WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear plant process

  1. Nuclear pre-mRNA processing in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, A.S.N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Biology and Program in Molecular Plant Biology; Golovkin, M. (eds.) [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Microbiology

    2008-07-01

    This volume of CTMI, entitled Nuclear premRNA Processing in Plants, with 16 chapters from leading scientists in this area, summarizes recent advances in nuclear pre-mRNA processing and its role in plant growth and development. It provides researchers in the field, as well as those in related areas, with an up-to-date and comprehensive, yet concise, overview of the current status and future potential of this research in understanding plant biology. The first four chapters focus on spliceosome composition, genome-wide alternative splicing, and splice site requirements for U1 and U12 introns using computational and empirical approaches. Analysis of sequenced plant genomes has revealed that 80% of all protein-coding nuclear genes contain one or more introns. The lack of an in vitro plant splicing system has made it difficult to identify general and plant-specific components of splicing machinery in plants. The next three chapters focus on serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins, a family of highly conserved proteins, which are known to play key roles in constitutive and regulated splicing of pre-mRNA and other aspects of RNA metabolism in metazoans. These proteins engage both in RNA binding and protein.protein interactions and function as splicing regulators at multiple stages of spliceosome assembly. This family of proteins has expanded considerably in plants with several plant-specific SR proteins. Several serendipitous discoveries made using forward genetics are indicating that RNA metabolism (alternative splicing, alternative polyadenylation, mRNA transport) plays an important role in many aspects of plant growth and development and in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The next seven chapters focus on these aspects of RNA metabolism. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates a number of physiological processes during plant growth and development. The next chapter or A.B. Rose discusses the ways introns affect gene expression both positively and

  2. Nuclear pre-mRNA processing in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, A.S.N.; Golovkin, M.

    2008-01-01

    This volume of CTMI, entitled Nuclear premRNA Processing in Plants, with 16 chapters from leading scientists in this area, summarizes recent advances in nuclear pre-mRNA processing and its role in plant growth and development. It provides researchers in the field, as well as those in related areas, with an up-to-date and comprehensive, yet concise, overview of the current status and future potential of this research in understanding plant biology. The first four chapters focus on spliceosome composition, genome-wide alternative splicing, and splice site requirements for U1 and U12 introns using computational and empirical approaches. Analysis of sequenced plant genomes has revealed that 80% of all protein-coding nuclear genes contain one or more introns. The lack of an in vitro plant splicing system has made it difficult to identify general and plant-specific components of splicing machinery in plants. The next three chapters focus on serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins, a family of highly conserved proteins, which are known to play key roles in constitutive and regulated splicing of pre-mRNA and other aspects of RNA metabolism in metazoans. These proteins engage both in RNA binding and protein.protein interactions and function as splicing regulators at multiple stages of spliceosome assembly. This family of proteins has expanded considerably in plants with several plant-specific SR proteins. Several serendipitous discoveries made using forward genetics are indicating that RNA metabolism (alternative splicing, alternative polyadenylation, mRNA transport) plays an important role in many aspects of plant growth and development and in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The next seven chapters focus on these aspects of RNA metabolism. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates a number of physiological processes during plant growth and development. The next chapter or A.B. Rose discusses the ways introns affect gene expression both positively and

  3. Nuclear power plant personnel training process management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjona Vazquez, Orison; Venegas Bernal, Maria del Carmen; Armeteros Lopez, Ana L.

    1996-01-01

    The system in charge the management of the training process personnel from a nuclear power plant was designed taking into account all the requirements stated in the training guide for nuclear power plant personnel and their evaluation, which were prepared by the IAEA in 1995 in order to implement the SAT in the training programs for nuclear plant personnel. In the preparations of formats and elements that shape the system, account has been taken of the views expressed in such a guide, in some other bibliography that was consulted, and in the authors own opinion mainly with regard to those issues which the guide does not go deeper into

  4. New nuclear plant design and licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luangdilok, W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes latest developments in the nuclear power reactor technology with emphasis on three areas: (1) the US technology of advanced passive light water reactors (AP600 and S BWR), (2) regulatory processes that certify their safety, and (3) current engineering concerns. The goal is to provide and insight of how the government's regulatory agency guarantees public safety by looking into how new passive safety features were designed and tested by vendors and how they were re-evaluated and retested by the US NRC. The paper then discusses the US 1989 nuclear licensing reform (10 CFR Part 52) whose objectives are to promote the standardization of nuclear power plants and provide for the early and definitive resolution of site and design issues before plants are built. The new licensing process avoids the unpredictability nd escalated construction cost under the old licensing process. Finally, the paper summarizes engineering concerns found in current light water reactors that may not go away in the new design. The concerns are related the material and water chemistry technology in dealing with corrosion problems in water-cooled nuclear reactor systems (PWRs and BWRs). These engineering concerns include core shroud cracking (BWRs), jet pump hold-down beam cracking (BWRs), steam generator tube stress corrosion cracking (PWR)

  5. Screen-based process control in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinz, W.; Arnoldt, C.; Hessler, C.

    1993-01-01

    Requirements, development and conceptual design of a screen-based control room for nuclear power plants are outlined. The control room consists of three or four equally equipped operator workstations comprising screens for process information and manual process control. A plant overview will assist the coordination among the operators. A safety classified backup system (safety control area) is provided to cover postulated failures of the control means. Some aspects of ergonomical validation and of future development trends are discussed. (orig.) [de

  6. Chemical process measurements in PWR-type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, E.

    1978-01-01

    In order to achieve high levels of availability of nuclear power plants equipped with pressurized water reactors, strict standards have to be applied to the purity of coolant and of other media. Chemical process measurements can meet these requirements only if programmes are established giving maximum information with minimum expenditure and if these programmes are realized with effective analytical methods. Analysis programmes known from literature are proved for their usefulness, and hints are given for establishing rational programmes. Analytical techniques are compared with each other taking into consideration both methods which have already been introduced into nuclear power plant practice and methods not yet generally used in practice, such as atomic absorption spectrophotometry, gas chromatography, etc. Finally, based on the state of the art of chemical process measurements in nuclear power plants, the trends of future development are pointed out. (author)

  7. Nuclear fuel re-processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Yuko; Honda, Takashi; Shoji, Saburo; Kobayashi, Shiro; Furuya, Yasumasa

    1989-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel re-processing plant, high Si series stainless steels not always have sufficient corrosion resistance in a solution containing only nitric acid at medium or high concentration. Further, a method of blowing NOx gases may possibly promote the corrosion of equipment constituent materials remarkably. In view of the above, the corrosion promoting effect of nuclear fission products is suppressed without depositing corrosive metal ions as metals in the nitric acid solution. That is, a reducing atmosphere is formed by generating NOx by electrolytic reduction thereby preventing increase in the surface potential of stainless steels. Further, an anode is disposed in the nitric acid solution containing oxidative metal ions to establish an electrical conduction and separate them by way of partition membranes and a constant potential or constant current is applied while maintaining an ionic state so as not to deposit metals. Thus, equipments of re-processing facility can be protected from corrosion with no particular treatment for wastes as radioactive materials. (K.M.)

  8. Nuclear heat source design for an advanced HTGR process heat plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; O'Hanlon, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    A high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with a chemical process facility could produce synthetic fuels (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, methanol, hydrogen, etc.) in the long term using low-grade carbon sources (e.g., coal, oil shale, etc.). The ultimate high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant is being studied for nuclear process heat. This paper discusses a process heat plant with a 2240-MW(t) nuclear heat source, a reactor outlet temperature of 950 0 C, and a direct reforming process. The nuclear heat source outputs principally hydrogen-rich synthesis gas that can be used as a feedstock for synthetic fuel production. This paper emphasizes the design of the nuclear heat source and discusses the major components and a deployment strategy to realize an advanced HTGR process heat plant concept

  9. Laser-based analytical monitoring in nuclear-fuel processing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1978-09-01

    The use of laser-based analytical methods in nuclear-fuel processing plants is considered. The species and locations for accountability, process control, and effluent control measurements in the Coprocessing, Thorex, and reference Purex fuel processing operations are identified and the conventional analytical methods used for these measurements are summarized. The laser analytical methods based upon Raman, absorption, fluorescence, and nonlinear spectroscopy are reviewed and evaluated for their use in fuel processing plants. After a comparison of the capabilities of the laser-based and conventional analytical methods, the promising areas of application of the laser-based methods in fuel processing plants are identified

  10. People detection in nuclear plants by video processing for safety purpose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A., E-mail: calexandre@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mol@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Seixas, Jose M.; Silva, Eduardo Antonio B., E-mail: seixas@lps.ufrj.b, E-mail: eduardo@lps.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Eletrica; Cota, Raphael E.; Ramos, Bruno L., E-mail: brunolange@poli.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (EP/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Eletronica e de Computacao

    2011-07-01

    This work describes the development of a surveillance system for safety purposes in nuclear plants. The final objective is to track people online in videos, in order to estimate the dose received by personnel, during the execution of working tasks in nuclear plants. The estimation will be based on their tracked positions and on dose rate mapping in a real nuclear plant at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Argonauta nuclear research reactor. Cameras have been installed within Argonauta's room, supplying the data needed. Both video processing and statistical signal processing techniques may be used for detection, segmentation and tracking people in video. This first paper reports people segmentation in video using background subtraction, by two different approaches, namely frame differences, and blind signal separation based on the independent component analysis method. Results are commented, along with perspectives for further work. (author)

  11. People detection in nuclear plants by video processing for safety purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Seixas, Jose M.; Silva, Eduardo Antonio B.; Cota, Raphael E.; Ramos, Bruno L.

    2011-01-01

    This work describes the development of a surveillance system for safety purposes in nuclear plants. The final objective is to track people online in videos, in order to estimate the dose received by personnel, during the execution of working tasks in nuclear plants. The estimation will be based on their tracked positions and on dose rate mapping in a real nuclear plant at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Argonauta nuclear research reactor. Cameras have been installed within Argonauta's room, supplying the data needed. Both video processing and statistical signal processing techniques may be used for detection, segmentation and tracking people in video. This first paper reports people segmentation in video using background subtraction, by two different approaches, namely frame differences, and blind signal separation based on the independent component analysis method. Results are commented, along with perspectives for further work. (author)

  12. Maintenance of process instrumentation in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.

    2006-01-01

    The resurgence of the nuclear power industry at a time when the nuclear plant I and C workforce is diminishing due to aging and retirements has been the motivation for writing this book. This book compiles 30 years of practical knowledge gained by the author and his staff in testing the I and C systems of nuclear power plants around the world. It focuses on process temperature and pressure sensors and the verification of these sensors' calibration and response time. In spite of great advances in electronics, computers, and measurement technologies, important process parameters such as temperature and pressure are still measured with conventional sensing techniques found in RTDs, thermocouples, and conventional pressure and differential pressure sensors. Furthermore, no improved technology providing comparable performance is currently on the horizon. Therefore, it is important to understand how these sensors function and the testing techniques for verifying their performance. This book is intended to help provide this understanding. (orig.)

  13. Alarm-Processing in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otazo, J; Fernandez, R

    2000-01-01

    Information overload due to the activation of a great number of alarms in a short time is a common problem for the operator in the control room of a industrial plant, mainly in complex process like the nuclear power plants.The problem is the conventional conception of the alarm system, that defines each alarm like a separated and independent entity of the global situation of the plant.A direct consequence is the generation of multiple alarms during a significative disturbance in the process, being most of them redundant and irrelevant to the actual process state wich involves an extra load to the operator, who wastes time in acting selecting the important alarms of the group that appears or lead to a an erroneous action.The present work first describes the techniques developed in the last years to attack the avalanche of alarms problem.Later we present our approach to alarm-processing: an expert system as alarm-filter.Our objective is collect in the system the state of the art in the development of advanced alarm systems, offering an improvement of the information flow to the operators through the suppression of nonsignificant alarms and a structured visualization of the process state.Such support is important during a disturbance for the identification of plant state, diagnosis, consequence prediction and corrective actions.The system is arranged in three stages: alarm-generation, alarm-filter and alarm-presentation.The alarm-generation uses conventional techniques or receives them from an external system.The alarm-filter uses suppression techniques based on: irrelevance analysis with the operation mode and the state of components, causal reasoning and static importance analysis.The alarm presentation is made through a structured way using a priority scheme with three level.The knowledge representation of each alarm is based on frames and a graph of alarms for global knowledge, where the connections between nodes represent causal and irrelevance relations

  14. Three essential management processes of nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Tunfeng

    2010-01-01

    The paper takes the operation and management of Qinshan NPP Phase II as an example, focusing on the implementation of the essential process from the following three aspects the NPP production organization, training, examination and authorization for safety-related personnel, and financing budge management. A better understanding and implementation of the essential process will enable nuclear power plants to effectively control the nuclear safety from the most fundamental managerial level. (author)

  15. AI-based alarm processing for a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, N.J.; Kim, I.S.; Hwang, I.K.; Lee, D.Y.; Ham, C.S.

    1996-01-01

    A real-time expert system is implemented using artificial intelligence and object-oriented technology for alarm processing and presentation in a nuclear power plant. The knowledge base is constructed based on some schemes to process and display alarms to the plant operators. The activated alarms are dynamically prioritized by the reasoning rules, and then, presented on the process mimic overview and by some other means. To demonstrate the proposed system, the alarm processing and presentation is carried out in a simulated environment of the TMI-2 accident

  16. Seawater desalination plant using nuclear heating reactor coupled with MED process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A small size plant for seawater desalination using nuclear heating reactor coupled with MED process was developed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, China. This seawater desalination plant was designed to supply potable water demand to some coastal location or island where both fresh water and energy source are severely lacking. It is also recommended as a demonstration and training facility for seawater desalination using nuclear energy. The design of small size of seawater desalination plant couples two proven technologies: Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR) and Multi-Effect Destination (MED) process. The NHR design possesses intrinsic and passive safety features, which was demonstrated by the experiences of the project NHR-5. The intermediate circuit and steam circuit were designed as the safety barriers between the NHR reactor and MED desalination system. Within 10~200 MWt of the power range of the heating reactor, the desalination plant could provide 8000 to 150,000 m3/d of high quality potable water. The design concept and parameters, safety features and coupling scheme are presented.

  17. Seawater desalination plant using nuclear heating reactor coupled with MED process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shaorong; Dong Duo; Zhang Dafang; Wang Xiuzhen

    2000-01-01

    A small size plant for seawater desalination using nuclear heating reactor coupled with MED process was developed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, China. this seawater desalination plant was designed to supply potable water demand to some coastal location or island where both fresh water and energy source are severely lacking. It is also recommended as a demonstration and training facility for seawater desalination using nuclear energy. The design of small size of seawater desalination plant couples two proven technologies: Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR) and Multi-Effect Destination (MED) process. The NHR design possesses intrinsic and passive safety features, which was demonstrated by the experiences of the project NHR-5. the intermediate circuit and steam circuit were designed as the safety barriers between the NHR reactor and MED desalination system. Within 10-200 MWt of the power range of the heating reactor, the desalination plant could provide 8000 to 150,000 m 3 /d of high quality potable water. The design concept and parameters, safety features and coupling scheme are presented

  18. The modernization of the process computer of the Trillo Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Aparicio, J.; Atanasio, J.

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the modernization of the Process computer of the Trillo Nuclear Power Plant. The process computer functions, have been incorporated in the non Safety I and C platform selected in Trillo NPP: the Siemens SPPA-T2000 OM690 (formerly known as Teleperm XP). The upgrade of the Human Machine Interface of the control room has been included in the project. The modernization project has followed the same development process used in the upgrade of the process computer of PWR German nuclear power plants. (Author)

  19. Safety implications of computerized process control in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    Modern nuclear power plants are making increasing use of computerized process control because of the number of potential benefits that accrue. This practice not only applies to new plants but also to those in operation. Here, the replacement of both conventional process control systems and outdated computerized systems is seen to be of benefit. Whilst this contribution is obviously of great importance to the viability of nuclear electricity generation, it must be recognized that there are major safety concerns in taking this route. However, there is the potential for enhancing the safety of nuclear power plants if the full power of microcomputers and the associated electronics is applied correctly through well designed, engineered, installed and maintained systems. It is essential that areas where safety can be improved be identified and that the pitfalls are clearly marked so that they can be avoided. The deliberations of this Technical Committee Meeting are a step on the road to this goal of improved safety through computerized process control. This report also contains the papers presented at the technical committee meeting by participants. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 15 presentations. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. A new advanced software platform for nuclear power plant process information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorsa, A.

    1993-01-01

    In the late 80s, ABB Stromberg Power Ltd. started the development of a new generation software platform for the power plant Process Information System (PIS). This development resulted in a software platform called Procontrol PMS. Procontrol PMS is a platform for fully distributed systems which provides the following features: distributed data processing, non-stop architecture, low-cost incremental expansion path, open network architecture, high functionality, effective application development environment, and advanced user interface services. A description of the structure of the Procontrol PMS software is given. ABB has received by May 1992 six orders for nuclear power plant PISs based on Procontrol PMS (4 for PWR plants, 2 for BWRs). The first Procontrol PMS based nuclear power plant PIS was commissioned in 1989 at the Loviisa nuclear power plant and has been running with 100% availability since the commissioning. (Z.S.) 2 figs

  1. Maintenance of process instrumentation in nuclear power plants

    CERN Document Server

    Hashemian, H M

    2006-01-01

    Compiles 30 years of practical knowledge gained by the author and his staff in testing the I and C systems of nuclear power plants around the world. This book focuses on process temperature and pressure sensors and the verification of these sensors' calibration and response time.

  2. Integrated Nuclear Recycle Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patodi, Anuj; Parashar, Abhishek; Samadhiya, Akshay K.; Ray, Saheli; Dey, Mitun; Singh, K.K.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Recycle Board (NRB), Tarapur proposes to set up an 'Integrated Nuclear Recycle Plant' at Tarapur. This will be located in the premises of BARC facilities. The project location is at coastal town of Tarapur, 130 Km north of Mumbai. Project area cover of INRP is around 80 hectares. The plant will be designed to process spent fuel received from Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). This is the first large scale integrated plant of the country. INRP will process spent fuel obtained from indigenous nuclear power plants and perform left over nuclear waste disposal

  3. Radioactive waste processing method for a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Kuriyama, O

    1976-06-04

    Object is to subject radioactive liquid waste in a nuclear power plant to reverse permeation process after which it is vaporized and concentrated thereby decreasing the quantity of foam to be used to achieve effective concentration of the liquid waste. Liquid waste containing a radioactive material produced from a nuclear power plant is first applied with pressure in excess of osmotic pressure by a reverse permeation device and is separated into clean water and concentrated liquid by semi-permeable membrane. Next, the thus reverse-permeated and concentrated waste is fed to an evaporator which control foaming by the foam and then further reconcentrated for purification of the liquid waste.

  4. Waste processing system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashinakagawa, Emiko; Tezuka, Fuminobu; Maesawa, Yukishige; Irie, Hiromitsu; Daibu, Etsuji.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention concerns a waste processing system of a nuclear power plant, which can reduce the volume of a large amount of plastics without burying them. Among burnable wastes and plastic wastes to be discarded in the power plant located on the sea side, the plastic wastes are heated and converted into oils, and the burnable wastes are burnt using the oils as a fuel. The system is based on the finding that the presence of Na 2 O, K 2 O contained in the wastes catalytically improves the efficiency of thermal decomposition in a heating atmosphere, in the method of heating plastics and converting them into oils. (T.M.)

  5. Decontamination process applied to radioactive solid wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Milton B.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Monteiro, Roberto Pellacani G.

    2009-01-01

    The process of decontamination is an important step in the economic operation of nuclear facilities. A large number of protective clothing, metallic parts and equipment get contaminated during the handling of radioactive materials in laboratory, plants and reactors. Safe and economic operation of these nuclear facilities will have a bearing on the extent to which these materials are reclaimed by the process of decontamination. The most common radioactive contaminants are fission products, corrosion products, uranium and thorium. The principles involved in decontamination are the same as those for an industrial cleaning process. However, the main difference is in the degree of cleaning required and at times special techniques have to be employed for removing even trace quantities of radioactive materials. This paper relate decontaminations experiences using acids and acids mixtures (HCl, HF, HNO 3 , KMnO 4 , C 2 H 2 O 4 , HBF 4 ) in several kinds of radioactive solid wastes from nuclear power plants. The result solutions were monitored by nuclear analytical techniques, in order to contribute for radiochemical characterization of these wastes. (author)

  6. Public hearing process for nuclear power plants. Seminar report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    On June 26 and 27, 1978, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission conducted a seminar on the public hearing process for nuclear power plants. The seminar was intended to examine current practices regarding the conduct of public hearings and how these practices related to the statutory intent, to assess whether existing procedures are being followed, and to explore whether administrative or legal changes are warranted. The seminar format allowed exchanges of views among participants in the hearing process and was attended by members of the public, the General Accounting Office, Congressional staffs, NRC, and the nuclear industry. The report contains panel reports on scheduling of public hearings, procedures for Board notification, selection and training of panel members, hearing procedures, and Board functions

  7. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulova, T.Ch.

    1976-01-01

    The textbook focuses on the technology and the operating characteristics of nuclear power plants equiped with pressurized water or boiling water reactors, which are in operation all over the world at present. The following topics are dealt with in relation to the complete plant and to economics: distribution and consumption of electric and thermal energy, types and equipment of nuclear power plants, chemical processes and material balance, economical characteristics concerning heat and energy, regenerative preheating of feed water, degassing and condenser systems, water supply, evaporators, district heating systems, steam generating systems and turbines, coolant loops and pipes, plant siting, ventilation and decontamination systems, reactor operation and management, heat transfer including its calculation, design of reactor buildings, and nuclear power plants with gas or sodium cooled reactors. Numerous technical data of modern Soviet nuclear power plants are included. The book is of interest to graduate and post-graduate students in the field of nuclear engineering as well as to nuclear engineers

  8. Model experiments on depressurisation accidents in nuclear process heat plants (HTGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsching, G.; Wolf, G. [Internationale Atomreaktorbau G.m.b.H. (INTERATOM), Bergisch Gladbach (Germany, F.R.)

    1981-01-15

    The analysis of depressurisation accidents requires the use of digital computer programs to find out the dynamic loads acting on the plant structures. Because of the importance of such accidents in safety and licensing procedures of nuclear process heat plants, it is necessary to compare these computer results with suitable experiments to show the accuracy and the limits of the programs in question. For this purpose a series of depressurisation experiments has been started at INTERATOM on a small scale model of a primary loop of a nuclear process heat plant. Using the results of these experiments three different computer programs were tested with good success. The development of the experimental program and the estimation of the results was carried out in co-operation with KFA-Juelich and the Technische Hochschule Aachen.

  9. Model experiments on depressurisation accidents in nuclear process heat plants (HTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsching, G.; Wolf, G.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of depressurisation accidents requires the use of digital computer programs to find out the dynamic loads acting on the plant structures. Because of the importance of such accidents in safety and licensing procedures of nuclear process heat plants, it is necessary to compare these computer results with suitable experiments to show the accuracy and the limits of the programs in question. For this purpose a series of depressurisation experiments has been started at INTERATOM on a small scale model of a primary loop of a nuclear process heat plant. Using the results of these experiments three different computer programs were tested with good success. The development of the experimental program and the estimation of the results was carried out in co-operation with KFA-Juelich and the Technische Hochschule Aachen

  10. Alarm processing system using AI techniques for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Joon On; Chang, Soon Heung

    1990-01-01

    An alarm processing system (APS) has been developed using artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. The alarms of nuclear power plants (NPP's) are classified into the generalized and special alarms. The generalized alarms are also classified into the global and local alarms. For each type of alarms, the specific processing rules are applied to filter and suppress unnecessary and potentially misleading alarms. The local processing are based on 'model-based reasoning.' The global and special alarms are processed by using the general cause-consequence check rules. The priorities of alarms are determined according to the plant state and the consistencies between them

  11. Process data validation according VDI 2048 in conventional and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenstein, M.; Laipple, B.; Schmid, F.

    2004-01-01

    Process data validation according VDI 2048 in conventional and nuclear power plants is required for acceptance testing, process and component monitoring, and status-oriented maintenance. Once a validation system like VALI III has been certified according to VDI 2048, power plant owners can use the data obtained for efficiency increase. Further, all control variables can be adjusted so as to ensure maximum plant efficiency. (orig.)

  12. Control and data processing systems in UK nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, J.A.; Wall, D.N.

    1997-01-01

    This note identifies some of the data processing and control systems in UK nuclear power plant, with emphasis on direct digital control systems and sequence control. A brief indication is also given of some of the associated research activities on control systems and software. (author). 2 figs

  13. Control and data processing systems in UK nuclear power plant and nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, J A; Wall, D N [AEA Technology, Winfrith, Dorchester (United Kingdom)

    1997-07-01

    This note identifies some of the data processing and control systems in UK nuclear power plant, with emphasis on direct digital control systems and sequence control. A brief indication is also given of some of the associated research activities on control systems and software. (author). 2 figs.

  14. Evaluation of regulatory processes affecting nuclear power plant early site approval and standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    This report presents the results of a survey and evaluation of existing federal, state and local regulatory considerations affecting siting approval of power plants in the United States. Those factors that may impede early site approval of nuclear power plants are identified, and findings related to the removal of these impediments and the general improvement of the approval process are presented. A brief evaluation of standardization of nuclear plant design is also presented

  15. Self-assessment on nuclear power plants operational experience feedback process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongtao; Ding Ying

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the purpose and function of self-assessment conducted by the responsible organizations of nuclear power plants, and describes the methods and requirements of self-assessment on operational experience feedback process to give a example. (authors)

  16. Integration of distributed plant process computer systems to nuclear power generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogard, T.; Finlay, K.

    1996-01-01

    Many operating nuclear power generation facilities are replacing their plant process computer. Such replacement projects are driven by equipment obsolescence issues and associated objectives to improve plant operability, increase plant information access, improve man machine interface characteristics, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. This paper describes a few recently completed and on-going replacement projects with emphasis upon the application integrated distributed plant process computer systems. By presenting a few recent projects, the variations of distributed systems design show how various configurations can address needs for flexibility, open architecture, and integration of technological advancements in instrumentation and control technology. Architectural considerations for optimal integration of the plant process computer and plant process instrumentation ampersand control are evident from variations of design features

  17. Designing new nuclear chemical processing plants for safeguards accountability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprouse, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    New nuclear chemical processing plants will be required to develop material accountability control limits from measurement error propagation analysis rather than historical inventory difference data as performed in the past. In order for measurement error propagation methods to be viable alternatives, process designers must ensure that two nondimensional accountability parameters are maintained below 0.1. These parameters are ratios between the material holdup increase and the variance in inventory difference measurement uncertainty. Measurement uncertainty data for use in error propagation analysis is generally available in the open literature or readily derived from instrument calibration data. However, nuclear material holdup data has not been adequately developed for use in the material accountability design process. Long duration development testing on isolated unit operations is required to generate this necessary information

  18. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-05-01

    The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported [via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)] to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers

  19. Digital Process Management Technology for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Young M.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2009-01-01

    PHILOSOPHIA, Inc. and Seoul National University have utilized the cutting edge Digital Process Management (DPM) technology for the good of Nuclear Power Plant in recent days. This work represent the overall benefits and the use of this new flow of technology which come into the spotlight. Before realizing the three dimensional (3D) technologies and applying it to real mechanical manufactures and constructions, majority of planning and designing works need huge time and cost even if the process is before the real work. Especially, for a massive construction such as power plant and harbor, without computer-aided technology currently we cannot imagine the whole process can be established easily. Computer-aided Design (CAD) is now main and common technology for manufacturing or construction. This technology lead the other virtual reality 3D technologies into the job site. As a member of these new technologies, DPM is utilized in high-tech and huge scale manufacturing and construction for the benefits of time and cost

  20. Consideration of Command and Control Performance during Accident Management Process at the Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Nisrene M. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sok Chul [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants shifted the nuclear safety paradigm from risk management to on-site management capability during a severe accident. The kernel of on-site management capability during an accident at a nuclear power plant is situation awareness and agility of command and control. However, little consideration has been given to accident management. After the events of September 11, 2001 and the catastrophic Fukushima nuclear disaster, agility of command and control has emerged as a significant element for effective and efficient accident management, with many studies emphasizing accident management strategies, particularly man-machine interface, which is considered a key role in ensuring nuclear power plant safety during severe accident conditions. This paper proposes a conceptual model for evaluating command and control performance during the accident management process at a nuclear power plant. Communication and information processing while responding to an accident is one of the key issues needed to mitigate the accident. This model will give guidelines for accurate and fast communication response during accident conditions.

  1. The main chemical safety problems in main process of nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Fengli; Zhao Shangui; Liu Xinhua; Zhang Chunlong; Lu Dan; Liu Yuntao; Yang Xiaowei; Wang Shijun

    2014-01-01

    There are many chemical reactions in the aqueous process of nuclear fuel reprocessing. The reaction conditions and the products are different so that the chemical safety problems are different. In the paper the chemical reactions in the aqueous process of nuclear fuel reprocessing are described and the main chemical safety problems are analyzed. The reference is offered to the design and accident analysis of the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. (authors)

  2. Prototype plant for nuclear process heat (PNP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerrfeld, R.; Kraut-Giesen, G.

    1982-01-01

    1. Goals: Verification of owner's interests during experimental and engineering phase of nuclear coal gasification. 2. Method: 2.1 Witnessing and evaluating of experimental results from running test facilities. 2.2 Influencing experimental program. 2.3 Participation in important meetings of PNP-project. 3. Results: From present point of view the realization of nuclear coal gasification with a nuclear high temperature reactor (HTR) in accordance with the present technical status as well as meeting the existing safety regulations seems to be feasable. R+D-work will be needed for affirmation of design. The gasification of hard coal basing on the allothermal principal has proved to be possible. The examination of the gasifier on a pilot scale is not yet done. The design work for the pilot plant should be started immediately, particularly keeping in mind the decision for erection of PNP in 1990. The calculation of production costs in comparison to autothermal gasification processes is promising better economics, if uncertainties of investment calculation are deemed to be neglectable. (orig.) [de

  3. Liquid radioactive waste processing improvement of PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nery, Renata Wolter dos Reis; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Monteiro, Jose Luiz Fontes

    2005-01-01

    The study evaluate an inorganic ion exchange to process the low level liquid radwaste of PWR nuclear plants, so that the level of the radioactivity in the effluents and the solid waste produced during the treatment of these liquid radwaste can be reduced. The work compares two types of ion exchange materials, a strong acid cation exchange resin, that is the material typically used to remove radionuclides from PWR nuclear plants wastes, and a mordenite zeolite. These exchange material were used to remove cesium from a synthetic effluent containing only this ion and another effluent containing cesium and cobalt. The breakthrough curves of the zeolite and resin using a fix bed reactor were compared. The results demonstrated that the zeolite is more efficient than the resin in removing cesium from a solution containing cesium and cobalt. The results also showed that a bed combining zeolite and resin can process more volume of an effluent containing cesium and cobalt than a bed resin alone. (author)

  4. Automated systems for control of technological processes at nuclear power plants and their use in putting the plant into operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majtan, L.

    1987-01-01

    The systems of testing and control of technological processes in WWER-440 units in nuclear power plants which have so far been constructed in Czechoslovakia have been based on the conceptual principles and hardware used in the USSR. For the Mochovce nuclear power plant an automated process control system is to be introduced which proceeds from experiences gained with new Czechoslovak conventional power plants with 200 MW units. The control system consists of two levels: unit control and the control of the whole power plant the unit control consists of the DERIS-900 decentralized control system and the SM 1804 microcomputer and SM 1420 minicomputer based information and control system. A data processing system based on the SM 52/11.M1 minicomputer system will be used for power plant start-up and commissioning. (Z.M.). 2 figs., 4 refs

  5. Nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulkiewicz, M.; Navratil, J.

    The construction of a nuclear power plant is conditioned on territorial requirements and is accompanied by the disturbance of the environment, land occupation, population migration, the emission of radioactive wastes, thermal pollution, etc. On the other hand, a nuclear power plant makes possible the introduction of district heating and increases the economic and civilization activity of the population. Due to the construction of a nuclear power plant the set limits of negative impacts must not be exceeded. The locality should be selected such as to reduce the unfavourable effects of the plant and to fully use its benefits. The decision on the siting of the nuclear power plant is preceded by the processing of a number of surveys and a wide range of documentation to which the given criteria are strictly applied. (B.H.)

  6. Life management plants at nuclear power plants PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, G.

    2014-01-01

    Since in 2009 the CSN published the Safety Instruction IS-22 (1) which established the regulatory framework the Spanish nuclear power plants must meet in regard to Life Management, most of Spanish nuclear plants began a process of convergence of their Life Management Plants to practice 10 CFR 54 (2), which is the current standard of Spanish nuclear industry for Ageing Management, either during the design lifetime of the plant, as well as for Long-Term Operation. This article describe how Life Management Plans are being implemented in Spanish PWR NPP. (Author)

  7. Improvement of the nuclear plant analyzer for Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Soo; Han, Byoung Sub; Suh, Jae Seung; Son, Dae Seong

    2005-04-01

    Accurate analysis of the operating characteristics of Nuclear Power Plants provides valuable information for both norman and abnormal operation. The information can be used for the enhancement of plant performance and safety. Usually, such analysis is performed using computer codes used for plant design or simulators. However, their usages are limited because special expertise is required to use the computer codes and simulators are not portable. Therefore, it deemed necessary to develop an NPA which minimizes those limitations and can be used for the analysis and simulation of Nuclear Power Plants. The purpose of this study is to develop a real-time best-estimate NPA for the Korean Nuclear Power Plants(KSNP). The NPA is an interactive, high fidelity engineering simulator. NPA combines the process model simulating the plant behavior with the latest computer technology such as Graphical User Interface(GUI) and simulation executive for enhanced user interface. The process model includes models for a three-dimensional reactor core, the NSSS, secondary system including turbine and feedtrain, safety auxiliary systems, and various control systems. Through the verification and validation of the NPA, it was demonstrated that the NPA can realistically simulate the plant behaviors during transient and accident conditions

  8. Low Level Event and Near Miss Process for Nuclear Power Plants: Best Practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA programme on the operational safety of nuclear power plants gives priority to the development and promotion of the proper use of IAEA safety standards through the provision of assistance to Member States in the application of safety standards, the performance of safety review missions and the conduct of training activities based on safety standards. A number of IAEA safety standards and nuclear safety publications discuss the processes that need to be put into place for the feedback and analysis of operating experience (OE) at nuclear power plants. These include: Fundamental Safety Principles (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1), Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Commissioning and Operation (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSR-2/2), Application of the Management System for Facilities and Activities (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-G-3.1) and A System for the Feedback of Experience from Events in Nuclear Installations (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-G-2.11). Additionally, several IAEA TECDOCs cover many aspects of the establishment, conduct and continuous improvement of an OE programme at nuclear power plants, including the consideration of low level events (LLEs) and near misses (NMs). Although these IAEA safety standards and nuclear safety publications have been in existence for several years, 70 per cent of the IAEA Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) missions carried out at nuclear power plants between 2006 and 2010 identified weaknesses in the reporting and analysis process for LLEs and NMs. In fact, this has been one of the recurring issues most often identified in the area of OE during these missions. These weaknesses have been further confirmed by most of the IAEA Peer Review of the Operational Safety Performance Experience (PROSPER) missions that have been conducted to date. Finally, the IAEA International Nuclear Safety Group, in their report entitled Improving the International System for Operating Experience Feedback (INSAG-23

  9. Enabling benchmarking and improving operational efficiency at nuclear power plants through adoption of a common process model: SNPM (standard nuclear performance model)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pete Karns

    2006-01-01

    To support the projected increase in base-load electricity demand, nuclear operating companies must maintain or improve upon current generation rates, all while their assets continue to age. Certainly new plants are and will be built, however the bulk of the world's nuclear generation comes from plants constructed in the 1970's and 1980's. The nuclear energy industry in the United States has dramatically increased its electricity production over the past decade; from 75.1% in 1994 to 91.9% by 2002 (source NEI US Nuclear Industry Net Capacity Factors - 1980 to 2003). This increase, coupled with lowered production costs; $2.43 in 1994 to $1.71 in 2002 (factored for inflation source NEI US Nuclear Industry net Production Costs 1980 to 2002) is due in large part to a focus on operational excellence that is driven by an industry effort to develop and share best practices for the purposes of benchmarking and improving overall performance. These best-practice processes, known as the standard nuclear performance model (SNPM), present an opportunity for European nuclear power generators who are looking to improve current production rates. In essence the SNPM is a model for the safe, reliable, and economically competitive nuclear power generation. The SNPM has been a joint effort of several industry bodies: Nuclear Energy Institute, Electric Cost Utility Group, and Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). The standard nuclear performance model (see figure 1) is comprised of eight primary processes, supported by forty four sub-processes and a number of company specific activities and tasks. The processes were originally envisioned by INPO in 1994 and evolved into the SNPM that was originally launched in 1998. Since that time communities of practice (CoPs) have emerged via workshops to further improve the processes and their inter-operability, CoP representatives include people from: nuclear power operating companies, policy bodies, industry suppliers and consultants, and

  10. Staffing decision processes and issues: Case studies of seven US Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, B.; Roussel, A.; Baker, K.; Durbin, N.; Hunt, P.; Hauth, J.; Forslund, C.; Terrill, E.; Gore, B.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this report is to identify how decisions are made regarding staffing levels and positions for a sample of U.S. nuclear power plants. In this report, a framework is provided for understanding the major forces driving staffing and the implications of staffing decisions for plant safety. The focus of this report is on driving forces that have led to changes in staffing levels and to the establishment of new positions between the mid-1980s and the early 1990s. Processes used at utilities and nuclear power plants to make and implement these staffing decisions are also discussed in the report. While general trends affecting the plant as a whole are presented, the major emphasis of this report is on staffing changes and practices in the operations department, including the operations shift crew. The findings in this report are based on interviews conducted at seven nuclear power plants and their parent utilities. A discussion of the key findings is followed by a summary of the implications of staffing issues for plant safety

  11. Modeling the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor process heat plant: a nuclear to chemical conversion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfremmer, R.D.; Openshaw, F.L.

    1982-05-01

    The high-temperature heat available from the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) makes it suitable for many process applications. One of these applications is a large-scale energy production plant where nuclear energy is converted into chemical energy and stored for industrial or utility applications. This concept combines presently available nuclear HTGR technology and energy conversion chemical technology. The design of this complex plant involves questions of interacting plant dynamics and overall plant control. This paper discusses how these questions were answered with the aid of a hybrid computer model that was developed within the time-frame of the conceptual design studies. A brief discussion is given of the generally good operability shown for the plant and of the specific potential problems and their anticipated solution. The paper stresses the advantages of providing this information in the earliest conceptual phases of the design

  12. Licensing Process for Nuclear Power Plants in Pakistan and its comparison with other Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Javed; Choi, Kwang Sik

    2012-01-01

    Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority (PNRA) was established in January 2001 with the promulgation of the Ordinance, No-III of 2001. Pakistan is one of the countries in the world who intend to expand its nuclear power program for energy generation upto 8800 MWe by 2030. Presently, there are two research reactors and three nuclear power plants in operation and two power plants are under various stages of construction which are expected to be in commercial operation in 2016. It is obvious that the primary responsibility of ensuring safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs) operation rests with the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC). However, PNRA's prime mission is to ensure the safe operation of nuclear and radiation facilities, safe use of radioactive sources and protection of the radiation workers, general public and the environment from the harmful hazards of radiation by formulating and implementing effective regulations. Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority issues authorizations for nuclear power plants in three stages i.e. site permit, construction license and operation license after detailed safety review. This paper presents the licensing process for NPPs in Pakistan and its comparison with SSG-12, USA and Finland

  13. Technical Characteristics of the Process Information System - Nuclear Power Plant Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, D.; Smolej, M.

    1998-01-01

    process Information System (PIS) of Nuclear Power Plant Krsko (NEK) is newly installed distributed and redundant process computer system which was built in NEK (Phase I: 1991-1995) to integrate the following main functions: - Signal Data Acquisition from the technological processes and environment - Implementation of the basic SCADA functions on the real time process signals data base - Execution of complex plant specific application programs - Advanced MMI (Man Machine Interface) features for users in MCR - Process data transfer to other than Main Control Room (MCR) locations - Process data archiving and capability to retrieve same data for future analysis PIS NEK architecture consists of three hierarchically interconnected hardware platforms: - PIS Level 1, DAS (Data Acquisition System) Level - PIS Level2, Level for MMI, application programs and process data archiving - PIS Level 3, Level for distribution of process data to remote users of PIS data. (author)

  14. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-01-01

    Using alternate energy sources abundant in the U.S.A. to help curb foreign oil imports is vitally important from both national security and economic standpoints. Perhaps the most forwardlooking opportunity to realize national energy goals involves the integrated use of two energy sources that have an established technology base in the U.S.A., namely nuclear energy and coal. The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc.) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported (via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)) to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers

  15. DIMOS: a new generation of nuclear power plant process monitoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlaminck, M. de; Gilliot, B.; Remacle, J.

    1993-01-01

    A new generation of nuclear power plant supervision systems is described, called DIMOS (DIstributed MOnitoring System). It was installed in August 1991 at the Doel nuclear power plant and is now monitoring reactors 1 and 2. The system represents one of the largest and most advanced process monitoring systems in operation. DIMOS has successfully provided the solution to the old system's limitations such as functional deficiencies, low response time, management and coherence of the data, maintenance costs, spare parts, and system availability. The use of the software development methodologies HOOD and ADA have not only allowed a rapid integration and installation of a robust system, but will also make further developments and improvements possible with maximum flexibility. (Z.S.) 2 figs

  16. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Data concerning the existing nuclear power plants in the world are presented. The data was retrieved from the SIEN (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: nuclear plants, its status and type; installed nuclear power plants by country; nuclear power plants under construction by country; planned nuclear power plants by country; cancelled nuclear power plants by country; shut-down nuclear power plants by country. (E.G.) [pt

  17. Improved people detection in nuclear plants by video processing for safety purpose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R., E-mail: calexandre@ien.gov.br, E-mail: mol@ien.gov.br, E-mail: paulov@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Seixas, Jose M.; Silva, Eduardo Antonio B., E-mail: seixas@lps.ufrj.br, E-mail: eduardo@smt.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Eletrica; Waintraub, Fabio, E-mail: fabiowaintraub@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Departamento de Engenharia Eletronica e de Computacao

    2013-07-01

    This work describes improvements in a surveillance system for safety purposes in nuclear plants. The objective is to track people online in video, in order to estimate the dose received by personnel, during working tasks executed in nuclear plants. The estimation will be based on their tracked positions and on dose rate mapping in a nuclear research reactor, Argonauta. Cameras have been installed within Argonauta room, supplying the data needed. Video processing methods were combined for detecting and tracking people in video. More specifically, segmentation, performed by background subtraction, was combined with a tracking method based on color distribution. The use of both methods improved the overall results. An alternative approach was also evaluated, by means of blind source signal separation. Results are commented, along with perspectives. (author)

  18. Improved people detection in nuclear plants by video processing for safety purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, Carlos Alexandre F.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R.; Seixas, Jose M.; Silva, Eduardo Antonio B.; Waintraub, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    This work describes improvements in a surveillance system for safety purposes in nuclear plants. The objective is to track people online in video, in order to estimate the dose received by personnel, during working tasks executed in nuclear plants. The estimation will be based on their tracked positions and on dose rate mapping in a nuclear research reactor, Argonauta. Cameras have been installed within Argonauta room, supplying the data needed. Video processing methods were combined for detecting and tracking people in video. More specifically, segmentation, performed by background subtraction, was combined with a tracking method based on color distribution. The use of both methods improved the overall results. An alternative approach was also evaluated, by means of blind source signal separation. Results are commented, along with perspectives. (author)

  19. 4. Nuclear power plant component failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear power plant component failures are dealt with in relation to reliability in nuclear power engineering. The topics treated include classification of failures, analysis of their causes and impacts, nuclear power plant failure data acquisition and processing, interdependent failures, and human factor reliability in nuclear power engineering. (P.A.). 8 figs., 7 tabs., 23 refs

  20. Facility for processing the condensates from nuclear power plants (BWR and PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucker, Georges.

    1975-01-01

    A plant for the processing of the condensates from boiling water or pressurized water nuclear power plants is presented. A series of couples of units for the processing of the condensates through mixed beds of ion exchange resins simultaneously ensures the filtration and demineralization of the condensates. When the resins are saturated, each mixed bed is transferred into a unit of regeneration of said resins. Each processing unit is a sphere made of a stainless material, and provided with a plurality of air and water pipes allowing the admission and evacuation of the various elements to be successively controlled [fr

  1. Benchmarking Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakic, I.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main tasks an owner have is to keep its business competitive on the market while delivering its product. Being owner of nuclear power plant bear the same (or even more complex and stern) responsibility due to safety risks and costs. In the past, nuclear power plant managements could (partly) ignore profit or it was simply expected and to some degree assured through the various regulatory processes governing electricity rate design. It is obvious now that, with the deregulation, utility privatization and competitive electricity market, key measure of success used at nuclear power plants must include traditional metrics of successful business (return on investment, earnings and revenue generation) as well as those of plant performance, safety and reliability. In order to analyze business performance of (specific) nuclear power plant, benchmarking, as one of the well-established concept and usual method was used. Domain was conservatively designed, with well-adjusted framework, but results have still limited application due to many differences, gaps and uncertainties. (author).

  2. Conduct of regulatory review and assessment during the licensing process for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the Agency's programme, referred to as the NUSS programme, for establishing Codes of Practice and Safety Guides relating to nuclear power plants. It supplements the Code of Practice on Governmental Organization for the Regulation of Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA Safety Series No. 50-C-G) and is concerned with the review and assessment by the regulatory body of all information submitted in support of licence applications, in the various phases of the licensing process. The purpose of the Guide is to provide information, recommendations and guidance for the conduct of these activities. The scope of the review and assessment will encompass the safety aspects of siting, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of each nuclear power plant

  3. Health physics self-assessment and the nuclear regulatory oversight process at a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, R.S.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has developed improvements in their Nuclear Power Plant inspection, assessment and enforcement practices. The objective of these changes was to link regulatory action with power plant performance through a risk- informed process which is intended to enhance objectivity. One of the Strategic Performance Areas of focus by the U.S. NRC is radiation safety. Two cornerstones, Occupational Radiation Safety and Public Radiation Safety, make up this area. These cornerstones are being evaluated through U.S. NRC Performance Indicators (PI) and baseline site inspections. Key to the U.S. NRC's oversight program is the ability of the licensee to implement a self-assessment program which pro-actively identifies potential problems and develops improvements to enhance management's effectiveness. The Health Physics Self-Assessment Program at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) identifies radiation protection-related weakness or negative trends. The intended end result is improved performance through rapid problem identification, timely evaluation, corrective action and follow-up effectiveness reviews. A review of the radiation protection oversight process and the SONGS Health Physics Self-Assessment Program will be presented. Lessons learned and management tools, which evaluate workforce and Health Physics (HP) staff performance to improve radiological practices, are discussed. (author)

  4. The process control and management on equipment qualification of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dong; Wang Hongyin; Zhang Yong

    2013-01-01

    The equipment qualification (EQ) to the safety class equipment is an important safety measure for the nuclear power plants (NPP), and also reflects the nuclear safety culture. Along with the continuous constructions of NPP in China, it has become an important issue for NPP engineering company and equipment suppliers how to effectively establish standard EQ process control and management, and provide sufficient technical arrangements to maintain this EQ management system. This paper summarizes three process of EQ including Design Input, EQ Establishment and EQ Maintenance, proposes the measures and key points for EQ process control and management in phase of NPP construction, and introduces the documents management during the whole process of EQ. (authors)

  5. A new method of knowledge processing for equipment diagnosis of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, M.; Fukumoto, A.; Tai, I.; Morioka, T.

    1987-01-01

    In this work, the authors complete the development of a new knowledge processing method and representation for equipment diagnosis of nuclear power plants and evaluate its functions by applying to the maintenance and diagnosis support system of the reactor instrumentation. This knowledge processing method system is based on the Cause Generation and Checking concept and has sufficient performance not only in the diagnosis function but also in the man-machine interfacing function. The maintenance and diagnosis support system based on this method leads to the possibility for users to diagnose various phenomena occurred in an objective equipment to the considerable extent by consulting with the system, even if they don't have enough knowledge. With this system, it becomes easy for operators or plant engineers to take immediate actions to counteract against the abnormality. The maintainability of the equipments is improved and MTTR (Mean Time To Repair) is expected to be shorter. This new knowledge processing method is proved to be suited for fault diagnosis of the equipments of nuclear power plants

  6. The modernization of the process computer of the Trillo Nuclear Power Plant; Modernizacion del ordenador de proceso de la Central Nuclear de Trillo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Aparicio, J.; Atanasio, J.

