoded poly(A tail lengths to ≃120 base pairs (bp. Here, we have developed a novel method for generation of extended poly(A tracts using a previously described linear plasmid system, pJazz. We find that linear plasmids can successfully propagate poly(A tracts up to ≃500 bp in length for IVT mRNA production. We then modified pJazz by removing extraneous restriction sites, adding a T7 promoter sequence upstream from an extended multiple cloning site, and adding a unique type-IIS restriction site downstream from the encoded poly(A tract to facilitate generation of IVT mRNA with precisely defined encoded poly(A tracts and 3′ termini. The resulting plasmid, designated pEVL, can be used to generate IVT mRNA with consistent defined lengths and terminal residue(s.

  19. PATACSDB—the database of polyA translational attenuators in coding sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Habich

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent additions to the repertoire of gene expression regulatory mechanisms are polyadenylate (polyA tracks encoding for poly-lysine runs in protein sequences. Such tracks stall the translation apparatus and induce frameshifting independently of the effects of charged nascent poly-lysine sequence on the ribosome exit channel. As such, they substantially influence the stability of mRNA and the amount of protein produced from a given transcript. Single base changes in these regions are enough to exert a measurable response on both protein and mRNA abundance; this makes each of these sequences a potentially interesting case study for the effects of synonymous mutation, gene dosage balance and natural frameshifting. Here we present PATACSDB, a resource that contain a comprehensive list of polyA tracks from over 250 eukaryotic genomes. Our data is based on the Ensembl genomic database of coding sequences and filtered with algorithm of 12A-1 which selects sequences of polyA tracks with a minimal length of 12 A’s allowing for one mismatched base. The PATACSDB database is accessible at: http://sysbio.ibb.waw.pl/patacsdb. The source code is available at http://github.com/habich/PATACSDB, and it includes the scripts with which the database can be recreated.

  20. PolyA deletions in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: mutations before a gatekeeper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Salovaara, Reijo; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Järvinen, Heikki J; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Shibata, Darryl

    2002-04-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) secondary to loss of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is present in adenomas and colorectal carcinomas from individuals with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). To better characterize when MMR loss occurs during HNPCC progression, the extent of deletions in noncoding polyA sequences were compared between 6 adenomas (all polyA deletions are stepwise. Adenoma deletions were nearly the same (85%) as the cancers with sum total deletions at four different polyA loci of -32.7 bases in adenomas and -38.4 bases in cancers. Intervals between negative clinical examinations and tumor removal (average of 2.1 years) were known for six tumors. There were no significant differences in the extent of deletions in tumors removed under clinical surveillance (-34.8 bases) versus tumors removed without prior negative examinations (-36.5 bases). These findings illustrate that MSI is extensive in both small adenomas, and tumors which appear after negative clinical examinations, consistent with an early loss of MMR in HNPCC, even before a gatekeeper mutation.

  1. Stable interaction between the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen loader complex Ctf18-replication factor C (RFC) and DNA polymerase {epsilon} is mediated by the cohesion-specific subunits, Ctf18, Dcc1, and Ctf8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takeshi; Takano, Ryuji; Takeo, Satoshi; Taniguchi, Rina; Ogawa, Kaori; Ohashi, Eiji; Tsurimoto, Toshiki

    2010-11-05

    One of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen loader complexes, Ctf18-replication factor C (RFC), is involved in sister chromatid cohesion. To examine its relationship with factors involved in DNA replication, we performed a proteomics analysis of Ctf18-interacting proteins. We found that Ctf18 interacts with a replicative DNA polymerase, DNA polymerase ε (pol ε). Co-immunoprecipitation with recombinant Ctf18-RFC and pol ε demonstrated that their binding is direct and mediated by two distinct interactions, one weak and one stable. Three subunits that are specifically required for cohesion in yeast, Ctf18, Dcc1, and Ctf8, formed a trimeric complex (18-1-8) and together enabled stable binding with pol ε. The C-terminal 23-amino acid stretch of Ctf18 was necessary for the trimeric association of 18-1-8 and was required for the stable interaction. The weak interaction was observed with alternative loader complexes including Ctf18-RFC(5), which lacks Dcc1 and Ctf8, suggesting that the common loader structures, including the RFC small subunits (RFC2-5), are responsible for the weak interaction. The two interaction modes, mediated through distinguishable structures of Ctf18-RFC, both occurred through the N-terminal half of pol ε, which includes the catalytic domain. The addition of Ctf18-RFC or Ctf18-RFC(5) to the DNA synthesis reaction caused partial inhibition and stimulation, respectively. Thus, Ctf18-RFC has multiple interactions with pol ε that promote polymorphic modulation of DNA synthesis. We propose that their interaction alters the DNA synthesis mode to enable the replication fork to cooperate with the establishment of cohesion.

  2. PolyA PCR amplification of cDNA from RNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Richard; Roebuck, Jamie; Sakhinia, Ebrahim; Hoyland, Judith

    2004-09-01

    RNA extraction still relies almost exclusively on the use of fresh or frozen tissue, limiting the number of samples that can be analyzed, and there is a growing need for means of global mRNA analysis of archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET). Previous reports of RNA extraction and amplification from FFPET are limited and do not enable global cDNA amplification. This study used polyA PCR to generate globally amplified cDNA from RNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. RNA was extracted from nine routinely processed archival FFPET samples (lymph node, nasopharynx, prostate, lung and bone marrow) using an Ambion Paraffin Block RNA Isolation Kit. Global cDNA was generated by polyA RT-PCR and used in GAPDH specific PCR and PCR for CD33, c-myb, and SNF2. PolyA cDNA was reamplified by polyA PCR and the reamplified cDNA also used in GAPDH PCR. RNA was extracted from all nine samples, but was degraded. PolyA RT-PCR generated cDNA from all samples and was positive for GAPDH PCR in seven. PCR for CD33, c-myb, and SNF2 was positive in all samples tested. Following reamplification, the polyA cDNA remained positive for GAPDH by PCR. The results demonstrate the feasibility of globally amplifying RNA isolated from archival FFPET samples using polyA RT-PCR, which generates a renewable cDNA pool that can be probed for any cDNA species and reamplified as necessary.

  3. Identification of a Nuclear Exosome Decay Pathway for Processed Transcripts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meola, Nicola; Domanski, Michal; Karadoulama, Evdoxia

    2016-01-01

    , the Zn-finger protein ZCCHC8, and the RNA-binding factor RBM7. NEXT primarily targets early and unprocessed transcripts, which demands a rationale for how the nuclear exosome recognizes processed RNAs. Here, we describe the poly(A) tail exosome targeting (PAXT) connection, which comprises the ZFC3H1 Zn...

  4. Pembelajaran Berbasis Masalah Berdasarkan Langkah - Langkah Polya untuk Meningkatkan Kemampuan Menyelesaikan Soal Cerita Matematika

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilyatin Nisak Sam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mendeskripsikan pembelajaran berbasis masalah berdasarkan langkah-langkah pemecahan masalah Polya yang dapat meningkatkan kemampuan menyelesaikan soal cerita matematika siswa kelas 8 SMPN 4 Malang. Data penelitian diperoleh dari analisis lembar jawaban tes, lembar observasi, lembar catatan lapangan, dan pedoman wawancara. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pembelajaran berbasis masalah berdasarkan langkah-langkah pemecahan masalah Polya yang dapat  meningkatkan kemampuan menyelesaikan soal cerita matematika siswa kelas 8 adalah 1 mengenalkan siswa pada masalah, 2 mengorganisasi siswa untuk belajar, 3 membantu investigasi mandiri dan kelompok dengan menggunakan langkah-langkah pemecahan masalah Polya, yaitu a memahami masalah, b menyusun rencana, c melaksanakan rencana, dan d mengecek kembali, 4 mengembangkan dan mempresentasikan hasil karya, dan 5 menganalisis dan mengevaluasi proses pemecahan masalah.The purpose of this study was to describe the problem-based learning by Polya’s steps problem solving that can improve math word problem solving grade 8 SMPN 4 Malang. Data were obtained from the analysis of the test answer sheets, observation sheets, sheets of field notes, and the questionnaires. The results showed that the problem-based learning by Polya’s steps problem solving that can improve student math story problems completion of grade 8 are 1 to introduce students to the problem, 2 organize the students to learn, 3 helping independent investigation and groups using the Polya’s steps problem solving, namely a understand the problem, b devise a plan, c carry out the plan, and d look back, 4 develop and present work, and 5 analyze and evaluate the problem-solving process.

  5. Expansion of the first PolyA tract of ARX causes infantile spasms and status dystonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrini, R; Moro, F; Kato, M; Barkovich, A J; Shiihara, T; McShane, M A; Hurst, J; Loi, M; Tohyama, J; Norci, V; Hayasaka, K; Kang, U J; Das, S; Dobyns, W B

    2007-07-31

    ARX is a paired-type homeobox gene located on the X chromosome that contains five exons with four polyalanine (PolyA) tracts, a homeodomain, and a conserved C-terminal aristaless domain. Studies in humans have demonstrated remarkable pleiotropy: malformation phenotypes are associated with protein truncation mutations and missense mutations in the homeobox; nonmalformation phenotypes, including X-linked infantile spasms (ISS), are associated with missense mutations outside of the homeobox and expansion of the PolyA tracts. To investigate the role of ARX, we performed mutation analysis in 115 boys with cryptogenic ISS. This included two pairs of brothers. We found an expansion of the trinucleotide repeat that codes for the first PolyA tract from 10 to 17 GCG repeats (c.333_334ins[GCG]7) in six boys (5.2%) ages 2 to 14, from four families, including the two pairs of brothers. In addition to ISS, all six boys had severe mental retardation and generalized dystonia that appeared around the age of 6 months and worsened, eventually leading to stable severe quadriplegic dyskinesia within age 2 years. Three children experienced recurrent, life-threatening status dystonicus. In four children brain MRI showed multiple small foci of abnormal cavitation on T1 and increased signal intensity on T2 in the putamina, possibly reflecting progressive multifocal loss of tissue. The phenotype of infantile spasms with severe dyskinetic quadriparesis increases the number of human disorders that result from the pathologic expansion of single alanine repeats. ARX gene testing should be considered in boys with infantile spasms and dyskinetic cerebral palsy in the absence of a consistent perinatal history.

  6. Justifying the Gompertz curve of mortality via the generalized Polya process of shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Ji Hwan; Finkelstein, Maxim

    2016-06-01

    A new probabilistic model of aging that can be applied to organisms is suggested and analyzed. Organisms are subject to shocks that follow the generalized Polya process (GPP), which has been recently introduced and characterized in the literature. Distinct from the nonhomogeneous Poisson process that has been widely used in applications, the important feature of this process is the dependence of its future behavior on the number of previous events (shocks). The corresponding survival and the mortality rate functions are derived and analyzed. The general approach is used for justification of the Gompertz law of human mortality.

  7. The multivariate beta process and an extension of the Polya tree model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippa, Lorenzo; Müller, Peter; Johnson, Wesley

    2011-03-01

    We introduce a novel stochastic process that we term the multivariate beta process. The process is defined for modelling-dependent random probabilities and has beta marginal distributions. We use this process to define a probability model for a family of unknown distributions indexed by covariates. The marginal model for each distribution is a Polya tree prior. An important feature of the proposed prior is the easy centring of the nonparametric model around any parametric regression model. We use the model to implement nonparametric inference for survival distributions. The nonparametric model that we introduce can be adopted to extend the support of prior distributions for parametric regression models.

  8. Are There Mutator Polymerases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garcia-Diaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are involved in different cellular events, including genome replication and DNA repair. In the last few years, a large number of novel DNA polymerases have been discovered, and the biochemical analysis of their properties has revealed a long list of intriguing features. Some of these polymerases have a very low fidelity and have been suggested to play mutator roles in different processes, like translesion synthesis or somatic hypermutation. The current view of these processes is reviewed, and the current understanding of DNA polymerases and their role as mutator enzymes is discussed.

  9. Interaction of phenazinium dyes with double-stranded poly(A): spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asma Yasmeen; Saha, Baishakhi; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2014-10-15

    A comprehensive study on the binding of phenazinium dyes viz. janus green B, indoine blue, safranine O and phenosafranine with double stranded poly(A) using various spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques is presented. A higher binding of janus green B and indoine blue over safranine O and phenosafranine to poly(A) was observed from all experiments. Intercalative mode of binding of the dyes was inferred from fluorescence polarization anisotropy, iodide quenching and viscosity experiments. Circular dichroism study revealed significant perturbation of the secondary structure of poly(A) on binding of these dyes. Results from isothermal titration calorimetry experiments suggested that the binding was predominantly entropy driven with a minor contribution of enthalpy to the standard molar Gibbs energy. The results presented here may open new opportunities in the application of these dyes as RNA targeted therapeutic agents.

  10. Removal of polyA tails from full-length cDNA libraries for high-efficiency sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y; Carninci, P; Sato, K; Hayatsu, N; Shiraki, T; Ishii, Y; Arakawa, T; Hara, A; Ohsato, N; Izawa, M; Aizawa, K; Itoh, M; Shibata, K; Shinagawa, A; Kawai, J; Ota, Y; Kikuchi, S; Kishimoto, N; Muramatsu, M; Hayashizaki, Y

    2001-11-01

    We have developed a method to overcome sequencing problems caused by the presence of homopolymer stretches, such as polyA/T, in cDNA libraries. PolyA tails are shortened by cleaving before cDNA cloning with type IIS restriction enzymes, such as GsuI, placed next to the oligo-dT used to prime the polyA tails of mRNAs. We constructed four rice Cap-Trapper-selected, full-length normalized cDNA libraries, of which the average residual polyA tail was 4 bases or shorter in most of the clones analyzed Because of the removal of homopolymeric stretches, libraries prepared with this method can be used for direct sequencing and transcriptional sequencing without the slippage observed for libraries prepared with currently available methods, thus improving sequencing accuracy, operations, and throughput.

  11. PENGEMBANGAN PERANGKAT PEMBELAJARAN BERBASIS PROBLEM SOLVING POLYA UNTUK MENINGKATKAN KEMAMPUAN PENALARAN MATEMATIS SISWA MATERI PELUANG KELAS XI SMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lela Nur Safrida

    2016-04-01

    Penalaran mulai ditonjolkan dalam kurikulum matematika di seluruh dunia dan dipandang sebagai upaya utama untuk mereformasi pembelajaran matematika. Penalaran dan matematika merupakan satu kesatuan yang tidak dapat dipisahkan karena materi matematika dipahami melalui penalaran. Upaya peningkatan kemampuan penalaran matematis siswa dapat dilakukan dengan memberikan tugas yang tidak rutin. Metode pembelajaran yang mampu mengakomodasi proses berfikir dan bernalar siswa yaitu problem solving Polya. Tujuan penelitian dan pengembangan ini adalah mendeskripsikan proses dan hasil pengembangan perangkat berbasis problem solving Polya untuk siswa kelas XI pada materi permutasi dan kombinasi yang valid, praktis, dan efektif dalam meningkatkan kemampuan penalaran matematis siswa.

  12. STRATEGI PEMECAHAN MASALAH MATEMATIS VERSI GEORGE POLYA DAN PENERAPANNYA DALAM PEMBELAJARAN MATEMATIKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahid Umar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available George Polya telah meletakan suatu warisan “pentingnya mengajar dengan pemecahan masalah”. Setiap masalah memiliki “sepuluh strategi” yang tepat dengan “empat” langkah pemecahan sesuai dengan aspek-aspek dan sudut pandangnya masing-masing di dalam menyelesaikan suatu masalah matematis. Topik ini telah menjadi komponen utama dalam kurikulum matematika pada semua tingkatan pendidikan. NCTM dalam standards (1989 mempublikasikan ”The Curriculum and Evaluations Standards for School Mathematics”, yang menekankan bahwa pemecahan masalah harus menjadi fokus dalam kurikulum matematika di sekolah. Ini berarti bahwa pemecahan masalah merupakan salah satu topik yang sangat penting dalam pembelajaran matematika. Tujuan mengajarkan matematika dengan pemecahan masalah adalah: (1 membantu guru memperbaiki keterampilan pemecahan masalah diri sendiri; (2 diberikan kepada guru untuk membantu siswa mengembangkan keterampilan pemecahan masalah mereka; (3 untuk menyelidiki strategi umum pemecahan masalah; dan (4 bagaimana membuat kata “masalah” dan “pemecahan masalah” menantang dan menarik untuk siswa. Pentingnya para siswa mengalami proses pembelajaran matematika dengan pemecahan masalah matematis. Siswa perlu dipersiapkan dan didorong untuk berpikir bahwa sesuatu itu multi-dimensi sehingga mereka dapat melihat banyak kemungkinan penyelesaian untuk suatu masalah. Dengan demikian, pemecahan masalah matematis dalam pembelajaran matematika merupakan bagian integral dari semua aktivitas matematis. Fokus kajian makalah ini adalah bagaimana strategi pemecahan masalah matematis versi George Polya dan penerapannya dalam pembelajaran matematika.

  13. Penerapan Grey-Tall and Polya Based Learning Disertai Assessment for Learning untuk Meningkatkan Kreativitas Mahasiswa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zainudin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendiskripsikan penerapan Gray-Tall and Polya Based Learning (GTPBL disertai Assessment for Learning (AfL yang dapat meningkatkan kreativitas mahasiswa pada matakuliah aljabar linear. Penelitian ini termasuk dalam Penelitian Tindakan Kelas (PTK, penelitian ini dilakukan di program studi pendidikan Matematika IKIP PGRI Bojonegoro selama 2 siklus. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa penerapan Gray-Tall and Polya Based Learning (GTPBL disertai Assessment for Learning (AfL yang dapat meningkatkan kreativitas mahasiswa pada matakuliah aljabar linear dilakukan dengan keaktifan dosen dalam  mengoreksi dan memberikan umpan balik hasil kinerja mahasiswa dalam membuat dan menyelesaikan permasalahan aljabar penelitian setiap pertemuan, mahasiswa pada setiap pertemuan selalu merevisi hasil kinerjanya berdasarkan masukan dari dosen dan teman sejawat, sedangkan bentuk projek yang diberikan kepada mahasiswa berupa tugas membuat permasalahan aljabar sesuai dengan materi dan menyelesaikannya dengan setidaknya 3 cara berbeda sesuai kreativitas mahasiswa. Rerata kreativitas mahasiswa berdasarkan indikator kreativitas pada aspek kefasihan dan kebaruan di siklus I lebih besar 75, tetapi pada aspek fleksibilitas hanya mencapai 70,3; sehingga belum memenuhi indikator keberhasilan. Rerata tiap indikator kreativitas mahasiswa pada siklus II lebih besar 75 sehingga memenuhi indikator keberhasilan, secara keseluruhan mahasiswa mengalami peningkatan kreativitasnya.

  14. Biochemical characterization of rhinovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Magdeleine; Gibbs, Craig S; Tsiang, Manuel

    2002-11-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV) represent the single most important causative agent of the common cold. The HRV genome encodes an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) designated 3D polymerase that is required for replication of the HRV RNA genome. We have expressed and purified recombinant HRV-16 3D polymerase to near homogeneity from Escherichia coli transformed with an expression plasmid containing the full-length 460 amino acid HRV-16 3D sequence with a methionine at the N-terminus and a glycine-serine linker followed by a 6-histidine affinity tag at the C-terminus. The purified recombinant protein has rifampicin-resistant activity in a poly(A)-dependent poly(U) polymerase assay while corresponding fractions similarly purified from E. coli transformed with an expression plasmid without the HRV-16 3D sequence showed no activity. The optimal conditions for temperature, pH, divalent cations Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), and KCl were determined. The recombinant protein has RNA polymerase activity on homopolymeric templates poly(A) and poly(C) and heteropolymeric RNA templates primed with either RNA or DNA oligonucleotide primers or self-primed by a copy-back mechanism. A unique, secondary structureless heteropolymeric RNA template that is an efficient substrate was developed to facilitate kinetic characterizations of the enzyme. In the presence of Mg(2+), the enzyme displayed strong base and sugar specificity. However, when Mg(2+) was replaced by Mn(2+) specificity for ribonucleotides was lost, utilization of deoxynucleotides became possible and primer-independent activity was observed on the poly(C) template. Zn(2+) was found to inhibit HRV-16 3D polymerase with an IC(50) as low as 0.6 microM by a mechanism distinct from the magnesium ion stimulation. The activity of this 6His-tagged HRV-16 3D polymerase was compared with that of a recombinant HRV-16 3D polymerase expressed without the 6His-tag and was found to be identical. The availability of recombinant rhinovirus RdRp in a

  15. Measurement of mRNA Poly(A) Tail Lengths in Drosophila Female Germ Cells and Germ-Line Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Aymeric; Joly, Willy; Simonelig, Martine

    2017-01-01

    mRNA regulation by poly(A) tail length variations plays an important role in many developmental processes. Recent advances have shown that, in particular, deadenylation (the shortening of mRNA poly(A) tails) is essential for germ-line stem cell biology in the Drosophila ovary. Therefore, a rapid and accurate method to analyze poly(A) tail lengths of specific mRNAs in this tissue is valuable. Several methods of poly(A) test (PAT) assays have been reported to measure mRNA poly(A) tail lengths in vivo. Here, we describe two of these methods (PAT and ePAT) that we have adapted for Drosophila ovarian germ cells and germ-line stem cells.

  16. The Effects of Pair Problem Solving Technique Incorporating Polya's Problem Solving Strategy on Undergraduate Students' Performance in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Ibrahim

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of pair problem solving technique incorporating Polya's problem solving strategy on undergraduate students' performance in conceptual and algorithmic questions in chemistry. The subjects of this study were 89 students enrolled from two first year chemistry classes. The experimental group was…

  17. Destabilization of the TAR hairpin leads to extension of the polyA hairpin and inhibition of HIV-1 polyadenylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrolijk, M.M.; Harwig, A.; Berkhout, B.; Das, A.T.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Two hairpin structures that are present at both the 5' and 3' end of the HIV-1 RNA genome have important functions in the viral life cycle. The TAR hairpin binds the viral Tat protein and is essential for Tat-mediated activation of transcription. The adjacent polyA hairpin

  18. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Roy; Denis, Clyde L; Zhang, Chongxu

    2012-01-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from...

  19. A P\\'olya criterion for (strict) positive definiteness on the sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Beatson, R K; Xu, Y

    2011-01-01

    Positive definite functions are very important in both theory and applications of approximation theory, probability and statistics. In particular, identifying strictly positive definite kernels is of great interest as interpolation problems corresponding to these kernels are guaranteed to be poised. A Bochner type result of Schoenberg characterises continuous positive definite zonal functions, $f(\\cos \\cdot)$, on the sphere $\\Sdmone$, as those with nonnegative Gegenbauer coefficients. More recent results characterise strictly positive definite functions on $\\Sdmone$ by stronger conditions on the signs of the Gegenbauer coefficients. Unfortunately, given a function $f$, checking the signs of all the Gegenbauer coefficients can be an onerous, or impossible, task. Therefore, it is natural to seek simpler sufficient conditions which guarantee (strict) positive definiteness. We state a conjecture which leads to a P\\'olya type criterion for functions to be (strictly) positive definite on the sphere $\\Sdmone$. In an...

  20. Characterization of PolyA and PolyC mismatches by Raman spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yubo Liao; Yaoyong Meng; Haodong Lei; Ying Wang

    2008-01-01

    A.C mismatches are studied by Raman spectral characterization of PolyA, PolyC, and their equimolar complex in solution of 0.14 mol/L Na+,pH7.0.Experimental results show that A·C mismatches occur to be A/B (mainly A) conformers, and unlike Watson-Crick base pairing, this kind of mismatches is stabilized by only one hydrogen bond involving cytosine N4H2 and adenine N7.The formation of A·C complex makes the base stacking interactions much stronger, and conformation of the backbone more ordered, which leads to obvious Raman hypochromic effect with some shifts in corresponding bands.

  1. PEMECAHAN MASALAH SPASIAL MATEMATIS CALON GURU MATEMATIKA DITINJAU DARI LANGKAH-LANGKAH PEMECAHAN MASALAH POLYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiki Alghadari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Studi ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui kendala yang dihadapi subjek studi dalam menyelesaikan masalah spasial dengan mengaplikasikan langkah-langkah umum pemecahan masalah dari Polya. Objek studi yaitutulisan jawaban penyelesaian tes kemampuan pemecahan masalah spasial matematis yang dibuat oleh subjek. Subjek studi ini adalah tiga orangmahasiswa tahun pelajaran 2015/2016.Pengumpulan data menggunakan pendekatan kualitatif. Analisisdifokuskan pada beberapa tulisan jawaban oleh subjek. Kelemahan subjek pada kemampuan pemecahan masalah spasial terlihat pada kekeliruanberimajinasi membentuk mental image membayangkanspatial imageryatau visual imagerydalam pemikirannya,sehingga subjek perempuan gagal membuat transformasi spasialdengan benar. Kegagalan ini merupakan masalah padakemampuan visualisasi spasialdan akan berdampak pula pada gagalnya memecahkan masalah spasial. Hasil analisis yang tidak konsisten ditemukan antara analisis tes pertama dan yang kedua, karena kualitas tes memang berbeda secara spasial.

  2. Recurrence and Polya Number of General One-Dimensional Random Walks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓琨; 万晶; 陆静菊; 徐新平

    2011-01-01

    The recurrence properties of random walks can be characterized by P61ya number, i.e., the probability that the walker has returned to the origin at least once. In this paper, we consider recurrence properties for a general 1D random walk on a line, in which at each time step the walker can move to the left or right with probabilities l and r, or remain at the same position with probability o (l + r + o = 1). We calculate Polya number P of this model and find a simple expression for P as, P = 1 - △, where △ is the absolute difference of l and r (△= |l - r|). We prove this rigorous expression by the method of creative telescoping, and our result suggests that the walk is recurrent if and only if the left-moving probability l equals to the right-moving probability r.

  3. [The effects of SV40 PolyA sequence and its AATAAA signal on upstream GFP gene expression and transcription termination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Ping; Feng, Jing-Jing; Wang, Hong-Gang; Wang, Xiu-Fang; Lv, Zhan-Jun

    2012-01-01

    SV40 PolyA (Simian virus 40 PolyA, also called PolyA) sequence is DNA sequence (240 bp) that possesses the activity of transcription termination and can add PolyA tail to mRNA. PolyA contains AATAAA hexanucleotide polyadenylation signal. Fourteen copies of Alu in sense orientation (Alu14) were inserted downstream of GFP in pEGFP-C1 to construct pAlu14 plasmid, and then HeLa cells were transiently transfected with pAlu14. Northern blot and fluorescence microscope were used to observe GFP RNA and protein expressions. Our results found that Alu tandem sequence inhibited remarkably GFP gene expression, but produced higher-molecular-mass GFP fusion RNA. PolyA and its sequence that was deleted AATAAA signal in sense or antisense orientation were inserted between GFP and Alu tandem sequence in pAlu14. The results showed that all the inserted PolyA sequences partly eliminated the inhibition induced by Alu14. PolyA sequences without AATAAA signal in sense or antisense orientation still induced transcription termination. Antisense PolyA (PolyAas) was divided into four fragments that all are 60 bp long and the middle two fragments were named 2F2R and 3F3R. 2F2R or 3F3R was inserted upstream of Alu tandem sequence in pAlu14. The molecular mass of GFP fusion RNA increased when the copy number of 2F2R increased. 2F2R can support transcription elongation when 2F2R is located upstream of other 2F2R. Nevertheless, 2F2R located upstream of Alu tandem sequence can induce transcription termination. Inserting one copy or 64 copies of 3F3R in upstream of Alu tandem sequence caused the production of lower-molecular-mass GFP RNA.

  4. Pyridine Nucleotide Cycling and Control of Intracellular Redox State in Relation to Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Activity and Nuclear Localization of Glutathione during Exponential Growth of Arabidopsis Cells in Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Till K.Pellny; Vittoria Locato; Pedro Diaz Vivancos; Jelena Markovic; Laura De Gara; Federico V.Pallardó; Christine H.Foyer

    2009-01-01

    Pyridine nucleotides,ascorbate and glutathione are major redox metabolites in plant cells,with specific roles in cellular redox homeostasis and the regulation of the cell cycle.However,the regulation of these metabolite pools during exponential growth and their precise functions in the cell cycle remain to be characterized.The present analysis of the abundance of ascorbate,glutathione,and pyridine nucleotides during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture provides evidence for the differential regulation of each of these redox pools.Ascorbate was most abundant early in the growth cycle,but glutathione was low at this point.The cellular ascorbate to dehydroascorbate and reduced glutathione (GSH) to glutathione disulphide ratios were high and constant but the pyridine nucleotide pools were largely oxidized over the period of exponential growth and only became more reduced once growth had ceased.The glutathione pool increased in parallel with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities and with increases in the abundance of PARP1 and PARP2 mRNAs at a time of high cell cycle activity as indicated by transcriptome information.Marked changes in the intracellular partitioning of GSH between the cytoplasm and nucleus were observed.Extension of the exponential growth phase by dilution or changing the media led to increases in the glutathione and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide,ox-idized form (NAD)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide,reduced form (NADH) pools and to higher NAD/NADH ratios but the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate,oxidized form (NADP)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate,reduced form (NADPH) pool sizes,and NAPD/NADPH ratios were much less affected.The ascorbate,glutathi-one,and pyridine nucleotide pools and PARP activity decreased before the exponential growth phase ended.We concludethat there are marked changes in intracellular redox state during the growth cycle but that redox homeostasis is main-rained by interplay

  5. Pyridine nucleotide cycling and control of intracellular redox state in relation to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity and nuclear localization of glutathione during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellny, Till K; Locato, Vittoria; Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Markovic, Jelena; De Gara, Laura; Pallardó, Federico V; Foyer, Christine H

    2009-05-01

    Pyridine nucleotides, ascorbate and glutathione are major redox metabolites in plant cells, with specific roles in cellular redox homeostasis and the regulation of the cell cycle. However, the regulation of these metabolite pools during exponential growth and their precise functions in the cell cycle remain to be characterized. The present analysis of the abundance of ascorbate, glutathione, and pyridine nucleotides during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture provides evidence for the differential regulation of each of these redox pools. Ascorbate was most abundant early in the growth cycle, but glutathione was low at this point. The cellular ascorbate to dehydroascorbate and reduced glutathione (GSH) to glutathione disulphide ratios were high and constant but the pyridine nucleotide pools were largely oxidized over the period of exponential growth and only became more reduced once growth had ceased. The glutathione pool increased in parallel with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities and with increases in the abundance of PARP1 and PARP2 mRNAs at a time of high cell cycle activity as indicated by transcriptome information. Marked changes in the intracellular partitioning of GSH between the cytoplasm and nucleus were observed. Extension of the exponential growth phase by dilution or changing the media led to increases in the glutathione and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form (NAD)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form (NADH) pools and to higher NAD/NADH ratios but the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, oxidized form (NADP)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form (NADPH) pool sizes, and NAPD/NADPH ratios were much less affected. The ascorbate, glutathione, and pyridine nucleotide pools and PARP activity decreased before the exponential growth phase ended. We conclude that there are marked changes in intracellular redox state during the growth cycle but that redox homeostasis is

  6. Fission yeast Mog1p homologue, which interacts with the small GTPase Ran, is required for mitosis-to-interphase transition and poly(A)(+) RNA metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatebayashi, K; Tani, T; Ikeda, H

    2001-04-01

    We have cloned and characterized the Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene mog1(+), which encodes a protein with homology to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mog1p participating in the Ran-GTPase system. The S. pombe Mog1p is predominantly localized in the nucleus. In contrast to the S. cerevisiae MOG1 gene, the S. pombe mog1(+) gene is essential for cell viability. mog1(+) is required for the mitosis-to-interphase transition, as the mog1-1 mutant arrests at restrictive temperatures as septated, binucleated cells with highly condensed chromosomes and an aberrant nuclear envelope. FACS analysis showed that these cells do not undergo a subsequent round of DNA replication. Surprisingly, also unlike the Delta mog1 mutation in S. cerevisiae, the mog1-1 mutation causes nucleolar accumulation of poly(A)(+) RNA at the restrictive temperature in S. pombe, but the signals do not overlap with the fibrillarin-rich region of the nucleolus. Thus, we found that mog1(+) is required for the mitosis-to-interphase transition and a class of RNA metabolism. In our attempt to identify suppressors of mog1-1, we isolated the spi1(+) gene, which encodes the fission yeast homologue of Ran. We found that overexpression of Spi1p rescues the S. pombe Delta mog1 cells from death. On the basis of these results, we conclude that mog1(+) is involved in the Ran-GTPase system.

