WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear plant pressure

  1. Nuclear power plant pressure vessels. Inservice inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The requirements for the planning and reporting of inservice inspections of nuclear power plant pressure vessels are presented. The guide specifically applies to inservice inspections of Safety class 1 and 2 nuclear power plant pressure vessels, piping, pumps and valves plus their supports and reactor pressure vessel internals by non- destructive examination methods (NDE). Inservice inspections according to the Pressure Vessel Degree (549/73) are discussed separately in the guide YVL 3.0. (4 refs.)

  2. Pressurizer model for Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkansky, D.G.; Bedrossian, G.C.

    1993-01-01

    Since the models normally used for he simulation of eventual accidents at the Embalse nuclear power plant with the FIREBIRD III code did not work satisfactorily when the pressurizer becomes empty of liquid, a new model was developed. This report presents the governing equations as well as the calculation technique, for which a computer program was made. An example of application is also presented. The results show that this new model can easily solve the problem of lack of liquid in the pressurizer, as it lets the fluid enter and exit freely, according to the pressure transient at the reactor outlet headers. (author)

  3. Fuzzy control applied to nuclear power plant pressurizer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Mauro V.; Almeida, Jose C.S., E-mail: mvitor@ien.gov.b, E-mail: jcsa@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants (NPPs) the pressure control in the primary loop is very important for keeping the reactor in a safety condition and improve the generation process efficiency. The main component responsible for this task is the pressurizer. The pressurizer pressure control system (PPCS) utilizes heaters and spray valves to maintain the pressure within an operating band during steady state conditions, and limits the pressure changes, during transient conditions. Relief and safety valves provide overpressure protection for the reactor coolant system (RCS) to ensure system integrity. Various protective reactor trips are generated if the system parameters exceed safe bounds. Historically, a proportional-integral derivative (PID) controller is used in PWRs to keep the pressure in the set point, during those operation conditions. The purpose of this study has two main goals: first is to develop a pressurizer model based on artificial neural networks (ANNs); second is to develop a fuzzy controller for the PWR pressurizer pressure, and compare its performance with the P controller. Data from a simulator PWR plant was used to test the ANN and the controllers as well. The reference simulator is a Westinghouse 3-loop PWR plant with a total thermal output of 2785 MWth. The simulation results show that the pressurizer ANN model response are in reasonable agreement with the simulated power plant, and the fuzzy controller built in this study has better performance compared to the P controller. (author)

  4. Fuzzy control applied to nuclear power plant pressurizer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Mauro V.; Almeida, Jose C.S.

    2011-01-01

    In a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants (NPPs) the pressure control in the primary loop is very important for keeping the reactor in a safety condition and improve the generation process efficiency. The main component responsible for this task is the pressurizer. The pressurizer pressure control system (PPCS) utilizes heaters and spray valves to maintain the pressure within an operating band during steady state conditions, and limits the pressure changes, during transient conditions. Relief and safety valves provide overpressure protection for the reactor coolant system (RCS) to ensure system integrity. Various protective reactor trips are generated if the system parameters exceed safe bounds. Historically, a proportional-integral derivative (PID) controller is used in PWRs to keep the pressure in the set point, during those operation conditions. The purpose of this study has two main goals: first is to develop a pressurizer model based on artificial neural networks (ANNs); second is to develop a fuzzy controller for the PWR pressurizer pressure, and compare its performance with the P controller. Data from a simulator PWR plant was used to test the ANN and the controllers as well. The reference simulator is a Westinghouse 3-loop PWR plant with a total thermal output of 2785 MWth. The simulation results show that the pressurizer ANN model response are in reasonable agreement with the simulated power plant, and the fuzzy controller built in this study has better performance compared to the P controller. (author)

  5. Pressure test behaviour of embalse nuclear power plant containment structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschi, S.; Marinelli, C.

    1984-01-01

    It's described the structural behaviour of the containment structure during the pressure test of the Embalse plant (CANDU type, 600MW), made of prestressed concrete with an epoxi liner. Displacement, strain, temperature, and pressure measurements of the containment structure of the Embalse Nuclear Power Plant are presented. The instrumentation set up and measurement specifications are described for all variables of interest before, during and after the pressure test. The analytical models to simulate the heat transfer due to sun heating and air convenction and to predict the associated thermal strains and displacements are presented. (E.G.) [pt

  6. Aging considerations for pressurizers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the degradation mechanisms affecting the residual life of the nuclear pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressurizer and its subcomponents. The major sources of degradation for pressurizers are thermal transients such as plant heatups and cooldowns, internal pressure within the vessel, high intermittent flow through the spray nozzle, differential thermal movement causing rubbing of the immersion heater sheathes, and prolonged exposure to chemical and thermal conditions that can potentially lead to degradation. The latter includes thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel spray heads and chemically assisted intergranular stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel. Steam leakage that interacts with lubricants used to assemble manway bolted joints can cause corrosion of bolts

  7. Prestressed pressure vessel for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The pressure vessel consists of a wall, a bottom, and a closure head, the wall being composed of annular segments. The closure head can be seated on the edge of the wall. Wall and closure head have got axial prestressing channels in which through-going steel tendons are arranged. They are concentrated in bundles and held above the head by anchoring devices. Within the prestressing channels of the head there are supporting jackets attached to the edge of the wall and projecting from the head through a coller. The anchoring devices, e.g. anchoring plates, may be optionally supported on the collars of the supporting jackets or on the closure head by means of auxiliary devices. The auxiliary devices for this purpose consist of extension nuts attached to the anchoring plates and closure head connecting shells. The closure head therefore may be drawn off over the anchoring devices. (DG) [de

  8. Aging characteristics of nuclear plant RTDs and pressure transmitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) and pressure, level, and flow transmitters provide almost all the vital signals that are used for the control and safety of nuclear power plants. Therefore, it is crucial to ensure that the performance of these sensors remain acceptable as they age in the process under normal operating conditions. Four comprehensive research projects were conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to evaluate the effects of normal aging on calibration stability and response time of RTDs and pressure transmitters of the types used for safety-related measurements in nuclear power plants. Each project was conducted over a three year period. The projects involved laboratory testing of representative RTDs and pressure transmitters aged in simulated reactor conditions. The main purpose of these projects was to establish the degradation rate of the sensors and use the information to determine if the current testing intervals practiced by the nuclear power industry are adequate for management of aging of the sensors. The results have indicated that the current nuclear industry practice of testing the response time and calibration of the sensors once every fuel cycle is adequate. (author)

  9. Fabrication of pressure vessels for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampaio, M.S.P. de

    1982-01-01

    The status of the technology used in the fabrication of pressure vessel for nuclear power plants and the performance of the Brazilian industry in this area are presented. The followng aspects are discussed: qualification of the industries for the supplying equipment in its requirement categories; the calculation of the components; the choice of the materials; the fabrication process; and, the destructive and nondestructive tests associated to the fabrication. (E.G.) [pt

  10. Fiber optic pressure sensors for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    In the last few years, the nuclear industry has experienced some problems with the performance of pressure transmitters and has been interested in new sensors based on new technologies. Fiber optic pressure sensors offer the potential to improve on or overcome some of the limitations of existing pressure sensors. Up to now, research has been motivated towards development and refinement of fiber optic sensing technology. In most applications, reliability studies and failure mode analyses remain to be exhaustively conducted. Fiber optic sensors have currently penetrated certain cutting edge markets where they possess necessary inherent advantages over other existing technologies. In these markets (e.g. biomedical, aerospace, automotive, and petrochemical), fiber optic sensors are able to perform measurements for which no alternate sensor previously existed. Fiber optic sensing technology has not yet been fully adopted into the mainstream sensing market. This may be due to not only the current premium price of fiber optic sensors, but also the lack of characterization of their possible performance disadvantages. In other words, in conservative industries, the known disadvantages of conventional sensors are sometimes preferable to unknown or not fully characterized (but potentially fewer and less critical) disadvantages of fiber optic sensors. A six-month feasibility study has been initiated under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the performance and reliability of existing fiber optic pressure sensors for use in nuclear power plants. This assessment will include establishment of the state of the art in fiber optic pressure sensing, characterization of the reliability of fiber optic pressure sensors, and determination of the strengths and limitations of these sensors for nuclear safety-related services.

  11. Fiber optic pressure sensors for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    In the last few years, the nuclear industry has experienced some problems with the performance of pressure transmitters and has been interested in new sensors based on new technologies. Fiber optic pressure sensors offer the potential to improve on or overcome some of the limitations of existing pressure sensors. Up to now, research has been motivated towards development and refinement of fiber optic sensing technology. In most applications, reliability studies and failure mode analyses remain to be exhaustively conducted. Fiber optic sensors have currently penetrated certain cutting edge markets where they possess necessary inherent advantages over other existing technologies. In these markets (e.g. biomedical, aerospace, automotive, and petrochemical), fiber optic sensors are able to perform measurements for which no alternate sensor previously existed. Fiber optic sensing technology has not yet been fully adopted into the mainstream sensing market. This may be due to not only the current premium price of fiber optic sensors, but also the lack of characterization of their possible performance disadvantages. In other words, in conservative industries, the known disadvantages of conventional sensors are sometimes preferable to unknown or not fully characterized (but potentially fewer and less critical) disadvantages of fiber optic sensors. A six-month feasibility study has been initiated under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the performance and reliability of existing fiber optic pressure sensors for use in nuclear power plants. This assessment will include establishment of the state of the art in fiber optic pressure sensing, characterization of the reliability of fiber optic pressure sensors, and determination of the strengths and limitations of these sensors for nuclear safety-related services

  12. Nuclear power plant pressure vessels. Control of piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The guide presents requirements for the pipework of nuclear facilities in Finland. According to the section 117 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree (161/88), the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland (STUK) controls the pressure vessels of nuclear facilities in accordance with the Nuclear Energy Act (990/87) and, to the extent applicable in accordance with the Act of Pressure Vessels (98/73) and the rules and regulations issued by the virtue of these. In addition STUK is an inspecting authority of pressure vessels of nuclear facilities in accordance with the Pressure Vessel Degree (549/1973). According to the section of the Pressure Vessel Degree, a pressure vessel is a steam boiler, pressure container, pipework of other such appliance in which the pressure is above or may come to exceed the atmospheric pressure. Guide YVL 3.0 describes in general terms how STUK controls pressure vessels. STUK controls Safety Class 1, 2 and 3 piping as well as Class EYT (non-nuclear) and their support structures in accordance with this guide and applies the provisions of the Decision of the Ministry of Trade and Industry on piping (71/1975) issued by virtue of the Pressure Vessel Decree

  13. Pressurized thermal shock analysis in German nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricke, Stefan; Braun, Michael [TUEV NORD Nuclear, Hannover (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    For more than 30 years TUeV NORD is a competent consultant in nuclear safety is-sues giving expert third party opinion to our clients. According to the German regulations the safety against brittle fracture has to be proved for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and with a new level of knowledge the proof has to be continuously updated with the development in international codes and standards like ASME, BS and RCC-M. The load of the RPV is a very complex transient pressure and temperature situation. Today these loading conditions can be modeled by thermal hydraulic calculations and new experimental results much more detailed than in the construction phase of German Nuclear Power Plants in the 1980s. Therefore, the proof against brittle fracture from the construction phase had to be updated for all German Nuclear Power Plants with the new findings of the loading conditions especially for a postulated small leakage in the main coolant line. The RPV consists of ferritic base material (about 250 mm) and austenitic cladding (about 6 mm) at the inner side. The base material and the cladding have different physical properties which have to be considered temperature dependently in the cal-culations. Radiation-embrittlement effects on the material are to be respected in the fracture mechanics assessment. The regions of the RPV of special interest are the core weld, the inlet and outlet nozzle region and the flange connecting weld zone. The fracture mechanics assessment is performed for normal and abnormal operating conditions and for accidents like LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident). In this paper the German approach to fracture mechanics assessment to brittle fracture will be discussed from the point of view of a third party organization.

  14. On the domestically-made heavy forging for reactor pressure vessels of PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Xiren; Zhang Chen.

    1988-01-01

    The present situation of the foreign heavy forgings for nuclear reactor pressure vessels and the heavy forgings condition which is used for the Qinshan 300MWe nuclear power plant are described. Some opinions of domestic products is proposed

  15. Pressure suppression apparatus of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumachi, W.; Funalashi, T.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure suppression apparatus for a nuclear reactor comprises a vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and containing a water pool at the bottom of the vessel, and a steam exhaust pipe. The apparatus further comprises an exhaust chamber connected to the immersed portion of the exhaust pipe and provided with a number of discharge openings. (auth)

  16. General requirements for pressure-retaining systems and components in CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This standard specifies the general requirements for the design, fabrication and installation of pressure-retaining systems, components, and their supports in CANDU nuclear power plants. (16 figs., 2 tabs., 25 refs.)

  17. Application of Pressure Equipment Standard at nuclear power plants; Aplicacion del Reglamento de Equipos a Presion a las centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostaza, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    Regarding with the paper presented on 9{sup t}h June 2011 referred to the Industrial Security standard in Nuclear Plants, it was about the application of Pressure Equipment standard to mentioned Nuclear Plants, this article is an extract of the paper going to be exposed. (Author)

  18. Modeling and simulation of pressurizer dynamic process in PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jin; Liu Changliang; Li Shu'na

    2010-01-01

    By analysis of the actual operating characteristics of pressurizer in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant and based on some reasonable simplification and basic assumptions, the quality and energy conservation equations about pressurizer' s steam zone and the liquid zone are set up. The purpose of this paper is to build a pressurizer model of two imbalance districts. Water level and pressure control system of pressurizer is formed though model encapsulation. Dynamic simulation curves of main parameters are also shown. At last, comparisons between the theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the pressurizer model of two imbalance districts is reasonable. (authors)

  19. Effects of normal aging on calibration and response time of nuclear plant RTDs and pressure sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.L.; Riner, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) and pressure, level, and flow transmitters provide a majority of the vital signals for the control and safety of nuclear power plants. Therefore, it is crucial to ensure that the performance of these sensors are maintained at an acceptable level while the plant is operating. Since aging has the potential to cause performance degradation in RTDs and pressure transmitters, several research projects have been sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to study the aging characteristics of these sensors and ensure that adequate test methods and test frequencies are followed by the nuclear industry to ensure safety. The details of these projects are summarized in this paper

  20. Fuzzy logic control for improved pressurizer systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Chris; Gabbar, Hossam A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Improved performance of the pressurizer system in a CANDU nuclear power plant (NPP). • Inventory control for the pressurizer system in NPP. • Compare fuzzy logic with PID in pressurizer system in NPP. • Develop a fuzzy controller to regulate the pressurizer inventory control. • Compare control performance with current proportional controller used at NPP. - Abstract: The pressurizer system in a CANDU nuclear power plant is responsible for maintaining the pressure of the primary heat transport system to ensure the plant is operated within its safe operating envelope. The inventory control for the pressurizer system use a combination of level sensors, feed valves and bleed valves to ensure that there is adequate room in the pressurizer to accommodate any swell or shrinkage in the PHT system. The Darlington Nuclear Generating Station (DNGS) in Ontario, Canada currently uses a proportional controller for the bleed and feed valves to regulate the pressurizer inventory control which can result in large coolant level overshoot along with excessive settling times. The purpose of this paper is to develop a fuzzy controller to regulate the pressurizer inventory control and compare its performance to the current proportional controller used at DNGS. The simulation of the pressurizer inventory control system shows the fuzzy controller performs better than the proportional controller in terms of settling time and overshoot

  1. Application on electrochemistry measurement of high temperature high pressure condition in PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuchun; Xiao Zhongliang; Jiang Ya; Yu Xiaowei; Pang Feifei; Deng Fenfang; Gao Fan; Zhou Nianguang

    2011-01-01

    High temperature high pressure electrochemistry testing system was comprehensively analyzed in this paper, according to actual status for supervision in primary and secondary circuits of PWR nuclear power plants. Three research methods were reviewed and discussed for in-situ monitor system. By combination with ECP realtime measurement it was executed for evaluation and water chemistry optimization in nuclear power plants. It is pointed out that in-situ electrochemistry measurement has great potential application for water chemistry evaluation in PWR nuclear power plants. (authors)

  2. Pressurized thermal shock evaluation of the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, L [ed.

    1985-09-01

    An evaluation of the risk to the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 nuclear power plant due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the assistance of several other organizations. This evaluation was part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission program designed to study the PTS risk to three nuclear plants, the other two plants being Oconee Unit 1 and H.B. Robinson Unit 2. The specific objectives of the program were to (1) provide a best estimate of the frequency of a through-the-wall crack in the pressure vessel at each of the three plants, together with the uncertainty in the estimated frequency and its sensitivity to the variables used in the evaluation; (2) determine the dominant overcooling sequences contributing to the estimated frequency and the associated failures in the plant systems or in operator actions; and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of potential corrective measures.

  3. Pressurized thermal shock evaluation of the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, L.

    1985-09-01

    An evaluation of the risk to the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 nuclear power plant due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the assistance of several other organizations. This evaluation was part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission program designed to study the PTS risk to three nuclear plants, the other two plants being Oconee Unit 1 and H.B. Robinson Unit 2. The specific objectives of the program were to (1) provide a best estimate of the frequency of a through-the-wall crack in the pressure vessel at each of the three plants, together with the uncertainty in the estimated frequency and its sensitivity to the variables used in the evaluation; (2) determine the dominant overcooling sequences contributing to the estimated frequency and the associated failures in the plant systems or in operator actions; and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of potential corrective measures

  4. A digital simulation of a pressurizer in a PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, E.F.

    1980-11-01

    A model for pressurizer digital simulation of a PWR nuclear power plant during transients, considering all pressurizer control features, is presented. The pressurizer is divided into two regions separated by a water-vapor interface and non-equilibrium conditions are considered. The particular thermodynamic process followed during insurge and outsurges is determined at each instant of analysis without any previous assumption. The pressure behavior is defined by an explicit equation in any of four possible pressurizer thermodynamic conditions. Thermodynamic properties of steam and water are computed by ASME subroutines and the mathematical formulation presented in this study was programed in FORTRAN IV for a Burroughs-6700 digital computer system. This program was employed to simulate the Shippingport Atomic Power Station and Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Power Plant - Unit 1 pressurizers. The test results compared with experimental or vendor data show the validity of this analysis method. (Author) [pt

  5. Containment pressure monitoring method after severe accident in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Chuanjie; Zhang Shishui

    2011-01-01

    The containment atmosphere monitoring system in nuclear power plant was designed on the basis of design accident. But containment pressure will increase greatly in a severe accident, and pressure instrument in the containment can't satisfy the monitoring requirement. A new method to monitor the pressure change in the containment after a severe accident was considered, through which accident soften methods can be adopted. Under present technical condition, adding a pressure monitoring channel out of containment for post-severe accident is a considerable method. Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant implemented this modification, by which the containment release time can be delayed during severe accident, and nuclear safety can be increased. After analysis, this method is safe and feasible. (authors)

  6. In-situ calibration of RTDs and pressure sensors in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    New techniques have been developed and validated for in-situ calibration of pressure transmitters as installed in nuclear power plants. These new techniques originate from a desire within the nuclear industry to monitor the calibration of pressure sensors during normal power operation by monitoring the DC output of the sensors for any significant draft and other anomalies. Currently, the calibration of pressure sensors is performed once every fuel cycle (18-24 months). The work involves significant manpower, radiation exposure to plant personnel, and potential damage to the plant equipment. In-situ calibration offers the potential to identify the sensors that need to be replaced or require calibration during normal plant operation, and reduce the calibration effort during outages to those sensors that need to be calibrated, as opposed to calibrating all the sensors

  7. Proactive pressure relief system management of life cycle and ageing in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolenc, J.; Ferrar, S.

    2011-01-01

    The last major power nuclear station built in North America was built when the Altair Company introduced the first microcomputer sparking the PC frenzy. It is safe to assume that there have been a great many changes since 1977 on both accounts. As the world's aging nuclear plants continue to be challenged with maintenance and replacement issues (obsolescence), as well making improvements within their facilities, proper pressure relief system management looms as a growing concern. This problem grows more acute as new engineering best practices are promulgated across industries and regulatory standards become more rigorous with much stricter enforcements. Unlike most pieces of operating equipment in a nuclear facility, pressure relief devices demand an extra level of consideration; as they form the 'last line of defense'. Combine the on-going obsolescence issue, with today's ever increasing demands for overall plant and public safety; pressure relief safety management will require increasing 'proactive' efforts to ensure safe facilities. This paper has been written to address some global pressure relief system management issues with respect the worlds aging nuclear facilities. This paper reflects findings we have discovered while conducting engineering pressure relief system audits on various nuclear power stations. It should be noted that these finding are not atypical of similar findings in pressure relief systems in the hydrocarbon processing world. (author)

  8. Pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant. Environmental characterization information report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The typical plant chosen for characterization is a 10000-MWe nameplate rating with wet-natural-draft cooling towers and modern radwaste control and processing equipment. The process, plant operating parameters, resources needed, and the environmental residuals and products associated with the power plant are presented. Annual resource usage and pollutant discharges are shown in English and metric units, assuming an annual plant capacity factor of 70%. In addition to annual quantities, the summary table gives quantities in terms of 10 12 Btu (about 293 million kWh) of electrical energy produced for comparison among energy processes. Supporting information and calculation procedures for the data are given. Thirteen environmental points of interest are discussed individually. Cost information, typical radioactive releases, and use of cooling ponds as an alternative cooling method are discussed in appendixes. A glossary and list of acronyms and abbreviations are provided

  9. Cylindrical prestressed concrete pressure vessel for a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner, M.; Hodzic, A.; Haferkamp, D.

    1976-01-01

    A prestressed concrete pressure vessel for a HTGR is proposed which encloses, in addition to the reactor core, not only the heat-exchanging facilities but also the turbine unit. The reinforcement of the cylindrical concrete body is to be carried out with special care, it is provided for horizontal tendons, the prestressed concrete pressure vessel has a wire-winding device, while the longitudinal reinforcement is achieved by tendous guided in parallel to the vesses axes through the interspaces between the pods. (UWI) [de

  10. Blow-off device for limiting excess pressure in nuclear power plants, especially in boiling water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, U.; Werner, K.D.; Hoffmann, D.; Pontani, B.

    1979-01-01

    In a blow-off device for limiting excess pressure in nuclear power plants, at least one condensation tube disposed so that a lower outflow and thereof is immersed in a volume of water, and an upper inflow end of the condensation tube extends out of the volume of water and is connectible to a source of steam that is to be condensed or a steam-air mixture, the outflow end of the condensation tube, for stabilizing the condensation being provided with an assembly of wall parts forming passageways extending in axial direction for subdividing the steam flow and bubbles produced in the volume of water, the passageways of the assembly of wall parts being stepped in axial direction at both axial ends of the assembly of wall parts

  11. Containers, particularly prestressed concrete pressure vessels for nuclear reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, J.; Schwiers, H.G.; Mitterbacher, P.

    1986-01-01

    Pressure and temperature changes act on the liner, which cause differential expansion between the liner and the prestressed concrete. So that there will be no overload or damage to the liner, its anchoring or the concrete structure, cutouts are provided in the concrete at deflection positions of the steel cladding, connections and penetrations. These cut-outs are filled with inserts made of elastic or plastic material. (DG) [de

  12. Effects of aging on calibration and response time of nuclear plant pressure transmitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the key results of an experimental research project conducted for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to quantify the effects of normal aging on static and dynamic performance of nuclear grade pressure, level, and flow transmitters (hereafter referred to as pressure transmitters). The project involved laboratory testing of representative pressure transmitters manufactured by Barton, Foxboro, Rosemount, and Tobar (or Veritrak) companies. These manufacturers provide the four most commonly used pressure transmitters in the safety systems of US nuclear power plants. The transmitters were tested under normal aging conditions as opposed to accelerated aging, even though accelerated aging will be used in the last few months of the project to determine the weak links and failure modes of the transmitters. The project has been performed in two phases. The Phase 1 project which was a six month feasibility study has been completed and the results published in NUREG/CR-5383. The Phase 2 project is still underway with the final report due in the fall of 1991. The project has focused on the following areas: (1) effects of aging on calibration stability; (2) effects of aging on response time; (3) study of individual components of pressure transmitters that are sensitive to aging degradation; (4) sensing line blockages due to solidification of boron, formation of sludge, freezing, and other effects; (5) search of licensee event reports and component reliability databases for failures of safety-related pressure transmitters; and (6) oil loss syndrome in Rosemount pressure transmitters

  13. The safety related aspects of pressure components in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindackers, K.H.