    2011-07-01

    The paper describes the modernization of the Process computer of the Trillo Nuclear Power Plant. The process computer functions, have been incorporated in the non Safety I and C platform selected in Trillo NPP: the Siemens SPPA-T2000 OM690 (formerly known as Teleperm XP). The upgrade of the Human Machine Interface of the control room has been included in the project. The modernization project has followed the same development process used in the upgrade of the process computer of PWR German nuclear power plants. (Author)

  7. Business data processing in the service of quality and safety in nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassignet, C.

    1980-01-01

    Construction of a nuclear power plant implies collection and correlation of several thousand items of information which must be identified and which must remain retrievable throughout the service life of the plant. The Framatome Corporation, which has one of the largest nuclear power plant construction programs in the world, therefore set up a processing and checking system for the documents containing this information. The author describes the functions and principles of this system (known as SHARAD), together with its technical data and its operation [fr

  8. KWU Nuclear Plant Analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennewitz, F.; Hummel, R.; Oelmann, K.

    1986-01-01

    The KWU Nuclear Plant Analyzer is a real time engineering simulator based on the KWU computer programs used in plant transient analysis and licensing. The primary goal is to promote the understanding of the technical and physical processes of a nuclear power plant at an on-site training facility. Thus the KWU Nuclear Plant Analyzer is available with comparable low costs right at the time when technical questions or training needs arise. This has been achieved by (1) application of the transient code NLOOP; (2) unrestricted operator interaction including all simulator functions; (3) using the mainframe computer Control Data Cyber 176 in the KWU computing center; (4) four color graphic displays controlled by a dedicated graphic computer, no control room equipment; and (5) coupling of computers by telecommunication via telephone

  9. IAEA Issues Report on Mission to Review Japan's Nuclear Power Plant Safety Assessment Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: A team of international nuclear safety experts has delivered its report on a mission it conducted from 21-31 January 2012 to review Japan's process for assessing nuclear safety at the nation's nuclear power plants. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) officials delivered the IAEA Mission Report to Japanese officials yesterday and made it publicly available today. Following the 11 March 2011 accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) announced the development of a revised safety assessment process for the nation's nuclear power reactors. At the request of the Government of Japan, the IAEA organized a team of five IAEA and three international nuclear safety experts and visited Japan to review NISA's approach to the Comprehensive Assessments for the Safety of Existing Power Reactor Facilities and how NISA examines the results submitted by nuclear operators. A Preliminary Summary Report was issued on 31 January. 'The mission report provides additional information regarding the team's recommendations and overall finding that NISA's instructions to power plants and its review process for the Comprehensive Safety Assessments are generally consistent with IAEA Safety Standards', said team leader James Lyons, Director of the IAEA's Nuclear Installation Safety Division. National safety assessments and their peer review by the IAEA are a key component of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which was approved by the Agency's Member States following last year's nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The IAEA safety review mission held meetings in Tokyo with officials from NISA, the Japanese Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES), and the Kansai Electric Power Company (KEPCO), and the team visited the Ohi Nuclear Power Station to see an example of how Japan's Comprehensive Safety Assessment is being implemented by nuclear operators. In its report delivered today

  10. Nuclear power plant diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokop, K.; Volavy, J.

    1982-01-01

    Basic information is presented on diagnostic systems used at nuclear power plants with PWR reactors. They include systems used at the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant in the USSR, at the Nord power plant in the GDR, the system developed at the Hungarian VEIKI institute, the system used at the V-1 nuclear power plant at Jaslovske Bohunice in Czechoslovakia and systems of the Rockwell International company used in US nuclear power plants. These diagnostic systems are basically founded on monitoring vibrations and noise, loose parts, pressure pulsations, neutron noise, coolant leaks and acoustic emissions. The Rockwell International system represents a complex unit whose advantage is the on-line evaluation of signals which gives certain instructions for the given situation directly to the operator. The other described systems process signals using similar methods. Digitized signals only serve off-line computer analyses. (Z.M.)

  11. Information Technology for Nuclear Power Plant Configuration Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    Configuration management (CM) is an essential component of nuclear power plant design, construction and operation. The application of information technology (IT) offers a method to automate and ensure the timely and effective capture, processing and distribution of key nuclear power plant information to support CM principles and practical processes and procedures for implementation of CM at nuclear power plants. This publication reviews some of the principles established in IAEA-TECDOC-1335, 'Configuration Management in Nuclear Power Plants.' It also recaps tenets laid out in IAEA- TECDOC-1284, 'Information Technology Impact on Nuclear Power Plant Documentation' that supports CM programmes. This publication has been developed in conjunction with and designed to support these other two publications. These three publications combined provide a comprehensive discussion on configuration management, information technology and the relationship between them. An extensive discussion is also provided in this publication on the role of the design basis of the facility and its control through the CM process throughout the facility's lifetime. While this report was developed specifically for nuclear power plants, the principles discussed can be usefully applied to any high hazard nuclear facility

  12. Life management plants at nuclear power plants PWR; Planes de gestion de vida en centrales nucleares PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban, G.

    2014-10-01

    Since in 2009 the CSN published the Safety Instruction IS-22 (1) which established the regulatory framework the Spanish nuclear power plants must meet in regard to Life Management, most of Spanish nuclear plants began a process of convergence of their Life Management Plants to practice 10 CFR 54 (2), which is the current standard of Spanish nuclear industry for Ageing Management, either during the design lifetime of the plant, as well as for Long-Term Operation. This article describe how Life Management Plans are being implemented in Spanish PWR NPP. (Author)

  13. Sustained qualification process for full scope nuclear power plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirson, J.; Stubbe, E.; Vanhoenacker, L.

    1994-01-01

    In the past decade, simulator training for all nuclear power plant operators has evolved into a vital requirement. To assure a correct training, the simulator qualification process is an important issue not only for the initial validation but also following major simulator updates, which are necessary during the lifetime of the simulator. In order to avoid degradation of the simulator validated software, the modifications have to be introduced according to a rigorous methodology and a practical requalification process has to be applied. Such methodology has to be enforced at every phase of the simulator construction or updating process from plant data package constitution, over simulator software development to simulator response qualification. The initial qualification and requalification process is based on the 3 levels identified by the ANSI/ANS 3-5 standard for steady-state, operational transients and accident conditions. For the initial certification of the full scope simulators in Belgium, a practical qualification methodology has been applied, which has been adapted into a set of non regression tests for the requalification after major simulator updates. (orig.) (4 refs., 3 figs.)

  14. Balance of Plant Requirements for a Nuclear Hydrogen Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley Ward

    2006-04-01

    This document describes the requirements for the components and systems that support the hydrogen production portion of a 600 megawatt thermal (MWt) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These systems, defined as the "balance-of-plant" (BOP), are essential to operate an effective hydrogen production plant. Examples of BOP items are: heat recovery and heat rejection equipment, process material transport systems (pumps, valves, piping, etc.), control systems, safety systems, waste collection and disposal systems, maintenance and repair equipment, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical supply and distribution, and others. The requirements in this document are applicable to the two hydrogen production processes currently under consideration in the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. These processes are the sulfur iodide (S-I) process and the high temperature electrolysis (HTE) process. At present, the other two hydrogen production process - the hybrid sulfur-iodide electrolytic process (SE) and the calcium-bromide process (Ca-Br) -are under flow sheet development and not included in this report. While some features of the balance-of-plant requirements are common to all hydrogen production processes, some details will apply only to the specific needs of individual processes.

  15. Iodine-129 in aquatic organisms near nuclear fuels processing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, D.G.

    1975-04-01

    Concentrations of 129 I in two aquatic habitats near nuclear fuel processing plants were highest in algae and crustaceans. These two forms may be useful in future monitoring of 129 I. There is some indication of an increase in atom ratios and specific activity in aquatic organisms over that in water and sediments. Additional measurements should be made to verify this conclusion. Efforts should continue to measure the possible long term build-up of 129 I in aquatic environments receiving effluents from fuels reprocessing plants. Even at very low rates of release to the environment, the long physical half-life of 129 I creates the potential for build-up of this nuclide to significant levels. (U.S.)

  16. A small floating seawater desalination plant using a nuclear heating reactor coupled with the MED process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Duo; Wu Shaorong; Zhang Dafang; Wu Zongxin

    1997-01-01

    A small floating seawater desalination plant using a nuclear heating reactor coupled with a multi-effect distillation (MED) process was designed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University of China. It was intended to supply potable water to remove coastal areas or islands where both fresh water and energy are severely lacking, and also to serve as a demonstration and training facility. The design of a small floating plant coupled two proven technologies in the cogeneration mode: a nuclear heating reactor (NHR-10), with inherent, passive safety features based on NHR-5 experience, and a low temperature MED process. The secondary loop was designed as a safety barrier between the primary loop and the steam loop. With a 10 MW(th) heating reactor, the floating plant could provide 4,000 m 3 /d of potable water and 750 kW of electricity. The design concept and parameters, safety features, coupling scheme and floating plant layout are presented in the paper. (author). 3 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  17. Backfitting possibilities of process instrumentation during planning, construction or operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, G.E.; Schemmel, R.R.; Warren, H.D.

    1985-01-01

    The necessity for backfitting existing C and I equipment in nuclear power plants arises as a result of new licensing requirements being imposed or through a need for improved performance as experience with operating plants becomes available. These changes arise either because additional process variables need to be monitored; improved sensors need to be installed (to increase safety or operating margin); more directly sense the processes; or to address concerns in signal conditioning, control algorithms, control system strategy, or safety system design. This paper discusses examples of backfitting experiences on existing plants and some being developed for future improvements

  18. Gas treatment processes for keeping the environment of nuclear plants free from gas-borne activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, H.

    1977-01-01

    The separation processes in gas treatment steps for the decontamination of circuit or offgas streams are described and their practicability is evaluated. Examples of the effectiveness of gas separation plants for keeping the environment within and without nuclear plants free from harmful gas-borne activity are presented. (orig.) [de

  19. Decommissioning and back working of Greifswald nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittscher, D.; Leushacke, D.F.; Meyer, R.

    1998-01-01

    At Nuclear Power Plant Greifswald, the Energiewerke Nord are carrying out the presently world's largest decommissioning project. This requires the gathering up of experience from the operation of the nuclear power plants at Greifswald, the decommissioning of other nuclear power plants, waste management, project management and licensing procedures for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants. That confirmed that the back working of nuclear plants is not a technical problem but a challenge for project management and logistics. It shows that the dismantling and disposal of nuclear plants is an ordinary process in our economic life. (orig.) [de

  20. Modern licensing approaches for analysis of important to safety processes in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, M.; Groudev, P.; Pavlova, M.; Stoyanov, S.

    2008-01-01

    It is presented within the paper the modern approaches for analysis of important to safety assessment processes in Nuclear Power Plants, included Bulgarian Regulatory Agency's requirements for quantity assessment of these processes applying deterministic and probabilistic approaches for establishing and confirming the design basis and defence-in-depth effectiveness. (authors)

  1. Loviisa nuclear power plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porkholm, K.; Nurmilaukas, P.; Tiihonen, O.; Haenninen, M.; Puska, E.

    1992-12-01

    The APROS Simulation Environment has been developed since 1986 by Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). It provides tools, solution algorithms and process components for use in different simulation systems for design, analysis and training purposes. One of its main nuclear applications is the Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant Analyzer (LPA). The Loviisa Plant Analyzer includes all the important plant components both in the primary and in the secondary circuits. In addition, all the main control systems, the protection system and the high voltage electrical systems are included. (orig.)

  2. On-line calibration of process instrumentation channels in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Farmer, J.P. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    An on-line instrumentation monitoring system was developed and validated for use in nuclear power plants. This system continuously monitors the calibration status of instrument channels and determines whether or not they require manual calibrations. This is accomplished by comparing the output of each instrument channel to an estimate of the process it is monitoring. If the deviation of the instrument channel from the process estimate is greater than an allowable limit, then the instrument is said to be {open_quotes}out of calibration{close_quotes} and manual adjustments are made to correct the calibration. The success of the on-line monitoring system depends on the accuracy of the process estimation. The system described in this paper incorporates both simple intercomparison techniques as well as analytical approaches in the form of data-driven empirical modeling to estimate the process. On-line testing of the calibration of process instrumentation channels will reduce the number of manual calibrations currently performed, thereby reducing both costs to utilities and radiation exposure to plant personnel.

  3. Advanced nuclear plant control complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarola, K.; Jamison, S.; Manazir, R.M.; Rescorl, R.L.; Harmon, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel in the control room. A separate data processing system, which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board. The discrete indicator and alarm system and the data processing system receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accidental conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof. (author)

  4. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friske, A.; Thiele, D.

    1988-01-01

    The IAEA classification of decommissioning stages is outlined. The international development hitherto observed in decommissioning of nuclear reactors and nuclear power stations is presented. The dismantling, cutting and decontamination methods used in the decommissioning process are mentioned. The radioactive wastes from decommissioning are characterized, the state of the art of their treatment and disposal is given. The radiation burdens and the decommissioning cost in a decommissioning process are estimated. Finally, some evaluation of the trends in the decommissioning process of nuclear power plants is given. 54 refs. (author)

  5. Power plant process computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, R.

    1982-01-01

    The concept of instrumentation and control in nuclear power plants incorporates the use of process computers for tasks which are on-line in respect to real-time requirements but not closed-loop in respect to closed-loop control. The general scope of tasks is: - alarm annunciation on CRT's - data logging - data recording for post trip reviews and plant behaviour analysis - nuclear data computation - graphic displays. Process computers are used additionally for dedicated tasks such as the aeroball measuring system, the turbine stress evaluator. Further applications are personal dose supervision and access monitoring. (orig.)

  6. Maintenance planning for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattu, R.K.; Cooper, S.E.; Lauderdale, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Maintenance planning for nuclear power plants is similar to that in other industrial plants but it is heavily influenced by regulatory rules, with consequent costs of compliance. Steps by the nuclear industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address that problem include development of guidelines for maintenance of risk-critical equipment, using PRA-based techniques to select a set of equipment that requires maintenance and reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) approaches for determining what maintenance is required. The result of the process is a program designed to ensure effective maintenance of the equipment most critical to plant safety. (author)

  7. Inspection of nuclear power plant piping welds by in-process acoustic emission monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prine, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    The results of using in-process acoustic emission monitoring on nuclear power plant piping welds are discussed. The technique was applied to good and intentionally flawed test welds as well as production welds, and the acoustic emission results are compared to standard NDT methods and selected metallographic cross-sections

  8. Ceramic process and plant design for high-level nuclear waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantham, L.F.; McKisson, R.L.; De Wames, R.E.; Guon, J.; Flintoff, J.F.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    In the last 3 years, significant advances in ceramic technology for high-level nuclear waste solidification have been made. Product quality in terms of leach-resistance, compositional uniformity, structural integrity, and thermal stability promises to be superior to borosilicate glass. This paper addresses the process effectiveness and preliminary designs for glass and ceramic immobilization plants. The reference two-step ceramic process utilizes fluid-bed calcination (FBC) and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidation. Full-scale demonstration of these well-developed processing steps has been established at DOE and/or commercial facilities for processing radioactive materials. Based on Savannah River-type waste, our model predicts that the capital and operating cost for the solidification of high-level nuclear waste is about the same for the ceramic and glass options. However, when repository costs are included, the ceramic option potentially offers significantly better economics due to its high waste loading and volume reduction. Volume reduction impacts several figures of merit in addition to cost such as system logistics, storage, transportation, and risk. The study concludes that the ceramic product/process has many potential advantages, and rapid deployment of the technology could be realized due to full-scale demonstrations of FBC and HIP technology in radioactive environments. Based on our finding and those of others, the ceramic innovation not only offers a viable backup to the glass reference process but promises to be a viable future option for new high-level nuclear waste management opportunities

  9. The Process of Legal Drafting Regulation in the Development of the Nuclear Power Plant in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Mardha, Amil

    2009-01-01

    THE PROCESS OF LEGAL DRAFTING REGULATION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IN INDONESIA. In Indonesia, the process of legal drafting to establish the regulation is based on the Act No. 10 Year 2004 on the Establishment of Legislation. The process shall comply with the constitutional and institutional requirements of national political and legal system. In drafting the development of the regulation of nuclear energy, BAPETEN has been involving some other agencies or other related g...

  10. A common high standard for nuclear power plant exports: overview and analysis of the Nuclear Power Plant Exporters' Principles of Conduct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkovich, George; Radzinsky, Brian

    2012-01-01

    At this time, there is no overarching global framework to regulate the development of the nuclear power industry. Laws concerning the export of nuclear technology vary across jurisdictions, and politically-binding arrangements such as the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) help ensure that weapons-usable or dual-use technologies are not exported, but no single international regime or agreement manages the gamut of potential risks that may arise from the export of civilian nuclear power plants. Accordingly in 2008, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace convened internationally-recognised experts in nuclear energy to begin a dialogue with nuclear power plant vendors about defining common criteria for the socially responsible export of nuclear power plants. The goal was to articulate a comprehensive set of principles and best practices that would raise the overall standard of practice for exports of nuclear power plants while enjoying widespread support and adherence. The outcome of this process is the Nuclear Power Plant Exporters' Principles of Conduct - an export-oriented code of conduct for nuclear power plant vendors. The Principles of Conduct help ensure that the participating companies will proceed with the sale of a new nuclear power plant only after a careful assessment of the legal, political, and technical contexts surrounding potential customers. It comprises six 'principles' that each address a major area of concern involved in the export of a nuclear power plant: safety, physical security, environmental protection and spent fuel management, systems of compensation for nuclear damage, non-proliferation and safeguards, and business ethics. The Principles of Conduct entail vendor responsibilities to apply specific standards or engage in certain practices before signing contracts and during the marketing and construction phases of a nuclear power plant export project. Conformity with the Principles of Conduct is voluntary and not-legally binding, but the

  11. Site survey for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This Safety Guide describes the first stage of the siting process for nuclear power plants - the site survey to select one or more preferred candidate sites. Its purpose is to recommend procedures and provide information for use in implementing a part of the Code of Practice on Safety in Nuclear Power Plant Siting (IAEA Safety Series No.50-C-S). The organization, procedures, methodologies, guidance for documenting the site survey process and examples of detailed procedures on some safety-related site characteristics are given in the Guide

  12. Radiological characterization of nuclear plants under decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mincarini, M.

    1989-01-01

    In the present work a description of major problems encountered in qualitative and quantitative radiological characterization of nuclear plants for decommissioning and decontamination purpose is presented. Referring to several nuclear plant classes activation and contamination processes, direct and indirect radiological analysis and some italian significant experience are descripted

  13. Automatic welding processes for reactor coolant pipes used in PWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, T.; Nakamura, A.; Nagura, Y.; Sakamoto, N.

    1979-01-01

    The authors developed automatic welding processes (submerged arc welding process and TIG welding process) for application to the welding of reactor coolant pipes which constitute the most important part of the PWR type nuclear power plant. Submerged arc welding process is suitable for flat position welding in which pipes can be rotated, while TIG welding process is suitable for all position welding. This paper gives an outline of the two processes and the results of tests performed using these processes. (author)

  14. Nuclear plant life - A business decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joosten, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    Regarding the future of the nuclear power option, many scenarios have been put forth over the years. The most commonly accepted projections for installed nuclear capacity show it growing at a rate of about 2% per year throughout the next few decades. These projections appear modes on the surface. However, underlying the projections are critical assumptions and sometimes misconceptions about the lifetimes of existing reactors and how they are determined. The notion of a 40 year plant life is very common. Consequently, many projections start either with the assumption that no plants will be retired in the near terms or with the assumption that each retired plant will be replaced by another nuclear plant after 40 years. Effectively, these assumptions yield future projections for installed capacity that might be characterized as low growth, medium growth and high growth scenarios - or grow, grow, grow. The question remains as to whether or not these assumptions accurately model the driving forces and constraints to nuclear development. After all, there is no scientific basis for believing that all plants, PWRs BWRs, RBMKs, etc., should have the same 40 year life. Most power plant owners purchase the plant for the main reason of supplying electrical power to their consumer. For these owners, electricity production is a day to day commercial activity with various alternatives on how to achieve the prime objective. The decision of which electricity generation alternative to select (gas, coal, nuclear or renewable energy) and how long to operate the plant before replacing it with a new one is essentially a business decision. The paper discusses ageing, the nuclear plant life decision process, the factors which influence the decision and their ramifications regarding the near term growth of nuclear power capacity. The modelling of nuclear plant lifetimes is also discussed. (author). 5 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  15. Basic Study of Establishment of Quality Assurance Processes to Develop an Integrated Quality Assurance System for Nuclear Power Plant Construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Byungki; Moon, Byeongsuk; Lee, Jae Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    An integrated quality assurance system has necessitated carrying out quality assurance programs in a systematic manner because the opportunities to expand business in overseas markets have increased since the export of a nuclear power plant to UAE in 2009. In this study, we use PDCA method to systematically analyze the quality assurance procedures that were used in previous projects for constructing nuclear power plants. We reached a classification system of quality assurance processes at each phase of nuclear power plant construction by integrating similar work related to quality such as planning, design, equipment manufacturing, construction and start-up. We also established a hierarchy of quality assurance processes to develop an integrated quality assurance system as a technology goal to be developed later. To obtain most updated quality assurance activities, a quality assurance process is structured by integrating similar works analyzed from quality assurance procedures through PDCA cycle method. At the implementation phase of Hierarchy of quality processes and sequence of processes for constructing nuclear power plant are established in this study. Integrated quality assurance system is to be developed by connecting organizations as well as stakeholders such as owners, Architect engineering, suppliers, contractors, and sub-contractors to carry out assigned work efficiently

  16. Basic Study of Establishment of Quality Assurance Processes to Develop an Integrated Quality Assurance System for Nuclear Power Plant Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Byungki; Moon, Byeongsuk; Lee, Jae Kyoung [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    An integrated quality assurance system has necessitated carrying out quality assurance programs in a systematic manner because the opportunities to expand business in overseas markets have increased since the export of a nuclear power plant to UAE in 2009. In this study, we use PDCA method to systematically analyze the quality assurance procedures that were used in previous projects for constructing nuclear power plants. We reached a classification system of quality assurance processes at each phase of nuclear power plant construction by integrating similar work related to quality such as planning, design, equipment manufacturing, construction and start-up. We also established a hierarchy of quality assurance processes to develop an integrated quality assurance system as a technology goal to be developed later. To obtain most updated quality assurance activities, a quality assurance process is structured by integrating similar works analyzed from quality assurance procedures through PDCA cycle method. At the implementation phase of Hierarchy of quality processes and sequence of processes for constructing nuclear power plant are established in this study. Integrated quality assurance system is to be developed by connecting organizations as well as stakeholders such as owners, Architect engineering, suppliers, contractors, and sub-contractors to carry out assigned work efficiently.

  17. Nuclear waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nienhuys, K.; Noordegraaf, D.

    1977-04-01

    This report is composed with a view to the discussions around the selection of a site in F.R.Germany near the Netherlands' border for a fuel reprocessing plant. Most of the scientific data available are placed side by side, especially those which are contradictory in order to promote better judgement of affairs before governmental decisions are made. The report comprises a brief introduction to nuclear power plants, fuel cycle, radioactive materials and their properties. Next the transportation of wastes from the nuclear power plants to the reprocessing plants is dealt with more extensively, including the processing and the effluents of as well as the experiences with operational reprocessing plants. The hazards from manipulation of radioactive materials accidents and theft are outlined in each case, followed by a problem discussion. The appendix illustrates the German concept of 'industrial park for after-treatment and disposal'

  18. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1991-12-01

    The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO 1 and II were in operation for almost the whole second quarter of 1991. The load factor average was 87.4 %. In consequence of a fire, which broke out in the switchgear building, connections to both external grids were lost and TVO II relied on power supplied by four back-up diesels for 7.5 hrs. The event is classified as Level 2 on the International Nuclear Event Scale. The process of examining the non-leaking fuel bundles removed from the Loviisa nuclear reactors has continued. The examinations have revealed, so far, that the uppermost spacing lattices of the bundles exhibit deformations similar to those detected in the leaking fuel bundles removed from the reactors. This event is classified as Level 1 on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Other events in this quarter which are classified according to the International Nuclear Event Scale are Level Zero (Below Scale) on the Scale. The Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety has assessed the safety of the Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants based on the new regulations issued on 14.2.1991 by the Council of State. The safety regulations are much more stringent than those in force when the Loviisa and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants were built. The assessment indicated that the TVO nuclear power plant meets these safety regulations. The Loviisa nuclear power plant meets the requirements with the exception of certain requirements related to the ensuring of safety functions and provision for accidents. At the Loviisa nuclear power plant there are several projects under consideration to enhance safety

  19. Legal advocacy and nuclear power: the impact of litigation on the Midland nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    The use of litigation as an interest-group strategy is analyzed in relation to the controversy over the development of nuclear power. An assessment is made of the impact of the judicial process, with the litigation involving the Midland, Michigan, nuclear plant serving as a representative case study. In the construction permit hearings for the Midland nuclear plant, which began in 1970, the interest groups were Consumers Power Company, a Michigan utility, and the Saginaw and Mapleton Intervernors, environmentalists dwelling near the proposed plant site. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a construction permit for the plant after a two-year licensing process, but the environmental groups appealed the permit to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. In 1976, the permit was remanded by the court to the Commission for reconsideration, and Consumers Power Company appealed that decision. In 1978, the Supreme Court handed down a unanimous and definitive opinion, Consumers Power Company vs Aeschliman, that upheld the Commission's original issuance of the construction plant. The Midland case well illustrates the detrimental impact that legal advocacy has had on atomic energy by prolonging the regulatory process. The positive consequences of the Court ruling favoring the utility's position were outweighed by the expense involved in the initial ten years of thelicensing and subsequent lawsuits concerning the Midland plant. Consequently, Consumers Power Company is representative of most other American electric companies in its determination that it cannot build additional nuclear plants without mitigation of the uncertainty and duration of the regulatory process. Thus, it may be concluded that the environmental groups' use of legal advocacy at Midland and elsewhere has proven to be an effective strategy for undermining the nuclear industry and for deterring the future development of nuclear power

  20. Nuclear and thermal power plants and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejstrik, V.

    1978-01-01

    The growth is briefly outlined of world daily power consumption and the possibilities are discussed of meeting this demand. Coal and nuclear power are of primary importance as energy resources for the present and the near future. Production costs per 1 kWh of electric power in nuclear power plants are already lower in fossil fuel power plants and both types of power plants have an environmental impact. Activities are presented of radioisotopes resulting from nuclear reactor operation and their release and environmental impact are discussed. An analysis is made of emissions from combustion processes and of wastes from fossil-fuel power plant operation. The environmental impacts of nuclear and fossil fuel power plants are compared. (Z.M.)

  1. Nuclear and thermal power plants and the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejstrik, V [Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Pruhonice. Ustav Krajinne Ekologie

    1978-01-01

    The growth is briefly outlined of world daily power consumption and the possibilities are discussed of meeting this demand. Coal and nuclear power are of primary importance as energy resources for the present and the near future. Production costs per 1 kWh of electric power in nuclear power plants are already lower than in fossil fuel power plants and both types of power plants have an environmental impact. Activities are presented of radioisotopes resulting from nuclear reactor operation and their release and environmental impact are discussed. An analysis is made of emissions from combustion processes and of wastes from fossil-fuel power plant operation. The environmental impacts of nuclear and fossil fuel power plants are compared.

  2. Selection of Possible Candidate Area for Nuclear Power Plant in Johor, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nor Afifah Basri; Ahmad Termizi Ramli

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power is considered as one of the best option for future energy development in Malaysia. Since Malaysia has no experience in nuclear energy generation, commissioning the first nuclear power plant needs tremendous effort in various aspects. Site selection is one of important step in nuclear power plant commissioning process. This paper proposes candidate sites for nuclear power plant in Mersing, Kota Tinggi, Muar and Batu Pahat district in Johor, Malaysia. The candidate selection process uses the IAEA document and AELB guideline as main reference, supported by site selection procedure by various countries. MapInfo Professional software was used to simulate the selection process for candidate areas for the nuclear power plant. This paper concluded that Tenggaroh and Jemaluang area are the most suitable area for nuclear power plant facilities in Johor, Malaysia. (Author)

  3. Major plant retrofits at Monticello nuclear generating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, D.E.; Hogg, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    For the past several years, Northern States Power (NSP) has been making major plant retrofits to Monticello Nuclear generating Station in order to improve plant availability and upgrade the plant components for the potential extension of the operating license (life extension). This paper discusses in detail three major retrofits that have been completed or in the process of completion; recirculation loop piping replacement, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) water level-instrumentation modification, core spray piping replacement, the authors will address the scope of work, design and installation concerns, and life extension considerations during the design and procurement process for these three projects

  4. Operation control device for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suto, Osamu.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To render the controlling functions of a central control console more centralized by constituting the operation controls for a nuclear power plant with computer systems having substantially independent functions such as those of plant monitor controls, reactor monitor management and CRT display and decreasing interactions between each of the systems. Constitution: An input/output device for the input of process data for a nuclear power plant and indication data for a plant control console is connected to a plant supervisory and control computer system and a display computer system, the plant supervisory control computer system and a reactor and management computer system are connected with a CRT display control device, a printer and a CRT display input/output device, and the display computer system is connected with the CRT display control device and the CRT display unit on the central control console, whereby process input can be processed and displayed at high speed. (Yoshino, Y.)

  5. Economics and policies of nuclear plant life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, H.

    1998-01-01

    NEA provides an opportunity for international exchange of information on the economics and policies of nuclear plant life management for governments and plant owners. The NEA Secretariat is finalising the 'state-of-the-art report' on the economics and policies of nuclear plant life management, including the model approach and national summaries. In order to meet power supply obligations in the early 2000, taking into account energy security, environmental impact, and the economics of nuclear power plants whose lives have been extended, initiatives at national level must be taken to monitor, co-ordinate, and support the various industry programmes of nuclear plant life management by integrated and consistent policies, public acceptance, R and D, and international co-operation. Nuclear power owners should establish an organisation and objectives to carry nuclear plant life management in the most economic and smoothest way taking into consideration internal and external influences. The organisation must identify the critical item and the ageing processes, and optimise equipment reliability and maintenance workload. (author)

  6. Prototype plant for nuclear process heat (PNP), reference phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fladerer, R.; Schrader, L.

    1982-07-01

    The coal gasification processes using nuclear process heat being developed within the framwork of the PNP project, have the advantages of saving feed coal, improving efficiency, reducing emissions, and stabilizing energy costs. One major gasification process is the hydrogasification of coal for producing SNG or gas mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen; this process can also be applied in a conventional route. The first steps to develop this process were planning, construction and operation of a semi-technical pilot plant for hydrogasification of coal in a fluidized bed having an input of 100 kg C/h. Before the completion of the development phase (reference phase) describing here, several components were tested on part of which no operational experience had so far been gained; these were the newly developed devices, e.g. the inclined tube for feeding coal into the fluidized bed, and the raw gas/hydrogenation gas heat exchanger for utilizing the waste heat of the raw gas leaving the gasifier. Concept optimizing of the thoroughly tested equipment parts led to an improved operational behaviour. Between 1976 and 1980, the semi-technical pilot plant was operated for about 19,400 hours under test conditions, more than 7,400 hours of which it has worked under gasification conditions. During this time approx. 1,100 metric tons of dry brown coal and more than 13 metric tons of hard coal were gasified. The longest coherent operational phase under gasification conditions was 748 hours in which 85.4 metric tons of dry brown coal were gasified. Carbon gasification rates up to 82% and methane contents in the dry raw gas (free of N 2 ) up to 48 vol.% were obtained. A detailed evaluation of the test results provided information of the results obtained previously. For the completion of the test - primarily of long-term tests - the operation of the semi-technical pilot plant for hydrogasification of coal is to be continued up to September 1982. (orig.) [de

  7. Computer system for nuclear power plant parameter display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, A.; Klobuchar, M.

    1990-01-01

    The computer system for efficient, cheap and simple presentation of data on the screen of the personal computer is described. The display is in alphanumerical or graphical form. The system can be used for the man-machine interface in the process monitoring system of the nuclear power plant. It represents the third level of the new process computer system of the Nuclear Power Plant Krsko. (author)

  8. Some Aspects of Process Computers Configuration Control in Nuclear Power Plant Krsko - Process Computer Signal Configuration Database (PCSCDB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, D.; Kocnar, R.; Sucic, B.

    2002-01-01

    During the operation of NEK and other nuclear power plants it has been recognized that certain issues related to the usage of digital equipment and associated software in NPP technological process protection, control and monitoring, is not adequately addressed in the existing programs and procedures. The term and the process of Process Computers Configuration Control joins three 10CFR50 Appendix B quality requirements of Process Computers application in NPP: Design Control, Document Control and Identification and Control of Materials, Parts and Components. This paper describes Process Computer Signal Configuration Database (PCSCDB), that was developed and implemented in order to resolve some aspects of Process Computer Configuration Control related to the signals or database points that exist in the life cycle of different Process Computer Systems (PCS) in Nuclear Power Plant Krsko. PCSCDB is controlled, master database, related to the definition and description of the configurable database points associated with all Process Computer Systems in NEK. PCSCDB holds attributes related to the configuration of addressable and configurable real time database points and attributes related to the signal life cycle references and history data such as: Input/Output signals, Manually Input database points, Program constants, Setpoints, Calculated (by application program or SCADA calculation tools) database points, Control Flags (example: enable / disable certain program feature) Signal acquisition design references to the DCM (Document Control Module Application software for document control within Management Information System - MIS) and MECL (Master Equipment and Component List MIS Application software for identification and configuration control of plant equipment and components) Usage of particular database point in particular application software packages, and in the man-machine interface features (display mimics, printout reports, ...) Signals history (EEAR Engineering

  9. CANDU 9 nuclear power plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kattan, M.; MacBeth, M.J.; Lam, K.

    1995-01-01

    Simulators are playing, an important role in the design and operations of CANDU reactors. They are used to analyze operating procedures under standard and upset conditions. The CANDU 9 nuclear power plant simulator is a low fidelity, near full scope capability simulator. It is designed to play an integral part in the design and verification of the control centre mock-up located in the AECL design office. It will also provide CANDU plant process dynamic data to the plant display system (PDS), distributed control system (DCS) and to the mock-up panel devices. The simulator model employs dynamic mathematical models of the various process and control components that make up a nuclear power plant. It provides the flexibility to add, remove or update user supplied component models. A block oriented process input is provided with the simulator. Individual blocks which represent independent algorithms of the model are linked together to generate the required overall plant model. As a design tool the simulator will be used for control strategy development, human factors studies (information access, readability, graphical display design, operability), analysis of overall plant control performance, tuning estimates for major control loops and commissioning strategy development. As a design evaluation tool, the simulator will be used to perform routine and non-routine procedures, practice 'what if' scenarios for operational strategy development, practice malfunction recovery procedures and verify human factors activities. This paper will describe the CANDU 9 plant simulator and demonstrate its implementation and proposed utility as a tool in the control system and control centre design of a CANDU 9 nuclear power plant. (author). 2 figs

  10. Chemical mode control in nuclear power plant decommissioning during operation of technologies in individual radioactive waste processing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, J.; Dugovic, L.

    1999-01-01

    Sewage treatment of nuclear power plant decommissioning is performed by system of sewage concentration in evaporator with formation of condensed rest, it means radioactive waste concentrate and breeding steam. During sewage treatment plant operation department of chemical mode performs chemical and radiochemical analysis of sewage set for treatment, chemical and radiochemical analysis of breeding steam condensate which is after final cleaning on ionization filter and fulfilling the limiting conditions released to environment; chemical and radiochemical analysis of heating steam condensate which is also after fulfilling the limiting conditions released to environment. Condensed radioactive concentrate is stored in stainless tanks and later converted into easy transportable and chemically stable matrix from the long term storage point of view in republic storage Mochovce. The article also refer to bituminous plant, vitrification plant, swimming pool decontamination plant of long term storage and operation of waste processing plant Bohunice

  11. Preparation for commissioning of nuclear plant with reference to British Nuclear Fuels Plc fuel handling plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamber, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The new Fuel Handling Plant at British Nuclear Fuels Sellafield is part of a Pound 550M complex which provides facilities for the receipt, storage and mechanical preparation of both Magnox and A.G.R. fuel. The plant is very large and complex with considerable use of computer based process control systems, providing for physical and nuclear safety. The preparation of such plant for active commissioning necessitates a great many physical checks and technical evaluations in support of its safety case. This paper describes arrangements for plant commissioning checks, against the regulatory framework and explains the physical preparations necessary for their timely accomplishment. (author)

  12. Preparation for commissioning of nuclear plant with reference to British Nuclear Fuels Plc fuel handling plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamber, D.

    1987-01-01

    The new Fuel Handing Plant at British Nuclear Fuels Sellafield is part of a Pound 550M complex which provides facilities for the receipt, storage and mechanical preparation of both magnox and A.G.R. fuel. The plant is very large and complex with considerable use of computer based process control systems, providing for physical and nuclear safety. The preparation of such plant for ''active'' commissioning necessitates a great many physical checks and technical evaluations in support of its safety case. This paper describes arrangements for plant commissioning checks, against the regulatory framework and explains the physical preparations necessary for their timely accomplishment. (author)

  13. Analysis of the certification process of computer programs used in a nuclear power plant, using the management systems approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, L.G. Jr.

    1983-12-01

    This dissertation concerns the management of computer programs, the utilization of software in a nuclear power plant, and the methods the nuclear power industry uses in certifying this software is correct and therefore suitable for real time use in a nuclear power plant. The need is established for improved management skills and attitudes prevalent in the nuclear power industry. It is concluded that quality assurance as it exists today in the nuclear power industry is inadequate. It is further concluded that the basis exists to certify software, and that therefore a certification process, although currently non-existent, can and will exist in the near term future

  14. Knowledge acquisition for nuclear power plant unit diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaodong; Xi Shuren

    2003-01-01

    The process of acquiring knowledge and building a knowledge base is critical to realize fault diagnostic system at unit level in a nuclear power plant. It directly determines whether the diagnostic system can be applied eventually in a commercial plant. A means to acquire knowledge and its procedures was presented in this paper for fault diagnostic system in a nuclear power plant. The work can be carried out step by step and it is feasible in a commercial nuclear power plant. The knowledge base of the fault diagnostic system for a nuclear power plant can be built after the staff finish the tasks according to the framework presented in this paper

  15. Operational characteristics of nuclear power plants - modelling of operational safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studovic, M.

    1984-01-01

    By operational experience of nuclear power plants and realize dlevel of availability of plant, systems and componenst reliabiliuty, operational safety and public protection, as a source on nature of distrurbances in power plant systems and lessons drawn by the TMI-2, in th epaper are discussed: examination of design safety for ultimate ensuring of safe operational conditions of the nuclear power plant; significance of the adequate action for keeping proess parameters in prescribed limits and reactor cooling rquirements; developed systems for measurements detection and monitoring all critical parameters in the nuclear steam supply system; contents of theoretical investigation and mathematical modeling of the physical phenomena and process in nuclear power plant system and components as software, supporting for ensuring of operational safety and new access in staff education process; program and progress of the investigation of some physical phenomena and mathematical modeling of nuclear plant transients, prepared at faculty of mechanical Engineering in Belgrade. (author)

  16. Life Cycle Management Managing the Aging of Critical Nuclear Plant Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Theodore A.; Elder, G. Gary; Llovet, Ricardo

    2002-01-01

    Life Cycle Management is a structured process to manage equipment aging and long-term equipment reliability for nuclear plant Systems, Structures and Components (SSCs). The process enables the identification of effective repair, replace, inspect, test and maintenance activities and the optimal timing of the activities to maximize the economic value to the nuclear plant. This paper will provide an overview of the process and some of the tools that can be used to implement the process for the SSCs deemed critical to plant safety and performance objectives. As nuclear plants strive to reduce costs, extend life and maximize revenue, the LCM process and the supporting tools summarized in this paper can enable development of a long term, cost efficient plan to manage the aging of the plant SSCs. (authors)

  17. IAEA Expert Team Completes Mission to Review Japan's Nuclear Power Plant Safety Assessment Process, 31 January 2012, Tokyo, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: A team of international nuclear safety experts today completed a review of Japan's two-stage process for assessing nuclear safety at the nation's nuclear power plants. The team began its work on 23 January and delivered a Preliminary Summary Report to Japanese officials today and plans to finish the final report by the end of February. National safety assessments and their peer review by the IAEA are a key component of the IAEA's Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which was approved by the Agency's 152 Member States following last year's nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. At the request of the Government of Japan, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized a 10-person team to review the Japanese Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency's (NISA) approach to the Comprehensive Assessments for the Safety of Existing Power Reactor Facilities and how NISA examines the results submitted by nuclear operators. The IAEA safety review mission consisted of five IAEA and three international nuclear safety experts. To help its review, the team held meetings in Tokyo with officials from NISA, the Japanese Nuclear Energy Safety (JNES) Organization, and the Kansai Electric Power Company (KEPCO), and the team visited the Ohi Nuclear Power Station to see an example of how Japan's Comprehensive Safety Assessment is being implemented by nuclear operators. 'We concluded that NISA's instructions to power plants and its review process for the Comprehensive Safety Assessments are generally consistent with IAEA Safety Standards', said team leader James Lyons, director of the IAEA's Nuclear Installation Safety Division. In its Preliminary Summary Report delivered today, the team highlighted a number of good practices and identified some improvements that would enhance the overall effectiveness of the Comprehensive Safety Assessment process. Good practices identified by the mission team include: Based on NISA instructions and commitments of the

  18. Data retrieval techniques for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sozzi, G.L.; Dahl, C.C.; Gross, R.S.; Voeller, J.G. III

    1995-01-01

    Data retrieval, processing retrieved data, and maintaining the plant documentation system to reflect the as-built condition of the plant are challenging tasks for most existing nuclear facilities. The information management systems available when these facilities were designed and constructed are archaic by today's standards. Today's plant documentation systems generally include hard copy drawings and text, drawings in various CAD formats, handwritten information, and incompatible databases. These existing plant documentation systems perpetuate inefficiency for the plant technical staff in the performance of their daily activities. This paper discusses data retrieval techniques and tools available to nuclear facilities to minimize the impacts of the existing plant documentation system on plant technical staff productivity

  19. Management of design support for nuclear plant modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, F.W.

    1991-01-01

    The paper will present an overview of the Ontario Hydro organization and processes for providing design support to the operating nuclear power plants. Examples of design support for Pickering GS will be highlighted. The process is described from identification of projects through the design, procurement, construction, commissioning and in-service phases. The practices for managing engineering deliverables are discussed in the context of how these integrate into the overall change control process. The interaction of Engineering with Operations, Construction, Supply and the regulatory bodies is discussed both for major retro-fit programs and for ongoing design support to the nuclear power plants. Recent experiences during the 1990 Pickering Station Outage and during the Unit 3 fuel channel replacement program are highlighted and an integrated 5 year plan for upgrading the safety related systems for the Pickering Nuclear Power Plant is presented. (author)

  20. Computer-based control systems of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnikov, V.K.; Shugam, R.A.; Ol'shevsky, Yu.N.

    1975-01-01

    Computer-based control systems of nuclear power plants may be classified into those using computers for data acquisition only, those using computers for data acquisition and data processing, and those using computers for process control. In the present paper a brief review is given of the functions the systems above mentioned perform, their applications in different nuclear power plants, and some of their characteristics. The trend towards hierarchic systems using control computers with reserves already becomes clear when consideration is made of the control systems applied in the Canadian nuclear power plants that pertain to the first ones equipped with process computers. The control system being now under development for the large Soviet reactors of WWER type will also be based on the use of control computers. That part of the system concerned with controlling the reactor assembly is described in detail

  1. Organization and practices on regulatory review in the licensing process of nuclear power plants in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba, P.

    1979-01-01

    The actual organisation, practices and experience of the JEN Nuclear Safety Department on the regulatory review in the licensing process of nuclear power plants in Spain, are presented. Topics to be covered are: The structure, organisation, staff and principal functional areas of the NSD, the academic qualifications and work experience of the NSD personnel, recruiting and training, the conduct of the regulatory review during the licensing process and working procedures, the manpower and coverage of the different technical areas, the principal problems and conclusions. (author)

  2. Nuclear power. Volume 1. Nuclear power plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DESIGN is intended to be used as a working reference book for management, engineers and designers, and as a graduate-level text for engineering students. The book is designed to combine theory with practical nuclear power engineering and design experience, and to give the reader an up-to-date view of the status of nuclear power and a basic understanding of how nuclear power plants function. Volume 1 contains the following chapters; (1) nuclear reactor theory; (2) nuclear reactor design; (3) types of nuclear power plants; (4) licensing requirements; (5) shielding and personnel exposure; (6) containment and structural design; (7) main steam and turbine cycles; (8) plant electrical system; (9) plant instrumentation and control systems; (10) radioactive waste disposal (waste management) and (11) conclusion

  3. Methodology for modular nuclear plant design and construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapp, C.W.; Golay, M.

    1992-01-01

    During the past decade, the rising cost of nuclear power plant construction has caused the cancellation of many projects and has forced some utilities into bankruptcy. Many factors have contributed to capital cost increases, including regulatory changes, the absence of standard designs, and low worker productivity. Low worker productivity can be attributed to the conventional building process, which is not conductive to productive labor. This study presents innovative ways to reduce the capital cost of nuclear plants through more efficient construction processes designed to increase worker productivity. A major portion of the plant capital cost is the interest paid during construction on borrowed capital. Modular fabrication could potentially reduce interest payments by compressing the construction schedule of nuclear facilities. Additional cost savings expected from modular designs arise from improved quality, productivity, and schedule control in fabrication of plant elements within a factory environment

  4. NPAR [Nuclear Plant Aging Research] approach to managing aging in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, the Nuclear Plant Aging Research program (NPAR) has been devoted to developing technical understanding of the time dependent processes that, through deterioration of components, systems, or structures (C/S/S), can reduce safety margins in nuclear power plants. A major and necessary element of the program involves the application of this basic knowledge in defining functional approaches to managing aging by anticipating and mitigating important deterioration processes. Fundamental understanding and characterization of aging processes are being accomplished through NPAR-sponsored research projects, review and analysis of aging related information, integration of NPAR results with those from industry and other aging studies, and interfacing of all of these with the existing body of codes, standards and regulatory instruments that convey aging-related guidance to NPP licensees. Products of these efforts are applied to structuring and providing aging-related technical recommendations in forms that are useful in: (1) developing and implementing good aging management practices, (2) developing regulatory guidance and requirements for understanding and managing aging during normal plant operations and in support of license renewal, and (3) planning and implementing other regulatory actions and initiatives in which aging-related concerns have a bearing on scope or priority

  5. Modularization in construction processes New Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, I.; Cobos, A.; Herrera Ropero, D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is that it has the capacity and expertise to analyze the suitability of modular technology design and construction compared to conventional nuclear plants. It will define the criteria for selecting the areas of modularity and the impact on design and its interfaces with engineering, supply, including logistics and construction.

  6. Nuclear electric power plants. [Journal, in Russian]. Atomnye elektricheskie stantsii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voronin, L M [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Separate articles are concerned with experience gained in the planning, exploitation, and adjustment of nuclear power plants with channel reactors. An examination is made of measures to be taken for assuring equipment reliability for nuclear power plants during the planning stage. Also examined is the experience gained in the operation of the pilot plants of the Kursk and Chernobyl' nuclear power plants, and the Bilibin nuclear thermal electric power plant. Considerable attention is given to the reprocessing and disposal of radioactive waste, the quality control of metal ducts in nuclear power plants, and the development of methods and means of controlling technological processes and equipment. The journal is intended for engineering-technical personnel of power plants, power supply administrations, adjustment, repair, and planning organizations.

  7. Aspects of nuclear safety at power plants and fuel cycle plants in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, N.I.; Efimov, E.; Dubovskij, B.G.; Dikarev, V.; Lyubchenko, V.; Kruglov, A.K.