  7. LA HOJA DE CÁLCULO PARA LA RESOLUCIÓN DE PROBLEMAS MATEMÁTICOS POR EL MÉTODO DE POLYA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alfonso José González Regaña

    2016-01-01

    .... En este articulo utilizamos el modelo de cuatro fases para la resolucion de problemas matematicos propuesto por George Polya, en un contexto de estudiantes de Primer curso del Grado de Educacion...

  8. RNA polymerase II pausing downstream of core histone genes is different from genes producing polyadenylated transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishanpal Anamika

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq analyses performed in various eukaryotic organisms, analysed RNA Polymerase II (Pol II pausing around the transcription start sites of genes. In this study we have further investigated genome-wide binding of Pol II downstream of the 3' end of the annotated genes (EAGs by ChIP-seq in human cells. At almost all expressed genes we observed Pol II occupancy downstream of the EAGs suggesting that Pol II pausing 3' from the transcription units is a rather common phenomenon. Downstream of EAGs Pol II transcripts can also be detected by global run-on and sequencing, suggesting the presence of functionally active Pol II. Based on Pol II occupancy downstream of EAGs we could distinguish distinct clusters of Pol II pause patterns. On core histone genes, coding for non-polyadenylated transcripts, Pol II occupancy is quickly dropping after the EAG. In contrast, on genes, whose transcripts undergo polyA tail addition [poly(A(+], Pol II occupancy downstream of the EAGs can be detected up to 4-6 kb. Inhibition of polyadenylation significantly increased Pol II occupancy downstream of EAGs at poly(A(+ genes, but not at the EAGs of core histone genes. The differential genome-wide Pol II occupancy profiles 3' of the EAGs have also been confirmed in mouse embryonic stem (mES cells, indicating that Pol II pauses genome-wide downstream of the EAGs in mammalian cells. Moreover, in mES cells the sharp drop of Pol II signal at the EAG of core histone genes seems to be independent of the phosphorylation status of the C-terminal domain of the large subunit of Pol II. Thus, our study uncovers a potential link between different mRNA 3' end processing mechanisms and consequent Pol II transcription termination processes.

  9. Secondary structures involving the poly(A tail and other 3’ sequences are major determinants of mRNA isoform stability in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarmik Moqtaderi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, previous measurements of mRNA stabilities have been determined on a per-gene basis. We and others have recently shown that yeast genes give rise to a highly heterogeneous population of mRNAs due to extensive alternative 3’ end formation. Typical genes can have fifty or more distinct mRNA isoforms with 3’ endpoints differing by as little as one and as many as hundreds of nucleotides. In our recent paper [Geisberg et al. Cell (2014 156: 812-824] we measured half-lives of individual mRNA isoforms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using the anchor away method for the rapid removal of Rpb1, the largest subunit of RNA Polymerase II, from the nucleus, followed by direct RNA sequencing of the cellular mRNA population over time. Combining these two methods allowed us to determine half-lives for more than 20,000 individual mRNA isoforms originating from nearly 5000 yeast genes. We discovered that different 3’ mRNA isoforms arising from the same gene can have widely different stabilities, and that such half-life variability across mRNA isoforms from a single gene is highly prevalent in yeast cells. Determining half-lives for many different mRNA isoforms from the same genes allowed us to identify hundreds of RNA sequence elements involved in the stabilization and destabilization of individual isoforms. In many cases, the poly(A tail is likely to participate in the formation of stability - enhancing secondary structures at mRNA 3’ ends. Our results point to an important role for mRNA structure at 3’ termini in governing transcript stability, likely by reducing the interaction of the mRNA with the degradation apparatus.

  10. The role of the poly(A) tract in the replication and virulence of tick-borne encephalitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Naveed; Lee, Yi-Ping; Nilsson, Emma; Lindqvist, Richard; Melik, Wessam; Kröger, Andrea; Överby, Anna K.; Johansson, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    The tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is a flavivirus transmitted to humans, usually via tick bites. The virus causes tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) in humans, and symptoms range from mild flu-like symptoms to severe and long-lasting sequelae, including permanent brain damage. It has been suggested that within the population of viruses transmitted to the mammalian host, quasispecies with neurotropic properties might become dominant in the host resulting in neurological symptoms. We previously demonstrated the existence of TBEV variants with variable poly(A) tracts within a single blood-fed tick. To characterize the role of the poly(A) tract in TBEV replication and virulence, we generated infectious clones of Torö-2003 with the wild-type (A)3C(A)6 sequence (Torö-6A) or with a modified (A)3C(A)38 sequence (Torö-38A). Torö-38A replicated poorly compared to Torö-6A in cell culture, but Torö-38A was more virulent than Torö-6A in a mouse model of TBE. Next-generation sequencing of TBEV genomes after passaging in cell culture and/or mouse brain revealed mutations in specific genomic regions and the presence of quasispecies that might contribute to the observed differences in virulence. These data suggest a role for quasispecies development within the poly(A) tract as a virulence determinant for TBEV in mice. PMID:27982069

  11. Poly(A binding protein 1 enhances cap-independent translation initiation of neurovirulence factor from avian herpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdessamad Tahiri-Alaoui

    Full Text Available Poly(A binding protein 1 (PABP1 plays a central role in mRNA translation and stability and is a target by many viruses in diverse manners. We report a novel viral translational control strategy involving the recruitment of PABP1 to the 5' leader internal ribosome entry site (5L IRES of an immediate-early (IE bicistronic mRNA that encodes the neurovirulence protein (pp14 from the avian herpesvirus Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1. We provide evidence for the interaction between an internal poly(A sequence within the 5L IRES and PABP1 which may occur concomitantly with the recruitment of PABP1 to the poly(A tail. RNA interference and reverse genetic mutagenesis results show that a subset of virally encoded-microRNAs (miRNAs targets the inhibitor of PABP1, known as paip2, and therefore plays an indirect role in PABP1 recruitment strategy by increasing the available pool of active PABP1. We propose a model that may offer a mechanistic explanation for the cap-independent enhancement of the activity of the 5L IRES by recruitment of a bona fide initiation protein to the 5' end of the message and that is, from the affinity binding data, still compatible with the formation of 'closed loop' structure of mRNA.

  12. Effect of Zn2+ and temperature on the conformational equilibrium of single-stranded polyA in neutral solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, V A; Valeev, V A; Usenko, E L; Andrushchenko, V V

    2013-10-01

    Effect of Zn(2+) ions on the conformation of polyA in cacodilic buffer at pH 7 was investigated by differential UV spectroscopy (DUV) and by thermal denaturation. The shapes of the DUV spectra and melting curves suggest a transition of polyA into a more ordered "metallized", possibly double-helical conformation at Zn(2+) concentrations above 3×10(-5) M. A phase diagram of polyA complexes with Zn(2+) was constructed for the temperature range from 20 °C to 95 °C and Zn(2+) concentrations between 10(-5) M and 5×10(-4) M. It was found that the transition of a single strand into the "metallized" form is possible only if the length of the disordered single-stranded region becomes larger than a certain critical value, ranging between 98% and 78% as the metal concentration increases from 3×10(-5) to 5×10(-4) M. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. La-related protein 4 binds poly(A), interacts with the poly(A)-binding protein MLLE domain via a variant PAM2w motif, and can promote mRNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruiqing; Gaidamakov, Sergei A; Xie, Jingwei; Lee, Joowon; Martino, Luigi; Kozlov, Guennadi; Crawford, Amanda K; Russo, Amy N; Conte, Maria R; Gehring, Kalle; Maraia, Richard J

    2011-02-01

    The conserved RNA binding protein La recognizes UUU-3'OH on its small nuclear RNA ligands and stabilizes them against 3'-end-mediated decay. We report that newly described La-related protein 4 (LARP4) is a factor that can bind poly(A) RNA and interact with poly(A) binding protein (PABP). Yeast two-hybrid analysis and reciprocal immunoprecipitations (IPs) from HeLa cells revealed that LARP4 interacts with RACK1, a 40S ribosome- and mRNA-associated protein. LARP4 cosediments with 40S ribosome subunits and polyribosomes, and its knockdown decreases translation. Mutagenesis of the RNA binding or PABP interaction motifs decrease LARP4 association with polysomes. Several translation and mRNA metabolism-related proteins use a PAM2 sequence containing a critical invariant phenylalanine to make direct contact with the MLLE domain of PABP, and their competition for the MLLE is thought to regulate mRNA homeostasis. Unlike all ∼150 previously analyzed PAM2 sequences, LARP4 contains a variant PAM2 (PAM2w) with tryptophan in place of the phenylalanine. Binding and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have shown that a peptide representing LARP4 PAM2w interacts with the MLLE of PABP within the affinity range measured for other PAM2 motif peptides. A cocrystal of PABC bound to LARP4 PAM2w shows tryptophan in the pocket in PABC-MLLE otherwise occupied by phenylalanine. We present evidence that LARP4 expression stimulates luciferase reporter activity by promoting mRNA stability, as shown by mRNA decay analysis of luciferase and cellular mRNAs. We propose that LARP4 activity is integrated with other PAM2 protein activities by PABP as part of mRNA homeostasis.

  14. The Distribution of Weighted Sums of the Liouville Function and P\\'olya's Conjecture

    CERN Document Server

    Humphries, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Under the assumption of the Riemann Hypothesis, the Linear Independence Hypothesis, and a bound on negative discrete moments of the Riemann zeta function, we prove the existence of a limiting logarithmic distribution of the normalisation of the weighted sum of the Liouville function, $L_{\\alpha}(x) = \\sum_{n \\leq x}{\\lambda(n) / n^{\\alpha}}$, for $0 \\leq \\alpha < 1/2$. Using this, we conditionally show that these weighted sums have a negative bias, but that for each $0 \\leq \\alpha < 1/2$, the set of all $x \\geq 1$ for which $L_{\\alpha}(x)$ is positive has positive logarithmic density. For $\\alpha = 0$, this gives a conditional proof that the set of counterexamples to P\\'olya's conjecture has positive logarithmic density. Finally, when $\\alpha = 1/2$, we conditionally prove that $L_{\\alpha}(x)$ is negative outside a set of logarithmic density zero, thereby lending support to a conjecture of Mossinghoff and Trudgian that this weighted sum is nonpositive for all $x \\geq 17$.

  15. A Simple Decision Rule for Recognition of Poly(A) Tail Signal Motifs in Human Genome

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2015-05-12

    Background is the numerous attempts were made to predict motifs in genomic sequences that correspond to poly (A) tail signals. Vast portion of this effort has been directed to a plethora of nonlinear classification methods. Even when such approaches yield good discriminant results, identifying dominant features of regulatory mechanisms nevertheless remains a challenge. In this work, we look at decision rules that may help identifying such features. Findings are we present a simple decision rule for classification of candidate poly (A) tail signal motifs in human genomic sequence obtained by evaluating features during the construction of gradient boosted trees. We found that values of a single feature based on the frequency of adenine in the genomic sequence surrounding candidate signal and the number of consecutive adenine molecules in a well-defined region immediately following the motif displays good discriminative potential in classification of poly (A) tail motifs for samples covered by the rule. Conclusions is the resulting simple rule can be used as an efficient filter in construction of more complex poly(A) tail motifs classification algorithms.

  16. Induction of antagonistic soluble decoy receptor tyrosine kinases by intronic polyA activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorlová, Sandra; Rocco, Gina; Lefave, Clare V; Jodelka, Francine M; Hess, Ken; Hastings, Michelle L; Henke, Erik; Cartegni, Luca

    2011-09-16

    Alternative intronic polyadenylation (IPA) can generate truncated protein isoforms with significantly altered functions. Here, we describe 31 dominant-negative, secreted variant isoforms of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) that are produced by activation of intronic poly(A) sites. We show that blocking U1-snRNP can activate IPA, indicating a larger role for U1-snRNP in RNA surveillance. Moreover, we report the development of an antisense-based method to effectively and specifically activate expression of individual soluble decoy RTKs (sdRTKs) to alter signaling, with potential therapeutic implications. In particular, a quantitative switch from signal transducing full-length vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2/KDR) to a dominant-negative sKDR results in a strong antiangiogenic effect both on directly targeted cells and on naive cells exposed to conditioned media, suggesting a role for this approach in interfering with angiogenic paracrine and autocrine loops. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Relooking `Look Back': a student's attempt at problem solving using Polya's model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoong Leong, Yew; Toh, Tin Lam; Guan Tay, Eng; Quek, Khiok Seng; Dindyal, Jaguthsing

    2012-04-01

    Against the backdrop of half a century of research in mathematics problem solving, Pólya's last stage is especially conspicuous - by the scarcity of research on it! Much of the research focused on the first three stages (J.M. Francisco and C.A. Maher, Conditions for promoting reasoning in problem solving: Insights from a longitudinal study, J. Math. Behav. 24 (2005), pp. 361-372; J.A. Taylor and C. Mcdonald, Writing in groups as a tool for non-routine problem solving in first year university mathematics, Int. J. Math. Educ. Sci. Technol. 38(5) (2007), pp. 639-655.), with little or no successful attempts at following through with the subjects. In this article, we describe a case study of how the innovation of a 'Practical Worksheet' within a new paradigm of a 'Mathematics Practical' enabled a high-achieving student to push beyond getting a solution for a problem to extending, adapting and generalizing his solution. The findings from this study indicate promise in achieving the learning of Polya's model with notable success in the fourth stage, Look Back.

  18. Structure of an Rrp6-RNA exosome complex bound to poly(A) RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasmuth, Elizabeth V.; Januszyk, Kurt; Lima, Christopher D. [MSKCC

    2014-08-20

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome processes and degrades RNA by directing substrates to the distributive or processive 3' to 5' exoribonuclease activities of Rrp6 or Rrp44, respectively. The non-catalytic nine-subunit exosome core (Exo9) features a prominent central channel. Although RNA can pass through the channel to engage Rrp44, it is not clear how RNA is directed to Rrp6 or whether Rrp6 uses the central channel. Here we report a 3.3 Å crystal structure of a ten-subunit RNA exosome complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae composed of the Exo9 core and Rrp6 bound to single-stranded poly(A) RNA. The Rrp6 catalytic domain rests on top of the Exo9 S1/KH ring above the central channel, the RNA 3' end is anchored in the Rrp6 active site, and the remaining RNA traverses the S1/KH ring in an opposite orientation to that observed in a structure of a Rrp44-containing exosome complex. Solution studies with human and yeast RNA exosome complexes suggest that the RNA path to Rrp6 is conserved and dependent on the integrity of the S1/KH ring. Although path selection to Rrp6 or Rrp44 is stochastic in vitro, the fate of a particular RNA may be determined in vivo by the manner in which cofactors present RNA to the RNA exosome.

  19. Role of polymerase η in mitochondrial mutagenesis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Pabla, Ritu [Dept. of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Siede, Wolfram, E-mail: wolfram.siede@unthsc.edu [Dept. of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► DNA polymerase η is detectable in mitochondria of budding yeast. ► Pol η reduces UV-induced mitochondrial base pair substitutions and frameshifts. ► For UV-induced base pair substitutions, Pol η and Pol ζ interact epistatically. -- Abstract: DNA polymerase η mostly catalyzes an error-free bypass of the most frequent UV lesions, pyrimidine dimers of the cyclobutane-type. In addition to its nuclear localization, we show here for the first time its mitochondrial localization in budding yeast. In mitochondria, this polymerase improves bypass replication fidelity opposite UV damage as shown in base pair substitution and frameshift assays. For base pair substitutions, polymerase η appears to be related in function and epistatic to DNA polymerase ζ which, however, plays the opposite role in the nucleus.

  20. Direct measurement of the poliovirus RNA polymerase error frequency in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, C.D.; Stokes, M.A.M.; Flanegan, J.B. (Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville (USA))

    1988-02-01

    The fidelity of RNA replication by the poliovirus-RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was examined by copying homopolymeric RNA templates in vitro. The poliovirus RNA polymerase was extensively purified and used to copy poly(A), poly(C), or poly(I) templates with equimolar concentrations of noncomplementary and complementary ribonucleotides. The error frequency was expressed as the amount of a noncomplementary nucleotide incorporated divided by the total amount of complementary and noncomplementary nucleotide incorporated. The polymerase error frequencies were very high, depending on the specific reaction conditions. The activity of the polymerase on poly(U) and poly(G) was too low to measure error frequencies on these templates. A fivefold increase in the error frequency was observed when the reaction conditions were changed from 3.0 mM Mg{sup 2+} (pH 7.0) to 7.0 mM Mg{sup 2+} (pH 8.0). This increase in the error frequency correlates with an eightfold increase in the elongation rate that was observed under the same conditions in a previous study.

  1. Structural Basis for the Function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gfd1 Protein in mRNA Nuclear Export* ♦

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Chao; Fasken, Milo B.; Marshall, Neil J.; Brockmann, Christoph; Rubinson, Max E.; Wente, Susan R.; Corbett, Anita H.; Stewart, Murray

    2010-01-01

    Following transcription, mRNA is processed, packaged into messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particles, and transported through nuclear pores (NPCs) to the cytoplasm. At the NPC cytoplasmic face, Dbp5 mediates mRNP remodeling and mRNA export factor dissociation, releasing transcripts for translation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the conserved poly(A) RNA-binding protein, Nab2, facilitates NPC targeting of transcripts and also modulates poly(A) tail length. Dbp5 removes Nab2 from mRNPs at the ...

  2. The Nuclear PolyA-Binding Protein Nab2p Is Essential for mRNA Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Manfred; Olszewski, Pawel; Pelechano, Vicent; Gupta, Ishaan; Steinmetz, Lars M; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2015-07-07

    Polyadenylation of mRNA is a key step in eukaryotic gene expression. However, despite the major impact of poly(A) tails on mRNA metabolism, the precise roles of poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) in nuclear mRNA biogenesis remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that rapid nuclear depletion of the S. cerevisiae PABP Nab2p leads to a global loss of cellular mRNA, but not of RNA lacking poly(A) tails. Disappearance of mRNA is a nuclear event, but not due to decreased transcription. Instead, the absence of Nab2p results in robust nuclear mRNA decay by the ribonucleolytic RNA exosome in a polyadenylation-dependent process. We conclude that Nab2p is required to protect early mRNA and therefore constitutes a crucial nuclear mRNA biogenesis factor. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Nuclear PolyA-Binding Protein Nab2p Is Essential for mRNA Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Manfred; Olszewski, Pawel; Pelechano, Vicent;

    2015-01-01

    Polyadenylation of mRNA is a key step in eukaryotic gene expression. However, despite the major impact of poly(A) tails on mRNA metabolism, the precise roles of poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) in nuclear mRNA biogenesis remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that rapid nuclear depletion of the S....... cerevisiae PABP Nab2p leads to a global loss of cellular mRNA, but not of RNA lacking poly(A) tails. Disappearance of mRNA is a nuclear event, but not due to decreased transcription. Instead, the absence of Nab2p results in robust nuclear mRNA decay by the ribonucleolytic RNA exosome in a polyadenylation......-dependent process. We conclude that Nab2p is required to protect early mRNA and therefore constitutes a crucial nuclear mRNA biogenesis factor....

  4. The Ccr4-Not deadenylase complex constitutes the main poly(A) removal activity in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nousch, Marco; Techritz, Nora; Hampel, Daniel; Millonigg, Sophia; Eckmann, Christian R

    2013-09-15

    Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are widely used to control gene expression programs of tissue development and physiology. Controlled 3' poly(A) tail-length changes of mRNAs provide a mechanistic basis of such regulation, affecting mRNA stability and translational competence. Deadenylases are a conserved class of enzymes that facilitate poly(A) tail removal, and their biochemical activities have been mainly studied in the context of single-cell systems. Little is known about the different deadenylases and their biological role in multicellular organisms. In this study, we identify and characterize all known deadenylases of Caenorhabditis elegans, and identify the germ line as tissue that depends strongly on deadenylase activity. Most deadenylases are required for hermaphrodite fertility, albeit to different degrees. Whereas ccr-4 and ccf-1 deadenylases promote germline function under physiological conditions, panl-2 and parn-1 deadenylases are only required under heat-stress conditions. We also show that the Ccr4-Not core complex in nematodes is composed of the two catalytic subunits CCR-4 and CCF-1 and the structural subunit NTL-1, which we find to regulate the stability of CCF-1. Using bulk poly(A) tail measurements with nucleotide resolution, we detect strong deadenylation defects of mRNAs at the global level only in the absence of ccr-4, ccf-1 and ntl-1, but not of panl-2, parn-1 and parn-2. Taken together, this study suggests that the Ccr4-Not complex is the main deadenylase complex in C. elegans germ cells. On the basis of this and as a result of evidence in flies, we propose that the conserved Ccr4-Not complex is an essential component in post-transcriptional regulatory networks promoting animal reproduction.

  5. Baculovirus RNA Polymerase: Activities, Composition, and Evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Lorena Passarelli

    2007-01-01

    Baculoviruses are the only nuclear replicating DNA-containing viruses that encode their own DNA-directed RNA polymerase (RNAP). The baculovirus RNAP is specific for the transcription of genes expressed after virus DNA replication. It is composed of four subunits, making it the simplest multisubunit RNAP known. Two subunits contain motifs found at the catalytic center of other RNAPs and a third has capping enzyme functions. The function of the fourth subunit is not known. Structural studies on this unique RNAP will provide new insights into the functions of this enzyme and the regulation of viral genes and may be instrumental to optimize the baculovirus gene expression system.

  6. Efferent loop small intestinal vitamin D receptor concentration and bone mineral density after Billroth II (Polya) gastrectomy in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazianas, M; Zaidi, M; Subhani, J M; Finch, P J; Ang, L; Maxwell, J D

    2003-04-01

    Animal studies have demonstrated that the highest concentration of vitamin D receptors (and greatest capacity for active calcium absorption) occurs in the proximal duodenum. By passing the duodenum following Polya/Billroth II gastrectomy could result in the development of a metabolic bone disease and low bone mineral density (BMD). We thus compared the vitamin D receptor (VDR) concentration in mucosal biopsies taken at endoscopy from two functionally corresponding areas of the small intestine: the jejunum (or efferent loop) in 21 patients with a history of Polya/Billroth II gastrectomy and the second part of the duodenum in age/sex-matched control subjects. We also measured the BMD by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The mean VDR concentration was not significantly different between the two groups (patients vs controls, fmol/mg protein, mean +/- SE: 34.99 +/- 2.57 vs 34.67 +/- 3.71; P = 0.22), even when subgrouped as males (36.22 +/- 3.16 vs 31.2 +/- 4.24; P = 0.351) or females (31.93 +/- 4.7 vs 43 +/- 6.76; P = 0.193). In Polya/Billroth II gastrectomy patients, the VDR concentration in the efferent loop declined with age (r = -0.78, P = 0.02). In the same group, BMD, as compared with matched controls, was significantly reduced at the lumbar spine (Z-score: patients vs controls: -1.138 vs 0.099, P = 0.01), but not at the femoral neck (Z-score: -0.69 vs 0.7, P = 0.084). There was no correlation between VDR and time since operation or BMD. These results suggest that following Polya/Billroth II gastrectomy, the functional capacity of the jejunal efferent loop in reference to VDR concentration is similar to that of the second part of the duodenum in normal subjects. Therefore, the reduced BMD in our patients, also a common finding in other studies, may not be secondary to the reduced capacity of the VDR system that facilitates the active calcium transport pathway in the proximal small intestine.

  7. Identification of Endogenous mRNA-Binding Proteins in Yeast Using Crosslinking and PolyA Enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sarah F; Parker, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The maturation, localization, stability, and translation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are regulated by a wide variety of mRNA-binding proteins. Identification of the complete set of mRNA-binding proteins is a key step in understanding the regulation of gene expression. Herein, we describe a method for identifying yeast mRNA-binding proteins in a systematic manner using UV crosslinking, purification of polyA(+) mRNAs under denaturing conditions, and mass spectrometry to identify covalently bound proteins.

  8. In vivo cross-linking followed by polyA enrichment to identify yeast mRNA binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sarah F; Parker, Roy

    2015-01-01

    mRNA binding proteins regulate gene expression by controlling the processing, localization, decay, and translation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs). To fully understand this process, it is necessary to identify the complete set of mRNA binding proteins. This work describes a method for the systematic identification of yeast mRNA binding proteins. This method applies in vivo UV cross-linking, affinity pull-down of polyA(+) mRNAs, and analysis by mass spectrometry to identify proteins that directly bind to mRNAs.

  9. Functional dissection of nuclear envelope mRNA translocation system: effects of phorbol ester and a monoclonal antibody recognizing cytoskeletal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, H C; Diehl-Seifert, B; Rottmann, M; Messer, R; Bryson, B A; Agutter, P S; Müller, W E

    1988-03-01

    Unidirectional transport of poly(A)-containing mRNA [poly(A)+ mRNA] through the nuclear envelope pore complex is thought to be an energy (ATP or GTP)-dependent process which involves a nuclear envelope nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase). In the intact envelope, this enzyme is regulatable by poly(A) binding and by poly(A)-dependent phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of other components of the mRNA translocation system, which are as yet unidentified. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were elicited against the poly(A) binding nuclear envelope fraction isolated from rat liver. The mAbs were screened for their modulatory effects on mRNA transport in vitro. One stable clone decreased the efflux of rapidly labeled RNA and of one specific mRNA (ovalbumin) from isolated nuclei. It increased the binding of poly(A) to the envelope and increased the maximal catalytic rate of the NTPase, but it did not alter the apparent Km of the enzyme or the extent of its stimulation by poly(A). The nuclear envelope-associated protein kinase that down-regulates the NTPase was inhibited by the antibody, while other protein kinases were not affected. Because both the NTPase and mRNA efflux were inhibited by the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, the sensitive kinase is probably protein kinase C. Protein kinase C was found to be associated with the isolated nuclear envelope. The antibody reacted with both a Mr 83,000 and a Mr 65,000 nuclear envelope polypeptide from rat liver and other tissues. By immunofluorescence microscopy in CV-1 cells, the antibody localized to the nuclear envelope and, in addition, to cytoplasmic filaments which show some superposition with the microfilament network.

  10. Pre- and postovulatory aging of murine oocytes affect the transcript level and poly(A tail length of maternal effect genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Dankert

    Full Text Available Maternal effect genes code for oocyte proteins that are important for early embryogenesis. Transcription in oocytes does not take place from the onset of meiotic progression until zygotic genome activation. During this period, protein levels are regulated posttranscriptionally, for example by poly(A tail length. Posttranscriptional regulation may be impaired in preovulatory and postovulatory aged oocytes, caused by delayed ovulation or delayed fertilization, respectively, and may lead to developmental defects. We investigated transcript levels and poly(A tail length of ten maternal effect genes in in vivo- and in vitro- (follicle culture grown oocytes after pre- and postovulatory aging. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed using random hexamer-primed cDNA to determine total transcript levels and oligo(dT16-primed cDNA to analyze poly(A tail length. Transcript levels of in vivo preovulatory-aged oocytes remained stable except for decreases in Brg1 and Tet3. Most genes investigated showed a tendency towards increased poly(A content. Polyadenylation of in vitro preovulatory-aged oocytes was also increased, along with transcript level declines of Trim28, Nlrp2, Nlrp14 and Zar1. In contrast to preovulatory aging, postovulatory aging of in vivo- and in vitro-grown oocytes led to a shortening of poly(A tails. Postovulatory aging of in vivo-grown oocytes resulted in deadenylation of Nlrp5 after 12 h, and deadenylation of 4 further genes (Tet3, Trim28, Dnmt1, Oct4 after 24 h. Similarly, transcripts of in vitro-grown oocytes were deadenylated after 12 h of postovulatory aging (Tet3, Trim28, Zfp57, Dnmt1, Nlrp5, Zar1. This impact of aging on poly(A tail length may affect the timed translation of maternal effect gene transcripts and thereby contribute to developmental defects.