    1979-01-01

    Over the last two years the safety philosophy for nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany has changed considerably, as everyone working in the field perceives. The original and appropriate philosophy of risk minimalisation through graduated safety barriers has been more and more replaced by the utopian goal of total prevention of any damage. The reasons for this development are discussed briefly especially regarding pressure components. The very numerous pressure components of a nuclear power station are not all of equal importance with respect to safety. Although considerable efforts have been made, it has not been possible, to date, to achieve an agreement between operators, manufacturers, licensing authorities, independent experts, and other specialists about the safety related classification of the manifold pressure bearing parts in nuclear power stations. The background of this extremely regrettable situation is explained. In the last part of the paper the author suggests a simple and clear safety philosophy for pressure components in nuclear power stations. This philosophy is orientated both on Safety Regulations of the Radiation Protection Decree ('Strahlenschutzverordnung') of the 13th October 1976 and on the Safety Criteria for Nuclear Power Stations from 21st October 1977. Only a simple, clear framework can make a contribution to the further improvement of the already exceptional safety of nuclear facilities and to the removal of obstacles in the licensing procedure which, taken as a whole, tie up skilled personnel to a senseless degree, involve considerable financial expenditure, and have no relevance for the safety of nuclear power plants. (orig.) [de

  14. A survey of repair practices for nuclear power plant containment metallic pressure boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oland, C.B.; Naus, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and leaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containments in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify repair practices for restoring metallic containment pressure boundary components that have been damaged or degraded in service. This report presents issues associated with inservice condition assessments and continued service evaluations and identifies the rules and requirements for the repair and replacement of nonconforming containment pressure boundary components by welding or metal removal. Discussion topics include base and welding materials, welding procedure and performance qualifications, inspection techniques, testing methods, acceptance criteria, and documentation requirements necessary for making acceptable repairs and replacements so that the plant can be returned to a safe operating condition.

  15. A survey of repair practices for nuclear power plant containment metallic pressure boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oland, C.B.; Naus, D.J.

    1998-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and leaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containments in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify repair practices for restoring metallic containment pressure boundary components that have been damaged or degraded in service. This report presents issues associated with inservice condition assessments and continued service evaluations and identifies the rules and requirements for the repair and replacement of nonconforming containment pressure boundary components by welding or metal removal. Discussion topics include base and welding materials, welding procedure and performance qualifications, inspection techniques, testing methods, acceptance criteria, and documentation requirements necessary for making acceptable repairs and replacements so that the plant can be returned to a safe operating condition

  16. Friction and wear studies of nuclear power plant components in pressurized high temperature water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, P.L.; Zbinden, M.; Taponat, M.C.; Robertson, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper is part of a series of papers aiming to present the friction and wear results of a collaborative study on nuclear power plant components tested in pressurized high temperature water. The high temperature test facilities and the methodology in presenting the kinetics and wear results are described in detail. The results of the same material combinations obtained from two very different high temperature test facilities (NRCC and EDF) are presented and discussed. (K.A.)

  17. A technical learning on the Pressurized Water Nuclear Power Plants using animation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hajime; Tomohara, Yasutaka; Kubo, Setsuo; Ninomiya, Toshiaki

    2002-01-01

    The pressurized water nuclear power generation plants tends to reduce construction of its new plant from viewpoints of recent stabilization in power demand/supply balance, development of new siting points, and so on. And, together with reducing any opportunity to experience at site, generation alternation to younger engineers without such experiences is progressing. In order to carry out technical tradition with high quality , as it is important to understand experiences of troubles and so on as valuable inheritance to apply them to actual use, it can be thought, in doubt, to be one of solving measures to prepare some learning tools applying the newest technology. The Kansai Electric Co., Ltd. Developed a CAD software using animation and 3D pictures using a personal computer which is edited some processes of technical transition on nuclear energy as a reference on a shape of CD ROM as an object from initial period of nuclear power station to present APWR. (G.K.)

  18. Nuclear power plant pressurizer fault diagnosis using fuzzy signed-digraph and spurious faults elimination methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joo Hyun

    1994-02-01

    In this work, the Fuzzy Signed Digraph(FSD) method which has been researched for the fault diagnosis of industrial process plant systems is improved and applied to the fault diagnosis of the Kori-2 nuclear power plant pressurizer. A method for spurious faults elimination is also suggested and applied to the fault diagnosis. By using these methods, we could diagnose the multi-faults of the pressurizer and could also eliminate the spurious faults of the pressurizer caused by other subsystems. Besides the multi-fault diagnosis and system-wide diagnosis capabilities, the proposed method has many merits such as real-time diagnosis capability, independency of fault pattern, direct use of sensor values, and transparency of the fault propagation to the operators

  19. Nuclear power plant pressurizer fault diagnosis using fuzzy signed-digraph and spurious faults elimination methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joo Hyun; Seong, Poong Hyun

    1994-01-01

    In this work, the Fuzzy Signed Digraph (FSD) method which has been researched for the fault diagnosis of industrial process plant systems is improved and applied to the fault diagnosis of the Kori-2 nuclear power plant pressurizer. A method for spurious faults elimination is also suggested and applied to the fault diagnosis. By using these methods, we could diagnose the multi-faults of the pressurizer and could also eliminate the spurious faults of the pressurizer caused by other subsystems. Besides the multi-fault diagnosis and system-wide diagnosis capabilities, the proposed method has many merits such as real-time diagnosis capability, independency of fault pattern, direct use of sensor values, and transparency of the fault propagation to the operators. (Author)

  20. In-situ measurement of response time of RTDs and pressure transmitters in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Riner, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Response time measurements are performed once every fuel cycle on most safety-related temperature and pressure sensors in a majority of nuclear power plants in the US. This paper provides a review of the methods that are used for these measurements. The methods are referred to as the Loop Current Step Response (LCSR) test, which is used for response time testing of temperature sensors, and noise analysis and power interrupt (PI) tests, which are used for response time testing of pressure, level, and flow transmitters

  1. Finite element method used in strength calculations of nuclear power plant pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanulak, E.

    1987-01-01

    A software system based on the use of the finite element method in linear and nonlinear elastomechanics was developed for assessing the strength and service life of steam generators and pressurizers for WWER type nuclear power plants. The individual programs are briefly described. They are written in FORTRAN IV, some modules are in ASSEMBLER. Programs EGUSAP, NEANKO, ROSYNA are designed for the calculation of stress and deformation, programs ROSYNA, NEANKO and NTEPLO are used for the calculation of temperature fields. Programs SPOJ and STATES are used for assessing the strength and service life of screw joints and other nodes of the WWER-440 type steam generators and pressurizers. (Z.M.)

  2. Data list of nuclear power plants of pressurized-water reactor type in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Fumio; Harayama, Yasuo

    1981-08-01

    This report has collected and compiled the data concerning performances, equipments and installations for nuclear power plants of the pressurized-water reactor type in Japan. The data used in the report are based on informations that were collected before December in 1980. The report is edited by modifing changes of the data appeared after publication of 1979 edition (JAERI-M 8947), and extending the data-package to cover new plants proposed thereafter. All data have been processed and tabulated with a computer program FREP, which has been developed as an exclusive use of data processing. (author)

  3. Tube Plugging Criteria for the High-pressure Heaters of Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyungnam; Cho, Nam-Cheoul; Lee, Kuk-hee [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, a method to establish the tube plugging criteria of BOP heat exchangers is introduced and the tube plugging criteria for the high pressure heaters of a nuclear power plant. This method relies on the similar plugging criteria used in the steam generator tubes. Power generation field urges nuclear power plants to reduce operating and maintaining costs to remain competitive. To reduce the cost by means of preventing the lowering thermal efficiency, the inspection of balance-of-plant heat exchanger, which was treated as not important work, becomes important. The tubing materials and tube thickness of heat exchangers in nuclear power plants are selected to withstand system temperature, pressure, and corrosion. But tubes have experienced leaks and failures and plugged based upon eddy current testing (ET) results. There are some problems for plugging the heat exchanger tubes since the criterion and its basis are not clearly described. For this reason, the criteria for the tube wall thickness are addressed in order to operate the heat exchangers in nuclear power plant without trouble during the cycle. The feed water heater is a kind of heat exchanger which raises the temperature of water supplied from the condenser. The heat source of high-pressure heaters is the extraction steam from the high-pressure turbine and moisture separator re-heater. If the tube wall of the heater is broken, the feed water flowing inside the tube intrudes to shell side. This forces the turbine to be stop in order to protect it. There are many codes and standards to be referred for calculating the minimum thickness of the heat exchanger tube in the designing stage. However, the codes and standards related to show the tube plugging criteria may not exist currently. A method to establish the tube plugging criteria of BOP heat exchangers is introduced and the tube plugging criteria for the high pressure heaters of Ulchin NPP No. 3 and 4. This method relies on the similar plugging

  4. Nuclear power plant containment metallic pressure boundary materials and plans for collecting and presenting their properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oland, C.B.

    1995-04-01

    A program is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL to assist the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)) in their assessment of the effects of degradation (primarily corrosion) on the structural capacity and leaktight integrity of metal containments and steel liners of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to characterize and quantify manifestations of corrosion on the properties of steels used to construct containment pressure boundary components. This report describes a plan for use in collecting and presenting data and information on ferrous alloys permitted for use in construction of pressure retaining components in concrete and metal containments. Discussions about various degradation mechanisms that could potentially affect the mechanical properties of these materials are also included. Conclusions and recommendations presented in this report will be used to guide the collection of data and information that will be used to prepare a material properties data base for containment steels

  5. Estimation of residual stress distribution for pressurizer nozzle of Kori nuclear power plant considering safe end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    In nuclear power plants, ferritic low alloy steel nozzle was connected with austenitic stainless steel piping system through alloy 82/182 butt weld. Accurate estimation of residual stress for weldment is important in the sense that alloy 82/182 is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. There are many results which predict residual stress distribution for alloy 82/182 weld between nozzle and pipe. However, nozzle and piping system usually connected through safe end which has short length. In this paper, residual stress distribution for pressurizer nozzle of Kori nuclear power plant was predicted using FE analysis, which considered safe end. As a result, existing residual stress profile was redistributed and residual stress of inner surface was decreased specially. It means that safe end should be considered to reduce conservatism when estimating the piping system.

  6. Reactor pressure vessel life cycle management at the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroshuk, B.W.; Bowman, M.E.; Henry, S.A.; Pavinich, W.A.; Lapides, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    Life Cycle Management (LCM) seeks to manage the aging process of important systems, structures, and components during licensed operation. The goal of Baltimore Gas and Electric Company's (BG and E) Life Cycle Management Program is to assure attainment of 40 years of operation and to preserve the option of an additional 20 years of operation for the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP). Since the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) has been identified as one of the most critical components with regard to long-term operation of a nuclear power plant, BG and E initiated actions to manage life limiting or aging issues for the CCNPP RPVs. To achieve long-term operation, technical RPV issues must be effectively managed. This paper describes methods BG and E uses for managing RPV age-related degradation. (author)

  7. Blow-off device for limiting excess pressure in nuclear power plants, especially in boiling-water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehnel, R.

    1979-01-01

    In a blow-off device for limiting excess pressure in nuclear power plants, at least one condensation tube disposed so that a lower outlet end thereof is immersed in a volume of water in a condensation chamber having a gas cushion located in a space above the volume of water, and the upper inlet end of the condensation tube extending out of the volume of water and being connectible to a source of steam that is to be condensed or a steam-air mixture, the outlet end of the condensation tube, for smoothing the condensation, being provided with wall parts forming passages extending in axial direction, delimited from one another and terminating in the water volume, the wall parts serving to subdivide steam flow from the source thereof and bubbles produced thereby in the water volume, the wall parts being constructed as a tube attachment and being formed with an opening corresponding to the outlet end of the condensation tube and by means of which the tube attachment is mounted on the outlet end of the condensation tube, a first group of the wall parts in the tube attachment being disposed in alignment with the outlet end of the condensation tube, and a second group of the wall parts surrounding the first group thereof, the passages formed by the second group of the wall parts communicating laterally with the passages formed by the first group of the wall parts, the passages formed by the second group of the wall parts, at least at the upper ends thereof, communicating with the water volume

  8. Pressure fluctuation analysis for charging pump of chemical and volume control system of nuclear power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Equipment Failure Root Cause Analysis (ERCA methodology is employed in this paper to investigate the root cause for charging pump’s pressure fluctuation of chemical and volume control system (RCV in pressurized water reactor (PWR nuclear power plant. RCA project task group has been set up at the beginning of the analysis process. The possible failure modes are listed according to the characteristics of charging pump’s actual pressure fluctuation and maintenance experience during the analysis process. And the failure modes are analysed in proper sequence by the evidence-collecting. It suggests that the gradually untightened and loosed shaft nut in service should be the root cause. And corresponding corrective actions are put forward in details.

  9. Evaluation of a Kalman filter based power pressurizer instrument failure detection system implemented on a nuclear power plant training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seegmiller, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    The usefulness of a nuclear power plant training simulator for developing and testing modern estimation and control applications for nuclear power plants is demonstrated. A Kalman filter based instrument failure detection technique for a pressurized water reactor pressurizer is implemented on the Department of Energy N Reactor Training Simulator. This real-time failure detection method computes the first two moments (mean and variance) of each element of a normalized filter innovations vector. Failed pressurizer instrumentation can be detected by comparing these moments to the known statistical properties of the steady state, linear Kalman fitler innovations sequence. The capabilities of the detection system are evaluated using simulated plant transients and instrument failures

  10. Integrated equipment for increasing and maintaining coolant pressure in primary circuit of PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.

    1986-01-01

    An open heat pump circuit is claimed connected to the primary circuit. The pump circuit consists of a steam pressurizer with a built-in steam distributor, a compressor, an expander, a reducing valve, an auxiliary pump, and of water and steam pipes. The operation is described and a block diagram is shown of integrated equipment for increasing and maintaining pressure in the nuclear power plant primary circuit. The appropriate entropy diagram is also shown. The advantage of the open pump circuit consists in reducing the electric power input and electric power consumption for the steam pressurizers, removing entropy loss in heat transfer with high temperature gradient, in the possibility of inserting, between the expander and the auxiliary pump, a primary circuit coolant treatment station, in simplified design and manufacture of the high-pressure steam pressurizer vessel, reducing the weight of the steam pressurizer by changing its shape from cylindrical to spherical, increasing the rate of pressure growth in the primary circuit. (E.S.)

  11. Pressure vessel for nuclear reactor plant consisting of several pre-stressed cast pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmann, E.

    1984-01-01

    Several cylindrical pressure vessel components made of pressure castings are arranged on a sector of a circle around the cylindrical cast pressure vessel for accommodating the helium cooled HTR. Each component pressure vessel is connected to the reactor vessel by a horizontal gas duct. The contact surfaces between reactor and component pressure vessel are in one plane. In the spaces between the individual component pressure vessels, there are supporting blocks made of cast iron, which are hollow and also have flat surfaces. With the reactor vessel and the component pressure vessels they form a disc-shaped connecting part below and above the gas ducts. (orig./PW)

  12. Safety implications associated with in-plant pressurized gas storage and distribution systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guymon, R.H.; Casto, W.R.; Compere, E.L.

    1985-05-01

    Storage and handling of compressed gases at nuclear power plants were studied to identify any potential safety hazards. Gases investigated were air, acetylene, carbon dioxide, chlorine, Halon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, propane, and sulfur hexaflouride. Physical properties of the gases were reviewed as were applicable industrial codes and standards. Incidents involving pressurized gases in general industry and in the nuclear industry were studied. In this report general hazards such as missiles from ruptures, rocketing of cylinders, pipe whipping, asphyxiation, and toxicity are discussed. Even though some serious injuries and deaths over the years have occurred in industries handling and using pressurized gases, the industrial codes, standards, practices, and procedures are very comprehensive. The most important safety consideration in handling gases is the serious enforcement of these well-known and established methods. Recommendations are made concerning compressed gas cylinder missiles, hydrogen line ruptures or leaks, and identification of lines and equipment

  13. Residual stress measurements in the dissimilar metal weld in pressurizer safety nozzle of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Wagner R.C.; Rabello, Emerson G.; Mansur, Tanius R.; Scaldaferri, Denis H.B.; Paula, Raphael G.; Souto, Joao P.R.S.; Carvalho Junior, Ideir T.

    2013-01-01

    Weld residual stresses have a large influence on the behavior of cracking that could possibly occur under normal operation of components. In case of an unfavorable environment, both stainless steel and nickel-based weld materials can be susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC). Stress corrosion cracks were found in dissimilar metal welds of some pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear plants. In the nuclear reactor primary circuit the presence of tensile residual stress and corrosive environment leads to so-called Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). The PWSCC is a major safety concern in the nuclear power industry worldwide. PWSCC usually occurs on the inner surface of weld regions which come into contact with pressurized high temperature water coolant. However, it is very difficult to measure the residual stress on the inner surfaces of pipes or nozzles because of inaccessibility. A mock-up of weld parts of a pressurizer safety nozzle was fabricated. The mock-up was composed of three parts: an ASTM A508 C13 nozzle, an ASTM A276 F316L stainless steel safe-end, an AISI 316L stainless steel pipe and different filler metals of nickel alloy 82/182 and AISI 316L. This work presents the results of measurements of residual strain from the outer surface of the mock-up welded in base metals and filler metals by hole-drilling strain-gage method of stress relaxation. (author)

  14. Cutting Technology for Decommissioning of the Reactor Pressure Vessels in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwan Seong; Kim, Geun Ho; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Byung Seon

    2012-01-01

    Lots of nuclear power plants have been decommissioned during the last 2 decades. An essential part of this work is the dismantling of the Reactor Pressure Vessel and its Internals. For this purpose a wide variety of different cutting technologies have been developed, adapted and applied. A detailed introduction to Plasma Arc cutting, Contact Arc Metal cutting and Abrasive Water Suspension Jet cutting is given, as it turned out that these cutting technologies are particularly suitable for these type of segmentation work. A comparison of these technologies including gaseous emissions, cutting power, manipulator requirements as well as selected design approaches are given. Process limits as well as actual limits of application are presented

  15. Pressure component for the non-nuclear part of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, E.; Bodmann, E.; Pradhan, M.

    1980-01-01

    A liner of steel is drawn in the He-pressure vessel of the NPP, placed in distance to the cylindrical pressure vessel and being provided with pressure equalization openings. The liner has the function of controlled pressure keeping if the pressure vessel bursts. (DG) [de

  16. The development of reactor vessel internal heavy forging for 1000 MW pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhifeng; Chen Yongbo; Ding Xiuping; Zhang Lingfang

    2012-01-01

    This Paper introduced the development of Reactor Vessel Internal (RVI) heavy forgings for 1000 MW Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant, analyzed the manufacture difficulties and technical countermeasures. The testing result of the product indicated that the performance of RVI heavy forgings manufactured by Shanghai Heavy Machinery Plant Ld. (SHMP) is outstanding and entirely satisfy the technical requirements for RVI product. (authors)

  17. Pressure and temperature analyses using GOTHIC for Mark I containment of the Chinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yen-Shu, E-mail: yschen@iner.org.t [Nuclear Engineering Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, 1000, Wenhua Rd., Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (China); Yuann, Yng-Ruey; Dai, Liang-Che; Lin, Yon-Pon [Nuclear Engineering Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, 1000, Wenhua Rd., Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (China)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: The Chinshan Mark I containment pressure-temperature responses are analyzed. GOTHIC is used to calculate the containment responses under three pipe break events. This study is used to support the Chinshan Stretch Power Uprate (SPU) program. The calculated peak pressure and temperature are still below the design values. The Chinshan containment integrity can be maintained under SPU condition. - Abstract: Chinshan Nuclear Power Plant in Taiwan is a GE-designed twin-unit BWR/4 plant with original licensed thermal power (OLTP) of 1775 MWt for each unit. Recently, the Stretch Power Uprate (SPU) program for the Chinshan plant is being conducted to uprate the core thermal power to 1858 MWt (104.66% OLTP). In this study, the Chinshan Mark I containment pressure/temperature responses during LOCA at 105% OLTP (104.66% OLTP + 0.34% OLTP power uncertainty = 105% OLTP) are analyzed using the containment thermal-hydraulic program GOTHIC. Three kinds of LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) scenarios are investigated: Recirculation Line Break (RCLB), Main Steam Line Break (MSLB), and Feedwater Line Break (FWLB). In the short-term analyses, blowdown data generated by RELAP5 transient analyses are provided as boundary conditions to the GOTHIC containment model. The calculated peak drywell pressure and temperature in the RCLB event are 217.2 kPaG and 137.1 {sup o}C, respectively, which are close to the original FSAR results (219.2 kPaG and 138.4 {sup o}C). Additionally, the peak drywell temperature of 155.3 {sup o}C calculated by MSLB is presented in this study. To obtain the peak suppression pool temperature, a long-term RCLB analysis is performed using a simplified RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) volume to calculate blowdown flow rate. One RHR (Residual Heat Removal) heat exchanger is assumed to be inoperable for suppression pool cooling mode. The calculated peak suppression pool temperature is 93.2 {sup o}C, which is below the pool temperature used for evaluating the

  18. Pressure and temperature analyses using GOTHIC for Mark I containment of the Chinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yen-Shu; Yuann, Yng-Ruey; Dai, Liang-Che; Lin, Yon-Pon

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The Chinshan Mark I containment pressure-temperature responses are analyzed. → GOTHIC is used to calculate the containment responses under three pipe break events. → This study is used to support the Chinshan Stretch Power Uprate (SPU) program. → The calculated peak pressure and temperature are still below the design values. → The Chinshan containment integrity can be maintained under SPU condition. - Abstract: Chinshan Nuclear Power Plant in Taiwan is a GE-designed twin-unit BWR/4 plant with original licensed thermal power (OLTP) of 1775 MWt for each unit. Recently, the Stretch Power Uprate (SPU) program for the Chinshan plant is being conducted to uprate the core thermal power to 1858 MWt (104.66% OLTP). In this study, the Chinshan Mark I containment pressure/temperature responses during LOCA at 105% OLTP (104.66% OLTP + 0.34% OLTP power uncertainty = 105% OLTP) are analyzed using the containment thermal-hydraulic program GOTHIC. Three kinds of LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) scenarios are investigated: Recirculation Line Break (RCLB), Main Steam Line Break (MSLB), and Feedwater Line Break (FWLB). In the short-term analyses, blowdown data generated by RELAP5 transient analyses are provided as boundary conditions to the GOTHIC containment model. The calculated peak drywell pressure and temperature in the RCLB event are 217.2 kPaG and 137.1 o C, respectively, which are close to the original FSAR results (219.2 kPaG and 138.4 o C). Additionally, the peak drywell temperature of 155.3 o C calculated by MSLB is presented in this study. To obtain the peak suppression pool temperature, a long-term RCLB analysis is performed using a simplified RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) volume to calculate blowdown flow rate. One RHR (Residual Heat Removal) heat exchanger is assumed to be inoperable for suppression pool cooling mode. The calculated peak suppression pool temperature is 93.2 o C, which is below the pool temperature used for evaluating the

  19. Pressure test at the reactor building of the Embalse Nuclear Power Plant (CNE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutsiers, E.E.; Perrino, J.; Moreno, C.; Batistic, J.A.; Lolis, R.R.; Aviles, A.