    1977-01-01

    The paper discusses the problems of organizing inspection monitoring of power plants including the development of some regulations and norms and the interaction between the USSR State Nuclear Safety Organization, scientific and designing organizations and power plants. The principles of computer use to work out advice for operational staff and warning signals and commands for the reactor control and protection system are discussed. Some attention is turned to the importance of using high-speed computers to calculate prompt reactivity values and to determine impurity concentrations in the coolant and margins to permissible operational limits. In particular, reactimeters are considered as signal generators in monitor and protection systems. Some problems of nuclear safety inspection, the issue and inculcation of some regulations and operational documents on nuclear safety, and instrumentation of plants reprocessing or processing fuel elements are presented. Methods of determining the critical parameters of technological units are described, together with the fundamental principles of fuel cycle plant nuclear safety, providing margin coefficients, accounting for deviations from the normal operational process and other problems, as well as methods of keeping the restrictions on nuclear safety requirements at fuel cycle plants. (author)

  8. Research of nuclear power plant in-service maintenance based on virtual reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yong; Kuang Weijun

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of constructing nuclear power plant in-service maintenance virtual simulation scene and virtual maintenance process. Taking air baffles dismantling process of CAP1400(China Advanced Passive 1400) nuclear power plant as an instance, this paper discusses ergonomics, space analysis, time assessment based on virtual reality in the process of in-service maintenance. It demonstrates the advantage of using VR technology to design and verify in-service maintenance process of nuclear power plant compared to the conventional way. (author)

  9. Modifications to nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    control and that the modified configuration conforms to the approved basis for granting a nuclear power plant operating licence. The main purpose of the recommendations concerning changes of management is to give general guidance on performing those changes in such a way that the safety of the plant is not compromised. This Safety Guide deals with the intended modification of structures, systems and components, operational limits and conditions, procedures and software, and the management systems and tools for the operation of a nuclear power plant. The recommendations made cover the whole modification process, from conception to completion. The justification for undertaking modifications is outside the scope of this Safety Guide. The modification and/or refurbishment of nuclear power plants for the purpose of extending the design lifetime could necessitate many major design modifications and special re-evaluation of plant safety (see Ref. [2]), and is therefore outside the scope of this publication. Section 2 gives guidance on general methods for modifications that could be implemented at nuclear power plants. Section 3 identifies the roles and responsibilities of various organizations involved in the modification process. Sections 4 and 5 give guidance on the different types of modification and their assessment in respect of safety aspects, and Section 4 provides guidelines on subsequent categorization. Section 6 deals with aspects of temporary modifications. Sections 7 and 8 give guidance on implementation of different types of modifications. Sections 9, 10 and 11 give basic recommendations on quality assurance, training and management of documentation. Comprehensive guidance on these matters can be found in the appropriate Safety Guides

  10. Modifications to nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    control and that the modified configuration conforms to the approved basis for granting a nuclear power plant operating licence. The main purpose of the recommendations concerning changes of management is to give general guidance on performing those changes in such a way that the safety of the plant is not compromised. This Safety Guide deals with the intended modification of structures, systems and components, operational limits and conditions, procedures and software, and the management systems and tools for the operation of a nuclear power plant. The recommendations made cover the whole modification process, from conception to completion. The justification for undertaking modifications is outside the scope of this Safety Guide. The modification and/or refurbishment of nuclear power plants for the purpose of extending the design lifetime could necessitate many major design modifications and special re-evaluation of plant safety, and is therefore outside the scope of this publication. Section 2 gives guidance on general methods for modifications that could be implemented at nuclear power plants. Section 3 identifies the roles and responsibilities of various organizations involved in the modification process. Sections 4 and 5 give guidance on the different types of modification and their assessment in respect of safety aspects, and Section 4 provides guidelines on subsequent categorization. Section 6 deals with aspects of temporary modifications. Sections 7 and 8 give guidance on implementation of different types of modifications. Sections 9, 10 and 11 give basic recommendations on quality assurance, training and management of documentation. Comprehensive guidance on these matters can be found in the appropriate Safety Guides

  11. Computerized control and management at the Temelin nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitosinka, J.; Korec, J.

    1992-01-01

    The proposed automation of the nuclear power plant control system includes a division of the control system into three hierarchic levels, supplemented with an additional level. These comprise the automated system of control of technological processes, the all-plant control of the power-generating process, the control of backup activities and of technical and economic activities, and top managerial control. The efficiency of the nuclear power plant operation, i.e. attainment of the maximum electricity output with minimum costs while securing the required safety, is the principal criterion in the design of the data model. Listed are tasks that would lend themselves to automation within the automated system of nuclear power plant control, and the basic scheme of their automation as follows from an analysis performed at the Temelin nuclear power plant. (Z.S). 2 figs., 2 refs

  12. Cooling tower make-up water processing for nuclear power plants: a comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andres, O; Flunkert, F; Hampel, G; Schiffers, A [Rheinisch-Westfaelisches Elektrizitaetswerk A.G., Essen (Germany, F.R.)

    1977-01-01

    In water-cooled nuclear power plants, 1 to 2% of the total investment costs go to cooling tower make-up water processing. The crude water taken from rivers or stationary waters for cooling must be sufficiently purified regarding its content of solids, carbonate hardness and corrosive components so as to guarantee an operation free of disturbances. At the same time, the processing methods must be selected for operational-economic reasons in such a manner that waste water and waste problems are kept small regarding environmental protection. The various parameters described have a decisive influence on the processing methods of the crude water, individual processes (filtration, sedimentation, decarbonization) are described, circuit possibilities for cooling water systems are compared and the various processes are analyzed and compared with regard to profitableness and environmental compatability.

  13. High temperature alloys for the primary circuit of a prototype nuclear process heat plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennis, P.J.; Schuster, H.

    1979-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive materials test programme for the High Temperature Reactor Project 'Prototype Plant for Nuclear Process Heat' (PNP), high temperature alloys are being investigated for primary circuit components operating at temperatures above 750 0 C. On the basis of important material parameters, in particular corrosion behaviour and mechanical properties in primary coolant helium, the potential of candidate alloys is discussed. By comparing specific PNP materials data with the requirements of PNP and those of conventional plant, the implications for the materials programme and component design are given. (orig.)

  14. A contractor's approach to engineering process plant for radioactive liquor processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braide, W.M.; Fletcher, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    Protection of personnel from damaging sources of radiation is the overriding consideration which influences the fundamental design of plant for processing active liquors in the Nuclear Industry. The conventional design procedures of the Chemical Plant Contractor have therefore to be modified to meet the specific technology and additional safety requirements. Ways in which the added factor of radiation influences the design philosophy for Nuclear Plant compared to conventional Chemical Plant are described. Design philosophy is demonstrated by design studies for active liquor storage and evaporation plant. (author)

  15. Corrosion surveillance of the chemical decontamination process in Kuosheng nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.H.

    2002-01-01

    The Piping Recirculation System (RRS) and reactor water clean-up system (RWCU) of Kuosheng Nuclear Power Plant of Taiwan Power Company were decontaminated by CORD process of Framatome ANP GmbH during the outage at October 2001. This is the first time that CORD process was adopted and applied in Taiwan Nuclear Power Plant. To verify minor corrosion damage and correct process control, the material corrosion condition was monitored during all the stages of the chemical decontamination work. Three kinds of specimen were adopted in this corrosion monitoring, including corrosion coupons for weight loss measurements, electrochemical specimens for on-line corrosion monitoring, and WOL specimens (wedge opening loaded) for stress corrosion evaluation. The measured metal losses from nine coupon materials did not reveal any unexpected or intolerable high corrosion damage from the CORD UV or CORD CS processes. The coupon materials included type 304 stainless steel (SS) with sensitized and as-received thermal history, type 308 weld filler, type CF8 cast SS, nickel base alloy 182 weld filler, Inconel 600, Stellite 6 hard facing alloy, NOREM low cobalt hard facing alloy, and A106B carbon steel (CS). The electrochemical noise (ECN) measurements from three-electrode electrochemical probe precisely depicted the metal corrosion variation with the decontamination process change. Most interestingly, the estimated trend of accumulated metal loss is perfectly corresponding to the total removed activities. The ECN measurements were also used for examining the effect of different SS oxide films pre-formed in NWC and HWC on the decontamination efficiency, and for evaluating the galvanic effect of CS with SS. The existing cracks did not propagate further during the decontamination. The average decontamination factors achieved were 50.8 and 4.2 respectively for RRS and RWCU. (authors)

  16. Introduction to Exxon nuclear fuel fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Exxon Nuclear low-enriched uranium fuel fabrication plant in Richland, Washington produces fuel assemblies for both pressurized water and boiling water reactors. The Richland plant was the first US bulk-handling facility selected by the IAEA for inspection under the US-IAEA Safeguards Agreement. The plant was under IAEA inspection from March 1981 through October 1983. This text provides a written description of the plant layout, operation and process. The text also includes a one ton-a-day model (or reference) plant which was adapted from the Exxon Nuclear plant. The Model Plant provides a generic example of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) bulk-handling facility. The Model Plant is used to illustrate in a more quantitative way some of the key safeguards requirements for a bulk-handling facility

  17. Nuclear plant simulation using the Nuclear Plant Analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beelman, R.J.; Laats, E.T.; Wagner, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA), a state-of-the-art computerized safety analysis and engineering tool, was employed to simulate nuclear plant response to an abnormal transient during a training exercise at the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) in Washington, DC. Information relative to plant status was taken from a computer animated color graphics display depicting the course of the transient and was transmitted to the NRC Operations Center in a manner identical to that employed during an actual event. Recommendations from the Operations Center were implemented during on-line, interactive execution of the RELAP5 reactor systems code through the NPA allowing a degree of flexibility in training exercises not realized previously. When the debriefing was conducted, the RELAP5 calculations were replayed by way of the color graphics display, adding a new dimension to the debriefing and greatly enhancing the critique of the exercise

  18. The licensing processes influence on nuclear market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locatelli, Giorgio; Mancini, Mauro; Sainati, Tristano; Sallinen, Liisa

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with the licensing nuclear power plants; it focuses primarily on the licensing process implications into the international nuclear market. Nowadays there are twenty-six countries that are planning to build new nuclear facilities, and thirty-seven where nuclear reactors are proposed; on the other hand, there are mainly ten international reactor vendors. At international level, there are few vendors that have sufficient resources, capabilities and experience to carry out the design and delivering of a nuclear power plant in the international market; On the other hand, the licensing processes are strictly dependent on national law frameworks, and on the nuclear policies. The paper proposes a comparison of six licensing processes (the ones established in Finland, France, Italy, South Korea, USA and UK), and analyzes its main features and implications; the IAEA licensing process is taken as reference point. The objective of the paper is to propose a systemic approach for considering the licensing procedures. The framework proposed enables facilitating the licensing management and inferring the main features of licensing contexts. The paper concludes with a forecast of the nuclear licensing context, especially with respect to the fourth generation of nuclear reactors. (author)

  19. Fiber optic applications in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collette, P.; Kwapien, D.

    1984-01-01

    Fiber optic technology possesses many desirable attributes for applications in commercial nuclear power plants. The non-electrical nature of fiber optics is an important factor in an industry governed by federal safety regulations such as Class 1E isolation and separation criteria. Immunity from Electromagnetic Interference (EMI), an increasing industry problem area, is another significant characteristic. Because of the extremely wide bandwidth offered, fiber optics better addresses the data acquistion and communication requirements of the complex processes of a nuclear power plant. Potential for fiber optic sensor applications exists within the nuclear industry because their small size and physical flexibility allows access into normally inaccessible areas. They possess high accuracy and allow environmentally sensitive electronics to be remotely located. The purpose of this paper is to explore current applications for fiber optic technology in modern nuclear plants, document examples of present day usage in C-E plants and suggest possible future application areas

  20. Nuclear power plant outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) controls nuclear power plant safety in Finland. In addition to controlling the design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants, STUK also controls refuelling and repair outages at the plants. According to section 9 of the Nuclear Energy Act (990/87), it shall be the licence-holder's obligation to ensure the safety of the use of nuclear energy. Requirements applicable to the licence-holder as regards the assurance of outage safety are presented in this guide. STUK's regulatory control activities pertaining to outages are also described

  1. Digital image processing for radiography in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidt, H.; Rose, P.; Raabe, P.; Daum, W.

    1985-01-01

    With the help of digital processing of radiographic images from reactor-components it is possible to increase the security and objectiveness of the evaluation. Several examples of image processing procedures (contrast enhancement, density profiles, shading correction, digital filtering, superposition of images etc.) show the advantages for the visualization and evaluation of radiographs. Digital image processing can reduce some of the restrictions of radiography in nuclear power plants. In addition a higher degree of automation can be cost-saving and increase the quality of radiographic evaluation. The aim of the work performed was to to improve the readability of radiographs for the human observer. The main problem is lack of contrast and the presence of disturbing structures like weld seams. Digital image processing of film radiographs starts with the digitization of the image. Conventional systems use TV-cameras or scanners and provide a dynamic range of 1.5. to 3 density units, which are digitized to 256 grey levels. For the enhancement process it is necessary that the grey level range covers the density range of the important regions of the presented film. On the other hand the grey level coverage should not be wider than necessary to minimize the width of digitization steps. Poor digitization makes flaws and cracks invisible and spoils all further image processing

  2. An approach to nuclear plant design and modification support for Russian-designed plants in Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioannidi, J.; Akins, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The Western nuclear countries have embarked on numerous programs to improve the safety of the Russian-designed nuclear power plants. In Russian-designed plants in Eastern Europe, plant management is being asked for the first time to decide which safety projects to implement and is finding itself lacking in nuclear safety analytical tools and practices, funds, and experience with project management and project engineering skills and tools. Some of the major areas where assistance is needed are: 1) Defining plant weaknesses toward nuclear safety. 2) Evaluating and grading the importance to safety of proposed modification. 3) Project Planning and Scheduling using computer based scheduling software. 4) Project Finance Development and Management using well defined cash flow management techniques. 5) Contract Management and Change Control. 6) Interface Management. Each of these areas requires a significant amount of discussion to understand the issues and problems associated with them. However, this paper is limited to the Project Management areas. This paper encourages the use of a design engineering firm experienced in safety practices and associated management and technical skills to serve as the Owner's Engineer/Project Management Consultant for the program period for a Russian-designed plants located outside Russia. This approach would allow for the availability and transfer of knowledge of safety practices to plant personnel and owners engineers at nuclear plants outside Russia, improving their nuclear safety culture. The plant personnel would control plant modernizations and upgrades based upon a proven and well-defined process for detailed project definition, configuration change control, and project management. This offers the opportunity to enhance the long-term safety culture by developing plant personnel knowledgeable of the safety practices, plant design basis, developing a modification control process enabling them to control the design basis through future

  3. Knowledge management for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschnick, F.; Engelhardt, S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes background, objectives and select conceptual components of knowledge management for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants. The concept focuses on the transfer of personal practice experience within and between nuclear power plants. The conceptual insights embrace aspects of knowledge content, structure, KM processes, organization, cooperation, culture, persuasion, leadership, technology, infrastructure, business impact and resilience. Key challenges are discussed, and related advice is provided for KM practitioners with similar endeavours in the field of nuclear power plant decommissioning. (author)

  4. A nuclear power plant system engineering workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, J.H.; Crosby, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    System engineers offer an approach for effective technical support for operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. System engineer groups are being set up by most utilities in the United States. Institute of Nuclear Power operations (INPO) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have endorsed the concept. The INPO Good Practice and a survey of system engineer programs in the southeastern United States provide descriptions of system engineering programs. The purpose of this paper is to describe a process for developing a design for a department-level information network of workstations for system engineering groups. The process includes the following: (1) application of a formal information engineering methodology, (2) analysis of system engineer functions and activities; (3) use of Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Plant Information Network (PIN) data; (4) application of the Information Engineering Workbench. The resulting design for this system engineer workstation can provide a reference for design of plant-specific systems

  5. Wireless Technology Application to Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Kweon; Jeong, See Chae; Jeong, Ki Hoon; Oh, Do Young; Kim, Jae Hack

    2009-01-01

    Wireless technologies are getting widely used in various industrial processes for equipment condition monitoring, process measurement and other applications. In case of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), it is required to review applicability of the wireless technologies for maintaining plant reliability, preventing equipment failure, and reducing operation and maintenance costs. Remote sensors, mobile technology and two-way radio communication may satisfy these needs. The application of the state of the art wireless technologies in NPPs has been restricted because of the vulnerability for the Electromagnetic Interference and Radio Frequency Interference (EMI/RFI) and cyber security. It is expected that the wireless technologies can be applied to the nuclear industry after resolving these issues which most of the developers and vendors are aware of. This paper presents an overview and information on general wireless deployment in nuclear facilities for future application. It also introduces typical wireless plant monitoring system application in the existing NPPs

  6. A contractors's approach to engineering process plant for radioactive liquor processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braide, W.M.; Fletcher, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    Protection of personnel from damaging sources of radiation is the overriding consideration which influences the fundamental design of plant for processing active liquors in the Nuclear Industry. The conventional design procedures of the Chemical Plant Contractor have therefore to be modified to meet the specific technology and additional safety requirements. This paper describes ways in which the added factor of radiation influences the design philosophy for Nuclear Plant compared to conventional Chemical Plant. The design philosophy is demonstrated by design studies for active liquor storage and evaporation plant. (author)

  7. Liquid radioactive waste processing improvement of PWR nuclear power plants; Melhorias no processamento de rejeitos liquidos radioativos de usinas nucleares PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nery, Renata Wolter dos Reis; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Monteiro, Jose Luiz Fontes [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: wolter@eletronuclear.gov.br; monteiro@peq.coppe.ufrj.br; aquilinosenra@lmp.ufrj.br

    2005-07-01

    The study evaluate an inorganic ion exchange to process the low level liquid radwaste of PWR nuclear plants, so that the level of the radioactivity in the effluents and the solid waste produced during the treatment of these liquid radwaste can be reduced. The work compares two types of ion exchange materials, a strong acid cation exchange resin, that is the material typically used to remove radionuclides from PWR nuclear plants wastes, and a mordenite zeolite. These exchange material were used to remove cesium from a synthetic effluent containing only this ion and another effluent containing cesium and cobalt. The breakthrough curves of the zeolite and resin using a fix bed reactor were compared. The results demonstrated that the zeolite is more efficient than the resin in removing cesium from a solution containing cesium and cobalt. The results also showed that a bed combining zeolite and resin can process more volume of an effluent containing cesium and cobalt than a bed resin alone. (author)

  8. Control system for technological processes in tritium processing plants with process analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retevoi, Carmen Maria; Stefan, Iuliana; Balteanu, Ovidiu; Stefan, Liviu; Bucur, Ciprian

    2005-01-01

    Integration of a large variety of installations and equipment into a unitary system for controlling the technological process in tritium processing nuclear facilities appears to be a rather complex approach particularly when experimental or new technologies are developed. Ensuring a high degree of versatility allowing easy modifications in configurations and process parameters is a major requirement imposed on experimental installations. The large amount of data which must be processed, stored and easily accessed for subsequent analyses imposes development of a large information network based on a highly integrated system containing the acquisition, control and technological process analysis data as well as data base system. On such a basis integrated systems of computation and control able to conduct the technological process could be developed as well protection systems for cases of failures or break down. The integrated system responds to the control and security requirements in case of emergency and of the technological processes specific to the industry that processes radioactive or toxic substances with severe consequences in case of technological failure as in the case of tritium processing nuclear plant. In order to lower the risk technological failure of these processes an integrated software, data base and process analysis system are developed, which, based on identification algorithm of the important parameters for protection and security systems, will display the process evolution trend. The system was checked on a existing plant that includes a removal tritium unit, finally used in a nuclear power plant, by simulating the failure events as well as the process. The system will also include a complete data base monitoring all the parameters and a process analysis software for the main modules of the tritium processing plant, namely, isotope separation, catalytic purification and cryogenic distillation

  9. Nuclear plant owners move closer to life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    A major debate is now underway about the safety of 40-year-old nuclear power plants. Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 a nuclear power plant's license is limited to a maximum of 40 years. Although the act permits the renewal of an operating license, it does not outline any standards or procedures for determining when or under what conditions a plant's operating license should be renewed. This paper reports that the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-sponsors of a program to demonstrate the license renewal process for two nuclear power plants - Yankee Atomic Electric's 175-MW Yankee PWR plant and Northern States Power's 536-MW Monticello BWR plant. The demonstration is known as the lead plant project. Yankee Atomic has already analyzed the plant's condition and evaluated aging using computer-based expert systems and the plant's operating experience. During these tests Yankee Atomic found embrittlement of the reactor vessel

  10. Geological and geotechnical investigations for nuclear power plants sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, P.R.R.

    1984-09-01

    This dissertation presents a general methodology for the tasks of geological and geotechnical investigations, to be performed in the proposed sites for construction of nuclear Power Plants. In this work, items dealing with the standards applied to licensing of Nuclear Power Plants, with the selection process of sites and identification of geological and geotechnical parameters needed for the regional and local characterization of the area being studied, were incorporated. This dissertation also provides an aid to the writing of Technical Reports, which are part of the documentation an owner of a Nuclear Power Plant needs to submit to the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, to fulfill the nuclear installation licensing requirements. Moreover, this work can contribute to the planning of field and laboratory studies, needed to determine the parameters of the area under investigation, for the siting of Nuclear Power Plants. (Author) [pt

  11. Fire protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Code on Design (Safety Series 50-C-D (Rev. 1)) within the NUSS (Nuclear Safety Standards) programme of the IAEA points out the necessity of measures for protecting plant items which are important to safety against fires of internal and external origin. Experience of the past two decades in the operation of nuclear power plants and modern analysis techniques confirm that fire may be a real threat to nuclear safety and should receive adequate attention from the beginning of the design process throughout the life of the plant. Within the framework of the NUSS programme, a Safety Guide on fire protection had therefore been developed to enlarge on the general requirements given in the Code. Since its first publication in 1979, there has been considerable development in protection technology and analysis methods and after the Chernobyl accident it was decided to revise the existing Guide. The present Safety Guide is intended to advise designers, safety assessors and regulators on the concept of fire protection in the design of nuclear power plants and on recommended ways of implementing the concept in some detail in practice. Figs, 1 tab

  12. Nuclear power plant alarm systems: Problems and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Despite the incorporation of advanced technology into nuclear power plant alarm systems, human factors problems remain. This paper identifies to be addressed in order to allow advanced technology to be used effectively in the design of nuclear power plant alarm systems. The operator's use and processing of alarm system information will be considered. Based upon a review of alarm system research, issues related to general system design, alarm processing, display and control are discussed. It is concluded that the design of effective alarm systems depends on an understanding of the information processing capabilities and limitations of the operator. 39 refs

  13. Nuclear power plant alarm systems: Problems and issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Despite the incorporation of advanced technology into nuclear power plant alarm systems, human factors problems remain. This paper identifies to be addressed in order to allow advanced technology to be used effectively in the design of nuclear power plant alarm systems. The operator's use and processing of alarm system information will be considered. Based upon a review of alarm system research, issues related to general system design, alarm processing, display and control are discussed. It is concluded that the design of effective alarm systems depends on an understanding of the information processing capabilities and limitations of the operator. 39 refs.

  14. Quality management for nuclear power plants in Germany. Track 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieter, Brosche; Ehrnsperger, K.

    2001-01-01

    An essential requirement for the safety of nuclear power plants is the quality assurance which for example is fixed also in the German safety criteria for nuclear power plants as the first principle of prime importance and also fixed in the technical rules for nuclear power plants. Quality assurance must be performed in all phases of the lifetime of a nuclear power plant and also all partners for example suppliers, operators, experts and authorities are involved in the quality assurance process. All activities in connection with quality assurance are summarized in an integrated quality assurance system or quality assurance management. (author)

  15. Revolution of Nuclear Power Plant Design Through Digital Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Shi, J.; Chen, W.

    2015-01-01

    In the digital times, digital technology has penetrated into every industry. As the highest safety requirement standard, nuclear power industry needs digital technology more to breed high quality and efficiency. Digital power plant is derived from digital design and the digitisation of power plant transfer is an inevitable trend. This paper introduces the technical solutions and features of digital nuclear power plant construction by Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research & Design Institute, points out the key points and technical difficulties that exist in the process of construction and can serve as references for further promoting construction of digital nuclear power plant. Digital technology is still flourishing. Although many problems will be encountered in construction, it is believed that digital technology will make nuclear power industry more safe, cost-effective and efficient. (author)

  16. Application of Advanced Technology to Improve Plant Performance in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in computer technologies, signal processing, analytical modeling, and the advent of wireless sensors have provided the nuclear industry with ample means to automate and optimize maintenance activities and improve safety, efficiency, and availability, while reducing costs and radiation exposure to maintenance personnel. This paper provides a review of these developments and presents examples of their use in the nuclear power industry and the financial and safety benefits that they have produced. As the current generation of nuclear power plants have passed their mid-life, increased monitoring of their health is critical to their safe operation. This is especially true now that license renewal of nuclear power plants has accelerated, allowing some plants to operate up to 60 years or more. Furthermore, many utilities are maximizing their power output through uprating projects and retrofits. This puts additional demand and more stress on the plant equipment such as the instrumentation and control (I and C) systems and the reactor internal components making them more vulnerable to the effects of aging, degradation, and failure. In the meantime, the nuclear power industry is working to reduce generation costs by adopting condition-based maintenance strategies and automation of testing activities. These developments have stimulated great interest in on-line monitoring (OLM) technologies and new diagnostic and prognostic methods to anticipate, identify, and resolve equipment and process problems and ensure plant safety, efficiency, and immunity to accidents. The foundation for much of the required technologies has already been established through 40 years of research and development (R and D) efforts performed by numerous organizations, scientists, and engineers around the world including the author. This paper provides examples of these technologies and demonstrates how the gap between some of the more important R and D efforts and end users have been filled

  17. Construction, Maintenance and Demolition of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smet, Camiel de [Hilti Corporation, P.O. Box 333, FL-9494 Schaan (Liechtenstein)

    2008-07-01

    Hilti is your reliable partner in nuclear power plant construction, maintenance and demolition worldwide. Professional advice and innovative solutions for virtually every phase of construction and supply technologically leading products and systems to increase your productivity and help to create and maintain safe and lasting plants is offered. The solutions for nuclear power plants construction, maintenance and demolition have been employed with great success in many different countries on a wide variety of projects due in no small way to their worldwide availability. An unbroken, international exchange of experience upholds a permanent innovation process. This assures our customers that they always receive products on the very latest technological standard. This paper is not intended to cover all topics related to nuclear power plants. The idea is more to give a kind of an overview. The paper covers briefly the following topics: safety (corrosion and fire), fastenings, measuring and finally decommissioning of nuclear power plants. (author)

  18. Construction, Maintenance and Demolition of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smet, Camiel de

    2008-01-01

    Hilti is your reliable partner in nuclear power plant construction, maintenance and demolition worldwide. Professional advice and innovative solutions for virtually every phase of construction and supply technologically leading products and systems to increase your productivity and help to create and maintain safe and lasting plants is offered. The solutions for nuclear power plants construction, maintenance and demolition have been employed with great success in many different countries on a wide variety of projects due in no small way to their worldwide availability. An unbroken, international exchange of experience upholds a permanent innovation process. This assures our customers that they always receive products on the very latest technological standard. This paper is not intended to cover all topics related to nuclear power plants. The idea is more to give a kind of an overview. The paper covers briefly the following topics: safety (corrosion and fire), fastenings, measuring and finally decommissioning of nuclear power plants. (author)

  19. Planting on the slope of Yangjiang nuclear power plant by spraying combined materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ning

    2010-01-01

    During the development and construction of nuclear power projects, in order to prevent ecological degradation and soil erosion of slope hazards, taking practical measures in the works or plant is particularly important. through the main high slope green field application of Yangjiang nuclear power plant, introducing mixed vegetation spraying techniques and characteristics of the construction process, for similar projects it is also a good guide. (author)

  20. Owners of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.S.

    1979-12-01

    The following list indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies as of December 1, 1979. The list includes all plants licensed to operate, under construction, docketed for NRC safety and envionmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review. It does not include those plants announced but not yet under review or those plants formally cancelled. In many cases, ownership may be in the process of changing as a result of antitrust license conditions and hearings, altered financial conditions, changed power needs, and other reasons. However, this list reflects only those ownership percentages of which the NRC has been formally notified

  1. Nuclear dual-purpose plants for industrial energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.H.

    1976-01-01

    One of the major obstacles to extensive application of nuclear power to industrial heat is the difference between the relatively small energy requirements of individual industrial plants and the large thermal capacity of current power reactors. A practical way of overcoming this obstacle would be to operate a centrally located dual-purpose power plant that would furnish process steam to a cluster of industrial plants, in addition to generating electrical power. The present study indicates that even relatively remote industrial plants could be served by the power plant, since it might be possible to convey steam economically as much as ten miles or more. A survey of five major industries indicates a major potential market for industrial steam from large nuclear power stations

  2. A view of treatment process of melted nuclear fuel on a severe accident plant using a molten salt system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, R.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Mizuguchi, K. [Power and Industrial Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, 4-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki 210-0862 (Japan); Oomori, T. [Chemical System Design and Engineering Department, Toshiba Corporation Power Systems Company, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    At severe accident such as Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident, the nuclear fuels in the reactor would melt and form debris which contains stable UO2-ZrO2 mixture corium and parts of vessel such as zircaloy and iron component. The requirements for solution of issues are below; -) the reasonable treatment process of the debris should be simple and in-situ in Fukushima Daiichi power plant, -) the desirable treatment process is to take out UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} or metallic U and TRU metal, and dispose other fission products as high level radioactive waste; and -) the candidate of treatment process should generate the smallest secondary waste. Pyro-process has advantages to treat the debris because of the high solubility of the debris and its total process feasibility. Toshiba proposes a new pyro-process in molten salts using electrolysing Zr before debris fuel being treated.

  3. Safety of nuclear power plants: Design. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The present publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design (Safety Series No. 50-C-D (Rev. 1), issued in 1988). It takes account of developments relating to the safety of nuclear power plants since the Code on Design was last revised. These developments include the issuing of the Safety Fundamentals publication, The Safety of Nuclear Installations, and the present revision of various safety standards and other publications relating to safety. Requirements for nuclear safety are intended to ensure adequate protection of site personnel, the public and the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation arising from nuclear power plants. It is recognized that technology and scientific knowledge advance, and nuclear safety and what is considered adequate protection are not static entities. Safety requirements change with these developments and this publication reflects the present consensus. This Safety Requirements publication takes account of the developments in safety requirements by, for example, including the consideration of severe accidents in the design process. Other topics that have been given more detailed attention include management of safety, design management, plant ageing and wearing out effects, computer based safety systems, external and internal hazards, human factors, feedback of operational experience, and safety assessment and verification. This publication establishes safety requirements that define the elements necessary to ensure nuclear safety. These requirements are applicable to safety functions and the associated structures, systems and components, as well as to procedures important to safety in nuclear power plants. It is expected that this publication will be used primarily for land based stationary nuclear power plants with water cooled reactors designed for electricity generation or for other heat production applications (such as district heating or desalination). It is recognized that in the case of

  4. Safety of nuclear power plants: Design. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The present publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design (Safety Series No. 50-C-D (Rev. 1), issued in 1988). It takes account of developments relating to the safety of nuclear power plants since the Code on Design was last revised. These developments include the issuing of the Safety Fundamentals publication, The Safety of Nuclear Installations, and the present revision of various safety standards and other publications relating to safety. Requirements for nuclear safety are intended to ensure adequate protection of site personnel, the public and the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation arising from nuclear power plants. It is recognized that technology and scientific knowledge advance, and nuclear safety and what is considered adequate protection are not static entities. Safety requirements change with these developments and this publication reflects the present consensus. This Safety Requirements publication takes account of the developments in safety requirements by, for example, including the consideration of severe accidents in the design process. Other topics that have been given more detailed attention include management of safety, design management, plant ageing and wearing out effects, computer based safety systems, external and internal hazards, human factors, feedback of operational experience, and safety assessment and verification. This publication establishes safety requirements that define the elements necessary to ensure nuclear safety. These requirements are applicable to safety functions and the associated structures, systems and components, as well as to procedures important to safety in nuclear power plants. It is expected that this publication will be used primarily for land based stationary nuclear power plants with water cooled reactors designed for electricity generation or for other heat production applications (such as district heating or desalination). It is recognized that in the case of

  5. Overview of plant life management for long term operation in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K.S.; Vincze, P.; Bychkov, A.

    2014-01-01

    Many IAEA member states have given high priority to licensing their nuclear power plants to operate for terms longer than the time frame originally anticipated (generally 40 years). The task of managing plant ageing is assigned in most member states to an engineering specialty called 'plant life management' (PLiM) applying a systematic analysis methodology to System Structure Components (SSCs) ageing. In many countries, the safety performance of nuclear power plants is periodically assessed and characterized via the periodic safety review (PSR) process. Regulatory review and acceptance of PSRs constitutes for these countries the licensing requirement for continued operation of the plant to the following PSR cycle (usually 10 years). In the USA and in other countries operating US designed plants, instead of PSR process, a license renewal application (LRA) process is followed, which requires certain prerequisites such as ageing management programs, particularly for passive irreplaceable SSCs. Active components are normally addressed via the maintenance rule (MR) requirements and other established regulatory processes. A third group of member states have adopted a combined approach that incorporates elements of both the PSR process and selected LRA specific requirements, such as time limited ageing analysis. The article ends with some IAEA recommendations for the implementation of national PLiM programs

  6. Process instrumentation for nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanai, Katsuya; Shinohara, Katsuhiko

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear power stations are the large scale compound system composed of many process systems. Accordingly, for the safe and high reliability operation of the plants, it is necessary to grasp the conditions of respective processes exactly and control the operation correctly. For this purpose, the process instrumentation undertakes the important function to monitor the plant operation. Hitachi Ltd. has exerted ceaseless efforts since long before to establish the basic technology for the process instrumentation in nuclear power stations, to develop and improve hardwares of high reliability, and to establish the quality control system. As for the features of the process instrumentation in nuclear power stations, the enormous quantity of measurement, the diversity of measured variables, the remote measurement and monitoring method, and the ensuring of high reliability are enumerated. Also the hardwares must withstand earthquakes, loss of coolant accidents, radiations, leaks and fires. Hitachi Unitrol Sigma Series is the measurement system which is suitable to the general process instrumentation in nuclear power stations, and satisfies sufficiently the basic requirements described above. It has various features as the nuclear energy system, such as high reliability by the use of ICs, the methods of calculation and transmission considering signal linkage, loop controller system and small size. HIACS-1000 Series is the analog controller of high reliability for water control. (Kako, I.)

  7. Technical specifications review of nuclear power plants: a risk-informed evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldanha, Pedro Luiz da Cruz; Sousa, Anna Leticia; Frutuoso e Melo, Paulo Fernando Ferreira; Duarte, Juliana Pacheco

    2012-01-01

    The use of risk information by a regulatory body as part of an integrated decision making process addresses the way in which risk information is being used as part of an integrated process in making decisions about safety issues at nuclear plants – commonly referred to as risk-informed decision making. The risk-informed approach aims to integrate in a systematic manner quantitative and qualitative, deterministic and probabilistic safety considerations to obtain a balanced decision. Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is a methodology that can be applied to provide a structured analysis process to evaluate the frequency and consequences of accidents scenarios in nuclear power plants. Technical Specifications (TS) are specifications regarding the characteristics of nuclear power plants (variables, systems or components) of overriding importance to nuclear safety and radiation protection, which is an integral part of plant operation authorization. Limiting Conditions of Operation (LCO) are the minimum levels of performance or capacity or operating system components required for the safe operation of nuclear plants, as defined in technical specifications. The Maintenance Rule (MR) is a requirement established by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to check the effectiveness of maintenance carried out in nuclear plants, and plant configuration control. The control of plant configuration is necessary to verify the impact of the maintenance of a safety device out of service on plant safety. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has assessed the role of probabilistic safety analysis in the regulation of nuclear power plants with the following objectives: a) to provide utilities with an approach for developing and implementing nuclear power station risk-managed technical specification programs; and b) to complement and supplement existing successful configuration risk management applications such as MR. This paper focuses on the evaluation of EPRI

  8. Surveillance robot for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.R.; Harvey, H.W.; Satterlee, P.E. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A demonstration project to determine the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of mobile surveillance robots in nuclear power plants is being conducted by the Remote Technology Corporation (REMOTEC) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Phase I of the project was completed in March 1984 and included a survey of currently used robotic equipment and the development of a robotics application methodology. Three Tennessee Valley Authority plants were analyzed to identify specific plant areas with a high potential for surveillance robotics. Based on these results, a number of robotic system applications were prepared and evaluated for cost-effectiveness. The system with the highest potential, a mobile surveillance robot, was selected for fabrication and in-plant demonstration testing in a phase II effort. The design, fabrication, and assembly of SURBOT has been completed and cold testing is in process. It will be installed at the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant early in 1986 for demonstration testing. Current projections are that SURBOT can be used in approx.40 rooms within the auxiliary building and will have annual savings of over 100 person-rem exposure, 1000 sets of C-zone clothing, and 1000 person-hours of labor

  9. Nuclear plants gain integrated information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villavicencio-Ramirez, A.; Rodriquez-Alvarez, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    With the objective of simplifying the complex mesh of computing devices employed within nuclear power plants, modern technology and integration techniques are being used to form centralized (but backed up) databases and distributed processing and display networks. Benefits are immediate as a result of the integration and the use of standards. The use of a unique data acquisition and database subsystem optimizes the high costs of engineering, as this task is done only once for the life span of the system. This also contributes towards a uniform user interface and allows for graceful expansion and maintenance. This article features an integrated information system, Sistema Integral de Informacion de Proceso (SIIP). The development of this system enabled the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant to fully use the already existing universe of signals and its related engineering during all plant conditions, namely, start up, normal operation, transient analysis, and emergency operation. Integrated systems offer many advantages over segregated systems, and this experience should benefit similar development efforts in other electric power utilities, not only for nuclear but also for other types of generating plants

  10. Development of a dynamical systems model of plant programmatic performance on nuclear power plant safety risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Stephen M.; Albano, Alfonso M.; Gaertner, John P.

    2005-01-01

    Application of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques to model nuclear power plant accident sequences has provided a significant contribution to understanding the potential initiating events, equipment failures and operator errors that can lead to core damage accidents. Application of the lessons learned from these analyses has resulted in significant improvements in plant operation and safety. However, this approach has not been nearly as successful in addressing the impact of plant processes and management effectiveness on the risks of plant operation. The research described in this paper presents an alternative approach to addressing this issue. In this paper we propose a dynamical systems model that describes the interaction of important plant processes on nuclear safety risk. We discuss development of the mathematical model including the identification and interpretation of significant inter-process interactions. Next, we review the techniques applicable to analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems that are utilized in the characterization of the model. This is followed by a preliminary analysis of the model that demonstrates that its dynamical evolution displays features that have been observed at commercially operating plants. From this analysis, several significant insights are presented with respect to the effective control of nuclear safety risk. As an important example, analysis of the model dynamics indicates that significant benefits in effectively managing risk are obtained by integrating the plant operation and work management processes such that decisions are made utilizing a multidisciplinary and collaborative approach. We note that although the model was developed specifically to be applicable to nuclear power plants, many of the insights and conclusions obtained are likely applicable to other process industries

  11. Images of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiguchi, Katsuhisa; Misumi, Jyuji; Yamada, Akira; Sakurai, Yukihiro; Seki, Fumiyasu; Shinohara, Hirofumi; Misumi, Emiko; Kinjou, Akira; Kubo, Tomonori.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to check and see, using Hayashi's quantification method III, whether or not the respondents differed in their images of a nuclear power plant, depending on their demographic variables particularly occupations. In our simple tabulation, we compared subject groups of nuclear power plant employees with general citizens, nurses and students in terms of their images of a nuclear power plant. The results were that while the nuclear power plant employees were high in their evaluations of facts about a nuclear power plant and in their positive images of a nuclear power plant, general citizens, nurses and students were overwhelmingly high in their negative images of a nuclear power plant. In our analysis on category score by means of the quantification method III, the first correlation axis was the dimension of 'safety'-'danger' and the second correlation axis was the dimension of 'subjectivity'-'objectivity', and that the first quadrant was the area of 'safety-subjectivity', the second quadrant was the area of 'danger-subjectivity', the third quadrant as the area of 'danger-objectivity', and the forth quadrant was the area of 'safety-objectivity'. In our analysis of sample score, 16 occupation groups was compared. As a result, it was found that the 16 occupation groups' images of a nuclear power plant were, in the order of favorableness, (1) section chiefs in charge, maintenance subsection chiefs, maintenance foremen, (2) field leaders from subcontractors, (3) maintenance section members, operation section members, (4) employees of those subcontractors, (5) general citizens, nurses and students. On the 'safety-danger' dimension, nuclear power plant workers on the one hand and general citizens, nurses and students on the other were clearly divided in terms of their images of a nuclear power plant. Nuclear power plant workers were concentrated in the area of 'safety' and general citizens, nurses and students in the area of 'danger'. (J.P.N.)

  12. On-line testing of calibration of process instrumentation channels in nuclear power plants. Phase 2, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.

    1995-11-01

    The nuclear industry is interested in automating the calibration of process instrumentation channels; this report provides key results of one of the sponsored projects to determine the validity of automated calibrations. Conclusion is that the normal outputs of instrument channels in nuclear plants can be monitored over a fuel cycle while the plant is operating to determine calibration drift in the field sensors and associated signal conversion and signal conditioning equipment. The procedure for on-line calibration tests involving calculating the deviation of each instrument channel from the best estimate of the process parameter that the instrument is measuring. Methods were evaluated for determining the best estimate. Deviation of each signal from the best estimate is updated frequently while the plant is operating and plotted vs time for entire fuel cycle, thereby providing time history plots that can reveal channel drift and other anomalies. Any instrument channel that exceeds allowable drift or channel accuracy band is then scheduled for calibration during a refueling outage or sooner. This provides calibration test results at the process operating point, one of the most critical points of the channel operation. This should suffice for most narrow-range instruments, although the calibration of some instruments can be verified at other points throughout their range. It should be pointed out that the calibration of some process signals such as the high pressure coolant injection flow in BWRs, which are normally off- scale during plant operation, can not be tested on-line

  13. Aspects related to the decommissioning of the nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goicea, Andrei; Andrei, Veronica

    2003-01-01

    All power plants, either coal, gas or nuclear, at the end of their life needs to be decommissioned and demolished and thus, to made the site available for other uses. The first generation nuclear power plants were designed for a life of about 30 years and some of them proved capable of continuing well beyond this term. Newer plants have been designed for a 40 to 60 years operating life. To date, other 90 commercial power reactors have been retired from operation. For nuclear power plants and nuclear facilities in general the decommissioning process consists of some or all of the following activities: the safe management of nuclear materials held in the facility, cleaning-up of radioactivity (decontamination), plant dismantling, progressive demolition of the plant and site remediation. Following the decommissioning, the regulatory controls covering facility end, partially or totally, and the safe site is released for appropriate alternative use. Cernavoda NPP is a young plant and it can benefit from the continuously developing experience of the decommissioning process at the international level. The current experience allows the most metallic parts of a nuclear power to be decontaminated and recycled and makes available proven techniques and equipment to dismantle nuclear facilities safely. As experience is gained, decommissioning costs for nuclear power plants, including disposal of associated wastes, are reducing and thus, contribute in a smaller fraction to the total cost of electricity generation. The new specific Romanian regulations establish a funding system for decommissioning and provisions for long-term radioactive waste management. In the near future a decommissioning plan will be made available for Cernavoda NPP. Since the plant has only 7 years operation, that plan can be improved in order to benefit from international experience that is growing. (authors)

  14. Startup of Pumping Units in Process Water Supplies with Cooling Towers at Thermal and Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, V. V., E-mail: vberlin@rinet.ru; Murav’ev, O. A., E-mail: muraviov1954@mail.ru; Golubev, A. V., E-mail: electronik@inbox.ru [National Research University “Moscow State University of Civil Engineering,” (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Aspects of the startup of pumping units in the cooling and process water supply systems for thermal and nuclear power plants with cooling towers, the startup stages, and the limits imposed on the extreme parameters during transients are discussed.

  15. Digital I and C for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemst, P. van

    1993-01-01

    A summary is given of the past experience (process I and C, digital controllers, Power Range Monitoring system) and future plans (integrated plant I and C, control room) of ABB Atom for programmable I and C at nuclear power plants. ABB Atom has designed and supplied an appreciable quantity of software based equipment for nuclear power plants. These have been supplied for both new plants as well as for backfitting. The well proven ABB Master system has been used for the supply of I and C equipment for these projects and will continue to be used in the future. (Z.S.) 1 fig

  16. Fuel cycle of nuclear power plants and safeguards system of nuclear weapon nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, Z.

    1980-10-01

    The international safeguard system of nuclear weapon nonproliferation and the IAEA safeguard system are briefly described. In Czechoslovakia, a decree was issued in 1977 governing the accounting for and control of nuclear materials. The contents of the decree are presented. Described are computer processing of accounting data, technical criteria for the safeguard system application, containment and inspection in the IAEA safeguard system. The method is shown of the control of and accounting for nuclear materials in nuclear power plants and in fuel manufacturing, reprocessing and enrichment plants. Nondestructive and destructive methods of nuclear materials analysis are discussed. Nondestructive methods used include gamma spectrometry, neutron techniques, X-ray fluores--cence techniques. (J.P.)

  17. Study on 'Safety qualification of process computers used in safety systems of nuclear power plants'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsche, K.; Hoermann, E.

    1991-01-01

    The study aims at developing safety standards for hardware and software of computer systems which are increasingly used also for important safety systems in nuclear power plants. The survey of the present state-of-the-art of safety requirements and specifications for safety-relevant systems and, additionally, for process computer systems has been compiled from national and foreign rules. In the Federal Republic of Germany the KTA safety guides and the BMI/BMU safety criteria have to be observed. For the design of future computer-aided systems in nuclear power plants it will be necessary to apply the guidelines in [DIN-880] and [DKE-714] together with [DIN-192]. With the aid of a risk graph the various functions of a system, or of a subsystem, can be evaluated with regard to their significance for safety engineering. (orig./HP) [de

  18. An intelligent tool for the training of nuclear plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, B.

    1990-01-01

    A new type of pedagogical tool has been developped for the training of nuclear power plant operation. This tool combines simulation and expert system. The first process developped is about Steam Generator Tube Rupture (S.G.T.R.). All nuclear power plants will be equiped with this system in 1989 and 1990. After this first experiment, others processes will be developped for this tool

  19. Decommissioning process of nuclear power plants and legislative base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachovsky, J.

    2003-01-01

    The present paper contains some considerations about applicability and completeness of existing Regulation No. 10 in the field of decommissioning of nuclear power plants. No pretence exists for comprehensiveness, representativeness, or even applicability of these considerations. This paper presents personal views of the author and not official position of Risk Engineering Ltd

  20. 3D visualization based customer experiences of nuclear plant control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Tienlung; Chou Chinmei; Hung Tamin; Cheng Tsungchieh; Yang Chihwei; Yang Lichen

    2011-01-01

    This paper employs virtual reality (VR) technology to develop an interactive virtual nuclear plant control room in which the general public could easily walk into the 'red zone' and play with the control buttons. The VR-based approach allows deeper and richer customer experiences that the real nuclear plant control room could not offer. When people know more about the serious process control procedures enforced in the nuclear plant control room, they will appropriate more about the safety efforts imposed by the nuclear plant and become more comfortable about the nuclear plant. The virtual nuclear plant control room is built using a 3D game development tool called Unity3D. The 3D scene is connected to a nuclear plant simulation system through Windows API programs. To evaluate the usability of the virtual control room, an experiment will be conducted to see how much 'immersion' the users could feel when they played with the virtual control room. (author)

  1. FEATURES OF ELECTRIC MOTOR CHOICE FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT TECHNOLOGICAL OBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Shevchenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear power plants remain the basic power generating enterprises for Ukraine. Execution of works on their reliability control and operating conditions optimization is therefore of current importance. Trouble-free nuclear power plant operation is a vital technical, economical, and ecological problem, a solution to which is largely specified by reliable operation of electric equipment, namely, electric motors of nuclear power plant technological process drives.

  2. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This 2003 version of Elecnuc contents information, data and charts on the nuclear power plants in the world and general information on the national perspectives concerning the electric power industry. The following topics are presented: 2002 highlights; characteristics of main reactor types and on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; the worldwide status of nuclear power plants on 2002/12/3; units distributed by countries; nuclear power plants connected to the Grid by reactor type groups; nuclear power plants under construction; capacity of the nuclear power plants on the grid; first electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit; electrical generation from nuclear plants by country at the end 2002; performance indicator of french PWR units; trends of the generation indicator worldwide from 1960 to 2002; 2002 cumulative Load Factor by owners; nuclear power plants connected to the grid by countries; status of license renewal applications in Usa; nuclear power plants under construction; Shutdown nuclear power plants; exported nuclear power plants by type; exported nuclear power plants by countries; nuclear power plants under construction or order; steam generator replacements; recycling of Plutonium in LWR; projects of MOX fuel use in reactors; electricity needs of Germany, Belgium, Spain, Finland, United Kingdom; electricity indicators of the five countries. (A.L.B.)