  11. Somatic Deletions of the PolyA Tract in the 3′ Untranslated Region of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Are Common in Microsatellite Instability–High Endometrial and Colorectal Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Deqin; Chen, Zhao; Nero, Christopher; Patel, Keyur P.; Daoud, Emad M.; Cheng, Hanyin; Djordjevic, Bojana; Broaddus, Russell R.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Rashid, Asif; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Context Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in up to 80% of colorectal and endometrial carcinomas. Deletions of the polyA tract in the 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR) have been reported in microsatellite instability–high (MSI-H) colonic carcinomas, but their impacts on EGFR expression and downstream pathways are unclear. This phenomenon has not been reported in other MSI-H tumors. Objective To assess the 3′ UTR polyA tract of EGFR in both endometrial and colorectal carcinomas and the mutational status of EGFR downstream pathways. Design Ninety-eight colorectal carcinomas and 47 endometrial carcinomas were included. EGFR 3′ UTR polyA status was detected by capillary electrophoresis and Sanger sequencing. EGFR gene expression, EGFR copy numbers, and KRAS and BRAF mutation status were analyzed accordingly. Results The 3′ UTR polyA tract was deleted in 18 of 23 (78%) MSI-H versus 0 of 24 microsatellite-stable endometrial carcinomas (P polyA deletions versus those with wild-type polyA tract. Amplification of the EGFR gene was not observed. Deletions in polyA tract do not seem to affect the frequency of KRAS and BRAF mutations. Conclusions Deletions of EGFR 3′ UTR polyA are frequent in endometrial and colorectal carcinomas, are confined almost exclusively to MSI-H tumors, and do not affect KRAS and BRAF mutations. PMID:22540299

  12. Somatic deletions of the polyA tract in the 3' untranslated region of epidermal growth factor receptor are common in microsatellite instability-high endometrial and colorectal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deqin, Ma; Chen, Zhao; Nero, Christopher; Patel, Keyur P; Daoud, Emad M; Cheng, Hanyin; Djordjevic, Bojana; Broaddus, Russell R; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Rashid, Asif; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi

    2012-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in up to 80% of colorectal and endometrial carcinomas. Deletions of the polyA tract in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) have been reported in microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) colonic carcinomas, but their impacts on EGFR expression and downstream pathways are unclear. This phenomenon has not been reported in other MSI-H tumors. To assess the 3' UTR polyA tract of EGFR in both endometrial and colorectal carcinomas and the mutational status of EGFR downstream pathways. Ninety-eight colorectal carcinomas and 47 endometrial carcinomas were included. EGFR 3' UTR polyA status was detected by capillary electrophoresis and Sanger sequencing. EGFR gene expression, EGFR copy numbers, and KRAS and BRAF mutation status were analyzed accordingly. The 3' UTR polyA tract was deleted in 18 of 23 (78%) MSI-H versus 0 of 24 microsatellite-stable endometrial carcinomas (P polyA deletions versus those with wild-type polyA tract. Amplification of the EGFR gene was not observed. Deletions in polyA tract do not seem to affect the frequency of KRAS and BRAF mutations. Deletions of EGFR 3' UTR polyA are frequent in endometrial and colorectal carcinomas, are confined almost exclusively to MSI-H tumors, and do not affect KRAS and BRAF mutations.

  13. PROSES BERPIKIR SISWA SEKOLAH MENENGAH PERTAMA DALAM MEMECAHKAN MASALAH MATEMATIKA BERDASARKAN LANGKAH-LANGKAH POLYA DITINJAU DARI ADVERSITY QUOTIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Yani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk menjelaskan proses berpikir dan menganalisis kesulitan siswa dalam memecahkan masalah matematika berdasarkan pengukuran Polya ditinjau dari Adversity Quotient (AQ. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian deskirptif kualitatif dengan subjek penelitian adalah siswa dari kelas IX SMP N 1 Banda Aceh tediri dari tiga siswa. Pemilihan subjek penelitian menggunakan metode purposive sampling dan berdasarkan tingkatan AQ (climber, camper, dan quitter dan komunikasi (lisan dan tertulis. Pengumpulan data menggunakan wawancara berbasis tugas, dan triangulasi untuk mengecek validitas data. Data dianalisis menggunakan konsep dari Miles dan Huberman: yaitu tahap pengurangan data, presentasi data, dan kesimpulan. Hasil menunjukkan bahwa: (1 Proses berpikir dari subjek climber yaitu secara asimilasi dalam memahami, merencanakan penyelesaian, .serta mengecek kembali; (2 Subjek camper juga berpikir secara asimilasi pada tahap memahami masalah, merencanakan penyelesaian, dan mengecek kembali; (3 subjek quitter berpikir secara akomodasi dalam memahami masalah dan menyelesaikan masalah. Kata kunci: Proses Berpikir, Pemecahan Masalah, Tahap Polya, Adversity Quotient (AQ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jpm.10.1.3278.42-57

  14. PolyA RT-PCR-based quantification of microRNA by using universal TaqMan probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Huijun; Du, Yingying; Yang, Lu; Zheng, Fengyun; Ma, Duan

    2012-04-01

    Quantification of microRNAs (miRNAs) in tissues under normal and pathological conditions is important for elucidating miRNA functions. Based on a PolyA RT-PCR method we have described (J Zhang et al. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2008 377:136-140), a modified miRNA quantification method was developed and validated using a universal TaqMan probe complementary to the reverse transcript primer. This method effectively detects miRNA expression in cell lines and tissues. The TaqMan probe is more accurate and reliable than the SYBR Green method since it was free from primer dimers. A series of miRNAs were tested in five different mouse tissues: the method differentiated different miRNAs of the same family. This universal TaqMan probe-based PolyA RT-PCR method showed its advantages in precision, simplicity and high-throughput capability compared with other miRNA-detecting methods.

  15. Analysis of poly(A + RNA distribution during maize somatic embryogenesis using digoxigenated oligo-dT probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bimal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pattern of total transcription activity in terms of steady state levels of poly(A+ containing mRNA during callus initiation and somatic embryogenesis in a high (A188 and a low (A632 embryogenic line of maize was analyzed using digoxigenin labelled oligo-dT probes. A gradual increase and a preferential accumulation of label was observed in both lines, differing temporally up to 4 days in culture. In the A188 line of maize the callus gave rise to somatic embryos. The globular embryos showed less label than the callus; this labelling was mostly present in the basal part of the embryos. At a later stage upper embryogenic and lower non-embryogenic layers were observed in the A188 callus, showing conspicuous differences in the amount of label. In the late globular stage the poly(A+ RNA signals were seen all over the embryo but at the junction of the suspensor and the callus tissue no label was observed.

  16. Destabilization of the TAR hairpin leads to extension of the polyA hairpin and inhibition of HIV-1 polyadenylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrolijk, Martine M; Harwig, Alex; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T

    2009-02-11

    Two hairpin structures that are present at both the 5' and 3' end of the HIV-1 RNA genome have important functions in the viral life cycle. The TAR hairpin binds the viral Tat protein and is essential for Tat-mediated activation of transcription. The adjacent polyA hairpin encompasses the polyadenylation signal AAUAAA and is important for the regulation of polyadenylation. Specifically, this RNA structure represses polyadenylation at the 5' side, and enhancer elements on the 3' side overcome this suppression. We recently described that the replication of an HIV-1 variant that does not need TAR for transcription was severely impaired by destabilization of the TAR hairpin, even though a complete TAR deletion was acceptable. In this study, we show that the TAR-destabilizing mutations result in reduced 3' polyadenylation of the viral transcripts due to an extension of the adjacent polyA hairpin. Thus, although the TAR hairpin is not directly involved in polyadenylation, mutations in TAR can affect this process. The stability of the HIV-1 TAR hairpin structure is important for the proper folding of the viral RNA transcripts. This study illustrates how mutations that are designed to study the function of a specific RNA structure can change the structural presentation of other RNA domains and thus affect viral replication in an indirect way.

  17. Norovirus Proteinase-Polymerase and Polymerase Are Both Active Forms of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Babu, Vijay; Uche, Uzo; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.; Green, Kim Y.

    2005-01-01

    In vitro mapping studies of the MD145 norovirus (Caliciviridae) ORF1 polyprotein identified two stable cleavage products containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains: ProPol (a precursor comprised of both the proteinase and polymerase) and Pol (the mature polymerase). The goal of this study was to identify the active form (or forms) of the norovirus polymerase. The recombinant ProPol (expressed as Pro−Pol with an inactivated proteinase domain to prevent autocleavage) and r...

  18. The Nuclear PolyA-Binding Protein Nab2p Is Essential for mRNA Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Manfred; Olszewski, Pawel; Pelechano, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    Polyadenylation of mRNA is a key step in eukaryotic gene expression. However, despite the major impact of poly(A) tails on mRNA metabolism, the precise roles of poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) in nuclear mRNA biogenesis remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that rapid nuclear depletion of the S....... cerevisiae PABP Nab2p leads to a global loss of cellular mRNA, but not of RNA lacking poly(A) tails. Disappearance of mRNA is a nuclear event, but not due to decreased transcription. Instead, the absence of Nab2p results in robust nuclear mRNA decay by the ribonucleolytic RNA exosome in a polyadenylation...

  19. Effects of Transcription Elongation Rate and Xrn2 Exonuclease Activity on RNA Polymerase II Termination Suggest Widespread Kinetic Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Nova; Brannan, Kristopher; Erickson, Benjamin; Kim, Hyunmin; Cortazar, Michael A; Sheridan, Ryan M; Nguyen, Tram; Karp, Shai; Bentley, David L

    2015-10-15

    The torpedo model of transcription termination asserts that the exonuclease Xrn2 attacks the 5'PO4-end exposed by nascent RNA cleavage and chases down the RNA polymerase. We tested this mechanism using a dominant-negative human Xrn2 mutant and found that it delayed termination genome-wide. Xrn2 nuclease inactivation caused strong termination defects downstream of most poly(A) sites and modest delays at some histone and U snRNA genes, suggesting that the torpedo mechanism is not limited to poly(A) site-dependent termination. A central untested feature of the torpedo model is that there is kinetic competition between the exonuclease and the pol II elongation complex. Using pol II rate mutants, we found that slow transcription robustly shifts termination upstream, and fast elongation extends the zone of termination further downstream. These results suggest that kinetic competition between elongating pol II and the Xrn2 exonuclease is integral to termination of transcription on most human genes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Localization of nuclear retained mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    THOMSEN, RUNE; LIBRI, DOMENICO; BOULAY, JOCELYNE; ROSBASH, MICHAEL; JENSEN, TORBEN HEICK

    2003-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a common conditional phenotype associated with deletion or mutation of genes encoding mRNA export factors is the rapid accumulation of mRNAs in intranuclear foci, suggested to be near transcription sites. The nuclear RNA exosome has been implicated in retaining RNAs in these foci; on deletion of the exosome component Rrp6p, the RNA is released. To determine the exact nuclear location of retained as well as released mRNAs, we have used mRNA export mutant strains to analyze the spatial relationship between newly synthesized heat shock mRNA, the chromosomal site of transcription, and known S. cerevisiae nuclear structures such as the nucleolus and the nucleolar body. Our results show that retained SSA4 RNA localizes to an area in close proximity to the SSA4 locus. On deletion of Rrp6p and release from the genomic locus, heat shock mRNAs produced in the rat7–1 strain colocalize predominantly with nucleolar antigens. Bulk poly(A)+ RNA, on the other hand, is localized primarily to the nuclear rim. Interestingly, the RNA binding nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Npl3p shows strong colocalization with bulk poly(A)+ RNA, regardless of its nuclear location. Taken together, our data show that retention occurs close to the gene and indicate distinct nuclear fates of different mRNAs. PMID:12923254

  1. The PolyA tail length of yeast histone mRNAs varies during the cell cycle and is influenced by Sen1p and Rrp6p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, Suzanne; James, Tharappel C; Bond, Ursula

    2012-03-01

    Yeast histone mRNAs are polyadenylated, yet factors such as Rrp6p and Trf4p, required for the 3'-end processing of non-polyadenylated RNAs, contribute to the cell cycle regulation of these transcripts. Here, we investigated the role of other known 3'-end processing/transcription termination factors of non-polyadenylated RNA in the biogenesis of histone mRNAs, specifically the Nab3p/Nrd1p/Sen1p complex. We also re-evaluated the polyadenylation status of these mRNAs during the cell cycle. Our analysis reveals that yeast histone mRNAs have shorter than average PolyA tails and the length of the PolyA tail varies during the cell cycle; S-phase histone mRNAs possess very short PolyA tails while in G1, the tail length is relatively longer. Inactivation of either Sen1p or Rrp6p leads to a decrease in the PolyA tail length of histone mRNAs. Our data also show that Sen1p contributes to 3'-end processing of histone primary transcripts. Thus, histone mRNAs are distinct from the general pool of yeast mRNAs and 3'-end processing and polyadenylation contribute to the cell cycle regulation of these transcripts.

  2. TMV mutants with poly(A) tracts of different lengths demonstrate structural variations in 3′UTR affecting viral RNAs accumulation and symptom expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Song; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Yi-Jun; Wong, Sek-Man

    2015-01-01

    The upstream pseudoknots domain (UPD) of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is located at the 3′-untranslated region (UTR). It plays an important role in virus replication and translation. To determine the importance of UPD and 3′-UTR, and the effects of introduced RNA elements in TMV 3′-UTR, a series of TMV mutants with internal poly(A) tract upstream of UPD was constructed for structural analysis by selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE). TMV(24A+UPD) and TMV(42A+UPD) formed a similar structure as that of TMV 3′-UTR, but TMV(62A+UPD) structures altered by the introduced poly(A) tract. In addition, TMV(24A+UPD) had a higher viral RNAs accumulation than TMV in N. benthamiana protoplasts, and induced lethal symptoms in the infected plants. TMV(62A+UPD) showed a drastically reduced accumulation, its coat protein was undetectable in protoplasts, and the inoculated plants remained symptomless. This study analyzed the structures of 3′-UTR of TMV and found that the longer poly(A) tract introduced upstream of UPD reduced viral RNAs accumulation and induced milder symptoms in N. benthamiana. In conclusion, different lengths of the internal poly(A) tract introduced into the TMV 3′UTR lead to structural variations that affect virus accumulation and symptom expression. PMID:26678425

  3. TMV mutants with poly(A) tracts of different lengths demonstrate structural variations in 3'UTR affecting viral RNAs accumulation and symptom expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Song; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Yi-Jun; Wong, Sek-Man

    2015-12-18

    The upstream pseudoknots domain (UPD) of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is located at the 3'-untranslated region (UTR). It plays an important role in virus replication and translation. To determine the importance of UPD and 3'-UTR, and the effects of introduced RNA elements in TMV 3'-UTR, a series of TMV mutants with internal poly(A) tract upstream of UPD was constructed for structural analysis by selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE). TMV(24A+UPD) and TMV(42A+UPD) formed a similar structure as that of TMV 3'-UTR, but TMV(62A+UPD) structures altered by the introduced poly(A) tract. In addition, TMV(24A+UPD) had a higher viral RNAs accumulation than TMV in N. benthamiana protoplasts, and induced lethal symptoms in the infected plants. TMV(62A+UPD) showed a drastically reduced accumulation, its coat protein was undetectable in protoplasts, and the inoculated plants remained symptomless. This study analyzed the structures of 3'-UTR of TMV and found that the longer poly(A) tract introduced upstream of UPD reduced viral RNAs accumulation and induced milder symptoms in N. benthamiana. In conclusion, different lengths of the internal poly(A) tract introduced into the TMV 3'UTR lead to structural variations that affect virus accumulation and symptom expression.

  4. Overexpression of DNA polymerase zeta reduces the mitochondrial mutability caused by pathological mutations in DNA polymerase gamma in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Baruffini

    Full Text Available In yeast, DNA polymerase zeta (Rev3 and Rev7 and Rev1, involved in the error-prone translesion synthesis during replication of nuclear DNA, localize also in mitochondria. We show that overexpression of Rev3 reduced the mtDNA extended mutability caused by a subclass of pathological mutations in Mip1, the yeast mitochondrial DNA polymerase orthologous to human Pol gamma. This beneficial effect was synergistic with the effect achieved by increasing the dNTPs pools. Since overexpression of Rev3 is detrimental for nuclear DNA mutability, we constructed a mutant Rev3 isoform unable to migrate into the nucleus: its overexpression reduced mtDNA mutability without increasing the nuclear one.

  5. Multiplex analysis of polyA-linked sequences (MAPS): an RNA-seq strategy to profile poly(A+) RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Li, Hai-Ri; Huang, Jie; Jin, Ge; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2014-01-01

    We summarize 12 experimental methods that have been developed for profiling gene expression by focusing on the 3'-end of poly(A+) mRNA, distilling both common and unique features. Of this family of methods, we provide detailed protocol for MAPS, a method we believe is the simplest and most cost-effective for profiling gene expression and quantifying alternative polyadenylation events by oligo-dT priming followed by random priming and deep sequencing. This method also enables library multiplexing by using a set of bar coding primers during PCR amplification. We also provide a general guideline for analysis of the data generated by MAPS by using the software package maps3end.

  6. Next generation sequencing analysis of human platelet PolyA+ mRNAs and rRNA-depleted total RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissopoulou, Antheia; Jonasson, Jon; Lindahl, Tomas L; Osman, Abdimajid

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are small anucleate cells circulating in the blood vessels where they play a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Here, we compared platelet RNA-Seq results obtained from polyA+ mRNA and rRNA-depleted total RNA. We used purified, CD45 depleted, human blood platelets collected by apheresis from three male and one female healthy blood donors. The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was employed to sequence cDNA converted either from oligo(dT) isolated polyA+ RNA or from rRNA-depleted total RNA. The reads were aligned to the GRCh37 reference assembly with the TopHat/Cufflinks alignment package using Ensembl annotations. A de novo assembly of the platelet transcriptome using the Trinity software package and RSEM was also performed. The bioinformatic tools HTSeq and DESeq from Bioconductor were employed for further statistical analyses of read counts. Consistent with previous findings our data suggests that mitochondrially expressed genes comprise a substantial fraction of the platelet transcriptome. We also identified high transcript levels for protein coding genes related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling, cell adhesion, aggregation, as well as receptor interaction between cells. Certain transcripts were particularly abundant in platelets compared with other cell and tissue types represented by RNA-Seq data from the Illumina Human Body Map 2.0 project. Irrespective of the different library preparation and sequencing protocols, there was good agreement between samples from the 4 individuals. Eighteen differentially expressed genes were identified in the two sexes at 10% false discovery rate using DESeq. The present data suggests that platelets may have a unique transcriptome profile characterized by a relative over-expression of mitochondrially encoded genes and also of genomic transcripts related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling and surface components compared with other cell and tissue types. The in vivo functional significance

  7. Localization of nuclear retained mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune; Libri, Domenico; Boulay, Jocelyne

    2003-01-01

    in the rat7–1 strain colocalize predominantly with nucleolar antigens. Bulk poly(A)+ RNA, on the other hand, is localized primarily to the nuclear rim. Interestingly, the RNA binding nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Npl3p shows strong colocalization with bulk poly(A)+ RNA, regardless of its nuclear location...... in retaining RNAs in these foci; on deletion of the exosome component Rrp6p, the RNA is released. To determine the exact nuclear location of retained as well as released mRNAs, we have used mRNA export mutant strains to analyze the spatial relationship between newly synthesized heat shock mRNA, the chromosomal...... site of transcription, and known S. cerevisiae nuclear structures such as the nucleolus and the nucleolar body. Our results show that retained SSA4 RNA localizes to an area in close proximity to the SSA4 locus. On deletion of Rrp6p and release from the genomic locus, heat shock mRNAs produced...

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ngl3p is an active 3′–5′ exonuclease with a specificity towards poly-A RNA reminiscent of cellular deadenylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feddersen, Ane; Dedic, Emil; Poulsen, Esben Guldahl

    2012-01-01

    –Endonuclease–Phosphatase (EEP) families, respectively. Ngl3p has been identified as a new member of the EEP family of exonucleases based on sequence homology, but its activity and biological roles are presently unknown. Here, we show using in vitro deadenylation assays on defined RNA species mimicking poly-A containing m......RNAs that yeast Ngl3p is a functional 3′–5′ exonuclease most active at slightly acidic conditions. We further show that the enzyme depends on divalent metal ions for activity and possesses specificity towards poly-A RNA similar to what has been observed for cellular deadenylases. The results suggest that Ngl3p...

  9. Next generation sequencing analysis of human platelet PolyA+ mRNAs and rRNA-depleted total RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antheia Kissopoulou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelets are small anucleate cells circulating in the blood vessels where they play a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Here, we compared platelet RNA-Seq results obtained from polyA+ mRNA and rRNA-depleted total RNA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used purified, CD45 depleted, human blood platelets collected by apheresis from three male and one female healthy blood donors. The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was employed to sequence cDNA converted either from oligo(dT isolated polyA+ RNA or from rRNA-depleted total RNA. The reads were aligned to the GRCh37 reference assembly with the TopHat/Cufflinks alignment package using Ensembl annotations. A de novo assembly of the platelet transcriptome using the Trinity software package and RSEM was also performed. The bioinformatic tools HTSeq and DESeq from Bioconductor were employed for further statistical analyses of read counts. RESULTS: Consistent with previous findings our data suggests that mitochondrially expressed genes comprise a substantial fraction of the platelet transcriptome. We also identified high transcript levels for protein coding genes related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling, cell adhesion, aggregation, as well as receptor interaction between cells. Certain transcripts were particularly abundant in platelets compared with other cell and tissue types represented by RNA-Seq data from the Illumina Human Body Map 2.0 project. Irrespective of the different library preparation and sequencing protocols, there was good agreement between samples from the 4 individuals. Eighteen differentially expressed genes were identified in the two sexes at 10% false discovery rate using DESeq. CONCLUSION: The present data suggests that platelets may have a unique transcriptome profile characterized by a relative over-expression of mitochondrially encoded genes and also of genomic transcripts related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling and surface components

  10. Effect of mutations in a simian virus 40 PolyA signal enhancer on green fluorescent protein reporter gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H G; Wang, X F; Jing, X Y; Li, Z; Zhang, Y; Lv, Z J

    2011-08-26

    Our previous studies have shown that tandem Alu repeats inhibit green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene expression when inserted downstream of the GFP gene in the pEGFP-C1 vector. We found that the 22R sequence (5'-GTGAAAAAAATGCTTTATTTGT-3') from the antisense PolyA (240 bp polyadenylation signal) of simian virus 40, eliminated repression of GFP gene expression when inserted between the GFP gene and the Alu repeats. The 22R sequence contains an imperfect palindrome; based on RNA structure software prediction, it forms an unstable stem-loop structure, including a loop, a first stem, a bulge, and a second stem. Analysis of mutations of the loop length of the 22R sequence showed that the three-nucleotide loop (wild-type, 22R) induced much stronger GFP expression than did other loop lengths. Two mutations, 4TMI (A7→T, A17→T) and 5AMI (A6→T, T18→A), which caused the base type changes in the bulge and in the second stem in the 22R sequence, induced stronger GFP gene expression than 22R itself. Mutation of the bulge base (A17→T), leading to complete complementation of the stem, caused weaker GFP gene expression. Sequences without a palindrome (7pieA, 5'-GTGAAAAAAATG CAAAAAAAGT-3', 7pieT, 5'-GTGTTTTTTTTGCTTTTTTTGT-3') did not activate GFP gene expression. We conclude that an imperfect palindrome affects and can increase GFP gene expression.

  11. Deep sequencing analysis reveals a TMV mutant with a poly(A) tract reduces host defense responses in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Song; Wong, Sek-Man

    2017-07-15

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) possesses an upstream pseudoknotted domain (UPD), which is important for replication. After substituting the UPD with an internal poly(A) tract (43 nt), a mutant TMV-43A was constructed. TMV-43A replicated slower than TMV and induced a non-lethal mosaic symptom in Nicotiana benthamiana. In this study, deep sequencing was performed to detect the differences of small RNA profiles between TMV- and TMV-43A-infected N. benthamiana. The results showed that TMV-43A produced lesser amount of virus-derived interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) than that of TMV. However, the distributions of vsiRNAs generation hotspots between TMV and TMV-43A were similar. Expression of genes related to small RNA biogenesis in TMV-43A-infected N. benthamiana was significantly lower than that of TMV, which leads to generation of lesser vsiRNAs. The expressions of host defense response genes were up-regulated after TMV infection, as compared to TMV-43A-infected plants. Host defense response to TMV-43A infection was lower than that to TMV. The absence of UPD might contribute to the reduced host response to TMV-43A. Our study provides valuable information in the role of the UPD in eliciting host response genes after TMV infection in N. benthamiana. (187 words). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Norovirus proteinase-polymerase and polymerase are both active forms of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Babu, Vijay; Uche, Uzo; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Green, Kim Y

    2005-02-01

    In vitro mapping studies of the MD145 norovirus (Caliciviridae) ORF1 polyprotein identified two stable cleavage products containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains: ProPol (a precursor comprised of both the proteinase and polymerase) and Pol (the mature polymerase). The goal of this study was to identify the active form (or forms) of the norovirus polymerase. The recombinant ProPol (expressed as Pro(-)Pol with an inactivated proteinase domain to prevent autocleavage) and recombinant Pol were purified after synthesis in bacteria and shown to be active RdRp enzymes. In addition, the mutant His-E1189A-ProPol protein (with active proteinase but with the natural ProPol cleavage site blocked) was active as an RdRp, confirming that the norovirus ProPol precursor could possess two enzymatic activities simultaneously. The effects of several UTP analogs on the RdRp activity of the norovirus and feline calicivirus Pro(-)Pol enzymes were compared and found to be similar. Our data suggest that the norovirus ProPol is a bifunctional enzyme during virus replication. The availability of this recombinant ProPol enzyme might prove useful in the development of antiviral drugs for control of the noroviruses associated with acute gastroenteritis.

  13. Unfaithful DNA polymerase caught in the act

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The 3D structures of all 12 mispairs formed in the active site of a DNA polymerase help explain their differential effects on polymerase stalling and on translocation of the primer terminus to the enzyme's proofreading site.

  14. A genetic analysis of Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase II subunits in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazoume, Adonis; Naderi, Kambiz; Candolfi, Ermanno; Kedinger, Claude; Chatton, Bruno; Vigneron, Marc

    2011-04-01

    RNA polymerase II is an essential nuclear multi subunit enzyme that transcribes nearly the whole genome. Its inhibition by the alpha-amanitin toxin leads to cell death. The enzyme of Plasmodium falciparum remains poorly characterized. Using a complementation assay in yeast as a genetic test, we demonstrate that five Plasmodium putative RNA polymerase subunits are indeed functional in vivo. The active site of this enzyme is built from the two largest subunits. Using site directed mutagenesis we were able to modify the active site of the yeast RNA polymerase II so as to introduce Plasmodium or human structural motifs. The resulting strains allow the screening of chemical libraries for potential specific inhibitors.

  15. Reliability of some ageing nuclear power plant system: a simple stochastic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Antola, Roberto [Catholic University of Uruguay, Montevideo (Uruguay). School of Engineering and Technologies; Ministerio de Industria, Energia y Mineria, Montevideo (Uruguay). Direccion Nacional de Energia y Tecnologia Nuclear; E-mail: rsuarez@ucu.edu.uy

    2007-07-01

    The random number of failure-related events in certain repairable ageing systems, like certain nuclear power plant components, during a given time interval, may be often modelled by a compound Poisson distribution. One of these is the Polya-Aeppli distribution. The derivation of a stationary Polya-Aeppli distribution as a limiting distribution of rare events for stationary Bernouilli trials with first order Markov dependence is considered. But if the parameters of the Polya-Aeppli distribution are suitable time functions, we could expect that the resulting distribution would allow us to take into account the distribution of failure-related events in an ageing system. Assuming that a critical number of damages produce an emergent failure, the above mentioned results can be applied in a reliability analysis. It is natural to ask under what conditions a Polya-Aeppli distribution could be a limiting distribution for non-homogeneous Bernouilli trials with first order Markov dependence. In this paper this problem is analyzed and possible applications of the obtained results to ageing or deteriorating nuclear power plant components are considered. The two traditional ways of modelling repairable systems in reliability theory: the 'as bad as old' concept, that assumes that the replaced component is exactly under the same conditions as was the aged component before failure, and the 'as good as new' concept, that assumes that the new component is under the same conditions of the replaced component when it was new, are briefly discussed in relation with the findings of the present work. (author)

  16. Proteins from rat liver cytosol which stimulate mRNA transport. Purification and interactions with the nuclear envelope mRNA translocation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, H C; Rottmann, M; Bachmann, M; Müller, W E; McDonald, A R; Agutter, P S

    1986-08-15

    Two polysome-associated proteins with particular affinities for poly(A) have been purified from rat liver. These proteins stimulate the efflux of mRNA from isolated nuclei in conditions under which such efflux closely stimulates mRNA transport in vivo, and they are therefore considered as mRNA-transport-stimulatory proteins. Their interaction with the mRNA-translocation system in isolated nuclear envelopes has been studied. The results are generally consistent with the most recently proposed kinetic model of mRNA translocation. One protein, P58, has not been described previously. It inhibits the protein kinase that down-regulates the NTPase, it enhances the NTPase activity in both the presence and the absence of poly(A) and it seems to increase poly(A) binding in unphosphorylated, but not in phosphorylated, envelopes. The other protein, P31, which probably corresponds to the 35,000-Mr factor described by Webb and his colleagues, enhances the binding of poly(A) to the mRNA-binding site in the envelope, thus stimulating the phosphoprotein phosphatase and, in consequence, the NTPase. The possible physiological significance of these two proteins is discussed.

  17. Omni-PolyA: a method and tool for accurate recognition of Poly(A) signals in human genomic DNA

    KAUST Repository

    Magana-Mora, Arturo

    2017-08-15

    BackgroundPolyadenylation is a critical stage of RNA processing during the formation of mature mRNA, and is present in most of the known eukaryote protein-coding transcripts and many long non-coding RNAs. The correct identification of poly(A) signals (PAS) not only helps to elucidate the 3′-end genomic boundaries of a transcribed DNA region and gene regulatory mechanisms but also gives insight into the multiple transcript isoforms resulting from alternative PAS. Although progress has been made in the in-silico prediction of genomic signals, the recognition of PAS in DNA genomic sequences remains a challenge.ResultsIn this study, we analyzed human genomic DNA sequences for the 12 most common PAS variants. Our analysis has identified a set of features that helps in the recognition of true PAS, which may be involved in the regulation of the polyadenylation process. The proposed features, in combination with a recognition model, resulted in a novel method and tool, Omni-PolyA. Omni-PolyA combines several machine learning techniques such as different classifiers in a tree-like decision structure and genetic algorithms for deriving a robust classification model. We performed a comparison between results obtained by state-of-the-art methods, deep neural networks, and Omni-PolyA. Results show that Omni-PolyA significantly reduced the average classification error rate by 35.37% in the prediction of the 12 considered PAS variants relative to the state-of-the-art results.ConclusionsThe results of our study demonstrate that Omni-PolyA is currently the most accurate model for the prediction of PAS in human and can serve as a useful complement to other PAS recognition methods. Omni-PolyA is publicly available as an online tool accessible at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/omnipolya/.