    1991-01-01

    Upon request by the Licensing Authority, the reactor building (RB) in a nuclear power plant must be submitted to pressure tests. One of these tests is to be performed before startup and, then, a test must be carried out every 5 years in operation. The pre-operational tests took place in August 1981, under two values of relative pressure: 1.266 kg/cm 2 and 0.422 kg/cm 2 . Operational tests must only be made at the lower pressure and their objective is to verify that the loss speed remains within the range indicated in the corresponding technical specification. The first operational test was performed in August 1989. The personnel of the CNE took care of the preparation of the Work Plan, of aligning the various systems contained in the RB, of pressurization, of monitoring localized tightedness, of depressurization and of the general and quality control of the test. The measurements were carried out by the CISME (Center of Metrology Research and Service) of the National Institute of Industrial Technology (INTI) , which did also supply the necesary instruments and the data collection system. There is also a description of the work performed before the test, of the calculation method used for assessing the loss rate, of the test sequencies and of the results obtained. (Author) [es

  20. Master curve approach to monitor fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessels in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-10-01

    A series of coordinated research projects (CRPs) have been sponsored by the IAEA, starting in the early 1970s, focused on neutron radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The purpose of the CRPs was to develop correlative comparisons to test the uniformity of results through coordinated international research studies and data sharing. The overall scope of the eighth CRP (CRP-8), Master Curve Approach to Monitor Fracture Toughness of Reactor Pressure Vessels in Nuclear Power Plants, has evolved from previous CRPs which have focused on fracture toughness related issues. The ultimate use of embrittlement understanding is application to assure structural integrity of the RPV under current and future operation and accident conditions. The Master Curve approach for assessing the fracture toughness of a sampled irradiated material has been gaining acceptance throughout the world. This direct measurement of fracture toughness approach is technically superior to the correlative and indirect methods used in the past to assess irradiated RPV integrity. Several elements have been identified as focal points for Master Curve use: (i) limits of applicability for the Master Curve at the upper range of the transition region for loading quasi-static to dynamic/impact loading rates; (ii) effects of non-homogeneous material or changes due to environment conditions on the Master Curve, and how heterogeneity can be integrated into a more inclusive Master Curve methodology; (iii) importance of fracture mode differences and changes affect the Master Curve shape. The collected data in this report represent mostly results from non-irradiated testing, although some results from test reactor irradiations and plant surveillance programmes have been included as available. The results presented here should allow utility engineers and scientists to directly measure fracture toughness using small surveillance size specimens and apply the results using the Master Curve approach

  1. Integrated Nuclear Recycle Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patodi, Anuj; Parashar, Abhishek; Samadhiya, Akshay K.; Ray, Saheli; Dey, Mitun; Singh, K.K.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Recycle Board (NRB), Tarapur proposes to set up an 'Integrated Nuclear Recycle Plant' at Tarapur. This will be located in the premises of BARC facilities. The project location is at coastal town of Tarapur, 130 Km north of Mumbai. Project area cover of INRP is around 80 hectares. The plant will be designed to process spent fuel received from Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). This is the first large scale integrated plant of the country. INRP will process spent fuel obtained from indigenous nuclear power plants and perform left over nuclear waste disposal

  2. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulova, T.Ch.

    1976-01-01

    The textbook focuses on the technology and the operating characteristics of nuclear power plants equiped with pressurized water or boiling water reactors, which are in operation all over the world at present. The following topics are dealt with in relation to the complete plant and to economics: distribution and consumption of electric and thermal energy, types and equipment of nuclear power plants, chemical processes and material balance, economical characteristics concerning heat and energy, regenerative preheating of feed water, degassing and condenser systems, water supply, evaporators, district heating systems, steam generating systems and turbines, coolant loops and pipes, plant siting, ventilation and decontamination systems, reactor operation and management, heat transfer including its calculation, design of reactor buildings, and nuclear power plants with gas or sodium cooled reactors. Numerous technical data of modern Soviet nuclear power plants are included. The book is of interest to graduate and post-graduate students in the field of nuclear engineering as well as to nuclear engineers

  3. Simulating the steam generator and the pressurizer of a PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Greef, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    In a PWR nuclear power plant, considered as a power generating device, the steam generator as a subset plays an important role in the generation process, whereas the pressurizer rather acts as a control device for security purposes. Nevertheless, from a thermodynamical point of view, the two subsets behave basically in the same way, so that a common set of basic equations may be suggested to develop for each the proper mathematical simulation model. In this paper the generation of this common set of basic equations is described, from which a specific model for each device is derived. A numerical illustration of the behaviour of the two devices for typical inputs to the derived simulation model is pictured. (author)

  4. Practical applications of probabilistic structural reliability analyses to primary pressure systems of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witt, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Primary pressure systems of nuclear power plants are built to exacting codes and standards with provisions for inservice inspection and repair if necessary. Analyses and experiments have demonstrated by deterministic means that very large margins exist on safety impacting failures under normal operating and upset conditions. Probabilistic structural reliability analyses provide additional support that failures of significance are very, very remote. They may range in degree of sophistication from very simple calculations to very complex computer analyses involving highly developed mathematical techniques. The end result however should be consistent with the desired usage. In this paper a probabilistic structural reliability analysis is performed as a supplement to in-depth deterministic evaluations with the primary objective to demonstrate an acceptably low probability of failure for the conditions considered. (author)

  5. Evaluation of the ultimate pressure capacity of rectangular HVAC ducts for nuclear pwoer plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedellsborg, B.W.

    1984-01-01

    Typical Category I HVAC ducts in a nuclear plant must be designed for loads and load combinations including positive and negative pressure loads which are generated due to the normal operation and postulated accident conditions. These pressure loads most often govern the design of the HVAC ducts. Structural design criteria are presently based on the AISI Code which limits the duct panel width-to-thickness ratio to a maximum of 500 and the maximum height-to-thickness ratio to 200, unless it can be shown by structural tests that larger ratios can be used. Test Programs performed on rectangular HVAC ducts subjected to vacumm loads have substantiated the use of ducts having panel width to thickness ratios of up to 1600. The results of the test programs were subsequently incorporated into the design through a more rational analytical design method which was developed from and correlates well with the test results. The purpose of this paper is to present the analytical design method and its correlation with the test results. Simple formulae for the design of rectangular HVAC ducts are presented. Lower bound values of duct sheet, and stiffener ultimate loads are derived, and correlated with recent test results. Analytically predicted ultimate pressures are also compared with other available duct test data

  6. Nuclear power plant pressurizer fault diagnosis using fuzzy signed-digraph method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joo Hyun; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2004-01-01

    In this study, The Fuzzy Signed Digraph method which has been researched and applied to the chemical process is improved and applied to the fault diagnosis of the pressurizer in nuclear power plants. The Fuzzy Signed-Digraph (FSD) is the method which applies the fuzzy number to the Signed-Digraph (SDG) method. The current SDG methods have many merits as follows: (1) SDG method can directly use the value of sensors not the alarm to the fault diagnosis. (2) This method can diagnose the fault independent on the pattern. (3) This method can diagnose the faults fastly because the method uses the cause-effect relation instead of the complex control equation among the variables. But, they are not proper to be applied to the diagnosis of the multi-faults and to diagnose faults on real time. It is because the unmeasured nodes in those methods must be connected to each other in order to find out the single fault under the single-fault assumption. These methods need long CPU time and cannot be applied to the multi-faults diagnosis. We propose a method in which the values of the unmeasured nodes are calculated from the relations between the unmeasured nodes and the measured nodes. By using this method, the CPU time for diagnosis can be reduced. This CPU time reduction makes the real-time diagnosis possible. This method can also be applied for the multi-faults diagnosis. This method is applied to the diagnosis of the pressurizer of the nuclear power plant KORI-2 in Korea. (author)

  7. Role of non destructive techniques for monitoring structural integrity of primary circuit of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, P.K.; Sreenivas, P.

    2015-01-01

    The safety of nuclear installations is ensured by assessing status of primary equipment for performing the intended function reliably and maintaining the integrity of pressure boundaries. The pressure boundary materials undergo material degradation during the plant operation. Pressure boundary materials are subjected to operating stresses and material degradation that results in material properties changes, discontinuities initiation and increase in size of existing discontinuities. Pre-Service Inspection (PSI) is performed to generate reference base line data of initial condition of the pressure boundary. In-Service Inspections (ISI) are performed periodically to confirm integrity of pressure boundaries through comparison with respect to base line data. The non destructive techniques are deployed considering nature of the discontinuities expected to be generated through operating conditions and degradation mechanisms. The paper is prepared considering Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Nuclear Power Plant. The paper describes the degradation mechanisms observed in the PWR nuclear power plants and salient aspect of PSI and ISI and considerations in selecting non destructive testing. The paper also emphasises on application of acoustic emission (AE) based condition monitoring systems that can supplement in-service inspections for detecting and locating discontinuities in pressure boundaries. Criticality of flaws can be quantitatively evaluated by determining their size through in-service inspection. Challenges anticipated in deployment of AE based monitoring system and solutions to cater those challenges are also discussed. (author)

  8. Neutronic calculations for the reactor pressure vessel of Atucha I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, Ana M.; Madariaga, Marcelo R.

    1999-01-01

    In 1974 a surveillance program for the Atucha I nuclear power plant pressure vessel was initiated which included the construction of different types of specimens, distributed in 30 irradiation capsules located under the core at the lower part of some of the fuel channels. The capsules containing the irradiated specimens were withdrawn in two stages; the first set (SET 1) of 15 specimens in 1980 and the second one (SET 2) of the remaining 15, in 1987. Both fracture mechanic tests and dosimetry analysis were carried out by the designer (KWU) for SET1 and by the owner National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) for SET2. The calculations performed in the case of SET1 showed that there was a significant spectrum difference between the position where the specimens had been and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) - inner surface (IS). It was established that the ratio of thermal flux (E 1 MeV) varied, approximately, from 1000 to 10 from the irradiation position to the RPV- IS. The purpose of this report is to show the calculations recently performed at the Nuclear Regulatory Authority, with particular emphasis on the difference in the results generated by the modification to sightly enriched fuel. A simplified 1-D calculations show that there is a slight increase (4% approximately) in the flux along the whole energy range. As it has already been mentioned, this is due, more than to the isotopic composition of the new fuel, to the difference in power density spatial distribution, which is a consequence of a different fuel management, necessary to preserve operational limits below their maximum allowed values with the same total thermal power generated. More detailed calculations are nevertheless foreseen in order to verify these first results. (author)

  9. Activity determination for neutron dosimetry in the vigilance programme for the pressure vessel in Atucha I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furnari, J.C.; Cohen, I.M.; Ciriani, D.F.; Helzel Garcia, J.

    1993-01-01

    The methodologies for the activity determination of Co-60, Nb-93m and Nb-94 in flux monitors are presented. This was done in order to evaluate dose and damage caused by radiation received by pressure vessel materials of the Atucha I nuclear power plant for its surveillance program. (author)

  10. Guidelines for Application of the Master Curve Approach to Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyssakov, V.N.; Kang, K.S.

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines have been developed under an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) titled ''Surveillance Programme Results Application to Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity Assessment.'' The IAEA has sponsored a series of five CRPs that have led to a focus on measuring the best irradiation fracture parameters using relatively small test specimens for assuring structural integrity of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs)

  11. Reynolds stress turbulence model applied to two-phase pressurized thermal shocks in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mérigoux, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.merigoux@edf.fr; Laviéville, Jérôme; Mimouni, Stéphane; Guingo, Mathieu; Baudry, Cyril

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • NEPTUNE-CFD is used to model two-phase PTS. • k-ε model did produce some satisfactory results but also highlights some weaknesses. • A more advanced turbulence model has been developed, validated and applied for PTS. • Coupled with LIM, the first results confirmed the increased accuracy of the approach. - Abstract: Nuclear power plants are subjected to a variety of ageing mechanisms and, at the same time, exposed to potential pressurized thermal shock (PTS) – characterized by a rapid cooling of the internal Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) surface. In this context, NEPTUNE-CFD is used to model two-phase PTS and give an assessment on the structural integrity of the RPV. The first available choice was to use standard first order turbulence model (k-ε) to model high-Reynolds number flows encountered in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary circuits. In a first attempt, the use of k-ε model did produce some satisfactory results in terms of condensation rate and temperature field distribution on integral experiments, but also highlights some weaknesses in the way to model highly anisotropic turbulence. One way to improve the turbulence prediction – and consequently the temperature field distribution – is to opt for more advanced Reynolds Stress turbulence Model. After various verification and validation steps on separated effects cases – co-current air/steam-water stratified flows in rectangular channels, water jet impingements on water pool free surfaces – this Reynolds Stress turbulence Model (R{sub ij}-ε SSG) has been applied for the first time to thermal free surface flows under industrial conditions on COSI and TOPFLOW-PTS experiments. Coupled with the Large Interface Model, the first results confirmed the adequacy and increased accuracy of the approach in an industrial context.

  12. Materialistic Aspects of Raising Resource of Pressurized Water Reactors for Low-Power Nuclear Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parshin, A.M.; Muratov, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    The opportunity of using ships reactors for low-power nuclear plants is considered. Some aspects of working constructional materials on cases of water-water reactors of ships nuclear units are considered. Advantages of raising resource of ships reactors are shown

  13. Multi-stage-flash desalination plants of relative small performance with integrated pressurized water reactors as a nuclear heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, G.; Peltzer, M.

    1977-01-01

    In the Krupp-GKSS joint study MINIPLEX the requirements for seawater-desalination plants with a performance in the range of 10 000 to 80 000 m 3 distillate per day heated by a nuclear reactor are investigated. The reactor concept is similar to the Integrated Pressurized Water Reactor (IPWR) of the nuclear ship OTTO HAHN. The design study shows that IPWR systems have specific advantages up to 200 MWth compared to other reactor types at least being adapted for single- and dual-purpose desalination plants. The calculated costs of the desalinated water show that due to fuel cost advantages of reactors small and medium nuclear desalination plants are economically competetive with oil-fired plants since the steep rise of oil price in autumn 1973. (author)

  14. Generic safety issues for nuclear power plants with pressurized heavy water reactors and measures for their resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    be used in reassessing the safety of individual operating plants. In 1998, the IAEA completed IAEA-TECDOC-1044 entitled Generic Safety Issues for Nuclear Power Plants with Light Water Reactors and Measures Taken for their Resolution and established the associated LWRGSIDB database (Computer Manual Series No. 13). The present compilation, which is based on broad international experience, is an extension of this work to cover pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). As in the case of LWRs, it is one element in the framework of IAEA activities to assist Member States in reassessing the safety of operating nuclear power plants. It addresses generic safety issues identified in nuclear power plants using PHWRs. In most cases, the measures taken or planned to resolve these issues are also identified. The work on this report was initiated by the Senior Regulators of Countries Operating CANDU-Type Nuclear Power Plants at one of their annual meetings. It was carried out within the framework of the IAEA's programme on National Regulatory Infrastructure for Nuclear Installation Safety and serves to enhance regulatory effectiveness through the exchange of safety related information

  15. Feasibility study of a dedicate nuclear desalination system: Low-pressure inherent heat sink nuclear desalination plant (LIND)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Sik; No, Hee Cheon; Jo, Yu Gwan; Wivisono, Andhika Feri; Park, Byung Ha; Choi, Jin Young; Lee, Jeong Ik; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Cho, Nam Zin [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    In this paper, we suggest the conceptual design of a water-cooled reactor system for a low-pressure inherent heat sink nuclear desalination plant (LIND) that applies the safety-related design concepts of high temperature gas-cooled reactors to a water-cooled reactor for inherent and passive safety features. Through a scoping analysis, we found that the current LIND design satisfied several essential thermal-hydraulic and neutronic design requirements. In a thermal-hydraulic analysis using an analytical method based on the Wooton-Epstein correlation, we checked the possibility of safely removing decay heat through the steel containment even if all the active safety systems failed. In a neutronic analysis using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code, we estimated a cycle length of approximately 6 years under 200 MW{sub th} and 4.5% enrichment. The very long cycle length and simple safety features minimize the burdens from the operation, maintenance, and spent-fuel management, with a positive impact on the economic feasibility. Finally, because a nuclear reactor should not be directly coupled to a desalination system to prevent the leakage of radioactive material into the desalinated water, three types of intermediate systems were studied: a steam producing system, a hot water system, and an organic Rankine cycle system.

  16. Feasibility study of a dedicated nuclear desalination system: Low-pressure Inherent heat sink Nuclear Desalination plant (LIND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Sik Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we suggest the conceptual design of a water-cooled reactor system for a low-pressure inherent heat sink nuclear desalination plant (LIND that applies the safety-related design concepts of high temperature gas-cooled reactors to a water-cooled reactor for inherent and passive safety features. Through a scoping analysis, we found that the current LIND design satisfied several essential thermal–hydraulic and neutronic design requirements. In a thermal–hydraulic analysis using an analytical method based on the Wooton–Epstein correlation, we checked the possibility of safely removing decay heat through the steel containment even if all the active safety systems failed. In a neutronic analysis using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code, we estimated a cycle length of approximately 6 years under 200 MWth and 4.5% enrichment. The very long cycle length and simple safety features minimize the burdens from the operation, maintenance, and spent-fuel management, with a positive impact on the economic feasibility. Finally, because a nuclear reactor should not be directly coupled to a desalination system to prevent the leakage of radioactive material into the desalinated water, three types of intermediate systems were studied: a steam producing system, a hot water system, and an organic Rankine cycle system.

  17. The online sealing performance test of the primary circuit pressure boundary check valve in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yunfei; Huang Huimin

    2013-01-01

    The primary circuit pressure boundary check valves of 320 MW pressurized water reactor is a nuclear grade I key equipment. The sealing demand is very high, which is directly related to the internal leakage rate of the primary circuit system. After the welding check valve is repaired, the sealing performance is judged by color printing checks. If there is water or humid vapor in the pipe, it will affect the accuracy of the color printing checks. For the particularity of the online check valve tightness test, online detecting device is designed by the hydraulic pressure drop method in other nuclear power plants, but the method has some shortcomings and restrictions. In this paper, we design a reliable and portable test equipment by the low-pressure gas seal test flow measurement, which make accurate and quantitative judgment of sealing property after the pressure boundary check valves are repaired. (authors)

  18. Rationalizing of construction engineering of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, S.

    1977-01-01

    Construction of large power plants requires further reduction of construction efforts and the construction period. A new constructional and technological solution has been developed with the steel-cell composite structure applied in the Greifswald nuclear power plant 'Bruno Leuschner' for the first time. Principles of design, fabrication, transport, and mounting are described. The benefits of the method are indicated. (author)

  19. Preliminary materials selection issues for the next generation nuclear plant reactor pressure vessel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Shah, V. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-03-21

    In the coming decades, the United States and the entire world will need energy supplies to meet the growing demands due to population increase and increase in consumption due to global industrialization. One of the reactor system concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), with helium as the coolant, has been identified as uniquely suited for producing hydrogen without consumption of fossil fuels or the emission of greenhouse gases [Generation IV 2002]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected this system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, to demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity and hydrogen production within the next 15 years. The NGNP reference concepts are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactors with a design goal outlet helium temperature of {approx}1000 C [MacDonald et al. 2004]. The reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The use of molten salt coolant, especially for the transfer of heat to hydrogen production, is also being considered. The NGNP is expected to produce both electricity and hydrogen. The process heat for hydrogen production will be transferred to the hydrogen plant through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The basic technology for the NGNP has been established in the former high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and demonstration plants (DRAGON, Peach Bottom, AVR, Fort St. Vrain, and THTR). In addition, the technologies for the NGNP are being advanced in the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) project, and the South African state utility ESKOM-sponsored project to develop the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Furthermore, the Japanese HTTR and Chinese HTR-10 test reactors are demonstrating the feasibility of some of the planned components and materials. The proposed high operating temperatures in the VHTR place significant constraints on the choice of material selected for the reactor pressure vessel for

  20. An investigation of temperature measurement methods in nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acton, R.U.; Gill, W.; Sais, D.J.; Schulze, D.H.; Nakos, J.T.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this project was to provide an assessment of several methods by which the temperature of a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel (RPV) could be measured during an annealing process. This project was a coordinated effort between DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology; DOE's Light Water Reactor Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories; and the Electric Power Research Institute's Non- Destructive Evaluation Center. Ball- thermocouple probes similar to those described in NUREG/CR-5760, spring-loaded, metal- sheathed thermocouple probes, and 1778 air- suspended thermocouples were investigated in experiments that heated a section of an RPV wall to simulate a thermal annealing treatment. A parametric study of ball material, emissivity, thermal conductivity, and thermocouple function locations was conducted. Also investigated was a sheathed thermocouple failure mode known as shunting (electrical breakdown of insulation separating the thermocouple wires). Large errors were found between the temperature as measured by the probes and the true RPV wall temperature during heat-up and cool-down. At the annealing soak temperature, in this case 454 degrees C [850'F], all sensors measured the same temperature within about ±5% (23.6 degrees C [42.5 degrees F]). Because of these errors, actual RPV wall heating and cooling rates differed from those prescribed (by up to 29%). Shunting does not appear to be a problem under these conditions. The large temperature measurement errors led to the development of a thermal model that predicts the RPV wall temperature from the temperature of a ball- probe. Comparisons between the model and the experimental data for ball-probes indicate that the model could be a useful tool in predicting the actual RPV temperature based on the indicated ball- probe temperature. The model does not predict the temperature as well for the spring-loaded and air suspended probes

  1. Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant: variation in test intervals for high-pressure coolant injection (HPCI) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, R.F.; Stetkar, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The change in availability of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCIS) due to a change in pump and valve test interval from monthly to quarterly was analyzed. This analysis started by using the HPCIS base line evaluation produced as part of the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant (BFN) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). The base line evaluation showed that the dominant contributors to the unavailability of the HPCI system are hardware failures and the resultant downtime for unscheduled maintenance. The effect of changing the pump and valve test interval from monthly to quarterly was analyzed by considering the system unavailability due to hardware failures, the unavailability due to testing, and the unavailability due to human errors that potentially could occur during testing. The magnitude of the changes in unavailability affected by the change in test interval are discussed. The analysis showed a small increase in the availability of the HPCIS to respond to loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) and a small decrease in the availability of the HPCIS to respond to transients which require HPCIS actuation. In summary, the increase in test interval from monthly to quarterly does not significantly impact the overall HPCIS availability

  2. The chemistry and activity build up in the primary systems of pressurized water nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darras, Raymond.

    1980-11-01

    After giving a background information on the present standards for the primary coolant in pressurized water nuclear reactors, the choice of particular chemical additives to the water is presented and their main properties are given; the various radioactivated products that are derived from these additives are also considered. The corrosion products transport through the whole primary circuit is then investigated. Two basically different types of processes, particularly about surface deposits, are characterized: that of suspended solids and that of soluble species, which are both carried by water. The physico-chemical data that rule the variations of solubilities for the more important elements are reviewed with details. From these data, the relation between corrosion products transport and radioactive contamination in primary circuits are examined, and this in the complex physico-chemical conditions of plant operation. Characteristic measurements, from operating power reactors, are also presented to illustrate the preceeding phenomena. Finally a chapter reviews the possible solutions against the radioactive contamination of the circuits and their surroundings: - a more adequate choice of materials, - a search for better surface treatment and application methods, - a better evaluation of the existing water conditioning, - an efficient filtration of the fluid, - the use of decontaminating processes [fr

  3. Requirements for class 1, 2, and 3 pressure-retaining systems and components in CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This third edition of CAN/CSA-N285.1 supersedes the 1981 and 1975 editions. It provides the specific requirements for design, fabrication, and installation of Class 1, 2 and 3 pressure-retaining systems and components in CANDU nuclear power plants, and over pressure protection of the heat transport system. The general requirements for pressure-retaining systems and components are given in CSA Standard CAN/CSA-N285.0, with which Class 1, 2 and 3 systems and components must also comply

  4. Excessive leakage measurement using pressure decay method in containment building local leakage rate test at nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Kyu; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Wang Bae [KHNP, Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    There are two methods for conducting the containment local leakage rate test (LLRT) in nuclear power plants: the make-up flow rate method and the pressure decay method. The make-up flow rate method is applied first in most power plants. In this method, the leakage rate is measured by checking the flow rate of the make-up flow. However, when it is difficult to maintain the test pressure because of excessive leakage, the pressure decay method can be used as a complementary method, as the leakage rates at pressures lower than normal can be measured using this method. We studied the method of measuring over leakage using the pressure decay method for conducting the LLRT for the containment building at a nuclear power plant. We performed experiments under conditions similar to those during an LLRT conducted on-site. We measured the characteristics of the leakage rate under varies pressure decay conditions, and calculated the compensation ratio based on these data.