  3. Distributing radiation management system of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihoya, Eiichi; Akashi, Michio

    1999-01-01

    The importance of radiation management for nuclear facilities including nuclear power plants has increased as the general public understanding has progressed, and necessary information for management must be processed exactly and quickly. In nuclear power plants, radiation management is performed by each individual operation, and collected information is managed by the system of each operation. The distributing radiation management system has been developed aiming to use a general-purpose LAN and make quick and efficient use of information managed by individual operations. This paper describes the system configuration and functions. (author)

  4. Organizational processes and nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landy, F.J.; Jacobs, R.R.; Mathieu, J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the effects organizational factors have on the risk associated with the operation of nuclear power plants. The described research project addresses three methods for identifying the organizational factors that impact safety. The first method consists of an elaborate theory-based protocol dealing with decision making procedures, interdepartmental coordination of activities, and communications. The second, known as goals/means/measures protocol, deals with identifying safey related goals. The third method is known as behaviorally anchored rating scale development. The paper discusses the importance of the convergence of these three methods to identify organizational factors essential to reactor safety

  5. Economical aspects of a nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meldonian, N.L.; Santos, E.M. dos

    1992-01-01

    This work describes different aspects and parameters that should be regarded as guidelines for economic evaluation of small and medium power plant projects. The main objective of an economic evaluation is to establish the plant's unitary cost and its economic figure of merit. To achieve that, a number of studies must be undertaken to compare the global competitiveness of a nuclear power plant with other energetic alternatives. These studies involve macro economy, energy generation, electricity transmission and global feasibility of the enterprise. It is concluded that the economic evaluation of a nuclear power plant should be considered as the culmination of a long process of planning at a national level. The main reasons are the investments involved, the technological developments required and political implications of the utilization of nuclear power energy. (author)

  6. Tecnatom support to new nuclear power plant projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, A. B.

    2009-10-01

    Tecnatom is a Spanish engineering company with more than 50 years of experience working for the nuclear industry all over the world. It has worked in over 30 countries in activities related to the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. Along this half century of history. Tecnatom has been providing its services to nuclear utilities, regulators, NPP vendors, NPP owners / operators and nuclear fuel manufacturers not only in Spain but also abroad. It started to work in the design of new nuclear power plants in the early 90 s and since then has continued collaborating with different suppliers in the design and licensing of new reactors especially in the areas of plant systems design, man-machine interface design, main control room simulators building, training, qualification of equipment and PSI/ISI engineering services. Some challenges to the reactivation of nuclear power plants construction are common worldwide, including: regulatory processes, workforce availability, construction project management, etc. Being some keys to success the following: apply qualified resources, enough resources for early planning, project leadership, organization and integration, establish a strong integrated management team. The goal of this paper is to inform regarding the capabilities of Tecnatom in the construction of new power plants. (Author)

  7. Development of the nuclear plant analyzer for Korean standard Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Shin Hwan; Kim, Hyeong Heon; Song, In Ho; Hong, Eon Yeong; Oh, Yeong Taek [Korea Power Engineering Company Inc., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop an NPA for the Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 and 4, the first KSNP type plant. In this study, the process model simulating the overall plant systems, GUI and simulation executive which provide the functions of an engineering simulator were developed, and the NPA was completed by integrating them. The contents and the scope of this study are as follows : main feedwater system, auxiliary feedwater system, Chemical and Volume Control System(CVCS), Safety Injection System(SIS), Shutdown Cooling System(SCS), electric power supply system, Core Protection Calculator(CPC), various plant control system, development of the graphics screens for each system, real-time simulation, simulation control for the enhancement of functional capabilities, user friendly GUI, collection of the design and operating data, establishment of the NPA database, integration of the GUI and simulation control program with process model, collection of the data for the verification and validation of the developed NPA, collection of the plant test data, collection and review of the results of other computer codes, verification of the simulation accuracy by comparing the NPA results with the actual plant data, validation of the simulation capability of the NPA, comparison against available data from other analysis suing different computer codes.

  8. Application of Entry-Time Processes to Asset Management in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Paul; Wang, Shuwen; Kee, Ernie J.

    2006-01-01

    The entry-time approach to dynamic reliability is based upon computational solution of the Chapman-Kolmogorov (generalized state-transition) equations underlying a certain class of marked point processes. Previous work has verified a particular finite-difference approach to computational solution of these equations. The objective of this work is to illustrate the potential application of the entry-time approach to risk-informed asset management (RIAM) decisions regarding maintenance or replacement of major systems within a plant. Results are presented in the form of plots, with replacement/maintenance period as a parameter, of expected annual revenue, along with annual variance and annual skewness as indicators of associated risks. Present results are for a hypothetical system, to illustrate the capability of the approach, but some considerations related to potential application of this approach to nuclear power plants are discussed. (authors)

  9. Water chemistry control in thermal and nuclear power plants. 9. Nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The chemical management of fuels in nuclear power plants aims at maintenance of the soundness of nuclear fuels and at reduction of the radiation exposure of the working employees. With regard to the former, particular attention should be paid to the fabrication process of fuel assembly, mainly for chemical management for fuel cladding tubes together with fuel pellet-clad chemical interactions, and to the outer tubes in the power plants. With regard to the latter, the fabrication process should be carefully controlled to prevent radioactive impurity increase in primary cooling water systems by maintaining cleaning level and decreasing surface contamination. Reactions of zircalloy with water or hydrogen forming ZrH 2 , sintered density of UO 2 pellet controlling water content, pellet-clad interactions, stress corrosion cracking, crud induced fuel failure, behaviors of such fission products as I, Xe, Kr, and Cs in plants are also important to water and chemical management of nuclear fuels. (S. Ohno)

  10. EPRI activities in support of new nuclear plant deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulford, T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the challenges to new plant deployment in the United States and discusses the role of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in efforts to address these challenges. These technical challenges include completing remaining design work, licensing review, and standardization required to ensure that new LWRs are a competitive near-term option. The costs for construction, licensing, and operation of new nuclear plants are uncertain and this uncertainty, along with concerns about construction schedule form a financial challenge to investment. Because the new process for licensing nuclear power plants in the United States has not been fully demonstrated, regulatory concerns also serve as a challenge to near-term commitments to build new nuclear power plants. EPRI is working in concert with utilities and vendors to upgrade certified LWR designs and obtain certification of new LWR designs. Specific technical areas being addressed by EPRI projects include updating the Utility Requirements Document (URD), seismic resolution, radiation protection, radioactive waste management, the development of utility planning tools, and staff optimization. EPRI's key on-going project, the New Plant Deployment Program Model (NPDPM), is designed to help prospective and actual new nuclear plant managers and staff to identify schedule and resource requirements from the point of the decision to build a plant through to the start of commercial operation. This model will describe and organize key activities and assess schedule, activity duration, logic relationships and critical path analysis. The new plant licensing and deployment process is a five to ten year activity representing a significant financial investment that requires coordination with federal and state regulators, designers, architect engineers, and numerous other contributing organizations. Planning is crucial to schedule and budget control. EPRI has also supported projects to quantify the environmental

  11. Japan's policy on the nuclear power plant life management, life management for nuclear power plants and measures to cope with aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takuma, Masao

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Plant is born after a lengthy, multi-year construction period, and ends its life decades later, having generated a vast amount of electricity. Its period of operation is, far longer than its period of construction. 'Construction' is the process of 'creating something of value', a new nuclear plant, using technology. 'Operation' is the process of 'raising the child with care' so that its potential can be realized to the fullest over the course of its life. From the view point of plant life management, it is appropriate to divide the life of a power plant into three stages, 'fostering, mature and aging', from the start of operation to the end of its operation. It is important to manage a plant accordingly. It is recently become important to the Utility companies under the competitive power market to manage aging plants effectively, in order to extend its life with sustained high level of performances, with plant safety in the first place. Whether this is, in fact, possible or not, depends upon how the plant was operated in the prior stages, that means, depends upon how it was 'brought up'. This report briefly shows what are important points of management in these 3 stages, and also describes general significances of plant maintenance and inspection, with the practices applied to the plants in Japan. Currently 52 plants Light Water Reactor Nuclear Plants are in operation in Japan, and 13 plants within next 5 years and 23 plants within 10 years are regarded as aged plants. So the contents of periodic inspections by the government and maintenance requirements on the Utilities will be modified to keep and enhance safe and stable operations of the aged plants. In the year 1994, Japanese Government released the report 'Basic Concepts on the Nuclear Power Plant Aging', the objectives of which was the evaluation of the soundness of major equipment and to establish the concepts of aging measures, assuming the plant to be operated 60 years. Utilities, in

  12. Development of a decommissioning plan for nuclear power plant 'Krsko'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tankosic, Djurica; Fink, Kresimir

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant 'Krsko' (NEK), is the only nuclear power plant in Yugoslavia, is a two-loop, Westinghouse-design, pressurized water reactor rated at 632 MWe. When NEK applied for an operating license in 1981, it did not have to explain how the plant would be decommissioned and decommissioning provisions were not part of the licensing process. Faced with mounting opposition to nuclear power and a real threat that the plant would be shut down, the plant management developed a Mission Plan for resolving the decommissioning problem. The Mission Plan calls for a preliminary decommissioning plan to be prepared and submitted to the local regulatory body before the end of 1992

  13. Nuclear energy and process heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozier, K.S

    1999-10-01

    Nuclear energy generated in fission reactors is a versatile commodity that can, in principle, satisfy any and all of mankind's energy needs through direct or indirect means. In addition to its dominant current use for electricity generation and, to a lesser degree, marine propulsion, nuclear energy can and has been used for process heat applications, such as space heating, industrial process heating and seawater desalination. Moreover, a wide variety of reactor designs has been employed to this end in a range of countries. From this spectrum of experience, two design approaches emerge for nuclear process heating (NPH): extracting a portion of the thermal energy from a nuclear power plant (NPP) (i.e., creating a combined heat and power, or CHP, plant) and transporting it to the user, or deploying dedicated nuclear heating plants (NHPs) in generally closer proximity to the thermal load. While the former approach is the basis for much of the current NPH experience, considerable recent interest exists for the latter, typically involving small, innovative reactor plants with enhanced and passive safety features. The high emphasis on inherent nuclear safety characteristics in these reactor designs reflects the need to avoid any requirement for evacuation of the public in the event of an accident, and the desire for sustained operation and investment protection at minimum cost. Since roughly 67% of mankind's primary energy usage is not in the form of electricity, a vast potential market for NPH systems exists, particularly at the low-to-moderate end-use temperatures required for residential space heating and several industrial applications. Although only About 0.5% of global nuclear energy production is presently used for NPH applications, an expanded role in the 21st century seems inevitable, in part, as a measure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality. While the technical aspects of many NPH applications are considered to be well proven, a

  14. Nuclear energy and process heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozier, K.S.

    1999-10-01

    Nuclear energy generated in fission reactors is a versatile commodity that can, in principle, satisfy any and all of mankind's energy needs through direct or indirect means. In addition to its dominant current use for electricity generation and, to a lesser degree, marine propulsion, nuclear energy can and has been used for process heat applications, such as space heating, industrial process heating and seawater desalination. Moreover, a wide variety of reactor designs has been employed to this end in a range of countries. From this spectrum of experience, two design approaches emerge for nuclear process heating (NPH): extracting a portion of the thermal energy from a nuclear power plant (NPP) (i.e., creating a combined heat and power, or CHP, plant) and transporting it to the user, or deploying dedicated nuclear heating plants (NHPs) in generally closer proximity to the thermal load. While the former approach is the basis for much of the current NPH experience, considerable recent interest exists for the latter, typically involving small, innovative reactor plants with enhanced and passive safety features. The high emphasis on inherent nuclear safety characteristics in these reactor designs reflects the need to avoid any requirement for evacuation of the public in the event of an accident, and the desire for sustained operation and investment protection at minimum cost. Since roughly 67% of mankind's primary energy usage is not in the form of electricity, a vast potential market for NPH systems exists, particularly at the low-to-moderate end-use temperatures required for residential space heating and several industrial applications. Although only About 0.5% of global nuclear energy production is presently used for NPH applications, an expanded role in the 21st century seems inevitable, in part, as a measure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality. While the technical aspects of many NPH applications are considered to be well proven, a determined

  15. 76 FR 1469 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2 Environmental Assessment... Plant, LLC, the licensee, for operation of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2... Impact Statement for License Renewal of Nuclear Plants, Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (NUREG-1437...

  16. Future of robots in nuclear plants and processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, J.J.; Byrd, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    The role of robotics at the Savannah River Plant and Laboratory is reviewed. The site's remote process areas are described briefly, and existing remote handling equipment and robots are discussed. Three technology areas under development and relating to process automation are reviewed. These are: inspection systems to detect and evaluate process problems or to determine equipment integrity, process monitoring systems to analyze plant operations and to supply information in the event of an unusual occurrence, and remote manipulator systems and controls to handle instruments and tools. A technique is presented for employing future intelligent robots through process networks. These networks will represent the integration of robotic technology with dedicated process knowledge bases

  17. DSNP: a new approach to simulate nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saphier, D.

    1977-01-01

    The DSNP (Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power-plants) is a special purpose block oriented simulation language. It provides for simulations of a large variety of nuclear power plants or various parts of the power plant in a simple straightforward manner. The system is composed of five basic elements, namely, the DSNP language, the precompiler-or the DSNP language translator, the components library, the document generator, and the system data files. The DSNP library of modules includes the selfcontained models of components or physical processes found in a nuclear power plant, and various auxiliary modules such as material properties, control modules, integration schemes, various basic transfer functions etc. In its final form DSNP will have four libraries

  18. Pre design processing of waste of ex-resin without materials matrix from nuclear power plant type PWR 1000 MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerdas Tarigan

    2010-01-01

    Have been done pre design processing of waste ex-resin without capacities matrix materials from nuclear power plant type PWR 1000 MW During the time radioactive waste of ex-resin processed to use process of immobilization use matrix materials like mixture cement and epoxy resin and then conditioning. This process is not effective and efficient because end result volume of end product bigger than volume early operation system and maintenance of its installation more difficult. To overcome this created a design of technology processing of waste of ex- resin without matrix materials through process of strainer, drying and conditioning represent technological innovation newly processing of radioactive waste of ex-resin. Besides this process more effective and efficient, volume of end product waste much more small from volume early and operation system and maintenance of its easier installation. Pre design is expected to be used as a basis to make conceptual of pre design installation of strainer, drying and conditioning for the processing of waste of ex-resin from nuclear power plant type PWR 1000 MW. (author)

  19. Nuclear regulation. License renewal questions for nuclear plants need to be resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fultz, Keith O.; Kruslicky, Mary Ann; McDowell, William D. Jr.; Coleman, Robert L.

    1989-04-01

    A December 1986 pipe rupture at Virginia Power's Surry unit 2 nuclear power plant injured eight workers; four later died. As a result of this accident, Representative Edward J. Markey requested GAO to examine the Surry accident and assess the problems confronting aging nuclear plants. In March 1988 we reported our findings concerning the accident and a July 1987 incident at the Trojan nuclear plant in Oregon. This report addresses problems confronting aging nuclear plants by examining the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) program to develop a license renewal policy and accompanying regulations, and the initiatives underway by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the electric utility industry to extend the operating lives of these plants. Nuclear power has become second only to coal as the largest producer of electricity in the United States. The 110 nuclear plants currently in service are operated by 54 utilities, provide about 20 percent of the nation's electricity, and represent a capital investment of over $200 billion. The Atomic Energy Act authorizes NRC to issue nuclear plant operating licenses for up to 40 years and provides for license extensions beyond the initial operating period. The act does not, however, stipulate the criteria for evaluating a utility request to operate a nuclear plant longer than 40 years. The oldest operating license currently in effect will expire in the year 2000. According to NRC, about one-half of the existing operating licenses will terminate by the year 2015, and most licenses will expire by about 2030. Many utilities will have to decide in the early 1990s whether to continue operating older nuclear plants or to construct new generating capacity. A clear understanding of the terms and conditions governing the license renewal process will be a key element in deciding how to meet future electricity demand. Although NRC has developed 3 possible license renewal policy options and identified 15 areas of regulatory uncertainty that

  20. Data list of nuclear power plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Fumio; Nakamura, Jinichi

    1982-10-01

    This report has collected and compiled the data by December in 1981 concerning performances, equipments and installations of the nuclear power plants in Japan. The data have been modified according to the changes produced after previous publication of 1979 edition including BWR and PWR (JAERI-M 8947) and 1980 edition including PWR (JAERI-M 9629), and extended to cover the new plants developed thereafter. All data have been processed and tabulated with a data processing computer program FREP. Besides this report, user also can refer to 'Data List of Nuclear Power Plant in Japan' through terminals equipped at various places in JAERI using TSS (Time Shearing System) network of FACOM M-200, and the explanation of the usage is given in the Appendix. (author)

  1. Physicochemical characteristics of uranium microparticles collected at nuclear fuel cycle plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaurov, G.; Stebelkov, V.; Kolesnikov, O.; Frolov, D.

    2001-01-01

    Any industrial process is accompanied by appearance of some quantity of microparticles of processed matter in the environment in immediate proximity to the manufacturing object. These particles can be transferred in atmosphere and can be collected at some distances from the plant. The determination of characteristics of industrial dust microparticles at nuclear fuel cycle plants (form, size, structure of surface, elemental composition, isotopic composition, presence of fission products, presence of activation products) in conjunction with the ability to connect these characteristics with certain nuclear manufacturing processes can become the main technical method of detecting of undeclared nuclear activity. Systematization of the experimental data on morphology, elemental and isotopic composition of uranium microparticles, collected at nuclear fuel cycle plants, is given. The purpose of this work is to establish the relationship between morphological characteristics of uranium dust microparticles and types of nuclear manufacture and to define the reference attributes of the most informative microparticles

  2. Safety goals for commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roe, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    In its official policy statement on safety goals for the operation of nuclear power plants, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) set two qualitative goals, supported by two quantitative objectives. These goals are that (1) individual members of the public should be provided a level of protection from the consequences of nuclear power plant operation such that individuals bear no significant additional risk to life and health; and (2) societal risks to life and health from nuclear power plant operation should be comparable to or less than the risks of generating electricity by viable competing technologies and should not be a significant addition to other societal risks. As an alternative, this study proposes four quantitative safety goals for nuclear power plants. It begins with an analysis of the NRC's safety-goal development process, a key portion of which was devoted to delineating criteria for evaluating goal-development methods. Based on this analysis, recommendations for revision of the NRC's basic benchmarks for goal development are proposed. Using the revised criteria, NRC safety goals are evaluated, and the alternative safety goals are proposed. To further support these recommendations, both the NRC's goals and the proposed goals are compared with the results of three major probabilistic risk assessment studies. Finally, the potential impact of these recommendations on nuclear safety is described

  3. Ensuring the operational safety of nuclear power plants with WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shasharin, G.A.; Veretennikov, G.A.; Abagyan, A.A.; Lesnoj, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    At the start of 1983, 27 nuclear power producing units with reactor facilities of the WWER type were in operation in the Soviet Union and other countries. In 1982 the average load factor for nuclear power plants with WWER reactors was 73 per cent. There was not a single nuclear accident or even damage with any significant radiation consequences in the WWER reactors during the entire period of their operation. The most modern nuclear power plants with WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors meet all present-day international requirements. Safe operation of the plants is achieved by a variety of measures, the most important of which include: procedures for increasing the reliability of plant equipment and systems; ensuring exact compliance with plant operating instructions; ensuring reliable operation of plant safety systems; action directed towards maintaining the skills of plant personnel at a level adequate to ensure the taking of proper action during transient processes and accident situations. The paper discusses concrete steps for ensuring safe nuclear power plant operation along these lines. In particular, measures such as the following are described: the use of a system for collecting and processing information on equipment failures and defects; the development and introduction of methods of early defect diagnosis; the performance of complex testing of safety systems; the training of highly skilled personnel for nuclear power plants at educational combines and at teaching and training centres making use of simulators; arranging accident-prevention training and special instruction for personnel. (author)

  4. Concerning change in nuclear fuel material processing business at Tokai plant of Japan Nuclear Fuel Conversion Co., Ltd. Report to Prime Minister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Committee of Japan on April 7, 1988, directed the Nuclear Safety Expert Group to make a study concerning the proposed changes in the nuclear fuel material processing business at the Tokai plant of Japan Nuclear Fuel Conversion Co., Ltd., and after receiving and reviewing the report from the Group, concluded that the proposed changes should be approved. The conclusions together with results of the study were reported to the Prime Minister on June 9. 1988. The proposed plan included changes in the maximum processing capacity of the No.2 processing facilities; construction of a new powder warehouse and changes in the maximum capacity of the No.3 powder storage room and No.2 powder warehouse; reuse of No.1 powder warehouse as No.3 solid waste warehouse; and abolition of UF 6 dispensing equipment installed at the No.1 processing facilities and changes in procedures for criticality control of the hydrolysis facilities. The safety of these facilities were studied in terms of resistance to earthquakes, prevention of fire and explosion, criticality control, operations of waste processing, and radiation management. Exposure doses expected during normal operations were also examined to confirm that the possible exposure doses to the public would be sufficiently small. (N.K.)

  5. Ultrasonic Inspection of Cracks in Stud Bolts of Reactor Vessels in Nuclear Power Plants by Signal Processing of Differential Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sang Woo; Lee, Joon Hyun; Oh, Won Deok

    2005-01-01

    The stud bolt is one of crucial parts for safe operation of reactor vessels in nuclear power plants, Crack initiation and propagation were reported in stud bolts that arc used for closure of reactor vessel and head, Stud bolts are inspected by ultrasonic technique during overhaul periodically for the prevention of stud bolt failure which could induce radioactive leakage from nuclear reactor, In conventional ultrasonic testing for inspection of stud bolts, cracks are detected by using shadow effect It takes too much time to inspect stud bolts by using conventional ultrasonic technique. In addition, there were numerous spurious signals reflected from every oblique surfaces of thread, In this study, the signal processing technique for enhancing conventional ultrasonic technique was introduced for inspecting stud bolts. The signal processing technique provides removing spurious signal reflected from every oblique surfaces of thread and enhances detectability of defects. Detectability for small crack was enhanced by using this signal processing in ultrasonic inspection of stud bolts in Nuclear Power Plants

  6. Studies in training nuclear plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlin, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    One of the lessons learned from the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident was that the nuclear industry was ineffective in learning from previous events at other plants. As training programs and methods have improved since TMI, the nuclear industry has searched for effective methods to teach the lessons learned from industry events. The case study method has great potential as a solution. By reviewing actual plant events in detail, trainees can be challenged with solving actual problems. When used in a seminar or discussion format, these case studies also help trainees compare their decision-making processes with other trainees, the instructor, and the personnel involved in the actual case study event

  7. Process information systems in nuclear reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeschke, A.; Keller, H.; Orth, H.

    1987-01-01

    On a production management level, a process information system in a nuclear reprocessing plant (NRP) has to fulfill conventional operating functions and functions for nuclear material surveillance (safeguards). Based on today's state of the art of on-line process control technology, the progress in hardware and software technology allows to introduce more process-specific intelligence into process information systems. Exemplified by an expert-system-aided laboratory management system as component of a NRP process information system, the paper demonstrates that these technologies can be applied already. (DG) [de

  8. Safety study on nuclear heat utilization system - accident delineation and assessment on nuclear steelmaking pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, T.; Mizuno, M.; Tsuruoka, K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents accident delineation and assessment on a nuclear steelmaking pilot plant as an example of nuclear heat utilization systems. The reactor thermal energy from VHTR is transported to externally located chemical process plant employing helium-heated steam reformer by an intermediate heat transport loop. This paper on the nuclear steelmaking pilot plant will describe (1) system transients under accident conditions, (2) impact of explosion and fire on the nuclear reactor and the public and (3) radiation exposure on the public. The results presented in this paper will contribute considerably to understanding safety features of nuclear heat utilization system that employs the intermediate heat transport loop and the helium-heated steam reformer

  9. Nuclear safety in fuel-reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennies, H.H.; Koerting, K.

    1976-01-01

    The danger potential of nuclear power and fuel reprocessing plants in normal operation is compared. It becomes obvious that there are no basic differences. The analysis of possible accidents - blow-up of an evaporator for highly active wastes, zircaloy burning, cooling failure in self-heating process solutions, burning of a charged solvent, criticality accidents - shows that they are kept under control by the plant layout. (HP) [de

  10. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chockie, Alan

    2005-09-01

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  11. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chockie, Alan [Chockie Group International, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2005-09-15

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  12. Are atomic power plants saver than nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeglin, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    It is rather impossible to establish nuclear power plants against the resistance of the population. To prevail over this resistance, a clarification of the citizens-initiatives motives which led to it will be necessary. This is to say: It is quite impossible for our population to understand what really heappens in nuclear power plants. They cannot identify themselves with nuclear power plants and thus feel very uncomfortable. As the total population feels the same way it is prepared for solidarity with the citizens-initiatives even if they believe in the necessity of nuclear power plants. Only an information-policy making transparent the social-psychological reasons of the population for being against nuclear power plants could be able to prevail over the resistance. More information about the technical procedures is not sufficient at all. (orig.) [de

  13. Training of nuclear power plant operating personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-04-01

    A collection is presented containing 11 papers submitted at a conference on the selection and education of specialists for operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. The conference was attended by specialists from universities and colleges, research institutes and production plants. It debated the methods and aims of both general and specialized theoretical and practical personnel education, the proposals for teaching centre equipment, the use of simulators, computers and other aids in the teaching process; training on school reactors was included. A proposal was put forward of the system of education, the teaching process itself, the content of the basic theoretical subjects, and the method of testing pupils' knowledge. The importance was stressed of establishing a national coordination centre to safeguard the syllabus, methodology, teaching aids, and also the training proper. The system of personnel education in the Paks nuclear power plant, Hungary, is presented as an example. (M.S.)

  14. Licensing and safety of nuclear power plants in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, F.C.

    1981-09-01

    An overview of the regulatory framework and licensing process for nuclear power plants in Canada is given along with an outline of the evolution of the safety philosophy followed and some comments on how this philosophy and process could be applied by a country embarking on a nuclear power program

  15. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This 2005 edition of the Elecnuc booklet summarizes in tables all numerical data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the PRIS database managed by the IAEA. The following aspects are reviewed: 2004 highlights; main characteristics of reactor types; map of the French nuclear power plants on 2005/01/01; worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 2004; units distributed by countries; nuclear power plants connected to the grid by reactor-type group; nuclear power plants under construction on 2004; evolution of nuclear power plant capacities connected to the grid; first electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit; electrical generation from nuclear power plants by country at the end 2004; performance indicator of PWR units in France; trend of the generation indicator worldwide; 2004 load factor by owners; units connected to the grid by countries at 12/31/2004; status of licence renewal applications in USA; nuclear power plants under construction at 12/31/2004; shutdown reactors; exported nuclear capacity in net MWe; exported and national nuclear capacity connected to the grid; exported nuclear power plants under construction or order; exported and national nuclear capacity under construction or order; recycling of plutonium in LWR; Mox licence plant projects; Appendix - historical development; acronyms, glossary

  16. Nuclear power plant operator licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The guide applies to the nuclear power plant operator licensing procedure referred to the section 128 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. The licensing procedure applies to shift supervisors and those operators of the shift teams of nuclear power plant units who manipulate the controls of nuclear power plants systems in the main control room. The qualification requirements presented in the guide also apply to nuclear safety engineers who work in the main control room and provide support to the shift supervisors, operation engineers who are the immediate superiors of shift supervisors, heads of the operational planning units and simulator instructors. The operator licensing procedure for other nuclear facilities are decided case by case. The requirements for the basic education, work experience and the initial, refresher and complementary training of nuclear power plant operating personnel are presented in the YVL guide 1.7. (2 refs.)

  17. Organizing nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, H.W.; Rekittke, K.

    1987-01-01

    With the preliminary culmination in the convoy plants of the high standard of engineered safeguards in German nuclear power plants developed over the past twenty years, the interest of operators has now increasingly turned to problems which had not been in the focus of attention before. One of these problems is the organization of nuclear power plant operation. In order to enlarge the basis of knowledge, which is documented also in the rules published by the Kerntechnischer Ausschuss (Nuclear Technology Committee), the German Federal Minister of the Interior has commissioned a study of the organizational structures of nuclear power plants. The findings of that study are covered in the article. Two representative nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany were selected for the study, one of them a single-unit plant run by an independent operating company in the form of a private company under German law (GmbH), the other a dual-unit plant operated as a dependent unit of a utility. The two enterprises have different structures of organization. (orig.) [de

  18. Nuclear Power Plants in the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2002 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from 65 electric power companies and other nuclear organizations in 28 countries and regions around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 19 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities; and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  19. Bid Preparation and Evaluation for Nuclear Power Plant Project Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Idris Taib, Mohd Khairulezwan Abdul Manan and Nur Farizan Amadzun

    2011-01-01

    Bid preparation and evaluation is one of the main activities in Nuclear Power Plant Project management. International Atomic Energy Agency guide and Korean experience was studied for Malaysian requirement in realization of first Nuclear Power Plant. Several aspects shall be taken into consideration such as political scenario, financial capabilities, sitting, human resource, technologies, fuel supplies and decommissioning for long term exceeded hundred years. Bidding process and activities is proposed for our country requirement. The main activities included but unlimited to Bid Invitation Specification, Bid Evaluation Process, Technical Evaluation, Economic Bid Evaluation and Contracting. On the end of day, Malaysia need safe and reliable Nuclear Power Plant. Malaysian Economic Transformation Programme also get benefit from spin-off localization products and services as well as Technology Transfer Programme. (author)

  20. Metabonomics for detection of nuclear materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Todd Michael; Luxon, Bruce A.; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Ansari, S.; Volk, David; Sarkar, S.; Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Tracking nuclear materials production and processing, particularly covert operations, is a key national security concern, given that nuclear materials processing can be a signature of nuclear weapons activities by US adversaries. Covert trafficking can also result in homeland security threats, most notably allowing terrorists to assemble devices such as dirty bombs. Existing methods depend on isotope analysis and do not necessarily detect chronic low-level exposure. In this project, indigenous organisms such as plants, small mammals, and bacteria are utilized as living sensors for the presence of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Such 'metabolic fingerprinting' (or 'metabonomics') employs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess alterations in organismal metabolism provoked by the environmental presence of nuclear materials processing, for example the tributyl phosphate employed in the processing of spent reactor fuel rods to extract and purify uranium and plutonium for weaponization.

  1. Integration of Biorefineries and Nuclear Cogeneration Power Plants - A Preliminary Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL

    2009-03-01

    Biomass-based ethanol and nuclear power are two viable elements in the path to U.S. energy independence. Numerous studies suggest nuclear power could provide a practical carbon-free heat source alternative for the production of biomass-based ethanol. In order for this coupling to occur, it is necessary to examine the interfacial requirements of both nuclear power plants and bioethanol refineries. This report describes the proposed characteristics of a small cogeneration nuclear power plant, a biochemical process-based cellulosic bioethanol refinery, and a thermochemical process-based cellulosic biorefinery. Systemic and interfacial issues relating to the co-location of either type of bioethanol facility with a nuclear power plant are presented and discussed. Results indicate future co-location efforts will require a new optimized energy strategy focused on overcoming the interfacial challenges identified in the report.

  2. Integration of Biorefineries and Nuclear Cogeneration Power Plants - A Preliminary Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, Sherrell R.; Flanagan, George F.; Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2009-01-01

    Biomass-based ethanol and nuclear power are two viable elements in the path to U.S. energy independence. Numerous studies suggest nuclear power could provide a practical carbon-free heat source alternative for the production of biomass-based ethanol. In order for this coupling to occur, it is necessary to examine the interfacial requirements of both nuclear power plants and bioethanol refineries. This report describes the proposed characteristics of a small cogeneration nuclear power plant, a biochemical process-based cellulosic bioethanol refinery, and a thermochemical process-based cellulosic biorefinery. Systemic and interfacial issues relating to the co-location of either type of bioethanol facility with a nuclear power plant are presented and discussed. Results indicate future co-location efforts will require a new optimized energy strategy focused on overcoming the interfacial challenges identified in the report.

  3. Method for processing spent nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levenson, M.; Zebroski, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    A method and apparatus are claimed for processing spent nuclear reactor fuel wherein plutonium is continuously contaminated with radioactive fission products and diluted with uranium. Plutonium of sufficient purity to fabricate nuclear weapons cannot be produced by the process or in the disclosed reprocessing plant. Diversion of plutonium is prevented by radiation hazards and ease of detection

  4. Steam generator and condenser design of WWER-1000 type of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zare Shahneh, Abolghasem.

    1995-03-01

    Design process of steam generator and condenser at Russian nuclear power plant type WWER-1000 is identified. The four chapter of the books are organized as nuclear power plant, types of steam generators specially horizontal steam generator, process of steam generator design and the description of condenser and its process design

  5. On nuclear power plant uprating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, S. Allen; Bailey, James V.; Maginnis, Stephen T.

    2004-01-01

    Power uprating for commercial nuclear power plants has become increasingly attractive because of pragmatic reasons. It provides quick return on investment and competitive financial benefits, while involving low risks regarding plant safety and public objection. This paper briefly discussed nuclear plant uprating guidelines, scope for design basis analysis and engineering evaluation, and presented the Salem nuclear power plant uprating study for illustration purposes. A cost and benefit evaluation of the Salem power uprating was also included. (author)

  6. Desalination demonstration plant using nuclear heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanra, M.S.; Misra, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    Most of the desalination plants which are operating throughout the world utilize the energy from thermal power station which has the main disadvantage of polluting the environment due to combustion of fossil fuel and with the inevitable rise in prices of fossil fuel, nuclear driven desalination plants will become more economical. So it is proposed to set up nuclear desalination demonstration plant at the location of Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS), Kalpakkam. The desalination plant will be of a capacity 6300 m 3 /day and based on both Multi Stage Flash (MSF) and Sea Water Reverse Osmosis (SWRO) processes. The MSF plant with performance ratio of 9 will produce water total dissolved solids (TDS-25 ppm) at a rate of 4500 m 3 /day from seawater of 35000 ppm. A part of this water namely 1000 m 3 /day will be used as Demineralised (DM) water after passing it through a mixed bed polishing unit. The remaining 3500 m 3 /day water will be mixed with 1800 m 3 /day water produced from the SWRO plant of TDS of 400 ppm and the same be supplied to industrial/municipal use. The sea water required for MSF and SWRO plants will be drawn from the intake/outfall system of MAPS which will also supply the required electric power pumping. There will be net 4 MW loss of power of MAPS namely 3 MW for MSF and 1 MW for SWRO desalination plants. The salient features of the project as well as the technical details of the both MSF and SWRO processes and its present status are given in this paper. It also contains comparative cost parameters of water produced by both processes. (author)

  7. Geology and geotechnic in the implantation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, P.R.R.

    1984-01-01

    It is presented a general methodology for geological and geotechnical investigations to be performed in sites selected for the construction of nucldar power plants. Items dealing with the standards applied to licensing of a nuclear power plants, the selection process of sites and identification of geological and geotechnical parameters needed for the regional and local characterization of the area being studied, were incorporated. It is also provided an aid to the writing of technical reports, which are part of the documentation an owner of a nuclear power plant needs to submit to the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, to fulfill the nuclear installation licensing requirements. (Author) [pt

  8. Nuclear power and heating plant control rooms. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaniuk, B.

    1983-01-01

    The questions are discussed of memory capacity, vigilance, speed of data processing, decision-making quality and other demands placed on operators of nuclear power and heating plants. On the example of the accident at the Three Mile Island-2 nuclear power plant, the instants are shown when failure of the human factor owing to a stress situation resulted in the accident not being coped with in time. It is therefore necessary to place high demands on the choice of operators and to devote equal attention to the human factor as to the safety of the technical equipment of the power plant. (J.B.)

  9. Technical aspects of coupling a 6300 m3/day MSF-RO desalination plant to a PHWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    Presently, eight pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) each of 235 MWe capacity are operational in India. Four more units of similar capacity are expected to be commissioned soon. Work on two units each of 500 MWe capacity is also initiated. Extensive engineering development work has also been carried out in India, both on the MSF process and the membrane process. Based on the experience obtained from the presently operating 425 m 3 /d MSF plant and from the R and D work on the RO process, a 6300 m 3 /d MSF-RO plant (4500 m 3 /d MSF and 1800 m 3 /d RO) has been designed and the work for setting up this plant is undertaken. The steam for the heating duty in the brine heater as well as the steam for the evacuation purpose for the MSF plant is proposed to be obtained from the nuclear plant steam cycle. Sea water feed for the MSF plant as well as for the RO plant will be derived from the sea water discharge system of the nuclear power plant. Provision is made for supply of electrical power also from the power plant. The details of the heating steam supply circuit starting from the steam tapping point on the nuclear plant side to the MSF plant brine heater inlet and the arrangement for the return of condensate to the nuclear plant has been described with component requirement and various technical considerations. All the liquid streams and the steam supplied from the nuclear plant to the desalination plant as well as the product water will be monitored to ensure that there is no radioactive contamination. (author)

  10. Expert robots in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.S.; Fisher, J.J.; DeVries, K.R.; Martin, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Expert robots enhance a safety and operations in nuclear plants. E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Savannah River Laboratory, is developing expert mobile robots for deployment in nuclear applications at the Savannah River Plant. Knowledge-based expert systems are being evaluated to simplify operator control, to assist in navigation and manipulation functions, and to analyze sensory information. Development work using two research vehicles is underway to demonstrate semiautonomous, intelligence, expert robot system operation in process areas. A description of the mechanical equipment, control systems, and operating modes is presented, including the integration of onboard sensors. A control hierarchy that uses modest computational methods is being used to allow mobile robots to autonomously navigate and perform tasks in known environments without the need for large computer systems

  11. Expert robots in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.S.; Fisher, J.J.; DeVries, K.R.; Martin, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Expert robots will enhance safety and operations in nuclear plants. E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Savannah River Laboratory, is developing expert mobile robots for deployment in nuclear applications at the Savannah River Plant. Knowledge-based expert systems are being evaluated to simplify operator control, to assist in navigation and manipulation functions, and to analyze sensory information. Development work using two research vehicles is underway to demonstrate semiautonomous, intelligent, expert robot system operation in process areas. A description of the mechanical equipment, control systems, and operating modes is presented, including the integration of onboard sensors. A control hierarchy that uses modest computational methods is being used to allow mobile robots to autonomously navigate and perform tasks in known environments without the need for large computer systems

  12. Expert system for nuclear power plant feedwater system diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meguro, R.; Kinoshita, Y.; Sato, T.; Yokota, Y.; Yokota, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Expert System for Nuclear Power Plant Feedwater System Diagnosis has been developed to assist maintenance engineers in nuclear power plants. This system adopts the latest process computer TOSBAC G8050 and the expert system developing tool TDES2, and has a large scale knowledge base which consists of the expert knowledge and experience of engineers in many fields. The man-machine system, which has been developed exclusively for diagnosis, improves the man-machine interface and realizes the graphic displays of diagnostic process and path, stores diagnostic results and searches past reference

  13. Safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeberlein, K.

    1987-01-01

    In nuclear power plants large amounts of radioactive fission products ensue from the fission of uranium. In order to protect the environment, the radioactive material is confined in multiple 'activity barriers' (crystal matrix of the fuel, fuel cladding, coolant boundary, safety containment, reactor building). These barriers are protected by applying a defense-in-depth concept (high quality requirements, protection systems which recognize and terminate operational incidents, safety systems to cope with accidents). In spite of a favorable safety record of German nuclear power plants it is obvious - and became most evident by the Chernobyl accident - that absolute safety is not achievable. At Chernobyl, however, design disadvantages of that reactor type (like positive reactivity feedback of coolant voiding, missing safety containment) played an important role in accident initiation and progression. Such features of the Russian 'graphite-moderated pressure tube boiling water reactor' are different from those of light water reactors operating in western countries. The essential steps of the waste management of the nuclear fuel cycle ('Entsorgung') are the interim storage, the shipment, and the reprocessing of the spent fuel and the final repository of radioactive waste. Reprocessing means the separation of fossil material (uranium, plutonium) from radioactive waste. Legal requirements for radiological protection of the environment, which are identical for nuclear power plants and reprocessing plant, are complied with by means of comprehensive filter systems. Safety problems of a reprocessing plant are eased considerably by the fact that system pressures, process temperatures and energy densities are low. In order to confine the radioactive waste from the biosphere for a very long period of time, it is to be discarded after appropriate treatment into the deep geological underground of salt domes. (orig./HP) [de

  14. The value of peer reviews to nuclear plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subalusky, W.T. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    On a global basis, the nuclear utility industry has clearly demonstrated the value of peer reviews for improving nuclear safety and overall plant performance. Peer reviews are conducted by small teams of technical experts who review various aspects of plant operation, recognize strengths and recommend improvements, thereby stimulating a positive response to the recommendations. U.S. nuclear utilities initiated the operator-to-operator peer review process first through the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Now, voluntary peer reviews are an important activity of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). Formed just five years ago. WANO has made significant progress in its key activities of the operator-to-operator exchanges, operating experience exchange, monitoring of plant performance indicators and sharing of good practices worldwide. A fifth activity, peer review on a strictly voluntary basis, is pertinent to this paper

  15. Plant Design Nuclear Fuel Element Production Capacity Optimization to Support Nuclear Power Plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambang Galung Susanto

    2007-01-01

    The optimization production capacity for designing nuclear fuel element fabrication plant in Indonesia to support the nuclear power plant has been done. From calculation and by assuming that nuclear power plant to be built in Indonesia as much as 12 NPP and having capacity each 1000 MW, the optimum capacity for nuclear fuel element fabrication plant is 710 ton UO 2 /year. The optimum capacity production selected, has considered some aspects such as fraction batch (cycle, n = 3), length of cycle (18 months), discharge burn-up value (Bd) 35,000 up 50,000 MWD/ton U, enriched uranium to be used in the NPP (3.22 % to 4.51 %), future market development for fuel element, and the trend of capacity production selected by advances country to built nuclear fuel element fabrication plant type of PWR. (author)

  16. Analysis of effect of safety classification on DCS design in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gou Guokai; Li Guomin; Wang Qunfeng

    2011-01-01

    By analyzing the safety classification for the systems and functions of nuclear power plants based on the general design requirements for nuclear power plants, especially the requirement of availability and reliability of I and C systems, the characteristics of modem DCS technology and I and C products currently applied in nuclear power field are interpreted. According to the requirements on the safety operation of nuclear power plants and the regulations for safety audit, the effect of different safety classifications on DCS design in nuclear power plants is analyzed, by considering the actual design process of different DCS solutions in the nuclear power plants under construction. (authors)

  17. Nuclear security - New challenge to the safety of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ganjie

    2008-01-01

    The safety of nuclear power plants involves two aspects: one is to prevent nuclear accidents resulted from systems and equipments failure or human errors; the other is to refrain nuclear accidents from external intended attack. From this point of view, nuclear security is an organic part of the nuclear safety of power plants since they have basically the same goals and concrete measures with each other. In order to prevent malicious attacks; the concept of physical protection of nuclear facilities has been put forward. In many years, a series of codes and regulations as well as technical standard systems on physical protection had been developed at international level. The United Nations passed No. 1540 resolution as well as 'Convention on the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear terrorism', and revised 'Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials', which has enhanced a higher level capacity of preparedness by international community to deal with security issues of nuclear facilities. In China, in order to improve the capability of nuclear power plants on preventing and suppressing the external attacks, the Chinese government consecutively developed the related codes and standards as well as technical documents based on the existing laws and regulations, including 'Guide for the Nuclear Security of Nuclear Power Plants' and 'Guide for the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials', so as to upgrade the legislative requirements for nuclear security in power plants. The government also made greater efforts to support the scientific research and staff training on physical protection, and satisfying the physical protection standards for newly-built nuclear facilities such as large scale nuclear power plants to meet requirement at international level. At the same time old facilities were renovated and the Chinese government established a nuclear emergency preparedness coordination mechanism, developed corresponding emergency preparedness plans, intensified the

  18. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2007/2008 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from electric power companies and other nuclear organizations around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 18 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; effect of the Niigata-ken chuetsu-oki earthquake; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  19. Nuclear Power Plants in the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2003 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from 81 electric power companies and other nuclear organizations in 33 countries and regions around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 19 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities; and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  20. The research on the material management system in nuclear power plant construction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xuegeng; Huang Zhongping

    2010-01-01

    According to the module construction speciality of nuclear power plant, this article analyzes the relationship between the actual amount of the material transported to the construction site and the planed needs of the material, and points out the zero inventory management target in the nuclear power plant construction site. Based on this, the article put forward a nuclear power plant material management system which is based on the 'pull' information driver. This system is composed by material coding sub-system, procurement and site material integrated management sub-system and project control sub-system, and is driven by the material demand from construction site to realize the JIT purchasing. This structure of the system can reduce the gap between the actual amount of the material transported to the site and the planed needs of the material and achieve the target of reducing storage at construction site. (authors)

  1. Development of automatic inspection robot for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, K.; Suzuki, K.; Saitoh, K.; Sakaki, T.; Ohe, Y.; Mizutani, T.; Segawa, M.; Kubo, K.

    1987-01-01

    This robot system has been developed for automatic inspection of nuclear power plants. The system configuration is composed of vehicle that runs on monorail, the sensors on the vehicle, an image processer that processes the image information from the sensors, a computer that creates the inspection planning of the robot and an operation panel. This system has two main features, the first is the robot control system. The vehicle and the sensors are controlled by the output data calculated in the computer with the three dimensional plant data. The malfunction is recognized by the combination of the results of image processing, information from the microphone and infrared camera. Tests for a prototype automatic inspection robot system have been performed in the simulated main steam piping room of a nuclear power plant

  2. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talarico, M.A., E-mail: talaricomarco@hotmail.com [Marinha do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao do Porgrama de Submarino com Propulsao Nuclear; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  3. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talarico, M.A.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  4. Steam turbines for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosyak, Yu.F.

    1978-01-01

    Considered are the peculiarities of the design and operation of steam turbines, condensers and supplementary equipment of steam turbines for nuclear power plants; described are the processes of steam flow in humid-steam turbines, calculation and selection principles of main parameters of heat lines. Designs of the turbines installed at the Charkov turbine plant are described in detail as well as of those developed by leading foreign turbobuilding firms

  5. Process of liquid radioactive waste treatment in nuclear power plant and development trend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiean; Wang Xin; Liu Dan; Zhu Laiye; Chen Bin

    2014-01-01

    The popular liquid radioactive waste treatment methods in nuclear power plants (NPP) are Chemical precipitation, evaporation, ion exchange, membrane treatment, chemical coagulation and activated carbon absorption and so on. 'Filter + activated carbon absorption (Chemical coagulation) + ion exchange' has a good prospect for development, as its simple process, high decontamination factor, low energy consumption and smaller secondary wastes. Also the process is used in Sanmen and Haiyang Projects. The severe incident in NPP set an even higher demand on liquid radioactive waste treatment. The new type treatment materials, optimization of the existed treatment, combination of treatment and the mobile treatment facility is the development trend in liquid radioactive waste treatment in NPP. (authors)

  6. Regulatory practices for nuclear power plants in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) is the national authority for ensuring that the use of ionizing radiation and nuclear energy does not cause any undue risk to the health of workers, members of the public and to the environment. AERB is responsible for the stipulation and enforcement of rules and regulations pertaining to nuclear and radiological safety. This paper describes the regulatory process followed by AERB for ensuring the safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs) during their construction as well as operation. This regulatory process has been continuously evolving to cater to the new developments in reactor technology. Some of the recent initiatives taken by AERB in this direction are briefly described. Today, AERB faces new challenges like simultaneous review of a large number of new projects of diverse designs, a fast growing nuclear power program and functioning of operating plants in a competitive environment. This paper delineates how AERB is gearing up to meet these challenges in an effective manner. (author)

  7. General view about reactor safety nuclear power plants in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparian, A.E.; Silva, D.E.; Salvatore, J.E.L.; Lima, J.M. de

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe the principles and goals that have guided, as well as the methods that have been used by the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) to set forth measures aiming at providing safety to the Brazilian nuclear power plants. The status of the licensing process of these power plants is shown. The performance and the results obtained so far in relation to the nuclear safety are also described. (author)

  8. Safety aspects of nuclear plants coupled with seawater desalination units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this publication is to address the safety and licensing aspects of nuclear power plants for which a significant portion of the heat energy produced by the reactor is intended for use in heat utilization applications. Although intended to cover the broad spectrum of nuclear heat applications, the focus of the discussion will be the desalination of sea water using nuclear power plants as the energy source for the desalination process

  9. Development of supplier evaluation model applying in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yonggang; Fang Chunfa

    2006-01-01

    It is essential for the safe and stable operations of Nuclear Power Plants that various resources in the supply chain are effectively managed. Supplier is a significant resource of nuclear entities serving as an extension of the operation process. Scientific and radiation evaluation of the performance of suppliers is of vital importance to an effective and high quality supply chain. This paper establishes an advance and practical supplier evaluation system that is applicable for the operational nuclear power plants, based on the analysis of the current operation status of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station against its targeted objectives, the acquisition of relevant practices home and abroad and the benchmarking with advanced peers, in order to enhance the core competence of nuclear power plant. (authors)

  10. Development of advanced I and C in nuclear power plants: ADIOS and ASICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung-Taek; Kwon, Kee-Choon; Hwang, In-Koo; Lee, Dong-Young; Park, Won-Man; Kim, Jung-Soo; Lee, Sang-Jeong

    2001-01-01

    In this paper Automatic Startup Intelligent Control System (ASICS) that automatically controls the PWR plant from cold shutdown to 5% of reactor power and Alarm and Diagnosis-Integrated Operator Support System (ADIOS) that is integrated with alarms, process values, and diagnostic information to an expert system focused on alarm processing are described. Nuclear Power Plant is manually controlled from cold shutdown to 5% according to the general operation procedures for startup operation of nuclear power plant. Alarm information is the primary sources to detect abnormalities in nuclear power plants or other process plants. The conventional hardwired alarm systems, characterized by one sensor-one indicator may lead the control room operators to be confused with avalanching alarms during plant transients. ASICS and ADIOS are designed to reduce the operator burden. The advances in computer software and hardware technology and also in information processing provide a good opportunity to improve the control systems and the annunciator systems of nuclear power plants or other similar process plants. It is very important to test and evaluate the performance and the function of the computer- or software-based systems like ASICS and ADIOS. The performance and the function of ASICS and ADIOS are evaluated with the real-time functional test facility and the results have shown that the developed systems are efficient and useful for operation and operator support

  11. Development of advanced I and C in nuclear power plants: ADIOS and ASICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung-Taek E-mail: jtkim@nanum.kaeri.re.kr; Kwon, Kee-Choon; Hwang, In-Koo; Lee, Dong-Young; Park, Won-Man; Kim, Jung-Soo; Lee, Sang-Jeong

    2001-07-01

    In this paper Automatic Startup Intelligent Control System (ASICS) that automatically controls the PWR plant from cold shutdown to 5% of reactor power and Alarm and Diagnosis-Integrated Operator Support System (ADIOS) that is integrated with alarms, process values, and diagnostic information to an expert system focused on alarm processing are described. Nuclear Power Plant is manually controlled from cold shutdown to 5% according to the general operation procedures for startup operation of nuclear power plant. Alarm information is the primary sources to detect abnormalities in nuclear power plants or other process plants. The conventional hardwired alarm systems, characterized by one sensor-one indicator may lead the control room operators to be confused with avalanching alarms during plant transients. ASICS and ADIOS are designed to reduce the operator burden. The advances in computer software and hardware technology and also in information processing provide a good opportunity to improve the control systems and the annunciator systems of nuclear power plants or other similar process plants. It is very important to test and evaluate the performance and the function of the computer- or software-based systems like ASICS and ADIOS. The performance and the function of ASICS and ADIOS are evaluated with the real-time functional test facility and the results have shown that the developed systems are efficient and useful for operation and operator support.