  18. Omni-PolyA: a method and tool for accurate recognition of Poly(A) signals in human genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magana-Mora, Arturo; Kalkatawi, Manal; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2017-08-15

    Polyadenylation is a critical stage of RNA processing during the formation of mature mRNA, and is present in most of the known eukaryote protein-coding transcripts and many long non-coding RNAs. The correct identification of poly(A) signals (PAS) not only helps to elucidate the 3'-end genomic boundaries of a transcribed DNA region and gene regulatory mechanisms but also gives insight into the multiple transcript isoforms resulting from alternative PAS. Although progress has been made in the in-silico prediction of genomic signals, the recognition of PAS in DNA genomic sequences remains a challenge. In this study, we analyzed human genomic DNA sequences for the 12 most common PAS variants. Our analysis has identified a set of features that helps in the recognition of true PAS, which may be involved in the regulation of the polyadenylation process. The proposed features, in combination with a recognition model, resulted in a novel method and tool, Omni-PolyA. Omni-PolyA combines several machine learning techniques such as different classifiers in a tree-like decision structure and genetic algorithms for deriving a robust classification model. We performed a comparison between results obtained by state-of-the-art methods, deep neural networks, and Omni-PolyA. Results show that Omni-PolyA significantly reduced the average classification error rate by 35.37% in the prediction of the 12 considered PAS variants relative to the state-of-the-art results. The results of our study demonstrate that Omni-PolyA is currently the most accurate model for the prediction of PAS in human and can serve as a useful complement to other PAS recognition methods. Omni-PolyA is publicly available as an online tool accessible at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/omnipolya/ .

  19. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Roy; Denis, Clyde L; Zhang, Chongxu; Nielsen, Maria E O; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Kierkegaard, Morten; Wang, Xin; Lee, Darren J; Andersen, Jens S; Yao, Gang

    2012-09-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because many of these factors may associate only indirectly with PAB1 by being components of the PAB1-mRNP structure, we additionally conducted mass spectrometric analyses on seven metabolically defined PAB1 deletion derivatives to delimit the interactions between these proteins and PAB1. These latter analyses identified 13 proteins whose associations with PAB1 were reduced by deleting one or another of PAB1's defined domains. Included in this list of 13 proteins were the translation initiation factors eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, translation termination factor eRF3, and PBP2, all of whose previously known direct interactions with specific PAB1 domains were either confirmed, delimited, or extended. The remaining nine proteins that interacted through a specific PAB1 domain were CBF5, SLF1, UPF1, CBC1, SSD1, NOP77, yGR250c, NAB6, and GBP2. In further study, UPF1, involved in nonsense-mediated decay, was confirmed to interact with PAB1 through the RRM1 domain. We additionally established that while the RRM1 domain of PAB1 was required for UPF1-induced acceleration of deadenylation during nonsense-mediated decay, it was not required for the more critical step of acceleration of mRNA decapping. These results begin to identify the proteins most likely to interact with PAB1 and the domains of PAB1 through which these contacts are made.

  20. Phylogenetic study on structural elements of HIV-1 poly(A region. 2. USE domain and TAR hairpin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarudnaya M. I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim Phylogenetic study on structural elements in the poly(A region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, in particular the major upstream sequence element (USE, which stimulates polyadenylation of HIV-1 transcript, and the TAR (trans-activation response hairpin, which juxtaposes spatially the AAUAAA and USE signals. Methods. The secondary structure of these elements has been predicted by UNA Fold program. Results. The structure of USE domain and TAR hairpin has been analysed in 1679 HIV-1 genomes and 17 genomes of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVcpzPtt. We found 376 and 588 different sequences for these elements, respectively, and revealed the most frequent base changes and subtypeand country-specific mutations. Only 43 % of HIV-1 isolates contain variants of the USE domain which occur with a frequency 5 % (the main variants and 35 % of isolates contain main variants of the TAR hairpin. We found that the SIV USE domain and TAR hairpin most closely resemble those found in HIV-1 genomes of A/G-containing subtypes. Conclusions. The results of our large-scale phylogenetic study support a hypothesis on the interaction between tRNA3Lys and the 3' end of HIV-1 genomic RNA and a controversial supposition of HIV-1 genome dimerization by the TAR-TAR kissing mechanism. Since the TAR hairpin is a target for developing antiviral drugs based on the inhibition of signal elements, the data on specific structural features of this hairpin may be useful for new antivirals design.

  1. Impact of library preparation on downstream analysis and interpretation of RNA-Seq data: comparison between Illumina PolyA and NuGEN Ovation protocol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifu Sun

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The sequencing by the PolyA selection is the most common approach for library preparation. With limited amount or degraded RNA, alternative protocols such as the NuGEN have been developed. However, it is not yet clear how the different library preparations affect the downstream analyses of the broad applications of RNA sequencing. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Eight human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC lines with high quality RNA were sequenced by Illumina's mRNA-Seq PolyA selection and NuGEN ENCORE library preparation. The following analyses and comparisons were conducted: 1 the numbers of genes captured by each protocol; 2 the impact of protocols on differentially expressed gene detection between biological replicates; 3 expressed single nucleotide variant (SNV detection; 4 non-coding RNAs, particularly lincRNA detection; and 5 intragenic gene expression. RESULTS: Sequences from the NuGEN protocol had lower (75% alignment rate than the PolyA (over 90%. The NuGEN protocol detected fewer genes (12-20% less with a significant portion of reads mapped to non-coding regions. A large number of genes were differentially detected between the two protocols. About 17-20% of the differentially expressed genes between biological replicates were commonly detected between the two protocols. Significantly higher numbers of SNVs (5-6 times were detected in the NuGEN samples, which were largely from intragenic and intergenic regions. The NuGEN captured fewer exons (25% less and had higher base level coverage variance. While 6.3% of reads were mapped to intragenic regions in the PolyA samples, the percentages were much higher (20-25% for the NuGEN samples. The NuGEN protocol did not detect more known non-coding RNAs such as lincRNAs, but targeted small and "novel" lincRNAs. CONCLUSION: Different library preparations can have significant impacts on downstream analysis and interpretation of RNA-seq data. The NuGEN provides an alternative for limited or

  2. Impact of library preparation on downstream analysis and interpretation of RNA-Seq data: comparison between Illumina PolyA and NuGEN Ovation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhifu; Asmann, Yan W; Nair, Asha; Zhang, Yuji; Wang, Liguo; Kalari, Krishna R; Bhagwate, Aditya V; Baker, Tiffany R; Carr, Jennifer M; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A; Perez, Edith A; Thompson, E Aubrey

    2013-01-01

    The sequencing by the PolyA selection is the most common approach for library preparation. With limited amount or degraded RNA, alternative protocols such as the NuGEN have been developed. However, it is not yet clear how the different library preparations affect the downstream analyses of the broad applications of RNA sequencing. Eight human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) lines with high quality RNA were sequenced by Illumina's mRNA-Seq PolyA selection and NuGEN ENCORE library preparation. The following analyses and comparisons were conducted: 1) the numbers of genes captured by each protocol; 2) the impact of protocols on differentially expressed gene detection between biological replicates; 3) expressed single nucleotide variant (SNV) detection; 4) non-coding RNAs, particularly lincRNA detection; and 5) intragenic gene expression. Sequences from the NuGEN protocol had lower (75%) alignment rate than the PolyA (over 90%). The NuGEN protocol detected fewer genes (12-20% less) with a significant portion of reads mapped to non-coding regions. A large number of genes were differentially detected between the two protocols. About 17-20% of the differentially expressed genes between biological replicates were commonly detected between the two protocols. Significantly higher numbers of SNVs (5-6 times) were detected in the NuGEN samples, which were largely from intragenic and intergenic regions. The NuGEN captured fewer exons (25% less) and had higher base level coverage variance. While 6.3% of reads were mapped to intragenic regions in the PolyA samples, the percentages were much higher (20-25%) for the NuGEN samples. The NuGEN protocol did not detect more known non-coding RNAs such as lincRNAs, but targeted small and "novel" lincRNAs. Different library preparations can have significant impacts on downstream analysis and interpretation of RNA-seq data. The NuGEN provides an alternative for limited or degraded RNA but it has limitations for some RNA-seq applications.

  3. TMV mutants with poly(A) tracts of different lengths demonstrate structural variations in 3′UTR affecting viral RNAs accumulation and symptom expression

    OpenAIRE

    Song Guo; Elzbieta Kierzek; Gang Chen; Yi-Jun Zhou; Sek-Man Wong

    2015-01-01

    The upstream pseudoknots domain (UPD) of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is located at the 3′-untranslated region (UTR). It plays an important role in virus replication and translation. To determine the importance of UPD and 3′-UTR, and the effects of introduced RNA elements in TMV 3′-UTR, a series of TMV mutants with internal poly(A) tract upstream of UPD was constructed for structural analysis by selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE). TMV(24A+UPD) and TMV(42A+UPD) ...

  4. Detection of TTV DNA from high background nuclear acid samples using specific nuclear acid captured polymerase chain reaction%特异核酸捕获-PCR技术在从高背景标本中检测TT病毒DNA的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭晓谋; 邓练贤; 陈文思; 高志良; 姚集鲁

    2001-01-01

    Objective To improve the amplification of non-specificity of TTV DNA detection using PCR from high background nuclear acids because of its low level in samples. Methods Specific nuclear acid captured PCR(SNAC-PCR) was established through capturing TTV DNA onto microplate with specific nuclear acid by means of avidin-biotin system, then amplifying captured TTV DNA as usual. Its specificity was evaluated by comparing with the detection of routine extraction samples using nested-PCR with or without subsequent DNA sequencing in 10 samples of sera and liver tissues in pairs. Results Positive results were obtained using routine protocol in 4 and 9 out of 10 samples of the sera and the liver tissues respectivly. The PCR products were proved to be specific using RFLP analysis with Kpn I . However,positive results were found in only 2/10 and 3/10 of samples of sera and liver tissue using DNA sequencing. The results of SNAC-PCR were the same as those of routine protocol with subsequent DNA sequencing. Furthermore, sharper electrophoreais bands were obtained. Conclusion SNAC-PCR could dramatically increase the specificity of the detection of TTV DNA,especially in high background nuclear acid samples. It can be widely used in the detection of other pathogens with low seral level or in high background nuclear acid samples. The level of TTV infection might be over-evaluated by currently used TTV DNA detection when the PCR products were not confirmed by DNA sequencing.%目的解决因TTV在样本中的水平极低而导致从高背景核酸样本中检测TTV DNA存在非特异性扩增的问题。方法采用亲和素生物素系统将TTV特异的核酸片段包被在微孔板上,利用特异核酸捕获样本中的TTV DNA,从而建立特异核酸捕获-PCR检测TTV DNA方法,并以10份血清(4份TTV DNA阳性)和肝组织配对标本为对象与抽提法进行比较,阳性产物进行DNA序列分析,最后评价特异核酸捕获-PCR的特异性。结果抽提法在

  5. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive ... NIBIB-funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that ...

  6. Viral factors reveal a role for REF/Aly in nuclear RNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Sarah H; Hunter, Olga V; Hoover, Ashley; Conrad, Nicholas K

    2012-04-01

    TREX is a conserved multiprotein complex that is necessary for efficient mRNA export to the cytoplasm. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the TREX complex is additionally implicated in RNA quality control pathways, but it is unclear whether this function is conserved in mammalian cells. The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 protein binds and recruits the TREX component REF/Aly to viral mRNAs. Here, we demonstrate that REF/Aly is recruited to the KSHV noncoding polyadenylated nuclear (PAN) RNA by ORF57. This recruitment correlates with ORF57-mediated stabilization of PAN RNA, suggesting that REF/Aly promotes nuclear RNA stability. Further supporting this idea, tethering REF/Aly to PAN RNA is sufficient to increase the nuclear abundance and half-life of PAN RNA but is not sufficient to promote its export. Interestingly, REF/Aly appears to protect the poly(A) tail from deadenylation, and REF/Aly-stabilized transcripts are further adenylated over time, consistent with previous reports linking poly(A) tail length with nuclear RNA surveillance. These studies show that REF/Aly can stabilize nuclear RNAs independently of their export and support a broader conservation of RNA quality control mechanisms from yeast to humans.

  7. The 3′ Untranslated Region of the Andes Hantavirus Small mRNA Functionally Replaces the Poly(A) Tail and Stimulates Cap-Dependent Translation Initiation from the Viral mRNA ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Ohlmann, Théophile; Darlix, Jean-Luc; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    In the process of translation of eukaryotic mRNAs, the 5′ cap and the 3′ poly(A) tail interact synergistically to stimulate protein synthesis. Unlike its cellular counterparts, the small mRNA (SmRNA) of Andes hantavirus (ANDV), a member of the Bunyaviridae, lacks a 3′ poly(A) tail. Here we report that the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of the ANDV SmRNA functionally replaces a poly(A) tail and synergistically stimulates cap-dependent translation initiation from the viral mRNA. Stimulation of translation by the 3′UTR of the ANDV SmRNA was found to be independent of viral proteins and of host poly(A)-binding protein. PMID:20660206

  8. Sulfolobus Replication Factor C stimulates the activity of DNA Polymerase B1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Xuanxuan; Zhang, Likui; Guo, Li;

    2014-01-01

    Replication factor C (RFC) is known to function in loading proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) onto primed DNA, allowing PCNA to tether DNA polymerase for highly processive DNA synthesis in eukaryotic and archaeal replication. In this report, we show that an RFC complex from...... with the ability of RFC to facilitate DNA binding by PolB1 through protein-protein interaction. These results suggest that Sulfolobus RFC may play a role in recruiting DNA polymerase for efficient primer extension, in addition to clamp loading, during DNA replication....... the hyperthermophilic archaea of the genus Sulfolobus physically interacts with DNA polymerase B1 (PolB1) and enhances both the polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease activities of PolB1 in an ATP-independent manner. Stimulation of the PolB1 activity by RFC is independent of the ability of RFC to bind DNA but is consistent...

  9. Molecular Modeling Approaches for Determining Gene Function: application to a Putative Poly-A Binding Protein from Leishmania amazonensis (LaPABP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva-Jr FP

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The great expansion in the number of genome sequencing projects has revealed the importance of computational methods to speed up the characterization of unknown genes. These studies have been improved by the use of three dimensional information from the predicted proteins generated by molecular modeling techniques. In this work, we disclose the structure-function relationship of a gene product from Leishmania amazonensis by applying molecular modeling and bioinformatics techniques. The analyzed sequence encodes a 159 aminoacids polypeptide (estimated 18 kDa and was denoted LaPABP for its high homology with poly-A binding proteins from trypanosomatids. The domain structure, clustering analysis and a three dimensional model of LaPABP, basically obtained by homology modeling on the structure of the human poly-A binding protein, are described. Based on the analysis of the electrostatic potential mapped on the model's surface and conservation of intramolecular contacts responsible for folding stabilization we hypothesize that this protein may have less avidity to RNA than it's L. major counterpart but still account for a significant functional activity in the parasite. The model obtained will help in the design of mutagenesis experiments aimed to elucidate the mechanism of gene expression in trypanosomatids and serve as a starting point for its exploration as a potential source of targets for a rational chemotherapy.

  10. PAPERCLIP Identifies MicroRNA Targets and a Role of CstF64/64tau in Promoting Non-canonical poly(A Site Usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun-Way Hwang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and precise annotation of 3′ UTRs is critical for understanding how mRNAs are regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. Here, we describe a method, poly(A binding protein-mediated mRNA 3′ end retrieval by crosslinking immunoprecipitation (PAPERCLIP, that shows high specificity for mRNA 3′ ends and compares favorably with existing 3′ end mapping methods. PAPERCLIP uncovers a previously unrecognized role of CstF64/64tau in promoting the usage of a selected group of non-canonical poly(A sites, the majority of which contain a downstream GUKKU motif. Furthermore, in the mouse brain, PAPERCLIP discovers extended 3′ UTR sequences harboring functional miRNA binding sites and reveals developmentally regulated APA shifts, including one in Atp2b2 that is evolutionarily conserved in humans and results in the gain of a functional binding site of miR-137. PAPERCLIP provides a powerful tool to decipher post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs through APA in vivo.

  11. Functional Significance of the Interaction between the mRNA-binding Protein, Nab2, and the Nuclear Pore-associated Protein, Mlp1, in mRNA Export* S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Fasken, Milo B.; Stewart, Murray; Corbett, Anita H.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear export of mRNA requires several key mRNA-binding proteins that recognize and remodel the mRNA and target it for export via interactions with the nuclear pore complex. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the shuttling heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, Nab2, which is essential for mRNA export, specifically recognizes poly(A) RNA and binds to the nuclear pore-associated protein, myosin-like protein 1 (Mlp1), which functions in mRNA export and quality control. Specifically, the N-terminal...

  12. The RNA polymerase II elongation complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, T; Conaway, J W; Conaway, R C

    1995-11-01

    The initiation stage of transcription by RNA polymerase II has long been regarded as the primary site for regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Nevertheless, a growing body of evidence reveals that the RNA polymerase II elongation complex is also a major target for regulation. Biochemical studies are implicating an increasing number of transcription factors in the regulation of elongation, and these transcription factors are being found to function by a diverse collection of mechanisms. Moreover, unexpected features of the structure and catalytic mechanism of RNA polymerase II are forcing a reconsideration of long-held views on the mechanics of some of the most basic aspects of polymerase function. In this review, we will describe recent insights into the structures and functions of RNA polymerase II and the transcription factors that control its activity during the elongation stage of eukaryotic messenger RNA synthesis.

  13. Bacteriophage T7 DNA polymerase — Sequenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin eZhu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An ideal DNA polymerase for chain-terminating DNA sequencing should possess the following features: 1 incorporate dideoxy- and other modified nucleotides at an efficiency similar to that of the cognate deoxynucleotides; 2 high processivity; 3 high fidelity in the absence of proofreading/exonuclease activity; and 4 production of clear and uniform signals for detection. The DNA polymerase encoded by bacteriophage T7 is naturally endowed with or can be engineered to have all these characteristics. The chemically or genetically modified enzyme (Sequenase expedited significantly the development of DNA sequencing technology. This article reviews the history of studies on T7 DNA polymerase with emphasis on the serial key steps leading to its use in DNA sequencing. Lessons from the study and development of T7 DNA polymerase have and will continue to enlighten the characterization of novel DNA polymerases from newly discovered microbes and their modification for use in biotechnology.

  14. Nuclear speckles are involved in nuclear aggregation of PABPN1 and in the pathophysiology of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoechea, Rocío; Tapia, Olga; Casafont, Iñigo; Berciano, José; Lafarga, Miguel; Berciano, María T

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear speckles are essential nuclear compartments involved in the assembly, delivery and recycling of pre-mRNA processing factors, and in the post-transcriptional processing of pre-mRNAs. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is caused by a small expansion of the polyalanine tract in the poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). Aggregation of expanded PABPN1 into intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers is the pathological hallmark of OPMD. In this study what we have analyzed in muscle fibers of OPMD patients and in primary cultures of human myoblasts are the relationships between nuclear speckles and INIs, and the contribution of the former to the biogenesis of the latter. While nuclear speckles concentrate snRNP splicing factors and PABPN1 in control muscle fibers, they are depleted of PABPN1 and appear closely associated with INIs in muscle fibers of OPMD patients. The induction of INI formation in human myoblasts expressing either wild type GFP-PABPN1 or expanded GFP-PABPN1-17ala demonstrates that the initial aggregation of PABPN1 proteins and their subsequent growth in INIs occurs at the edges of the nuclear speckles. Moreover, the growing of INIs gradually depletes PABPN1 proteins and poly(A) RNA from nuclear speckles, although the existence of these nuclear compartments is preserved. Time-lapse experiments in cultured myoblasts confirm nuclear speckles as biogenesis sites of PABPN1 inclusions. Given the functional importance of nuclear speckles in the post-transcriptional processing of pre-mRNAs, the INI-dependent molecular reorganization of these nuclear compartments in muscle fibers may cause a severe dysfunction in nuclear trafficking and processing of polyadenylated mRNAs, thereby contributing to the molecular pathophysiology of OPMD. Our results emphasize the potential importance of nuclear speckles as nuclear targets of neuromuscular disorders.

  15. DNA polymerase preference determines PCR priming efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of the most important developments in modern biotechnology. However, PCR is known to introduce biases, especially during multiplex reactions. Recent studies have implicated the DNA polymerase as the primary source of bias, particularly initiation of polymerization on the template strand. In our study, amplification from a synthetic library containing a 12 nucleotide random portion was used to provide an in-depth characterization of DNA polymerase priming bias. The synthetic library was amplified with three commercially available DNA polymerases using an anchored primer with a random 3’ hexamer end. After normalization, the next generation sequencing (NGS) results of the amplified libraries were directly compared to the unamplified synthetic library. Results Here, high throughput sequencing was used to systematically demonstrate and characterize DNA polymerase priming bias. We demonstrate that certain sequence motifs are preferred over others as primers where the six nucleotide sequences at the 3’ end of the primer, as well as the sequences four base pairs downstream of the priming site, may influence priming efficiencies. DNA polymerases in the same family from two different commercial vendors prefer similar motifs, while another commercially available enzyme from a different DNA polymerase family prefers different motifs. Furthermore, the preferred priming motifs are GC-rich. The DNA polymerase preference for certain sequence motifs was verified by amplification from single-primer templates. We incorporated the observed DNA polymerase preference into a primer-design program that guides the placement of the primer to an optimal location on the template. Conclusions DNA polymerase priming bias was characterized using a synthetic library amplification system and NGS. The characterization of DNA polymerase priming bias was then utilized to guide the primer-design process and demonstrate varying amplification

  16. Nuclear Confidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident provides valuable lessons for China national nuclear Corp.as it continues to expand its operations AS Japan’s Fukushima nuclear crisis sparks a global debate over nuclear safety,China National Nuclear Corp. (CNNC),the country’s largest nuclear plant operator, comes under the spotlight.

  17. [Influence of temperature on the preferential extraction of RNA polymerase I from hepatic nuclei of the rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoncheddu, A; Accomando, R; Pertica, M; Orunesu, M

    1979-11-15

    RNA polymerase I has been extracted from rat liver nuclei by three consecutive washings at 0 degrees C with a medium of relatively low ionic strength (0.15 M KCl) containing Mg++ rather than by incubating the organelles at 37 degrees C in the same medium, as originally proposed by Chesterton and Butterworth. The modified technique, which has the advantage of preventing a temperature-mediated conversion of form IB to IA, gives similar yields of RNA polymerase I and retains the capacity of preferentially extracting the enzyme with respect to the other forms of nuclear RNA polymerase.

  18. Interruption of env gene expression depending on the length of the SV40 early region used for the polyA signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Kei; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka; Watanabe, Rihito

    2005-12-01

    In order to invent a screening system to check in vivo gene function and the efficiency of gene transfer mediated by a retroviral vector system, we established a novel packaging cell, PacNIH/A8, based on the neuropathogenic retrovirus A8-V. To construct the expression vector, pA8(Psi-), which expresses the genes gag, pol and env derived from A8-V, the SV40 early region was used for the polyadenylation signal (polyA signal). When a 0.85 kbp fragment in the SV40 early region was employed for the expression vector (pA8(Psi-)beta), env expression was abolished. This abolition was rescued by shortening the SV40 early region to 0.14 kbp (pA8(Psi-)delta). The NHI3T3 cells transfected with pA8(Psi-)delta showed expressions of both env and gag genes.

  19. Accuracy of replication in the polymerase chain reaction. Comparison between Thermotoga maritima DNA polymerase and Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Diaz

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available For certain applications of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR, it may be necessary to consider the accuracy of replication. The breakthrough that made PCR user friendly was the commercialization of Thermus aquaticus (Taq DNA polymerase, an enzyme that would survive the high temperatures needed for DNA denaturation. The development of enzymes with an inherent 3' to 5' exonuclease proofreading activity, lacking in Taq polymerase, would be an improvement when higher fidelity is needed. We used the forward mutation assay to compare the fidelity of Taq polymerase and Thermotoga maritima (ULTMA™ DNA polymerase, an enzyme that does have proofreading activity. We did not find significant differences in the fidelity of either enzyme, even when using optimal buffer conditions, thermal cycling parameters, and number of cycles (0.2% and 0.13% error rates for ULTMA™ and Taq, respectively, after reading about 3,000 bases each. We conclude that for sequencing purposes there is no difference in using a DNA polymerase that contains an inherent 3' to 5' exonuclease activity for DNA amplification. Perhaps the specificity and fidelity of PCR are complex issues influenced by the nature of the target sequence, as well as by each PCR component.

  20. Nuclear safeguards; Salvaguardias nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurron, O.

    2015-07-01

    Safeguards control at the Juzbado Plant is implemented through the joint IAEA/EURATOM partnership approach in force within the European Union for all nuclear facilities. this verification agreement is designed to minimize burden on the operators whilst ensuring that both inspectorate achieve the objectives related to their respective safeguards regimes. This paper outlines the safeguards approaches followed by the inspectorate and the particularities of the Juzbado Plants nuclear material accountancy and control system. (Authors)

  1. Identification and Molecular Characterization of Nuclear Citrus leprosis virus, a Member of the Proposed Dichorhavirus Genus Infecting Multiple Citrus Species in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Avijit; Stone, Andrew L; Shao, Jonathan; Otero-Colina, Gabriel; Wei, Gang; Choudhary, Nandlal; Achor, Diann; Levy, Laurene; Nakhla, Mark K; Hartung, John S; Schneider, William L; Brlansky, Ronald H

    2015-04-01

    Citrus leprosis is one of the most destructive diseases of Citrus spp. and is associated with two unrelated virus groups that produce particles primarily in either the cytoplasm or nucleus of infected plant cells. Symptoms of leprosis, including chlorotic spots surrounded by yellow haloes on leaves and necrotic spots on twigs and fruit, were observed on leprosis-affected mandarin and navel sweet orange trees in the state of Querétaro, Mexico. Serological and molecular assays showed that the cytoplasmic types of Citrus leprosis virus (CiLV-C) often associated with leprosis symptomatic tissues were absent. However, using transmission electron microscopy, bullet-shaped rhabdovirus-like virions were observed in the nuclei and cytoplasm of the citrus leprosis-infected leaf tissues. An analysis of small RNA populations from symptomatic tissue was carried out to determine the genome sequence of the rhabdovirus-like particles observed in the citrus leprosis samples. The complete genome sequence showed that the nuclear type of CiLV (CiLV-N) present in the samples consisted of two negative-sense RNAs: 6,268-nucleotide (nt)-long RNA1 and 5,847-nt-long RNA2, excluding the poly(A) tails. CiLV-N had a genome organization identical to that of Orchid fleck virus (OFV), with the exception of shorter 5' untranslated regions in RNA1 (53 versus 205 nt) and RNA2 (34 versus 182 nt). Phylogenetic trees constructed with the amino acid sequences of the nucleocapsid (N) and glycoproteins (G) and the RNA polymerase (L protein) showed that CiLV-N clusters with OFV. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses of N protein established CiLV-N as a member of the proposed genus Dichorhavirus. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction primers for the detection of CiLV-N were designed based on the sequence of the N gene and the assay was optimized and tested to detect the presence of CiLV-N in both diseased and symptom-free plants.

  2. Nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, David (Bishop Luffa Comprehensive School, Chichester (UK))

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Physics covers the aspects of radioactivity and nuclear physics dealt with in the syllabuses of all the A-level examination boards; in particular, it provides detailed coverage of the Joint Matriculation Board option in nuclear physics. It deals with the discovery of the atomic nucleus, the physics of nuclear processes, and nuclear technology. (author).

  3. DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I in the initiation of plasmid DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mammalian DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I of Escherichia coli in DNA replication and in base excision repair. We have now obtained genetic evidence suggesting that DNA polymerase beta can substitute for E. coli DNA polymerase I in the initiation of replication of a plasmid containing a pMB1 origin of DNA replication. Specifically, we demonstrate that a plasmid with a pMB1 origin of replication can be maintained in an E. coli polA mutant ...

  4. Nuclear ventriculography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ventriculography (RNV); Multiple gate acquisition scan (MUGA); Nuclear cardiology; Cardiomyopathy - nuclear ventriculography ... 56. Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby ...

  5. Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  6. Infectious RNA transcripts derived from cloned cDNA of papaya mosaic virus: effect of mutations to the capsid and polymerase proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, T L; AbouHaidar, M G

    1993-06-01

    Genomic length cDNAs of papaya mosaic virus (PMV) RNA were generated utilizing reverse transcriptase (RNase H-) for first strand synthesis, Sequenase for second strand synthesis and primers specific for the 5' and 3' termini of the viral genome. These cDNAs were cloned into plasmid pUC18 and infectious RNA transcripts were synthesized in vitro from a bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase promoter incorporated into the 5' specific primer. The infectivity of transcripts was 16% that of native PMV RNA. Increasing the poly(A) tail length from A24 to A71 produced a 43% increase in infectivity. Transcripts synthesized with or without an m7GpppG cap structure were biologically active although uncapped transcripts were much less infectious. The addition of up to 2434 non-viral nucleotides at the 3' end of transcripts decreased but did not abolish infectivity. Insertions of two amino acid residues within the polymerase coding region inactivated viral transcripts. A single amino acid deletion within the capsid protein (CP) produced local lesions of a reduced size as compared to native PMV RNA. Viral particles could not be observed in crude extracts from lesions produced by this deletion mutant suggesting that it exists as a naked RNA species within the host. Mutations to the CP suggest that it is required not only for viral assembly but also for some other unidentified function(s) during the replication cycle.

  7. On the evolution of the single-subunit RNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermakian, N; Ikeda, T M; Miramontes, P; Lang, B F; Gray, M W; Cedergren, R

    1997-12-01

    Many eukaryotic nuclear genomes as well as mitochondrial plasmids contain genes displaying evident sequence similarity to those encoding the single-subunit RNA polymerase (ssRNAP) of bacteriophage T7 and its relatives. We have collected and aligned these ssRNAP sequences and have constructed unrooted phylogenetic trees that demonstrate the separation of ssRNAPs into three well-defined and nonoverlapping clusters (phage-encoded, nucleus-encoded, and plasmid-encoded). Our analyses indicate that these three subfamiles of T7-like RNAPs shared a common ancestor; however, the order in which the groups diverged cannot be inferred from available data. On the basis of structural similarities and mutational data, we suggest that the ancestral ssRNAP gene may have arisen via duplication and divergence of a DNA polymerase or reverse transcriptase gene. Considering the current phylogenetic distribution of ssRNAP sequences, we further suggest that the origin of the ancestral ssRNAP gene closely paralleled in time the introduction of mitochondria into eukaryotic cells through a eubacterial endosymbiosis.