  5. Nuclear power plant control room task analysis. Pilot study for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barks, D.B.; Kozinsky, E.J.; Eckel, S.

    1982-05-01

    The purposes of this nuclear plant task analysis pilot study: to demonstrate the use of task analysis techniques on selected abnormal or emergency operation events in a nuclear power plant; to evaluate the use of simulator data obtained from an automated Performance Measurement System to supplement and validate data obtained by traditional task analysis methods; and to demonstrate sample applications of task analysis data to address questions pertinent to nuclear power plant operational safety: control room layout, staffing and training requirements, operating procedures, interpersonal communications, and job performance aids. Five data sources were investigated to provide information for a task analysis. These sources were (1) written operating procedures (event-based); (2) interviews with subject matter experts (the control room operators); (3) videotapes of the control room operators (senior reactor operators and reactor operators) while responding to each event in a simulator; (4) walk-/talk-throughs conducted by control room operators for each event; and (5) simulator data from the PMS

  6. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Data concerning the existing nuclear power plants in the world are presented. The data was retrieved from the SIEN (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: nuclear plants, its status and type; installed nuclear power plants by country; nuclear power plants under construction by country; planned nuclear power plants by country; cancelled nuclear power plants by country; shut-down nuclear power plants by country. (E.G.) [pt

  7. Behaviour of a pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plant during loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.; Carl, H.; Kubis, K.

    1979-01-01

    Starting from the foundation of the design basis accident in a PWR-type nuclear power plant - Loss of Coolant Accident -the actual status of the processes to be expected in the reactor are described. Operating behaviour of the heat removal system and efficiency of the safety systems are evaluated. Final considerations are concerned with the overall behaviour of the plant under such conditions. Probable failures, shut down times and possibilities of repair are estimated. (author)

  8. Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design

  9. In-service - pressure test of the primary circuit of the Chooz nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelemy, F.L.; Lespiaucq, P.G.

    1977-01-01

    A brief summary is given of the regulations governing inspection pratices of operating nuclear power plants, in France. As an example, such an inspection performed in 1976 on the Westinghouse 320 MWe PWR built in Chooz (Ardennes) is described. Emphasis is put on the administrative organization, the technical solutions, the specific problems and the difficulties encountered. (author)

  10. Pressure waves transient occurred in the steam generators feedwater lines of the Atucha-1 Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balino, J.L.; Carrica, P.M.; Larreteguy, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    The pressure transient occurred at Atucha I Nuclear Power Plant in March 1990 is simulated. The transient was due to the fast closure of a flow control valve at the steam generators feedwater lines. The system was modelled, including the actuation of the relief valves. The minimum closure time for no actuation of the relief valves and the evolution of the velocity and piezo metric head for different cases were calculated. (author)

  11. The role of pressure vessel embrittlement in the long term operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros, A.; Ahlstrand, R.; Bruynooghe, C.; Estorff, U. von; Debarberis, L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Relevant open scientific issues for the long term operation of RPVs are discussed (flux effect, late blooming phases, etc.). ► Several European and American research programmes dealing with these open issues are reviewed. ► A method for consolidation and preservation of knowledge in this field is presented. - Abstract: The lack of new build of plants over the last twenty years has resulted in a switch within the industry from design, construction and development of new systems to the strengthening of safety systems and to the life extension, or long term operation (LTO), of existing reactors. The most relevant component of any nuclear power plan (NPP) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). This is because currently the RPV is still considered irreplaceable or prohibitively expensive to replace. This means, that if it degrades sufficiently, it could be the operational life limiting feature of the NPP. A RPV operational life of 60 years is being considered frequently by many utilities in their plant life management programmes. Areas of improvement facing long term operation are the reduction of uncertainties in the embrittlement parameters of irradiated vessels, and the development of embrittlement trend curves at high fluence levels, where surveillance data are scarce. Different techniques can be used to upgrade the surveillance programmes, as the use of miniature or reconstituted specimens and the application of best estimate assessment tools (e.g. Master Curve). Several relevant international research projects are on-going or have been proposed to clarify the material condition of long operated vessels. Knowledge management is a complementary tool, but not for it less important. The general context for LTO of RPVs is presented in this paper. Starting with a review of relevant embrittlement issues still open, followed by presenting the different techniques and tools that can be used to support LTO, and summarising the scopes of relevant European

  12. Assessment of missiles generated by pressure component failure and its application to recent gas-cooled nuclear plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulacz, J.; Smith, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Methods for establishing characteristics of missiles following pressure barrier rupture have been reviewed in order to enable evaluation of structural response to missile impact and to aid the design of barriers to protect essential plant on gas cooled nuclear plant against unacceptable damage from missile impact. Methods for determining structural response of concrete barriers to missile impact have been reviewed and some methods used for assessing the adequacy of steel barriers on gas-cooled nuclear plant have been described. The possibility of making an incredibility case for some of the worst missiles based on probability arguments is briefly discussed. It is shown that there may be scope for such arguments but there are difficulties in quantifying some of the probability factors. (U.K.)

  13. Internal exposure monitoring of personnel of a nuclear power plant with pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, F.W.; Poulheim, K.F.; Rueger, G.; Schreiter, W.D.

    1982-01-01

    In the GDR a programme for monitoring the internal radiation exposure of personnel has been established in the Bruno Leuschner Nuclear Power Plant, Greifswald, which allows one to estimate the effective dose equivalent in the way recommended by the ICRP. The measuring equipment used, and the methods of calibration and of evaluation of results are described. At present about 400 persons are monthly monitored with a thorax monitor in the nuclear power plant. If an investigation level - corresponding to an effective dose equivalent of 0.3mSv/month - is exceeded, a more exact measurement is made in the whole-body counter at the National Board for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection of the GDR. In addition, a selected group of 50 persons is measured twice yearly in the whole-body counter. The measurements show the high effectiveness of the protective measures against radionuclide intake by workers in the nuclear power plant, resulting in a contribution of less than 1% to the collective dose of the personnel. A correlation has been found between external and internal exposure indicating that, in general, there will be a higher intake only under conditions resulting also in higher external exposures. The highest individual values of internal exposure found are below 0.5mSv/month and thus within the range of the lower detection limit of dosimeter films used for monitoring the external exposure. (author)

  14. Assessment of a pressurizer spray valve faulty opening transient at Asco Nuclear Power Plant with RELAP5/MOD2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reventos, F.; Baptista, J.S.; Navas, A.P.; Moreno, P.

    1993-12-01

    The Asociacion Nuclear Asco has prepared a model of Asco NPP using RELAP5/MOD2. This model, which include thermalhydraulics, kinetics and protection and controls, has been qualified in previous calculations of several actual plant transients. One of the transients of the qualification process is a ''Pressurizer spray valve faulty opening'' presented in this report. It consists in a primary coolant depressurization that causes the reactor trip by overtemperature and later on the actuation of the safety injection. The results are in close agreement with plant data

  15. Operating reliability of valves in French pressurized water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte

    1986-10-01

    Taking into account the large numbers of valves (about 10000) of a PWR nuclear power plant, the importance of some valves in the safety functions and the cost resulting from their unavailability, the individual operability of these equipments has to be ensured at a high reliability level. This assurance can be obtained by means of an effort at all the stages which contribute to the quality of the product: design, qualification tests, fabrication, tests at the start-up stage, maintenance and tests during the power plant operation, experience feedback. This paper emphasizes more particularly on the tests carried out on loops of qualification [fr

  16. A dynamic failure evaluation of a simplified digital control system of a nuclear power plant pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, J.M.O.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e; Saldanha, P.L.C.

    2010-01-01

    Given the increasing use of digital systems in nuclear power plants, a specific approach to reliability and risk analysis has been required. The digital system reflects many interactions between hardware, software, process variables, and human actions. At the same time, the software, does not have a reliability approach as well-defined as the one existing for the other physical components of the system. Then, its reliability analysis is still under development due to difficulties arising from the complexity, flexibility and interactions present in such systems.The traditional approach of using fault trees is static and does not approach the dynamic interactions in such systems, such as delays in capture and processing information, memory, logic loops, system states, etc. It is necessary to find a reliability methodology that takes into account these issues without violating the existing requirements concerning safety analysis, such as: ability to distinguish between common-cause failures, availability of relevant information to users, like minimal cut sets, and failure probabilities as long as the possibility of incorporating the results into existing probabilistic safety assessments (PSA).One approach is to trace all the possible errors of the digital system through dynamic methodologies. The DFM (Dynamic Flow-graph Methodology) is one of the methodologies that better meets the requirements for modeling dynamic systems. It discretizes the most relevant variables of the analyzed system in states that reflect their behavior, sets the logic that connects them through decision tables and finally performs a system analysis, aiming, for example, the root causes (prime implicants) of a given top event of failure. Three aspects have been addressed, the modeling of the system itself, the incorporation of results to probabilistic safety analyses and identification of software failures.To illustrate the DFM, a simplified digital control system of a typical PWR pressurizer

  17. New method of safety assessment for pressure vessel of nuclear power plant--brief introduction of master curve approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wendou

    2011-01-01

    The new Master Curve Method is called as a revolutionary advance to the assessment of- reactor pressure vessel integrity in USA. This paper explains the origin, basis and standard of the Master Curve from the reactor pressure-temperature limit curve which assures the safety of nuclear power plant. According to the characteristics of brittle fracture which is greatly susceptible to the microstructure, the theory and the test method of the Master Curve as well as its statistical law which can be modeled using Weibull distribution are described in this paper. The meaning, advantage, application and importance of the Master Curve as well as the relation between the Master Curve and nuclear power safety are understood from the fitting formula for the fracture toughness database by Weibull distribution model. (author)

  18. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisaka, Tatsuyoshi; Kamahara, Hisato; Yanagisawa, Ko.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent corrosion stress cracks in structural materials in a BWR type nuclear power plant by decreasing the oxygen concentration in the reactor coolants. Constitution: A hydrogen injector is connected between the condensator and a condensate clean up system of a nuclear power plant. The injector is incorporated with hydrogenated compounds formed from metal hydrides, for example, of alloys such as lanthanum-nickel alloy, iron titanium alloy, vanadium, palladium, magnesium-copper alloy, magnesium-nickel alloy and the like. Even if the pressure of hydrogen obtained from a hydrogen bomb or by way of water electrolysis is changed, the hydrogen can always be injected into a reactor coolant at a pressure equal to the equilibrium dissociation pressure for metal hydride by introducing the hydrogen into the hydrogen injector. (Seki, T.)

  19. Contamination of occupational radiation exposure in nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Sebastian; Bruhn, Gerd; Artmann, Andreas; Sentuc, Florence-Nathalie; Tiessen, Olga

    2017-12-01

    In the precursor project of this study a simulation procedure was developed, consisting of a 3D-CAD model, a mathematical method for coordinate transformation, the software MicroShield and an empiric job model, to calculate the occupational exposure for definable jobs at the primary circuit. It was validated for inspection and maintenance jobs at PWRs of the second and third KWU/Siemens generation. With that the aptitude of this tool for prognosis of radiation exposure was demonstrated. Adhering contaminations within the primary circuit are considered as relevant sources, whereas activated core-near components are neglected. In this study, the model was extended by PWR of the so-called Convoy generation, which differ from older plants in the material composition and consequently in the relevant nuclide vectors. With information from a visit at a nuclear power plant and conversation with the staff, the model could be adjusted appropriately. The radionuclide Cobalt-60 is indeed less important compared to older plant-types, but it is still the dominant nuclide in facilities of the fourth KWU/Siemens generation, so that it is used as reference nuclide. Due to the contemporary planned final shut-down of the three Convoy plants (besides other), dismantling work was set into focus of simulation. Simulation was conducted and results compared for Convoy plants and for plants of the older generations two and three. Furthermore, by comparative simulations the question was answered if full system decontamination in Convoy plants before dismantling lead to benefits that justify this measure. The determined dose saving during unmounting works at the steam generators caused by the decontamination is remarkable. An abdication of decontamination at this location would lead to doses much higher than the occupational job dose during steam generator dismantling in a decontaminated generation 2 facility.

  20. Operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, G.

    1987-01-01

    This textbook gives a systematic introduction into the operational and maintenance activities in nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors. Subjects: (1) Setup and operational behaviour of power reactors, (2) setup of nuclear power plants, (3) radiation protection and nuclear safety, (4) nuclear fuel, (5) constructional layout of nuclear power plants, (6) management, and (7) maintenance. 158 figs., 56 tabs

  1. Qualifying Elbow Meters for High Pressure Flow Measurements in an Operating Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, A.M.; Maynard, K.J.; Ramundi, J.; Wiklung, E.

    2006-01-01

    To support the installation and use of elbow meters to measure the high pressure emergency coolant injection flow in an operating nuclear station, a test program was performed to qualify: (i) the 'hot' tapping procedure for field application and (ii) the use of elbow meters for accurate flow measurements over the full range of station ECI flow conditions. This paper describes the design conditions and major components of a flow loop used for the elbow meter calibrations. Typical test results are presented and discussed. (authors)

  2. Knowledges and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    This document catalogs roughly 5300 knowledges and abilities of reactor operators and senior reactor operators. It results from a reanalysis of much larger job-task analysis data base compiled by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Knowledges and abilities are cataloged for 45 major power plant systems and 38 emergency evolutions, grouped according to 11 fundamental safety functions (e.g., reactivity control and reactor coolant system inventory control). With appropriate sampling from this catalog, operator licensing examinations having content validity can be developed. A structured sampling procedure for this catalog is under development by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and will be published as a companion document, ''Examiners' Handbook for Developing Operator Licensing Examinations'' (NUREG-1121). The examinations developed by using the catalog and handbook will cover those topics listed under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55

  3. On-line testing of response time and calibration of temperature and pressure sensors in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    Periodic calibrations and response time measurements are necessary for temperature and pressure sensors in the safety systems of nuclear power plants. Conventional measurement methods require the test to be performed at the sensor location or involve removing the sensor from the process and performing the tests in a laboratory or on the bench. The conventional methods are time consuming and have the potential of causing wear and tear on the equipment, can expose the test personnel to radiation and other harsh environments, and increase the length of the plant outage. Also, the conventional methods do not account for the installation effects which may have an influence on sensor performance. On-line testing methods alleviate these problems by providing remote sensor response time and calibration capabilities. For temperature sensors such as Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) and thermocouples, an on-line test method called the Loop Current Step Response (LCSR) technique has been developed, and for pressure transmitters, an on-line method called noise analysis which was available for reactor diagnostics was validated for response time testing applications. Both the LCSR and noise analysis tests are performed periodically in U.S. nuclear power plants to meet the plant technical specification requirements for response time testing of safety-related sensors. Automated testing of the calibration of both temperature and pressure sensors can be accomplished through an on-line monitoring system installed in the plant. The system monitors the DC output of the sensors over the fuel cycle to determine if any calibration drift has occurred. Changes in calibration can be detected using signal averaging and intercomparison methods and analytical redundancy techniques. (author)

  4. Studies on the effectiveness of measures to maintain the integrity of pressurized components in German nuclear power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmas, M.; Jendrich, U.; Michel, F.; Reck, H.; Schimpfke, T.; Walter, M.; Wenke, R.

    2013-03-01

    The overall objective of the project was to investigate the effectiveness of measures to maintain the as-built quality of the pressure-retaining components in German nuclear power plants. In particular, investigations were performed on the application of the break preclusion concept, existing monitoring systems and the significance of the pressure test as part of the inspection concept. Moreover, the KompInt knowledge base has been updated. Break preclusion for pipes was applied in all German plants already during planning or after commissioning to a varying extent. The basic features of the required assessments were considered in the German nuclear regulations for the first time by inclusion in the safety requirements for nuclear power plants of 2012. The requirements for assessments, differing in their degree of detail, in the interpretations of these safety requirements and in the safety standard KTA 3206 are still in the draft stage. For the first time, the vessels as well as housings of valves and pumps are also included in the concept. Through the use of advanced monitoring systems it was possible in German plants at an early stage to establish modes of operation that minimise the load on components, to carry out appropriate technical backfitting measures, and to identify damages. In plant areas where local water chemistry parameters may result that deviate from the specification, the effectiveness of water chemistry monitoring is limited. In this case, other operational measures must be taken. The results of the simulations performed with the help of the GRS-developed PROST computer code to determine the significance of pressure tests lead - in accordance with the results of operating experience evaluation - to the conclusion that pressure tests carried out within the pressure-retaining boundary contribute to safeguarding the integrity. The user-friendliness of the KompInt knowledge base has been increased by changing over to a new hardware, a software

  5. On-line testing of nuclear plant temperature and pressure instrumentation and other critical plant equipment. IAEA regional workshop. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-31

    Under European regional TC project RER/4/011, IAEA and VUJE Training centre organized a workshop on On-line Testing of Nuclear Power Plant Temperature and Pressure Instrumentation and Other Critical Plant Equipment in Trnava, Slovak Republic, from 25 to 29 May 1998. The objective of the workshop was to review the state-of-the-art in NPP instrumentation, cover typical instrumentation problems and solutions, describe technical and regulatory requirements for verifying the performance of nuclear power plant instrumentation, describe new methods developed and applied in NPPs for on-line verification and performance of instrumentation and present new techniques using existing instrumentation to identify the on-set problems in the plant electrical, mechanical and thermal hydraulic systems. Particular emphasis was placed on temperature measurements by Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) and thermocouples and pressure measurements using motion-balanced and forced-balanced pressure transmitters. This proceedings includes papers presented by the invited speakers and the participants each with an abstract as wells as a summary of the Round-Table discussions Refs, figs, tabs

  6. On-line testing of nuclear plant temperature and pressure instrumentation and other critical plant equipment. IAEA regional workshop. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Under European regional TC project RER/4/011, IAEA and VUJE Training centre organized a workshop on On-line Testing of Nuclear Power Plant Temperature and Pressure Instrumentation and Other Critical Plant Equipment in Trnava, Slovak Republic, from 25 to 29 May 1998. The objective of the workshop was to review the state-of-the-art in NPP instrumentation, cover typical instrumentation problems and solutions, describe technical and regulatory requirements for verifying the performance of nuclear power plant instrumentation, describe new methods developed and applied in NPPs for on-line verification and performance of instrumentation and present new techniques using existing instrumentation to identify the on-set problems in the plant electrical, mechanical and thermal hydraulic systems. Particular emphasis was placed on temperature measurements by Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) and thermocouples and pressure measurements using motion-balanced and forced-balanced pressure transmitters. This proceedings includes papers presented by the invited speakers and the participants each with an abstract as wells as a summary of the Round-Table discussions

  7. Nuclear reactor plant with a gas-cooled nuclear reactor situated in a cylindrical prestressed concrete pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.; Elter, C.; Fritz, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Schoening, J.; Stracke, W.

    1986-01-01

    A simplified construction of the nuclear reactor plant with a guarantee of great safety is achieved by the auxiliary heat exhangers, which remove the post-shutdown heat in fault situations, being arranged in the wellknown way in pairs above one another in a vertical shaft. The associated auxiliary blowers are situated at the top for the upper auxiliary heat exchangers and at the bottom for the lower auxiliary heat exchangers. The cold gas is taken from the lower auxiliary blowers through a parallel gas pipe laid in concrete, which enters the vertical shaft concerned in the area of the cold gas pipe. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Annotated bibliography of safety-related occurrences in pressurized-water nuclear power plants as reported in 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, R.L.; Gallaher, R.B.

    1976-07-01

    The bibliography presented contains 100-word abstracts of reports to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning operational events that occurred at pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plants in 1975. The report includes 1097 abstracts, arranged alphabetically by reactor name and then chronologically for each reactor, that describe incidents, failures, and design or construction deficiencies experienced at the facilities. Key-word and permuted-title indexes are provided to facilitate location of the subjects of interest, and tables summarizing the information contained in the bibliography are presented. The information listed in the tables includes instrument failures, equipment failures, system failures, causes of failures, deficiencies noted, and the time of occurrence (i.e., during refueling, operation, testing, or construction). A few of the unique events that occurred during the year are reviewed in detail

  9. Annotated bibliography of safety-related occurrences in pressurized-water nuclear power plants as reported in 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, R.L.; Gallaher, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    The bibliography contains 100-word abstracts of reports to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning operational events that occurred at pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plants in 1976. Included are 1264 abstracts that describe incidents, failures, and design construction deficiencies experienced at the facilities. They are arranged alphabetically by reactor name and then chronologically for each reactor. Key-word and permuted-title indexes are provided to facilitate location of the subjects of interest, and tables summarizing the information contained in the bibliography are presented. The information listed in the tables includes instrument failures, equipment failures, system failures, causes of failures, deficiencies noted, and the time of occurrence (i.e., during refueling, operation, testing, or construction). A few of the unique events that occurred during the year are reviewed in detail

  10. Annotated bibliography of safety-related occurrences in pressurized-water nuclear power plants as reported in 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R.L.; Gallaher, R.B.

    1977-08-01

    The bibliography contains 100-word abstracts of reports to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning operational events that occurred at pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plants in 1976. Included are 1264 abstracts that describe incidents, failures, and design construction deficiencies experienced at the facilities. They are arranged alphabetically by reactor name and then chronologically for each reactor. Key-word and permuted-title indexes are provided to facilitate location of the subjects of interest, and tables summarizing the information contained in the bibliography are presented. The information listed in the tables includes instrument failures, equipment failures, system failures, causes of failures, deficiencies noted, and the time of occurrence (i.e., during refueling, operation, testing, or construction). A few of the unique events that occurred during the year are reviewed in detail.

  11. Annotated bibliography of safety-related occurrences in pressurized-water nuclear power plants as reported in 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R.L.; Gallaher, R.B.

    1976-07-01

    The bibliography presented contains 100-word abstracts of reports to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning operational events that occurred at pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plants in 1975. The report includes 1097 abstracts, arranged alphabetically by reactor name and then chronologically for each reactor, that describe incidents, failures, and design or construction deficiencies experienced at the facilities. Key-word and permuted-title indexes are provided to facilitate location of the subjects of interest, and tables summarizing the information contained in the bibliography are presented. The information listed in the tables includes instrument failures, equipment failures, system failures, causes of failures, deficiencies noted, and the time of occurrence (i.e., during refueling, operation, testing, or construction). A few of the unique events that occurred during the year are reviewed in detail.