  12. Retrofitting Trojan Nuclear Plant's spent resin transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The spent resin slurry transport system at the Trojan Nuclear Plant operated by Portland General Electric Company is one of the most advanced systems of its type in the nuclear industry today. The new system affords the plant's operators safe remote sonic indication for spent resin and cover water levels, manual remote dewatering and watering capability to establish desirable resin-to-water volumetric ratios, reliable non-mechanical resin agitation utilizing fixed spargers, and controllable process flow utilizing a variable speed recessed impeller pump

  13. Essays on the economics of licensing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, L.R.

    1979-01-01

    Regulation and licensing of nuclear power plants by the United States Atomic Energy Commission and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission are discussed. Chapter 1 overviews the licensing process and issues raised in licensing cases. Based on a sample of plants licensed between 1967 and 1978, a statistical study of the impact of public participation in licensing is performed. The study concludes that public participation has had a major impact on licensing and power-plant costs. The impact is due to a fundamental weakness of the Commissions: their inability to resolve certain issues related to acceptable social risk. The study has important policy implications for reforming the Federal licensing process. Chapter 2 contains an analysis of the Price-Anderson Act, a Federal program for compensating victims of large nuclear accidents. The Price-Anderson Act is placed within the context of generalized federal disaster relief. A model is developed that allows an evaluation programs on the basis of moral hazard and equity principles. Chapter 3 analyzes the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's treatment of its mandatory antitrust review of applicants for nuclear power plants. The main conclusion of the chapter is that the reviews have not addressed the central economic issues of antitrust that are relevant to nuclear power. Instead, the reviews contribute to further cartelization of the electric utility industry. While politically expedient, the reviews are counter-productive to the development of an optimal industry structure

  14. Metabonomics for detection of nuclear materials processing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd Michael; Luxon, Bruce A. (University Texas Medical Branch); Neerathilingam, Muniasamy (University Texas Medical Branch); Ansari, S. (University Texas Medical Branch); Volk, David (University Texas Medical Branch); Sarkar, S. (University Texas Medical Branch); Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2010-08-01

    Tracking nuclear materials production and processing, particularly covert operations, is a key national security concern, given that nuclear materials processing can be a signature of nuclear weapons activities by US adversaries. Covert trafficking can also result in homeland security threats, most notably allowing terrorists to assemble devices such as dirty bombs. Existing methods depend on isotope analysis and do not necessarily detect chronic low-level exposure. In this project, indigenous organisms such as plants, small mammals, and bacteria are utilized as living sensors for the presence of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Such 'metabolic fingerprinting' (or 'metabonomics') employs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess alterations in organismal metabolism provoked by the environmental presence of nuclear materials processing, for example the tributyl phosphate employed in the processing of spent reactor fuel rods to extract and purify uranium and plutonium for weaponization.

  15. Nuclear Power Plants (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell III, Walter [Southern Nuclear Engineering, Inc.

    1973-01-01

    Projected energy requirements for the future suggest that we must employ atomic energy to generate electric power or face depletion of our fossil-fuel resources—coal, oil, and gas. In short, both conservation and economic considerations will require us to use nuclear energy to generate the electricity that supports our civilization. Until we reach the time when nuclear power plants are as common as fossil-fueled or hydroelectric plants, many people will wonder how the nuclear plants work, how much they cost, where they are located, and what kinds of reactors they use. The purpose of this booklet is to answer these questions. In doing so, it will consider only central station plants, which are those that provide electric power for established utility systems.

  16. Nuclear power plants in post-war thought

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toya, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    This paper overviews how nuclear power plants have been talked about in the post-war thought. Science and technology sometimes significantly change the thinking way of humans, and nuclear power generation is an extreme technology. This paper overviews how nuclear power plants and humans are correlated. The following three points are discussed as the major issues of contemporary thought over nuclear power plants. First, on the danger of nuclear power plants, the risk of destructive power that nuclear energy has, and the danger of unreasoning development in science and technology civilization are discussed. Second, on the ethics issues surrounding nuclear power plants, the ethics that are based on unbalanced power relations, and democratic responsibility ethics based on discussion ethics are discussed. Third, on the issues of nuclear power plants and imagination, the limitations of democratic discussion surrounding nuclear power plants, the formation of imagination commensurate with the destructive power of nuclear power plants, and the formation of imagination that can represent the distant future are discussed. (A.O.)

  17. Remotex and servomanipulator needs in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Work on the conceptual design of a pilot-scale plant for reprocessing breeder reactor fuels is being performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The plant design will meet all current federal regulations for repocessing plants and will serve as prototype for future production plants. A unique future of the concept is the incorporation of totally remote operation and maintenance of the process equipment within a large barn-like hot cell. This approach, caled Remotex, utilizes servomanipulators coupled with television viewing to extend man's capabilities into the hostile cell environment. The Remotex concept provides significant improvements for fuel reprocessing plants and other nuclear facilities in the areas of safeguarding nuclear materials, reducing radiation exposure, improving plant availability, recovering from unplanned events, and plant decommissioning

  18. Public regulation of nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtheret, M.; Cormis, de

    1980-01-01

    The construction and operation of nuclear plants are subject to a complex system of governmental administration. The authors list the various governmental authorisations and rules applicable to these plants. In the first part, they describe the national regulations which relate specifically to nuclear plants, and emphasize the provisions which are intended to ensure the safety of the installations and the protection of the public against ionizing radiation. However, while the safety of nuclear plants is a major concern of the authorities, other interests are also protected. This is accomplished by various laws or regulations which apply to nuclear plants as well as other industrial installations. The duties which these texts, and the administrative practice based thereon, impose on Electricite de France are covered in the second part [fr

  19. The Acceptance Strategy for Nuclear Power Plant In Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhaemi, Tjipta; Syaukat, Achmad

    2010-06-01

    THE ACCEPTANCE STRATEGY FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IN INDONESIA. Indonesia has planned to build nuclear power plants. Some feasibility studies have been conducted intensively. However, the processes of NPP introduction are still uncertain. National Energy Plan in Indonesia, which has been made by some governmental agencies, does not yet give positive impact to the government decision to construct the nuclear power plant (NPP). This paper discusses the process of NPP introduction in Indonesia, which has been colored with debate of stakeholder and has delayed decision for go-nuclear. The technology paradigm is used to promote NPP as an alternative of reliable energy resources. This paradigm should be complemented with international politic-economic point of view. The international politic-economic point of view shows that structural powers, consisting of security, production, finance, and knowledge structures, within which the NPP is introduced, have dynamic characteristics. The process of NPP introduction in Indonesia contains some infrastructure development (R&D, legislation, regulation, energy planning, site study, public acceptance efforts, etc), but they need a better coherent NPP implementation program and NPP Acceptance Program. Strategic patterns for NPP acceptance described in this paper are made by considering nuclear regulation development and the interest of basic domestic participation. The first NPP program in Indonesia having proven technology and basic domestic participation is and important milestone toward and optimal national energy-mix.

  20. Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

    2006-12-11

    This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

  1. Particular features of fire protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, W.

    1985-01-01

    The particular features of fire protection in nuclear power plants that are connected with the need to ensure nuclear and radiation safety even during an emergency are outlined followed by the recommendation to lay them down in special fire protection standards. These, in conjunction with comprehensive fire hazard analyses, could serve to work out complex concepts for the fire protection of individual nuclear power plants. Such concepts would be very useful for review and assessment of the fire protection design during the licensing process and for later inspections. (author)

  2. Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant

  3. Nuclear Power Plants in the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Developmental trends on nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 1999 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from 72 electric companies in 31 nations and regions in the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 19 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; location of the plants; the plants in the world; and so forth. And, it also has some survey results on the 'Liberalization of electric power markets and nuclear power generation' such as some 70% of respondents in nuclear power for future option, gas-thermal power seen as power source with most to gain from liberalization, merits on nuclear power generation (environmental considerations and supply stability), most commonly voiced concern about new plant orders in poor economy, and so forth. (G.K.)

  4. Development of a standard equipment management model for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hee Seung; Ju, Tae Young; Kim, Jung Wun [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Most utilities that have achieved high performance have introduced a management model to improve performance and operate plants safely. The Nuclear Energy Institute has developed and updated its Standard Nuclear Performance Model (SNPM) in order to provide a summary of nuclear processes, cost definitions, and key business performance measures for business performance comparison and benchmarking. Over the past decade, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. (KHNP) has introduced and implemented many engineering processes such as Equipment Reliability (ER), Maintenance Rule (MR), Single Point Vulnerability (SPV), Corrective Action Program (CAP), and Self Assessment (SA) to improve plant performance and to sustain high performance. Some processes, however, are not well interfaced with other processes, because they were developed separately and were focused on the process itself. KHNP is developing a Standard Equipment Management Model (SEMM) to integrate these engineering processes and to improve the interrelation among the processes. In this paper, a draft model and attributes of the SEMM are discussed.

  5. Development of a standard equipment management model for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hee Seung; Ju, Tae Young; Kim, Jung Wun

    2012-01-01

    Most utilities that have achieved high performance have introduced a management model to improve performance and operate plants safely. The Nuclear Energy Institute has developed and updated its Standard Nuclear Performance Model (SNPM) in order to provide a summary of nuclear processes, cost definitions, and key business performance measures for business performance comparison and benchmarking. Over the past decade, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. (KHNP) has introduced and implemented many engineering processes such as Equipment Reliability (ER), Maintenance Rule (MR), Single Point Vulnerability (SPV), Corrective Action Program (CAP), and Self Assessment (SA) to improve plant performance and to sustain high performance. Some processes, however, are not well interfaced with other processes, because they were developed separately and were focused on the process itself. KHNP is developing a Standard Equipment Management Model (SEMM) to integrate these engineering processes and to improve the interrelation among the processes. In this paper, a draft model and attributes of the SEMM are discussed

  6. Summary revaluation of cold testing of the first block of nuclear power plant Mochovce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miskolci, M.; Sarvaic, I.

    1998-01-01

    The document contents summary revaluation of the stage of cold testing of the first unit of nuclear power plant Mochovce. The valuation is processed in individual systems with safety significance. The process and results of system testing and their conclusions for the block readiness for active testing are summarized in the document. The valuation has been elaborated by a scientific management for start-up of nuclear power plant Mochovce as an independent conductor assistance for activation check from the nuclear safety point of view. The valuation of the activation results of systems in the first unit of nuclear power plant was processed as of 15.3.1998

  7. Process improvement of the emergency operating procedures for Embalse Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariotti, A.D.; Pomerantz, M.; Moreno, C., E-mail: dmariotti@na-sa.com.ar, E-mail: mpomerantz@na-sa.com.ar, E-mail: cmoreno@na-sa.com.ar [Embalse Nuclear Power Plant, Nuclear Safety Dept., Embalse (Argentina)

    2014-07-01

    Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP) package of the Embalse Nuclear Power Plant (CNE) were made entirely by the plant staff since the beginning of its operation. With the emergence of Severe Accidents Guidelines (SAMG) and the latest events related to Fukushima, the EOP philosophy should include a new concept. It should consider that the EOP may be unsuccessful and an exit to the SAMG must be necessary. However, due to abnormal event mitigation using EOP is the way to prevent the beginning of a severe accident, EOP always had significant relevance in the plant documentation. For this reason, added to the overall requirement of an exit to the SAMG, it emerges a general review of the use efficiency of the EOP during an abnormal event. For this reason, a comprehensive process improvement has emerged using the operating experience, full-scope simulator training of the control room staff, advances in technology and the arrival of new generations. In this work, fundamental changes, new document format and ergonomic redesign for validation at full-scope simulator and use at main control room of new EOP for CNE are presented. (author)

  8. Nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otway, H.J.

    1974-01-01

    Action at the international level will assume greater importance as the number of nuclear power plants increases, especially in the more densely populated parts of the world. Predictions of growth made prior to October 1973 [9] indicated that, by 1980, 14% of the electricity would be supplied by nuclear plants and by the year 2000 this figure would be about 50%. This will make the topic of international co-operation and standards of even greater importance. The IAEA has long been active in providing assistance to Member States in the siting design and operation of nuclear reactors. These activities have been pursued through advisory missions, the publication of codes of practice, guide books, technical reports and in arranging meetings to promote information exchange. During the early development of nuclear power, there was no well-established body of experience which would allow formulation of internationally acceptable safety criteria, except in a few special cases. Hence, nuclear power plant safety and reliability matters often received an ad hoc approach which necessarily entailed a lack of consistency in the criteria used and in the levels of safety required. It is clear that the continuation of an ad hoc approach to safety will prove inadequate in the context of a world-wide nuclear power industry, and the international trade which this implies. As in several other fields, the establishment of internationally acceptable safety standards and appropriate guides for use by regulatory bodies, utilities, designers and constructors, is becoming a necessity. The IAEA is presently planning the development of a comprehensive set of basic requirements for nuclear power plant safety, and the associated reliability requirements, which would be internationally acceptable, and could serve as a standard frame of reference for nuclear plant safety and reliability analyses

  9. Small and medium-sized nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.

    1986-01-01

    Small and medium-sized nuclear power plants have long been under discussion as possible applications of nuclear power in countries with small transmission grid systems, in threshold countries and developing countries, and under special local supply conditions. IAEA has condensed and promoted this interest and tried to establish the demand, and possibilities of meeting it, in special events and campaigns. In recent years, considerable interest was registered even in industrialized countries, but here specially for heating and process heat generation applications and for special purposes and, in medium-sized units, also for combined supplies of electricity and heat. This corresponds to special reactor and plant concepts, some of which have already been developed to a stage at which construction work could begin. The analysis presented deals with necessary preconditions on the sides of the users and the vendors, with problems of economy, infrastructure and financing and with the market prospects of small nuclear power plants. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Managing Siting Activities for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    , referenced bank of data that can be used during the lifetime of the nuclear power plant. As a result, and after reviewing the existing publications, the IAEA decided to develop an integrated Nuclear Energy Series publication on managing siting activities for a nuclear power plant using recent siting experience from States. This publication: -Complements the IAEA Safety Guide related to site selection; - Emphasizes the integrity and interdependence of various activities related to site selection and assessment, including safety, environmental, technical, economic and social factors; - Develops the methodology and framework for all aspects of the siting process; - Updates the existing IAEA documentation in order to better reflect the developments in the nuclear and energy industry related to siting; - Integrates the existing IAEA publications on the subject into a more compact and user friendly guide. This publication provides the information necessary to organize, guide and realize the activities related to the selection and assessment of a site through defining the factors for consideration and methodologies for site investigation. Other factors that could have an impact on the final selection, such as national or international politics are not addressed. This publication also discusses communication with and involvement of stakeholders as this has a strong influence on the process of selecting a site for a nuclear power plant. This report is intended for use by Member States initiating, restarting or expanding their nuclear power programmes. It gives guidance on the complex organizational, engineering, socio-economic, and environmental issues of siting. It aims to enable States to develop detailed country-specific processes for implementation of siting activities or to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the siting process. This publication may be used by utilities assessing the possibilities for building and operating a nuclear power plant as well as by contractors

  11. Managing Siting Activities for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    , referenced bank of data that can be used during the lifetime of the nuclear power plant. As a result, and after reviewing the existing publications, the IAEA decided to develop an integrated Nuclear Energy Series publication on managing siting activities for a nuclear power plant using recent siting experience from States. This publication: -Complements the IAEA Safety Guide related to site selection; - Emphasizes the integrity and interdependence of various activities related to site selection and assessment, including safety, environmental, technical, economic and social factors; - Develops the methodology and framework for all aspects of the siting process; - Updates the existing IAEA documentation in order to better reflect the developments in the nuclear and energy industry related to siting; - Integrates the existing IAEA publications on the subject into a more compact and user friendly guide. This publication provides the information necessary to organize, guide and realize the activities related to the selection and assessment of a site through defining the factors for consideration and methodologies for site investigation. Other factors that could have an impact on the final selection, such as national or international politics are not addressed. This publication also discusses communication with and involvement of stakeholders as this has a strong influence on the process of selecting a site for a nuclear power plant. This report is intended for use by Member States initiating, restarting or expanding their nuclear power programmes. It gives guidance on the complex organizational, engineering, socio-economic, and environmental issues of siting. It aims to enable States to develop detailed country-specific processes for implementation of siting activities or to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the siting process. This publication may be used by utilities assessing the possibilities for building and operating a nuclear power plant as well as by contractors

  12. Managing the high level waste nuclear regulatory commission licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskin, K.P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the process for obtaining Nuclear Regulatory Commission permits for the high level waste storage facility is basically the same process commercial nuclear power plants followed to obtain construction permits and operating licenses for their facilities. Therefore, the experience from licensing commercial reactors can be applied to the high level waste facility. Proper management of the licensing process will be the key to the successful project. The management of the licensing process was categorized into four areas as follows: responsibility, organization, communication and documentation. Drawing on experience from nuclear power plant licensing and basic management principles, the management requirement for successfully accomplishing the project goals are discussed

  13. Summary of nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Saburo

    1973-01-01

    Various conditions for the construction of nuclear power plants in Japan without natural resources were investigated. Expansion of the sites of plants, change of reactor vessels, standardization of nuclear power plants, possiblity of the reduction of construction period, approaching of nuclear power plants to consuming cities, and group construction were studied. Evaluation points were safety and economy. Previous sites of nuclear power plants were mostly on plane ground or cut and enlarge sites. Proposals for underground or offshore plants have been made. The underground plants were made at several places in Europe, and the ocean plant is now approved in U.S.A. as a plant on a man-made island. Vessels for containing nuclear reactors are the last barriers to the leakage of radioactive substance. At the initial period, the vessels were made of steel, which were surrounded by shielding material. Those were dry well type containers. Then, vessel type changed to pressure-suppression type wet containers. Now, it tends to concrete (PC or RC) type containers. There is the policy on the standardization of nuclear power plants by U.S.A.E.C. in recent remarkable activity. The merit and effect of the standardization were studied, and are presented in this paper. Cost of the construction of nuclear power plants is expensive, and interest of money is large. Then, the reduction of construction period is an important problem. The situations of plants approaching to consuming cities in various countries were studied. Idea of group construction is described. (Kato, T.)

  14. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all the numerical data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the French CEA/DSE/SEE Elecnuc database. The following aspects are reviewed: 1997 highlights; main characteristics of the reactor types in operation, under construction or on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1997; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and on order; capacity of nuclear power plants in operation; net and gross capacity of nuclear power plants on the grid and in commercial operation; forecasts; first power generation of nuclear origin per country, achieved or expected; performance indicator of PWR units in France; worldwide trend of the power generation indicator; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction, on order, planned, cancelled, shutdown, and exported; planning of steam generators replacement; MOX fuel program for plutonium recycling. (J.S.)

  15. Owners of nuclear power plants: Percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.S.

    1987-08-01

    The following list indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies as of June 1, 1987. The list includes all plants licensed to operate, under construction, docked for NRC safety and environmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review. It does not include those plants announced but not yet under review or those plants formally canceled. In many cases, ownership may be in the process of changing as a result of altered financial conditions, changed power needs, and other reasons. However, this list reflects only those ownership percentages of which the NRC has been formally notified. Part I lists plants alphabetically with their associated applicants/licensees and percentage ownership. Part II lists applicants/licensees alphabetically with their associated plants and percentage ownership. Part I also indicates which plants have received operating licenses (OL's). Footnotes for both parts appear at the end of this document

  16. Preparedness of public authorities for emergencies at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The safety guide lays down the requirements for the establishment of suitable procedures to be followed in the event of an emergency situation at a nuclear power plant. Many of the procedures would also be applicable at other nuclear facilities such as fuel manufacturing plants, irradiated fuel processing plants and the like. The guide defines reponsibilities for emergency planning, organization and action, protective measures to be taken, information and instruction of the public, training and cooperation across boundaries

  17. Nuclear accidents and safety measures of domestic nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Zurong; Che Shuwei; Pan Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Based on the design standards for the safety of nuclear and radiation in nuclear power plants, the three accidents in the history of nuclear power are analyzed. And the main factors for these accidents are found out, that is, human factors and unpredicted natural calamity. By combining the design and operation parameters of domestic nuclear plants, the same accidents are studied and some necessary preventive schemes are put forward. In the security operation technology of domestic nuclear power plants nowadays, accidents caused by human factors can by prevented completely. But the safety standards have to be reconsidered for the unpredicted neutral disasters. How to reduce the hazard of nuclear radiation and leakage to the level that can be accepted by the government and public when accidents occur under extreme conditions during construction and operation of nuclear power plants must be considered adequately. (authors)

  18. Perspectives of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajda, Gy.

    2001-01-01

    In several countries the construction of nuclear power plants has been stopped, and in some counties several plants have been decommissioned or are planned to. Therefore, the question arises: have nuclear power plants any future? According to the author, the question should be reformulated: can mankind survive without nuclear power? To examine this challenge, the global power demand and its trends are analyzed. According to the results, traditional energy sources cannot be adequate to supply power. Therefore, a reconsideration of nuclear power should be imminent. The economic, environmental attractions are discussed as opposite to the lack of social support. (R.P.)

  19. Concept and design of a fully computerized control room for future nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinz, W.; Kollmannsberger, J.

    1991-01-01

    The development of digital process control equipment and of safety engineering equipment together with the CRT - based information visualization systems is advanced to a state allowing process control of nuclear power plant to be done by these equipments. The systems have been tested in the control room of the fossil-fuel Staudinger reactor station, unit 5, and the computer-assisted PRISCA process information system has been tested in the Konvoi-type nuclear reactor series. These tests serve as a basis for further process control system development by Siemens KWU, to be used in their future nuclear power plants. The advantages of digital process control and CRT-based information display are intended to be used for further optimization of the man-machine interface in nuclear power plant. One important aspect is to give the control room personnel complete insight into the operational processes of the entire plant, and to establish for detail recognition for process monitoring a very close mental link between operators and the system processes. In addition, the control room operator has to be given appropriate means and tools for process monitoring and control, fulfilling the requirements of guaranteeing the plant's availability and safety. These requirements put very high demands on the process monitoring and control equipment. (orig.) [de

  20. Modeling risk assessment for nuclear processing plants with LAVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.T.; Tisinger, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Using the Los Alamos Vulnerability and Risk Assessment (LAVA) methodology, the authors developed a model for assessing risks associated with nuclear processing plants. LAVA is a three-part systematic approach to risk assessment. The first part is the mathematical methodology; the second is the general personal computer-based software engine; and the third is the application itself. The methodology provides a framework for creating applications for the software engine to operate upon; all application-specific information is data. Using LAVA, the authors build knowledge-based expert systems to assess risks in applications systems comprising a subject system and a safeguards system. The subject system model is sets of threats, assets, and undesirable outcomes. The safeguards system model is sets of safeguards functions for protecting the assets from the threats by preventing or ameliorating the undesirable outcomes, sets of safeguards subfunctions whose performance determine whether the function is adequate and complete, and sets of issues, appearing as interactive questionnaires, whose measures (in both monetary and linguistic terms) define both the weaknesses in the safeguards system and the potential costs of an undesirable outcome occurring

  1. High temperature corrosion in the service environments of a nuclear process heat plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    In a nuclear process heat plant the heat-exchanging components fabricated from nickel- and Fe-Ni-based alloys are subjected to corrosive service environments at temperatures up to 950 0 C for service lives of up to 140 000 h. In this paper the corrosion behaviour of the high temperature alloys in the different service environments will be described. It is shown that the degree of protection provided by Cr 2 O 3 -based surface oxide scales against carburization and decarburization of the alloys is primarily determined not by the oxidation potential of the atmospheres but by a dynamic process involving, on the one hand, the oxidizing gas species and the metal and, on the other hand, the carbon in the alloy and the oxide scale. (orig.)

  2. Application of expert system to nuclear power plant operation and guidance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, M.; Takada, Y.

    1990-01-01

    For a nuclear power plant, it is important that an expert system supplies useful information to the operator to meet the increasing demand for high-level plant operation. It is difficult to build a user-friendly expert system that supplies useful information in real time using existing general-purpose expert system shells. Therefore a domain-specific expert system shell with a useful knowledge representation for problem-solving in nuclear power plant operation was selected. The Plant Table (P/T) representation format was developed for description of a production system for nuclear power plant operation knowledge. The P/T consists of plant condition representation designed to process multiple inputs and single output. A large number of operation inputs for several plant conditions are divided into 'timing conditions', 'preconditions' and 'completion conditions' to facilitate knowledge-base build-up. An expert system for a Nuclear Power Plant Operation and Guidance System utilizing the P/T was developed to assist automatic plant operation and surveillance test operation. In these systems, automatic plant operation signals to the plant equipment and operation guidance messages to the operators are both output based on the processing and assessment of plant operation conditions by the P/T. A surveillance test procedure guide for major safety-related systems, such as those for emergency core cooling systems, is displayed on a CRT (Cathode Ray Tube) and test results are printed out. The expert system for a Nuclear Power Plant Operation and Guidance System has already been successfully applied to Japanese BWR plants

  3. Dynamic flowgraph modeling of process and control systems of a nuclear-based hydrogen production plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Dabbagh, Ahmad W. [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada); Lu, Lixuan [Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-09-15

    Modeling and analysis of system reliability facilitate the identification of areas of potential improvement. The Dynamic Flowgraph Methodology (DFM) is an emerging discrete modeling framework that allows for capturing time dependent behaviour, switching logic and multi-state representation of system components. The objective of this research is to demonstrate the process of dynamic flowgraph modeling of a nuclear-based hydrogen production plant with the copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) cycle. Modeling of the thermochemical process of the Cu-Cl cycle in conjunction with a networked control system proposed for monitoring and control of the process is provided. This forms the basis for future component selection. (author)

  4. Off-shore nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, T.

    1980-01-01

    In order to avoid losses of energy and seawater pollution an off-shore nuclear power plant is coupled with a power plant which utilizes the temperature difference between seawater and hot reactor cooling water. According to the invention the power plant has a working media loop which is separated from the nuclear power plant. The apparative equipment and the operational characteristics of the power plant are the subject of the patent. (UWI) [de

  5. Plant life management optimized utilization of existing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watzinger, H.; Erve, M.

    1999-01-01

    For safe, reliable and economical nuclear power generation it is of central importance to understand, analyze and manage aging-related phenomena and to apply this information in the systematic utilization and as-necessary extension of the service life of components and systems. An operator's overall approach to aging and plant life management which also improves performance characteristics can help to optimize plant operating economy. In view of the deregulation of the power generation industry with its increased competition, nuclear power plants must today also increasingly provide for or maintain a high level of plant availability and low power generating costs. This is a difficult challenge even for the newest, most modern plants, and as plants age they can only remain competitive if a plant operator adopts a strategic approach which takes into account the various aging-related effects on a plant-wide basis. The significance of aging and plant life management for nuclear power plants becomes apparent when looking at their age: By the year 2000 roughly fifty of the world's 434 commercial nuclear power plants will have been in operation for thirty years or more. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency, as many as 110 plants will have reached the thirty-year service mark by the year 2005. In many countries human society does not push the construction of new nuclear power plants and presumably will not change mind within the next ten years. New construction licenses cannot be expected so that for economical and ecological reasons existing plants have to be operated unchallengeably. On the other hand the deregulation of the power production market is asking just now for analysis of plant life time to operate the plants at a high technical and economical level until new nuclear power plants can be licensed and constructed. (author)

  6. Trial application of guidelines for nuclear plant response to an earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W.; Oliver, R.; O'Connor, W.

    1993-09-01

    Guidelines have been developed to assist nuclear plant personnel in the preparation of earthquake response procedures for nuclear power plants. These guidelines are published in EPRI report NP-6695, ''Guidelines for Nuclear Plant Response to an Earthquake,'' dated December 1989. This report includes two sets of nuclear plant procedures which were prepared to implement the guidelines of EPRI report NP-6695. The first set were developed by the Toledo Edison Company Davis-Besse plant. Davis-Besse is a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and contains relatively standard seismic monitoring instrumentation typical of many domestic nuclear plants. The second set of procedures were prepared by Yankee Atomic Electric Company for the Vermont Yankee facility. This plant is a boiling water reactor (BWR) with state-of-the-art seismic monitoring and PC-based data processing equipment, software developed specifically to implement the OBE Exceedance Criterion presented in EPRI report NP-5930, ''A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the operating Basis Earthquake.'' The two sets of procedures are intended to demonstrate how two different nuclear utilities have interpreted and applied the EPRI guidance given in report NP-6695

  7. Building of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Takashi.

    1997-01-01

    A first nuclear plant and a second nuclear power plant are disposed in adjacent with each other in a building for a nuclear reactor. A reactor container is disposed in each of the plants, and each reactor container is surrounded by a second containing facility. A repairing chamber capable of communicating with the secondary containing facilities for both of the secondary containing facilities is disposed being in contact with the second containing facility of each plant for repairing control rod driving mechanisms or reactor incorporated-type recycling pumps. Namely, the repairing chamber is in adjacent with the reactor containers of both plants, and situated between both of the plants as a repairing chamber to be used in common for both plants. Air tight inlet/exit doors are formed to the inlets/exits of both plants of the repairing chamber. Space for the repairing chamber can be reduced to about one half compared with a case where the repairing chamber is formed independently on each plant. (I.N.)

  8. [Risk communication in construction of new nuclear power plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gui-Zhen; Lü, Yong-Long

    2013-03-01

    Accompanied by construction of new nuclear power plants in the coming decades in China, risk management has become increasingly politicized and contentious. Nuclear risk communication is a critical component in helping individuals prepare for, respond to, and recover from nuclear power emergencies. It was discussed that awareness of trust and public attitudes are important determinants in nuclear power risk communication and management. However, there is limited knowledge about how to best communicate with at-risk populations around nuclear power plant in China. To bridge this gap, this study presented the attitudinal data from a field survey in under-building Haiyang nuclear power plant, Shandong Province to measure public support for and opposition to the local construction of nuclear power plant. The paper discussed the structure of the communication process from a descriptive point of view, recognizing the importance of trust and understanding the information openness. The results showed that decision-making on nuclear power was dominated by a closed "iron nuclear triangle" of national governmental agencies, state-owned nuclear enterprises and scientific experts. Public participation and public access to information on nuclear constructions and assessments have been marginal and media was a key information source. As information on nuclear power and related risks is very restricted in China, Chinese citizens (51%) tend to choose the government as the most trustworthy source. More respondents took the negative attitudes toward nuclear power plant construction around home. It drew on studies about risk communication to develop some guidelines for successful risk communication. The conclusions have vast implications for how we approach risk management in the future. The findings should be of interest to state and local emergency managers, community-based organizations, public health researchers, and policy makers.

  9. Nuclear Power Plants. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell, Walter, III

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Why Use Nuclear Power?; From Atoms to Electricity; Reactor Types; Typical Plant Design Features; The Cost of Nuclear Power; Plants in the United States; Developments in Foreign…

  10. An international benchmark on safety review practices at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, B.; Kettunen, J.

    2000-02-01

    A benchmarking exercise on safety review practices at nuclear power plants in Finland, Sweden and the United Kingdom has been carried out. In the exercise a comparison was made between documented practices at the Forsmark, Hinkley Point A and Olkiluoto nuclear power plants. In addition a total of 28 persons at FKA, Magnox and TVO were interviewed on their views on the efficiency of the plant modification processes in the later half of 1997. One specific example of a plant modification was selected from each of the nuclear power plant sites to provide a basis for the comparison. The report gives an account of the methodology used, a description of the plant modification projects, impressions from the interviews, potential problem areas and suggestions for possible improvements. (orig.)

  11. 75 FR 66802 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2; Notice of Withdrawal of...) has granted the request of Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC, the licensee, to withdraw its... for the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2, located in Calvert County, MD. The...

  12. The Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant Process for Managing Equipment Intended for Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting System Upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuldashev, Rashid; Nosov, Andrei; Carroll, Michael F.; Garrett, Albert G.; Dabbs, Richard D.; Ku, Esther M.

    2008-01-01

    Since 1996, the Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) located in the town of Novouralsk, Russia, (previously known as Sverdlovsk-44) and the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) have been cooperating under the Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A) Program. Because UEIP is involved in the processing of highly enriched uranium (HEU) into low enriched uranium (LEU), and there are highly enriched nuclear materials on its territory, the main goal of the MPC and A cooperation is to upgrade those systems that ensure secure storage, processing and transportation of nuclear materials at the plant. UEIP has completed key upgrades (equipment procurement and installation) aimed at improving MPC and A systems through significant investments made by both the U.S. DOE and UEIP. These joint cooperative efforts resulted in bringing MPC and A systems into compliance with current regulations, which led to nuclear material (NM) theft risk reduction and prevention from other unlawful actions with respect to them. Upon the U.S. MPC and A project team's suggestion, UEIP has developed an equipment inventory control process to track all the property provided through the MPC and A Program. The UEIP process and system for managing equipment provides many benefits including: greater ease and efficiency in determining the quantities, location, maintenance and repair schedule for equipment; greater assurance that MPC and A equipment is in continued satisfactory operation; and improved control in the development of a site sustainability program. While emphasizing UEIP's equipment inventory control processes, this paper will present process requirements and a methodology that may have practical and helpful applications at other sites.

  13. Electromagnetic compatibility of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabayan, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    Lately, there has been a mounting concern about the electromagnetic compatibility of nuclear-power-plant systems mainly because of the effects due to the nuclear electromagnetic pulse, and also because of the introduction of more-sophisticated and, therefore, more-susceptible solid-state devices into the plants. Questions have been raised about the adequacy of solid-state-device protection against plant electromagnetic-interference sources and transients due to the nuclear electromagnetic pulse. In this paper, the author briefly reviews the environment, and the coupling, susceptibility, and vulnerability assessment issues of commercial nuclear power plants

  14. Nuclear power plants in populated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachsmann, F.

    1973-01-01

    The article first deals with the permanently increasing demand for electical power. Considering the ever growing energy demand which can no longer be covered by conventional power plants, it has become necessary to set up nuclear power plants of larger range. The author presents in a survey the basic function of nuclear power plants as well as the resulting risks and safety measures. The author concludes that according to present knowledge there is no more need to erect nuclear power plants outside densely populated urban areas but there is now the possibility of erecting nuclear power plants in densely populated areas. (orig./LH) [de

  15. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

  16. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purvis, James W.

    1999-01-01

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented

  17. Energy economics of nuclear and coal fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kee Won; Cho, Joo Hyun; Kim, Sung Rae; Choi, Hae Yoon

    1995-01-01

    The upturn of Korean nuclear power program can be considered to have started in early 70's while future plants for the construction of new nuclear power plants virtually came to a halt in United States. It is projected that power plant systems from combination of nuclear and coal fired types might shift to all coal fired type, considering the current trend of construction on the new plants in the United States. However, with the depletion of natural resources, it is desirable to understand the utilization of two competitive utility technologies in terms of of invested energy. Presented in this paper is a comparison between two systems, nuclear power plant and coal fired steam power plant in terms of energy investment. The method of comparison is Net Energy Analysis (NEA). In doing so, Input-Output Analysis (IOA) among industries and commodities is done. Using these information, net energy ratios are calculated and compared. NEA is conducted for power plants in U.S. because the availability of necessary data are limited in Korea. Although NEA does not offer conclusive solution, this method can work as a screening process in decision making. When considering energy systems, results from such analysis can be used as a general guideline. 2 figs., 12 tabs., 5 refs. (Author)

  18. A small floating seawater desalination plant by using a nuclear heating reactor coupled with the MED process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Dazhi; Zhang Dafang; Dong Duo [Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2000-03-01

    Based on the experience of development of nuclear district heating reactor (NHR) a seawater desalination plant using NHR coupled with the multi-effect distillation (MED) process is being designed. With the same technology a floating desalination plant was proposed to supply potable water to remote areas or islands. With a 10 MWth NHR the floating plant could produce 4000 m{sup 3}/d of potable water and 750 kW of electricity. The design of NHR-10 and the safety features are described. The coupling scheme and parameters are given. Some special considerations for using in ship condition are also presented in this paper. (author)

  19. Virtual environments for nuclear power plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.; Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; King, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    In the design and operation of nuclear power plants, the visualization process inherent in virtual environments (VE) allows for abstract design concepts to be made concrete and simulated without using a physical mock-up. This helps reduce the time and effort required to design and understand the system, thus providing the design team with a less complicated arrangement. Also, the outcome of human interactions with the components and system can be minimized through various testing of scenarios in real-time without the threat of injury to the user or damage to the equipment. If implemented, this will lead to a minimal total design and construction effort for nuclear power plants (NPP)

  20. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant phaseout/deactivation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M.W.; Thompson, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The decision to cease all US Department of Energy (DOE) reprocessing of nuclear fuels was made on April 28, 1992. This study provides insight into and a comparison of the management, technical, compliance, and safety strategies for deactivating the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant. The purpose of this study is to ensure that lessons-learned and future plans are coordinated between the two facilities

  1. Nuclear Security for Floating Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiba, James M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Scherer, Carolynn P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a lot of interest in small modular reactors. A specific type of these small modular reactors (SMR,) are marine based power plants called floating nuclear power plants (FNPP). These FNPPs are typically built by countries with extensive knowledge of nuclear energy, such as Russia, France, China and the US. These FNPPs are built in one country and then sent to countries in need of power and/or seawater desalination. Fifteen countries have expressed interest in acquiring such power stations. Some designs for such power stations are briefly summarized. Several different avenues for cooperation in FNPP technology are proposed, including IAEA nuclear security (i.e. safeguards), multilateral or bilateral agreements, and working with Russian design that incorporates nuclear safeguards for IAEA inspections in non-nuclear weapons states

  2. Chemical Plant Accidents in a Nuclear Hydrogen Generation Scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Revankar, Shripad T.

    2011-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear reactor (HTR) could be used to drive a steam reformation plant, a coal gasification facility, an electrolysis plant, or a thermochemical hydrogen production cycle. Most thermochemical cycles are purely thermodynamic, and thus achieve high thermodynamic efficiency. HTRs produce large amounts of heat at high temperature (1100 K). Helium-cooled HTRs have many passive, or inherent, safety characteristics. This inherent safety is due to the high design basis limit of the maximum fuel temperature. Due to the severity of a potential release, containment of fission products is the single most important safety issue in any nuclear reactor facility. A HTR coupled to a chemical plant presents a complex system, due primarily to the interactive nature of both plants. Since the chemical plant acts as the heat sink for the nuclear reactor, it important to understand the interaction and feedback between the two systems. Process heat plants and HTRs are generally very different. Some of the major differences include: time constants of plants, safety standards, failure probability, and transient response. While both the chemical plant and the HTR are at advanced stages of testing individually, no serious effort has been made to understand the operation of the integrated system, especially during accident events that are initiated in the chemical plant. There is a significant lack of knowledge base regarding scaling and system integration for large scale process heat plants coupled to HTRs. Consideration of feedback between the two plants during time-dependent scenarios is absent from literature. Additionally, no conceptual studies of the accidents that could occur in either plant and impact the entire coupled system are present in literature

  3. Nuclear power plants in the world - 2010 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the IAEA's PRIS and AREVA-CEA's GAIA databases. The following aspects are reviewed: 2009 highlights, Main characteristics of reactor types, Map of the French nuclear power plants on 2010/01/01, Worldwide status of nuclear power plants (12/31/2009), Units distributed by countries, Nuclear power plants connected to the Grid- by reactor type groups, Nuclear power plants under construction on 2009, Evolution of nuclear power plants capacities connected to the grid, First electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit in each country, Electrical generation from nuclear power plants by country at the end 2009, Performance indicator of french PWR units, Evolution of the generation indicators worldwide by type, Nuclear operator ranking according to their installed capacity, Units connected to the grid by countries at 12/31/2009, Status of licence renewal applications in USA, Nuclear power plants under construction at 12/31/2009, Shutdown reactors, Exported nuclear capacity in net MWe, Exported and national nuclear capacity connected to the grid, Exported nuclear power plants under construction, Exported and national nuclear capacity under construction, Nuclear power plants ordered at 12/31/2009, Long term shutdown units at 12/31/2009, COL applications in the USA, Recycling of Plutonium in reactors and experiences, Mox licence plants projects, Appendix - historical development, Meaning of the used acronyms, Glossary

  4. Basic factors to forecast maintenance cost and failure processes for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popova, Elmira; Yu, Wei; Kee, Ernie; Sun, Alice; Richards, Drew; Grantom, Rick

    2006-01-01

    Two types of maintenance interventions are usually administered at nuclear power plants: planned and corrective. The cost incurred includes the labor (manpower) cost, cost for new parts, or emergency order of expensive items. At the plant management level there is a budgeted amount of money to be spent every year for such operations. It is very important to have a good forecast for this cost since unexpected events can trigger it to a very high level. In this research we present a statistical factor model to forecast the maintenance cost for the incoming month. One of the factors is the expected number of unplanned (due to failure) maintenance interventions. We introduce a Bayesian model for the failure rate of the equipment, which is input to the cost forecasting model. The importance of equipment reliability and prediction in the commercial nuclear power plant is presented along with applicable governmental and industry organization requirements. A detailed statistical analysis is performed on a set of maintenance cost and failure data gathered at the South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) in Bay City, Texas, USA

  5. Nuclear power plant ageing and life extension: Safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, S.; Podest, M.

    1987-01-01

    Experience with large fossil-fired electrical generating units, as well as in all process industries, shows that plants begin to deteriorate with age after approximately 10 years of operation. Similar phenomena will prevail for nuclear plants, and it is reasonable to postulate that their availability will be affected, as will their safety, if appropriate measures are not taken. It is evident that the average age of power reactors in the IAEA's Member States is increasing. By 2000, more than 50 nuclear plants will have been providing electricity for 25 years or longer. Most nuclear power plants have operating lifetimes of between 20 and 40 years. Ageing is defined as a continuing time-dependent degradation of material due to service conditions, including normal operation and transient conditions. It is common experience that over long periods of time, there is a gradual change in the properties of materials. These changes can affect the capability of engineered components, systems, or structures to perform their required function. Not all changes are deleterious, but it is commonly observed that ageing processes normally involve a gradual reduction in performance capability. All materials in a nuclear power plant can suffer from ageing and can partially or totally lose their designed function. Ageing is not only of concern for active components (for which the probability of malfunction increases with time) but also for passive ones, since the safety margin is being reduced towards the lowest allowable level

  6. Management strategies for nuclear power plant outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    More competitive energy markets have significant implications for nuclear power plant operations, including, among others, the need for more efficient use of resources and effective management of plant activities such as on-line maintenance and outages. Outage management is a key factor for safe, reliable and economic plant performance and involves many aspects: plant policy, coordination of available resources, nuclear safety, regulatory and technical requirements, and all activities and work hazards, before and during the outage. The IAEA has produced this report on nuclear power plant outage management strategies to provide both a summary and an update of a follow-up to a series of technical documents related to practices regarding outage management and cost effective maintenance. The aim of this publication is to identify good practices in outage management: outage planning and preparation, outage execution and post-outage review. As in in the related technical documents, this report aims to communicate these practices in such a way that they can be used by operating organizations and regulatory bodies in Member States. The report was prepared as part of an IAEA project on continuous process improvement. The objective of this project is to increase Member State capabilities in improving plant performance and competitiveness through the utilization of proven engineering and management practices developed and transferred by the IAEA

  7. Safety aspects of the modernization of I and C and process information in nuclear power plants with special regard to alarm annunciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, F [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Salzgitter (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    In particular for older German nuclear power plants there are projects to modernize I and C and process information systems. This modernization mainly aims at improvements in plant operation. For instance, using modern computing technology, the plant operation can be optimized, according to further details. Furthermore, the problem of spare-part keeping for out-dated components can be solved. For modernizing the I and C or the process computer system, safety-relevant aspects have to be taken into account. For instance, the compatibility of the system modification with the existing alarm annunciation concept shall be considered, and for each modernization step, the interfaces between the equipment of different safety significance shall be assessed and observed. The functions and the associated equipment have to be qualified in accordance to their safety significance. At present, the regulatory framework for computer-based instrumentation and control as well as for information systems is being elaborated in Germany and worldwide. Recently, the guidelines of the German Reactor Safety Commission have been extended with regard to the introduction and safety application of modern computer-based I and C in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, some of the essential requirements for design and qualification of modern I and C can be derived from the existing rules and standards. Particularly, concerning the alarm annunciation system, this report summarizes safety-relevant aspects of the modernization of the instrumentation and control system as well as the process information system in nuclear power plants. (author). 4 refs.

  8. Safety aspects of the modernization of I and C and process information in nuclear power plants with special regard to alarm annunciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, F.