  8. Emerging roles for RNA polymerase II CTD in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajheidari, Mohsen; Koncz, Csaba; Eick, Dirk

    2013-11-01

    Post-translational modifications of the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII CTD) provide recognition marks to coordinate recruitment of numerous nuclear factors controlling transcription, cotranscriptional RNA processing, chromatin remodeling, and RNA export. Compared with the progress in yeast and mammals, deciphering the regulatory roles of position-specific combinatorial CTD modifications, the so-called CTD code, is still at an early stage in plants. In this review, we discuss some of the recent advances in understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling the deposition and recognition of RNAPII CTD marks in plants during the transcriptional cycle and highlight some intriguing differences between regulatory components characterized in yeast, mammals, and plants.

  9. Trypanosoma brucei: a putative RNA polymerase II promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayele, Henry K

    2009-12-01

    RNA polymerase II (pol II) promoters are rare in the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei because gene regulation in the parasite is complex and polycistronic. Here, we describe a putative pol II promoter and its structure-function relationship. The promoter has features of an archetypal eukaryotic pol II promoter including putative canonical CCAAT and TATA boxes, and an initiator element. However, the spatial arrangement of these elements is only similar to yeast pol II promoters. Deletion mapping and transcription assays enabled delineation of a minimal promoter that could drive orientation-independent reporter gene expression suggesting that it may be a bidirectional promoter. In vitro transcription in a heterologous nuclear extract revealed that the promoter can be recognized by the basal eukaryotic transcription complex. This suggests that the transcription machinery in the parasite may be very similar to those of other eukaryotes.

  10. Free RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Michael; Dennis, Patrick P; Ehrenberg, Mans; Bremer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    The frequencies of transcription initiation of regulated and constitutive genes depend on the concentration of free RNA polymerase holoenzyme [Rf] near their promoters. Although RNA polymerase is largely confined to the nucleoid, it is difficult to determine absolute concentrations of [Rf] at particular locations within the nucleoid structure. However, relative concentrations of free RNA polymerase at different growth rates, [Rf]rel, can be estimated from the activities of constitutive promoters. Previous studies indicated that the rrnB P2 promoter is constitutive and that [Rf]rel in the vicinity of rrnB P2 increases with increasing growth rate. Recently it has become possible to directly visualize Rf in growing Escherichia coli cells. Here we examine some of the important issues relating to gene expression based on these new observations. We conclude that: (i) At a growth rate of 2 doublings/h, there are about 1000 free and 2350 non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules per average cell (12 and 28%, respectively, of 8400 total) which are in rapid equilibrium. (ii) The reversibility of the non-specific binding generates more than 1000 free RNA polymerase molecules every second in the immediate vicinity of the DNA. Of these, most rebind non-specifically to the DNA within a few ms; the frequency of non-specific binding is at least two orders of magnitude greater than specific binding and transcript initiation. (iii) At a given amount of RNA polymerase per cell, [Rf] and the density of non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules along the DNA both vary reciprocally with the amount of DNA in the cell. (iv) At 2 doublings/h an E. coli cell contains, on the average, about 1 non-specifically bound RNA polymerase per 9 kbp of DNA and 1 free RNA polymerase per 20 kbp of DNA. However some DNA regions (i.e. near active rRNA operons) may have significantly higher than average [Rf].

  11. Cytoplasmic RNA: a case of the tail wagging the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, Chris J

    2013-10-01

    The addition of poly(A) tails to eukaryotic nuclear mRNAs promotes their stability, export to the cytoplasm and translation. Subsequently, the balance between exonucleolytic deadenylation and selective re-establishment of translation-competent poly(A) tails by cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerases is essential for the appropriate regulation of gene expression from oocytes to neurons. In recent years, surprising roles for cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase-related enzymes that add uridylyl, rather than adenylyl, residues to RNA 3' ends have also emerged. These terminal uridylyl transferases promote the turnover of certain mRNAs but also modify microRNAs, their precursors and other small RNAs to modulate their stability or biological functions.

  12. Nuclear Theory - Nuclear Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenne, J. P.; Canton, L.; Kozier, K. S.

    2008-01-01

    The results from modern nuclear theory are accurate and reliable enough to be used for practical applications, in particular for scattering that involves few-nucleon systems of importance to nuclear power. Using well-established nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions that fit well the NN scattering data, and the AGS form of the three-body theory, we have performed precise calculations of low-energy neutron-deuteron (n+d) scattering. We show that three-nucleon force effects that have impact on the low-energy vector analyzing powers have no practical effects on the angular distribution of the n+d cross-section. There appear to be problems for this scattering in the evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF) libraries, at the incident neutron energies less than 3.2 MeV. Supporting experimental data in this energy region are rather old (>25 years), sparse and often inconsistent. Our three-body results at low energies, 50 keV to 10.0 MeV, are compared to the ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) -3.3 evaluated angular distributions. The impact of these results on the calculated reactivity for various critical systems involving heavy water is shown.

  13. Cloning the Horse RNA Polymerase I Promoter and Its Application to Studying Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gang; He, Dong; Wang, Zengchao; Ou, Shudan; Yuan, Rong; Li, Shoujun

    2016-05-31

    An influenza virus polymerase reconstitution assay based on the human, dog, or chicken RNA polymerase I (PolI) promoter has been developed and widely used to study the polymerase activity of the influenza virus in corresponding cell types. Although it is an important member of the influenza virus family and has been known for sixty years, no studies have been performed to clone the horse PolI promoter or to study the polymerase activity of equine influenza virus (EIV) in horse cells. In our study, the horse RNA PolI promoter was cloned from fetal equine lung cells. Using the luciferase assay, it was found that a 500 bp horse RNA PolI promoter sequence was required for efficient transcription. Then, using the developed polymerase reconstitution assay based on the horse RNA PolI promoter, the polymerase activity of two EIV strains was compared, and equine myxovirus resistance A protein was identified as having the inhibiting EIV polymerase activity function in horse cells. Our study enriches our knowledge of the RNA PolI promoter of eukaryotic species and provides a useful tool for the study of influenza virus polymerase activity in horse cells.

  14. DNA polymerase activity of tomato fruit chromoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, E C; Carrillo, N

    1990-11-26

    DNA polymerase activity was measured in chromoplasts of ripening tomato fruits. Plastids isolated from young leaves or mature red fruits showed similar DNA polymerase activities. The same enzyme species was present in either chloroplasts or chromoplasts as judged by pH and temperature profiles, sensitivities towards different inhibitors and relative molecular mass (Mr 88 kDa). The activities analyzed showed the typical behaviour of plastid-type polymerases. The results presented here suggest that chromoplast maintain their DNA synthesis potential in fruit tissue at chloroplast levels. Consequently, the sharp decrease of the plastid chromosome transcription observed at the onset of fruit ripening could not be due to limitations in the availability of template molecules. Other mechanisms must be involved in the inhibition of chromoplast RNA synthesis.

  15. Nuclear control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Wan Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    International cooperation in nuclear industries requires nuclear control as prerequisites. The concept of nuclear control is based on the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapon (NPT). The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) plays central role in implementing nuclear control. Nuclear control consists of nuclear safeguards, physical protection, and export/import control. Each member state of NPT is subject to the IAEA`s safeguards by concluding safeguards agreements with the IAEA. IAEA recommends member states to implement physical protection on nuclear materials by `The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material` and `The Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material` of IAEA. Export/Import Control is to deter development of nuclear weapons by controlling international trade on nuclear materials, nuclear equipments and technology. Current status of domestic and foreign nuclear control implementation including recent induction of national inspection system in Korea is described and functions of recently set-up Technology Center for Nuclear Control (TCNC) under the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) are also explained. 6 tabs., 11 refs. (Author).

  16. Insertion of the T3 DNA polymerase thioredoxin binding domain enhances the processivity and fidelity of Taq DNA polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Insertion of the T3 DNA polymerase thioredoxin binding domain (TBD) into the distantly related thermostable Taq DNA polymerase at an analogous position in the thumb domain, converts the Taq DNA polymerase from a low processive to a highly processive enzyme. Processivity is dependent on the presence of thioredoxin. The enhancement in processivity is 20–50-fold when compared with the wild-type Taq DNA polymerase or to the recombinant polymerase in the absence of thioredoxin. The recombinant Taq...

  17. Bordetella pertussis diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkebaek, N H; Heron, I; Skjødt, K

    1994-01-01

    The object of this work was to test the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for demonstration of Bordetella pertussis (BP) in nasopharyngeal secretions. The method was applied to patients with recently diagnosed pertussis, as verified by BP culture. In order to test the sensitivity and specificity of...

  18. Determining Annealing Temperatures for Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Angela R.; Enners, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common technique used in high school and undergraduate science teaching. Students often do not fully comprehend the underlying principles of the technique and how optimization of the protocol affects the outcome and analysis. In this molecular biology laboratory, students learn the steps of PCR with an…

  19. Polymerase Chain Reaction for Educational Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Stephen J.; dePamphillis, Claude

    1994-01-01

    Suggests the incorporation of the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique into high school and college biology laboratories. Discusses the following sections: (1) current PCR applications; (2) PCR technique; (3) Manual and Machine PCR; (4) Manual PCR Preparations and Procedure; (5) Materials, Supplies, and Recipes; (6) Primer Selection; and (7)…

  20. RNA polymerase II collision interrupts convergent transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobson, David J; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2012-01-01

    Antisense noncoding transcripts, genes-within-genes, and convergent gene pairs are prevalent among eukaryotes. The existence of such transcription units raises the question of what happens when RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules collide head-to-head. Here we use a combination of biochemical...

  1. Evolution of DNA polymerases: an inactivated polymerase-exonuclease module in Pol epsilon and a chimeric origin of eukaryotic polymerases from two classes of archaeal ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahirov, Tahir H; Makarova, Kira S; Rogozin, Igor B; Pavlov, Youri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2009-03-18

    Evolution of DNA polymerases, the key enzymes of DNA replication and repair, is central to any reconstruction of the history of cellular life. However, the details of the evolutionary relationships between DNA polymerases of archaea and eukaryotes remain unresolved. We performed a comparative analysis of archaeal, eukaryotic, and bacterial B-family DNA polymerases, which are the main replicative polymerases in archaea and eukaryotes, combined with an analysis of domain architectures. Surprisingly, we found that eukaryotic Polymerase epsilon consists of two tandem exonuclease-polymerase modules, the active N-terminal module and a C-terminal module in which both enzymatic domains are inactivated. The two modules are only distantly related to each other, an observation that suggests the possibility that Pol epsilon evolved as a result of insertion and subsequent inactivation of a distinct polymerase, possibly, of bacterial descent, upstream of the C-terminal Zn-fingers, rather than by tandem duplication. The presence of an inactivated exonuclease-polymerase module in Pol epsilon parallels a similar inactivation of both enzymatic domains in a distinct family of archaeal B-family polymerases. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicate that eukaryotic B-family polymerases, most likely, originate from two distantly related archaeal B-family polymerases, one form giving rise to Pol epsilon, and the other one to the common ancestor of Pol alpha, Pol delta, and Pol zeta. The C-terminal Zn-fingers that are present in all eukaryotic B-family polymerases, unexpectedly, are homologous to the Zn-finger of archaeal D-family DNA polymerases that are otherwise unrelated to the B family. The Zn-finger of Polepsilon shows a markedly greater similarity to the counterpart in archaeal PolD than the Zn-fingers of other eukaryotic B-family polymerases. Evolution of eukaryotic DNA polymerases seems to have involved previously unnoticed complex events. We hypothesize that the archaeal

  2. Viral uncoating is directional: exit of the genomic RNA in a common cold virus starts with the poly-(A tail at the 3'-end.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shushan Harutyunyan

    Full Text Available Upon infection, many RNA viruses reorganize their capsid for release of the genome into the host cell cytosol for replication. Often, this process is triggered by receptor binding and/or by the acidic environment in endosomes. In the genus Enterovirus, which includes more than 150 human rhinovirus (HRV serotypes causing the common cold, there is persuasive evidence that the viral RNA exits single-stranded through channels formed in the protein shell. We have determined the time-dependent emergence of the RNA ends from HRV2 on incubation of virions at 56°C using hybridization with specific oligonucleotides and detection by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We report that psoralen UV crosslinking prevents complete RNA release, allowing for identification of the sequences remaining inside the capsid. We also present the structure of uncoating intermediates in which parts of the RNA are condensed and take the form of a rod that is directed roughly towards a two-fold icosahedral axis, the presumed RNA exit point. Taken together, in contrast to schemes frequently depicted in textbooks and reviews, our findings demonstrate that exit of the RNA starts from the 3'-end. This suggests that packaging also occurs in an ordered manner resulting in the 3'-poly-(A tail becoming located close to a position of pore formation during conversion of the virion into a subviral particle. This directional genome release may be common to many icosahedral non-enveloped single-stranded RNA viruses.

  3. Viral uncoating is directional: exit of the genomic RNA in a common cold virus starts with the poly-(A) tail at the 3'-end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harutyunyan, Shushan; Kumar, Mohit; Sedivy, Arthur; Subirats, Xavier; Kowalski, Heinrich; Köhler, Gottfried; Blaas, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Upon infection, many RNA viruses reorganize their capsid for release of the genome into the host cell cytosol for replication. Often, this process is triggered by receptor binding and/or by the acidic environment in endosomes. In the genus Enterovirus, which includes more than 150 human rhinovirus (HRV) serotypes causing the common cold, there is persuasive evidence that the viral RNA exits single-stranded through channels formed in the protein shell. We have determined the time-dependent emergence of the RNA ends from HRV2 on incubation of virions at 56°C using hybridization with specific oligonucleotides and detection by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We report that psoralen UV crosslinking prevents complete RNA release, allowing for identification of the sequences remaining inside the capsid. We also present the structure of uncoating intermediates in which parts of the RNA are condensed and take the form of a rod that is directed roughly towards a two-fold icosahedral axis, the presumed RNA exit point. Taken together, in contrast to schemes frequently depicted in textbooks and reviews, our findings demonstrate that exit of the RNA starts from the 3'-end. This suggests that packaging also occurs in an ordered manner resulting in the 3'-poly-(A) tail becoming located close to a position of pore formation during conversion of the virion into a subviral particle. This directional genome release may be common to many icosahedral non-enveloped single-stranded RNA viruses.

  4. Stimulation of translation by human Unr requires cold shock domains 2 and 4, and correlates with poly(A) binding protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Swagat; Anderson, Emma C

    2016-03-03

    The RNA binding protein Unr, which contains five cold shock domains, has several specific roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. It can act as an activator or inhibitor of translation initiation, promote mRNA turnover, or stabilise mRNA. Its role depends on the mRNA and other proteins to which it binds, which includes cytoplasmic poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABP1). Since PABP1 binds to all polyadenylated mRNAs, and is involved in translation initiation by interaction with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G), we investigated whether Unr has a general role in translational control. We found that Unr strongly stimulates translation in vitro, and mutation of cold shock domains 2 or 4 inhibited its translation activity. The ability of Unr and its mutants to stimulate translation correlated with its ability to bind RNA, and to interact with PABP1. We found that Unr stimulated the binding of PABP1 to mRNA, and that Unr was required for the stable interaction of PABP1 and eIF4G in cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Unr reduced the overall level of cellular translation in cells, as well as that of cap-dependent and IRES-dependent reporters. These data describe a novel role for Unr in regulating cellular gene expression.

  5. Cationic peptides as RNA compaction agents: a study on the polyA compaction activity of a linear alpha,epsilon-oligo-L-lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roviello, Giovanni N; Musumeci, Domenica; Roviello, Valentina

    2015-05-15

    In this work, we investigate the compaction activity of a sequential alpha,epsilon-peptide composed of l-lysines towards two RNA targets, in view of its possible pharmaceutical application in RNA-targeting and RNA delivery. The basic oligolysine, object of the present study, proved not only to be efficient in compacting the single-stranded polyA RNA, but also to strongly interact with the polyA·polyU complex, as evidenced by CD-binding and UV-melting experiments. In particular, the marked differences in the CD spectra of the RNA targets upon addition of the peptide, as well as the different UV melting behaviour for the polyA·polyU complex in the presence and absence of the peptide, sustain the hypothesis of a strong RNA compaction capacity of the alpha,epsilon-oligolysine. Finally, by using HPLC analysis, we found a good resistance of the peptide against the lytic action of human serum, an important requirement in view of in vitro/in vivo biological assays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Polyadenylated RNA and mRNA export factors in extrachromosomal nuclear domains of vitellogenic oocytes of the insect Tenebrio molitor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoliubov, D S; Kiselev, A M; Shabel'nikov, S V; Parfenov, V N

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus ofvitellogenic oocytes of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, contains a karyosphere that consists of the condensed chromatin embedded in an extrachromosomal fibrogranular material. Numerous nuclear bodies located freely in the nucleoplasm are also observed. Amongst these bodies, counterparts of nuclear speckles (= interchromatin granule clusters, IGCs) can be identified by the presence of the marker protein SC35. Microinjections of fluorescently tagged methyloligoribonucleotide probes 2'-O-Me(U)22, complementary to poly(A) tails of RNAs, revealed poly(A)+ RNA in the vast majority of IGCs. We found that all T. molitor oocyte IGCs contain heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) core protein Al that localizes to IGCs in an RNA-dependent manner. The extrachromosomal material of the karyosphere and a part of nucleoplasmic IGCs also contain the adapter protein Aly that is known to provide a link between pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA export. The essential mRNA export factor/receptor NXF1 was observed to colocalize with Aly. In nucleoplasmic IGCs, NXF1 was found to localize in an RNA-dependent manner whereas it is RNA-independently located in the extrachromosomal material of the karyosphere. We believe our data suggest on a role of the nucleoplasmic IGCs in mRNA biogenesis and retention in a road to nuclear export.

  7. Temporal order of evolution of DNA replication systems inferred by comparison of cellular and viral DNA polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2006-12-01

    help of the archaeal system, and viruses with the bacterial system never took off. I further suggest that the two other systems of DNA replication, the rolling circle mechanism and the protein-primed mechanism, which are represented in diverse selfish elements, also evolved prior to the emergence of the bacterial replication system. This hypothesis is compatible with the distinct structural affinities of PolB, which has the palm-domain fold shared with reverse transcriptases and RNA-dependent RNA polymerases, and PolC that has a distinct, unrelated nucleotidyltransferase fold. I propose that PolB is a descendant of polymerases that were involved in the replication of genetic elements in the RNA-protein world, prior to the emergence of DNA replication. By contrast, PolC might have evolved from an ancient non-templated polymerase, e.g., polyA polymerase. The proposed temporal succession of the evolving DNA replication systems does not depend on the specific scenario adopted for the evolution of cells and viruses, i.e., whether viruses are derived from cells or virus-like elements are thought to originate from a primordial gene pool. However, arguments are presented in favor of the latter scenario as the most parsimonious explanation of the evolution of DNA replication systems. Conclusion Comparative analysis of the diversity of genomic strategies and organizations of viruses and cellular life forms has the potential to open windows into the deep past of life's evolution, especially, with the regard to the origin of genome replication systems. When complemented with information on the evolution of the relevant protein folds, this comparative approach can yield credible scenarios for very early steps of evolution that otherwise appear to be out of reach. Reviewers Eric Bapteste, Patrick Forterre, and Mark Ragan.

  8. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  9. Nuclear Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  10. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  11. Nuclear Ambitions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    China will begin to build the world’s first third-generation nuclear power plant at the Sanmen Nuclear Power Project in Sanmen City, coastal Zhejiang Province, in March 2009, accord-ing to the State Nuclear Power Technology Corp.

  12. Nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarewicz, W

    1999-01-01

    Current developments in nuclear structure are discussed from a theoretical perspective. The studies of the nuclear many-body system provide us with invaluable information about the nature of the nuclear interaction, nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales, and the modes of the nucleonic matter.

  13. PABPN1 overexpression leads to upregulation of genes encoding nuclear proteins that are sequestered in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy nuclear inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Klein, Arnaud F; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Lavoie, Hugo; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Duranceau, André; Codère, François; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Karpati, George; Rouleau, Guy A; Massie, Bernard; Langelier, Yves; Brais, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disease caused by expanded (GCN)12-17 stretches encoding the N-terminal polyalanine domain of the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD is characterized by intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers, which contain PABPN1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, and poly(A)-mRNA. We describe an adenoviral model of PABPN1 expression that produces INIs in most cells. Microarray analysis revealed that PABPN1 overexpression reproducibly changed the expression of 202 genes. Sixty percent of upregulated genes encode nuclear proteins, including many RNA and DNA binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that all tested nuclear proteins encoded by eight upregulated genes colocalize with PABPN1 within the INIs: CUGBP1, SFRS3, FKBP1A, HMG2, HNRPA1, PRC1, S100P, and HSP70. In addition, CUGBP1, SFRS3, and FKBP1A were also found in OPMD muscle INIs. This study demonstrates that a large number of nuclear proteins are sequestered in OPMD INIs, which may compromise cellular function.

  14. Structural biology of bacterial RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Katsuhiko S

    2015-05-11

    Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477-42485), an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank), describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  15. Structural Biology of Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko S. Murakami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477–42485, an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP. In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank, describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  16. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Three DNA polymerases - Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ - are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson-Crick base pairing and 3'exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to 'polymerase proofreading associated polyposis' (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an 'ultramutator' phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions.

  17. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR): general methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Daniel L E; Shapter, Frances M

    2014-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) converts very low quantities of DNA into very high quantities and is the foundation of many specialized techniques of molecular biology. PCR utilizes components of the cellular machinery of mitotic cell division in vitro which respond predictably to user inputs. This chapter introduces the principles of PCR and discusses practical considerations from target sequence definition through to optimization and application.

  18. Nucleolin Is Required for RNA Polymerase I Transcription In Vivo▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickards, Brenden; Flint, S. J.; Cole, Michael D.; LeRoy, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged with histones and accessory proteins in the form of chromatin. RNA polymerases and their accessory proteins are sufficient for transcription of naked DNA, but not of chromatin, templates in vitro. In this study, we purified and identified nucleolin as a protein that allows RNA polymerase II to transcribe nucleosomal templates in vitro. As immunofluorescence confirmed that nucleolin localizes primarily to nucleoli with RNA polymerase I, we demonstrated that nucleolin allows RNA polymerase I transcription of chromatin templates in vitro. The results of chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments established that nucleolin is associated with chromatin containing rRNA genes transcribed by RNA polymerase I but not with genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II or III. Knockdown of nucleolin by RNA interference resulted in specific inhibition of RNA polymerase I transcription. We therefore propose that an important function of nucleolin is to permit RNA polymerase I to transcribe nucleolar chromatin. PMID:17130237

  19. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Hijacks RNA Polymerase II To Create a Viral Transcriptional Factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christopher Phillip; Lyu, Yuanzhi; Chuang, Frank; Nakano, Kazushi; Izumiya, Chie; Jin, Di; Campbell, Mel; Izumiya, Yoshihiro

    2017-06-01

    Locally concentrated nuclear factors ensure efficient binding to DNA templates, facilitating RNA polymerase II recruitment and frequent reutilization of stable preinitiation complexes. We have uncovered a mechanism for effective viral transcription by focal assembly of RNA polymerase II around Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genomes in the host cell nucleus. Using immunofluorescence labeling of latent nuclear antigen (LANA) protein, together with fluorescence in situ RNA hybridization (RNA-FISH) of the intron region of immediate early transcripts, we visualized active transcription of viral genomes in naturally infected cells. At the single-cell level, we found that not all episomes were uniformly transcribed following reactivation stimuli. However, those episomes that were being transcribed would spontaneously aggregate to form transcriptional "factories," which recruited a significant fraction of cellular RNA polymerase II. Focal assembly of "viral transcriptional factories" decreased the pool of cellular RNA polymerase II available for cellular gene transcription, which consequently impaired cellular gene expression globally, with the exception of selected ones. The viral transcriptional factories localized with replicating viral genomic DNAs. The observed colocalization of viral transcriptional factories with replicating viral genomic DNA suggests that KSHV assembles an "all-in-one" factory for both gene transcription and DNA replication. We propose that the assembly of RNA polymerase II around viral episomes in the nucleus may be a previously unexplored aspect of KSHV gene regulation by confiscation of a limited supply of RNA polymerase II in infected cells.IMPORTANCE B cells infected with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) harbor multiple copies of the KSHV genome in the form of episomes. Three-dimensional imaging of viral gene expression in the nucleus allows us to study interactions and changes in the physical distribution of

  20. Nuclear spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ajzenberg-Selove, Fay

    1960-01-01

    Nuclear Spectroscopy, Part B focuses on the ways in which experimental data may be analyzed to furnish information about nuclear parameters and nuclear models in terms of which the data are interpreted.This book discusses the elastic and inelastic potential scattering amplitudes, role of beta decay in nuclear physics, and general selection rules for electromagnetic transitions. The nuclear shell model, fundamental coupling procedure, vibrational spectra, and empirical determination of the complex potential are also covered. This publication is suitable for graduate students preparing for exper

  1. Proficient Replication of the Yeast Genome by a Viral DNA Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodola, Joseph L; Stith, Carrie M; Burgers, Peter M

    2016-05-27

    DNA replication in eukaryotic cells requires minimally three B-family DNA polymerases: Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ϵ. Pol δ replicates and matures Okazaki fragments on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol δ is a three-subunit enzyme (Pol3-Pol31-Pol32). A small C-terminal domain of the catalytic subunit Pol3 carries both iron-sulfur cluster and zinc-binding motifs, which mediate interactions with Pol31, and processive replication with the replication clamp proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), respectively. We show that the entire N-terminal domain of Pol3, containing polymerase and proofreading activities, could be effectively replaced by those from bacteriophage RB69, and could carry out chromosomal DNA replication in yeast with remarkable high fidelity, provided that adaptive mutations in the replication clamp PCNA were introduced. This result is consistent with the model that all essential interactions for DNA replication in yeast are mediated through the small C-terminal domain of Pol3. The chimeric polymerase carries out processive replication with PCNA in vitro; however, in yeast, it requires an increased involvement of the mutagenic translesion DNA polymerase ζ during DNA replication.

  2. Molecular architecture and function of adenovirus DNA polymerase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenkman, A.B. (Arjan Bernard)

    2003-01-01

    Central to this thesis is the role of adenovirus DNA polymerase (Ad pol) in adenovirus DNA replication. Ad pol is a member of the family B DNA polymerases but belongs to a distinct subclass of polymerases that use a protein as primer. As Ad pol catalyses both the initiation and elongation phases and

  3. Molecular tools for studying the major malaria vector Anopheles funestus: improving the utility of the genome using a comparative poly(A) and Ribo-Zero RNAseq analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedall, Gareth D; Irving, Helen; Hughes, Margaret A; Wondji, Charles S

    2015-11-14

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) offers great opportunities for studying the biology of insect vectors of disease. Prerequisites for successful analyses include high quality annotated genome assemblies and that techniques designed for use with model organisms be tested and optimised for use with these insects. We aimed to test and improve genomic tools for studying the major malaria vector Anopheles funestus. To guide future RNAseq transcriptomic studies of An. funestus, we compared two methods for enrichment of non-ribosomal RNA for analysis: enrichment of polyadenylated RNA and ribosomal RNA depletion using a kit designed to deplete human/rat/mouse rRNA. We found large differences between the two methods in the resulting transcriptomes, some of which is due to differential representation of polyadenylated and non-polyadenylated transcripts. We used the RNAseq data for validation and targeted manual editing of the draft An. funestus genome annotation, validating 62 % of annotated introns, manually improving the annotation of seven gene families involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics and integrated two published transcriptomic datasets with the recently published genome assembly. The mRNA enrichment method makes a substantial, replicable difference to the transcriptome composition, at least partly due to the representation of non-polyadenylated transcripts in the final transcriptome. Therefore, great care should be taken in comparing gene expression data among studies. Ribosomal RNA depletion of total RNA using a kit designed to deplete human/rat/mouse rRNA works in mosquitoes and, we argue, results in a truer representation of the transcriptome than poly(A) selection. The An. funestus genome annotation can be considerably improved with the help of these new RNAseq data and further guided manual gene editing efforts will be of great benefit to the Anopheles research community for studies of this insect's genome and transcriptome.

  4. Differential localization of the two T. brucei poly(A binding proteins to the nucleus and RNP granules suggests binding to distinct mRNA pools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Kramer

    Full Text Available The number of paralogs of proteins involved in translation initiation is larger in trypanosomes than in yeasts or many metazoan and includes two poly(A binding proteins, PABP1 and PABP2, and four eIF4E variants. In many cases, the paralogs are individually essential and are thus unlikely to have redundant functions although, as yet, distinct functions of different isoforms have not been determined. Here, trypanosome PABP1 and PABP2 have been further characterised. PABP1 and PABP2 diverged subsequent to the differentiation of the Kinetoplastae lineage, supporting the existence of specific aspects of translation initiation regulation. PABP1 and PABP2 exhibit major differences in intracellular localization and distribution on polysome fractionation under various conditions that interfere with mRNA metabolism. Most striking are differences in localization to the four known types of inducible RNP granules. Moreover, only PABP2 but not PABP1 can accumulate in the nucleus. Taken together, these observations indicate that PABP1 and PABP2 likely associate with distinct populations of mRNAs. The differences in localization to inducible RNP granules also apply to paralogs of components of the eIF4F complex: eIF4E1 showed similar localization pattern to PABP2, whereas the localisation of eIF4E4 and eIF4G3 resembled that of PABP1. The grouping of translation initiation as either colocalizing with PABP1 or with PABP2 can be used to complement interaction studies to further define the translation initiation complexes in kinetoplastids.

  5. Systematic profiling of poly(A+ transcripts modulated by core 3' end processing and splicing factors reveals regulatory rules of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencheng Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA results in mRNA isoforms containing different 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs and/or coding sequences. How core cleavage/polyadenylation (C/P factors regulate APA is not well understood. Using siRNA knockdown coupled with deep sequencing, we found that several C/P factors can play significant roles in 3'UTR-APA. Whereas Pcf11 and Fip1 enhance usage of proximal poly(A sites (pAs, CFI-25/68, PABPN1 and PABPC1 promote usage of distal pAs. Strong cis element biases were found for pAs regulated by CFI-25/68 or Fip1, and the distance between pAs plays an important role in APA regulation. In addition, intronic pAs are substantially regulated by splicing factors, with U1 mostly inhibiting C/P events in introns near the 5' end of gene and U2 suppressing those in introns with features for efficient splicing. Furthermore, PABPN1 inhibits expression of transcripts with pAs near the transcription start site (TSS, a property possibly related to its role in RNA degradation. Finally, we found that groups of APA events regulated by C/P factors are also modulated in cell differentiation and development with distinct trends. Together, our results support an APA code where an APA event in a given cellular context is regulated by a number of parameters, including relative location to the TSS, splicing context, distance between competing pAs, surrounding cis elements and concentrations of core C/P factors.