  12. technical guidelines for the design and construction of the next generation of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    These technical guidelines present the opinion of the French 'Groupe Permanent charge des Reacteurs nucleaires' (GPR) concerning the safety philosophy and approach as well as the general safety requirements to be applied for the design and construction of the next generation of nuclear power plants of the PWR (pressurized water reactor) type, assuming the construction of the first units of this generation would start at the beginning of the 21. century. These technical guidelines are based on common work of the French Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN) and of the German Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS). Moreover, these technical guidelines were extensively discussed with members of the German Reaktor Sicherheitskommission (RSK) until the end of 1998 and further with German experts. The context of these technical guidelines must be clearly understood. Faced with the current situation of nuclear energy in the world, the various nuclear steam supply system designers are developing new products, all of them claiming their intention of obtaining a higher safety level, by various ways. GPR believes that, for the operation of a new series of nuclear power plants at the beginning of the next century, the adequate way is to derive the design of these plants in an 'evolutionary' way from the design of existing plants, taking into account the operating experience and the in-depth studies conducted for such plants. Nevertheless, introduction of innovative features must also be considered in the frame of the design of the new generation of plants, especially in preventing and mitigating severe accidents. GPR underlines here that a significant improvement of the safety of the next generation of nuclear power plants at the design stage is necessary, compared to existing plants. If the search for improvement is a permanent concern in the field of safety, the necessity of a significant step at the design stage clearly derives from better

  13. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: BWR pressure vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (caused for instance by unanticipated phenomena and by operating maintenance or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling, within acceptable limits, the ageing degradation and ware out of components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of guidance reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers, and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety, which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. Since the reports are written from a safety perspective, they do not address life or life cycle management of plant components, which involves economic considerations. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness for service) and the inspection, monitoring and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of heavy water moderated reactors (HWRs), boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and water moderated, water cooled energy reactors (WWERs) are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs, and also to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age related licensing issues

  14. Computational fluid dynamic simulation of pressurizer safety valve loop seal purge phenomena in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Woon

    2012-01-01

    In Korean 3 Loop plants a water loop seal pipe is installed containing condensed water upstream of a pressurizer safety valve to protect the valve disk from the hot steam environment. The loop seal water purge time is a key parameter in safety analyses for overpressure transients, because it delays valve opening. The loop seal purge time is uncertain to measure by test and thus 3-dimensional realistic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed in this paper to predict the seal water purge time before full opening of the valve which is driven by steam after water purge. The CFD model for a typical pressurizer safety valve with a loop seal pipe is developed using the computer code of ANSYS CFX 11. Steady-state simulations are performed for full discharge of steam at the valve full opening. Transient simulations are performed for the loop seal dynamics and to estimate the loop seal purge time. A sudden pressure drop higher than 2,000 psia at the tip of the upper nozzle ring is expected from the steady-state calculation. Through the transient simulation, almost loop seal water is discharged within 1.2 second through the narrow opening between the disk and the nozzle of the valve. It can be expected that the valve fully opens at least before 1.2 second because constant valve opening is assumed in this CFX simulation, which is conservative because the valve opens fully before the loop seal water is completely discharged. The predicted loop seal purge time is compared with previous correlation. (orig.)

  15. Computational fluid dynamic simulation of pressurizer safety valve loop seal purge phenomena in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Woon [Dongguk Univ., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of). Nuclear and Energy Engineering Dept.

    2012-11-15

    In Korean 3 Loop plants a water loop seal pipe is installed containing condensed water upstream of a pressurizer safety valve to protect the valve disk from the hot steam environment. The loop seal water purge time is a key parameter in safety analyses for overpressure transients, because it delays valve opening. The loop seal purge time is uncertain to measure by test and thus 3-dimensional realistic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed in this paper to predict the seal water purge time before full opening of the valve which is driven by steam after water purge. The CFD model for a typical pressurizer safety valve with a loop seal pipe is developed using the computer code of ANSYS CFX 11. Steady-state simulations are performed for full discharge of steam at the valve full opening. Transient simulations are performed for the loop seal dynamics and to estimate the loop seal purge time. A sudden pressure drop higher than 2,000 psia at the tip of the upper nozzle ring is expected from the steady-state calculation. Through the transient simulation, almost loop seal water is discharged within 1.2 second through the narrow opening between the disk and the nozzle of the valve. It can be expected that the valve fully opens at least before 1.2 second because constant valve opening is assumed in this CFX simulation, which is conservative because the valve opens fully before the loop seal water is completely discharged. The predicted loop seal purge time is compared with previous correlation. (orig.)

  16. Suggestion on the safety classification of spent fuel dry storage in China’s pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Qu, Yunhuan; Meng, De; Zhang, Qiaoer; Lu, Xinhua

    2018-01-01

    China’s spent fuel storage in the pressurized water reactors(PWR) is stored with wet storage way. With the rapid development of nuclear power industry, China’s NPPs(NPPs) will not be able to meet the problem of the production of spent fuel. Currently the world’s major nuclear power countries use dry storage as a way of spent fuel storage, so in recent years, China study on additional spent fuel dry storage system mainly. Part of the PWR NPP is ready to apply for additional spent fuel dry storage system. It also need to safety classificate to spent fuel dry storage facilities in PWR, but there is no standard for safety classification of spent fuel dry storage facilities in China. Because the storage facilities of the spent fuel dry storage are not part of the NPP, the classification standard of China’s NPPs is not applicable. This paper proposes the safety classification suggestion of the spent fuel dry storage for China’s PWR NPP, through to the study on China’s safety classification principles of PWR NPP in “Classification for the items of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plants (GB/T 17569-2013)”, and safety classification about spent fuel dry storage system in NUREG/CR - 6407 in the United States.

  17. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: BWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (caused for instance by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling, within acceptable limits, the ageing degradation and wear out of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety, which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. Since the reports are written from a safety perspective, they do not address life or life cycle management of plant components, which involves economic considerations. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness for service) and the inspection, monitoring and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of Canada deuterium-uranium (CANDU) reactors, boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and water moderated, water cooled energy reactors (WWERs) are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs, and also to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age related licensing issues

  18. A multi-stage-flash desalination plant of relative small performance with an integrated pressurized water reactor as a nuclear heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltzer, M.; Petersen, G.

    1976-01-01

    In the Krupp-GKSS joint study MINIPLEX the requirements for seawater-desalination-plants with a performance in the range of 10,000 to 80,000 m 3 /d heated by a nuclear reactor are investigated. The reactor concept is similar to the integrated pressurized water reactor (IPWR) of the nuclear ship OTTO HAHN. The calculated costs of the desalinated water show, that due to the fuel cost advantages of reactors small and medium nuclear desalination plants are economically competetive with oil-fired plants since the steep rise of oil price in autumn 1973. (orig.) [de

  19. In-service inspection of nuclear power-plant pressure components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautzenheiser, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    The early light-water-reactor systems for production of commercial power were designed and fabricated in accordance with the codes then being used for fossil-fired power-generating stations with some design changes for increased inspectability during fabrication. Over the past few years, major strides have been made in in-service inspection technology. Work has been under way to determine the reliability of nondestructive testing methods and to develop formal inspection programs throughout the world. The major problems associated with in-service inspection are the scarcity of qualified personnel, the variability in procedures and data recording between inspection agencies, and exposure of inspection personnel to radiation. Further work will be required to more completely mechanize piping inspections to reduce radiation exposure and to standardize inspection procedures, equipment, and certification of personnel. Worldwide attention to the requirements of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, the size and integrity of inspection agencies, and efforts such as the development of personnel qualification and certification guides emphasize the importance of in-service inspection to nuclear safety

  20. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: PWR pressure vessels. 2007 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that effective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (e.g. caused by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance or manufacturing errors) is one of the most important issues for plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling within acceptable limits the ageing degradation and wear-out of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. IAEA-TECDOC-1120 documented ageing assessment and management practices for pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) that were current at the time of its finalization in 1997-1998. Safety significant operating events have occurred since the finalization of the TECDOC, e.g. primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) penetrations and boric acid corrosion/wastage of RPV heads, which threatened the integrity of the RPV heads. These events led to new ageing management actions by both NPP operators and regulators. Therefore it was recognized that IAEA-TECDOC-1120 should be updated by incorporating those new events and their countermeasures. The objective of this report is to update IAEA-TECDOC-1120 in order to provide current ageing management guidance for PWR RPVs to all involved in the operation and regulation of PWRs and thus to help ensure PWR RPV integrity in IAEA Member States throughout their entire service life

  1. Analysis of liquid relief valves opening demand during pressure increase abnormal scenarios at Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedrossian, Gustavo C.; Gersberg, Sara

    2000-01-01

    Two hypothetical scenarios have been analyzed where, after an initiating event, Embalse nuclear power plant primary heat transport system could undergo a pressure increase. These abnormal events are a loss of feedwater to the steam generators and a loss of Class IV power supply with Class III restoration. This analysis focuses on primary system liquid relief valves action, specially on their opening demand. Calculation results show that even when these valves are expected to open during the transient, primary system maximum allowable pressure would not be exceeded if they failed to open. System response was also studied in case that one of these relief valves did not close once primary system pressure decreases. For the scenario of loss of feedwater to steam generators, if the degasser-condenser could not be bottled-up, Emergency Cooling Injection conditions would be reached due to a continuos loss of coolant. In case of loss of Class IV -and assuming degasser-condenser bottling-up as service water would not be available- it was observed that primary system should remain pressurized, and with core cooled by thermo siphoning mechanism. (author)

  2. Assessment and Management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: PWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    At present, there are over four hundred operational nuclear power plants (NPPs) in IAEA Member States. Operating experience has shown that ineffective control of the ageing degradation of the major NPP components (e.g., caused by unanticipated phenomena and by operating, maintenance or manufacturing errors) can jeopardize plant safety and also plant life. Ageing in these NPPs must be therefore effectively managed to ensure the availability of design functions throughout the plant service life. From the safety perspective, this means controlling within acceptable limits the ageing degradation and wear-out of plant components important to safety so that adequate safety margins remain, i.e. integrity and functional capability in excess of normal operating requirements. This TECDOC is one in a series of reports on the assessment and management of ageing of the major NPP components important to safety. The reports are based on experience and practices of NPP operators, regulators, designers, manufacturers and technical support organizations and a widely accepted Methodology for the Management of Ageing of NPP Components Important to Safety which was issued by the IAEA in 1992. The current practices for the assessment of safety margins (fitness-for-service) and the inspection, monitoring and mitigation of ageing degradation of selected components of Canada deuterium-uranium (CANDU) reactors, boiling water reactors (BWRs), pressurized water reactors (PWRs), including water moderated, water cooled energy reactors (WWERs) are documented in the reports. These practices are intended to help all involved directly and indirectly in ensuring the safe operation of NPPs; and also to provide a common technical basis for dialogue between plant operators and regulators when dealing with age related licensing issues. Since the reports are written from a safety perspective, they do not address life or life-cycle management of the plant components, which involves the integration of

  3. In-service diagnostic systems of steam generators, pressurizers and other components of WWER type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matal, O.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed description is presented of the systems of vibration inspections and systems of determining residual service life, implemented as in-service diagnostic systems for steam generators and pressurizers at the Dukovany nuclear power plant. Low temperature accelerometers of the KD or KS type and high temperature accelerometers CA 91 are used as vibration sensors. In the system of vibration inspection a total of 64 vibration measuring chains of Czechoslovak make and design are installed in the power plant. Systems are being built for determining residual service life which consist of 75 special chains for heat monitoring with thermocouples installed on selected assemblies of the steam generators and the pressurizers serving to monitor and evaluate heat stress. Also included in the system for determining residual service life are 16 routes for water withdrawal from steam generators. Their purpose is to make in-service determinations of places of biggest concentrations of impurities in secondary water, to determine the biggest local chemical exposure of primary collector and heat exchange tube materials and to optimize the size and place of leachate withdrawal. (Z.M.). 2 figs., 2 tabs., 15 refs

  4. Manufacturing of welded polyblock turbine rotors for pressurized water reactor nuclear plants; Optimization of the steel grade; Effect of impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisseloup, J.; Poitrault, I.S.; De Badereau, A.; Bocquet, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    Le Creusot Heavy Forge has been manufacturing low-pressure (LP) disks and shaft ends for 1300-MW nuclear power plants. These forgings, in weldable 1.8Cr-1Ni-0.8Mo steel, are welded by Alsthom Atlantique. With the aim of improved quality, homogeneity of mechanical properties, hardenability, and weldability, this metallurgical research has been carried out: 1. Optimization of the steel grade (the effect of silicon, manganese, and molybdenum). 2. The influence of tempering and stress relief treatment parameters. 3. The effect of impurities. These studies have led the Steel Melting Shop of Creusot-Loire Factory to invest in a high-performance process of steelmaking: the heating ladle refining process. This new process has had spectacular results that have been confirmed by investigations on cut-up industrial forgings

  5. Effect of preemptive weld overlay on residual stress mitigation for dissimilar metal weld of nuclear power plant pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong

    2008-01-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation methods which arrest crack initiation and crack growth. Therefore weld overlay can be applied to the region where cracking is likely to be. An overlay weld used in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). In Pressurized Water Reactor(PWR) dissimilar metal weld is susceptible region for Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking(PWSCC). In order to examine the effect of PWOL on residual stress mitigation, PWOL was applied to a specific dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, strong compressive residual stress was made in PWSCC susceptible region and PWOL was proved effective preemptive repair method for weldment

  6. Effect of preemptive weld overlay on residual stress mitigation for dissimilar metal weld of nuclear power plant pressurizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Bae, Hong Yeol; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation methods which arrest crack initiation and crack growth. Therefore weld overlay can be applied to the region where cracking is likely to be. An overlay weld used in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). In Pressurized Water Reactor(PWR) dissimilar metal weld is susceptible region for Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking(PWSCC). In order to examine the effect of PWOL on residual stress mitigation, PWOL was applied to a specific dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, strong compressive residual stress was made in PWSCC susceptible region and PWOL was proved effective preemptive repair method for weldment.

  7. Underwater nuclear power plant structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severs, S.; Toll, H.V.

    1982-01-01

    A structure for an underwater nuclear power generating plant comprising a triangular platform formed of tubular leg and truss members upon which are attached one or more large spherical pressure vessels and one or more small cylindrical auxiliary pressure vessels. (author)

  8. Design of an integral missile shield in integrated head assembly for pressurized water reactor at commercial nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baliga, Ravi; Watts, Tom Neal; Kamath, Harish

    2015-01-01

    In ICONE22, the authors presented the Integrated Head Assembly (IHA) design concept implemented at Callaway Nuclear Power Plant in Missouri, USA. The IHA concept is implemented to reduce the outage duration and the associated radiation exposure to the workers by reducing critical path time during Plant Refueling Outage. One of the head area components in the IHA is a steel missile shield designed to protect the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) assembly from damaging other safety-related components in the vicinity in the Containment. Per Federally implemented General Design Criteria for commercial nuclear plants in the USA, the design of Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) must provide protection from the damages caused by a postulated event of CRDM housing units and their associated parts disengaging from the reactor vessel assembly. This event is considered as a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and assumes that once the CRDM housing unit and their associated parts disengage from the reactor vessel internals assembly, they travel upward by the water jet with the following sequence of events: Per Reference 1, the drive shaft and control rod cluster are forced out of the reactor core by the differential pressure across the drive shaft with the assumption that the drive shaft and control rod cluster, latched together, are fully inserted when the accident occurs. After the travel, the rod cluster control spider will impact the lower side of the upper support plate inside the reactor vessel fracturing the flexure arms in the joint freeing the drive shaft from the control rod cluster. The control rod cluster is stopped by the upper support plate and will remain below the upper support plate during this accident. However, the drive shaft will continue to accelerate in the upward direction until it is stopped by a safety feature in the IHA. The integral missile shield as a safety feature in the IHA is designed to stop the CRDM drive shaft from moving further up in the

  9. Nuclear reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Laurer, E.

    1977-01-01

    The invention is concerned with a quick-closing valve on the main-steam pipe of a nuclear reactor plant. The quick-closing valve serves as isolating valve and as safety valve permitting depressurization in case of an accident. For normal operation a tube-shaped gate valve is provided as valve disc, enclosing an auxiliary valve disc to be used in case of accidents and which is opened at increased pressure to provide a smaller flow cross-section. The design features are described in detail. (RW) [de

  10. WWER-440/230 reactor pressure vessel integrity. A publication of the extrabudgetary programme on the safety of WWER and RBMK nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This report was prepared with the objective of integrating all aspects involved and to provide plant specific information on the issue of reactor pressure vessel integrity including pressurized thermal shock assessment. Areas of the thermal hydraulic analysis including selection of transients, of the structural analysis including fracture mechanics assessment and of the material properties including embrittlement, annealing and re-embrittlement behaviour are addressed. The report also provides related recommendations and conclusions as well as detailed information on the plant specific status for operating WWER-440/230 nuclear power plants. 10 refs, 9 figs, 9 tabs

  11. Nuclear power plant diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokop, K.; Volavy, J.

    1982-01-01

    Basic information is presented on diagnostic systems used at nuclear power plants with PWR reactors. They include systems used at the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant in the USSR, at the Nord power plant in the GDR, the system developed at the Hungarian VEIKI institute, the system used at the V-1 nuclear power plant at Jaslovske Bohunice in Czechoslovakia and systems of the Rockwell International company used in US nuclear power plants. These diagnostic systems are basically founded on monitoring vibrations and noise, loose parts, pressure pulsations, neutron noise, coolant leaks and acoustic emissions. The Rockwell International system represents a complex unit whose advantage is the on-line evaluation of signals which gives certain instructions for the given situation directly to the operator. The other described systems process signals using similar methods. Digitized signals only serve off-line computer analyses. (Z.M.)

  12. Criteria for safety-related nuclear-power-plant operator actions: 1982 pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) simulator exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, D.S.; Beare, A.N.; Kozinsky, E.J.; Haas, P.M.

    1983-06-01

    The primary objective of the Safety-Related Operator Action (SROA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is to provide a data base to support development of criteria for safety-related actions by nuclear power plant operators. When compared to field data collected on similar events, a base of operator performance data developed from the simulator experiments can then be used to establish safety-related operator action design evaluation criteria, evaluate the effects of performance shaping factors, and support safety/risk assessment analyses. This report presents data obtained from refresher training exercises conducted in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant control room simulator. The 14 exercises were performed by 24 teams of licensed operators from one utility, and operator performance was recorded by an automatic Performance Measurement System. Data tapes were analyzed to extract operator response times (RTs) and error rate information. Demographic and subjective data were collected by means of brief questionnaires and analyzed in an attempt to evaluate the effects of selected performance shaping factors on operator performance

  13. Reliability analysis of pipelines and pressure vessels at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klemin, A.I.; Shiverskij, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    Reliability analysis of pipelines and pressure vessels at NPP is given. The main causes and failure mechanisms of these elements, the ways of reliability improvement and preventing of great damages are considered. The reliability estimation methods both according to the statistical operation data and under the conditions of absence of failure statistics are given. The main characteristics and actual reliability factors of pipelines and pressure vessels of three home NPP: the first in the world NPP, VK-50 and Beloyarsk NPP, are presented. From the start-up there were practically no failures of the pipelines and pressure vessels at the VK-50 pilot installation. The analysis of the operation experience of the first and second blocks of the Beloyarsk NPP, as well as the first in the world NPP, shows that the most part of failures of the pipelines and pressure vessels of these energy blocks with the channel reactors is connected with the coolant leakage at minority pipelines of a small diameter. The most part of failures at individual pipelines of the first and second blocks of the Beloyarsk NPP are connected with the leakages of stuffing boxes of switching off devices. It is noted that serious failures of large pipelines and pressure vessels at all home NPP under operation have not been observed

  14. Pressurized thermal shock in nuclear power plants: Good practices for assessment. Deterministic evaluation for the integrity of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-02-01

    Starting in the early 1970s, a series of coordinated research projects (CRPs) was sponsored by the IAEA focusing on the effects of neutron radiation on reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and RPV integrity. In conjunction with these CRPs, many consultants meetings, specialists meetings, and international conferences, dating back to the mid-1960s, were held. Individual studies on the basic phenomena of radiation hardening and embrittlement were also performed to better understand increases in tensile strength and shifts to higher temperatures for the integrity of the RPV. The overall objective of this CRP was to perform benchmark deterministic calculations of a typical pressurized thermal shock (PTS) regime, with the aim of comparing the effects of individual parameters on the final RPV integrity assessment, and then to recommend the best practices for their implementation in PTS procedures. At present, several different procedures and approaches are used for RPV integrity assessment for both WWER 440-230 reactors and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). These differences in procedures and approaches are based, in principle, on the different codes and rules used for design and manufacturing, and the different materials used for the various types of reactor, and the different levels of implementation of recent developments in fracture mechanics. Benchmark calculations were performed to improve user qualification and to reduce the user effect on the results of the analysis. This addressed generic PWR and WWER types of RPV, as well as sensitivity analyses. The complementary sensitivity analyses showed that the following factors significantly influenced the assessment: flaw size, shape, location and orientation, thermal hydraulic assumptions and material toughness. Applying national codes and procedures to the benchmark cases produced significantly different results in terms of allowable material toughness. This was mainly related to the safety factors used and the

  15. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear power plant is described which includes a steam generator supplied via an input inlet with feedwater heated by reactor coolant to generate steam, the steam being conducted to a steam engine having a high pressure stage to which the steam is supplied, and which exhausts the steam through a reheater to a low pressure stage. The reheater is a heat exchanger requiring a supply of hot fluid. To avoid the extra load that would be placed on the steam generator by using a portion of its steam output as such heating fluid, a portion of the water in the steam generator is removed and passed through the reheater, this water having received at least adequate heating in the steam generator to make the reheater effective, but not at the time of its removal being in a boiling condition

  16. Critical review of use of high pressure saturated steam turbine economizers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanek, J.

    1981-01-01

    In the high-pressure part of the turbine drops of moisture condensate, which causes erosion and has negative impact on the service-life of the turbine and on its thermodynamic efficiency. Various designs have been put forward to eliminate moisture. A good combination is moisture separation combined with the offtake of steam for the regeneration of feed water or for the steam re-heater. As concerns the high-pressure component of the turbine it is best to offtake steam for the feed water heater and for heating the steam between the high- and low-pressure components of the turbine. The connections of the heater and re-heater in diagrams of various manufacturers are evaluated and compared. It appears to be uneconomical to use the heater in cases where feed water would be heated to temperature considerably below its optimal value. (M.D.)

  17. The analysis of cracks in high-pressure piping and their effects on strength and lifetime of construction components at the Ignalina nuclear plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleev, A.; Petkevicius, K.; Senkus, V. [and others

    1997-04-01

    A number of cracks and damages of other sorts have been identified in the high-pressure parts at the Ignalina Nuclear Plant. They are caused by inadequate production- and repair technologies, as well as by thermal, chemical and mechanical processes of their performance. Several techniques are available as predictions of cracks and other defects of pressurized vessels. The choice of an experimental technique should be based on the level of its agreement with the actual processes.

  18. The flooding incident at the Aagesta pressurized heavy water nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlgren, C.

    1996-03-01

    This work is an independent investigation of the consequences of the flooding incident at the Aagesta HPWR, Stockholm in May 1969. The basis for the report is an incident in which, due to short circuits in the wiring because of flooding water, the ECCS is momentarily subjected to a pressure much higher than designed for. The hypothetical scenario analyzed here is the case in which the ECCS breaks due to the high pressure. As a consequence of the break, the pressure and the water level in the reactor vessel decrease. The report is divided into three parts; First the Aagesta HPWR is described as well as the chronology of the incident, an analysis of the effects of a hypothetical break in the ECCS is then developed. The second part is a scoping analysis of the incident, modeling the pressure decrease and mass flow rate out of the break. The heat-up of the core, and the core degradation was modeled as well. The third part is formed by a RELAP5/MOD3.1 modeling of the Aagesta HPWR. 18 refs

  19. The corrosion products in the coolant circuits of pressurized water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darras, R.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of the corrosion products formed in the primary and secondary coolant circuits of light-water pressurized reactors are reviewed. The problem induced by the pollution of coolants and metallic surface are examined. Then, the recommendations to follow to minimize the disturbing effects of this pollution by the corrosion products are indicated [fr

  20. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Pressurized water reactors. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The examinations developed using the PWR catalog will cover those topics listed under Title 10, (ode of Federal Regulations Part 55. The PWR catalog contains approximately 5100 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Catalog Organization; Generic Knowledge and Abilities; Plant Systems; Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions; Components and Theory.