    1997-01-01

    In particular for older German nuclear power plants there are projects to modernize I and C and process information systems. This modernization mainly aims at improvements in plant operation. For instance, using modern computing technology, the plant operation can be optimized, according to further details. Furthermore, the problem of spare-part keeping for out-dated components can be solved. For modernizing the I and C or the process computer system, safety-relevant aspects have to be taken into account. For instance, the compatibility of the system modification with the existing alarm annunciation concept shall be considered, and for each modernization step, the interfaces between the equipment of different safety significance shall be assessed and observed. The functions and the associated equipment have to be qualified in accordance to their safety significance. At present, the regulatory framework for computer-based instrumentation and control as well as for information systems is being elaborated in Germany and worldwide. Recently, the guidelines of the German Reactor Safety Commission have been extended with regard to the introduction and safety application of modern computer-based I and C in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, some of the essential requirements for design and qualification of modern I and C can be derived from the existing rules and standards. Particularly, concerning the alarm annunciation system, this report summarizes safety-relevant aspects of the modernization of the instrumentation and control system as well as the process information system in nuclear power plants. (author). 4 refs

  9. "Life without nuclear power": A nuclear plant retirement formulation model and guide based on economics. San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station case: Economic impacts and reliability considerations leading to plant retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasko, Frank

    Traditionally, electric utilities have been slow to change and very bureaucratic in nature. This culture, in and of itself, has now contributed to a high percentage of United States electric utilities operating uneconomical nuclear plants (Crooks, 2014). The economic picture behind owning and operating United States nuclear plants is less than favorable for many reasons including rising fuel, capital and operating costs (EUCG, 2012). This doctoral dissertation is specifically focused on life without nuclear power. The purpose of this dissertation is to create a model and guide that will provide electric utilities who currently operate or will operate uneconomical nuclear plants the opportunity to economically assess whether or not their nuclear plant should be retired. This economic assessment and stakeholder analysis will provide local government, academia and communities the opportunity to understand how Southern California Edison (SCE) embraced system upgrade import and "voltage support" opportunities to replace "base load" generation from San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) versus building new replacement generation facilities. This model and guide will help eliminate the need to build large replacement generation units as demonstrated in the SONGS case analysis. The application of The Nuclear Power Retirement Model and Guide will provide electric utilities with economic assessment parameters and an evaluation assessment progression needed to better evaluate when an uneconomical nuclear plant should be retired. It will provide electric utilities the opportunity to utilize sound policy, planning and development skill sets when making this difficult decision. There are currently 62 nuclear power plants (with 100 nuclear reactors) operating in the United States (EIA, 2014). From this group, 38 are at risk of early retirement based on the work of Cooper (2013). As demonstrated in my model, 35 of the 38 nuclear power plants qualify to move to the economic

  10. Licensing the First Nuclear Power Plant. INSAG-26. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This report is primarily addressed to policy makers and nuclear safety regulatory bodies in IAEA Member States planning to establish their first nuclear power plant. It outlines the key challenges with suggestions on how the regulator and policy makers might address them and also prepare for further development of nuclear power in the country. INSAG believes that development of technical competence of the national regulatory body is a necessary condition for the safe development of nuclear power. Therefore, regulatory infrastructure development should be a national policy requirement, as opposed to being a challenge only for the regulator. A major challenge in the deployment of the first nuclear power plant is the development of the underlying nuclear safety infrastructure and knowledge base. Since an independent regulatory body is an important part of such infrastructure, its establishment and development must be addressed at an early stage and adequate resources must be made available for this purpose. This is to ensure smooth and efficient conduct of the licensing process and regulatory oversight of the first nuclear power plant through an informed decision making process. It is essential that the legal framework starts to be implemented with a main component being the issuance of a nuclear law establishing fundamental principles and defining the responsibilities of the principal organizations, particularly the operating organization and the regulatory body. The regulatory body on its part should develop the regulatory framework that includes the establishment of regulations against which the nuclear power project will be assessed, definition of the licensing steps and corresponding documentation to be submitted by the applicant, and the implementation of a quality management system. It is expected that the 'reference plant' concept will be employed whereby the country's first nuclear power plant would have essentially the same design and safety features as a

  11. The German risk study for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkhofer, A.

    1980-01-01

    In August 1979 results of the ''German Risk Study for Nuclear Power Plants'' were published. The Main Report, in which approach and results of the study are documented, has been available since the end of 1979. It was the charter of the study - which was performed on behalf of the Minister of Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany - to apply as far as possible the methods of the US Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) to German plant and site conditions. A direct transfer of the results was not deemed justified, mainly for the following reasons: There is quite a number of differences between the design of the reference plants of WASH-1400 (Surry-1, Peach Bottom-2) and German nuclear power plants. The mean population density in the Federal Republic of Germany is more than ten times of the United States. In the vicinity of nuclear power plants the ratio is about 3:1. To calculate the collective risk resulting from reactor accidents, a total of 25 plants at 19 different sites in the Federal Republic of Germany were considered. This included all plants with 600 MW or more electrical output, which were in operation, under construction or in licensing process by July 1, 1977. As an approximation to the real situation, it has been assumed that all 25 plants are technically identical to the reference plant

  12. Lifetime Management in Non-US-Technology Nuclear Power Plants using US Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelius Steenkamp, J.; Encabo Espartero, J.; Garcia Iglesias, R.

    2013-01-01

    In July 2009 the Spanish Nuclear Regulator (CSN) issued a Safety Instruction (IS-22) for the development of Lifetime Management in the Nuclear Power Plants within Spain. The context of this Safety Instruction is based on the American Regulations 10CFR54, NUREG1800/1801 and the technical guide NEI95-10. All these regulations are aimed at US-Technology Nuclear Power Plants. Lifetime Management of Nuclear Power Plants with a plant design different from US technologies can most certainly be developed with the mentioned US regulations. The successful development of Lifetime Management in these cases depends on the adaptation of the different requirements of the regulations. Challenges resulting from the adaptation process can be resolved by taking into consideration the plant design of the plant in question.

  13. Status of the Monticello nuclear generating plant lead plant license renewal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickens, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    In 1988, the Monticello nuclear generating plant was chosen by the US Department of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories and the Electric Power Research Institute to serve as the lead boiling water reactor in the lead plant license renewal program. The purpose of the lead plant license renewal program is to provide insights during the development of and to demonstrate the license renewal regulatory process with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The work being performed in three phases: (1) preparation of the technical basis for license renewal; (2) development of the technical basis into a formal license renewal application; and (3) review of the application by the NRC. This paper discusses the systems and structures identified as important to license renewal in accordance with 10CFR54 as well as the plant documents and programs that were used in going through the identification process. The systems and structures important to license renewal will then provide insights into how structures and components were identified that are required to be evaluated for aging, the elements of the aging evaluations, and the effective programs used to manage potentially significant aging

  14. Owners of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

    1996-11-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  15. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all the numerical data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the French CEA/DSE/SEE Elecnuc database. The following aspects are reviewed: 1999 highlights; main characteristics of the reactor types in operation, under construction or on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1999; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and on order; capacity of nuclear power plants in operation; net and gross capacity of nuclear power plants on the grid and in commercial operation; grid connection forecasts; world electric power market; electronuclear owners and share holders in EU, capacity and load factor; first power generation of nuclear origin per country, achieved or expected; performance indicator of PWR units in France; worldwide trend of the power generation indicator; 1999 gross load factor by operator; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction, on order, planned, cancelled, shutdown, and exported; planning of steam generators replacement; MOX fuel program for plutonium recycling. (J.S.)

  16. Advanced plant design recommendations from Cook Nuclear Plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, W.L.

    1993-01-01

    A project in the American Electric Power Service Corporation to review operating and maintenance experience at Cook Nuclear Plant to identify recommendations for advanced nuclear plant design is described. Recommendations so gathered in the areas of plant fluid systems, instrument and control, testing and surveillance provisions, plant layout of equipment, provisions to enhance effective maintenance, ventilation systems, radiological protection, and construction, are presented accordingly. An example for a design review checklist for effective plant operations and maintenance is suggested

  17. Summary of operating experience at Swedish nuclear power plants in 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The four owners on nuclear power plants in Sweden - The Swedish State Power Board, Forsmarks Kraftgrupp AB, Sydkraft AB and OKG AKTIEBOLAG - formed in 1980 the Nuclear Safety Board of the Swedish Utilities as a joint body for collaboration in safety matters. The Board participates in coordination of the safety work of the utilities and conducts its own safety projects, whereever this is more efficient than the utilities' working independently. The work of the Board shall contribute to optimizing safety in the operation of the Swedish nuclear power plants. The most important function of the Board is to collect, process and evaluate information on operational disturbances and incidents at Swedish and foreign nuclear power plants and then use the knowledge thus gained to improve the safety of the operation of the Swedish nuclear power plants (experience feedback). The work with Experience Feedback proceeds in three stages: Event follow-up, Fault analysis and Feedback of results. The Board runs a system for experience feedback (ERF). ERF is a computer-based information and communication system. ERF provides the Board with a daily update of operating experience in both Swedish and foreign nuclear power plants. Each Swedish nuclear power station supplies the ERF system with data on, among other things, operation and operational distrubances. Important experiences are thereby fed back to plant operation. Experience from foreign nuclear power stations can be of interest to the Swedish nuclear power plants. This information comes to RKS and is reviewed daily. The information that is considered relevant to Swedish plants is fed after analysis into the ERF system. Conversely, foreign nuclear power stations can obtain information from the operation of the Swedish plants. (author)

  18. Geomorphologic specificities of selected sites for nuclear power plants in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalvoda, J.; Demek, J.

    1991-01-01

    The contribution of geomorphology to the complex evaluation of properties of sites for the construction and operation of nuclear facilities is demonstrated. The unique manifestation of the present geodynamics at the Jaslovske Bohunice nuclear power plant locality and the spatial correlations of annals of the specific morphotectonic development of georeliefs of that nuclear power plant with the location of the epicentral earthquake zones are shown. The results of the geomorphological survey in the surroundings of the Temelin nuclear power plant construction site are described and a drawing is reproduced showing how the georelief of this locality divides into areas with different categories of occurrence of morpho-structural formations. For the Tetov locality, where the construction of a nuclear power plant is planned, the changes in the course of the Labe (Elbe) river which occurred in the Pleistocene are of importance in the assessment of the intensity of geodynamic processes. The geomorphological and geotectonic complexity of the planned Blahutovice nuclear power plant construction site is demonstrated. A drawing shows the morphotectonic situation in the surroundings of that construction site. (Z.S.). 4 figs

  19. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This small folder presents a digest of some useful information concerning the nuclear power plants worldwide and the situation of nuclear industry at the end of 1997: power production of nuclear origin, distribution of reactor types, number of installed units, evolution and prediction of reactor orders, connections to the grid and decommissioning, worldwide development of nuclear power, evolution of power production of nuclear origin, the installed power per reactor type, market shares and exports of the main nuclear engineering companies, power plants constructions and orders situation, evolution of reactors performances during the last 10 years, know-how and development of nuclear safety, the remarkable facts of 1997, the future of nuclear power and the energy policy trends. (J.S.)

  20. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1991-02-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 and TVO I and II were in commercial operation for most of the time. The annual maintenance outages of the Loviisa plant units were held during the report period. All events during this quarter are classified as Level hero (Below Scale) on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were below authorised limits. Only small amounts of radioactive substances originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  1. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1991-08-01

    In the Quarterly Reports on the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants such events and observations are described relating to nuclear and radiation safety which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Also other events of general interest are reported. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the plants' workers and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO I and II were in commercial operation during the whole first quarter of 1991. The load factor average was 99.1 %. Failures have been detected in the uppermost spacing lattices of nuclear fuel bundles removed from the Loviisa nuclear reactors. Further investigations into the significance of the failures have been initiated. In this quarter, renewed cooling systems for the instrumentation area were introduced at Loviisa 1. The modifications made in the systems serve to ensure reliable cooling of the area even during the hottest summer months when the possibility exists that the temperature of the automation equipment could rise too high causing malfunctions which could endanger plant safety. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were below prescribed limits in this quarter. Only small amounts of radioactive substances originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  2. TOSHIBA CAE system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machiba, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Norio

    1990-01-01

    TOSHIBA aims to secure safety, increase reliability and improve efficiency through the engineering for nuclear power plant using Computer Aided Engineering (CAE). TOSHIBA CAE system for nuclear power plant consists of numbers of sub-systems which had been integrated centering around the Nuclear Power Plant Engineering Data Base (PDBMS) and covers all stage of engineering for nuclear power plant from project management, design, manufacturing, construction to operating plant service and preventive maintenance as it were 'Plant Life-Cycle CAE System'. In recent years, TOSHIBA has been devoting to extend the system for integrated intelligent CAE system with state-of-the-art computer technologies such as computer graphics and artificial intelligence. This paper shows the outline of CAE system for nuclear power plant in TOSHIBA. (author)

  3. Configuration management in nuclear power plants

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Configuration management (CM) is the process of identifying and documenting the characteristics of a facility's structures, systems and components of a facility, and of ensuring that changes to these characteristics are properly developed, assessed, approved, issued, implemented, verified, recorded and incorporated into the facility documentation. The need for a CM system is a result of the long term operation of any nuclear power plant. The main challenges are caused particularly by ageing plant technology, plant modifications, the application of new safety and operational requirements, and in general by human factors arising from migration of plant personnel and possible human failures. The IAEA Incident Reporting System (IRS) shows that on average 25% of recorded events could be caused by configuration errors or deficiencies. CM processes correctly applied ensure that the construction, operation, maintenance and testing of a physical facility are in accordance with design requirements as expressed in the d...

  4. Provision of operational radiation protection services at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide practical guidance on establishing and maintaining a radiation protection programme for a nuclear power plant that is consistent with the optimization process recommended in the Basic Safety Standards. This publication is written with a view to providing guidance to every person associated with the radiation protection programme for a nuclear power plant and develops the theme that radiation protection requires the commitment of all plant staff, including higher levels of executive management. 12 refs, 2 figs

  5. Operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, G.

    1987-01-01

    This textbook gives a systematic introduction into the operational and maintenance activities in nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors. Subjects: (1) Setup and operational behaviour of power reactors, (2) setup of nuclear power plants, (3) radiation protection and nuclear safety, (4) nuclear fuel, (5) constructional layout of nuclear power plants, (6) management, and (7) maintenance. 158 figs., 56 tabs

  6. Report on countermeasure to plant life management of the nuclear power plants at three electric power companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Three nuclear power reactors of the Fukushima-1 nuclear power plant, the Mihama-1 power plant and the Tsuruga-1 power plant were investigated according to the estimation plan shown in the Fundamental Concept on Plant Life Management of Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Ministry of International Trade and Industry on April, 1996. Their reports contained the technical evaluation against, the responsive items to and the future examinations of the plant life management. In special, in the responsive items, some items to be added to the present maintenance process and some technical developmental problems are described in details and concretely. (G.K.)

  7. Meteorological events in site evaluation for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations and guidance on conducting hazard assessments of extreme and rare meteorological phenomena. It is of interest to safety assessors and regulators involved in the licensing process as well as to designers of nuclear power plants. This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. It supplements the IAEA Safety Requirements publication on Site Evaluation for Nuclear Facilities which is to supersede the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Siting, Safety Series No. 50-C-S (Rev. 1), IAEA, Vienna (1988). The present Safety Guide supersedes two earlier Safety Guides: Safety Series No. 50-SG-S11A (1981) on Extreme Meteorological Events in Nuclear Power Plant Siting, Excluding Tropical Cyclones and Safety Series No. 50-SG-S11B (1984) on Design Basis Tropical Cyclone for Nuclear Power Plants. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations and guidance on conducting hazard assessments of extreme and rare meteorological phenomena. This Safety Guide provides interpretation of the Safety Requirements publication on Site Evaluation for Nuclear Facilities and guidance on how to fulfil these requirements. It is aimed at safety assessors or regulators involved in the licensing process as well as designers of nuclear power plants, and provides them with guidance on the methods and procedures for analyses that support the assessment of the hazards associated with extreme and rare meteorological events. This Safety Guide discusses the extreme values of meteorological variables and rare meteorological phenomena, as well as their rates of occurrence, according to the following definitions: (a) Extreme values of meteorological variables such as air temperature and wind speed characterize the meteorological or climatological environment. And (b) Rare meteorological phenomena

  8. Principles of education and training of plant engineers for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, G.; Meyer, K.; Brune, W.

    1978-01-01

    Experience in education and advanced training of nuclear engineers in the GDR is reviewed. The basic education of engineers is carried out at universities and colleges. Graduate engineers who have been working in non-nuclear industries for a longer time receive their basic education in nuclear engineering through postgraduate studies. Graduate engineers with a basic knowledge of nuclear engineering are trained at the Nuclear Power Plant School of the Rheinsberg nuclear power plant and at the nuclear power plants of the GDR under operational conditions relating to their future job. In addition to basic theoretical knowledge, training at a nuclear power plant simulator plays an important role. This permits training of the staff under normal operating conditions including transient processes and under unusual conditions. Further particular modes of advanced professional training such as courses in radiation protection and further postgraduate studies are described. This system of education has proved successful. It will be developed further to meet the growing demands. (author)

  9. Performance of candu-6 fuel bundles manufactured in romania nuclear fuel plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailescu, A.; Barbu, A.; Din, F.; Dinuta, G.; Dumitru, I.; Musetoiu, A.; Serban, G.; Tomescu, A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the performance of nuclear fuel produced by Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti during 1995 - 2012 and irradiated in units U1 and U2 from Nuclear Power Plant (N.P.P.) Cernavoda and also present the Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti concern for providing technology to prevent the failure causes of fuel bundles in the reactor. This article presents Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti experience on tracking performance of nuclear fuel in reactor and strategy investigation of fuel bundles notified as suspicious and / or defectives both as fuel element and fuel bundle, it analyzes the possible defects that can occur at fuel bundle or fuel element and can lead to their failure in the reactor. Implementation of modern technologies has enabled optimization of manufacturing processes and hence better quality stability of achieving components (end caps, chamfered sheath), better verification of end cap - sheath welding. These technologies were qualified by Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti on automatic and Computer Numerical Control (C.N.C.) programming machines. A post-irradiation conclusive analysis which will take place later this year (2013) in Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (the action was initiated earlier this year by bringing a fuel bundle which has been reported defective by pool visual inspection) will provide additional information concerning potential damage causes of fuel bundles due to manufacturing processes. (authors)

  10. Nuclear plant scram reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegle, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Utility Management and Human Resources Committee (NUMARC) is a confederation of all 55 utilities with nuclear plants either in operation or under construction. NUMARC was formed in April 1984 by senior nuclear executives with hundreds of man-years of plant experience to improve (plant) performance and resolve NRC concerns. NUMARC has adopted 10 commitments in the areas of management, training, staffing and performance. One of these commitments is to strive to reduce automatic trips to 3 per year per unit for calendar year 1985 for plants in commercial operation greater than 3 years (with greater than 25% capacity factor). This goal applies to any unplanned automatic protection system trips at any time when the reactor is critical. Each utility has committed to develop methods to thoroughly evaluate all unplanned automatic trips to identify the root causes and formulate plans to correct the root causes thus reducing future unplanned scrams. As part of this program, the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) collects and evaluates information on automatic reactor trips. It publishes the results of these evaluations to aid the industry to identify root causes and corrective actions

  11. Recognition of Instrumentation Gauge in the Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Nuclear emergency robots were developed in 2001 as the countermeasure following the criticality accident at the JCO (uranium refinery facility) in Tokaimura, Japan in 1999. We assumed that these nuclear emergency robots were deployed (or put into) for a mitigation (or management) of severe accident, for example, occurred at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. In the case, the image understanding using a color CCD camera, loaded on the nuclear emergency robot, is important. We proposed an image processing technique to read indication value of the IC water level gauges using the structural characteristics of the instrumentation panels (water level gauges) located inside the reactor building. At first, we recognized the scales on the instrumentation panel using the geometric shape of the panel. And then, we could read the values of the instrumentation gauge by calculating the slope of the needle on the gauge. Using the proposed algorithm, we deciphered instrumentation panels for the four water level gauges and indicators shown on the IC video released by TEPCO and Japanese Nuclear Regulatory Commission of Japan. In this paper, recognition of the instrumentation gauges inside reactor building of the nuclear power plant by an image processing technology is described.

  12. Plant process computer replacements - techniques to limit installation schedules and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, M.D.; Olson, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Plant process computer systems, a standard fixture in all nuclear power plants, are used to monitor and display important plant process parameters. Scanning thousands of field sensors and alarming out-of-limit values, these computer systems are heavily relied on by control room operators. The original nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) vendor for the power plant often supplied the plant process computer. Designed using sixties and seventies technology, a plant's original process computer has been obsolete for some time. Driven by increased maintenance costs and new US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations such as NUREG-0737, Suppl. 1, many utilities have replaced their process computers with more modern computer systems. Given that computer systems are by their nature prone to rapid obsolescence, this replacement cycle will likely repeat. A process computer replacement project can be a significant capital expenditure and must be performed during a scheduled refueling outage. The object of the installation process is to install a working system on schedule. Experience gained by supervising several computer replacement installations has taught lessons that, if applied, will shorten the schedule and limit the risk of costly delays. Examples illustrating this technique are given. This paper and these examples deal only with the installation process and assume that the replacement computer system has been adequately designed, and development and factory tested

  13. Meteorological safeguarding of nuclear power plant operation in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rak, J.; Skulec, S.

    1976-01-01

    A meteorological tower 200 m high has to be built for meteorological control of the operation of the A-1 nuclear power plant at Jaslovske Bohunice. This meteorological station will measure the physical properties of the lower layers of the atmosphere, carry out experimental verifications of the models of air pollution, investigate the effects of waste heat and waste water from the nuclear power plant on the microclimate, provide the theoretical processing of measured data with the aim of selecting the most favourable model for conditions prevailing in the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic, perform basic research of the physical properties of the ground and boundary layers of the atmosphere and the coordination of state-wide plans in the field of securing the operation of nuclear power plants with regard to meteorology. (Z.M.)

  14. Effects of nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, P.R.; Manweiler, R.W.; Davis, R.R.

    1977-09-01

    The electromagnetic pulse (EMP) from a high-altitude nuclear detonation consists of a transient pulse of high intensity electromagnetic fields. These intense fields induce current and voltage transients in electrical conductors. Although most nuclear power plant cables are not directly exposed to these fields, the attenuated EMP fields that propagate into the plant will couple some EMP energy to these cables. The report predicts the probable effects of the EMP transients that could be induced in critical circuits of safety-related systems. It was found that the most likely consequence of EMP for nuclear plants is an unscheduled shutdown. EMP could prolong the shutdown period by the unnecessary actuation of certain safety systems. In general, EMP could be a nuisance to nuclear power plants, but it is not considered a serious threat to plant safety

  15. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-09-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear safety and radiation protection which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Safety-enhancing modifications at the nuclear power plants and issues relating to the use of nuclear energy which are of general interest are also reported. The reports include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the first quarter of 1993, a primary feedwater system pipe break occurred at Loviisa 2, in a section of piping after a feedwater pump. The break was erosion-corrosion induced. Repairs and inspections interrupted power generation for seven days. On the International Nuclear Event Scale the event is classified as a level 2 incident. Other events in the first quarter of 1993 had no bearing on nuclear safety and radiation protection

  16. Program change management during nuclear power plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushart, Sean; Kim, Karen; Naughton, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Decommissioning a nuclear power plant is a complex project. The project involves the coordination of several different departments and the management of changing plant conditions, programs, and regulations. As certain project Milestones are met, the evolution of such plant programs and regulations can help optimize project execution and cost. This paper will provide information about these Milestones and the plant departments and programs that change throughout a decommissioning project. The initial challenge in the decommissioning of a nuclear plant is the development of a definitive plan for such a complex project. EPRI has published several reports related to decommissioning planning. These earlier reports provided general guidance in formulating a Decommissioning Plan. This Change Management paper will draw from the experience gained in the last decade in decommissioning of nuclear plants. The paper discusses decommissioning in terms of a sequence of major Milestones. The plant programs, associated plans and actions, and staffing are discussed based upon experiences from the following power reactor facilities: Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant, Yankee Nuclear Power Station, and the Haddam Neck Plant. Significant lessons learned from other sites are also discussed as appropriate. Planning is a crucial ingredient of successful decommissioning projects. The development of a definitive Decommissioning Plan can result in considerable project savings. The decommissioning plants in the U.S. have planned and executed their projects using different strategies based on their unique plant circumstances. However, experience has shown that similar project milestones and actions applied through all of these projects. This allows each plant to learn from the experiences of the preceding projects. As the plant transitions from an operating plant through decommissioning, the reduction and termination of defunct programs and regulations can help optimize all facets of

  17. Nuclear power plants maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power plants maintenance now appears as an important factor contributing to the competitivity of nuclea energy. The articles published in this issue describe the way maintenance has been organized in France and how it led to an actual industrial activity developing and providing products and services. An information note about Georges Besse uranium enrichment plant (Eurodif) recalls that maintenance has become a main data not only for power plants but for all nuclear industry installations. (The second part of this dossier will be published in the next issue: vol. 1 January-February 1989) [fr

  18. Different aspects of safety in Nuclear Fuel Plant at Pitesti, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivana, T.; Epure, Gh.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Plant (FCN) is a facility that produces fuel bundles of CANDU-6 type for the CANDU nuclear power plant. Only natural and depleted uranium in bulk and itemized form are present as nuclear materials in this facility. Uranium and wastes from the plant are handled, processed, treated and stored throughout the entire facility. The nuclear materials with natural and depleted uranium are entirely under nuclear safeguards. The amount of uranium present in the plant in different forms and activities together with zircaloy, beryllium and other hazardous substances, wastes, explosive materials at high temperatures, etc. lead to special measures undertaken by Nuclear Safety Department (DNS) to ensure nuclear safety. Different aspects of safety are continuously monitored in the plant: operational safety, industrial safety, radiological safety, labour safety, informational safety. The emergency preparedness and response, physical protection and the security of the plant and of the transportation of radioactive materials are contributing to cover the multitude of safety aspects. The safety culture of workers built directly on the safety components completes this activity in the plant. In addition the aspects of safety, security and safeguards are in permanent synergy, parts of the three components being included in each other. In the future the policy of FCN will be focused so that any improvement of one of the safety components will be reflected in improving the other safety aspects. (authors)

  19. Maintenance risk management in Dayabay nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xuhong; Tong Jiejuan

    2005-01-01

    The importance of proper maintenance to safe and reliable nuclear plant operation has long been recognized by the nuclear utility and regulatory body. This paper presents a process of maintenance risk management developed for a Chinese Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The process includes three phases: (I) long term maintenance plan risk management, (II) monthly maintenance plan risk management, and (III) detailed risk management for high risk configuration. A risk matrix is developed for phase I whose purpose is to provide a rough guide for risk management in the making of the annual maintenance plan. For Phase II and Phase III, a software tool named Maintenance- Risk-Monitor is developed based on the internal initiating event, level 1 PSA model. The results of Phase II are the risk information of the all plant configurations caused by the unavailability of the components included the monthly maintenance plan. When the increase of core damage frequency (CDF) or the incremental core damage probability (ICDP) of a configuration is higher than the corresponding thresholds, Phase III is needed for this high risk configuration to get the useful information such as risk-importance components, human actions and initial events, from which appropriate preventive measurements could be derived. It is hoped that the provided process of maintenance risk management, together with the developed software tool, could facilitate the maintenance activities in the NPPs of China. (authors)

  20. Safety evaluation of nuclear power plant against the virtual tsunami

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, S. B.; Imamura, Fumihiko

    2004-01-01

    The main scope of this study is the numerical analysis of virtual tsunami event near the Ulchin Nuclear Power Plants. In the numerical analysis, the maximum run-up height and draw-down are estimated at the Ulchin Nuclear Power Plants. The computer program developed in this study describes the propagation and associated run-up process of tsunamis by solving linear and nonlinear shallow-water equations with finite difference methods. It can be used to check the safety of a nuclear power plant against tsunami attacks. The program can also be used to calculate run-up height of wave and provide proper design criteria for coastal facilities and structures. A maximum inundation zone along the coastline can be developed by using the moving boundary condition. As a result, it is predicted that the Ulchin Nuclear Power Plants might be safe against the virtual tsunami event. Although the Ulchin Nuclear Power Plants are safe against the virtual tsunami event, the occurrence of a huge tsunami in the seismic gap should be investigated in detail. Furthermore, the possibility of nearshore tsunamis around the Korean Peninsula should also be studied and monitored continuously

  1. Cooling towers of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikyska, L.

    1986-01-01

    The specifications are given of cooling towers of foreign nuclear power plants and a comparison is made with specifications of cooling towers with natural draught in Czechoslovak nuclear power plants. Shortcomings are pointed out in the design of cooling towers of Czechoslovak nuclear power plants which have been derived from conventional power plant design. The main differences are in the adjustment of the towers for winter operation and in the designed spray intensity. The comparison of selected parameters is expressed graphically. (J.B.)

  2. The operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosche, D.

    1992-01-01

    The duties to be performed in managing the operation of a nuclear power plant are highly diverse, as will be explained in this contribution by the examples of the Grafenrheinfeld Nuclear Power Station. The excellent safety record and the high availabilities of German nuclear power plants demonstrate that their operators have adopted the right approaches. Systematic evaluation of the operating experience accumulated inhouse and in other plants is of great significance in removing weak spots and improving operation. The manifold and complex activities in the structure of organization and of activities in a nuclear power plant require a high degree of division of labor. (orig.) [de

  3. Nuclear process heat at high temperature: Application, realization and development programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammeck, K.H.; Fischer, R.

    1976-01-01

    Studies in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), the USA and the United Kingdom have shown that high-temperature helium energy from an HTR can advantageously be utilized for coal gasification and other fossil fuel conversion processes, and that a substantial demand for substitute natural gas (SNG) can be expected in the future. These results are based on plant design studies, economic assessments and basic development efforts in the field of coal gasification with nuclear heat, which in the FRG were carried out by Arbeitsgemeinschaft Nukleare Prozesswaerme (ANP)-members, HRB and KFA Juelich. Nuclear process plants are based on different gasification processes, resulting in different concepts of the nuclear heat system. In the case of hydro-gasification it is expected that steam reformers, arranged within the primary circuit of the reactor, will be heated directly by the primary helium. In the case of steam gasification, the high-temperature energy must be transferred to the gasification process via an intermediate circuit which is coupled to a gasifier outside the containment. In both cases the design of the nuclear reactor resembles an HTR for electricity generation. The main objectives of the development of nuclear process heat are to increase the helium outlet temperature of the reactor up to 950 0 C, to develop metallic alloys for high-temperature components such as heat exchangers, to design and construct a hot-gas duct, a steam reformer and a helium-helium heat exchanger and to develop the gasification processes. The nuclear safety regulations and the interface problems between the reactor, the process plant and the electricity generating plant have to be considered thoroughly. The Arbeitsgemeinschaft Nukleare Prozesswaerme and HRB started a development programme, in close collaboration with KFA Juelich, which will lead to the construction of a prototype plant for coal gasification with nuclear heat within 5 to 5 1/2 years. A survey of the main objectives

  4. Nuclear power plant training simulator fidelity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.J.; Laughery, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    The fidelity assessment portion of a methodology for evaluating nuclear power plant simulation facilities in regard to their appropriateness for conducting the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's operating test was described. The need for fidelity assessment, data sources, and fidelity data to be collected are addressed. Fidelity data recording, collection, and analysis are discussed. The processes for drawing conclusions from the fidelity assessment and evaluating the adequacy of the simulator control-room layout were presented. 3 refs

  5. Probabilistic safety assessment technology for commercial nuclear power plant security evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liming, J.K.; Johnson, D.H.; Dykes, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Commercial nuclear power plant physical security has received much more intensive treatment and regulatory attention since September 11, 2001. In light of advancements made by the nuclear power industry in the field of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for its power plants over that last 30 years, and given the many examples of successful applications of risk-informed regulation at U. S. nuclear power plants during recent years, it may well be advisable to apply a 'risk-informed' approach to security management at nuclear power plants from now into the future. In fact, plant PSAs developed in response to NRC Generic Letter 88-20 and related requirements are used to help define target sets of critical plant safety equipment in our current security exercises for the industry. With reasonable refinements, plant PSAs can be used to identify, analyze, and evaluate reasonable and prudent approaches to address security issues and associated defensive strategies at nuclear power plants. PSA is the ultimate scenario-based approach to risk assessment, and thus provides a most powerful tool in identifying and evaluating potential risk management decisions. This paper provides a summary of observations of factors that are influencing or could influence cost-effective or 'cost-reasonable' security management decision-making in the current political environment, and provides recommendations for the application of PSA tools and techniques to the nuclear power plant operational safety response exercise process. The paper presents a proposed framework for nuclear power plant probabilistic terrorist risk assessment that applies these tools and techniques. (authors)

  6. Data list of nuclear power plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Fumio; Morishima, Atsuyoshi; Suzuki, Motoe; Harayama, Yasuo

    1980-07-01

    this report has collected and compiled the data concerning performances, equipments and installations of the nuclear power plants constructed in Japan by December 1979. The data have been modified according to the changes produced after publication of 1978 edition (JAERI-M 8083), and extended to cover the new plants developed thereafter. All data have been processed and tabulated with a computer program FREP for the exclusive use of data processing. While this plant data list has been edited annually, there are increasing use of this in foreign countries; hence, a commentary in English on the usage has been presented in the Appendix. (author)

  7. Siting studies for new nuclear power plants in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaran, Gustavo A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a summary of the thesis prepared by the Group of Prospective and Energy Planning of the National Atomic Energy Commission for the 'Specialization on Applications of Nuclear Technology Course' of the Instituto Balseiro in 2007. It describes the evolution of siting studies through time and the main focus worldwide in this type of studies. Then, it makes a brief review of previous siting studies of nuclear power plants conducted in Argentina. It carries out a description of the methodology to conduct a site evaluation for nuclear power plants according to actual international criteria. Finally, it describes the licensing process that follows every site study. (author) [es

  8. Preparation and practice for nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xuesong; Lu Tiezhong

    2015-01-01

    The operational preparation of the nuclear power plant is an important work in nuclear power plant production preparation. Due to the construction period of nuclear power plant from starting construction to production is as long as five years, the professional requirements of nuclear power operation are very strict, and the requirements for nuclear safety are also extremely high. Especially after the Fukushima accident, higher requirements for the safe operation of nuclear power plant are posed by competent authorities of the national level, regulatory authorities and each nuclear power groups. Based on the characteristics of the construction phase of nuclear power plant and in combination with engineering practice, this paper expounds the system established in the field of nuclear power plant operation and generally analyses the related management innovation. (authors)

  9. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-06-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear and radiation safety, which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers significant. Also other events of general interest are reported. The reports also include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the plants' production and load factors

  10. Selection/licensing of nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saari, L.M.

    1983-07-01

    An important aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) safety is the reactor operator in the control room. The operators are the first individuals to deal with an emergency situation, and thus, effective performance on their part is essential for safe plant operations. Important issues pertaining to NPP reactor operators would fall within the personnel subsystem of our safety system analysis. While there are many potential aspects of the personnel subsystem, a key first step in this focus is the selection of individuals - attempting to choose individuals for the job of reactor operator who will safely perform the job. This requires a valid (job-related) selection process. Some background information on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing process used for selecting NPP reactor operators is briefly presented and a description of a research endeavor now underway at Battelle for developing a valid reactor operator licensing examination is included

  11. Management of abnormal radioactive wastes at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    As with any other industrial activity, a certain level of risk is associated with the operation of nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities. That is, on occasions nuclear power plants or nuclear facilities may operate under conditions which were not specifically anticipated during the design and construction of the plant. These abnormal conditions and situations may cause the production of abnormal waste, which can differ in character or quantity from waste produced during normal routine operation of nuclear facilities. Abnormal waste can also occur during decontamination programmes, replacement of a reactor component, de-sludging of storage ponds, etc. The management of such kinds of waste involves the need to evaluate existing waste management systems in order to determine how abnormal wastes should best be handled and processed. There are no known publications on this subject, and the IAEA believes that the development and exchange of such information among its Member States would be useful for specialists working in the waste management area. The main objective of this report is to review existing waste management practices which can be applied to abnormal waste and provide assistance in the selection of appropriate technologies and processes that can be used when abnormal situations occur. Naturally, the subject of abnormal waste is complex and this report can only be considered as a guide for the management of abnormal waste. Refs, figs and tabs.

  12. Status report on the application of process noise technique in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espefaelt, R.; Aakerhielm, F.

    1979-09-01

    The report gives a survey of applications of noise technique reported for nuclear power plants. The scope has been limited to areas of interest for BWR and PWR plants of the types found in Sweden and with an emphasis on cases where the practical applicability has been clearly demonstrated. (author)

  13. Nuclear Power Plant Lifetime Management Study (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Yull; Jeong, Ill Seok; Jang, Chang Heui; Song, Taek Ho; Song, Woo Young [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Tae Eun [Korea Power Engineering Company Consulting and Architecture Engineers, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    As the operation-year of nuclear power plant increases and finding sites for new nuclear power plant becomes harder, a comprehensive and systematic nuclear plant lifetime management(PLIM) program including life extension has to be established for stable and safe supply of electricity. A feasibility study was conducted to systematically evaluate technical, economic and regulatory aspect of plant lifetime managements and plant life extension for Kori-1 nuclear power plant. For technical evaluation of nuclear power plant, 13 major components were selected for lifetime evaluation by screening system. structure, and components(SSCs) of the plant. It was found that except reactor pressure vessel, which needs detailed integrity analysis, and low pressure turbine, which is scheduled to be replaced, 11 out of 13 major components have sufficient service life, for more than 40 years. Because domestic rules and regulations related to license renewal has not yet been written, review on the regulatory aspect of life extensions was conducted using US NRC rules and regulations. A cooperative effort with nuclear regulatory body is needed for early completion of license renewal rules and regulations. For economic evaluation of plant lifetime extension, a computer program was developed and used. It was found that 10 to 20 year of extension operation of Kori-1 nuclear power plant was proved. Based on the results, next phase of plant lifetime management program for detailed lifetime evaluation and presenting detailed implementation schedule for plant refurbishment for lifetime extension should be followed. (author). 74 refs., figs.

  14. Nuclear Power Plant Lifetime Management Study (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Yull; Jeong, Ill Seok; Jang, Chang Heui; Song, Taek Ho; Song, Woo Young [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Tae Eun [Korea Power Engineering Company Consulting and Architecture Engineers, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    As the operation-year of nuclear power plant increases and finding sites for new nuclear power plant becomes harder, a comprehensive and systematic nuclear plant lifetime management(PLIM) program including life extension has to be established for stable and safe supply of electricity. A feasibility study was conducted to systematically evaluate technical, economic and regulatory aspect of plant lifetime managements and plant life extension for Kori-1 nuclear power plant. For technical evaluation of nuclear power plant, 13 major components were selected for lifetime evaluation by screening system. structure, and components(SSCs) of the plant. It was found that except reactor pressure vessel, which needs detailed integrity analysis, and low pressure turbine, which is scheduled to be replaced, 11 out of 13 major components have sufficient service life, for more than 40 years. Because domestic rules and regulations related to license renewal has not yet been written, review on the regulatory aspect of life extensions was conducted using US NRC rules and regulations. A cooperative effort with nuclear regulatory body is needed for early completion of license renewal rules and regulations. For economic evaluation of plant lifetime extension, a computer program was developed and used. It was found that 10 to 20 year of extension operation of Kori-1 nuclear power plant was proved. Based on the results, next phase of plant lifetime management program for detailed lifetime evaluation and presenting detailed implementation schedule for plant refurbishment for lifetime extension should be followed. (author). 74 refs., figs.

  15. Decommissioning of building part of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sochor, R.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics are discussed using literature data of building work during decommissioning or reconstruction of nuclear power plants. The scope of jobs associated with power plant decommissioning is mainly given by the size of contaminated parts, intensity of radioactivity, the volume of radioactive wastes and the possible building processes. Attention is devoted to the cost of such jobs and the effect of the plant design on cost reduction. (Z.M.). 6 refs

  16. Periodic Safety Review of Nuclear Power Plants: Experience of Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-04-01

    Routine reviews of nuclear power plant operation (including modifications to hardware and procedures, operating experience, plant management and personnel competence) and special reviews following major events of safety significance are the primary means of safety verification. In addition, many Member States of the IAEA have initiated systematic safety reassessments, termed periodic safety reviews, of nuclear power plants, to assess the cumulative effects of plant ageing and plant modifications, operating experience, technical developments and siting aspects. The reviews include an assessment of plant design and operation against current safety standards and practices, and they have the objective of ensuring a high level of safety throughout the plant's operating lifetime. They are complementary to the routine and special safety reviews and do not replace them. Periodic safety reviews of nuclear power plants are considered an effective way to obtain an overall view of actual plant safety, and to determine reasonable and practical modifications that should be made in order to maintain a high level of safety. They can be used as a means of identifying time limiting features of the plant in order to determine nuclear power plant operation beyond the designed lifetime. The periodic safety review process can be used to support the decision making process for long term operation or licence renewal. Since 1994, the use of periodic safety reviews by Member States has substantially broadened and confirmed its benefits. Periodic safety review results have, for example, been used by some Member States to help provide a basis for continued operation beyond the current licence term, to communicate more effectively with stakeholders regarding nuclear power plant safety, and to help identify changes to plant operation that enhance safety. This IAEA-TECDOC is intended to assist Member States in the implementation of a periodic safety review. This publication complements the

  17. Safety culture in the maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Safety culture is the complexity of beliefs, shared values and behaviour reflected in making decisions and performing work in a nuclear power plant or nuclear facility. The definition of safety culture and the related concepts presented in the IAEA literature are widely known to experts. Since the publication of Safety Culture, issued by the IAEA as INSAG-4 in 1991, the IAEA has produced a number of publications on strengthening the safety culture in organizations that operate nuclear power plants and nuclear facilities. However, until now the focus has been primarily on the area of operations. Apart from operations, maintenance in plants and nuclear facilities is an aspect that deserves special attention, as maintenance activities can have both a direct and an indirect effect on equipment reliability. Adverse safety effects can arise, depending upon the level of skill of the personnel involved, safety awareness and the complexity of the work process. Any delayed effects resulting from challenges to maintenance can cause interruptions in operation, and hence affect the safety of a plant or facility. Building upon earlier IAEA publications on this topic, this Safety Report reviews how challenges to the maintenance of nuclear power plants can affect safety culture. It also highlights indications of a weakening safety culture. The challenges described are in areas such as maintenance management; human resources management; plant condition assessment and the business environment. The steps that some Member States have taken to address safety culture aspects are detailed and singled out as good practices, with a view to disseminating and exchanging experiences and lessons learned. Although this report is primarily directed at plant maintenance organizations, the subject matter is applicable to a wider audience, including plant contracting organizations and regulatory authorities

  18. Nuclear plant life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negin, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear power industry's addressing of life extension is a natural trend in the maturation of this technology after 20 years of commercial operation. With increasing emphasis on how plants are operated, and less on how to build them, attention is turning on to maximizing the use of these substantial investments. The first studies of life extension were conducted in the period from 1978 and 1982. These were motivated by the initiation, by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), of studies to support decommissioning rulemaking. The basic conclusions of those early studies that life extension is feasible and worth pursuing have not been changed by the much more extensive investigations that have since been conducted. From an engineering perspective, life extension for nuclear plants is fundamentally the same as for fossil plants

  19. Monitor and control device in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neda, Toshikatsu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate and ensure monitor and control, as well as improve the operation efficiency and save man power, by render the operation automatic utilizing a process computer and centralizing the monitor and control functions. Constitution: All of the operations from the start up to stop in a nuclear power plant are conducted by way of a monitor and control board. The process data for the nuclear power plant are read into the process computer and displayed on a CRT display. Controls are carried out respectively for the control rod on a control rod panel, for the feedwater rate on a feedwater control panel, for the recycling flow rate on a recycling control panel and for the turbine generator on a turbine control panel. When the operation is conducted by an automatic console, operation signals from the console are imputted into the process computer and the state of the power plant is monitored and automatic operation is carried out based on the operation signals and from signals from each of the panels. (Moriyama, K.)

  20. Nuclear power plant operation experience - a feedback programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banica, I.; Sociu, F.; Margaritescu, C.

    1994-01-01

    An effective high quality maintenance programme is required for the safe reliable operation of a nuclear power plant. To achieve the objectives of such a programme, both plant management and staff must be highly dedicated and motivated to perform high quality work at all levels. Operating and maintenance experience data collections and analysis are necessary in order to enhance the safety of the plant and reliability of the structures systems and components throughout their operating life. Significant events, but also minor incident, may reveal important deficiencies or negative trends adverse to safety. Therefore, a computer processing system for collecting, classifying and evaluating abnormal events or findings concerning operating-maintenance and for feeding back the results of the lessons learned from experience into the design and the operation of our nuclear power plant is considered to be of paramount importance. (Author)

  1. NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

    1963-05-14

    A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

  2. On the network protocol performance evaluation for large scale communication system of nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, K. S.; Lee, T. H.; Kim, H. R.; Kim, D. H.; Ku, I. S.

    1998-01-01

    Computer technology has been dramatically advanced and it is now natural to apply digital network technology into nuclear plants. Communication architecture for nuclear plant defines the coordination of safety reactor control, balance of plant, subsystem utilities, and plant monitoring functions, and how they are connected and their user interface to guarantee plant performance and guarantee safety requirements. Therefore, to implement a digital network for control and monitoring systems of advanced nuclear plant needs systematic design and evaluation procedures because of responsive and hard real-time process characteristics of nuclear plant. In this paper, we evaluate several digital network protocols in terms of network delay, link failure effects to hard real-time requirements with full scale traffic

  3. QA programs in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingson, A.C.

    1976-01-01

    As an overview of quality assurance programs in nuclear power plants, the energy picture as it appears today is reviewed. Nuclear power plants and their operations are described and an attempt is made to place in proper perspective the alleged ''threats'' inherent in nuclear power. Finally, the quality assurance programs being used in the nuclear industry are described

  4. Monitoring support system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashikawa, Yuichi; Kubota, Rhuji; Tanaka, Keiji; Takano, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear power plants in Japan reach to 49 plants and supply 41.19 million kW in their installed capacities, which is equal to about 31% of total electric power generation and has occupied an important situation as a stable energy supplying source. As an aim to keeping safe operation and working rate of the power plants, various monitoring support systems using computer technology, optical information technology and robot technology each advanced rapidly in recent year have been developed to apply to the actual plants for a plant state monitoring system of operators in normal operation. Furthermore, introduction of the emergent support system supposed on accidental formation of abnormal state of the power plants is also investigated. In this paper, as a monitoring system in the recent nuclear power plants, design of control panel of recent central control room, introduction to its actual plant and monitoring support system in development were described in viewpoints of improvement of human interface, upgrade of sensor and signal processing techniques, and promotion of information service technique. And, trend of research and development of portable miniature detector and emergent monitoring support system are also introduced in a viewpoint of labor saving and upgrade of the operating field. (G.K.)

  5. Design and safety features of commercial nuclear power plants in Japan, 1976 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Fumio; Harayama, Yasuo

    1976-10-01

    The December 1975 edition (JAERI-M 5959) contained design particulars and safety features of 20 commercial nuclear power plants in Japan as of December 1974. Subsequently new plants have been put into operation and some plants under construction have undergone design modifications. The present edition presents similar data of the commercial nuclear power plants in Japan up to June 1976, compiled by computer processing. (auth.)

  6. Investigations of gas explosions in a nuclear coal gasification plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, K.

    1981-01-01

    The safety research program on gas cloud explosions is performed in the context of the German project of the Prototype Plant Nuclear Process Heat. By the work within this project, it is tried to extend the use of nuclear energy to non-electric application. The programme comprises efforts in several scientific disciplines. The final goal is to provide a representative pressure-time-function or a set of such functions. These functions should be the basis for safe design and construction of the nuclear reactor system of a coal gasification plant. No result yet achieved contradicts the assumption that released process gas is only able to deflagrate. It should be possible to demonstrate that, if unfavourable configurations are avoided, a design pressure of 300 mbar is sufficient to withstand an explosion of process gas; this pressure should never be exceeded by process gas explosions irrespective of gas mass released and distance to release point, except possibly in relatively small areas

  7. Atucha I nuclear power plant transients analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano, J.; Schivo, M.

    1987-01-01

    A program for the transients simulation thermohydraulic calculation without loss of coolant (KWU-ENACE development) to evaluate Atucha I nuclear power plant behaviour is used. The program includes systems simulation and nuclear power plants control bonds with real parameters. The calculation results show a good agreement with the output 'protocol' of various transients of the nuclear power plant, keeping the error, in general, lesser than ± 10% from the variation of the nuclear power plant's state variables. (Author)

  8. Guidelines for nuclear plant response to an earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    Guidelines have been developed to assist nuclear plant personnel in the preparation of earthquake response procedures for nuclear power plants. The objectives of the earthquake response procedures are to determine (1) the immediate effects of an earthquake on the physical condition of the nuclear power plant, (2) if shutdown of the plant is appropriate based on the observed damage to the plant or because the OBE has been exceeded, and (3) the readiness of the plant to resume operation following shutdown due to an earthquake. Readiness of a nuclear power plant to restart is determined on the basis of visual inspections of nuclear plant equipment and structures, and the successful completion of surveillance tests which demonstrate that the limiting conditions for operation as defined in the plant Technical Specifications are met. The guidelines are based on information obtained from a review of earthquake response procedures from numerous US and foreign nuclear power plants, interviews with nuclear plant operations personnel, and a review of reports of damage to industrial equipment and structures in actual earthquakes. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demick, L.E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  10. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  11. Medium-size nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelweith, L.; Lavergne, J.C.; Martinot, G.; Weiss, A.

    1977-01-01

    CEA (TECHNICATOME) has developed a range of pressurized water reactors of the type ''CAS compact'' which are adapted to civil ship propulsion, or to electric power production, combined possibly with heat production, up to outputs equivalent to 125 MWe. Nuclear plants equipped with these reactors are suitable to medium-size electric networks. Among the possible realizations, two types of plants are mentioned as examples: 1) Floating electron-nuclear plants; and 2) Combined electric power and desalting plants. The report describes the design characteristics of the different parts of a 125 MWe unit floating electro-nuclear plant: nuclear steam system CAS 3 G, power generating plant, floating platform for the whole plant. The report gives attention to the different possibilities according to site conditions (the plant can be kept floating, in a natural or artificial basin, it can be put aground, ...) and to safety and environment factors. Such unit can be used in places where there is a growing demand in electric power and fresh water. The report describes how the reactor, the power generating plant and multiflash distillation units of an electric power-desalting plant can be combined: choice of the ratio water output/electric power output, thermal cycle combination, choice of the gain ratio, according to economic considerations, and to desired goal of water output. The report analyses also some technical options, such as: choice of the extraction point of steam used as heat supply of the desalting station (bleeding a condensation turbine, or recovering steam at the exhaust of a backpressure turbine), design making the system safe. Lastly, economic considerations are dealt with: combining the production of fresh water and electric power provides usually a much better energy balance and a lower cost for both products. Examples are given of some types of installations which combine medium-size reactors with fresh water stations yielding from 10000 to 120000 m 3 per day

  12. Licensing new nuclear energy plants in the 90s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.H. III; Bishop, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the framework for nuclear regulation in the United States was established by Congress in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA). Under the AEA, the nuclear power program in the United States was launched with a technology just being developed and a nuclear power industry in its infancy. The regulations fashioned by the Atomic Energy Commission under the AEA took into account the evolving state of the technology and the emerging industry in those formative years. The process required a utility desiring to build and operate a nuclear power plant to obtain two separate licenses: one authorizing construction and one authorizing operation. At the construction permit stage, generally only preliminary design information was available and a construction permit could be issued with as little as ten to fifteen percent of the facility design completed. Thereafter, design completion, along with research and development required to address open technical issues, progressed in tandem with construction in what is fairly characterized as a design-as-you-go process. Only as plant construction approached completion was the adequacy of the final design evaluated in connection with the operating license review process

  13. Analysis of color environment in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natori, Kazuyuki; Akagi, Ichiro; Souma, Ichiro; Hiraki, Tadao; Sakurai, Yukihiro.