  6. Detection of specific polymerase chain reaction product by utilizing the 5'----3' exonuclease activity of Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The 5'----3' exonuclease activity of the thermostable enzyme Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase may be employed in a polymerase chain reaction product detection system to generate a specific detectable signal concomitantly with amplification. An oligonucleotide probe, nonextendable at the 3' end, labeled at the 5' end, and designed to hybridize within the target sequence, is introduced into the polymerase chain reaction assay. Annealing of probe to one of the polymerase chain reaction product s...

  7. Biochemical characterization of a recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chan-Mi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV NS5 is a viral nonstructural protein that carries both methyltransferase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp domains. It is a key component of the viral RNA replicase complex that presumably includes other viral nonstructural and cellular proteins. The biochemical properties of JEV NS5 have not been characterized due to the lack of a robust in vitro RdRp assay system, and the molecular mechanisms for the initiation of RNA synthesis by JEV NS5 remain to be elucidated. Results To characterize the biochemical properties of JEV RdRp, we expressed in Escherichia coli and purified an enzymatically active full-length recombinant JEV NS5 protein with a hexahistidine tag at the N-terminus. The purified NS5 protein, but not the mutant NS5 protein with an Ala substitution at the first Asp of the RdRp-conserved GDD motif, exhibited template- and primer-dependent RNA synthesis activity using a poly(A RNA template. The NS5 protein was able to use both plus- and minus-strand 3'-untranslated regions of the JEV genome as templates in the absence of a primer, with the latter RNA being a better template. Analysis of the RNA synthesis initiation site using the 3'-end 83 nucleotides of the JEV genome as a minimal RNA template revealed that the NS5 protein specifically initiates RNA synthesis from an internal site, U81, at the two nucleotides upstream of the 3'-end of the template. Conclusion As a first step toward the understanding of the molecular mechanisms for JEV RNA replication and ultimately for the in vitro reconstitution of viral RNA replicase complex, we for the first time established an in vitro JEV RdRp assay system with a functional full-length recombinant JEV NS5 protein and characterized the mechanisms of RNA synthesis from nonviral and viral RNA templates. The full-length recombinant JEV NS5 will be useful for the elucidation of the structure-function relationship of this enzyme and for the

  8. Distribution of different phosphorylated forms of RNA polymerase II in relation to Cajal and PML bodies in human cells: an ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sheila Q; Pombo, Ana

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian nucleus is a highly organised organelle that contains many subcompartments with roles in DNA replication and repair, gene expression and RNA processing. Cajal and promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) bodies are discrete nuclear structures with specific molecular signatures. RNA polymerase II and many transcription factors have been identified within these compartments by immunofluorescence microscopy, suggesting a role in polymerase II assembly or transcriptional activity. Here, we have examined the presence of different phosphorylated forms of polymerase II and newly made RNA in Cajal and PML bodies using high-resolution imaging of ultrathin cryosections (approximately 120 nm thick) with fluorescence and electron microscopes. We show that Cajal bodies contain polymerase II phosphorylated on Ser5, and not the Ser2-phosphorylated (active) form or newly made RNA. The presence of polymerase II in the absence of transcriptional activity suggests that Cajal bodies have roles in polymerase assembly or transport, but not in gene transcription. PML bodies contain no detectable polymerase II or nascent RNA in HeLa cells, at the resolution achieved by electron microscopy, but are often surrounded by these markers at distances>25 nm. These results support the view that although PML bodies are present in transcriptionally active areas of the nucleus, they are not generally sites of polymerase II assembly, transport or activity.

  9. SINE transcription by RNA polymerase III is suppressed by histone methylation but not by DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Dhaval; Vavrova-Anderson, Jana; Oler, Andrew J.; Cowling, Victoria H.; Cairns, Bradley R.; White, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs), such as Alu, spread by retrotransposition, which requires their transcripts to be copied into DNA and then inserted into new chromosomal sites. This can lead to genetic damage through insertional mutagenesis and chromosomal rearrangements between non-allelic SINEs at distinct loci. SINE DNA is heavily methylated and this was thought to suppress its accessibility and transcription, thereby protecting against retrotransposition. Here we provide several lines of evidence that methylated SINE DNA is occupied by RNA polymerase III, including the use of high-throughput bisulphite sequencing of ChIP DNA. We find that loss of DNA methylation has little effect on accessibility of SINEs to transcription machinery or their expression in vivo. In contrast, a histone methyltransferase inhibitor selectively promotes SINE expression and occupancy by RNA polymerase III. The data suggest that methylation of histones rather than DNA plays a dominant role in suppressing SINE transcription. PMID:25798578

  10. Regulation of nucleolus assembly by non-coding RNA polymerase II transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Pankert, Teresa; Rippe, Karsten

    2016-05-01

    The nucleolus is a nuclear subcompartment for tightly regulated rRNA production and ribosome subunit biogenesis. It also acts as a cellular stress sensor and can release enriched factors in response to cellular stimuli. Accordingly, the content and structure of the nucleolus change dynamically, which is particularly evident during cell cycle progression: the nucleolus completely disassembles during mitosis and reassembles in interphase. Although the mechanisms that drive nucleolar (re)organization have been the subject of a number of studies, they are only partly understood. Recently, we identified Alu element-containing RNA polymerase II transcripts (aluRNAs) as important for nucleolar structure and rRNA synthesis. Integrating these findings with studies on the liquid droplet-like nature of the nucleolus leads us to propose a model on how RNA polymerase II transcripts could regulate the assembly of the nucleolus in response to external stimuli and during cell cycle progression.

  11. Functional Diversification of Maize RNA Polymerase IV and V subtypes via Alternative Catalytic Subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Brower-Toland, Brent; Krieger, Elysia K.; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Irsigler, Andre; LaRue, Huachun; Brzeski, Jan; Mcginnis, Karen A.; Ivashuta, Sergey; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Chandler, Vicki L.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2014-10-01

    Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic ana- lyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two sub- types of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis.

  12. AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b are Involved in Determining the Poly(A) Length of Granule-bound starch synthase 1 Transcript and Modulating Sucrose and Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuya; Arae, Toshihiro; Green, Pamela J; Yamaguchi, Junji; Chiba, Yukako

    2015-05-01

    Removing the poly(A) tail is the first and rate-limiting step of mRNA degradation and apparently an effective step not only for modulating mRNA stability but also for translation of many eukaryotic transcripts. Carbon catabolite repressor 4 (CCR4) has been identified as a major cytoplasmic deadenylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Arabidopsis thaliana homologs of the yeast CCR4, AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b, were identified by sequence-based analysis; however, their role and physiological significance in plants remain to be elucidated. In this study, we revealed that AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b are localized to cytoplasmic mRNA processing bodies, which are specific granules consisting of many enzymes involved in mRNA turnover. Double mutants of AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b exhibited tolerance to sucrose application but not to glucose. The levels of sucrose in the seedlings of the atccr4a/4b double mutants were reduced, whereas no difference was observed in glucose levels. Further, amylose levels were slightly but significantly increased in the atccr4a/4b double mutants. Consistent with this observation, we found that the transcript encoding granule-bound starch synthase 1 (GBSS1), which is responsible for amylose synthesis, is accumulated to a higher level in the atccr4a/4b double mutant plants than in the control plants. Moreover, we revealed that GBSS1 has a longer poly(A) tail in the double mutant than in the control plant, suggesting that AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b can influence the poly(A) length of transcripts related to starch metabolism. Our results collectively suggested that AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b are involved in sucrose and starch metabolism in A. thaliana.

  13. Proteinase-Polymerase Precursor as the Active Form of Feline Calicivirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Lai; Huhn, Jason S.; Mory, Aaron; Pathak, Harsh B.; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Green, Kim Y.; Cameron, Craig E.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the active form of the feline calicivirus (FCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). Multiple active forms of the FCV RdRP were identified. The most active enzyme was the full-length proteinase-polymerase (Pro-Pol) precursor protein, corresponding to amino acids 1072 to 1763 of the FCV polyprotein encoded by open reading frame 1 of the genome. Deletion of 163 amino acids from the amino terminus of Pro-Pol (the Val-1235 amino terminus) caused a three...

  14. Interplay between polymerase II- and polymerase III-assisted expression of overlapping genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoszek, Radoslaw; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Ignatova, Zoya

    2013-11-15

    Up to 15% of the genes in different genomes overlap. This architecture, although beneficial for the genome size, represents an obstacle for simultaneous transcription of both genes. Here we analyze the interference between RNA-polymerase II (Pol II) and RNA-polymerase III (Pol III) when transcribing their target genes encoded on opposing strands within the same DNA fragment in Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression of a Pol II-dependent protein-coding gene negatively correlated with the transcription of a Pol III-dependent, tRNA-coding gene set. We suggest that the architecture of the overlapping genes introduces an additional layer of control of gene expression.

  15. Kinetic Induction of Oat Shoot Pulvinus Invertase mRNA by Gravistimulation and Partial cDNA Cloning by the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liu-Lai; Song, Il; Karuppiah, Nadarajah; Kaufman, Peter B.

    1993-01-01

    An asymmetric (top vs. bottom halves of pulvini) induction of invertase mRNA by gravistimulation was analyzed in oat shoot pulvini. Total RNA and poly(A)(+) RNA, isolated from oat pulvini, and two oli-gonucleotide primers, corresponding to two conserved amino acid sequences (NDPNG and WECPD) found in invertase from other species, were used for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A partial length cDNA (550 bp) was obtained and characterized. A 62% nucleotide sequence homology and 58% deduced amino acid sequence homology, as compared to beta-fructosidase of carrot cell wall, was found. Northern blot analysis showed that there was an obviously transient induction of invertase mRNA by gravistimulation in the oat pulvinus system. The mRNA was rapidly induced to a maximum level at 1 hour after gravistimulation treatment and gradually decreased afterwards. The mRNA level in the bottom half of the oat pulvinus was significantly higher than that in the top half of the pulvinus tissue. The kinetic induction of invertase mRNA was consistent with the transient accumulation of invertase activity during the graviresponse of the pulvinus. This indicates that the expression of the invertase gene(s) could be regulated by gravistimulation at the transcriptional level. Southern blot analysis showed that there were two to three genomic DNA fragments which hybridized with the partial-length invertase cDNA.

  16. Kinetic Induction of Oat Shoot Pulvinus Invertase mRNA by Gravistimulation and Partial cDNA Cloning by the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liu-Lai; Song, Il; Karuppiah, Nadarajah; Kaufman, Peter B.

    1993-01-01

    An asymmetric (top vs. bottom halves of pulvini) induction of invertase mRNA by gravistimulation was analyzed in oat shoot pulvini. Total RNA and poly(A)(+) RNA, isolated from oat pulvini, and two oli-gonucleotide primers, corresponding to two conserved amino acid sequences (NDPNG and WECPD) found in invertase from other species, were used for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A partial length cDNA (550 bp) was obtained and characterized. A 62% nucleotide sequence homology and 58% deduced amino acid sequence homology, as compared to beta-fructosidase of carrot cell wall, was found. Northern blot analysis showed that there was an obviously transient induction of invertase mRNA by gravistimulation in the oat pulvinus system. The mRNA was rapidly induced to a maximum level at 1 hour after gravistimulation treatment and gradually decreased afterwards. The mRNA level in the bottom half of the oat pulvinus was significantly higher than that in the top half of the pulvinus tissue. The kinetic induction of invertase mRNA was consistent with the transient accumulation of invertase activity during the graviresponse of the pulvinus. This indicates that the expression of the invertase gene(s) could be regulated by gravistimulation at the transcriptional level. Southern blot analysis showed that there were two to three genomic DNA fragments which hybridized with the partial-length invertase cDNA.

  17. Polymerase chain reaction assay for avian polyomavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Phalen, D.N.; Wilson, V G; Graham, D L

    1991-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for detection of budgerigar fledgling disease virus (BFDV). The assay used a single set of primers complementary to sequences located in the putative coding region for the BFDV VP1 gene. The observed amplification product had the expected size of 550 bp and was confirmed to derive from BFDV DNA by its restriction digestion pattern. This assay was specific for BFDV and highly sensitive, being able to detect as few as 20 copies of the virus. By us...

  18. RNA polymerase: the vehicle of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borukhov, Sergei; Nudler, Evgeny

    2008-03-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is the principal enzyme of gene expression and regulation for all three divisions of life: Eukaryota, Archaea and Bacteria. Recent progress in the structural and biochemical characterization of RNAP illuminates this enzyme as a flexible, multifunctional molecular machine. During each step of the transcription cycle, RNAP undergoes elaborate conformational changes. As many fundamental and previously mysterious aspects of how RNAP works begin to be understood, this enzyme reveals intriguing similarities to man-made engineered devices. These resemblances can be found in the mechanics of RNAP-DNA complex formation, in RNA chain initiation and in the elongation processes. Here we highlight recent advances in understanding RNAP function and regulation.

  19. The RNA polymerase I transcription machinery

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C. B. M.

    2006-01-01

    The rRNAs constitute the catalytic and structural components of the ribosome, the protein synthesis machinery of cells. The level of rRNA synthesis, mediated by Pol I (RNA polymerase I), therefore has a major impact on the life and destiny of a cell. In order to elucidate how cells achieve the stringent control of Pol I transcription, matching the supply of rRNA to demand under different cellular growth conditions, it is essential to understand the components and mechanics of the Pol I transc...

  20. Chemical fidelity of an RNA polymerase ribozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attwater, J.; Tagami, S.; Kimoto, M.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of catalytically active RNA enzymes (ribozymes) is widely believed to have been an important transition in the origin of life. In the context of a likely heterogeneous chemical environment, substrate specificity and selectivity of these primordial enzymes would have been critical...... for function. Here we have explored the chemical fidelity, i.e. substrate selectivity and specificity for both single and multiple catalytic steps of the Z RNA polymerase ribozyme-a modern day analogue of the primordial RNA replicase. Using a wide range of nucleotide analogues and ionic conditions, we observe...

  1. ppGpp: magic beyond RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalebroux, Zachary D; Swanson, Michele S

    2012-02-16

    During stress, bacteria undergo extensive physiological transformations, many of which are coordinated by ppGpp. Although ppGpp is best known for enhancing cellular resilience by redirecting the RNA polymerase (RNAP) to certain genes, it also acts as a signal in many other cellular processes in bacteria. After a brief overview of ppGpp biosynthesis and its impact on promoter selection by RNAP, we discuss how bacteria exploit ppGpp to modulate the synthesis, stability or activity of proteins or regulatory RNAs that are crucial in challenging environments, using mechanisms beyond the direct regulation of RNAP activity.

  2. Nuclear Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    This chapter first gives a survey on the history of the discovery of nuclear fission. It briefly presents the liquid-drop and shell models and their application to the fission process. The most important quantities accessible to experimental determination such as mass yields, nuclear charge distribution, prompt neutron emission, kinetic energy distribution, ternary fragment yields, angular distributions, and properties of fission isomers are presented as well as the instrumentation and techniques used for their measurement. The contribution concentrates on the fundamental aspects of nuclear fission. The practical aspects of nuclear fission are discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0720-2_57 of Vol. 6.

  3. Nuclear Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, E G [ed.

    1989-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  4. Metabolic roles of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vida, András; Márton, Judit; Mikó, Edit; Bai, Péter

    2017-03-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) is an evolutionarily conserved reaction that had been associated with numerous cellular processes such as DNA repair, protein turnover, inflammatory regulation, aging or metabolic regulation. The metabolic regulatory tasks of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are complex, it is based on the regulation of metabolic transcription factors (e.g. SIRT1, nuclear receptors, SREBPs) and certain cellular energy sensors. PARP over-activation can cause damage to mitochondrial terminal oxidation, while the inhibition of PARP-1 or PARP-2 can induce mitochondrial oxidation by enhancing the mitotropic tone of gene transcription and signal transduction. These PARP-mediated processes impact on higher order metabolic regulation that modulates lipid metabolism, circadian oscillations and insulin secretion and signaling. PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARP-7 are related to metabolic diseases such as diabetes, alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD, NAFLD), or on a broader perspective to Warburg metabolism in cancer or the metabolic diseases accompanying aging.

  5. Evolution of DNA polymerases: an inactivated polymerase-exonuclease module in Pol ε and a chimeric origin of eukaryotic polymerases from two classes of archaeal ancestors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlov Youri I

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution of DNA polymerases, the key enzymes of DNA replication and repair, is central to any reconstruction of the history of cellular life. However, the details of the evolutionary relationships between DNA polymerases of archaea and eukaryotes remain unresolved. Results We performed a comparative analysis of archaeal, eukaryotic, and bacterial B-family DNA polymerases, which are the main replicative polymerases in archaea and eukaryotes, combined with an analysis of domain architectures. Surprisingly, we found that eukaryotic Polymerase ε consists of two tandem exonuclease-polymerase modules, the active N-terminal module and a C-terminal module in which both enzymatic domains are inactivated. The two modules are only distantly related to each other, an observation that suggests the possibility that Pol ε evolved as a result of insertion and subsequent inactivation of a distinct polymerase, possibly, of bacterial descent, upstream of the C-terminal Zn-fingers, rather than by tandem duplication. The presence of an inactivated exonuclease-polymerase module in Pol ε parallels a similar inactivation of both enzymatic domains in a distinct family of archaeal B-family polymerases. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicate that eukaryotic B-family polymerases, most likely, originate from two distantly related archaeal B-family polymerases, one form giving rise to Pol ε, and the other one to the common ancestor of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ζ. The C-terminal Zn-fingers that are present in all eukaryotic B-family polymerases, unexpectedly, are homologous to the Zn-finger of archaeal D-family DNA polymerases that are otherwise unrelated to the B family. The Zn-finger of Polε shows a markedly greater similarity to the counterpart in archaeal PolD than the Zn-fingers of other eukaryotic B-family polymerases. Conclusion Evolution of eukaryotic DNA polymerases seems to have involved previously unnoticed complex events. We

  6. Evolution of DNA polymerases: an inactivated polymerase-exonuclease module in Pol ε and a chimeric origin of eukaryotic polymerases from two classes of archaeal ancestors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahirov, Tahir H; Makarova, Kira S; Rogozin, Igor B; Pavlov, Youri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2009-01-01

    Background Evolution of DNA polymerases, the key enzymes of DNA replication and repair, is central to any reconstruction of the history of cellular life. However, the details of the evolutionary relationships between DNA polymerases of archaea and eukaryotes remain unresolved. Results We performed a comparative analysis of archaeal, eukaryotic, and bacterial B-family DNA polymerases, which are the main replicative polymerases in archaea and eukaryotes, combined with an analysis of domain architectures. Surprisingly, we found that eukaryotic Polymerase ε consists of two tandem exonuclease-polymerase modules, the active N-terminal module and a C-terminal module in which both enzymatic domains are inactivated. The two modules are only distantly related to each other, an observation that suggests the possibility that Pol ε evolved as a result of insertion and subsequent inactivation of a distinct polymerase, possibly, of bacterial descent, upstream of the C-terminal Zn-fingers, rather than by tandem duplication. The presence of an inactivated exonuclease-polymerase module in Pol ε parallels a similar inactivation of both enzymatic domains in a distinct family of archaeal B-family polymerases. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicate that eukaryotic B-family polymerases, most likely, originate from two distantly related archaeal B-family polymerases, one form giving rise to Pol ε, and the other one to the common ancestor of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ζ. The C-terminal Zn-fingers that are present in all eukaryotic B-family polymerases, unexpectedly, are homologous to the Zn-finger of archaeal D-family DNA polymerases that are otherwise unrelated to the B family. The Zn-finger of Polε shows a markedly greater similarity to the counterpart in archaeal PolD than the Zn-fingers of other eukaryotic B-family polymerases. Conclusion Evolution of eukaryotic DNA polymerases seems to have involved previously unnoticed complex events. We hypothesize that the archaeal

  7. Solving the RNA polymerase I structural puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Morcillo, María [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Taylor, Nicholas M. I. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gruene, Tim [Georg-August-University, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Legrand, Pierre [SOLEIL Synchrotron, L’Orme de Merisiers, Saint Aubin, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Rashid, Umar J. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ruiz, Federico M. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Steuerwald, Ulrich; Müller, Christoph W. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fernández-Tornero, Carlos, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-01

    Details of the RNA polymerase I crystal structure determination provide a framework for solution of the structures of other multi-subunit complexes. Simple crystallographic experiments are described to extract relevant biological information such as the location of the enzyme active site. Knowing the structure of multi-subunit complexes is critical to understand basic cellular functions. However, when crystals of these complexes can be obtained they rarely diffract beyond 3 Å resolution, which complicates X-ray structure determination and refinement. The crystal structure of RNA polymerase I, an essential cellular machine that synthesizes the precursor of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus of eukaryotic cells, has recently been solved. Here, the crucial steps that were undertaken to build the atomic model of this multi-subunit enzyme are reported, emphasizing how simple crystallographic experiments can be used to extract relevant biological information. In particular, this report discusses the combination of poor molecular replacement and experimental phases, the application of multi-crystal averaging and the use of anomalous scatterers as sequence markers to guide tracing and to locate the active site. The methods outlined here will likely serve as a reference for future structural determination of large complexes at low resolution.

  8. Polymerase chain reaction assay for avian polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalen, D N; Wilson, V G; Graham, D L

    1991-05-01

    A polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for detection of budgerigar fledgling disease virus (BFDV). The assay used a single set of primers complementary to sequences located in the putative coding region for the BFDV VP1 gene. The observed amplification product had the expected size of 550 bp and was confirmed to derive from BFDV DNA by its restriction digestion pattern. This assay was specific for BFDV and highly sensitive, being able to detect as few as 20 copies of the virus. By using the polymerase chain reaction, BFDV was detected in adult, nestling, and embryo budgerigar (Melopsitticus undulatus) tissue DNAs and in sera from adult and nestling budgerigars. These results suggest the possibility of persistent infections in adult birds and lend further support to previously described evidence of possible in ovo transmission. BFDV was also detected in chicken embryo fibroblast cell cultures and chicken eggs inoculated with the virus. A 550-bp product with identical restriction enzyme sites was amplified from a suspected polyomavirus isolated from a peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis pesonata) and from tissue DNA from a Hahn's macaw (Ara nobilis) and a sun conure (Aratinga solstitialis) with histological lesions suggestive of polyomavirus infection. These fragments also hybridized with a BFDV-derived probe, proving that they were derived from a polyomavirus very similar, if not identical, to BFDV.

  9. RNA polymerase activity of Ustilago maydis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yie, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    Ustilago maydis virus has an RNA polymerase enzyme which is associated with virion capsids. In the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ ion and ribonucleotide triphosphate, the enzyme catalyzes the in vitro synthesis of mRNA by using dsRNA as a template. The products of the UmV RNA polymerase were both ssRNA and dsRNA. The dsRNA was determined by characteristic mobilities in gel electrophoresis, lack of sensitivity to RNase, and specific hybridization tests. The ssRNAs were identified by elution from a CF-11 column and by their RNase sensitivity. On the basis of the size of ssRNAs, it was concluded that partial transcripts were produced from H dsRNA segments, and full length transcripts were produced from M and L dsRNA segments. The following observations indicates that transcription occurs by strand displacement; (1) Only the positive strand of M2 dsRNA was labeled by the in vitro reaction. (2) The M2 dsRNA which had been labeled with /sup 32/''P-UTP in vitro could be chased from dsRNA with unlabeled UTP. The transcription products of three UmV strains were compared, and the overall pattern of transcription was very similar among them.

  10. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Three DNA polymerases — Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ — are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson–Crick base pairing and 3′exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to ‘polymerase proofreading associated polyposis’ (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an ‘ultramutator’ phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. PMID:24583393

  11. Multiple, non-allelic, intein-coding sequences in eukaryotic RNA polymerase genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butler Margaret I

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inteins are self-splicing protein elements. They are translated as inserts within host proteins that excise themselves and ligate the flanking portions of the host protein (exteins with a peptide bond. They are encoded as in-frame insertions within the genes for the host proteins. Inteins are found in all three domains of life and in viruses, but have a very sporadic distribution. Only a small number of intein coding sequences have been identified in eukaryotic nuclear genes, and all of these are from ascomycete or basidiomycete fungi. Results We identified seven intein coding sequences within nuclear genes coding for the second largest subunits of RNA polymerase. These sequences were found in diverse eukaryotes: one is in the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase I (RPA2 from the ascomycete fungus Phaeosphaeria nodorum, one is in the RNA polymerase III (RPC2 of the slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum and four intein coding sequences are in RNA polymerase II genes (RPB2, one each from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the zygomycete fungus Spiromyces aspiralis and the chytrid fungi Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and Coelomomyces stegomyiae. The remaining intein coding sequence is in a viral relic embedded within the genome of the oomycete Phytophthora ramorum. The Chlamydomonas and Dictyostelium inteins are the first nuclear-encoded inteins found outside of the fungi. These new inteins represent a unique dataset: they are found in homologous proteins that form a paralogous group. Although these paralogues diverged early in eukaryotic evolution, their sequences can be aligned over most of their length. The inteins are inserted at multiple distinct sites, each of which corresponds to a highly conserved region of RNA polymerase. This dataset supports earlier work suggesting that inteins preferentially occur in highly conserved regions of their host proteins. Conclusion The identification of these new inteins

  12. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Alessandro

    2005-04-01

    The activity of the Italian nuclear physicists community in the field of Nuclear Astrophysics is reported. The researches here described have been performed within the project "Fisica teorica del nucleo e dei sistemi a multi corpi", supported by the Ministero dell'Istruzione, dell'Università e della Ricerca.

  13. Augmentation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-dependent neuronal cell death by acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Xiaoling; Kwansa, Herman; Kim, Yun Tai; Yi, Liye; Hong, Gina; Andrabi, Shaida A; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Koehler, Raymond C; Yang, Zeng-Jin

    2017-06-01

    Tissue acidosis is a key component of cerebral ischemic injury, but its influence on cell death signaling pathways is not well defined. One such pathway is parthanatos, in which oxidative damage to DNA results in activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and generation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymers that trigger release of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor. In primary neuronal cultures, we first investigated whether acidosis per sé is capable of augmenting parthanatos signaling initiated pharmacologically with the DNA alkylating agent, N-methyl- N'-nitro- N-nitrosoguanidine. Exposure of neurons to medium at pH 6.2 for 4 h after N-methyl- N'-nitro- N-nitrosoguanidine washout increased intracellular calcium and augmented the N-methyl- N'-nitro- N-nitrosoguanidine-evoked increase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymers, nuclear apoptosis-inducing factor , and cell death. The augmented nuclear apoptosis-inducing factor and cell death were blocked by the acid-sensitive ion channel-1a inhibitor, psalmotoxin. In vivo, acute hyperglycemia during transient focal cerebral ischemia augmented tissue acidosis, poly(ADP-ribose) polymers formation, and nuclear apoptosis-inducing factor , which was attenuated by a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor. Infarct volume from hyperglycemic ischemia was decreased in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1-null mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate that acidosis can directly amplify neuronal parthanatos in the absence of ischemia through acid-sensitive ion channel-1a . The results further support parthanatos as one of the mechanisms by which ischemia-associated tissue acidosis augments cell death.

  14. mRNA decay proteins are targeted to poly(A+ RNA and dsRNA-containing cytoplasmic foci that resemble P-bodies in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itzel López-Rosas

    Full Text Available In higher eukaryotes, mRNA degradation and RNA-based gene silencing occur in cytoplasmic foci referred to as processing bodies (P-bodies. In protozoan parasites, the presence of P-bodies and their putative role in mRNA decay have yet to be comprehensively addressed. Identification of P-bodies might provide information on how mRNA degradation machineries evolved in lower eukaryotes. Here, we used immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy assays to investigate the cellular localization of mRNA degradation proteins in the human intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica and found evidence of the existence of P-bodies. Two mRNA decay factors, namely the EhXRN2 exoribonuclease and the EhDCP2 decapping enzyme, were localized in cytoplasmic foci in a pattern resembling P-body organization. Given that amoebic foci appear to be smaller and less rounded than those described in higher eukaryotes, we have named them "P-body-like structures". These foci contain additional mRNA degradation factors, including the EhCAF1 deadenylase and the EhAGO2-2 protein involved in RNA interference. Biochemical analysis revealed that EhCAF1 co-immunoprecipitated with EhXRN2 but not with EhDCP2 or EhAGO2-2, thus linking deadenylation to 5'-to-3' mRNA decay. The number of EhCAF1-containing foci significantly decreased after inhibition of transcription and translation with actinomycin D and cycloheximide, respectively. Furthermore, results of RNA-FISH assays showed that (i EhCAF1 colocalized with poly(A(+ RNA and (ii during silencing of the Ehpc4 gene by RNA interference, EhAGO2-2 colocalized with small interfering RNAs in cytoplasmic foci. Our observation of decapping, deadenylation and RNA interference proteins within P-body-like foci suggests that these structures have been conserved after originating in the early evolution of eukaryotic lineages. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report on the localization of mRNA decay proteins within P

  15. Nuclear stress test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Persantine stress test; Thallium stress test; Stress test - nuclear; Adenosine stress test; Regadenoson stress test; CAD - nuclear stress; Coronary artery disease - nuclear stress; Angina - nuclear ...