  1. Knowledge and abilities catalog for nuclear power plant operators: Pressurized water reactors. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This document provides the basis for the development of content-valid licensing examinations for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The examinations developed using the PWR catalog will cover those topics listed under Title 10, (ode of Federal Regulations Part 55. The PWR catalog contains approximately 5100 knowledge and ability (K/A) statements for reactor operators and senior reactor operators. The catalog is organized into six major sections: Catalog Organization; Generic Knowledge and Abilities; Plant Systems; Emergency and Abnormal Plant Evolutions; Components and Theory

  2. Qualification of NDT systems for in-service inspections of nuclear power plant pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfving, K.

    1998-11-01

    The goal of this study is to determine the requirements of the in-service inspection qualification in Europe, their feasibility in practice and to find out possible manufacture defects in test pieces used in practical trials. The literature study consists of qualification requirements set by European regulatory bodies and by the European nuclear power utilities. Also a brief summary of qualification requirements set by ASME Code, Section XI and comparison between ASME and European qualification requirements is included

  3. Operability of the valves in the french pressurized water nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, M.; Vrillon, B.

    1986-10-01

    There are about 10 000 valves in a PWR, which must have a high standard of reliability. This confidence can be obtained by a continuous effort at every important stage, in the maintenance of the product's quality: design, loop qualifying tests, manufacture, plant start-up tests, maintenance and periodic tests during operation, feed-back of experience. This paper describes more particularly the loop qualifying tests

  4. A modular simulation code applied to pressurized water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnoux, D.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the overall operation of an installation requires taking into account all couplings between the various components and integrating all the automatic actions initiated by control and instrumentation. The tool used for this analysis must be a high performing simulation model, flexible enough to be able to be quickly adapted to varying configurations. In order to study the behaviour of PWR nuclear power stations during normal or incidental operating transients, EDF-SEPTEN has developed the ERABLE code (Etudes Reacteurs a Base LEGO), based on the LEGO software package. (author)

  5. Partner of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribi, M.; Lauer, F.; Pauli, W.; Ruzek, W.

    1992-01-01

    Sulzer, the Swiss technology group, is a supplier of components and systems for nuclear power plants. Important parts of Swiss nuclear power stations, such as containments, reactor pressure vessels, primary pipings, are made in Winterthur. Sulzer Thermtec AG and some divisions of Sulzer Innotec focus their activities on servicing and backfitting nuclear power plants. The European market enjoys priority. New types of valves or systems are developed as economic solutions meeting more stringent criteria imposed by public authorities or arising from operating conditions. (orig.) [de

  6. BWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kosuke.

    1991-01-01

    In a BWR type nuclear power plant in which reactor water in a reactor pressure vessel can be drained to a waste processing system by way of reactor recycling pipeways and remaining heat removal system pipeways, a pressurized air supply device is disposed for supplying air for pressurizing reactor water to the inside of the reactor pressure vessel by way of an upper head. With such a constitution, since the pressurized air sent from the pressurized air supply device above the reactor pressure vessel for the reactor water discharging pressure upon draining, the water draining pressure is increased compared with a conventional case and, accordingly, the amount of drained water is not reduced even in the latter half of draining. Accordingly, the draining efficiency can be improved and only a relatively short period of time is required till the completion of the draining, which can improve safety and save labors. (T.M.)

  7. Nuclear power plant outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) controls nuclear power plant safety in Finland. In addition to controlling the design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants, STUK also controls refuelling and repair outages at the plants. According to section 9 of the Nuclear Energy Act (990/87), it shall be the licence-holder's obligation to ensure the safety of the use of nuclear energy. Requirements applicable to the licence-holder as regards the assurance of outage safety are presented in this guide. STUK's regulatory control activities pertaining to outages are also described

  8. The flow effect in the irradiation embrittlement in pressure vessel steels of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempf, Rodolfo A.; Cativa Tolosa, Sebastian; Fortis, Ana M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the advances in the study of the mechanical behavior of the Reactor Pressure Vessel steels under accelerate irradiations. The objective is to study the effect of lead factors on the interpretation of the mechanisms that induced the embrittlement of the RPV, like those of the reactors Atucha II and CAREM. It is described a device designed to irradiate Charpy specimens with V notch of SA-508 type 3 steel at power reactor temperature, installed in the RA-1 reactor. It is presented also an automatic digital image processing technique for partitioning Charpy fracture surface into regions with a clear physical meaning and appropriate for the work in hot cells. The aim is to obtain the fracture behavior of irradiated specimens with different lead factors in the range of high fluencies and to know the dependence with the composition of the alloy and with the diffusion of other alloy elements. (author)

  9. Cracking of low-pressure steam turbine rotor discs in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMinn, A.; Burghard, H.C. Jr.; Lyle, F.F. Jr.; Leverant, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the results of several metallurgical analyses of retired low pressure (LP) turbine discs that had suffered in-service cracking. Cracks were found in four locations; keyways, bores, web faces and rim attachment areas. In every case, the metallurgical analyses identified intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) as the operative mechanism. The cracks normally have been filled with iron oxides; but chlorides, sulphates, carbonates, copper and copper oxide have been found in, or near cracks. In some cases deposits have been strongly alkaline. However, no specific corrodent has been identified as being uniquely responsible for the cracking in any of the discs. In every case, the disc materials met all mechanical-properties and chemical-composition requirements, and had normal microstructures

  10. AVISE, ageing anticipation methodology using expert judgement and stimulation. Application to a nuclear power plant component: the pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzaiene-Marle, L.

    2005-04-01

    This thesis deals with components ageing anticipation in the context of life cycle management. The proposed approach, called AVISE, allows the identification of potentials problems related to ageing, to measure the risks in terms of degradation probability and degradation consequences and gives the adequate solutions to stop or to postpone ageing. This research was undertaken in a particular industrial context, the nuclear industry. Equipments used in this context are specific and particularly reliable. These characteristics result in limited feedback (low number of failures). To compensate for this limited information, two solutions are proposed in this approach. The first solution that we can consider as a classical one consists in using expert judgement. The second one, more original, consists in using the operation feedback of 'similar' components. In order to apply these solutions and to obtain the anticipation results, a set of methodological tools was developed and tested in a real industrial application on a nuclear power plant component: the pressurizer. The first tool is a generic process for expert judgement, identified thanks to a comparison between eleven existing methods using expert judgement. Two methods based on expert stimulation and called STIMEX-IMDP and STIMEX-IPP were elaborated. A reference list of degradation mechanisms and a reference list of ageing effects were constructed and used in the method STIMEX-IMDP in order to help expert stimulation. Then, the developed approach proposes the use of belief networks to model and quantify the risks related to the potential degradations. Finally, the construction of a conceptual data model and specifications are given for the creation of an ageing database. The data to capitalize was identified on the basis of the research undertaken in this thesis. (author)

  11. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horschel, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix

  12. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horschel, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix.

  13. Preliminary development of an integrated approach to the evaluation of pressurized thermal shock as applied to the Oconee Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, T J; Cheverton, R D; Flanagan, G F; White, J D; Ball, D G; Lamonica, L B; Olson, R

    1986-05-01

    An evaluation of the risk to the Oconee-1 nuclear plant due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) has been Completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This evaluaion was part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) program designed to study the PTS risk to three nuclear plants: Oconee-1, a Babcock and Wilco reactor plant owned and operated by Duke Power Company; Calvert Cliffs-1, a Combustion Engineering reactor plant owned and operated by Baltimore Gas and Electric company; and H.B. Robinson-2, a Westinghouse reactor plant owned and operated by Carolina Power and Light Company. Studies of Calvert Cliffs-1 and H.B. Robinson-2 are still underway. The specific objectives of the Oconee-1 study were to: (1) provide a best estimate of the probability of a through-the-wall crack (TWC) occurring in the reactor pressure vessel as a result of PTS; (2) determine dominant accident sequences, plant features, operator and control actions and uncertainty in the PTS risk; and (3) evaluate effectiveness of potential corrective measures.

  14. Developments of integrity evaluation technology for pressurized components in nuclear power plant and IT based integrity evaluation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Choi, Jae Boong; Shim, Do Jun [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2003-03-15

    The objective of this research is to develop an efficient evaluation technology and to investigate applicability of newly-developed technology, such as internet-based cyber platform, to operating power plants. Development of efficient evaluation systems for Nuclear Power Plant components, based on structural integrity assessment techniques, are increasingly demanded for safe operation with the increasing operating period of Nuclear Power Plants. The following five topics are covered in this project: development of assessment method for wall-thinned nuclear piping based on pipe test; development of structural integrity program for steam generator tubes with cracks of various shape; development of fatigue life evaluation system for mam components of NPP; development of internet-based cyber platform and integrity program for primary components of NPP; effect of aging on strength of dissimilar welds.

  15. Topics to be covered in safety analysis reports for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors or boiling water reactors in the F.R.G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, H.A.G.

    1977-01-01

    This manual aims at defining the standards to be used in Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants with Pressurized Water Reactors or Boiling Water Reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany. The topics to be covered are: Information about the site (geographic situation, settlement, industrial and military facilities, transport and communications, meteorological conditions, geological, hydrological and seismic conditions, radiological background), description of the power plant (building structures, safety vessel, reactor core, cooling system, ventilation systems, steam power plant, electrical facilities, systems for measurement and control), indication of operation (commissioning, operation, safety measures, radiation monitoring, organization), incident analysis (reactivity incidents, loss-of-coolant incidents, external impacts). (HP) [de

  16. Nuclear Power Plants. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell, Walter, III

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Why Use Nuclear Power?; From Atoms to Electricity; Reactor Types; Typical Plant Design Features; The Cost of Nuclear Power; Plants in the United States; Developments in Foreign…

  17. Requirements for class 1C, 2C, and 3C pressure-retaining components and supports in CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This Standard applies to pressure-retaining components of CANDU nuclear power plants that have a code classification of Class 1C, 2C or 3C. These are pressure-retaining components where, because of the design concept, the rules of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code do not exist, are not applicable, or are not sufficient. The Standard provides rules for the design, fabrication, installation, examination and inspection of these components and supports. It provides rules intended to ensure the pressure-retaining integrity of components, not the operability. It also provides rules for the support of fueling machines. The Standard applies only to new construction prior to the plant being declared in service

  18. Numerical Analysis of Molten Corium Dispersion during Hypothetical High-Pressure Accidents in APR1400 Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Tae; Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Sang Baik; Kim, Hee Dong; Jeong, Jae Sik

    2010-01-01

    During a hypothetical high-pressure accident in a nuclear power plant (NPP), molten corium can be ejected through a breach of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and dispersed by the following jet of a high pressure steam in the RPV. The dispersed corium is fragmented into smaller droplets in a reactor cavity of the NPP by the steam jet with very high velocity and is released into the upper compartment of the NPP by an overpressure in the cavity. The heat-carrying fragments of the corium transfer the thermal energy to the ambient air in the containment and react chemically with steam and generate hydrogen which may be burnt in the containment. The thermal loads from the ejected molten corium on the containment which is called direct containment heating (DCH) can threaten the integrity of the containment. New generation NPPs such as APR1400 and EPR have been designed in consideration of reducing the possibility of the containment failure from the DCH. In order for that, APR1400 has a convolute-type corium chamber connected to the reactor cavity. In the case of EPR, severe-accident dedicated depressurization valves are installed to preclude a high pressure melt ejection (HPME). DCH in a NPP containment is related to many physical phenomena such as multi-phase hydrodynamics, thermodynamics and chemical reaction. In the evaluation of the DCH load, the melt dispersion rates depending on the RPV pressure are the most important parameter. Mostly, DCH was evaluated by using lumped-analysis codes with some correlations obtained from experiments for the dispersion rates. The corium dispersion rates for many types of the NPP containments had been obtained by experiments in 90s. And some correlations from the experimental data were developed. As mentioned above, APR1400 has a corium chamber to reduce the corium dispersion rate. But there is no experimental data for the dispersion rate specific to the APR1400 cavity geometry. So its performance for capturing of the dispersed corium

  19. Pumps in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that pumps play an important role in nuclear plant operation. For instance, reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) should provide adequate cooling for reactor core in both normal operation and transient or accident conditions. Pumps such as Low Pressure Safety Injection (LPSI) pump in the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) play a crucial role during an accident, and their reliability is of paramount importance. Some key issues involved with pumps in nuclear plant system include the performance of RCP under two-phase flow conditions, piping vibration due to pump operating in two-phase flows, and reliability of LPSI pumps

  20. Nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulkiewicz, M.; Navratil, J.

    The construction of a nuclear power plant is conditioned on territorial requirements and is accompanied by the disturbance of the environment, land occupation, population migration, the emission of radioactive wastes, thermal pollution, etc. On the other hand, a nuclear power plant makes possible the introduction of district heating and increases the economic and civilization activity of the population. Due to the construction of a nuclear power plant the set limits of negative impacts must not be exceeded. The locality should be selected such as to reduce the unfavourable effects of the plant and to fully use its benefits. The decision on the siting of the nuclear power plant is preceded by the processing of a number of surveys and a wide range of documentation to which the given criteria are strictly applied. (B.H.)

  1. Characterization of the inside and outside oxide surfaces of irradiated pressure tubes of Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordoni, Roberto A.; Olmedo, Ana M.

    2004-01-01

    The inside and outside surfaces of two pressure tubes (PT) removed from Embalse nuclear power plant (CNE) after 10 of effective full power years (EFPY) were characterized. The oxide thickness of both faces, in different zones, was also measured. The inside surfaces of both PTs, B-102 (A-14) and B-298 (L-12), were covered with a black oxide that replicates the original PT surface. A network of microcracks perpendicular to the inside surface in contact with the coolant was found. In some cases, near the outlet of the PT, some spalling of the oxide was also found. These small microcracks and spalling do not affect the protective character of the oxide since a thickness about 5 or 6 μm of an undamaged oxide is found at the metal/oxide interface side. The oxide thickness changes between approximately 6 to 12 μm for B-102 tube and around 7 to 15 μm for B-298 tube. The average corrosion rate is 1.16 μm/10 4 HH for B-102 tube and 1.35 μm/10 4 HH for B-298 tube at 5.8 m position for both PTs. These corrosion rates show good corrosion behaviour of CNE PTs. The average corrosion rate of the inside surface of the PTs depends on the coolant temperature but not on fast neutron flux. The outside oxide film is black, shiny, compact and protective, replicating also the original surface. The oxide thickness changes between 2 to 6.5 μm in B-102 tube and between 1.8 to 3.7 μm B-298 tube. These oxide thicknesses are within the values reported for PTs in CANDU Stations. (author) [es

  2. Study of the characteristic response of the pressure control system for the design parameters of the new turbine control system, MARK VI, in Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo anaya, M. J.; Ruiz Bueno, G.; Mora, J. A.; Vaquer, J. I.; Bucho, L.; Lopez, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the study of the characteristic response of the ancient Pressure and Turbine Control System for the OCP-4300 Project in the Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant, made by Tatiana Servicios Tecnologicos in collaboration with the Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety. This work was done as one of the preliminary work necessary for replacing the old control system by Mark VI.

  3. The 1978 first in-service inspection of the reactor pressure vessel of the second unit of the Greifswald nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, D.; Busch, R.; Hildebrandt, E.; Redlich, K.H.

    1979-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel and the primary coolant circuit of the second 440-MW(e) unit of the Greifswald nuclear power plant were subjected to an in-service inspection. Extent of the inspection, development and construction of a reactor inspection container as well as the nondestructive materials testing methods used are described. Further, problems of performing the inspection, such as needs of time and personnel and radiation exposure, are considered. Finally, it is stated that the reactor pressure vessel was in safe operating state. (author)

  4. Nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Moreira, Y.M. de.

    1979-01-01

    The legal aspects of nuclear power plant construction in Brazil, derived from governamental political guidelines, are presented. Their evolution, as a consequence of tecnology development is related. (A.L.S.L.) [pt

  5. Heat and fluid flow in accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 3. Behaviour of high pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) based on thermodynamic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Shigenao

    2014-01-01

    In order to clarify the process of Accident of Fukushima Nuclear Plants, an accident scenario of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 3 is analyzed from the data open to the public. Phase equilibrium process model was introduced in which the vapor and water are at saturation point in the vessels. The present accident scenario assumes that the high pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) did not worked properly, but the steam in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) leaked through the turbine of HPCI to the suppression chamber since 12/3/2011 12:35. It is assumed that the Tsunami flooded the torus room where the suppression chamber was placed. Proposed accident scenario agrees with the data of the plant parameters obtained just after the accident. It is estimated that the water injection by HPIC was stopped since around at 13/3 19:00 and the water level in RPV decreased since then. It is estimated that the RPV broke at 14/3 8:55 and water could injected from fire engines due to the depression due to the rupture of RPV. There was little water left in RPV at the time of the rupture. If the present scenario is correct, the behavior that operators in the plant stopped HPCI at 13/3 2:42 did not affect seriously on the RPV rupture. If HPCI was working properly until the operators stopped it, the plant parameters obtained in the accident cannot be explained. (author)

  6. Nuclear Power Plant Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, George A.

    1975-01-01

    The author recognizes a body of basic knowledge in nuclear power plant technoogy that can be taught in school programs, and lists the various courses, aiming to fill the anticipated need for nuclear-trained manpower--persons holding an associate degree in engineering technology. (Author/BP)

  7. Technical update on pressure suppression type containments in use in U.S. light water reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    In 1972, Dr. S. H. Hanauer (Technical Advisor to the NRC's Executive Director for Operations) wrote a memorandum that raised several questions on the viability of pressure suppression containment concepts. The concerns raised by Dr. Hanauer have recently become the subject of considerable discussion by several members of the U.S. Congress and public. The report provides a response to these expressed concerns and a status summary for various technical matters that relate to the safety of pressure suppression type containments for light water cooled reactor plants

  8. Nuclear power plant operating experience, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    This report is the third in a series of reports issued annually that summarize the operating experience of U.S. nuclear power plants in commercial operation. Power generation statistics, plant outages, reportable occurrences, fuel element performance, occupational radiation exposure and radioactive effluents for each plant are presented. Summary highlights of these areas are discussed. The report includes 1976 data from 55 plants--23 boiling water reactor plants and 32 pressurized water reactor plants

  9. NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

    1963-05-14

    A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

  10. Nuclear power plants maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power plants maintenance now appears as an important factor contributing to the competitivity of nuclea energy. The articles published in this issue describe the way maintenance has been organized in France and how it led to an actual industrial activity developing and providing products and services. An information note about Georges Besse uranium enrichment plant (Eurodif) recalls that maintenance has become a main data not only for power plants but for all nuclear industry installations. (The second part of this dossier will be published in the next issue: vol. 1 January-February 1989) [fr

  11. Medium-size nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelweith, L.; Lavergne, J.C.; Martinot, G.; Weiss, A.

    1977-01-01

    CEA (TECHNICATOME) has developed a range of pressurized water reactors of the type ''CAS compact'' which are adapted to civil ship propulsion, or to electric power production, combined possibly with heat production, up to outputs equivalent to 125 MWe. Nuclear plants equipped with these reactors are suitable to medium-size electric networks. Among the possible realizations, two types of plants are mentioned as examples: 1) Floating electron-nuclear plants; and 2) Combined electric power and desalting plants. The report describes the design characteristics of the different parts of a 125 MWe unit floating electro-nuclear plant: nuclear steam system CAS 3 G, power generating plant, floating platform for the whole plant. The report gives attention to the different possibilities according to site conditions (the plant can be kept floating, in a natural or artificial basin, it can be put aground, ...) and to safety and environment factors. Such unit can be used in places where there is a growing demand in electric power and fresh water. The report describes how the reactor, the power generating plant and multiflash distillation units of an electric power-desalting plant can be combined: choice of the ratio water output/electric power output, thermal cycle combination, choice of the gain ratio, according to economic considerations, and to desired goal of water output. The report analyses also some technical options, such as: choice of the extraction point of steam used as heat supply of the desalting station (bleeding a condensation turbine, or recovering steam at the exhaust of a backpressure turbine), design making the system safe. Lastly, economic considerations are dealt with: combining the production of fresh water and electric power provides usually a much better energy balance and a lower cost for both products. Examples are given of some types of installations which combine medium-size reactors with fresh water stations yielding from 10000 to 120000 m 3 per day

  12. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, R.

    1979-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel consists of two parts. A cylindrical lower part with a hemispherical steel roof is placed at some distance within an equally shaped pressure vessel of concrete. Both vessels are standing on a common bottom plate. The interspace is kept at subpressure. It serves to contain ring galleries, elevator shafts, and power plant components. (GL) [de

  13. The proposals on cooperation to foreign centers of science on thermophysical properties of reactor materials in a broad band of pressure and temperatures realized at normal transient and emergency operation activity of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortov, V.E.

    1996-01-01

    The proposals on cooperation in the area of thermophysical properties of reactor materials in a broad band of pressure and temperature realized at normal transient and emergency operation activity of nuclear power plants are discussed. 1 fig

  14. KWU Nuclear Plant Analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennewitz, F.; Hummel, R.; Oelmann, K.

    1986-01-01

    The KWU Nuclear Plant Analyzer is a real time engineering simulator based on the KWU computer programs used in plant transient analysis and licensing. The primary goal is to promote the understanding of the technical and physical processes of a nuclear power plant at an on-site training facility. Thus the KWU Nuclear Plant Analyzer is available with comparable low costs right at the time when technical questions or training needs arise. This has been achieved by (1) application of the transient code NLOOP; (2) unrestricted operator interaction including all simulator functions; (3) using the mainframe computer Control Data Cyber 176 in the KWU computing center; (4) four color graphic displays controlled by a dedicated graphic computer, no control room equipment; and (5) coupling of computers by telecommunication via telephone

  15. Nuclear Power Plants (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell III, Walter [Southern Nuclear Engineering, Inc.

    1973-01-01

    Projected energy requirements for the future suggest that we must employ atomic energy to generate electric power or face depletion of our fossil-fuel resources—coal, oil, and gas. In short, both conservation and economic considerations will require us to use nuclear energy to generate the electricity that supports our civilization. Until we reach the time when nuclear power plants are as common as fossil-fueled or hydroelectric plants, many people will wonder how the nuclear plants work, how much they cost, where they are located, and what kinds of reactors they use. The purpose of this booklet is to answer these questions. In doing so, it will consider only central station plants, which are those that provide electric power for established utility systems.

  16. Nuclear Power Plant Lifetime Management Study (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Yull; Jeong, Ill Seok; Jang, Chang Heui; Song, Taek Ho; Song, Woo Young [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Tae Eun [Korea Power Engineering Company Consulting and Architecture Engineers, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    As the operation-year of nuclear power plant increases and finding sites for new nuclear power plant becomes harder, a comprehensive and systematic nuclear plant lifetime management(PLIM) program including life extension has to be established for stable and safe supply of electricity. A feasibility study was conducted to systematically evaluate technical, economic and regulatory aspect of plant lifetime managements and plant life extension for Kori-1 nuclear power plant. For technical evaluation of nuclear power plant, 13 major components were selected for lifetime evaluation by screening system. structure, and components(SSCs) of the plant. It was found that except reactor pressure vessel, which needs detailed integrity analysis, and low pressure turbine, which is scheduled to be replaced, 11 out of 13 major components have sufficient service life, for more than 40 years. Because domestic rules and regulations related to license renewal has not yet been written, review on the regulatory aspect of life extensions was conducted using US NRC rules and regulations. A cooperative effort with nuclear regulatory body is needed for early completion of license renewal rules and regulations. For economic evaluation of plant lifetime extension, a computer program was developed and used. It was found that 10 to 20 year of extension operation of Kori-1 nuclear power plant was proved. Based on the results, next phase of plant lifetime management program for detailed lifetime evaluation and presenting detailed implementation schedule for plant refurbishment for lifetime extension should be followed. (author). 74 refs., figs.