    1996-01-01

    This article reports the results of color and psychological analysis of the outlook of nuclear power plants and the visual environments inside of the plants. Study one was the color measurements of the outlook of nuclear plants and the visual environment inside of the plants. Study two was a survey of the impressions on the visual environments of nuclear plants obtained from observers and interviews of the workers. Through these analysis, we have identified the present state of, and the problems of the color environments of the nuclear plants. In the next step, we have designed the color environments of inside and outside of the nuclear plants which we would recommend (inside designs were about fuel handling room, operation floor of turbine building, observers' pathways, central control room, rest room for the operators). Study three was the survey about impressions on our design inside and outside of the nuclear plants. Nuclear plant observers, residents in Osaka city, residents near the nuclear plants, the operators, employees of subsidiary company and the PR center guides rated their impressions on the designs. Study four was the survey about the design of the rest room for the operators controlling the plants. From the results of four studies, we have proposed some guidelines and problems about the future planning about the visual environments of nuclear power plants. (author)

  14. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-03-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear and radiation safety, which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Also other events of general interest are reported. The reports also include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the plants' production and load factors

  15. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1990-12-01

    During the second quarter of 1990 the Finnish nuclear plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 and TVO and II were in commercial operation for most of the time. The feedwater pipe rupture at Loviisa 1 and the resulting inspections and repairs at both Loviisa plant units brought about an outage the overall duration of which was 32 days. The annual maintenance outages of the TVO plant units were arranged during the report period and their combined duration was 31.5 days. Nuclear electricity accounted for 35.3% of the total Finnish electricity production during this quarter. The load factor average of the nuclear power plant units was 83.0%. Three events occurred during the report period which are classified as Level 1 on the International Nuclear Event Scale: feedwater pipe rupture at Loviisa 1, control rod withdrawal at TVO I in a test during an outage when the hydraulic scram system was rendered inoperable and erroneous fuel bundle transfers during control rod drives maintenance at TVO II. Other events during this quarter are classified as Level Zero (Below Scale) on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were considerably below authorised limits. Only small amounts of nuclides originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  16. Advances in processing technologies for titanium heat exchanger tubes of fossil and nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likhareva, T P; Tchizhik, A A; Chavchanidze, N N [Polzanov Central Boiler and Turbine Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1999-12-31

    The advances in processing technologies for titanium heat exchangers with rolled and welded tubes of fossil and nuclear power plants in Russia are presented. The special methodology of investigations with constant small strain rate have been used to study the effects of mixed corrosion and creep processes in condensers cooled by sea or synthetic sea waters. The results of corrosion creep tests and K1scc calculations are given. The Russian science activities concerning condensers manufactured from titanium show the possibilities for designing structures with very high level service reliability in different corrosion aggressive mediums with high total salt, Cl-ion and oxygen contents. (orig.)

  17. Advances in processing technologies for titanium heat exchanger tubes of fossil and nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likhareva, T.P.; Tchizhik, A.A.; Chavchanidze, N.N. [Polzanov Central Boiler and Turbine Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    The advances in processing technologies for titanium heat exchangers with rolled and welded tubes of fossil and nuclear power plants in Russia are presented. The special methodology of investigations with constant small strain rate have been used to study the effects of mixed corrosion and creep processes in condensers cooled by sea or synthetic sea waters. The results of corrosion creep tests and K1scc calculations are given. The Russian science activities concerning condensers manufactured from titanium show the possibilities for designing structures with very high level service reliability in different corrosion aggressive mediums with high total salt, Cl-ion and oxygen contents. (orig.)

  18. IAEA activity on operator support systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dounaev, V.; Fujita, Y.; Juslin, K.; Haugset, K.; Lux, I.; Naser, J.

    1994-01-01

    Various operator support systems for nuclear power plants are already operational or under development in the IAEA Member States. Operator support systems are based on intelligent data processing and, in addition to plant operation, they are also becoming more important for safety. A key feature of operator support systems is their availability to restructure data to increase its relevance for a given situation. This can improve the user's ability to identify plant mode, system state, and component state and to identify and diagnose faults. Operator support systems can also assist the user in planning and implementing corrective actions to improve the nuclear power plant's availability and safety. In September 1991, the IAEA Committee for Contractual Scientific Services approved the Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Operator Support Systems in Nuclear Power Plants'' in the framework of the Project ''Man-Machine Interface Studies''. The main objective of this programme is to provide guidance and technology transfer for the development and implementation of operator support systems. This includes the experience with human-machine interfaces and closely related issues such as instrumentation and control, the use of computers in nuclear power plants, and operator qualification. (author)

  19. Modelling of nuclear power plant decommissioning financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemš, J; Knápek, J; Králík, T; Hejhal, M; Kubančák, J; Vašíček, J

    2015-06-01

    Costs related to the decommissioning of nuclear power plants create a significant financial burden for nuclear power plant operators. This article discusses the various methodologies employed by selected European countries for financing of the liabilities related to the nuclear power plant decommissioning. The article also presents methodology of allocation of future decommissioning costs to the running costs of nuclear power plant in the form of fee imposed on each megawatt hour generated. The application of the methodology is presented in the form of a case study on a new nuclear power plant with installed capacity 1000 MW. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Technical study for the automation and control of processes of the chemical processing plant for liquid radioactive waste at Racso Nuclear Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quevedo D, M.; Ayala S, A.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to introduce the development of an automation and control system in a chemical processing plant for liquid radioactive waste of low and medium activity. The control system established for the chemical processing plant at RACSO Nuclear Center is described. It is an on-off sequential type system with feedback. This type of control has been chosen according to the volumes to be treated at the plant as processing is carried out by batches. The system will be governed by a programmable controller (PLC), modular, with a minimum of 24 digital inputs, 01 analog input, 16 digital outputs and 01 analog input. Digital inputs and outputs are specifically found at the level sensors of the tanks and at the solenoid-type electro valve control. Analog inputs and outputs have been considered at the pH control. The comprehensive system has been divided into three control bonds, The bonds considered for the operation of the plant are described, the plant has storing, fitting, processing and clarifying tanks. National Instruments' Lookout software has been used for simulation, constituting an important tool not only for a design phase but also for a practical one since this software will be used as SCADA system. Finally, the advantages and benefits of this automation system are analyzed, radiation doses received by occupationally exposed workers are reduced and reliability on the operation on the system is increased. (authors)

  1. Design of a nuclear steam reforming plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malherbe, J.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a plant for the steam reforming of methane using a High Temperature Reactor has been studied by CEA in connection with the G.E.G.N. This group of companies (CEA, GAZ DE FRANCE, CHARBONNAGES DE FRANCE, CREUSOT-LOIRE, NOVATOME) is in charge of studying the feasibility of the coal gasification process by using a nuclear reactor. The process is based on the hydrogenation of the coal in liquid phase with hydrogen produced by a methane steam reformer. The reformer plant is fed by a pipe of natural gas or SNG. The produced hydrogen feeds the gasification plant which could not be located on the same site. An intermediate hydrogen storage between the two plants could make the coupling more flexible. The gasification plant does not need a great deal of heat and this heat can be satisfied mostly by internal heat exchanges

  2. Design concepts for the reactor protection and control process instrumentation digital upgrade project at the Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant units 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruth, R.C.; Sotos, W.G.

    1996-01-01

    As the nation's nuclear power plants age, the need to consider upgrading of their electronic protection and control systems becomes more urgent. Hardware obsolescence and mechanical wear out resulting from frequent calibration and surveillance play a major role in defining their useful life. At Cook Nuclear Plant, a decision was made to replace a major portion of the plant's protection and control systems with newer technology. This paper describes the engineering processes involved in this successful upgrade and explains the basis for many decisions made while performing the digital upgrade

  3. Material and welding development of anchor plates to build nuclear power plant by blue arc process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibelli, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    To build nuclear power plants, anchor plates are plenty used. These anchor plates serve as a system with the purpose to fix many heavy components or a simple stair. Considering the necessity of element fabrication fastly, with reasonable economy and quality, the arc study welding process (blue arc) was used. A special development of the material concept as well as a welding procedure and a subsuppliers qualification of the raw material was necessary. (Author) [pt

  4. World nuclear power plant capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report provides the background information for statistics and analysis developed by NUKEM in its monthly Market Report on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The assessments in this Special Report are based on the continuous review of individual nuclear power plant projects. This Special Report begins with tables summarizing a variety of nuclear power generating capacity statistics for 1990. It continues with a brief review of the year's major events regarding each country's nuclear power program. The standard NUKEM Market Report tables on nuclear plant capacity are given on pages 24 and 25. Owing to space limitations, the first year shown is 1988. Please refer to previous Special Reports for data covering earlier years. Detailed tables for each country list all existing plants as well as those expected by NUKEM to be in commercial operation by the end of 2005. An Appendix containing a list of abbreviations can be found starting on page 56. Only nuclear power plants intended for civilian use are included in this Special Report. Reactor lifetimes are assumed to be 35 years for all light water reactors and 30 years for all other reactor types, unless other data or definite decommissioning dates have been published by the operators. (orig./UA) [de

  5. Development of nuclear power plant Risk Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaoming; Sun Jinlong; Ma Chao; Wang Lin; Gu Xiaohui; Bao Zhenli; Qu Yong; Zheng Hao

    2014-01-01

    Risk Monitor is a tool to monitor the real-time risk of a nuclear power plant for risk management and comprehensive decision-making, which has been widely used all over the world. The nuclear power plant Risk Monitor applies the real-time risk model with low-complicacy that could reflect the plant's actual configuration, automatically reads the plant's configuration information from the engineering system through the developed interface, and efficiently analyzes the plant's risk Dy the intelligent parallel-computing method in order to provide the risk basement for the safety management of nuclear power plant. This paper generally introduces the background, architecture, functions and key technical features of a nuclear power plant Risk Monitor, and validates the risk result, which could well reflect the plant's risk information and has a significant practical value. (authors)

  6. Dynamic testing of nuclear power plant structures: an evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, H.J.

    1980-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) evaluated the applications of system identification techniques to the dynamic testing of nuclear power plant structures and subsystems. These experimental techniques involve exciting a structure and measuring, digitizing, and processing the time-history motions that result. The data can be compared to parameters calculated using finite element or other models of the test systems to validate the model and to verify the seismic analysis. This report summarizes work in three main areas: (1) analytical qualification of a set of computer programs developed at LLL to extract model parameters from the time histories; (2) examination of the feasibility of safely exciting nuclear power plant structures and accurately recording the resulting time-history motions; (3) study of how the model parameters that are extracted from the data be used best to evaluate structural integrity and analyze nuclear power plants

  7. Models development for natural circulation and its transition process in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Lei; Cai Qi; Cai Zhangsheng; Xie Haiyan

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of nuclear power plant (NPP) best-estimate transient analysis code RELAP5/MOD3, the point reactor kinetics model in RELAP5/MOD3 was replaced by the two-group, 3-D space and time dependent neutron kinetic model, in order to exactly analyze the responses of key parameters in natural circulation and its transition process considering the reactivity feedback. The coupled model for three-dimensional physics and thermohydraulics was established and corresponding computing code was developed. Using developed code, natural circulation of NPP and its transiton process were calculated and analyzed. Compared with the experiment data, the calculated results show that its high precise avoids the shortage that the point reactor equation can not reflect the reactivity exactly. This code can be a computing and analysis tool for forced circulation and natural circulation and their transitions. (authors)

  8. HVDC transmission from nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yukio; Takenaka, Kiyoshi; Taniguchi, Haruto; Ueda, Kiyotaka

    1980-01-01

    HVDC transmission directly from a nuclear power plant is expected as one of the bulk power transmission systems from distant power generating area. Successively from the analysis of HVDC transmission from BWR-type nuclear power plant, this report discusses dynamic response characteristics of HVDC transmission (double poles, two circuits) from PWR type nuclear power plant due to dc-line faults (DC-1LG, 2LG) and ac-line faults (3LG) near inverter station. (author)

  9. Regulatory considerations for extending the life of nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, H.; Rowden, M.

    1987-01-01

    This study provides the nuclear industry with its first systematic evaluation of the regulatory implications of nuclear plant life extension. The report recommends courses of action that might be followed by the industry and its regulators to ensure the development of a process that is both reasonable and predictable. The study holds that ''license renewal should be a reaffirmation of the ongoing and continuous process of hardware renewal that is already an integral part of every nuclear power plant's operating program.'' The report's findings can be used by the new AIF Subcommittee on License Renewal, by other industry groups, and by individual licensees in making constructive recommendations to NRC for the development of a workable license renewal policy. No such policy now exists, and the establishment of one is preferable to allowing the consideration of life extension matters on a case-by-case basis

  10. Multicriteria decision analysis based on analytic hierarchy process in GIS environment for siting nuclear power plant in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abudeif, A.M.; Abdel Moneim, A.A.; Farrag, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The binary overlay method was used in Phase I through OR operator for selecting the candidate areas. • The WLC and AHP methods was used to screen and select the potential sites (phase II) in Arc GIS 10.1 software. • In phase III, four sites, all located on the North western coast and Red Sea, of highest scores were chosen as Candidate sites after eliminating the lowest score sites. • The AHP method was applied to select preferred candidate site and calculating the eigenvectors in Expert Choice Software Package. - Abstract: Due to increasing demand of electrical energy and freshwater in Egypt, it is safe to assume that the decision makers will turn to nuclear power as the feasible alternative for energy. However, as time goes by, fewer sites will be available and suitable for nuclear power plant development. Site selection is a key phase of the siting process of a nuclear plant and may significantly affect the safety and cost of the facility during its entire life cycle. The siting of nuclear power plants is one of multi-criteria problems, which makes it complex. Many interrelated factors affect the process. Six constraints and twenty-two factors corresponding to safety, environment and socio-economy were considered in the siting study presented in this paper. Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis was applied during the selection of nuclear power plants site using GIS software. Three spatial decision making models were applied in this paper during site selection stage. The binary overlay (Boolean logic) with Low Risk approach in which the logical OR operator is used to determine the candidate areas. All constraints were represented in binary maps, combined and a masking layer was created to eliminate the lands considered as constraints in Arc GIS Software. The 22 factors were represented in normalized maps after unifying all of them to 0–1 score scales based on the philosophy of suitability criteria (factors) using the Weighted Linear Combination

  11. The application of plant information system on third Qinshan nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wangtian

    2005-01-01

    Plant overall control has been applied in Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, which enhances the security of plant operation, but it is not enough to improve the technical administration level. In order to integrate the overall information and to improve the technical administration level more. Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant applies the plant information system. This thesis introduces the application of plant information system in Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant and the effect to the plant after the system is carried into execution, in addition, it does more analysis and exceptions for application of plant information system in the future. (authors)

  12. Safety criteria for nuclear chemical plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, P.W.; Curtis, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Safety measures have always been required to limit the hazards due to accidental release of radioactive substances from nuclear power plants and chemical plants. The risk associated with the discharge of radioactive substances during normal operation has also to be kept acceptably low. BNFL (British Nuclear Fuels Ltd.) are developing risk criteria as targets for safe plant design and operation. The numerical values derived are compared with these criteria to see if plants are 'acceptably safe'. However, the criteria are not mandatory and may be exceeded if this can be justified. The risk assessments are subject to independent review and audit. The Nuclear Installations Inspectorate also has to pass the plants as safe. The assessment principles it uses are stated. The development of risk criteria for a multiplant site (nuclear chemical plants tend to be sited with many others which are related functionally) is discussed. This covers individual members of the general public, societal risks, risks to the workforce and external hazards. (U.K.)

  13. Development on database for foreign nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Yasunori; Yanagi, Chihiro

    1999-01-01

    The Nuclear Information Project in Institute of Nuclear Technology, Institute of Nuclear Safety Systems, Inc. (INSS) has been carrying out two activities related to technical information about nuclear power plants. The first is collection and analysis of accidents and incidents (troubles) of nuclear power plants in U.S.A. and West Europe and making draft of action proposals. The second is collection of main laws, government ordinances, regulatory guides, standard and domestic and international technical news connected with nuclear power plants. This report describes these two data bases about nuclear power plants details. (author)

  14. Uptake of actinides and nuclear fission products in graminaceous and nongraminaceous plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Stephanie Lynn

    Radionuclides exist within the environment naturally and also from release during nuclear power and weapons production. The ability of plants to uptake radionuclides may prove beneficial for exploitation in the field of phytoremediation and as a biomonitor within the field of nuclear forensics. The fact that plants have the ability to take up radionuclides as an unintended metabolic process is well known, however, the mechanisms through which uptake occur present large gaps within the current research. Therefore, gaining further knowledge regarding overall plant radionuclide uptake and specific mechanisms may prove as an invaluable tool to enhance phytoremediation and nuclear forensic efforts. Within this work, controlled laboratory experiments were conducted in order to determine any uptake differences between graminaceous (rye grass) and nongraminaceous (cucumber) plants. A matrix of samples were individually spiked with known amounts of Sr, Cs, Th, U as well as ligands of acetate, citrate, DFOB. Uptake was compared through the calculation and analysis of distribution coefficients within the roots and shoots of each plant sample. A variety of trends were observed throughout this study. Overall, it was determined that the cucumber plant takes up slightly higher concentrations within both the roots and the shoots, except for within the Cs set of samples. Within the Cs samples it was determined that uptake was much higher in the rye grass than in the cucumber plant. Therefore, it was concluded that it may be more beneficial to focus on the collection of grasses and other graminaceous plants when the goal is to collect a plant to determine nuclear activity within the vicinity of a facility. This is due to the fact that Cs is generally released at higher concentrations than other radionuclides during the process of nuclear power and energy production. Similarly, grasses may also be desired as the main focus for phytoremediation efforts due to the fact that Cs is a

  15. Development of a computerized nuclear materials control and accounting system for a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.M.; Ehinger, M.H.; Joseph, C.; Madeen, M.L.

    1979-07-01

    A computerized nuclear materials control and accounting system (CNMCAS) for a fuel reprocessing plant is being developed by Allied-General Nuclear Services at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant. Development work includes on-line demonstration of near real-time measurement, measurement control, accounting, and processing monitoring/process surveillance activities during test process runs using natural uranium. A technique for estimating in-process inventory is also being developed. This paper describes development work performed and planned, plus significant design features required to integrate CNMCAS into an advanced safeguards system

  16. Disposal of slightly contaminated radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minns, J.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    With regard to the disposal of solid wastes, nuclear power plants basically have two options, disposal in a Part 61 licensed low-level waste site, or receive approval pursuant to 20.2002 for disposal in a manner not otherwise authorized by the NRC. Since 1981, the staff has reviewed and approved 30 requests for disposal of slightly contaminated radioactive materials pursuant to Section 20.2002 (formerly 20.302) for nuclear power plants located in non-Agreement States. NRC Agreement States have been delegated the authority for reviewing and approving such disposals (whether onsite or offsite) for nuclear power plants within their borders. This paper describes the characteristics of the waste disposed of, the review process, and the staff`s guidelines.

  17. Chemistry management system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Katsumi; Maeda, Katsuji

    1998-01-01

    Recently, the chemistry management in the nuclear power plants has been changing from the problem solution to the predictive diagnosis and maintenance. It is important to maintain the integrity of plant operation by an adequate chemistry control. For these reasons, many plant operation data and chemistry analysis data should be collected and treated effectively to evaluate chemistry condition of the nuclear power plants. When some indications of chemistry anomalies occur, quick and effective root cause evaluation and countermeasures should be required. The chemistry management system has been developed as to provide sophisticate chemistry management in the nuclear power plants. This paper introduces the concept and functions of the chemistry management system for the nuclear power plants. (author)

  18. Application of integrated logistic techniques to operation, maintenance and re engineering processes in Nuclear Power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago Diez, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses the advisability of adapting and applying management and Integrated Logistic engineering techniques to nuclear power plants instead of using more traditional maintenance management methods. It establishes a historical framework showing the origins of integrated approaches based on traditional logistic support concepts, their phases and the real results obtained in the aeronautic world where they originated. It reviews the application of integrated management philosophy, and logistic support and engineering analysis techniques regarding Availability, Reliability and Maintainability (ARM) and shows their inter dependencies in different phases of the system's life (Design, Development and Operation). It describes how these techniques are applied to nuclear power plant operation, their impact on plant availability and the optimisation of maintenance and replacement plans. The paper analyses the need for data (type and volume), which will have to be collected, and the different tools to manage such data. It examines the different CALS tools developed by EA for engineering and for logistic management. It also explains the possibility of using these tools for process and data operations through the INTERNET. It also focuses on the qualities of some simple examples of possible applications, and how they would be used in the framework of Integrated Logistic Support (ILS). (Author)

  19. Process for testing noise emission from containers or pipelines made of steel, particularly for nuclear reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Votava, E.; Stipsits, G.; Sommer, R.

    1982-01-01

    In a process for noise emission testing of steel containers or pipelines, particularly for testing primary circuit components of nuclear reactor plants, measuring sensors and/or associated electronic amplifiers are used, which are tuned for receiving the frequency band of the sound emission spectrum above a limiting frequency f G , but are limited or non-resonant for frequency bands less than f G . (orig./HP) [de

  20. Site selection process for new nuclear power plants - a method to support decision making and improving public participation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Vivian B.; Cunha, Tatiana S. da; Simoes Filho, Francisco Fernando Lamego; Lapa, Celso Marcelo F.

    2011-01-01

    The Brazilian Energy Plan (PNE 2030) that guides the Government in formulating its strategy for expanding energy supply by 2030 highlights the need for the Brazilian electrical system have more than 4,000 MW from nuclear sources by 2025. Therefore, the Government presented a proposal to build four more nuclear power plants with capacity of 1,000 MW each, at first, two in the Northeast and two in Southeast. The selection and site assessment are key parts of the installation process of a nuclear plant and may significantly affect the cost, public acceptance and safety of the facility during its entire life cycle. The result of this initial stage, it can even seriously affect program success. Wrong decisions in the process of site selection may also require a financial commitment to higher planned in a later phase of the project, besides causing extensive and expensive downtime. Select the location where these units will be built is not a trivial process, because involves the consideration of multiple criteria and judgments in addition to obtaining, organizing and managing a diverse range of data, both qualitative and quantitative, to assist in decision making and ensure that the site selected is the most appropriate in relation to safety and technical, economic and environmental feasibility. This paper presents an overview of the site selection process and its stages, the criteria involved in each step, the tools to support decision making that can be used and the difficulties in applying a formal process of decision making. Also discussed are ways to make the process more transparent and democratic, increasing public involvement as a way to improve acceptance and reduce opposition from various sectors of society, trying to minimize the expense and time involved in the implementation of undertakings of this kind. (author)

  1. Configuration management in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Configuration management (CM) is the process of identifying and documenting the characteristics of a facility's structures, systems and components of a facility, and of ensuring that changes to these characteristics are properly developed, assessed, approved, issued, implemented, verified, recorded and incorporated into the facility documentation. The need for a CM system is a result of the long term operation of any nuclear power plant. The main challenges are caused particularly by ageing plant technology, plant modifications, the application of new safety and operational requirements, and in general by human factors arising from migration of plant personnel and possible human failures. The IAEA Incident Reporting System (IRS) shows that on average 25% of recorded events could be caused by configuration errors or deficiencies. CM processes correctly applied ensure that the construction, operation, maintenance and testing of a physical facility are in accordance with design requirements as expressed in the design documentation. An important objective of a configuration management program is to ensure that accurate information consistent with the physical and operational characteristics of the power plant is available in a timely manner for making safe, knowledgeable, and cost effective decisions with confidence. Currently, the nuclear industry and governmental organizations are showing an increasing interest in the implementation of this process as an effective way of limiting configuration errors and related risks. In this report the necessary attributes of a good operational CM are identified. It is recognized and emphasized that a CM is one aspect of the overall management system. Nevertheless, this is an important part of managerial activity focused on the compliance of knowledge of the plant personnel, plant documentation and records with the state of the plant technology. The concepts developed in this report present a basic approach to CM, taking into

  2. Nuclear power plant V-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear power plant Bohunice V -1 is briefly described. This NPP consists from two reactor units. Their main time characteristics are (Reactor Unit 1, Reactor Unit 2): beginning of construction - 24 April 1972; first controlled reactor power - 27 November 1978, 15 March 1980; connection to the grid - 17 December 1978, 26 March 1980; commercial operation - 1 April 1980, 7 January 1981. This leaflet contains: NPP V-1 construction; Major technological equipment (Primary circuit: Nuclear reactor [WWER 440 V230 type reactor];Steam generator; Reactor Coolant Pumps; Primary Circuit Auxiliary Systems. Secondary circuit: Turbine generators, Nuclear power plant electrical equipment; power plant control) and technical data

  3. Automatic acoustic and vibration monitoring system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tothmatyas, Istvan; Illenyi, Andras; Kiss, Jozsef; Komaromi, Tibor; Nagy, Istvan; Olchvary, Geza

    1990-01-01

    A diagnostic system for nuclear power plant monitoring is described. Acoustic and vibration diagnostics can be applied to monitor various reactor components and auxiliary equipment including primary circuit machinery, leak detection, integrity of reactor vessel, loose parts monitoring. A noise diagnostic system has been developed for the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, to supervise the vibration state of primary circuit machinery. An automatic data acquisition and processing system is described for digitalizing and analysing diagnostic signals. (R.P.) 3 figs

  4. Risk-based inspection in the context of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Wellington A.; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Rabello, Emerson G., E-mail: soaresw@cdtn.br, E-mail: vasconv@cdtn.br, E-mail: egr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear power plant owners have to consider several aspects like safety, availability, costs and radiation exposure during operation of nuclear power plants. They also need to demonstrate to regulatory bodies that risk assessment and inspection planning processes are being implemented in effective and appropriate manner. Risk-Based Inspection (RBI) is a methodology that, unlike time-based inspection, involves a quantitative assessment of both failure probability and consequence associated with each safety-related item. A correctly implemented RBI program classifies individual equipment by its risks and prioritizes inspection efforts based on this classification. While in traditional deterministic approach, the inspection frequencies are constant, in the RBI approach the inspection interval for each item depends on the risk level. Regularly, inspection intervals from RBI result in risk levels lower or equal than deterministic inspection intervals. According to the literature, RBI solutions improve integrity and reduce costs through a more effective inspection. Risk-Informed In-service Inspection (RI-ISI) is the equivalent term used in the nuclear area. Its use in nuclear power plants around world is briefly reviewed in this paper. Identification of practice methodologies for performing risk-based analyses presented in this paper can help both Brazilian nuclear power plant operator and regulatory body in evaluating the RI-ISI technique feasibility as a tool for optimizing inspections within nuclear plants. (author)

  5. Risk-based inspection in the context of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Wellington A.; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Rabello, Emerson G.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear power plant owners have to consider several aspects like safety, availability, costs and radiation exposure during operation of nuclear power plants. They also need to demonstrate to regulatory bodies that risk assessment and inspection planning processes are being implemented in effective and appropriate manner. Risk-Based Inspection (RBI) is a methodology that, unlike time-based inspection, involves a quantitative assessment of both failure probability and consequence associated with each safety-related item. A correctly implemented RBI program classifies individual equipment by its risks and prioritizes inspection efforts based on this classification. While in traditional deterministic approach, the inspection frequencies are constant, in the RBI approach the inspection interval for each item depends on the risk level. Regularly, inspection intervals from RBI result in risk levels lower or equal than deterministic inspection intervals. According to the literature, RBI solutions improve integrity and reduce costs through a more effective inspection. Risk-Informed In-service Inspection (RI-ISI) is the equivalent term used in the nuclear area. Its use in nuclear power plants around world is briefly reviewed in this paper. Identification of practice methodologies for performing risk-based analyses presented in this paper can help both Brazilian nuclear power plant operator and regulatory body in evaluating the RI-ISI technique feasibility as a tool for optimizing inspections within nuclear plants. (author)

  6. Man and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    According to the Inst. fuer Unfallforschung/TUeV Rheinland, Koeln, the interpretation of empirical data gained from the operation of nuclear power plants at home and abroad during the period 1967-1975 has shown that about 38% of all reactor accidents were caused by human failures. These occured either during the design and construction, the commissioning, the reconditioning or the operation of the plants. This very fact stresses human responsibility for the safety of nuclear power plants, in spite of those plants being automated to a high degree and devices. (orig.) [de

  7. 75 FR 16524 - FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company, Perry Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Company, Perry Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption 1.0 Background FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company (FENOC... the Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 1 (PNPP). The license provides, among other things, that the... date for all operating nuclear power plants, but noted that the Commission's regulations provide...

  8. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1992-09-01

    The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO I and II were in operation for almost all the time in the first quarter of 1992. The load factor average was 99.8%. All events which are classified on the International Nuclear Event Scale were level 0/below scale on the Scale. Occupational radiation doses and releases of radioactive material off-site remained well below authorised limits. Only quantities of radioactive material insignificant to radiation exposure, originating from the nuclear power plants, were detected in samples collected in the vicinity of the nuclear power plants

  9. Challenges for new nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschi, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    In the past 20 years, numerous new nuclear plant designs have been introduced in the hope of generating a mixture of features and benefits that generated enough enthusiasm amongst the utility industry decision makers to move forward with a new nuclear generation. Not only has there not been enough enthusiasm, there has been little interest in building new plants with advanced features, especially in the U.S. Compounding this predicament are the changing paradigms to which a new plant would be measured. The near hiatus on new plant orders is the clear cause of the significant consolidation in the nuclear industry. Regardless whether the disappearance of old-line nuclear companies is over or not, some paradigms for new generation designs are unmovable, while others are still under discussion as to their role in future plant designs. This paper will address those design goals that Westinghouse deems already having earned the rank of exemplar, and those still open to debate. Because it is my hope that this paper will lead to a fruitful discussion period, I will provide a list of what I feel are the champion design requirements, and those I consider the contenders. (author)

  10. Safety culture in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weihe, G. von; Pamme, H.

    2003-01-01

    Experience shows that German nuclear power plants have always been operated reliably and safely. Over the years, the safety level in these plants has been raised considerably so that they can stand any comparison with other countries. This is confirmed by the two reports published by the Federal Ministry for the Environment on the nuclear safety convention. Behind this, there must obviously stand countless appropriate 'good practices' and a safety management system in nuclear power plants. (orig.) [de

  11. Elecnuc - Nuclear power plants in the world - 2009 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the IAEA's PRIS and AREVA-CEA's GAIA databases. The following aspects are reviewed: 2008 highlights, Main characteristics of reactor types, Map of the French nuclear power plants on 2008/01/01, Worldwide status of nuclear power plants (12/31/2008), Units distributed by countries, Nuclear power plants connected to the Grid- by reactor type groups, Nuclear power plants under construction on 2008, Evolution of nuclear power plants capacities connected to the grid, First electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit in each country, Electrical generation from nuclear powe plants by country at the end 2008, Performance indicator of french PWR units, Evolution of the generation indicators worldwide by type, Nuclear operator ranking according to their installed capacity, Units connected to the grid by countries at 12/31/2008, Status of licence renewal applications in USA, Nuclear power plants under construction at 12/31/2008, Shutdown reactors, Exported nuclear capacity in net MWe, Exported and national nuclear capacity connected to the grid, Exported nuclear power plants under construction, Exported and national nuclear capacity under construction, Nuclear power plants ordered at 12/31/2008, Long term shutdown units at 12/31/2008, COL applications in the USA, Recycling of Plutonium in reactors and experiences, Mox licence plants projects, Appendix - historical development, Meaning of the used acronyms, Glossary

  12. ELECNUC Nuclear power plants in the world - 2013 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This small booklet summarizes in a series of tables the figures relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. Data come from the IAEA's PRIS database and from specific I-tese studies. The following aspects are reviewed: 2012 highlights; Main characteristics of reactor types; Map of the French nuclear power plants on 2012/01/01; Worldwide status of nuclear power plants (12/31/2012); Units distributed by countries; Nuclear power plants connected to the Grid- by reactor type groups; Nuclear power plants under construction on 2012; Evolution of nuclear power plants capacities connected to the grid; First electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit in each country; Electrical generation from nuclear power plants by country at the end 2012; Performance indicator of french PWR units; Evolution of the generation indicators worldwide by type; Nuclear operator ranking according to their installed capacity; Units connected to the grid by countries at 12/31/2012; Status of licence renewal applications in USA; Nuclear power plants under construction at 12/31/2012; Shutdown reactors; Exported nuclear capacity in net MWe; Exported and national nuclear capacity connected to the grid; Exported nuclear power plants under construction; Exported and national nuclear capacity under construction; Nuclear power plants ordered at 12/31/2012; Long term shutdown units at 12/31/2012; COL (Combined Licence) applications in the USA; Recycling of Plutonium in reactors and experiences; Mox licence plants projects; Appendix - historical development; Meaning of the used acronyms; Glossary

  13. A method for systematic resource allocation for improved nuclear power plant performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doboe, L.; Golay, M.; Todreas, N.; Li, F.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation was made on plant improvement investments in terms of the methods and criteria used in cooperation with the staffs of a group of nuclear power plants, aiming to understand better the methods used within US nuclear power plants for allocating investments. Cost analyses were being used the authors translated the process into a mathematical format. A spectrum of practices, ranging from use of informal power relationship-based processes to format benefit was found among different organizations. Cost-based processes structured to take into account a broad range of decision factors. Factors such as cost results, risk aversion and required uncertainty premiums were included in the treatment. Ultimately, competing investments can be ranked using the method presented in order of their return upon investment at an equivalent level of uncertainty. A method for ranking the attractiveness of nuclear power plant investments is presented which takes into account consistently factors of return upon investment, uncertainty and decision-maker risk aversion. Hopefully its use will result in improved decisions. (M.N.)

  14. Source book for planning nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, S.A.

    1981-02-01

    A source book on nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants was prepared to assist government and other planners in preparing broad evaluations of proposed applications of dual-purpose plants. The document is divided into five major sections. Section 1 presents general discussions relating to the benefits of dual-purpose plants, and spectrum for water-to-power ratios. Section 2 presents information on commercial nuclear plants manufactured by US manufacturers. Section 3 gives information on distillation desalting processes and equipment. Section 4 presents a discussion on feedwater pretreatment and scale control. Section 5 deals with methods for coupling the distillation and electrical generating plants to operate in the dual mode

  15. Source book for planning nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, S.A.

    1981-02-01

    A source book on nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants was prepared to assist government and other planners in preparing broad evaluations of proposed applications of dual-purpose plants. The document is divided into five major sections. Section 1 presents general discussions relating to the benefits of dual-purpose plants, and spectrum for water-to-power ratios. Section 2 presents information on commercial nuclear plants manufactured by US manufacturers. Section 3 gives information on distillation desalting processes and equipment. Section 4 presents a discussion on feedwater pretreatment and scale control. Section 5 deals with methods for coupling the distillation and electrical generating plants to operate in the dual mode.

  16. Implication of dual-purpose nuclear desalination plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutbi, I.I.

    1983-01-01

    Available dual purpose nuclear desalination schemes are reviewed. Three specific issues namely, impact of availability and reliability of the desalination stage of the plant, integration of the desalination and power production stages and new safety concerns of dual system, relating to desalination schemes are discussed. Results of operational and reliability studies of nuclear power stations, reverse osmosis and multistage flash distillation desalination plants are considered. Operational aspects of nuclear-multistage flash distillation, nuclear-reverse osmosis and nuclear-multistage flash distillation-reverse osmosis are compared. Concludes that the combined nuclear-multistage flash distillation-reverse osmosis plant arrangement permits very large production capacity, high availability, improvement of plant reliability and proovision of savings on the cost of water and power produced. 23 Ref

  17. Economic impact associated with the decommissioning process of Vandellos I Nuclear Power Plant; Informe final. Impacto economico del desmantelamiento de la central nuclear Vandellos I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Silva, M.

    2005-07-01

    This economic study examines the economic impact associated with the decommissioning process of the Vandellos I Nuclear Power Plant, measured in terms of the global income that generated the ending of the Nuclear Power Plant activity, on the territory. To this end, we will take into account the total investment that has been necessary to complete the process of decommissioning. The economic impact is calculated using the Input- Output methodology. Briefly, the Input-Output model defines a group of accounting relationships that reflect the links taking place within the production system. The Input-Output model is based on the assumption that given an increase (decrease) in the final demand of one sector, this sector should produce more (less) to satisfy this new demand. At the same time, this will lead to demand more (less) intermediate consumption goods from the remainder sectors of the economy. Then, these sectors should produce more (less) and use more (less) intermediate inputs, and so on. Therefore, an increase (decrease) in the final demand of one sector multiplies the effect throughout the economy, following the interdependency relationships that exist among the productive activities. We will start by collecting an exhaustive economic information. This information covers the whole decommissioning process and the whole economic and productive activity of the province of Tarragona. Next, this information is used with the objective of building an Input-Output table of the province that will serve as a base to establish the global economic impact of Vandellos I. The incomes and employment generation has been evaluated in the province of Tarragona that, following the main assumptions, correspond to the global effects of the decommissioning. In addition, we have evaluated the income and employment generation within the region where the nuclear power plant is located. The total income impacts show a high multiplier effect due to the investment carried out during the

  18. Ageing studies on materials, components and process instruments used in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bora, J.S.

    1997-04-01

    This report is a compilation of test results of thermal and radiation ageing tests carried out in the laboratory over a period of 25 years on diverse engineering materials, components and instruments used in nuclear power plants. Test items covered are different types of electrical cables, elastomers, surface coatings, electrical and electronics components and process instruments. Effects of thermal and radiation ageing on performance parameters are shown in tabular forms. Apart from finding the characteristics, capabilities and limitations of test items, ageing research has helped in pin-pointing sub-standard and critical parts and necessary corrective action has been taken. This report is expected to be quite useful to the manufacturers users and researchers for reference and guidance. (author)

  19. From the first nuclear power plant to fourth-generation nuclear power installations [on the 60th anniversary of the World's First nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachkov, V. I.; Kalyakin, S. G.; Kukharchuk, O. F.; Orlov, Yu. I.; Sorokin, A. P.

    2014-05-01

    Successful commissioning in the 1954 of the World's First nuclear power plant constructed at the Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) in Obninsk signaled a turn from military programs to peaceful utilization of atomic energy. Up to the decommissioning of this plant, the AM reactor served as one of the main reactor bases on which neutron-physical investigations and investigations in solid state physics were carried out, fuel rods and electricity generating channels were tested, and isotope products were bred. The plant served as a center for training Soviet and foreign specialists on nuclear power plants, the personnel of the Lenin nuclear-powered icebreaker, and others. The IPPE development history is linked with the names of I.V. Kurchatov, A.I. Leipunskii, D.I. Blokhintsev, A.P. Aleksandrov, and E.P. Slavskii. More than 120 projects of various nuclear power installations were developed under the scientific leadership of the IPPE for submarine, terrestrial, and space applications, including two water-cooled power units at the Beloyarsk NPP in Ural, the Bilibino nuclear cogeneration station in Chukotka, crawler-mounted transportable TES-3 power station, the BN-350 reactor in Kazakhstan, and the BN-600 power unit at the Beloyarsk NPP. Owing to efforts taken on implementing the program for developing fast-neutron reactors, Russia occupied leading positions around the world in this field. All this time, IPPE specialists worked on elaborating the principles of energy supertechnologies of the 21st century. New large experimental installations have been put in operation, including the nuclear-laser setup B, the EGP-15 accelerator, the large physical setup BFS, the high-pressure setup SVD-2; scientific, engineering, and technological schools have been established in the field of high- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics, electrostatic accelerators of multicharge ions, plasma processes in thermionic converters and nuclear-pumped lasers, physics of compact

  20. Development of a computerized nuclear materials control and accounting system for a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.M.; Ehinger, M.H.; Joseph, C.; Madeen, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    A computerized nuclear materials control and accounting system (CNMCAS) for a fuel reprocessing plant is being developed by Allied-General Nuclear Services at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant. Development work includes on-line demonstration of near real-time measurement, measurement control, accounting, and processing monitoring/process surveillance activities during test process runs using natural uranium. A technique for estimating in-process inventory is also being developed. This paper describes development work performed and planned, plus significant design features required to integrate CNMCAS into an advanced safeguards system. 2 refs

  1. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-12-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations related to nuclear and radiation safety which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Safety-enhancing plant modifications and general matters relating to the use of nuclear energy are also reported. A summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, and tabulated data on the plants' production and their load factors are also given. At the Loviisa 1 plant unit one of two specially-backed AC busbars was lost during the second quarter of 1993. A ca. 30 minute voltage break caused malfunctions in the plant unit's electrical equipment and rendered inoperable certain components important to safety. The event is rated on the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) at level 1. In inspections carried out at TVO II during the annual maintenance outage, the number of cracks detected in control rod structural material was higher than usual. When cracks occur, part of boron carbide, the power regulating medium in control rods, may wash into the reactor water and control rod shutdown capability may be impaired. The event is rated on the INES at level 1. Other events in the second quarter of 1993 had no bearing on nuclear or radiation safety. (4 figs., 5 tabs.)

  2. Conformation of an evaluation process for a license renovation solicitude of a nuclear power plant in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano R, M. L.

    2012-10-01

    So that the construction stages, of operation, closing, dismantlement and the radioactive waste disposal of a nuclear power plant (NPP) are carried out in Mexico, is necessary that the operator has a license, permission or authorization for each stage. In Mexico, these licenses, permissions or authorizations are granted by the Energy Secretariat with base in the verdict of the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS). The operation licenses ar the moment effective for the reactors of the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde (NPP-L V) they will expire respectively in the year 2020 and 2025 for the Unit 1 and Unit 2, for what the CNSNS has begun its preparation before a potential solicitude of the licensee to continue the operation of the NPP-L V. Defining the process to continue and to generate the documents that would help in this phase as normalization, guides, procedures, regulations, controls, etc., is the task that intends to be carried out the regulator body so that the evaluation process is effective and efficient, so much for the same regulator body as for the licensee. This work exposes the advance that the CNSNS has in this aspect and is centered specifically in the conformation of an evaluation process of license renovation solicitude, taking as base what the regulator body of the United States of North America (US NRC) established and following to the IAEA. Also, this work includes statistical of electric power production in Mexico, licensing antecedents for the NPP-L V, a world perspective of the license renovations and the regulation of the US NRC related to the license renovation of a NPP. (Author)

  3. Reprocessing of nuclear fuels at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.

    1986-01-01

    For more than 30 years, the Savannah River Plant (SRP) has been a major supplier of nuclear materials such as plutonium-239 and tritium-3 for nuclear and thermonuclear weapons, plutonium-238 for space exploration, and isotopes of americium, curium, and californium for use in the nuclear research community. SRP is a complete nuclear park, providing most of the processes in the nuclear fuel cycle. Key processes involve fabrication and cladding of the nuclear fuel, target, and control assemblies; rework of heavy water for use as reactor moderator; reactor loading, operation, and unloading; chemical recovery of the reactor transmutation products and spent fuels; and management of the gaseous, liquid, and solid nuclear and chemical wastes; plus a host of support operations. The site's history and the key processes from fabrication of reactor fuels and targets to finishing of virgin plutonium for use in the nuclear weapons complex are reviewed. Emphasis has been given to the chemistry of the recovery and purification of weapons grade plutonium from irradiated reactor targets

  4. Nuclear power plants: 2009 atw compact statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    At the turn of 2009/2010, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 30 countries of the world. A total of 437 nuclear power plants, which is one plant less than at the 2008/2009 turn, were in operation with an aggregate gross power of approx. 391 GWe and an aggregate net power, respectively, of 371 GWe. The available gross power of nuclear power plants did not changed noticeably from 2008 to the end of 2009. In total 2 nuclear generating units were commissioned in 2009. One NPP started operation in India and one in Japan. Three nuclear generating units in Japan (2) und Lithuania (1) were decomissioned in 2009. 52 nuclear generating units, i.e. 10 plants more than at the end of 2008, with an aggregate gross power of approx. 51 GWe, were under construction in 14 countries end of 2009. New or continued projects are notified from (number of new projects): China (+9), Russia (1), and South Korea (1). Some 84 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning and licensing phases worldwide; on some of them, contracts have already been awarded. Another units are in their preliminary project phases. (orig.)

  5. Nuclear power plants: 2008 atw compact statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    At the turn of 2008/2009, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply in 31 countries of the world. A total of 438 nuclear power plants, which is one plant less than at the 2007/2008 turn, were in operation with an aggregate gross power of approx. 393 GWe and an aggregate net power, respectively, of 372 GWe. The available gross power of nuclear power plants didn't changed noticeabely from 2007 to the end of 2008. No nuclear generating unit was commissioned in 2008. One nuclear generating unit in the Slovak Republic was decomissioned in 2008. 42 nuclear generating units, i.e. 10 plants more than at the end of 2007, with an aggregate gross power of approx. 38 GWe, were under construction in 14 countries end of 2008. New or continued projects are notified from (in brackets: number of new projects): Bulgaria (2), China (5), South Korea (2), Russia (1), and the Slovak Republic (2). Some 80 new nuclear power plants are in the concrete project design, planning and licensing phases worldwide; on some of them, contracts have already been awarded. Another approximately 120 units are in their preliminary project phases. (orig.)

  6. Plant computer system in nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shinji; Fukuchi, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    In nuclear power stations, centrally concentrated monitoring system has been adopted, and in central control rooms, large quantity of information and operational equipments concentrate, therefore, those become the important place of communication between plants and operators. Further recently, due to the increase of the unit capacity, the strengthening of safety, the problems of man-machine interface and so on, it has become important to concentrate information, to automate machinery and equipment and to simplify them for improving the operational environment, reliability and so on. On the relation of nuclear power stations and computer system, to which attention has been paid recently as the man-machine interface, the example in Tsuruga Power Station, Japan Atomic Power Co. is shown. No.2 plant in the Tsuruga Power Station is a PWR plant with 1160 MWe output, which is a home built standardized plant, accordingly the computer system adopted here is explained. The fundamental concept of the central control board, the process computer system, the design policy, basic system configuration, reliability and maintenance, CRT display, and the computer system for No.1 BWR 357 MW plant are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Applications of wavelet transforms for nuclear power plant signal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seker, S.; Turkcan, E.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Erbay, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    The safety of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) may be enhanced by the timely processing of information derived from multiple process signals from NPPs. The most widely used technique in signal analysis applications is the Fourier transform in the frequency domain to generate power spectral densities (PSD). However, the Fourier transform is global in nature and will obscure any non-stationary signal feature. Lately, a powerful technique called the Wavelet Transform, has been developed. This transform uses certain basis functions for representing the data in an effective manner, with capability for sub-band analysis and providing time-frequency localization as needed. This paper presents a brief overview of wavelets applied to the nuclear industry for signal processing and plant monitoring. The basic theory of Wavelets is also summarized. In order to illustrate the application of wavelet transforms data were acquired from the operating nuclear power plant Borssele in the Netherlands. The experimental data consist of various signals in the power plant and are selected from a stationary power operation. Their frequency characteristics and the mutual relations were investigated using MATLAB signal processing and wavelet toolbox for computing their PSDs and coherence functions by multi-resolution analysis. The results indicate that the sub-band PSD matches with the original signal PSD and enhances the estimation of coherence functions. The Wavelet analysis demonstrates the feasibility of application to stationary signals to provide better estimates in the frequency band of interest as compared to the classical FFT approach. (author)

  8. Fire scenarios in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asp, I.B.; MacDougall, E.A.; Hall, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    This report defines a Design Base Fire and looks at 3 major areas of a hypothetical model for a Nuclear Power Plant. In each of these areas a Design Base Fire was developed and explained. In addition, guidance is given for comparing fire conditions of a given Nuclear Power Plant with the model plant described. Since there is such a wide variation in nuclear plant layouts, model areas were chosen for simplicity. The areas were not patterned after any existing plant area; rather several plant layouts were reviewed and a simplified model developed. The developed models considered several types of fires. The fire selected was considered to be the dominant one for the case in point. In general, the dominant fire selected is time dependent and starts at a specific location. After these models were developed, a comparison was drawn between the model and an operating plant for items such as area, cable numbers and weight, tray sizes and lengths. The heat loads of the model plant are summarized by area and compared with those of an actual operating plant. This document is intended to be used as a guide in the evaluation of fire hazards in nuclear power stations and a summarization of one acceptable analytical methodology to accomplish this

  9. Concept of a computer network architecture for complete automation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.M.; Ray, A.