  16. Nuclear questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, M. [Physics World (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-01

    The future of nuclear power has returned to centre stage. Freezing weather on both sides of the Atlantic and last month's climate-change talks in Montreal have helped to put energy and the future of nuclear power right back on the political agenda. The issue is particularly pressing for those countries where existing nuclear stations are reaching the end of their lives. In the UK, prime minister Tony Blair has commissioned a review of energy, with a view to deciding later this year whether to build new nuclear power plants. The review comes just four years after the Labour government published a White Paper on energy that said the country should keep the nuclear option open but did not follow this up with any concrete action. In Germany, new chancellor and former physicist Angela Merkel is a fan of nuclear energy and had said she would extend the lifetime of its nuclear plants beyond 2020, when they are due to close. However, that commitment has had to be abandoned, at least for the time being, following negotiations with her left-wing coalition partners. The arguments in favour of nuclear power will be familiar to all physicists - it emits almost no carbon dioxide and can play a vital role in maintaining a diverse energy supply. To over-rely on imported supplies of oil and gas can leave a nation hostage to fortune. The arguments against are equally easy to list - the public is scared of nuclear power, it generates dangerous waste with potentially huge clean-up costs, and it is not necessarily cheap. Nuclear plants could also be a target for terrorist attacks. Given political will, many of these problems can be resolved, or at least tackled. China certainly sees the benefits of nuclear power, as does Finland, which is building a new 1600 MW station - the world's most powerful - that is set to open in 2009. Physicists, of course, are essential to such developments. They play a vital role in ensuring the safety of such plants and developing new types of

  17. Nucleoprotein of influenza B virus binds to its type A counterpart and disrupts influenza A viral polymerase complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaru-ampornpan, Peera, E-mail: peera.jar@biotec.or.th; Narkpuk, Jaraspim; Wanitchang, Asawin; Jongkaewwattana, Anan, E-mail: anan.jon@biotec.or.th

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FluB nucleoprotein (BNP) can bind to FluA nucleoprotein (ANP). •BNP–ANP interaction inhibits FluA polymerase activity. •BNP binding prevents ANP from forming a functional FluA polymerase complex. •Nuclear localization of BNP is necessary for FluA polymerase inhibition. •Viral RNA is not required for the BNP–ANP interaction. -- Abstract: Upon co-infection with influenza B virus (FluB), influenza A virus (FluA) replication is substantially impaired. Previously, we have shown that the nucleoprotein of FluB (BNP) can inhibit FluA polymerase machinery, retarding the growth of FluA. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this inhibitory action awaited further investigation. Here, we provide evidence that BNP hinders the proper formation of FluA polymerase complex by competitively binding to the nucleoprotein of FluA. To exert this inhibitory effect, BNP must be localized in the nucleus. The interaction does not require the presence of the viral RNA but needs an intact BNP RNA-binding motif. The results highlight the novel role of BNP as an anti-influenza A viral agent and provide insights into the mechanism of intertypic interference.

  18. The RNA polymerase I transcription machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C B M

    2006-01-01

    The rRNAs constitute the catalytic and structural components of the ribosome, the protein synthesis machinery of cells. The level of rRNA synthesis, mediated by Pol I (RNA polymerase I), therefore has a major impact on the life and destiny of a cell. In order to elucidate how cells achieve the stringent control of Pol I transcription, matching the supply of rRNA to demand under different cellular growth conditions, it is essential to understand the components and mechanics of the Pol I transcription machinery. In this review, we discuss: (i) the molecular composition and functions of the Pol I enzyme complex and the two main Pol I transcription factors, SL1 (selectivity factor 1) and UBF (upstream binding factor); (ii) the interplay between these factors during pre-initiation complex formation at the rDNA promoter in mammalian cells; and (iii) the cellular control of the Pol I transcription machinery.

  19. Polymerase Chain Reaction on a Viral Nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr-Smith, James; Pacheco-Gómez, Raúl; Little, Haydn A; Hicks, Matthew R; Sandhu, Sandeep; Steinke, Nadja; Smith, David J; Rodger, Alison; Goodchild, Sarah A; Lukaszewski, Roman A; Tucker, James H R; Dafforn, Timothy R

    2015-12-18

    The field of synthetic biology includes studies that aim to develop new materials and devices from biomolecules. In recent years, much work has been carried out using a range of biomolecular chassis including α-helical coiled coils, β-sheet amyloids and even viral particles. In this work, we show how hybrid bionanoparticles can be produced from a viral M13 bacteriophage scaffold through conjugation with DNA primers that can template a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This unprecedented example of a PCR on a virus particle has been studied by flow aligned linear dichroism spectroscopy, which gives information on the structure of the product as well as a new protototype methodology for DNA detection. We propose that this demonstration of PCR on the surface of a bionanoparticle is a useful addition to ways in which hybrid assemblies may be constructed using synthetic biology.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Polymerase Clamp Loaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelch, Brian; Makino, Debora; Simonetta, Kyle; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    Clamp loaders are ATP-driven multiprotein machines that couple ATP hydrolysis to the opening and closing of a circular protein ring around DNA. This ring-shaped clamp slides along DNA, and interacts with numerous proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair and cell cycle control. Recently determined structures of clamp loader complexes from prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases have revealed exciting new details of how these complex AAA+ machines perform this essential clamp loading function. This review serves as background to John Kuriyan's lecture at the 2010 Erice School, and is not meant as a comprehensive review of the contributions of the many scientists who have advanced this field. These lecture notes are derived from recent reviews and research papers from our groups.

  1. Polymerase chain reaction with nearby primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garafutdinov, Ravil R; Galimova, Aizilya A; Sakhabutdinova, Assol R

    2017-02-01

    DNA analysis of biological specimens containing degraded nucleic acids such as mortal remains, archaeological artefacts, forensic samples etc. has gained more attention in recent years. DNA extracted from these samples is often inapplicable for conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), so for its amplification the nearby primers are commonly used. Here we report the data that clarify the features of PCR with nearby and abutting primers. We have shown that the proximity of primers leads to significant reduction of the reaction time and ensures the successful performance of DNA amplification even in the presence of PCR inhibitors. The PCR with abutting primers is usually characterized by the absence of nonspecific amplification products that causes extreme sensitivity with limit of detection on single copy level. The feasibility of PCR with abutting primers was demonstrated on species identification of 100 years old rotten wood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Bordetella pertussis diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkebaek, N H; Heron, I; Skjødt, K

    1994-01-01

    The object of this work was to test the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for demonstration of Bordetella pertussis (BP) in nasopharyngeal secretions. The method was applied to patients with recently diagnosed pertussis, as verified by BP culture. In order to test the sensitivity and specificity...... in 25 patients in whose nasopharyngeal secretions BP had been demonstrated after 4-7 days of culture. The detection limit of PCR in aqueous solution was 1-2 BP bacteria per reaction tube. PCR was 100% specific for BP, showing no response with other Bordetella species or other bacteria known to colonize...... of PCR for the diagnosis of BP, we used known concentrations of BP, Bordetella parapertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica in aqueous solutions. PCR was furthermore carried out on species of bacteria that might be isolated from the nasopharynx. The applicability of PCR to patient specimens was tested...

  3. [Polymerase chain reaction and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sárosi, I; Gerald, E; Girish, V N

    1992-07-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of the most important new methods in molecular biology. It is widely used in genetic and anthropologic basic research, in oncology and virology, in all those fields, where molecular biologic methods can give answers to the questions raised. The procedure enables one to multiply with extreme precision targeted pieces of amounts as little as one target molecule of DNA or RNA by five to six logs, making them easy to be handled and examined by routine molecular biological methods. The method is presented through one possible application field, that is of great importance in the study of hepatocarcinogenesis. Sensitivity of PCR in detection of hepatitis B virus DNA is greater by four logs than animal inoculation, the last most sensitive method known.

  4. The punctilious RNA polymerase II core promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo Ngoc, Long; Wang, Yuan-Liang; Kassavetis, George A; Kadonaga, James T

    2017-07-01

    The signals that direct the initiation of transcription ultimately converge at the core promoter, which is the gateway to transcription. Here we provide an overview of the RNA polymerase II core promoter in bilateria (bilaterally symmetric animals). The core promoter is diverse in terms of its composition and function yet is also punctilious, as it acts with strict rules and precision. We additionally describe an expanded view of the core promoter that comprises the classical DNA sequence motifs, sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors, chromatin signals, and DNA structure. This model may eventually lead to a more unified conceptual understanding of the core promoter. © 2017 Vo ngoc et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase 1 is required for protein localization to Cajal body.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Kotova

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the nuclear protein known as Poly (ADP-ribose Polymerase1 (PARP1 was shown to play a key role in regulating transcription of a number of genes and controlling the nuclear sub-organelle nucleolus. PARP1 enzyme is known to catalyze the transfer of ADP-ribose to a variety of nuclear proteins. At present, however, while we do know that the main acceptor for pADPr in vivo is PARP1 protein itself, by PARP1 automodification, the significance of PARP1 automodification for in vivo processes is not clear. Therefore, we investigated the roles of PARP1 auto ADP-ribosylation in dynamic nuclear processes during development. Specifically, we discovered that PARP1 automodification is required for shuttling key proteins into Cajal body (CB by protein non-covalent interaction with pADPr in vivo. We hypothesize that PARP1 protein shuttling follows a chain of events whereby, first, most unmodified PARP1 protein molecules bind to chromatin and accumulate in nucleoli, but then, second, upon automodification with poly(ADP-ribose, PARP1 interacts non-covalently with a number of nuclear proteins such that the resulting protein-pADPr complex dissociates from chromatin into CB.

  6. Nuclear Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Savage, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Lattice QCD is making good progress toward calculating the structure and properties of light nuclei and the forces between nucleons. These calculations will ultimately refine the nuclear forces, particularly in the three- and four-nucleon sector and the short-distance interactions of nucleons with electroweak currents, and allow for a reduction of uncertainties in nuclear many-body calculations of nuclei and their reactions. After highlighting their importance, particularly to the Nuclear Physics and High-Energy Physics experimental programs, I discuss the progress that has been made toward achieving these goals and the challenges that remain.

  7. Basic mechanism of transcription by RNA polymerase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlov, Vladimir; Nudler, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    RNA polymerase II-like enzymes carry out transcription of genomes in Eukaryota, Archaea, and some viruses. They also exhibit fundamental similarity to RNA polymerases from bacteria, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. In this review we take an inventory of recent studiesilluminating different steps of basic transcription mechanism, likely common for most multi-subunit RNA polymerases. Through the amalgamation of structural and computational chemistry data we attempt to highlight the most feasible reaction pathway for the two-metal nucleotidyl transfer mechanism, and to evaluate the way catalysis can be linked to translocation in the mechano-chemical cycle catalyzed by RNA polymerase II. PMID:22982365

  8. Nuclear reaction

    CERN Multimedia

    Penwarden, C

    2001-01-01

    At the European Research Organization for Nuclear Research, Nobel laureates delve into the mysteries of particle physics. But when they invited artists from across the continent to visit their site in Geneva, they wanted a new kind of experiment.

  9. Nuclear Disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher

    1982-01-01

    Material about nuclear disarmament and the arms race should be included in secondary school curricula. Teachers can present this technical, controversial, and frightening material in a balanced and comprehensible way. Resources for instructional materials are listed. (PP)

  10. Nuclear Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Morgan C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  11. Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Angela

    2003-04-01

    An account of recent studies in the field of theoretical nuclear structure is reported. These studies concern essentially research activities performed under the Italian project "Fisica Teorica del Nucleo e dei Sistemi a Molti Corpi". Special attention is addressed to results obtained during the last two years as regards the development of new many-body techniques as well as the interpretation of new experimental aspects of nuclear structure.

  12. Nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Bruxelles (Belgium); Takahashi, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Garching (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding of the Universe, or at least some of its many faces, through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. It attempts to find as many nuclear physics imprints as possible in the macrocosm, and to decipher what those messages are telling us about the varied constituent objects in the Universe at present and in the past. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress made in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other subfields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Notwithstanding the accomplishment, many long-standing problems remain to be solved, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endangering old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experimental and theoretical components. On top of the fact that large varieties of nuclei have to be dealt with, these nuclei are immersed in highly unusual environments which may have a significant impact on their static properties, the diversity of their transmutation modes, and on the probabilities of these modes. In order to have a chance of solving some of the problems nuclear astrophysics is facing, the astrophysicists and nuclear physicists are obviously bound to put their competence in common, and have sometimes to benefit from the help of other fields of physics, like particle physics, plasma physics or solid-state physics. Given the highly varied and complex aspects, we pick here some specific nuclear

  13. Nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, M.; Takahashi, K.

    1999-03-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding of the Universe, or at least some of its many faces, through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. It attempts to find as many nuclear physics imprints as possible in the macrocosm, and to decipher what those messages are telling us about the varied constituent objects in the Universe at present and in the past. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress made in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other subfields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Notwithstanding the accomplishment, many long-standing problems remain to be solved, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endangering old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experimental and theoretical components. On top of the fact that large varieties of nuclei have to be dealt with, these nuclei are immersed in highly unusual environments which may have a significant impact on their static properties, the diversity of their transmutation modes, and on the probabilities of these modes. In order to have a chance of solving some of the problems nuclear astrophysics is facing, the astrophysicists and nuclear physicists are obviously bound to put their competence in common, and have sometimes to benefit from the help of other fields of physics, like particle physics, plasma physics or solid-state physics. Given the highly varied and complex aspects, we pick here some specific nuclear

  14. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  17. General Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of ... limitations of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  2. The polymerase chain reaction: current and future clinical applications.

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, J R; Brown, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction has undergone rapid improvement since its initial development, such that the technique currently permits rapid, accurate, predictive tests to be made in the field of prenatal diagnosis and has greatly aided forensic medicine. It is anticipated that the polymerase chain reaction will also facilitate advances in other fields, in particular preimplantation diagnosis, virology, bacteriology, and cancer therapy.

  3. Role for DNA polymerase beta in response to ionizing radiation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, C.; Verwijs-Janssen, M.; Cramers, P.; Begg, A.C.; Vens, C.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence for a role of DNA polymerase beta in determining radiosensitivity is conflicting. In vitro assays show an involvement of DNA polymerase beta in single strand break repair and base excision repair of oxidative damages, both products of ionizing radiation. Nevertheless the lack of DNA polymer

  4. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Nathanael S. (Berkeley, CA); Schultz, Peter (Oakland, CA); Kim, Sung-Hou (Moraga, CA); Meijer, Laurent (Roscoff, FR)

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  5. Problem-Solving Test: Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: polymerase chain reaction, DNA amplification, electrophoresis, breast cancer, "HER2" gene, genomic DNA, "in vitro" DNA synthesis, template, primer, Taq polymerase, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] elongation activity, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] exonuclease activity, deoxyribonucleoside…

  6. The RNA polymerase of marine cyanophage Syn5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bin; Tabor, Stanley; Raytcheva, Desislava A; Hernandez, Alfredo; King, Jonathan A; Richardson, Charles C

    2013-02-01

    A single subunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified and purified to apparent homogeneity from cyanophage Syn5 that infects the marine cyanobacteria Synechococcus. Syn5 is homologous to bacteriophage T7 that infects Escherichia coli. Using the purified enzyme its promoter has been identified by examining transcription of segments of Syn5 DNA and sequencing the 5'-termini of the transcripts. Only two Syn5 RNAP promoters, having the sequence 5'-ATTGGGCACCCGTAA-3', are found within the Syn5 genome. One promoter is located within the Syn5 RNA polymerase gene and the other is located close to the right genetic end of the genome. The purified enzyme and its promoter have enabled a determination of the requirements for transcription. Unlike the salt-sensitive bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, this marine RNA polymerase requires 160 mm potassium for maximal activity. The optimal temperature for Syn5 RNA polymerase is 24 °C, much lower than that for T7 RNA polymerase. Magnesium is required as a cofactor although some activity is observed with ferrous ions. Syn5 RNA polymerase is more efficient in utilizing low concentrations of ribonucleotides than T7 RNA polymerase.

  7. A Practical Polymerase Chain Reaction Laboratory for Introductory Biology Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlus, R. David; Grether, Susan C.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) laboratory exercise that can be performed by introductory biology students in 1 45- to 55-minute class period. Includes a general description of the polymerase chain reaction, materials needed, procedure, and details of interest to teachers. (JRH)

  8. Genotypic frequency of calpastatin gene in lori sheep by polymerase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... consequently the balance of calpain-calpastatin activity in muscles is believed to dictate the rate of tenderization in post-mortem meat. ... Polymerase chain reaction was performed to amplify a 622 bp fragment of this gene. Restriction reaction of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was done using MspI enzyme.

  9. Ribonucleic acid stimulation of mammalian liver nuclear-envelope nucleoside triphosphatase. A possible enzymic marker for the nuclear envelope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; Harris, J R; Stevenson, I

    1977-03-15

    1. The specific activity of rat and pig liver nuclear-envelope nucleoside triphosphatase (EC 3.6.1.3) decreases when the system is depleted of RNA. The activity can be restored by adding high concentrations of yeast RNA to the assay medium. 2. Exogenous RNA also increases the activity of the enzyme in control envelopes (not RNA-depleted). The effect appears to be largely specific for poly(A) and poly(G); it is not stimulated by rRNA or tRNA preparations, ribonuclease-hydrolysed RNA, AMP, or double- or single-stranded DNA. 3. Inhibitors of the enzyme, in concentrations at which half-maximal inhibition of the enzyme is achieved, do not affect the percentage stimulation of the enzyme by yeast RNA. 4. The simulation is abolished by the inclusion of 150 mM-KCl or -NaCl in the assay medium, but not by increasing the assay pH to 8.5. 5. The results are discussed in the light of the possible role of the nucleoside triphosphatase in vivo in nucleo-cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein translocation. 6. It is proposed that poly(G)-stimulated Mg2+-activated adenosine triphosphatase activity should be adopted as an enzymic marker for the nuclear envelope.

  10. Quality control mechanisms exclude incorrect polymerases from the eukaryotic replication fork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Grant D.; O’Donnell, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is primarily replicated by two DNA polymerases, Pol ε and Pol δ, that function on the leading and lagging strands, respectively. Previous studies have established recruitment mechanisms whereby Cdc45-Mcm2-7-GINS (CMG) helicase binds Pol ε and tethers it to the leading strand, and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) binds tightly to Pol δ and recruits it to the lagging strand. The current report identifies quality control mechanisms that exclude the improper polymerase from a particular strand. We find that the replication factor C (RFC) clamp loader specifically inhibits Pol ε on the lagging strand, and CMG protects Pol ε against RFC inhibition on the leading strand. Previous studies show that Pol δ is slow and distributive with CMG on the leading strand. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol δ–PCNA is a rapid and processive enzyme, suggesting that CMG may bind and alter Pol δ activity or position it on the lagging strand. Measurements of polymerase binding to CMG demonstrate Pol ε binds CMG with a Kd value of 12 nM, but Pol δ binding CMG is undetectable. Pol δ, like bacterial replicases, undergoes collision release upon completing replication, and we propose Pol δ–PCNA collides with the slower CMG, and in the absence of a stabilizing Pol δ–CMG interaction, the collision release process is triggered, ejecting Pol δ on the leading strand. Hence, by eviction of incorrect polymerases at the fork, the clamp machinery directs quality control on the lagging strand and CMG enforces quality control on the leading strand. PMID:28069954

  11. Polyadenylation Linked to Transcription Termination Directs the Processing of snoRNA Precursors in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Grzechnik, Pawel; Kufel, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    Summary Transcription termination by RNA polymerase II is coupled to transcript 3′ end formation. A large cleavage and polyadenylation complex containing the major poly(A) polymerase Pap1 produces mRNA 3′ ends, whereas those of nonpolyadenylated snoRNAs in yeast are formed either by endonucleolytic cleavage or by termination, followed by trimming by the nuclear exosome. We show that synthesis of independently transcribed snoRNAs involves default polyadenylation of two classes of precursors de...

  12. Role of DNA Polymerases in Repeat-Mediated Genome Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik A. Shah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansions of simple DNA repeats cause numerous hereditary diseases in humans. We analyzed the role of DNA polymerases in the instability of Friedreich’s ataxia (GAAn repeats in a yeast experimental system. The elementary step of expansion corresponded to ∼160 bp in the wild-type strain, matching the size of Okazaki fragments in yeast. This step increased when DNA polymerase α was mutated, suggesting a link between the scale of expansions and Okazaki fragment size. Expandable repeats strongly elevated the rate of mutations at substantial distances around them, a phenomenon we call repeat-induced mutagenesis (RIM. Notably, defects in the replicative DNA polymerases δ and ∊ strongly increased rates for both repeat expansions and RIM. The increases in repeat-mediated instability observed in DNA polymerase δ mutants depended on translesion DNA polymerases. We conclude that repeat expansions and RIM are two sides of the same replicative mechanism.

  13. Actinobaculum suis Detection Using Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Román Amigo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinobaculum suis is an important agent related to urinary infection in swine females. Due to its fastidious growth characteristics, the isolation of this anaerobic bacterium is difficult, thus impairing the estimation of its prevalence. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the detection and identification of A. suis and then compare these results with traditional isolation methods. Bacterial isolation and PCR were performed on one hundred and ninety-two urine samples from sows and forty-five preputial swabs from boars. The results indicate that this PCR was specific for A. suis, presenting a detection limit between 1.0×101 CFU/mL and 1.0×102 CFU/mL. A. suis frequencies, as measured by PCR, were 8.9% (17/192 in sow urine samples and 82.2% (37/45 in preputial swabs. Assessed using conventional culturing techniques, none of the urine samples were positive for A. suis; however, A. suis was detected in 31.1% (14/45 of the swabs. This PCR technique was shown to be an efficient method for the detection of A. suis in urine and preputial swabs.

  14. Conserved Endonuclease Function of Hantavirus L Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Rothenberger

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses are important emerging pathogens belonging to the Bunyaviridae family. Like other segmented negative strand RNA viruses, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp also known as L protein of hantaviruses lacks an intrinsic “capping activity”. Hantaviruses therefore employ a “cap snatching” strategy acquiring short 5′ RNA sequences bearing 5′cap structures by endonucleolytic cleavage from host cell transcripts. The viral endonuclease activity implicated in cap snatching of hantaviruses has been mapped to the N-terminal domain of the L protein. Using a combination of molecular modeling and structure–function analysis we confirm and extend these findings providing evidence for high conservation of the L endonuclease between Old and New World hantaviruses. Recombinant hantavirus L endonuclease showed catalytic activity and a defined cation preference shared by other viral endonucleases. Based on the previously reported remarkably high activity of hantavirus L endonuclease, we established a cell-based assay for the hantavirus endonuclase function. The robustness of the assay and its high-throughput compatible format makes it suitable for small molecule drug screens to identify novel inhibitors of hantavirus endonuclease. Based on the high degree of similarity to RdRp endonucleases, some candidate inhibitors may be broadly active against hantaviruses and other emerging human pathogenic Bunyaviruses.

  15. Trapping Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuqiao; Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Wang, Bing

    2015-06-01

    Recent findings indicate that a major mechanism by which poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors kill cancer cells is by trapping PARP1 and PARP2 to the sites of DNA damage. The PARP enzyme-inhibitor complex "locks" onto damaged DNA and prevents DNA repair, replication, and transcription, leading to cell death. Several clinical-stage PARP inhibitors, including veliparib, rucaparib, olaparib, niraparib, and talazoparib, have been evaluated for their PARP-trapping activity. Although they display similar capacity to inhibit PARP catalytic activity, their relative abilities to trap PARP differ by several orders of magnitude, with the ability to trap PARP closely correlating with each drug's ability to kill cancer cells. In this article, we review the available data on molecular interactions between these clinical-stage PARP inhibitors and PARP proteins, and discuss how their biologic differences might be explained by the trapping mechanism. We also discuss how to use the PARP-trapping mechanism to guide the development of PARP inhibitors as a new class of cancer therapy, both for single-agent and combination treatments. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. Nuclear scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friar, J.L.

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  17. Nuclear Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Friar, J L

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the $\\pi$-$\\gamma$ force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  18. Nuclear astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Arnould, M

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding some of the many facets of the Universe through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other sub-fields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Many long-standing problems remain to be solved, however, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endanger old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experime...

  19. Nuclear Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossión, Rubén

    2010-09-01

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction). Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  20. Nuclear Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHARLES K.EBINGER; JOHN P.BANKS

    2010-01-01

    @@ In President Barack Obama's State of the Union address in January 2009,he called for the building of "a new generation of safe,clean nuclear power plants" This was followed by his highprofile speech in Prague in April 2009,in which he noted the need "to harness the power of nuclear energy on behalf of our efforts to combat climate change."In December 2009 in Copenhagen,he pledged the United States will reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions 17 percent from 2005 levels by 2020.

  1. Nuclear winter or nuclear fall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, André

    Climate is universal. If a major modern nuclear war (i.e., with a large number of small-yield weapons) were to happen, it is not even necessary to have a specific part of the world directly involved for there to be cause to worry about the consequences for its inhabitants and their future. Indeed, smoke from fires ignited by the nuclear explosions would be transported by winds all over the world, causing dark and cold. According to the first study, by Turco et al. [1983], air surface temperature over continental areas of the northern mid-latitudes (assumed to be the nuclear war theatre) would fall to winter levels even in summer (hence the term “nuclear winter”) and induce drastic climatic conditions for several months at least. The devastating effects of a nuclear war would thus last much longer than was assumed initially. Discussing to what extent these estimations of long-term impacts on climate are reliable is the purpose of this article.

  2. Nuclear Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHARLES; K.; EBINGER; JOHN; P.; BANKS

    2010-01-01

    The United States needs a comprehensive policy and market-based solutions to address the challenges and demands of energy provision in President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address in January 2009, he called for the building of "a new generation of safe, clean nuclear power plants." This was followed by his high- profile speech in Prague in April 2009,

  3. Nuclear Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    This document is a report on a course in nuclear science for the high school curriculum. The course is designed to provide a basic but comprehensive understanding of the atom in the light of modern knowledge, and to show how people attempt to harness the tremendous energy liberated through fission and fusion reactions. The course crosses what are…

  4. Discovery of cyanophage genomes which contain mitochondrial DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yi-Wah; Mohr, Remus; Millard, Andrew D; Holmes, Antony B; Larkum, Anthony W; Whitworth, Anna L; Mann, Nicholas H; Scanlan, David J; Hess, Wolfgang R; Clokie, Martha R J

    2011-08-01

    DNA polymerase γ is a family A DNA polymerase responsible for the replication of mitochondrial DNA in eukaryotes. The origins of DNA polymerase γ have remained elusive because it is not present in any known bacterium, though it has been hypothesized that mitochondria may have inherited the enzyme by phage-mediated nonorthologous displacement. Here, we present an analysis of two full-length homologues of this gene, which were found in the genomes of two bacteriophages, which infect the chlorophyll-d containing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina. Phylogenetic analyses of these phage DNA polymerase γ proteins show that they branch deeply within the DNA polymerase γ clade and therefore share a common origin with their eukaryotic homologues. We also found homologues of these phage polymerases in the environmental Community Cyberinfrastructure for Advanced Microbial Ecology Research and Analysis (CAMERA) database, which fell in the same clade. An analysis of the CAMERA assemblies containing the environmental homologues together with the filter fraction metadata indicated some of these assemblies may be of bacterial origin. We also show that the phage-encoded DNA polymerase γ is highly transcribed as the phage genomes are replicated. These findings provide data that may assist in reconstructing the evolution of mitochondria.

  5. Optical tweezers studies of transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisica, Ana; Grill, Stephan W

    2017-03-01

    Transcription is the first step in the expression of genetic information and it is carried out by large macromolecular enzymes called RNA polymerases. Transcription has been studied for many years and with a myriad of experimental techniques, ranging from bulk studies to high-resolution transcript sequencing. In this review, we emphasise the advantages of using single-molecule techniques, particularly optical tweezers, to study transcription dynamics. We give an overview of the latest results in the single-molecule transcription field, focusing on transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases. Finally, we evaluate recent quantitative models that describe the biophysics of RNA polymerase translocation and backtracking dynamics.

  6. Theoretical analysis of transcription process with polymerase stalling

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    Experimental evidences show that in gene transcription, RNA polymerase has the possibility to be stalled at certain position of the transcription template. This may be due to the template damage, or protein barriers. Once stalled, polymerase may backtrack along the template to the previous nucleotide to wait for the repair of the damaged site, or simply bypass the barrier or damaged site and consequently synthesize an incorrect messenger RNA, or degrade and detach from the template. Thus, the {\\it effective} transcription rate (the rate to synthesize correct product mRNA) and the transcription {\\it effectiveness} (the ratio of the {\\it effective} transcription rate to the {\\it effective} transcription initiation rate) are both influenced by polymerase stalling events. This study shows that, Without backtracking, detachment of stalled polymerase can also help to increase the {\\it effective} transcription rate and transcription {\\it effectiveness}. Generally, the increase of bypass rate of the stalled polymeras...

  7. Tetrahydrobenzothiophene inhibitors of hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, M G; Lessen, T A; Leister, L; Cebzanov, D; Amparo, E; Faust, C; Ortlip, D; Bailey, T R; Nitz, T J; Chunduru, S K; Young, D C; Burns, C J

    2006-01-01

    A novel series of selective HCV NS5B RNA dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors has been disclosed. These compounds contain an appropriately substituted tetrahydrobenzothiophene scaffold. This communication will detail the SAR and activities of this series.

  8. Sexing bovine pre-implantation embryos using the polymerase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-06

    Mar 6, 2012 ... polymerase chain reaction: A model for human embryo ... Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine ... obtain and there is no ethical issue related to their use for research.

  9. Hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase gene polymorphism based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... HBV is distributed into various genotypes based on nucleic acid sequence variation. ... compared to genotype B and higher incidence of HCC in genotype D ... DNA sequencing technology to sequence HBV DNA polymerase ...

  10. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral Transmission In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arias Esteban, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo. We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences...... viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase...... fidelity can also impact virus transmission between susceptible hosts. We have identified a high-fidelity norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase mutant (I391L) which displays delayed replication kinetics in vivo but not in cell culture. The I391L polymerase mutant also exhibited lower transmission rates...

  11. Proofreading genotyping assays mediated by high fidelity exo+ DNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Li, Kai; Pardinas, Jose R; Sommer, Steve S; Yao, Kai-Tai

    2005-02-01

    DNA polymerases with 3'-5' proofreading function mediate high fidelity DNA replication but their application for mutation detection was almost completely neglected before 1998. The obstacle facing the use of exo(+) polymerases for mutation detection could be overcome by primer-3'-termini modification, which has been tested using allele-specific primers with 3' labeling, 3' exonuclease-resistance and 3' dehydroxylation modifications. Accordingly, three new types of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays have been developed to carry out genome-wide genotyping making use of the fidelity advantage of exo(+) polymerases. Such SNP assays might also provide a novel approach for re-sequencing and de novo sequencing. These new mutation detection assays are widely adaptable to a variety of platforms, including real-time PCR, multi-well plate and microarray technologies. Application of exo(+) polymerases to genetic analysis could accelerate the pace of personalized medicine.

  12. Translesion Synthesis Polymerases in the Prevention and Promotion of Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jay Stallons

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A critical step in the transformation of cells to the malignant state of cancer is the induction of mutations in the DNA of cells damaged by genotoxic agents. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS is the process by which cells copy DNA containing unrepaired damage that blocks progression of the replication fork. The DNA polymerases that catalyze TLS in mammals have been the topic of intense investigation over the last decade. DNA polymerase η (Pol η is best understood and is active in error-free bypass of UV-induced DNA damage. The other TLS polymerases (Pol ι, Pol κ, REV1, and Pol ζ have been studied extensively in vitro, but their in vivo role is only now being investigated using knockout mouse models of carcinogenesis. This paper will focus on the studies of mice and humans with altered expression of TLS polymerases and the effects on cancer induced by environmental agents.