  17. Nuclear Power Plant Lifetime Management Study (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Yull; Jeong, Ill Seok; Jang, Chang Heui; Song, Taek Ho; Song, Woo Young [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Tae Eun [Korea Power Engineering Company Consulting and Architecture Engineers, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    As the operation-year of nuclear power plant increases and finding sites for new nuclear power plant becomes harder, a comprehensive and systematic nuclear plant lifetime management(PLIM) program including life extension has to be established for stable and safe supply of electricity. A feasibility study was conducted to systematically evaluate technical, economic and regulatory aspect of plant lifetime managements and plant life extension for Kori-1 nuclear power plant. For technical evaluation of nuclear power plant, 13 major components were selected for lifetime evaluation by screening system. structure, and components(SSCs) of the plant. It was found that except reactor pressure vessel, which needs detailed integrity analysis, and low pressure turbine, which is scheduled to be replaced, 11 out of 13 major components have sufficient service life, for more than 40 years. Because domestic rules and regulations related to license renewal has not yet been written, review on the regulatory aspect of life extensions was conducted using US NRC rules and regulations. A cooperative effort with nuclear regulatory body is needed for early completion of license renewal rules and regulations. For economic evaluation of plant lifetime extension, a computer program was developed and used. It was found that 10 to 20 year of extension operation of Kori-1 nuclear power plant was proved. Based on the results, next phase of plant lifetime management program for detailed lifetime evaluation and presenting detailed implementation schedule for plant refurbishment for lifetime extension should be followed. (author). 74 refs., figs.

  18. Commissioning of the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtado, P.M.; Rolf, F.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant Angra 2, located at Itaorna Beach-Angra dos Reis is the first plant of the Brazilian-German Agreement to be commissioned. The Nuclear Power Plant is a pressurized water reactor rated at 3765 Mw thermal/1325 Mw electrical. For commissioning purpose the plant is divided into 110 systems. Plant commissioning objective is to demonstrate the safe and correct operation of each plan component, system and of the whole plant in agreement with design conditions, licensing requirements and contractual obligations. This work gives a description of plant commissioning objectives, activities their time sequence, and documentation. (Author) [pt

  19. Nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otway, H.J.

    1974-01-01

    Action at the international level will assume greater importance as the number of nuclear power plants increases, especially in the more densely populated parts of the world. Predictions of growth made prior to October 1973 [9] indicated that, by 1980, 14% of the electricity would be supplied by nuclear plants and by the year 2000 this figure would be about 50%. This will make the topic of international co-operation and standards of even greater importance. The IAEA has long been active in providing assistance to Member States in the siting design and operation of nuclear reactors. These activities have been pursued through advisory missions, the publication of codes of practice, guide books, technical reports and in arranging meetings to promote information exchange. During the early development of nuclear power, there was no well-established body of experience which would allow formulation of internationally acceptable safety criteria, except in a few special cases. Hence, nuclear power plant safety and reliability matters often received an ad hoc approach which necessarily entailed a lack of consistency in the criteria used and in the levels of safety required. It is clear that the continuation of an ad hoc approach to safety will prove inadequate in the context of a world-wide nuclear power industry, and the international trade which this implies. As in several other fields, the establishment of internationally acceptable safety standards and appropriate guides for use by regulatory bodies, utilities, designers and constructors, is becoming a necessity. The IAEA is presently planning the development of a comprehensive set of basic requirements for nuclear power plant safety, and the associated reliability requirements, which would be internationally acceptable, and could serve as a standard frame of reference for nuclear plant safety and reliability analyses

  20. Development of Automatic Ultrasonic Testing Equipment for Pressure-Retaining Studs and Bolts in Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, D. M.; Park, M. H.; Hong, S. S.

    1989-01-01

    Bolting degradation problems in primary coolant pressure boundary applications have become a major concern in the nuclear industry. In the bolts concerned, the failure mechanism was either corrosion wastage(loss of bolt diameter) or stress-corrosion cracking. Here the manual ultrasonic testing of RPV(Reactor Pressure Vessel) and RCP(Reactor Coolant Pump) stud has been performed. But it is difficult to detect indications because examiner can not exactly control the rotation angle and can not distinguish the indication from signals of bolt. In many cases, the critical sizes of damage depth are very small(1-2 mm order). At critical size, the crack tends to propagatecompletly through the bolt under stress, Resulting in total fracture. Automatic stud scanner for studs(bolts) was developed because the precise measurement of bolt diameter is required in this circumstance. By use of this scanner, the rotation angle of probe was exactly controlled and the exposure time of radiations was reduced

  1. Development of integrity evaluation technology for pressurized components in nuclear power plant and IT based integrity evaluation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Jin; Choi, Jae Boong; Shim, Do Jun

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this research is to develop on efficient integrity evaluation technology and to investigate the applicability of the newly-developed technology such as internet-based cyber platform etc. to Nuclear Power Plant(NPP) components. The development of an efficient structural integrity evaluation system is necessary for safe operation of NPP as the increase of operating periods. Moreover, material test data as well as emerging structural integrity assessment technology are also needed for the evaluation of aged components. The following five topics are covered in this project: development of the wall-thinning evaluation program for nuclear piping; development of structural integrity evaluation criteria for steam generator tubes with cracks of various shape; development of fatigue life evaluation system for major components of NPP; ingegration of internet-based cyber platform and integrity evaluation program for primary components of NPP; effects of aging on strength of dissimilar welds

  2. Development of integrity evaluation technology for pressurized components in nuclear power plant and IT based integrity evaluation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Choi, Jae Boong; Shim, Do Jun [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2004-02-15

    The objective of this research is to develop on efficient integrity evaluation technology and to investigate the applicability of the newly-developed technology such as internet-based cyber platform etc. to Nuclear Power Plant(NPP) components. The development of an efficient structural integrity evaluation system is necessary for safe operation of NPP as the increase of operating periods. Moreover, material test data as well as emerging structural integrity assessment technology are also needed for the evaluation of aged components. The following five topics are covered in this project: development of the wall-thinning evaluation program for nuclear piping; development of structural integrity evaluation criteria for steam generator tubes with cracks of various shape; development of fatigue life evaluation system for major components of NPP; ingegration of internet-based cyber platform and integrity evaluation program for primary components of NPP; effects of aging on strength of dissimilar welds.

  3. Assessment of possibility of primary water stress corrosion cracking occurrence based on residual stress analysis in pressurizer safety nozzle of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Kim, W.; Lee, Jeong Geun

    2012-01-01

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is a major safety concern in the nuclear power industry worldwide. PWSCC is known to initiate only in the condition in which sufficiently high tensile stress is applied to alloy 600 tube material or alloy 82/182 weld material in pressurized water reactor operating environments. However, it is still uncertain how much tensile stress is required to generate PWSCC or what causes such high tensile stress. This study was performed to predict the magnitude of weld residual stress and operating stress and compare it with previous experimental results for PWSCC initiation. For the study, a pressurizer safety nozzle was selected because it is reported to be vulnerable to PWSCC in overseas plants. The assessment was conducted by numerical analysis. Before performing stress analysis for plant conditions, a preliminary mock-up analysis was done. The result of the preliminary analysis was validated by residual stress measurement in the mockup. After verification of the analysis methodology, an analysis under plant conditions was conducted. The analysis results show that the stress level is not high enough to initiate PWSCC. If a plant is properly welded and operated, PWSCC is not likely to occur in the pressurizer safety nozzle.

  4. Aging and service wear of spring-loaded pressure relief valves used in safety-related systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staunton, R.H.; Cox, D.F.

    1995-03-01

    Spring-loaded pressure relief valves (PRVS) are used in some safety-related applications at nuclear power plants. In general, they are used in systems where, during accidents, pressures may rise to levels where pressure safety relief is required for protection of personnel, system piping, and components. This report documents a study of PRV aging and considers the severity and causes of service wear and how it is discovered and corrected in various systems, valve sizes, etc. Provided in this report are results of the examination of the recorded failures and identification of trends and relationships/correlations in the failures when all failure-related parameters are considered. Components that comprise a typical PRV, how those components fail, when they fail, and the current testing frequencies and methods are also presented in detail

  5. Aging and service wear of spring-loaded pressure relief valves used in safety-related systems at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staunton, R.H.; Cox, D.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Spring-loaded pressure relief valves (PRVS) are used in some safety-related applications at nuclear power plants. In general, they are used in systems where, during accidents, pressures may rise to levels where pressure safety relief is required for protection of personnel, system piping, and components. This report documents a study of PRV aging and considers the severity and causes of service wear and how it is discovered and corrected in various systems, valve sizes, etc. Provided in this report are results of the examination of the recorded failures and identification of trends and relationships/correlations in the failures when all failure-related parameters are considered. Components that comprise a typical PRV, how those components fail, when they fail, and the current testing frequencies and methods are also presented in detail.

  6. Effect of preemptive weld overlay sequence on residual stress distribution for dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant pressurizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hong Yeol; Song, Tae Kwang; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation method which arrest crack. An overlay weld sued in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). PWOL was good for distribution of residual stress of Dissimilar Metal Weld(DMW) by previous research. Because range of overlay welding is wide relatively, residual stress distribution on PWR is affected by welding sequence. In order to examine the effect of welding sequence, PWOL was applied to a specific DMW of KORI nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, the welding direction that from nozzle to pipe is better good for residual stress distribution on PWR.

  7. Effect of preemptive weld overlay sequence on residual stress distribution for dissimilar metal weld of Kori nuclear power plant pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Hong Yeol; Song, Tae Kwang; Chun, Yun Bae; Oh, Chang Young; Kim, Yun Jae; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Park, Chi Yong

    2008-01-01

    Weld overlay is one of the residual stress mitigation method which arrest crack. An overlay weld sued in this manner is termed a Preemptive Weld OverLay(PWOL). PWOL was good for distribution of residual stress of Dissimilar Metal Weld(DMW) by previous research. Because range of overlay welding is wide relatively, residual stress distribution on PWR is affected by welding sequence. In order to examine the effect of welding sequence, PWOL was applied to a specific DMW of KORI nuclear power plant by finite element analysis method. As a result, the welding direction that from nozzle to pipe is better good for residual stress distribution on PWR

  8. Nuclear plant life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negin, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear power industry's addressing of life extension is a natural trend in the maturation of this technology after 20 years of commercial operation. With increasing emphasis on how plants are operated, and less on how to build them, attention is turning on to maximizing the use of these substantial investments. The first studies of life extension were conducted in the period from 1978 and 1982. These were motivated by the initiation, by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), of studies to support decommissioning rulemaking. The basic conclusions of those early studies that life extension is feasible and worth pursuing have not been changed by the much more extensive investigations that have since been conducted. From an engineering perspective, life extension for nuclear plants is fundamentally the same as for fossil plants

  9. Benchmarking Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakic, I.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main tasks an owner have is to keep its business competitive on the market while delivering its product. Being owner of nuclear power plant bear the same (or even more complex and stern) responsibility due to safety risks and costs. In the past, nuclear power plant managements could (partly) ignore profit or it was simply expected and to some degree assured through the various regulatory processes governing electricity rate design. It is obvious now that, with the deregulation, utility privatization and competitive electricity market, key measure of success used at nuclear power plants must include traditional metrics of successful business (return on investment, earnings and revenue generation) as well as those of plant performance, safety and reliability. In order to analyze business performance of (specific) nuclear power plant, benchmarking, as one of the well-established concept and usual method was used. Domain was conservatively designed, with well-adjusted framework, but results have still limited application due to many differences, gaps and uncertainties. (author).

  10. Nuclear power plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaziz Yunus

    1986-01-01

    A number of issues have to be taken into account before the introduction of any nuclear power plant in any country. These issues include reactor safety (site and operational), waste disposal and, lastly, the decommissioning of the reactor inself. Because of the radioactive nature of the components, nuclear power plants require a different approach to decommission compared to other plants. Until recently, issues on reactor safety and waste disposal were the main topics discussed. As for reactor decommissioning, the debates have been academic until now. Although reactors have operated for 25 years, decommissioning of retired reactors has simply not been fully planned. But the Shippingport Atomic Power Plant in Pennysylvania, the first large scale power reactor to be retired, is now being decommissioned. The work has rekindled the debate in the light of reality. Outside the United States, decommissioning is also being confronted on a new plane. (author)

  11. Safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeberlein, K.

    1987-01-01

    In nuclear power plants large amounts of radioactive fission products ensue from the fission of uranium. In order to protect the environment, the radioactive material is confined in multiple 'activity barriers' (crystal matrix of the fuel, fuel cladding, coolant boundary, safety containment, reactor building). These barriers are protected by applying a defense-in-depth concept (high quality requirements, protection systems which recognize and terminate operational incidents, safety systems to cope with accidents). In spite of a favorable safety record of German nuclear power plants it is obvious - and became most evident by the Chernobyl accident - that absolute safety is not achievable. At Chernobyl, however, design disadvantages of that reactor type (like positive reactivity feedback of coolant voiding, missing safety containment) played an important role in accident initiation and progression. Such features of the Russian 'graphite-moderated pressure tube boiling water reactor' are different from those of light water reactors operating in western countries. The essential steps of the waste management of the nuclear fuel cycle ('Entsorgung') are the interim storage, the shipment, and the reprocessing of the spent fuel and the final repository of radioactive waste. Reprocessing means the separation of fossil material (uranium, plutonium) from radioactive waste. Legal requirements for radiological protection of the environment, which are identical for nuclear power plants and reprocessing plant, are complied with by means of comprehensive filter systems. Safety problems of a reprocessing plant are eased considerably by the fact that system pressures, process temperatures and energy densities are low. In order to confine the radioactive waste from the biosphere for a very long period of time, it is to be discarded after appropriate treatment into the deep geological underground of salt domes. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Technical feasibility and costs of the retention of radionuclides during accidents in nuclear power plants demonstrated by the example of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H.; Grigull, R.; Lahner, K.; Gutowski, H.; Weber, J.

    1985-01-01

    The maximum allowable radiation doses during accidents in nuclear power plants, i.e., 5 rem whole-body dose and 15 rem thyroid dose, have been laid down in the German Radiation Protection Act. In order to ensure that these limits are not exceeded for all exposure paths including the ingestion path or, if possible, to remain far below them, the Federal Ministry of the Interior has initiated a study on the effectiveness and cost of additional safety features for reducing the release of activity and the dose exposure during accidents in nuclear power plants. Detailed investigations were carried out for the following three radiologically representative types of accidents: break of a reactor coolant line, break of an instrument line in one of the outer ring rooms, and break of a main stream line outside the containment. The technical basis of the study was a BBR-type nuclear power plant with pressurized water reactor and once-through steam generator. I-131 was chosen for determining the activity release as this is the critical nuclide for the ingestion path. Altogether 33 feasible technical measures were investigated and their potential improvement was assessed

  13. Protecting nuclear power plants. Chapter 2. On the importance of the security and safety of the reactor pressure vessel to external threats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros, A.; Gonzalez, J.; Debarberis, L.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear power plants have blong been recognized as potential targets of terrorist attacks, and critics have long questioned the adequacy of the existing measures to defend against such attacks. The 11-S 2001, 11-M 2004 and 7-J 2005 attacks in USA, Spain and UK illustrated the deadly intention and abilities of modern terrorist groups. These attacks also brought to surface long standing concerns about the vulnerability of nuclear installations to possible terrorist attacks. Commercial nuclear reactors contain large inventory of radioactive fission products which, if dispersed, could pose a direct radiation hazard on the population. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV), which contains the nuclear fuel, is the most critical component of the plant. This paper shows that small amount of explosive material can produce irreversible damage in the RPV and the release of radioactive material. Therefor, access of working personal to the vicinity of the RPV during the refuelling outage should be stricktly limited. It should be considered a high priority security issue

  14. Nuclear power plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of Nuclear Power Plant Analyzers in USA is described. There are two different types of Analyzers under development in USA, the forst in Idaho and Los Alamos national Lab, the second in brookhaven National lab. That one is described in detail. The computer hardware and the mathematical models of the reactor vessel thermalhydraulics are described. (author)

  15. Nuclear plant scram reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegle, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Utility Management and Human Resources Committee (NUMARC) is a confederation of all 55 utilities with nuclear plants either in operation or under construction. NUMARC was formed in April 1984 by senior nuclear executives with hundreds of man-years of plant experience to improve (plant) performance and resolve NRC concerns. NUMARC has adopted 10 commitments in the areas of management, training, staffing and performance. One of these commitments is to strive to reduce automatic trips to 3 per year per unit for calendar year 1985 for plants in commercial operation greater than 3 years (with greater than 25% capacity factor). This goal applies to any unplanned automatic protection system trips at any time when the reactor is critical. Each utility has committed to develop methods to thoroughly evaluate all unplanned automatic trips to identify the root causes and formulate plans to correct the root causes thus reducing future unplanned scrams. As part of this program, the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) collects and evaluates information on automatic reactor trips. It publishes the results of these evaluations to aid the industry to identify root causes and corrective actions

  16. Summary of nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Saburo

    1973-01-01

    Various conditions for the construction of nuclear power plants in Japan without natural resources were investigated. Expansion of the sites of plants, change of reactor vessels, standardization of nuclear power plants, possiblity of the reduction of construction period, approaching of nuclear power plants to consuming cities, and group construction were studied. Evaluation points were safety and economy. Previous sites of nuclear power plants were mostly on plane ground or cut and enlarge sites. Proposals for underground or offshore plants have been made. The underground plants were made at several places in Europe, and the ocean plant is now approved in U.S.A. as a plant on a man-made island. Vessels for containing nuclear reactors are the last barriers to the leakage of radioactive substance. At the initial period, the vessels were made of steel, which were surrounded by shielding material. Those were dry well type containers. Then, vessel type changed to pressure-suppression type wet containers. Now, it tends to concrete (PC or RC) type containers. There is the policy on the standardization of nuclear power plants by U.S.A.E.C. in recent remarkable activity. The merit and effect of the standardization were studied, and are presented in this paper. Cost of the construction of nuclear power plants is expensive, and interest of money is large. Then, the reduction of construction period is an important problem. The situations of plants approaching to consuming cities in various countries were studied. Idea of group construction is described. (Kato, T.)

  17. Nuclear plant license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazda, P.A.; Bhatt, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    During the next 10 years, nuclear plant license renewal is expected to become a significant issue. Recent Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studies have shown license renewal to be technically and economically feasible. Filing an application for license renewal with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) entails verifying that the systems, structures, and components essential for safety will continue to perform their safety functions throughout the license renewal period. This paper discusses the current proposed requirements for this verification and the current industry knowledge regarding age-related degradation of structures. Elements of a license renewal program incorporating NRC requirements and industry knowledge including a schedule are presented. Degradation mechanisms for structural components, their significance to nuclear plant structures, and industry-suggested age-related degradation management options are also reviewed

  18. Fracture mechanics investigations within the swiss surveillance programme for the pressure vessel of modern nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, G; Krompholz, K [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1994-12-31

    In the frame of surveillance programmes of Swiss nuclear power plants, irradiation tests have been performed on tensile, impact and wedge opening load specimens as well as on three point bend-type specimens (for J-integral investigations) and pre-cracked Charpy impact specimens (for dynamical stress intensities K{sub ID}). An experimental method (potential drop technique) is used together with a mathematical procedure which allow for the determination of the stress intensity K{sub IC} for small CT-samples instead of large ones: agreement of these both methods is found excellent, and the mapping of both methods to fatigue pre-cracked small specimens (3 PB and Charpy) is possible. The application of the analysis method to dynamical tests is also possible. 15 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Analysis of the strength and structure modification of brackets in the pressure vessel of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Junjie; Liao Weixian; Zhang Zhaoxiang; Xiong Yuanbo

    1995-11-01

    A mechanical model has been set up to analyze the bracket structure in the containment of a nuclear power plant. Its stress and displacement distributions were studied with both FEM and photoelastic experiments. Results of the two methods are consistent. It is shown that the rear reinforcing plate has less strengthening effect on the bracket. Therefore, several modified bracket structures were investigated and a reasonable simplified bracket is proposed here, i.e., the rear reinforcing plate is cancelled, the web is an inverted ladder-shaped plate and part of the lower wing is cut off. The new structure can meet the loading demands without any major difference from the original and may save steel, simplify manufacturing technique. It is helpful to alleviate the welding residual stress and the tendency of cracking of the welding seams. (9 figs., 9 tabs.)