    1990-01-01

    The state of the art in automation of nuclear power plants has been largely limited to computerized data acquisition, monitoring, display, and recording of process signals. Complete automation of nuclear power plants, which would include plant operations, control, and management, fault diagnosis, and system reconfiguration with efficient and reliable man/machine interactions, has been projected as a realistic goal. This paper presents the concept of a computer network architecture that would use a high-speed optical data highway to integrate diverse, interacting, and spatially distributed functions that are essential for a fully automated nuclear power plant

  10. The future of nuclear energy. Safety and nuclear power plants. Contribution of engineering companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Rodriguez, A.

    1995-01-01

    Risk, its consideration and its acceptance or rejection, are parameters which to a large extent are independent and sometimes difficult to interrelate. Nuclear energy, unlike motoring or civil aviation, has not gained sufficient public acceptance, this despite the fact that the risk to population is by far the least of the three. It is therefore necessary to continue with its improvement is an attempt to create the same confidence in the nuclear industry, as society has placed in civil aviation. Improvement in future nuclear power plants must be a combination of improved safety and a reduction in capital investment. This objective can only be reached through standardization and international cooperation. Engineering has a very important part to play in the standardization process. An increase in engineering input during the design, construction, operation and maintenance phases of future nuclear power plants, and the application of increasingly sophisticated analysis and management tools are anticipated. Nevertheless, the financial impact on the cost of each plant will fall as a result of increased input spread throughout the range of standard plants. Our current Advanced Reactor Power Plant Programme enables the Spanish industry to participate actively in the creation of future standards nuclear power plants. Having a presence in selected engineering activities, which guarantees access to the state of the art in this area, is one of our priorities, since it will facilitate the presence of the rest of the industry in future projects. If the objectives described above are to be reached, the present involvement of the spanish industry in this programme must be maintained in the medium and long term. (Author)

  11. Modernization of turbines in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harig, T.

    2005-01-01

    An ongoing goal in the power generation industry is to maximize the output of currently installed assets. This is most important at nuclear power plants due to the large capital investments that went into these plants and their base loaded service demands. Recent trends in the United States show a majority of nuclear plants are either obtaining, or are in the process of obtaining NRC approvals for operating license extensions and power uprates. This trend is evident in other countries as well. For example, all Swedish nuclear power plants are currently working on projects to extend their service life and maximize capacity through thermal uprate and turbine-generator upgrade with newest technology. The replacement of key components with improved ones is a means of optimizing the service life and availability of power plants. Economic advantages result from increased efficiency, higher output, shorter startup and shutdown times as well as reduced outage times and service costs. The rapid advances over recent years in the development of calculation programs enables adaptation of the latest blading technology to the special requirements imposed by steam turbine upgrading. This results in significant potential for generating additional output with the implementation of new technology, even without increased thermal power. In contrast to maintenance and investment in pure replacement or repair of a component with the primary goal of maintaining operability and reliability, the additional output gained by upgrading enables a return on investment to be reaped. (orig.)

  12. Coupling of RO-MSF hybrid desalination plants with nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sulaiman, Khalil; Al-Mutaz, Ibrahim S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text.Reverse osmosis (RO) and multistage flash (MSF) desalination are the most widely commercial available processes. MSF utilizes stream in the brine heater as a primary source of energy. RO is derived mainly by electricity that pumps the feed water against the mambranes. Steam and electricity and be produced easily by nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactors may be coupled with deslination plants (MSF, RO or combined (hybrid) RO/MSF configuration). This integrated plant will be capable of producing power and water at reasonable cost. The capital and operating cost will be reduced and the excess power can be efficiently utilized. Maintenance and operating cost will drop significantly. In this paper, a techno-economic study of hybrid reverses osmosis /multistage flash desalination will be carried. The proposed configuration (hybrid RO/MSF) coupled with nuclear reactor is considered the most appropriate candidate system for the application of dual-purpose nuclear desalination plants. the design parameters for such a desalination hybrid system will be the applied pressure and recovery for reverse osmosis plant and the number of stages and the heat transfer areas for multistage flash plant

  13. Promoting excellence in nuclear power plant training in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangin, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) was formed in late 1979 by U.S. nuclear utilities to enhance the operational safety and reliability of their nuclear plants. One of INPO's major functions is to promote excellence in industry training and qualification programs. To accomplish this objective, INPO develops and uses guidelines and evaluation criteria to assist utilities in developing and implementing high quality training and education programs. The training guidelines permit utilities to develop performance-based programs which meet their specific need with minimal duplication of effort. INPO regularly evaluates each utility's training programs and practices in the plant evaluation and accreditation processes using criteria based on the training guidelines. In the accreditation process, INPO examines training programs and training organizations to determine whether they have the potential to produce individuals qualified to perform assigned tasks. During plant evaluations, INPO examines the implementation of the programs and their effectiveness in producing qualified individuals. After each accreditation review and plant evaluation, INPO recommends improvements and follows up to ensure they are made. (author)

  14. Ventilation-air conditioner system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Ryuji; Sugisaki, Toshihiko.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns a ventilation-air conditioner system which enables, upon occurrence of accidents in a nuclear power plant, continuous operation for other adjacent nuclear power plants with no effect of accidents. Air supply system and exhaust system are operated during usual operaiton. If loss of coolants accidents should occur in an adjacent nuclear power plants, operation is switched from ventilation operaiton to the operation of re-cycling system based on an AND logic of three signals, that is, a pressure HIGH signal for the reactor container, a water level LOW signal for the reactor and a radioactivity signal of the ventilation-air conditioner sytem on the side of air supply in the nuclear power plant. Thus, nuclear reactor buildings of the nuclear power plant are from the external atmosphere. Therefore, the radioactivity HIGH signal for switching to the emergency air conditioner system of the nuclear power plant is not actuated due to the loss of coolant accidents in the adjacent nuclear power plant. In addition, since the atmospheric temperature in the nuclear reactor building can be maintained by a cooling device disposed to the recycling system, reactor shutdown can be prevented. (I.S.)

  15. Vital areas at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    Vital area analysis of nuclear power plants has been performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission by the Los Alamos National Laboratory from the late 1970's through the present. The Los Alamos Vital Area Study uses a fault-tree modeling technique to identify vital areas and equipment at nuclear power plants to determine their vulnerability. This technique has been applied to all operating plants and approximately one-half of those under construction in the US. All saboteur-induced loss-of-coolant accidents and transients and the systems needed to mitigate them are considered. As a result of this effort, security programs at nuclear power plants now include vulnerability studies that identify targets in a systematic manner, and thus unnecessary protection has been minimized. 1 ref., 8 figs., 1 tab

  16. Future-oriented computerized information system for power plant process control in a pilot project at Philippsburg nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woehrle, G.; Kraft, M.

    1988-01-01

    The motivation for the pilot project at Philippsburg nuclear power plant resulted from the Three Mile Island accident in 1979. The primary task embraces an efficient computer-aided reduction of information when a fault occurs based on a process engineering analysis of the information accrued. Accompanying this are a consolidation and evaluation of the information available in the control room. In this pilot project the new tasks of status monitoring, information reduction and operationalcontrol have been realized for the first time using a computer-aided process information system. In addition to the existing control computer, an information computer with approximately 1200 analogue and about 10000 binary signals has been installed. The installation of the system was completed in 1984 and in the meantime initial operational experience has become available. (orig.) [de

  17. 78 FR 38739 - Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... Systems for Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Regulatory guide; issuance... Guide (RG) 5.29, ``Special Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems for Nuclear Power Plants... material control and accounting. This guide applies to all nuclear power plants. ADDRESSES: Please refer to...

  18. Licensing the First Nuclear Power Plant. INSAG-26. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Group (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This report is primarily addressed to policy makers and nuclear safety regulatory bodies in IAEA Member States planning to establish their first nuclear power plant. It outlines the key challenges with suggestions on how the regulator and policy makers might address them and also prepare for further development of nuclear power in the country. INSAG believes that development of technical competence of the national regulatory body is a necessary condition for the safe development of nuclear power. Therefore, regulatory infrastructure development should be a national policy requirement, as opposed to being a challenge only for the regulator. A major challenge in the deployment of the first nuclear power plant is the development of the underlying nuclear safety infrastructure and knowledge base. Since an independent regulatory body is an important part of such infrastructure, its establishment and development must be addressed at an early stage and adequate resources must be made available for this purpose. This is to ensure smooth and efficient conduct of the licensing process and regulatory oversight of the first nuclear power plant through an informed decision making process. It is essential that the legal framework starts to be implemented with a main component being the issuance of a nuclear law establishing fundamental principles and defining the responsibilities of the principal organizations, particularly the operating organization and the regulatory body. The regulatory body on its part should develop the regulatory framework that includes the establishment of regulations against which the nuclear power project will be assessed, definition of the licensing steps and corresponding documentation to be submitted by the applicant, and the implementation of a quality management system. It is expected that the 'reference plant' concept will be employed whereby the country's first nuclear power plant would have essentially the same design and safety

  19. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Commissioning and Operation. Specific Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This publication describes the requirements to be met to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. It takes into account developments in areas such as long term operation of nuclear power plants, plant ageing, periodic safety review, probabilistic safety analysis and risk informed decision making processes. In addition, the requirements are governed by, and must apply, the safety objective and safety principles that are established in the IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles. A review of Safety Requirements publications was commenced in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The review revealed no significant areas of weakness and resulted in just a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation, which are contained in the present publication

  20. China’s Nuclear Power Plants in Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Qinshan Plant Phase I Located in Haiyan,Zhejiang Province,Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant Phase I is t he first 300-megawatt pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant independently designed,constructed,operated and managed by China.The plant came into commercial operation in April 1994.

  1. Analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this report is to present the results of a statistical analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs and lead-times (where lead-time is defined as the duration of the construction period), using a sample of units that entered construction during the 1966-1977 period. For more than a decade, analysts have been attempting to understand the reasons for the divergence between predicted and actual construction costs and lead-times. More importantly, it is rapidly being recognized that the future of the nuclear power industry rests precariously on an improvement in the cost and lead-time situation. Thus, it is important to study the historical information on completed plants, not only to understand what has occurred to also to improve the ability to evaluate the economics of future plants. This requires an examination of the factors that have affected both the realized costs and lead-times and the expectations about these factors that have been formed during the construction process. 5 figs., 22 tabs

  2. Analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this report is to present the results of a statistical analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs and lead-times (where lead-time is defined as the duration of the construction period), using a sample of units that entered construction during the 1966-1977 period. For more than a decade, analysts have been attempting to understand the reasons for the divergence between predicted and actual construction costs and lead-times. More importantly, it is rapidly being recognized that the future of the nuclear power industry rests precariously on an improvement in the cost and lead-time situation. Thus, it is important to study the historical information on completed plants, not only to understand what has occurred to also to improve the ability to evaluate the economics of future plants. This requires an examination of the factors that have affected both the realized costs and lead-times and the expectations about these factors that have been formed during the construction process. 5 figs., 22 tabs.

  3. Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    A comprehensive Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program was implemented by the US NRC office of Nuclear Regulatory Research in 1985 to identify and resolve technical safety issues related to the aging of systems, structures, and components in operating nuclear power plants. This is Revision 2 to the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program Plant. This planes defines the goals of the program the current status of research, and summarizes utilization of the research results in the regulatory process. The plan also describes major milestones and schedules for coordinating research within the agency and with organizations and institutions outside the agency, both domestic and foreign. Currently the NPAR Program comprises seven major areas: (1) hardware-oriented engineering research involving components and structures; (2) system-oriented aging interaction studies; (3) development of technical bases for license renewal rulemaking; (4) determining risk significance of aging phenomena; (5) development of technical bases for resolving generic safety issues; (6) recommendations for field inspection and maintenance addressing aging concerns; (7) and residual lifetime evaluations of major LWR components and structures. The NPAR technical database comprises approximately 100 NUREG/CR reports by June 1991, plus numerous published papers and proceedings that offer regulators and industry important insights to aging characteristics and aging management of safety-related equipment. Regulatory applications include revisions to and development of regulatory guides and technical specifications; support to resolve generic safety issues; development of codes and standards; evaluation of diagnostic techniques; (e.g., for cables and valves); and technical support for development of the license renewal rule. 80 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs

  4. Modeling closed nuclear fuel cycles processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmidt, O.V. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute for Inorganic Materials, Rogova, 5a street, Moscow, 123098 (Russian Federation); Makeeva, I.R. [Zababakhin All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Technical Physics, Vasiliev street 13, Snezhinsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456770 (Russian Federation); Liventsov, S.N. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Lenin Avenue, 30, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    Computer models of processes are necessary for determination of optimal operating conditions for closed nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) processes. Computer models can be quickly changed in accordance with new and fresh data from experimental research. 3 kinds of process simulation are necessary. First, the VIZART software package is a balance model development used for calculating the material flow in technological processes. VIZART involves taking into account of equipment capacity, transport lines and storage volumes. Secondly, it is necessary to simulate the physico-chemical processes that are involved in the closure of NFC. The third kind of simulation is the development of software that allows the optimization, diagnostics and control of the processes which implies real-time simulation of product flows on the whole plant or on separate lines of the plant. (A.C.)

  5. Eddy currents signal processing for steam generator inspection in PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgel, B.

    1992-01-01

    Steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants are periodically checked by means of eddy current probes. The output of a probe is composed of three types of signals: known events (rolling zone, support plates, U-bend part), noise (mainly metallurgical noise) and possible flaws. The latter are random transients, both in arrival time and in shape: they have to be detected and then estimated, before to be fed to the high level stages of a diagnostic system. The objective of the study presented is to develop a semi-automatic system, which could manage and process more than 1 M-bytes of data per tube and provide an operator with reliable diagnostics proposals within a few minutes. This can be achieved only by cooperation of several digital signal processing techniques: detection, segmentation, estimation, noise subtraction, adaptive filtering, modelization, pattern recognition. The paper describes some of these items

  6. Nuclear plants near borders: environmental, legal, economic and political aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carle, R.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last few years, the legal framework of the development of nuclear energy within Europe has focussed on the special problems posed by nuclear plants located near national boundaries. The problems which may be caused by such plants must clearly be handled in the same way as for any other installations and the governments concerned need to define mutually acceptable conditions. Joint committees have already been formed between some countries, most notably to deal with nuclear plant safety issues. Special agreements have been reached covering the use of river water, public information and mutual assistance in case of accident. The key to the whole process is a progressive standardization of regulations concerning the environment, safety, radiological protection, non-proliferation, public information and emergency plans in case of accidents. (UK)

  7. A completely new design and regulatory process - A risk-based approach for new nuclear power plants. Annex 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritterbusch, S.E.

    2002-01-01

    In the de-regulated electric power market place that is developing in the USA, competition from alternative electric power sources has provided significant downward pressure on the costs of new construction projects. Studies by the Electric Power Research Institute have shown that, in the USA, the capital cost of new nuclear plants must be decreased by at least 35% to 40% relative to the cost of Advanced Light Water Reactors designed in the early 1990s in order to be competitive with capital costs of gas-fired electric power plants. The underlying reasons for the high capital costs estimated for some nuclear plants are (1) long construction times, (2) the high level of 'defense-in-depth' or safety margin, included throughout the design and licensing process, and (3) the use of out-dated design methods and information. Probabilistic Safety Assessments are being used to develop a more accurate assessment of real plant risk and to provide relief if it can be demonstrated that plant equipment is not providing a significant contribution to plant safety. Westinghouse addressed some of these cost drivers in the development of the AP-600 passive plant design. However, because of relatively inexpensive natural gas plant alternative, we need to reduce the costs even further. Therefore, the AP-600 design is now being up-rated to a 1000 MWe design, AP-1000. The development of AP1000 is described in another paper being presented at this meeting. Westinghouse is also managing a project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, which is aimed at developing an all-new 'risk-based' approach to design and regulation. Methodologies being developed use risk-based information to the extent practical and 'defense-in-depth' only when necessary to address uncertainties in models and equipment performance. Early results, summarized in this paper, include (1) the initial framework for a new design and regulatory process and (2) a sample design analysis which shows that the Emergency Core

  8. Development of robots for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masayoshi

    1982-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, the reduction of maintenance time, the reduction of radiation exposure and man-power saving are increasingly required. To achieve these purposes, various remote-controlled devices, such as robots in a broad sense, have been earnestly developed. Of these, three machines for replacing, four devices for inspection, two systems for cleaning, and two equipment for processing are tabulated in this paper. Typical eight machines or equipment are briefly introduced, mainly describing their features or characteristics. Those are: a remotely handling machine for control rod drive mechanism, an automatic refueling machine, an automatic ultrasonic flaw detection system replacing for a manually operated testing system for the welded parts of primary cooling system, an automatic cask washing machine for decontamination, a floor-type remote inspection vehicle for various devices operating inside power plants, a monorail-type remote inspection vehicle for inspection in spaces where floor space is short, and a remote-controlled automatic pipe welding machine for welding operations in a radioactive environment such as replacing the piping of primary cooling system. Most of these devices serves for radiation exposure reduction at the same time. Existing nuclear power plant design assumes direct manual maintenance, which limits the introduction of robots. Future nuclear power plants should be designed on the assumption of automatic remote-controlled tools and devices being used in maintenance work. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. CSNI technical opinion papers no.10. The role of human and organisational factors in nuclear power plant modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear power plant modifications may be needed for a number of different reasons. These include physical ageing of plant systems, structures and components; obsolescence in hardware and software; feedback from operating experience; and opportunities for improved plant safety, reliability or capability. However, experience has also shown that weaknesses in the design and/or implementation of modifications can present significant challenges to plant safety. They can also have a considerable impact on the commercial performance of the plant. It is therefore important that the plant modification process reflect a recognition of the potential impact of human errors and that it incorporate suitable measures to minimise the potential for such errors. In this context, the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) and its Working Group on Human and Organisational Factors organised an international workshop in 2003 to discuss the role of human and organisational performance in the nuclear plant modification process. This technical opinion paper represents the consensus of specialists in human and organisational factors (HOF) in the NEA member countries on commendable practices and approaches to dealing with nuclear plant modifications. It considers factors that should be taken into account when developing a modification process and identifies some lessons learnt from application of the process. The paper should be of particular interest of nuclear safety regulators and nuclear power plant operators. (author)

  10. Commissioning of the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtado, P.M.; Rolf, F.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant Angra 2, located at Itaorna Beach-Angra dos Reis is the first plant of the Brazilian-German Agreement to be commissioned. The Nuclear Power Plant is a pressurized water reactor rated at 3765 Mw thermal/1325 Mw electrical. For commissioning purpose the plant is divided into 110 systems. Plant commissioning objective is to demonstrate the safe and correct operation of each plan component, system and of the whole plant in agreement with design conditions, licensing requirements and contractual obligations. This work gives a description of plant commissioning objectives, activities their time sequence, and documentation. (Author) [pt

  11. Operational failure at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szatmary, Z.

    2003-01-01

    NPP failures are ranked according to the International Nuclear Event Scale. To rank the failure first a presentation of the pressurized water plant is given, including fuel change, maintenance cleaning and decontamination process. The failure has been produced with fuel bars in the cleaning container. Consequences of the failure are small, negligible environmental pollution with radioactive material and significant financial outfall due to inactivity of block 2. Among the causes of the failure are design errors of the cleaning container, the pure chemical approach to cleaning, unknown risk factors for some of the cleaning staff, cleaning container has not been verified and approved by responsible authorities, the prevalence of economic and quantitative indicators of the plant on the detriment of safety. Organisational factors also contribute to the possibility of nuclear failures. Specialist training in Germany (where the container has been produced) is significantly reduced, while in Hungary the political tide has caused a permanent change in the higher echelons of the plant management, where nuclear specialists were not included. (Gy.M.)

  12. The financing of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, M.

    2009-01-01

    Existing nuclear generating capacity plays an important role in providing secure, economic and low-carbon electricity supplies in many OECD countries. At the same time, there is increasing recognition that an expansion of nuclear power could play a valuable role in reducing future carbon dioxide emissions. However, in recent years only a handful of new nuclear power plants (NPPs) have been built in just a few OECD countries. An important reason for this is the challenges associated with financing the construction of new NPPs. The just-published NEA report entitled The Financing of Nuclear Power Plants examines these challenges. In addition, recognizing that any expansion of nuclear power programmes will require strong and sustained government support, the report highlights the role of governments in facilitating and encouraging investment in new nuclear capacity. Key actions that should be considered by governments that wish to see investment in new NPPs include: - Provide clear and sustained policy support for the development of nuclear power, by setting out the case for a nuclear component in energy supply as part of a long-term national energy strategy. - Work with electricity utilities, financial companies and other potential investors, and the nuclear industry from an early stage to address concerns that may prevent nuclear investment and to avoid mistakes in establishing the parameters for new NPPs. - Establish an efficient and effective regulatory system which provides adequate opportunities for public involvement in the decision-making process, while also providing potential investors with the certainty they require to plan such a major investment. - Put arrangements in place for the management of radioactive waste and spent fuel, and show progress towards a solution for final disposal of waste. For investors in NPPs, the financial arrangements for paying their fair share of the costs must be clearly defined. - Ensure that electricity market regulation does

  13. Preparation of environmental reports and impact statements for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Y.H.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable first-hand experience has accumulated during the past decade in the United States regarding the preparation of environmental reports (ER) and environmental impact statements (EIS) for nuclear power plants. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), which is responsible for regulating the construction and operation of nuclear power plants, is required under the National Environmental Policy Act to prepare an EIS for each plant. To obtain information essential to the EIS, the USNRC requires that each power company submit an ER. This paper focuses on the interrelationships of the two environmental documents and discusses the environmental review process and the environmental laws and regulations related to the licensing of nuclear power plants. It also describes the format and content, environmental issues, data requirements, and impact assessment methodologies for preparation of the ER and EIS. Problems associated with preparing the EIS are presented, with particular emphasis on the problems and methodologies associated with evaluating environmental costs and benefits

  14. Decommissioning Licensing Process of Nuclear Installations in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa Sainz, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The Enresa experience related to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities includes the decommissioning of the Vandellos I and Jose Cabrera NPPs. The Vandellos I gas-graphite reactor was decommissioned in about five years (from 1998 to 2003) to what is known as level 2. In February 2010, the decommissioning of Jose Cabrera power plant has been initiated and it is scheduled to be finished by 2018. The decommissioning of a nuclear power plant is a complex administrative process, the procedure for changing from operation to decommissioning is established in the Spanish law. This paper summarizes the legal framework defining the strategies, the main activities and the basic roles of the various agents involved in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Spain. It also describes briefly the Licensing documents required to obtain the decommissioning authorization and the Enresa point of view, as licensee, on the licensing decommissioning process. (author)

  15. Comparison of risk assessment methodologies for nuclear power and nuclear fuels processing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durant, W.S.; Walker, D.H.

    1986-08-01

    The utilization of nuclear fission for the generation of electric power or other purposes has as its by-product radioactive fission products. These radioactive fission products represent a potential hazard different in nature from that associated with other process operations or other methods of electrical power generation. As a result the electrical power stations and the facilities designed to process the irradiated fuel to recover the still useful fuel and the products of the irradiation are designed with multiple physical barriers to contain the radioactive fission products in the event that an accident were to occur. In recent years, a disciplined approach has evolved for developing detailed models of a facility and its processes. These models can be used to assess the response for the facility to upset or accident events. The approach is based on an ordered application of available data employing fault tree/event tree methodologies. Data and/or engineering judgment are applied in a probabilisitc framework so the approach has been called Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). The approach has been applied to nuclear electric generating facilities and to nuclear fuel processing facilities to assess the potential for release of fission product and transuranium element radionuclides (the hazard) and the resulting risks. The application of the methodology to the electrical generating facilities and to the fuel processing facilities has evolved somewhat differently because of differences in the facilities, availability of failure rate data, and expected outputs. This paper summarizes the two approaches and the differences in them compares the risk results from the existing studies

  16. How safe are nuclear plants? How safe should they be?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouts, H.

    1988-01-01

    It has become customary to think about safety of nuclear plants in terms of risk as defined by the WASH-1400 study that some of the implications for the non-specialist escape our attention. Yet it is known that a rational program to understand safety, to identify unsafe events, and to use this kind of information or analysis to improve safety, requires us to use the methods of quantitative risk assessment. How this process can be made more understandable to a broader group of nontechnical people and how can a wider acceptance of the results of the process be developed have been questions under study and are addressed in this report. These are questions that have been struggled with for some time in the world of nuclear plant safety. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission examined them for several years as it moved toward developing a position on safety goals for nuclear plants, a requirement that had been assigned it by Congress. Opinion was sought from a broad spectrum of individuals, within the field of nuclear power and outside it, on the topic that was popularly called, ''How safe is safe enough?'' Views were solicited on the answer to the question and also on the way the answer should be framed when it was adopted. This report discusses the public policy and its implementation

  17. Changes in control room at Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kecklund, Lena

    2005-09-01

    The Swedish nuclear power plants were commissioned during a period between 1972 and 1985 and the instrumentation and control equipment are basically from that period. For several years there have been plans made for changes in all the nuclear power plants and to a certain extent the changes in control equipment and monitoring rooms have also been implemented. The object of this project was to make a comprehensive review of the changes in control room design implemented in the Swedish nuclear power plants and to describe how the MTO- (Man-Technology-Organisation) and (Man-Machine-Interface) -issues have been integrated in the process. The survey is intended to give an overall picture of the changes in control room design and man-machine-interface made in the Swedish control rooms, in order to get a deeper knowledge of the change management process and its results as well as of the management of MTO-issues in these projects. The units included in this survey are: Oskarhamn reactor 2 and 3; Ringhals reactor 2, 3 and 4; Forsmark reactor 1, 2 and 3. The Oskarshamn 1 unit has not been included in this report as it has recently undergone an extensive modernisation program as well as a detailed inspection by the SKI (Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate). At Ringhals 2 the modernisation work is carried out at present and the unit is also subjected to extensive inspection activities carried out by SKI and is therefore not part of this survey. This report also includes a short description of relevant standards and requirements. Then follows a presentation of the results of the plant survey, presented as case studies for three companies OKG, Ringhals and FKA. Control room changes are summarized as well as the results on specific MTO issues which has been surveyed. In all the power companies there is a joint way of working with projects concerning plant modifications. This process is described for each company separately. In the concluding of the report the strengths and

  18. Nuclear power plant control and instrumentation 1982. Proceedings of an international symposium on nuclear power plant control and instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Ever increasing demands for nuclear power plant safety and availability imply a need for the introduction of modern measurement and control methods, together with data processing techniques based on the latest advances in electronic components, transducers and computers. Nuclear power plant control and instrumentation is therefore an extremely rapidly developing field. The present symposium, held in Munich, FR Germany, was prepared with the help of the IAEA International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation and organized in close co-operation with the Gesellschaft fur Reaktorsicherheit, Federal Republic of Germany. A number of developments were highlighted at the Munich symposium: - The increased use of computers can bring clear advantages and this technique is now proven as a tool for supervising and controlling plant operation. Advanced computerized systems for operator support are being developed on a large scale in many countries. The progress in this field is quite obvious, especially in disturbance analysis, safety parameter display, plant operator guidance and plant diagnostics. The new trend of introducing computers and microprocessors in protection systems makes it easy to implement 'defence-in-depth' strategies which give better assurance of correct system responses and also prevent unnecessary reactor trips, thus improving plant availability. The introduction of computerized systems for control of reactor power, reactor water level and reactor pressure as well as for reactor start-up and shut-down could improve the reliability and availability of nuclear power plants. The rapid technical development in the area of control and instrumentation makes it necessary to plan for at least one replacement of obsolete equipment in the course of the 30 years lifetime of a nuclear power plant and retrofitting of currently operating reactors with new control systems. Major design improvements and regulatory requirements also require

  19. Integration of artificial intelligence systems for nuclear power plants surveillance and diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetry, Moon K.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this program is to design, construct operate, test, and evaluate a prototype integrated monitoring and diagnostic system for a nuclear power plant. It is anticipated that this technology will have wide application to other complex systems (e.g., fossil power plants, chemical processing plants, and possibly air traffic control systems). Over the past decade, the University of Tennessee (UT) and others have carried out many projects utilizing various methodologies of artificial intelligence (expert systems, neural networks, fuzzy systems and genetic algorithms) to enhance the performance (safety, efficiency, reliability, and availability) of nuclear power plants. Investigations and studies have included a) instrumentation surveillance and calibration validation, b) inferential sensing to calibration of feed water venture flow during fouling, c) thermodynamic performance modeling with iterative improvement of plant heat rate, d) diagnosis of nuclear power plant transients

  20. Partner of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribi, M.; Lauer, F.; Pauli, W.; Ruzek, W.

    1992-01-01

    Sulzer, the Swiss technology group, is a supplier of components and systems for nuclear power plants. Important parts of Swiss nuclear power stations, such as containments, reactor pressure vessels, primary pipings, are made in Winterthur. Sulzer Thermtec AG and some divisions of Sulzer Innotec focus their activities on servicing and backfitting nuclear power plants. The European market enjoys priority. New types of valves or systems are developed as economic solutions meeting more stringent criteria imposed by public authorities or arising from operating conditions. (orig.) [de

  1. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1990-08-01

    During the first quarter of 1990 the Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 and TVO I and II were in commercial operation for most of the time. Nuclear electricity accounted for 32.5% of the total Finnish electricity production during this quarter. The load factor average of the nuclear power plant units was 99.0%. An international nuclear event scale has been introduced for the classification of nuclear power plant events according to their nuclear and radiation safety significance. The scale first undergoes about a year long trial period in several countries. on the scale, events are divided into levels from 1 to 7 of which events at Level 7 are the most serious. Furthermore, Level 0 (Below Scale) is used for events with no safety significance. All events which occurred at the Finnish nuclear power plants this quarter are classified as Level 0. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were considerably below authorised limits. At the Loviisa plant, a back-up emergency feedwater system independent of the plant's other systems has been introduced which offers a new, alternative means of removing residual heat from the reactor. Owing to this system, the risk of a severe accident has been further reduced. At the TVO plants, systems have been introduced by which accident sequences which lead to containment failure could be eliminated and the consequences of a potential severe accident could be mitigated. In this report, also the release of short-lived radioactive materials along the transfer route of an irradiated sample is described which occured at the FiR 1 research reactor. The amounts of radioactive materials individuals received in their bodies in connection with this event were very low

  2. The safety of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    Do nuclear power plants present an unjustifiable risk Can there be confidence in their safety The Uranium Institute invited a group of senior safety experts from eight different Western countries operating different types of reactors to provide an authoritative explanation for non-specialists of the basic principles of reactor safety, their application and their implications. The report presents the group's opinion on the level of safety achieved in the Western nuclear power plants with which the authors are directly familiar. Although many of the points made may well also be true for non-Western reactors, the report does not cover them except where specifically stated. It does describe and discuss the causes of the Chernobyl disaster. It does not compare nuclear power with other fuels, nor does it deal with its benefits, since however great the benefits from the peaceful use of nuclear power, and its own advantages over other fuels, they could not compensate for lack of safety. The conclusion reached is that the risk associated with electricity production at nuclear power plants can be kept very low. Proper use of the extensive knowledge available today can guarantee operation of nuclear power plants at very high safety levels, carrying very low risks, both to health and of contamination of the environment: risks that are continually lowered by upgrading existing plants and their operation, and by the design of future power plants. (author).

  3. Countermeasures to earthquakes in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kazuhide

    1979-01-01

    The contribution of atomic energy to mankind is unmeasured, but the danger of radioactivity is a special thing. Therefore in the design of nuclear power plants, the safety has been regarded as important, and in Japan where earthquakes occur frequently, the countermeasures to earthquakes have been incorporated in the examination of safety naturally. The radioactive substances handled in nuclear power stations and spent fuel reprocessing plants are briefly explained. The occurrence of earthquakes cannot be predicted effectively, and the disaster due to earthquakes is apt to be remarkably large. In nuclear plants, the prevention of damage in the facilities and the maintenance of the functions are required at the time of earthquakes. Regarding the location of nuclear plants, the history of earthquakes, the possible magnitude of earthquakes, the properties of ground and the position of nuclear plants should be examined. After the place of installation has been decided, the earthquake used for design is selected, evaluating live faults and determining the standard earthquakes. As the fundamentals of aseismatic design, the classification according to importance, the earthquakes for design corresponding to the classes of importance, the combination of loads and allowable stress are explained. (Kako, I.)

  4. Nuclear reactor kinetics and plant control

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Understanding time-dependent behaviors of nuclear reactors and the methods of their control is essential to the operation and safety of nuclear power plants. This book provides graduate students, researchers, and engineers in nuclear engineering comprehensive information on both the fundamental theory of nuclear reactor kinetics and control and the state-of-the-art practice in actual plants, as well as the idea of how to bridge the two. The first part focuses on understanding fundamental nuclear kinetics. It introduces delayed neutrons, fission chain reactions, point kinetics theory, reactivit

  5. Calibration of radiation monitors at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudreau, L.; Miller, A.D.; Naughton, M.D.

    1994-03-01

    This work was performed to provide guidance to the utilities in the primary and secondary calibration of the radiation monitoring systems (RMS) installed in nuclear power plants. These systems are installed in nuclear power plants to monitor ongoing processes, identify changing radiation fields, predict and limit personnel radiation exposures and measure and control discharge of radioactive materials to the environment. RMS are checked and calibrated on a continuing basis to ensure their precision and accuracy. This report discusses various approaches towards primary and secondary calibrations of the RMS equipment in light of accepted practices at typical power plants and recent interpretations of regulatory guidance. Detailed calibration techniques and overall system responses, trends, and practices are discussed. Industry, utility, and regulatory sources were contacted to create an overall consensus of the most reasonable approaches to optimizing the performance of this equipment

  6. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world. 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maubacq, F.; Tailland, C.

    1997-04-01

    This small booklet provides information about all type of nuclear power plants worldwide. It is based on the data taken from the CEA/DSE/SEE Elecnuc database. The content comprises: the 1996 highlights, the main characteristics of the different type of reactors in operation or under construction, the map of the French nuclear power plant sites, the worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1996, the nuclear power plants in operation, under construction or on order (by groups of reactor-types), the power capacity evolution of power plants in operation, the net and gross capacity of the power plants on the grid, the commercial operation and grid connection forecasts, the first achieved or expected power generation supplied by a nuclear reactor for each country and the power generation from nuclear reactors, the performance indicator of the PWR units in France, the trends of the power generation indicator worldwide, the nuclear power plants in operation, under construction, on order, planned, cancelled, decommissioned and exported worldwide, the schedule of steam generator replacements, and the MOX fuel plutonium recycling programme. (J.S.)

  7. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Commissioning and Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This publication is a revision of Safety Requirements No. NS-R-2, Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, and has been extended to cover the commissioning stage. It describes the requirements to be met to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Over recent years there have been developments in areas such as long term operation, plant ageing, periodic safety review, probabilistic safety analysis and risk informed decision making processes. It became necessary to revise the IAEA's safety requirements in these areas and to correct and/or improve the publication on the basis of feedback from its application by both the IAEA and its Member States. In addition, the requirements are governed by, and must apply, the safety objective and safety principles that are established in the Fundamental Safety Principles. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Safety objectives and principles; 3. The management and organizational structure of the operating organization; 4. Management of operational safety; 5. Operational safety programmes; 6. Plant commissioning; 7. Plant operations; 8. Maintenance, testing, surveillance and inspection; 9. Preparation for decommissioning.

  8. Nuclear plant aging research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissenberg, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, has established the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program in its Division of Engineering Technology. Principal contractors for this program include Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The program goals are: to identify and characterize time-dependent degradation (aging) of nuclear plant safety-related electrical and mechanical components which could lead to loss of safety function; to identify and recommend methods for detecting and trending aging effects prior to loss of safety function so that timely maintenance can be implemented; and to recommend maintenance practices for mitigating the effects of aging. Research activities include prioritization of system and component aging in nuclear plants, characterization of aging degradation of specific components including identification of functional indicators useful for trending degradation, and testing of practical methods and devices for measuring the functional indicators. Aging assessments have been completed on electric motors, snubbers, motor-operated valves, and check valves. Testing of trending methods and devices for motor-operated valves and check valves is in progress

  9. Dismantling and decommissioning of Jose Cabrera nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.

    2009-01-01

    With the start of the dismantling works at the Jose Cabrera nuclear power plant now in sight, this is an appropriate moment to look back and consider recent history. The first time that the issue of nuclear power plant dismantling was dealt with was in 1975, at a conference in Paris entitled Nuclear Energy Maturity. Up until then the entire question had been one of design, construction and operation, but since that moment and it has been quite a while since that conference dismantling has begun to be seen as just another activity in the nuclear cycle, a final activity that will sooner or later affect all the facilities, an activity different from its predecessors and with the ultimate objective of restoring the sites for whatever use might be determined. During the 1960s and 1970s, the construction of nuclear power plants was widespread across the entire world. It was the baby boom of nuclear energy and now, forty or fifty years later, we are seeing the arrival of the end of the service lifetime of these plants and are faced with the corresponding general process of dismantling these installations. The dismantling of nuclear power plants has ceased to be an emerging issue and is now consolidated as a regular activity in the nuclear industry, albeit an activity that lacks adequate financing or specific regulation in certain countries. Fortunately this is not the case in Spain, since economic provisions have been planned and the regulatory framework developed. In view of the above, the dismantling of the nuclear power plants is an industrial activity involving specific technologies that implies new professional and business opportunities that should be absorbed and seized by society. In Spain the path followed in this direction has been a long one, as is underlined by the experiences of dismantling the Argos (Barcelona, 1998- 2004) and Arbi (Bilbao, 2002-2005) research reactors, the Andujar Uranium Mill (Jaen, 1991-1995), the Vandellos I nuclear power plant

  10. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tubulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment

  11. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimburger, H.

    1988-08-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment

  12. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottosson, C.

    1989-05-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment

  13. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenninen, R.; Koponen, H.; Nevander, O.; Paltemaa, R.; Poellaenen, I.; Rannila, P.; Valtonen, K.; Vilkamo, O.

    1988-02-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment

  14. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenninen, R.

    1988-09-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hzard to the personnel or the environment

  15. Increasing reliability of nuclear energy equipment and at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochrana, L.

    1997-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Energy at the Technical University in Brno cooperates with nuclear power plants in increasing their reliability. The teaching programme is briefly described. The scientific research programme of the Department of Heat and Nuclear Power Energy Equipment in the field of reliability is based on a complex systematic concept securing a high level of reliability. In 1996 the Department prepared a study dealing with the evaluation of the maintenance system in a nuclear power plant. The proposed techniques make it possible to evaluate the reliability and maintenance characteristics of any individual component in a nuclear power plant, and to monitor, record and evaluate data at any given time intervals. (M.D.)

  16. TVA's nuclear power plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews TVA's nuclear power plant design and construction experience in terms of schedule and capital costs. The completed plant in commercial operation at Browns Ferry and six additional plants currently under construction represent the nation's largest single commitment to nuclear power and an ultimate investment of $12 billion by 1986. The presentation is made in three separate phases. Phase one will recapitulate the status of the nuclear power industry in 1966 and set forth the assumptions used for estimating capital costs and projecting project schedules for the first TVA units. Phase two describes what happened to the program in the hectic early 1979's in terms of expansion of scope (particularly for safety features), the dramatic increase in regulatory requirements, vendor problems, stretchout of project schedules, and unprecedented inflation. Phase three addresses the assumptions used today in estimating schedules and plant costs for the next ten-year period

  17. Engineering management at feasibility study stage of nuclear power plant under EPC mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    After the investment reform by the State Council in 2004, NDRC carries out approval system for enterprises to invest in nuclear power plants. Feasibility study stage is a critical stage on the mainline of nuclear power project approval, which intersects with the license application, and engineering design. The owners of nuclear power plants are required stringently in engineering management. From the owners' management point of view under EPC mode, this paper sorts the preliminary project process for nuclear power plants, focusing on the management in the feasibility study stage. License application and engineering design management in the feasibility study stage are also discussed. (author)

  18. Academic training for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    In view of the increasing emphasis being placed upon academic training of nuclear power plant operators, it is important that institutions of higher education develop and implement programs which will meet the educational needs of operational personnel in the nuclear industry. Two primary objectives must be satisfied by these programs if they are to be effective in meeting the needs of the industry. One objective is for academic quality. The other primary objective is for programs to address the specialized needs of the nuclear plant operator and to be relevant to the operator's job. The Center for Nuclear Studies at Memphis State University, therefore, has developed a total program for these objectives, which delivers the programs, and/or appropriate parts thereto, at ten nuclear plant sites and with other plants in the planning stage. The Center for Nuclear Studies program leads to a Bachelor of Professional Studies degree in nuclear industrial operations, which is offered through the university college of Memphis State University

  19. 78 FR 50458 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Plant, Vermont Yankee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Nuclear Operations, Inc., James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Plant, Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station... that the NRC take action with regard to James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Plant, Vermont Yankee.... Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Plant (Fitzpatrick), Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station (Vermont Yankee), and...

  20. Cyber security issues imposed on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Provide history of cyber attacks targeting at nuclear facilities. • Provide cyber security issues imposed on nuclear power plants. • Provide possible countermeasures for protecting nuclear power plants. - Abstract: With the introduction of new technology based on the increasing digitalization of control systems, the potential of cyber attacks has escalated into a serious threat for nuclear facilities, resulting in the advent of the Stuxnet. In this regard, the nuclear industry needs to consider several cyber security issues imposed on nuclear power plants, including regulatory guidelines and standards for cyber security, the possibility of Stuxnet-inherited malware attacks in the future, and countermeasures for protecting nuclear power plants against possible cyber attacks

  1. Development of data acquisition and processing system for In-service inspection of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takama, Shinkichi; Kobayashi, Koji; Satoh, Yoshio; Koga, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Takakazu

    1981-01-01

    In-service inspection (ISI) is required during the plant outage to assure the reliability of the components of a nuclear power plant. IHI has developed the advanced ISI system which consists of remote controlled and mechanized ultrasonic inspection devices for reactor pressure vessel examination, semi-automatic inspection instruments for piping examination with manual scan and automatic recording, data acquisition and processing system with microprocessor and mini-computer. By this system, ISI can be performed fully satisfying the requirement of ASME Code Sec. XI and minimizing operation in the high radioactive areas. All ultrasonic information is processed by the computer and the examination results such as size and location of ultrasonic indication are printed out in the form of sectional and plan view of the part examined, reproduced screen image and polar plot, etc. as well as the evaluation sheet. This system saves the elaborate work of inspection personnel and is expected to contribute to the improvement of inspection quality and to the reduction of radiation exposure of inspection personnel. (author)

  2. Nuclear power plant insurance - experience and loss statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmann, J.; Dangelmaier, P.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are treated separately when concluding insurance contracts. National insurance pools have been established in industrial countries, co-operating on an international basis, for insuring a nuclear power plant. In combined property insurance, the nuclear risk is combined with the fire risk. In addition, there are the engineering insurances. Of these, the one of significance for nuclear power plants is the machinery insurance, which can be covered on the free insurance market. Nuclear power plants have had fewer instances of damage than other, conventional installations. (orig.) [de

  3. Human factors in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, J.; Bohr, E.

    1976-04-01

    This annotated bibliography is a first attempt to give a survey of the kind of literature which is relevant for the ergonomic working conditions in nuclear power plants. Such a survey seems to be useful in view of the fact that the 'factor human being' comes recently more and more to the fore in nuclear power plants. In this context, the necessity is often pointed out to systematically include our knowledge of the performance capacity and limits of human beings when designing the working conditions for the personnel of nuclear power plants. For this reason, the bibliography is so much intended for the ergonomics experts as for the experts of nuclear engineering. (orig./LN) [de

  4. Nuclear fuel reprocessing deactivation plan for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M.W.

    1994-10-01

    The decision was announced on April 28, 1992 to cease all United States Department of Energy (DOE) reprocessing of nuclear fuels. This decision leads to the deactivation of all fuels dissolution, solvent extraction, krypton gas recovery operations, and product denitration at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The reprocessing facilities will be converted to a safe and stable shutdown condition awaiting future alternate uses or decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). This ICPP Deactivation Plan includes the scope of work, schedule, costs, and associated staffing levels necessary to achieve a safe and orderly deactivation of reprocessing activities and the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF). Deactivation activities primarily involve shutdown of operating systems and buildings, fissile and hazardous material removal, and related activities. A minimum required level of continued surveillance and maintenance is planned for each facility/process system to ensure necessary environmental, health, and safety margins are maintained and to support ongoing operations for ICPP facilities that are not being deactivated. Management of the ICPP was transferred from Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO) to Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) on October 1, 1994 as part of the INEL consolidated contract. This revision of the deactivation plan (formerly the Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Phaseout Plan for the ICPP) is being published during the consolidation of the INEL site-wide contract and the information presented here is current as of October 31, 1994. LITCO has adopted the existing plans for the deactivation of ICPP reprocessing facilities and the plans developed under WINCO are still being actively pursued, although the change in management may result in changes which have not yet been identified. Accordingly, the contents of this plan are subject to revision

  5. Economic Analysis for Nuclear Hydrogen Production System Based on HyS Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Ki Young; Lee, Tae Hoon; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2009-01-01

    The current promising base for massive hydrogen production on high temperature environment derives primarily from three sources: the commercial production of chemicals for the sulfur-iodine (SI) process, the development of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC), and the hybrid method of chemicals and fuel cells. The three kinds of process requires high temperature heat energy over 850∼950 .deg. C for the efficient and economic hydrogen production. One of the clean, economic, and moreover promising heat sources supplied to the process is nuclear plants. The nuclear plants producing high temperature heat energy over 950 .deg. C are well known as Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) which could have two types of prismatic and pebble-bed cores along reactor core shape. In this paper, we report on the Hybrid Sulfur Process (HyS), and the estimated costs for the system which composes of VHTR of prismatic core type and HyS plant. Nuclear hydrogen production system based on HyS process has been configured to optimally use the thermal energy from VHTR and electric energy to produce hydrogen and oxygen from clean water. High temperature thermal energy is transferred to the HyS process by way of intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) with associated piping. In this paper, the hydrogen production costs for a system composed of a VHTR with six 600MWth module, a power conversion unit (PCU) and a HyS plant are presented, where the thermal energy produced in two module was converted to electric energy in PCU and then transferred to the electrolysis cells for hydrogen production and circulating units on HyS plant, and the remaining thermal energy was supplied to chemical process on HyS plants. As a preliminary study of cost estimates for nuclear hydrogen systems, the hydrogen production costs of the nuclear energy sources benchmarking GT-MHR are estimated in the necessary input data on a Korean specific basis. G4- ECONS was appropriately modified to calculate the cost for hydrogen production

  6. 76 FR 40403 - R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, LLC, R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, R.E. Ginna Independent Spent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-244; Docket No. 72-67] R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, LLC, R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, R.E. Ginna Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation; Notice of... Facility Operating License No. DPR-18, for the R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant (Ginna), currently held by R...

  7. Digital control in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzon, B.

    1984-01-01

    This document presents the latest automatic control structures used in the programmable control systems of 13.00 MW nuclear power plants constructed by Electricite de France. The impact of this technological innovation goes beyond a straightforward design modification; in addition to the new range of processes made possible, it permits far-reaching changes in the working method employed at the design office and in the field. (author)

  8. Financial support for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollister, K.

    1981-01-01

    It is suggested that from the standpoint of financial support, currently it is too expensive to build large scale nuclear plants under present rules and regulation. Until it becomes economic relative to other energy sources or until there is public acceptance of the process, the author believes there will be a hiatus of construction of units not currently in latter stages of completion. (author)

  9. Advancements in nuclear plant maintenance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meligi, A.E.; Maras, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The viability of the nuclear option as a technology choice for present and future electricity generation will be decided primarily on the basis of operating cost to achieve plant performance objectives. In a nuclear plant, performance is judged not only on availability and output rate but also on safety risk and radiation exposure. Operating, cost is essentially made up of the fuel cost and operation and maintenance (O and M) cost. Over the past decade, the industry average nuclear plant performance has improved significantly; however, this improvement was accompanied by rising O and M cost. The net result was that the nuclear option lost its long-standing economic advantage over the coal option, based on the industry average comparison, around 1987 - with the gap narrowing slightly in the last 2 years. In recent times, gas-fired plants have also become a basis for comparison. The electric generation cost comparisons of various fuel options has led to even greater scrutiny of nuclear plant performance, with the poorer performing plants facing the risk of shutdown. While effective O and M programs improve plant performance, present industry data show that there is no direct correlation between the cost of a plant O and M program and its associated performance. There is a significant number of existing tools and techniques in the O and M area that have proved to be successful and have resulted in significant benefits and payback. This paper presents an overview of the nuclear industry efforts to improve the conduct of O and M activities, describes the basic elements of an effective O and M program, and addresses some of the state-of-the-art tools and techniques to enhance maintenance work planning, training, and procedures