  13. an overview on the application of polymerase chain reaction (pcr)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Bayero Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences, 2(1): 109 - 114 ... Keywords: Polymerase chain reaction, Diagnosis, Bacteria, Infections .... A brain abscess is a localized pyogenic bacterial ... as encephalitis and skin rash. ... Streptococcus.

  14. Genotypic frequency of calpastatin gene in lori sheep by polymerase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-07

    May 7, 2014 ... meat. Genomic DNA was extracted from 100 sheep blood sample. Polymerase chain ... The effect of calpains gene polymorphism on ... dation and meat tenderness after slaughter. Increased ... to -20°C freezer. Genomic DNA ...

  15. Engineered DNA Polymerase Improves PCR Results for Plastid DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Schori

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Secondary metabolites often inhibit PCR and sequencing reactions in extractions from plant material, especially from silica-dried and herbarium material. A DNA polymerase that is tolerant to inhibitors improves PCR results. Methods and Results: A novel DNA amplification system, including a DNA polymerase engineered via directed evolution for improved tolerance to common plant-derived PCR inhibitors, was evaluated and PCR parameters optimized for three species. An additional 31 species were then tested with the engineered enzyme and optimized protocol, as well as with regular Taq polymerase. Conclusions: PCR products and high-quality sequence data were obtained for 96% of samples for rbcL and 79% for matK, compared to 29% and 21% with regular Taq polymerase.

  16. Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contents: V Dinucleons, published in The Physical Review , v93 n4 p908-909, 15 Feb 1954; Concentration of a Cyclotron Beam by Strong Focusing Lenses...published in The Review of Scientific Instruments, v25 n4 p365-367, Apr 1954; and Photon Splitting in a Nuclear Electrostatic Field, published in The Physical Review , v94 n2 p367-368, 15 Apr 1954.

  17. Nuclear Waffles

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, A S; Briggs, C M; Caplan, M E; Horowitz, C J

    2014-01-01

    The dense neutron-rich matter found in supernovae and neutron stars is expected to form complex nonuniform phases referred to as nuclear pasta. The pasta shapes depend on density, temperature and proton fraction and determine many transport properties in supernovae and neutron star crusts. We use two recently developed hybrid CPU/GPU codes to perform large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with $51200$ and $409600$ nucleons of nuclear pasta. From the output of the MD simulations we characterize the topology and compute two observables, the radial distribution function $g(r)$ and the structure factor $S(q)$, for systems with proton fractions $Y_p=0.10, 0.20, 0.30$ and $0.40$ at about one third of nuclear saturation density and temperatures near $1.0$ MeV. We observe that the two lowest proton fraction systems simulated, $Y_p=0.10$ and $0.20$, equilibrate quickly and form liquid-like structures. Meanwhile, the two higher proton fraction systems, $Y_p=0.30$ and $0.40$, take a longer time to equilibrate a...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a ... of your child's body. top of page How is the procedure performed? Nuclear medicine imaging is usually ...

  19. The Role of Polymerase Gamma Mutations in Breast Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Saada A, Shaag A, Mandel A, Nevo Y, Eriksson S, Elpeleg O. Mutant mitochondrial thymidine kinase in mitochondrial DNA depletion myopathy . Nat. Genet...Functional defects due to spacer-region mutations of human mitochondrial DNA polymerase in a family with an ataxia- myopathy syndrome. Hum. Mol. Genet...polymerase gamma (POLG) have led to depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mutations in mtDNA. This proposal seeks to determine the effect of POLG

  20. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2004-10-12

    The present invention relates to 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  1. Favipiravir (T-705), a novel viral RNA polymerase inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Furuta, Yousuke; Gowen, Brian B.; Takahashi, Kazumi; Shiraki, Kimiyasu; Smee, Donald F.; Barnard, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    Favipiravir (T-705; 6-fluoro-3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxamide) is an antiviral drug that selectively inhibits the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza virus. It is phosphoribosylated by cellular enzymes to its active form, favipiravir-ribofuranosyl-5′-triphosphate (RTP). Its antiviral effect is attenuated by the addition of purine nucleic acids, indicating the viral RNA polymerase mistakenly recognizes favipiravir-RTP as a purine nucleotide. Favipiravir is active against a broad range of ...

  2. Kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA polymerases with exonuclease proofreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Kinetic theory and thermodynamics are applied to DNA polymerases with exonuclease activity, taking into account the dependence of the rates on the previously incorporated nucleotide. The replication fidelity is shown to increase significantly thanks to this dependence at the basis of the mechanism of exonuclease proofreading. In particular, this dependence can provide up to a 100-fold lowering of the error probability under physiological conditions. Theory is compared with numerical simulations for the DNA polymerases of T7 viruses and human mitochondria.

  3. Redistributive properties of the vesicular stomatitis virus polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfman, W.B.; Perrault, J. (San Diego State Univ., CA (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The template for transcription of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) genome consists of a negative-strand RNA (approximately 11 kb) tightly associated with approximately 1250 copies of the nucleocapsid or N protein (N-RNA template). The interaction between the virion-associated polymerase and this template was probed with a novel assay using purified N-RNA complexes added to detergent-disrupted uv-irradiated standard virions or unirradiated defective interfering (DI) particles. In contrast to the well-known stability of assembled cellular transcription complexes, the VSV polymerase copied exogenously added templates efficiently and yielded products indistinguishable from control virus transcription. Addition of uv-irradiated N-RNA templates to unirradiated virus effectively competed for transcription of endogenous template indicating that most or all of the polymerase can freely redistribute. Furthermore preincubation of virus and added templates at high ionic strength to solubilize L and NS polymerase proteins did not release additional active enzyme for redistribution. Pretranscription of virus also had little or no effect on redistributed activity indicating that polymerase complexes are capable of multiple rounds of synthesis beginning at the 3' end promoter. Unexpectedly, titration with saturating amounts of added N-RNA showed that active polymerase complexes are only in slight excess relative to template in standard or DI particles despite the large surplus of packaged L and NS polypeptides. Moreover, added standard virus templates competed equally well for the redistributing polymerase from DI particles or standard virus indicating no significant polymerase-binding preference for interfering templates. These findings bear important implications regarding mechanisms of VSV transcription and replication.

  4. Deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase III of Escherichia coli. Purification and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, D M; Hinkle, D C; Richardson, C C

    1975-01-25

    DNA polymerase III has been purified 4,500-fold from the Escherichis coli mutant, HMS83, which lacks DNA polymerases I and II. When subjected to disc gel electrophoresis, the most purified fraction exhibits a single major protein band from which enzymatic activity may be recovered. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions produces two protein bands with molecular weights of 140,000 and 40,000. The sedimentation coefficient of the enzyme is 7.0 S, and the Stokes radius is 62 A. Taken together these tow parameters indicate a native molecular weight of 180,000. Purified DNA polymerase III catalyzes the polymerization of nucleotides into DNA when provided with both a DNA template and a complementary primer strand. The newly synthesized DNA is covalently attached to the 3' terminus of the primer strand. Because the extent of polymerization is only 10 to 100 nucleotides, the best substrates are native DNA molecules with small single-stranded regions. The most purified enzyme preparation is devoid of endonuclease activities. In addition to the two exonuclease activities described in the accompanying paper, purified polymerase III also catalyzes pyrophosphorolysis and the exchange of pyrophosphate into deoxynucleoside triphosphates. DNA polymerase III has also been isolated from wild type E. coli containing the other two known DNA polymerases. Futhermore, the enzyme purified from three different polC mutants exhibits altered polymerase III activity, confirming that polC is the structural gene for DNA polymerase III (Gefter, M., Hirota, Y., Kornberb, T., Wechsler, J., and Barnoux, C. (1971) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 68, 3150-3153).

  5. Investigation of Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity in Pig Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncorgé, Olivier; Long, Jason S.; Cauldwell, Anna V.; Zhou, Hongbo; Lycett, Samantha J.

    2013-01-01

    Reassortant influenza viruses with combinations of avian, human, and/or swine genomic segments have been detected frequently in pigs. As a consequence, pigs have been accused of being a “mixing vessel” for influenza viruses. This implies that pig cells support transcription and replication of avian influenza viruses, in contrast to human cells, in which most avian influenza virus polymerases display limited activity. Although influenza virus polymerase activity has been studied in human and avian cells for many years by use of a minigenome assay, similar investigations in pig cells have not been reported. We developed the first minigenome assay for pig cells and compared the activities of polymerases of avian or human influenza virus origin in pig, human, and avian cells. We also investigated in pig cells the consequences of some known mammalian host range determinants that enhance influenza virus polymerase activity in human cells, such as PB2 mutations E627K, D701N, G590S/Q591R, and T271A. The two typical avian influenza virus polymerases used in this study were poorly active in pig cells, similar to what is seen in human cells, and mutations that adapt the avian influenza virus polymerase for human cells also increased activity in pig cells. In contrast, a different pattern was observed in avian cells. Finally, highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 polymerase activity was tested because this subtype has been reported to replicate only poorly in pigs. H5N1 polymerase was active in swine cells, suggesting that other barriers restrict these viruses from becoming endemic in pigs. PMID:23077313

  6. Nuclear photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habs, D.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    With the planned new γ-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 1013 γ/s and a band width of ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-3, a new era of γ beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIγS facility at Duke University (USA) with 108 γ/s and ΔEγ/Eγ≈3ṡ10-2. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for γ beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused γ beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the γ beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for γ beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for γ beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the γ-beam facility, the γ-beam optics and γ detectors. We can trade γ intensity for band width, going down to ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-6 and address individual nuclear levels. The term "nuclear photonics" stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with γ-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, γ beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to μm resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  7. Extragenic accumulation of RNA polymerase II enhances transcription by RNA polymerase III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Listerman

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent genomic data indicate that RNA polymerase II (Pol II function extends beyond conventional transcription of primarily protein-coding genes. Among the five snRNAs required for pre-mRNA splicing, only the U6 snRNA is synthesized by RNA polymerase III (Pol III. Here we address the question of how Pol II coordinates the expression of spliceosome components, including U6. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP and high-resolution mapping by PCR to localize both Pol II and Pol III to snRNA gene regions. We report the surprising finding that Pol II is highly concentrated approximately 300 bp upstream of all five active human U6 genes in vivo. The U6 snRNA, an essential component of the spliceosome, is synthesized by Pol III, whereas all other spliceosomal snRNAs are Pol II transcripts. Accordingly, U6 transcripts were terminated in a Pol III-specific manner, and Pol III localized to the transcribed gene regions. However, synthesis of both U6 and U2 snRNAs was alpha-amanitin-sensitive, indicating a requirement for Pol II activity in the expression of both snRNAs. Moreover, both Pol II and histone tail acetylation marks were lost from U6 promoters upon alpha-amanitin treatment. The results indicate that Pol II is concentrated at specific genomic regions from which it can regulate Pol III activity by a general mechanism. Consequently, Pol II coordinates expression of all RNA and protein components of the spliceosome.

  8. Nuclear tele medicine; Telemedicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, L.; Hernandez, F.; Fernandez, R. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Imagenologia Diagnostica, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The great majority of the digital images of nuclear medicine are susceptible of being sent through internet. This has allowed that the work in diagnosis cabinets by image it can benefit of this modern technology. We have presented in previous congresses works related with tele medicine, however, due to the speed in the evolution of the computer programs and the internet, becomes necessary to make a current position in this modality of work. (Author)

  9. The nuclear arsenals and nuclear disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaby, F

    1998-01-01

    Current world stockpiles of nuclear weapons and the status of treaties for nuclear disarmament and the ultimate elimination of nuclear weapons are summarised. The need for including stockpiles of civil plutonium in a programme for ending production and disposing of fissile materials is emphasized, and the ultimate difficulty of disposing of the last few nuclear weapons discussed.

  10. Nuclear energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandin, Karl; Jagers, Peter; Kullander, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a role in carbon free production of electrical energy, thus making it interesting for tomorrow's energy mix. However, several issues have to be addressed. In fission technology, the design of so-called fourth generation reactors show great promise, in particular in addressing materials efficiency and safety issues. If successfully developed, such reactors may have an important and sustainable part in future energy production. Working fusion reactors may be even more materials efficient and environmental friendly, but also need more development and research. The roadmap for development of fourth generation fission and fusion reactors, therefore, asks for attention and research in these fields must be strengthened.

  11. The actinobacterial transcription factor RbpA binds to the principal sigma subunit of RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib-Salazar, Aline; Liu, Bing; Doughty, Philip; Lewis, Richard A; Ghosh, Somadri; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Simpson, Peter J; O'Dwyer, Kathleen; Matthews, Steve J; Paget, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    RbpA is a small non-DNA-binding transcription factor that associates with RNA polymerase holoenzyme and stimulates transcription in actinobacteria, including Streptomyces coelicolor and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. RbpA seems to show specificity for the vegetative form of RNA polymerase as opposed to alternative forms of the enzyme. Here, we explain the basis of this specificity by showing that RbpA binds directly to the principal σ subunit in these organisms, but not to more diverged alternative σ factors. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that, although differing in their requirement for structural zinc, the RbpA orthologues from S. coelicolor and M. tuberculosis share a common structural core domain, with extensive, apparently disordered, N- and C-terminal regions. The RbpA-σ interaction is mediated by the C-terminal region of RbpA and σ domain 2, and S. coelicolor RbpA mutants that are defective in binding σ are unable to stimulate transcription in vitro and are inactive in vivo. Given that RbpA is essential in M. tuberculosis and critical for growth in S. coelicolor, these data support a model in which RbpA plays a key role in the σ cycle in actinobacteria.

  12. Characterization of a Y-Family DNA Polymerase eta from the Eukaryotic Thermophile Alvinella pompejana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Sayo; Kuraoka, Isao; Fujiwara, Yoshie; Hitomi, Kenichi; Cheng, Quen J.; Fuss, Jill O.; Shin, David S.; Masutani, Chikahide; Tainer, John A.; Hanaoka, Fumio; Iwai, Shigenori

    2010-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase η (HsPolη) plays an important role in translesion synthesis (TLS), which allows for replication past DNA damage such as UV-induced cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Here, we characterized ApPolη from the thermophilic worm Alvinella pompejana, which inhabits deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimneys. ApPolη shares sequence homology with HsPolη and contains domains for binding ubiquitin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Sun-induced UV does not penetrate Alvinella's environment; however, this novel DNA polymerase catalyzed efficient and accurate TLS past CPD, as well as 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine and isomers of thymine glycol induced by reactive oxygen species. In addition, we found that ApPolη is more thermostable than HsPolη, as expected from its habitat temperature. Moreover, the activity of this enzyme was retained in the presence of a higher concentration of organic solvents. Therefore, ApPolη provides a robust, human-like Polη that is more active after exposure to high temperatures and organic solvents. PMID:20936172

  13. Recessive mutations in POLR1C cause a leukodystrophy by impairing biogenesis of RNA polymerase III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiffault, Isabelle; Wolf, Nicole I.; Forget, Diane; Guerrero, Kether; Tran, Luan T.; Choquet, Karine; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Poitras, Christian; Brais, Bernard; Yoon, Grace; Sztriha, Laszlo; Webster, Richard I.; Timmann, Dagmar; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Seeger, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Alíz; Máté, Adrienn; Goizet, Cyril; Fung, Eva; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Fribourg, Sébastien; Vanderver, Adeline; Simons, Cas; Taft, Ryan J.; Yates III, John R.; Coulombe, Benoit; Bernard, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    A small proportion of 4H (Hypomyelination, Hypodontia and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism) or RNA polymerase III (POLR3)-related leukodystrophy cases are negative for mutations in the previously identified causative genes POLR3A and POLR3B. Here we report eight of these cases carrying recessive mutations in POLR1C, a gene encoding a shared POLR1 and POLR3 subunit, also mutated in some Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) cases. Using shotgun proteomics and ChIP sequencing, we demonstrate that leukodystrophy-causative mutations, but not TCS mutations, in POLR1C impair assembly and nuclear import of POLR3, but not POLR1, leading to decreased binding to POLR3 target genes. This study is the first to show that distinct mutations in a gene coding for a shared subunit of two RNA polymerases lead to selective modification of the enzymes' availability leading to two different clinical conditions and to shed some light on the pathophysiological mechanism of one of the most common hypomyelinating leukodystrophies, POLR3-related leukodystrophy. PMID:26151409

  14. When transcription goes on Holliday: Double Holliday junctions block RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipathsouk, Anne; Belotserkovskii, Boris P; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2017-02-01

    Non-canonical DNA structures can obstruct transcription. This transcription blockage could have various biological consequences, including genomic instability and gratuitous transcription-coupled repair. Among potential structures causing transcription blockage are Holliday junctions (HJs), which can be generated as intermediates in homologous recombination or during processing of stalled replication forks. Of particular interest is the double Holliday junction (DHJ), which contains two HJs. Topological considerations impose the constraint that the total number of helical turns in the DNA duplexes between the junctions cannot be altered as long as the flanking DNA duplexes are intact. Thus, the DHJ structure should strongly resist transient unwinding during transcription; consequently, it is predicted to cause significantly stronger blockage than single HJ structures. The patterns of transcription blockage obtained for RNA polymerase II transcription in HeLa cell nuclear extracts were in accordance with this prediction. However, we did not detect transcription blockage with purified T7 phage RNA polymerase; we discuss a possible explanation for this difference. In general, our findings implicate naturally occurring Holliday junctions in transcription arrest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional Diversification of Maize RNA Polymerase IV and V Subtypes via Alternative Catalytic Subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy R. Haag

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic analyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two subtypes of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis.

  16. Stability of the human polymerase δ holoenzyme and its implications in lagging strand DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedglin, Mark; Pandey, Binod; Benkovic, Stephen J

    2016-03-29

    In eukaryotes, DNA polymerase δ (pol δ) is responsible for replicating the lagging strand template and anchors to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) sliding clamp to form a holoenzyme. The stability of this complex is integral to every aspect of lagging strand replication. Most of our understanding comes from Saccharomyces cerevisae where the extreme stability of the pol δ holoenzyme ensures that every nucleobase within an Okazaki fragment is faithfully duplicated before dissociation but also necessitates an active displacement mechanism for polymerase recycling and exchange. However, the stability of the human pol δ holoenzyme is unknown. We designed unique kinetic assays to analyze the processivity and stability of the pol δ holoenzyme. Surprisingly, the results indicate that human pol δ maintains a loose association with PCNA while replicating DNA. Such behavior has profound implications on Okazaki fragment synthesis in humans as it limits the processivity of pol δ on undamaged DNA and promotes the rapid dissociation of pol δ from PCNA on stalling at a DNA lesion.

  17. Analysis of Translesion DNA Synthesis by the Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William C; Kasiviswanathan, Rajesh; Longley, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is replicated by the nuclear-encoded DNA polymerase γ (pol γ) which is composed of a single 140 kDa catalytic subunit and a dimeric 55 kDa accessory subunit. Mitochondrial DNA is vulnerable to various forms of damage, including several types of oxidative lesions, UV-induced photoproducts, chemical adducts from environmental sources, as well as alkylation and inter-strand cross-links from chemotherapy agents. Although many of these lesions block DNA replication, pol γ can bypass some lesions by nucleotide incorporation opposite a template lesion and further extension of the DNA primer past the lesion. This process of translesion synthesis (TLS) by pol γ can occur in either an error-free or an error-prone manner. Assessment of TLS requires extensive analysis of oligonucleotide substrates and replication products by denaturing polyacrylamide sequencing gels. This chapter presents protocols for the analysis of translesion DNA synthesis.

  18. The Role of Poly(ADP-ribose Polymerase-1 in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel García

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is a nuclear enzyme with a crucial role in the maintenance of genomic stability. In addition to the role of PARP-1 in DNA repair, multiple studies have also demonstrated its involvement in several inflammatory diseases, such as septic shock, asthma, atherosclerosis, and stroke, as well as in cancer. In these diseases, the pharmacological inhibition of PARP-1 has shown a beneficial effect, suggesting that PARP-1 regulates their inflammatory processes. In recent years, we have studied the role of PARP-1 in rheumatoid arthritis, as have other researchers, and the results have shown that PARP-1 has an important function in the development of this disease. This review summarizes current knowledge on the effects of PARP-1 in rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Analysis of Translesion DNA Synthesis by the Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William C.; Kasiviswanathan, Rajesh; Longley, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial DNA is replicated by the nuclear encoded DNA polymerase γ (pol γ) which is composed of a single 140 kDa catalytic subunit and a dimeric 55 kDa accessory subunit. Mitochondrial DNA is vulnerable to various forms of damage, including several types of oxidative lesions, UV-induced photoproducts, chemical adducts from environmental sources, as well as alkylation and inter-strand crosslinks from chemotherapy agents. Although many of these lesions block DNA replication, Pol γ can bypass some lesions by nucleotide incorporation opposite a template lesion and further extension of the DNA primer past the lesion. This process of translesion synthesis (TLS) by Pol γ can occur in either an error-free or an error-prone manner. Assessment of TLS requires extensive analysis of oligonucleotide substrates and replication products by denaturing polyacrylamide sequencing gels. This chapter presents protocols for the analysis of translesion DNA synthesis. PMID:26530671

  20. Applications of nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. C.

    2017-02-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  1. Nuclear Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Habs, D; Jentschel, M; Thirolf, P G

    2012-01-01

    With new gamma-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest with 10^13 g/s and a bandwidth of Delta E_g/E_g ~10^-3, a new era of g-beams with energies <=20 MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIGS facility (Duke Univ., USA) with 10^8 g/s and Delta E_g/E_g~0.03. Even a seeded quantum FEL for g-beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused g-beams. We describe a new experiment at the g-beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for g-beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for g-beams are being developed. Thus we have to optimize the system of the g-beam facility, the g-beam optics and g-detectors. We can trade g-intensity for band width, going down to Delta E_g/E_g ~ 10^-6 and address individual nuclear levels. 'Nuclear pho...

  2. Metabolism and expression of RNA polymerase II transcripts in Influenza virus-infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katze, M.G.; Krug, R.M.

    1984-10-01

    Influenza virus infection has adverse effects on the metabolism of two representative RNA polymerase II transcripts in chicken embryo fibroblasts, those coding for BETA-actin and for avian leukosis virus (ALV) proteins. Proviral ALV DNA was integrated into host cell DNA by prior infection with ALV. By S1 endonuclease assay, it was confirmed that nuclear ALV transcripts disappeared very early after infection, already decreasing ca. 80% by 1 h postinfection. A plausible explanation for this nuclear degradation is that the viral cap-dependent endonuclease in the nucleas cleaves the 5' ends of new polymerase II transcripts, rendering the resulting decapped RNAs susceptible to hydrolysis by cellular nucleases. Similar stability of cytoplasmic host cell mRNAs was observed in infected HeLa cells, in which the levels of actin mRNA and two HeLa cell mRNAs (pHe 7 and pHe 28) remained at undiminished levels for 3 h of infection and decreased only slightly by 4.5 h postinfection. The cytoplamic actin and pHe 7 mRNAs isolated from infected HeLa cells were shown to be translated in reticulocyte extracts in biro, indicating that host mRNAs were not inactivated by a virus-induced modification. Despite the continued presence of high levels of functional host cell mRNAs, host cell protein synthesis was effectively shut off by about 3 h postinfection in both chicken embryo fibroblasts and HeLa cells. These results are consistent with the establishment of an influenza virus-specific translational system that selectively translates viral and not host mRNAs.

  3. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of proteins associated with nuclear matrix in rat testis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quesada, P.; Atorino, L.; Faraone-Mennella, M.R.; Farina, B. [Naples Univ. (Italy); Caiafa, P. [Rome Univ. (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    We have previously demonstrated that a significant percentage of poly(ADPR)polymerase is present, as a tightly-bound form, at the third level of chromatin organization defined by chromosomal loops and nuclear matrix. The present work is focused on the study of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of proteins present in these nuclear subfractions. It has been shown that, due to the action of poly(ADPR) polymerase, the ADP-ribose moiety of [{sup 14}C]NAD is transferred to both loosely-bound and tightly-bound chromosomal proteins, which in consequence are modified by chain polymers of ADP-ribose of different lengths. Moreover, histone-like proteins seem to be ADP-ribosylated in chromosomal loops and nuclear matrix associated regions of DNA loops (MARS). A hypothesis can be put forward that the ADP-ribosylation system is functionally related to the nuclear processes, actively coordinated by the nuclear matrix. (author). 34 refs, 4 figs.

  4. Dictionary of nuclear engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sube, R.

    1985-01-01

    Ralf Sube, an experienced compiler of three wellknown four-language reference works has now prepared this glossary of nuclear engineering terms in English, German, French and Russian. Based on the proven lexicography of the Technik-Worterbuch series, it comprises about 30,000 terms in each language covering the following: Nuclear and Atomic Physics; Nuclear Radiation and Isotopes; Nuclear Materials; Nuclear Facilties; Nuclear Power Industry; Nuclear Weapons.

  5. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom eKillelea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR, cDNA cloning, genome sequencing and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3’ primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications.

  6. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Tom; Ralec, Céline; Bossé, Audrey; Henneke, Ghislaine

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cDNA cloning, genome sequencing, and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3' primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications. PMID:24847315

  7. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Tom; Ralec, Céline; Bossé, Audrey; Henneke, Ghislaine

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cDNA cloning, genome sequencing, and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3' primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications.

  8. A deep phylogeny of viral and cellular right-hand polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černý, Jiří; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; de A Zanotto, Paolo M; Grubhoffer, Libor; Růžek, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Right-hand polymerases are important players in genome replication and repair in cellular organisms as well as in viruses. All right-hand polymerases are grouped into seven related protein families: viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases, reverse transcriptases, single-subunit RNA polymerases, and DNA polymerase families A, B, D, and Y. Although the evolutionary relationships of right-hand polymerases within each family have been proposed, evolutionary relationships between families remain elusive because their sequence similarity is too low to allow classical phylogenetic analyses. The structure of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases recently was shown to be useful in inferring their evolution. Here, we address evolutionary relationships between right-hand polymerase families by combining sequence and structure information. We used a set of 22 viral and cellular polymerases representing all right-hand polymerase families with known protein structure. In contrast to previous studies, which focused only on the evolution of particular families, the current approach allowed us to present the first robust phylogenetic analysis unifying evolution of all right-hand polymerase families. All polymerase families branched into discrete lineages, following a fairly robust adjacency pattern. Only single-subunit RNA polymerases formed an inner group within DNA polymerase family A. RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of RNA viruses and reverse transcriptases of retroviruses formed two sister groups and were distinguishable from all other polymerases. DNA polymerases of DNA bacteriophages did not form a monophyletic group and are phylogenetically mixed with cellular DNA polymerase families A and B. Based on the highest genetic variability and structural simplicity, we assume that RNA-dependent RNA polymerases are the most ancient group of right-hand polymerases, in agreement with the RNA World hypothesis, because RNA-dependent RNA polymerases are enzymes that could serve in replication of

  9. Nuclear "waffles"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, A. S.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Horowitz, C. J.

    2014-11-01

    Background: The dense neutron-rich matter found in supernovae and inside neutron stars is expected to form complex nonuniform phases, often referred to as nuclear pasta. The pasta shapes depend on density, temperature and proton fraction and determine many transport properties in supernovae and neutron star crusts. Purpose: To characterize the topology and compute two observables, the radial distribution function (RDF) g (r ) and the structure factor S (q ) , for systems with proton fractions Yp=0.10 ,0.20 ,0.30 , and 0.40 at about one-third of nuclear saturation density, n =0.050 fm-3 , and temperatures near k T =1 MeV . Methods: We use two recently developed hybrid CPU/GPU codes to perform large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with 51 200 and 409 600 nucleons. From the output of the MD simulations we obtain the two desired observables. Results: We compute and discuss the differences in topology and observables for each simulation. We observe that the two lowest proton fraction systems simulated, Yp=0.10 and 0.20 , equilibrate quickly and form liquidlike structures. Meanwhile, the two higher proton fraction systems, Yp=0.30 and 0.40 , take a longer time to equilibrate and organize themselves in solidlike periodic structures. Furthermore, the Yp=0.40 system is made up of slabs, lasagna phase, interconnected by defects while the Yp=0.30 systems consist of a stack of perforated plates, the nuclear waffle phase. Conclusions: The periodic configurations observed in our MD simulations for proton fractions Yp≥0.30 have important consequences for the structure factors S (q ) of protons and neutrons, which relate to many transport properties of supernovae and neutron star crust. A detailed study of the waffle phase and how its structure depends on temperature, size of the simulation, and the screening length showed that finite-size effects appear to be under control and, also, that the plates in the waffle phase merge at temperatures slightly above 1.0 MeV and

  10. Structure and function of the bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase (or, the virtues of simplicity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, W T

    1993-01-01

    A consideration of the properties of a number of mutants of T7 RNA polymerase, together with emerging structural information (Sousa et al., 1993) allows an interpretation of the the mechanics of transcription by this relatively simple RNA polymerase. Evidence indicating features in common with other nucleotide polymerases (such as DNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases) is reviewed.

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  19. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Gon.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: Pol.Pan.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.Liv.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  3. File list: Pol.Prs.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  5. File list: Pol.Bon.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.CDV.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.PSC.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: Pol.Emb.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.Gon.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Spl.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Bon.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Kid.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Plc.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Lng.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Oth.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Plc.05.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Pan.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Oth.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.Dig.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Lar.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Prs.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.Liv.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Prs.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Liv.05.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Emb.20.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.Liv.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Liv.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Pol.Myo.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Kid.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.ALL.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Bon.10.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Bon.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bon.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Bone SRX1...035115,SRX731126 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bon.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Dig.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Pan.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase II Pancreas ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Pan.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Bon.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Pol.Spl.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Spl.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase RNA Polymerase III Spleen ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Spl.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.Neu.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Pol.Oth.50.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Pol.CDV.50.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.Neu.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Pol.Unc.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Pol.Prs.20.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Pol.Emb.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.ALL.50.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.Oth.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Oth.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell hg19 RNA polymerase RNA polymerase III Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Oth.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Neu.20.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: Pol.Lng.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.ALL.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Pol.Unc.20.RNA_polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.Myo.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Pol.Utr.50.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Dig.05.RNA_Polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.Unc.10.RNA_polymerase_II.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.Oth.10.RNA_Polymerase_III.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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