  20. Nuclear plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The four-member New York Power Pool Panel concluded that, for a number of reasons, no nuclear power plant in New York State is prone to the type of accident that occurred at Three Mile Island (TMI). The Panel further concluded that changes in operating practices, both regulatory and voluntary, and heightened sensitivity to reactor-core-cooling requirements will substantially reduce the chances for another such accident anywhere. Panel members found that New York State utilities have taken a responsible attitude with regard to requirements set forth by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a result of the TMI accident. In a cover letter that accompanied the report to Federal and New York state officials, New York Power Pool Executive Committee Chairman Francis E. Drake, Jr. expressed hope that the report will alleviate public fears of nuclear reactors and promote wider acceptance of nuclear energy as an economic and safe means of power production. 17 references

  1. Nuclear plants - military hostages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramberg, B.

    1986-01-01

    Recent events suggest that nuclear reactors could make tempting military or terrorist targets. Despite the care with which most reactors are built, studies document their vulnerability to willful destruction through disruption of coolant mechanisms both inside and outside the containment building. In addition to reactors, such nuclear support facilities as fuel fabrication, reprocessing, and waste storage installations may be attractive military targets. A nuclear bomb which exploded in the vicinity of a reactor could increase its lethal effects by one-third. The implications of this is vulnerability for Middle East stability as well as to other volatile regions. The author suggests several avenues for controlling the dangers: international law, military and civil defense, facility siting, increasing plant safety, and the international management of nuclear energy. 21 references

  2. Assessment and management of ageing of major nuclear power plant components important to safety: CANDU pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    The report documents the current practices for assessment and management of the ageing of the pressure tubes in CANDU reactors and Indian PHWTRs. Chapter headings are: fuel channel and pressure tube description, design basis for the fuel channel and pressure tube, degradation mechanisms and ageing concerns for pressure tubes, inspection and monitoring methods for pressure tubes,assessment methods and fitness-for-service guidelines for pressure tubes, mitigation methods for pressure tubes, and pressure tube ageing management programme

  3. Pulsed nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, C.V.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear power plant. This power plant consists of: 1.) a cavity; 2.) a detonatable nuclear device in a central region of the cavity; 3.) a working fluid inside of the cavity; 4.) a method to denote a nuclear device inside of the cavity; 5.) a mechanical projection from an interior wall of the cavity for recoiling to absorb a shock wave produced by the detonation of the nuclear device and thereby protecting the cavity from damage. A plurality of segments defines a shell within the cavity and a plurality of shock absorbers, each connecting a corresponding segment to a corresponding location on the wall of the cavity. Each of these shock absorbers regulate the recoil action of the segments; and 6.) means for permitting controlled extraction of a quantity of hot gases from the cavity produced by the vaporization of the working fluid upon detonation of the nuclear device. A method of generating power is also described. This method consists of: 1.) introducing a quantity of water in an underground cavity; 2.) heating the water in the cavity to form saturated steam; 3.) detonating a nuclear device at a central location inside the cavity; 4.) recoiling plate-like elements inside the cavity away from the central location in a mechanically regulated and controlled manner to absorb a shock wave produced by the nuclear device detonation and thereby protect the underground cavity against damage; 5.) extracting a quantity of superheated steam produced by the detonation of the nuclear device; and 6.) Converting the energy in the extracted superheated steam into electrical power

  4. SECURE nuclear district heating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson; Hannus, M.

    1978-01-01

    The role foreseen for the SECURE (Safe Environmentally Clean Urban REactor) nuclear district heating plant is to provide the baseload heating needs of primarily the larger and medium size urban centers that are outside the range of waste heat supply from conventional nuclear power stations. The rationale of the SECURE concept is that the simplicity in design and the inherent safety advantages due to the use of low temperatures and pressures should make such reactors economically feasible in much smaller unit sizes than nuclear power reactors and should make their urban location possible. It is felt that the present design should be safe enough to make urban underground location possible without restriction according to any criteria based on actual risk evaluation. From the environmental point of view, this is a municipal heat supply plant with negligible pollution. Waste heat is negligible, gaseous radioactivity release is negligible, and there is no liquid radwaste release. Economic comparisons show that the SECURE plant is competitive with current fossil-fueled alternatives. Expected future increase in energy raw material prices will lead to additional energy cost advantages to the SECURE plant

  5. Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) is located in Zarechny, approximately 60 km east of Ekaterinberg along the Trans-Siberian Highway. Zarechny, a small city of approximately 30,000 residents, was built to support BNPP operations. It is a closed city to unescorted visitors. Residents must show identification for entry. BNPP is one of the first and oldest commercial nuclear power plants in Russia and began operations in 1964. As for most nuclear power plants in the Russian Federation, BNPP is operated by Rosenergoatom, which is subordinated to the Ministry of Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation (Minatom). BNPP is the site of three nuclear reactors, Units 1, 2, and 3. Units 1 and 2, which have been shut-down and defueled, were graphite moderated reactors. The units were shut-down in 1981 and 1989. Unit 3, a BN-600 reactor, is a 600 MW(electric) sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. Unit 3 went on-line in April 1980 and produces electric power which is fed into a distribution grid and thermal power which provides heat to Zarechny. The paper also discusses the SF NIKIET, the Sverdiovsk Branch of NIKIET, Moscow, which is the research and development branch of the parent NIKEIT and is primarily a design institute responsible for reactor design. Central to its operations is a 15 megawatt IVV research reactor. The paper discusses general security and fissile material control and accountability at these two facilities

  6. Nuclear power plant component protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, E.; Ruf, R.; Dorner, H.

    1976-01-01

    Described is a nuclear power plant installation which includes a concrete biological shield forming a pit in which a reactor pressure vessel is positioned. A steam generator on the outside of the shield is connected with the pressure vessel via coolant pipe lines which extend through the shield, the coolant circulation being provided by a coolant pump which is also on the outside of the shield. To protect these components on the outside of the shield and which are of mainly or substantially cylindrical shape, semicylindrical concrete segments are interfitted around them to form complete outer cylinders which are retained against outward separation radially from the components, by rings of high tensile steel which may be interspaced so closely that they provide, in effect, an outer steel cylinder. The invention is particularly applicable to pressurized-water coolant reactor installations

  7. Nuclear Plant Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, C.P.; Turner, M.R.; Spore, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Data Bank (NPDB) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to assist analysts in the rapid and accurate creation of input decks for reactor transient analysis. The NPDB will reduce the time and cost of the creation or modification of a typical input deck. This data bank will be an invaluable tool in the timely investigation of recent and ongoing nuclear reactor safety analysis. This paper discusses the status and plans for the NPDB development and describes its anticipated structure and capabilities

  8. Ardennes nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-12-01

    The SENA nuclear power plant continued to operate, as before, at authorized rated power, namely 905MWth during the first half year and 950MWth during the second half year. Net energy production:2028GWh; hours phased to the line: 7534H; availability factor: 84%; utilization factor: 84%; total shutdowns:19; number of scrams:10; cost per KWh: 4,35 French centimes. Overall, the plant is performing very satisfactory. Over the last three years net production has been 5900GWh, corresponding to in average utilization factor of 83%

  9. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, V.V.; Rineisky, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    The invention is aimed at designing a nuclear power plant with a heat transfer system which permits an accelerated fuel regeneration maintaining relatively high initial steam values and efficiency of the steam power circuit. In case of a plant with three circuits the secondary cooling circuit includes a steam generator with preheater, evaporator, steam superheater and intermediate steam superheater. At the heat supply side the latter is connected with its inlet to the outlet of the evaporator and with its outlet to the low-temperature side of the secondary circuit

  10. Third generation nuclear plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Bertrand

    2012-05-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, a new generation of Light Water Reactors has been designed and is being built. Third generation nuclear plants are equipped with dedicated systems to insure that if the worst accident were to occur, i.e. total core meltdown, no matter how low the probability of such occurrence, radioactive releases in the environment would be minimal. This article describes the EPR, representative of this "Generation III" and a few of its competitors on the world market.

  11. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Laurer, E.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns a quick-acting valve on the main-steam pipe of a nuclear power plant. The engineering design of the valve is to be improved. To the main valve disc, a piston-operated auxiliary valve disc is to be assigned closing a section of the area of the main valve disc. This way it is avoided that the drive of the main valve disc has to carry out different movements. 15 sub-claims. (UWI) [de

  12. Method of operating a nuclear turbine plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Hiraku; Ootawara, Yasuhiko; Imai, Tetsu

    1985-04-25

    A method is presented to prevent the lowering in the reactor feedwater temperature thereby secure necessary amount of steams even in a plant operation under low load. The feedwater temperature of a nuclear reactor is detected at the low load region of the plant and high enthalpy steams are supplied to a high pressure feedwater heater by opening a supply stream extract switching valve. This enables to maintain the feedwater temperature in the nuclear reactor at a constant level.

  13. Large nuclear steam turbine plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urushidani, Haruo; Moriya, Shin-ichi; Tsuji, Kunio; Fujita, Isao; Ebata, Sakae; Nagai, Yoji.

    1986-01-01

    The technical development of the large capacity steam turbines for ABWR plants was partially completed, and that in progress is expected to be completed soon. In this report, the outline of those new technologies is described. As the technologies for increasing the capacity and heightening the efficiency, 52 in long blades and moisture separating heaters are explained. Besides, in the large bore butterfly valves developed for making the layout compact, the effect of thermal efficiency rise due to the reduction of pressure loss can be expected. As the new technology on the system side, the simplification of the turbine system and the effect of heightening the thermal efficiency by high pressure and low pressure drain pumping-up method based on the recent improvement of feed water quality are discussed. As for nuclear steam turbines, the actual records of performance of 1100 MW class, the largest output at present, have been obtained, and as a next large capacity machine, the development of a steam turbine of 1300 MWe class for an ABWR plant is in progress. It can be expected that by the introduction of those new technologies, the plants having high economical efficiency are realized. (Kako, I.)

  14. Submarine nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enohara, Masami; Araragi, Fujio.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a ballast tank, and nuclear power facilities within the containment shell of a pressure resistance structure and a maintenance operator's entrance and a transmission cable cut-off device at the outer part of the containment shell, whereby after the construction, the shell is towed, and installed by self-submerging, and it can be refloated for repairs by its own strength. Constitution: Within a containment shell having a ballast tank and a pressure resisting structure, there are provided nuclear power facilities including a nuclear power generating chamber, a maintenance operator's living room and the like. Furthermore, a maintenance operator's entrance and exit device and a transmission cable cut-off device are provided within the shell, whereby when it is towed to a predetermined a area after the construction, it submerges by its own strength and when any repair inspection is necessary, it can float up by its own strength, and can be towed to a repair dock or the like. (Yoshihara, H.)

  15. Pressure vessel for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The invention applies to a pressure vessel for nuclear reactors whose shell, made of cast metal segments, has a steel liner. This liner must be constructed to withstand all operational stresses and to be easily repairable. The invention solves this problem by installing the liner at a certain distance from the inner wall of the pressure vessel shell and by filling this clearance with supporting concrete. Both the concrete and the steel liner must have a lower prestress than the pressure vessel shell. In order to avoid damage to the liner when prestressing the pressure vessel shell, special connecting elements are provided which consist of welded-on fastening elements projecting into recesses in the cast metal segments of the pressure vessel. Their design is described in detail. (TK) [de

  16. China’s Nuclear Power Plants in Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Qinshan Plant Phase I Located in Haiyan,Zhejiang Province,Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant Phase I is t he first 300-megawatt pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant independently designed,constructed,operated and managed by China.The plant came into commercial operation in April 1994.

  17. On nuclear power plant uprating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, S. Allen; Bailey, James V.; Maginnis, Stephen T.

    2004-01-01

    Power uprating for commercial nuclear power plants has become increasingly attractive because of pragmatic reasons. It provides quick return on investment and competitive financial benefits, while involving low risks regarding plant safety and public objection. This paper briefly discussed nuclear plant uprating guidelines, scope for design basis analysis and engineering evaluation, and presented the Salem nuclear power plant uprating study for illustration purposes. A cost and benefit evaluation of the Salem power uprating was also included. (author)

  18. Nuclear Power Plant 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Again this year, our magazine presents the details of the conference on Spanish nuclear power plant operation held in February and that was devoted to 1996 operating results. The Protocol for Establishment of a New Electrical Sector Regulation that was signed last December will undoubtedly represent a new challenge for the nuclear industry. By clearing stating that current standards of quality and safety should be maintained or even increased if possible, the Protocol will force the Sector to improve its productivity, which is already high as demonstrated by the results of the last few years described during this conference and by recent sectorial economic studies. Generation of a nuclear kWh that can compete with other types of power plants is the new challenge for the Sector's professionals, who do not fear the new liberalization policies and approaching competition. Lower inflation and the resulting lower interest rates, apart from being representative indices of our economy's marked improvement, will be very helpful in facing this challenge. (Author)

  19. Nuclear power plant with several reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishanin, E I; Ilyunin, V G; Kuznetsov, I A; Murogov, V M; Shmelev, A N

    1972-05-10

    A design of a nuclear power plant suggested involves several reactors consequently transmitting heat to a gaseous coolant in the joint thermodynamical circuit. In order to increase the power and the rate of fuel reproduction the low temperature section of the thermodynamical circuit involves a fast nuclear reactor, whereas a thermal nuclear reactor is employed in the high temperature section of the circuit for intermediate heating and for over-heating of the working body. Between the fast nuclear and the thermal nuclear reactors there is a turbine providing for the necessary ratio between pressures in the reactors. Each reactor may employ its own coolant.

  20. Nuclear power plant diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollo, E.; Siklossy, P.

    1982-01-01

    The cooling circuit vibration diagnostic system of the Block 1 of the Paks nuclear power station is described. The automatic online vibration monitoring system consisting presently of 42 acceleration sensors and 9 pressure fluctuation sensors, which could be extended, performs both global and local inspection of the primary cooling circuit and its components. The offline data processing system evaluates the data for failure mode analysis. The software under development will be appropriate for partial preliminary identification of failure reasons during their initial phases. The installation experiences and the preliminary results during the hot operational testing of Block 1 are presented. (Sz.J.)

  1. Linguistic control of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feeley, J.J.; Johnson, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    A multivariable linguistic controller based on fuzzy set theory is discussed and its application to a pressurized water nuclear power plant control is illustrated by computer simulation. The nonlinear power plant simulation model has nine states, two control inputs, one disturbance input, and two outputs. Although relatively simple, the model captures the essential coupled nonlinear plant dynamics and is convenient to use for control system studies. The use of an adaptive version of the controller is also demonstrated by computer simulation

  2. Introduction to Exxon nuclear fuel fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Exxon Nuclear low-enriched uranium fuel fabrication plant in Richland, Washington produces fuel assemblies for both pressurized water and boiling water reactors. The Richland plant was the first US bulk-handling facility selected by the IAEA for inspection under the US-IAEA Safeguards Agreement. The plant was under IAEA inspection from March 1981 through October 1983. This text provides a written description of the plant layout, operation and process. The text also includes a one ton-a-day model (or reference) plant which was adapted from the Exxon Nuclear plant. The Model Plant provides a generic example of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) bulk-handling facility. The Model Plant is used to illustrate in a more quantitative way some of the key safeguards requirements for a bulk-handling facility

  3. Siting nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellin, J.; Joskow, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    The first edition of this journal is devoted to the policies and problems of siting nuclear power plants and the question of how far commercial reactors should be placed from urban areas. The article is divided into four major siting issues: policies, risk evaluation, accident consequences, and economic and physical constraints. One concern is how to treat currently operating reactors and those under construction that were established under less-stringent criteria if siting is to be used as a way to limit the consequences of accidents. Mehanical cost-benefit analyses are not as appropriate as the systematic use of empirical observations in assessing the values involved. Stricter siting rules are justified because (1) opposition because of safety is growing: (2) remote siting will make the industry more stable; (3) the conflict is eliminated between regulatory policies and the probability basis for nuclear insurance; and (4) joint ownership of utilities and power-pooling are increasing. 227 references, 7 tables

  4. Nuclear power plant disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.R.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of a nuclear power plant disaster is small but not excluded: in its event, assistance to the affected population mainly depends on local practitioners. Already existing diseases have to be diagnosed and treated; moreover, these physicians are responsible for the early detection of those individuals exposed to radiation doses high enough to induce acute illness. Here we present the pathogenesis, clinical development and possible diagnostic and therapeutical problems related to acute radiation-induced diseases. The differentiation of persons according to therapy need and prognosis is done on the sole base of the clinical evidence and the peripheral blood count. (orig.) [de

  5. Garigliano nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-03-01

    During the period under review, the Garigliano power station produced 1,028,77 million kWh with a utilization factor of 73,41% and an availability factor of 85,64%. The disparity between the utilization and availability factors was mainly due to a shutdown of about one and half months owing to lack of staff at the plant. The reasons for nonavailability (14.36%) break down as follows: nuclear reasons 11,49%; conventional reasons 2,81%; other reasons 0,06%. During the period under review, no fuel replacements took place. The plant functioned throughout with a single reactor reticulation pump and resulting maximum available capacity of 150 MWe gross. After the month of August, the plant was operated at levels slightly below the maximum available capacity in order to lengthen the fuel cycle. The total number of outages during the period under review was 11. Since the plant was brought into commercial operation, it has produced 9.226 million kWh

  6. Nuclear power plant emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The guide sets forth detailed requirements on how the licensee of a nuclear power plant shall plan, implement and maintain emergency response arrangements. The guide is also applied to nuclear material and nuclear waste transport in situations referred to in guide YVL 6.5. Requirements on physical protection are presented in a separate guide of Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK)

  7. Water cooled type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Shigeki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To construct high efficiency a PWR type nuclear power plant with a simple structure by preparing high temperature and pressure water by a PWR type nuclear reactor and a pressurizer, converting the high temperature and high pressure water into steam with a pressure reducing valve and introducing the steam into a turbine, thereby generating electricity. Constitution: A pressurizer is connected downstream of a PWR type nuclear reactor, thereby maintaining the reactor at high pressure. A pressure-reducing valve is provided downstream of the pressurizer, the high temperature and pressure water is reduced in pressure, thereby producing steam. The steam is fed to a turbine, and electric power is generated by a generator connected to the turbine. The steam exhausted from the turbine is condensed by a condenser into water, and the water is returned through a feedwater heater to the reactor. Since the high temperature and pressure water in thus reduced in pressure thereby evaporating it, the steam can be more efficiently produced than by a steam generator. (Sekiya, K.)

  8. Thermal coupling system analysis of a nuclear desalination plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adak, A.K.; Srivastava, V.K.; Tewari, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    When a nuclear reactor is used to supply steam for desalination plant, the method of coupling has a significant technical and economic impact. The exact method of coupling depends upon the type of reactor and type of desalination plant. As a part of Nuclear Desalination Demonstration Project (NDDP), BARC has successfully commissioned a 4500 m 3 /day MSF desalination plant coupled to Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS) at Kalpakkam. Desalination plant coupled to nuclear power plant of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) type is a good example of dual-purpose nuclear desalination plant. This paper presents the thermal coupling system analysis of this plant along with technical and safety aspects. (author)

  9. Slovenske elektrarne, a.s., Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In this booklet the uranium atom nucleus fission as well as electricity generation in a nuclear power plant (primary circuit, reactor, reactor pressure vessel, fuel assembly, control rod and reactor power control) are explained. Scheme of electricity generation in nuclear power plant and Cross-section of Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant unit are included. In next part a reactor scram, refuelling of fuel, instrumentation and control system as well as principles of nuclear safety and safety improvements are are described

  10. Nuclear power plant operator licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The guide applies to the nuclear power plant operator licensing procedure referred to the section 128 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. The licensing procedure applies to shift supervisors and those operators of the shift teams of nuclear power plant units who manipulate the controls of nuclear power plants systems in the main control room. The qualification requirements presented in the guide also apply to nuclear safety engineers who work in the main control room and provide support to the shift supervisors, operation engineers who are the immediate superiors of shift supervisors, heads of the operational planning units and simulator instructors. The operator licensing procedure for other nuclear facilities are decided case by case. The requirements for the basic education, work experience and the initial, refresher and complementary training of nuclear power plant operating personnel are presented in the YVL guide 1.7. (2 refs.)

  11. Periodical in-service inspection as part of individual program of quality assurance of steam generators and pressurizers of WWER 440 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawalec, M.

    1982-01-01

    The manufacturers of equipment for nuclear power plants in the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic are obligated to process so-called individual programs of quality assurance in order to secure the quality of selected equipment in nuclear power. These programmes should include the evaluation of the design of the individual equipments with regard to the implementation of in-service inspection. The main problems are discussed related to the processing of the program of quality assurance for the steam generator and pressurizer. To solve these problems it is necessary that the general project designer should make a classification of the components according to safety categories and that the manufacturers should determine the weak points of the design on the basis of an analysis of the design of individual component nodes. On the basis of such an analysis it is then necessary to evaluate the existing design of the scale of in-service inspections and to decide whether or not new inspection methods should be added. (Z.M.)

  12. Images of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiguchi, Katsuhisa; Misumi, Jyuji; Yamada, Akira; Sakurai, Yukihiro; Seki, Fumiyasu; Shinohara, Hirofumi; Misumi, Emiko; Kinjou, Akira; Kubo, Tomonori.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to check and see, using Hayashi's quantification method III, whether or not the respondents differed in their images of a nuclear power plant, depending on their demographic variables particularly occupations. In our simple tabulation, we compared subject groups of nuclear power plant employees with general citizens, nurses and students in terms of their images of a nuclear power plant. The results were that while the nuclear power plant employees were high in their evaluations of facts about a nuclear power plant and in their positive images of a nuclear power plant, general citizens, nurses and students were overwhelmingly high in their negative images of a nuclear power plant. In our analysis on category score by means of the quantification method III, the first correlation axis was the dimension of 'safety'-'danger' and the second correlation axis was the dimension of 'subjectivity'-'objectivity', and that the first quadrant was the area of 'safety-subjectivity', the second quadrant was the area of 'danger-subjectivity', the third quadrant as the area of 'danger-objectivity', and the forth quadrant was the area of 'safety-objectivity'. In our analysis of sample score, 16 occupation groups was compared. As a result, it was found that the 16 occupation groups' images of a nuclear power plant were, in the order of favorableness, (1) section chiefs in charge, maintenance subsection chiefs, maintenance foremen, (2) field leaders from subcontractors, (3) maintenance section members, operation section members, (4) employees of those subcontractors, (5) general citizens, nurses and students. On the 'safety-danger' dimension, nuclear power plant workers on the one hand and general citizens, nurses and students on the other were clearly divided in terms of their images of a nuclear power plant. Nuclear power plant workers were concentrated in the area of 'safety' and general citizens, nurses and students in the area of 'danger'. (J.P.N.)

  13. Wuergassen nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The decision of the Federal Court of Administration concerns an application for immediate decommissioning of a nuclear power plant (Wuergassen reactor): The repeal of the permit granted. The decision dismisses the appeal for non-admission lodged by the plaintiffs against the ruling of the Higher Court of Administration (OVG) of North-Rhine Westphalia of December 19th 1988 (File no. 21 AK 8/88). As to the matter in dispute, the Federal Court of Administration confirms the opinion of the Higher Court of Administration. As to the headnotes, reference can be made to that decision. Federal Court of Administration, decision of April 5th 1989 - 7 B 47.89. Lower instance: OVG NW, Az.: 21 AK 8/88. (orig./RST) [de

  14. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruma, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    In the first embodiment of the present invention, elements less activated by neutrons are used as reactor core structural materials placed under high neutron irradiation. In the second embodiment of the present invention, materials less activated by neutrons when corrosive materials intrude to a reactor core are used as structural materials constituting portions where corrosion products are generated. In the third embodiment, chemical species comprising elements less activated by neutrons are used as chemical species to be added to reactor water with an aim of controlling water quality. A nuclear power plant causing less radioactivity can be provided by using structural materials comprising a group of specific elements hardly forming radioactivity by activation of neutrons or by controlling isotope ratios. (N.H.)

  15. Pressurized Hybrid Heat Pipe for Passive IN-Core Cooling System (PINCs) in Advanced Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The representative operating limit of the thermosyphon heat pipe is flooding limit that arises from the countercurrent flow of vapor and liquid. The effect of difference between wetted perimeter and heated perimeter on the flooding limit of the thermosyphons has not been studied; despite the effect of cross-sectional area of the vapor path on the heat transfer characteristics of thermosyphons have been studied. Additionally, the hybrid heat pipe must operate at the high temperature and high pressure environment because it will be inserted to the active core to remove the decay heat. However, the previously studied heat pipes operated below the atmospheric pressure. Therefore, the effect of the unique geometry for hybrid heat pipe and operating pressure on the heat transfer characteristics including the flooding limit of hybrid heat pipe was experimentally measured. Hybrid heat pipe as a new conceptual decay heat removal device was proposed. For the development of hybrid heat pipe operating at high temperature and high pressure conditions, the pressurized hybrid heat pipe was prepared and the thermal performances including operation limits of hybrid heat pipe were experimentally measured. Followings were obtained: (1) As operating pressure of the heat pipe increases, the evaporation heat transfer coefficient increases due to heat transfer with convective pool boiling mode. (2) Non-condensable gas charged in the test section for the pressurization lowered the condensation heat transfer by impeding the vapor flow to the condenser. (3) The deviations between experimentally measured flooding limits for hybrid heat pipes and the values from correlation for annular thermosyphon were observed.

  16. A Study on the Leakage Characteristic Evaluation of High Temperature and Pressure Pipeline at Nuclear Power Plants Using the Acoustic Emission Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Jin Hyun; Song, Bong Min; Lee, Joon Hyun; Cho, Youn Ho [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    An acoustic leak monitoring system(ALMS) using acoustic emission(AE) technique was applied for leakage detection of nuclear power plant's pipeline which is operated in high temperature and pressure condition. Since this system only monitors the existence of leak using the root mean square(RMS) value of raw signal from AE sensor, the difficulty occurs when the characteristics of leak size and shape need to be evaluated. In this study, dual monitoring system using AE sensor and accelerometer was introduced in order to solve this problem. In addition, artificial neural network(ANN) with Levenberg Marquardt(LM) training algorithm was also applied due to rapid training rate and gave the reliable classification performance. The input parameters of this ANN were extracted from varying signal received from experimental conditions such as the fluid pressure inside pipe, the shape and size of the leak area. Additional experiments were also carried out and with different objective which is to study the generation and characteristic of lamb and surface wave according to the pipe thickness

  17. A Study on the Leakage Characteristic Evaluation of High Temperature and Pressure Pipeline at Nuclear Power Plants Using the Acoustic Emission Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Jin Hyun; Song, Bong Min; Lee, Joon Hyun; Cho, Youn Ho

    2009-01-01

    An acoustic leak monitoring system(ALMS) using acoustic emission(AE) technique was applied for leakage detection of nuclear power plant's pipeline which is operated in high temperature and pressure condition. Since this system only monitors the existence of leak using the root mean square(RMS) value of raw signal from AE sensor, the difficulty occurs when the characteristics of leak size and shape need to be evaluated. In this study, dual monitoring system using AE sensor and accelerometer was introduced in order to solve this problem. In addition, artificial neural network(ANN) with Levenberg Marquardt(LM) training algorithm was also applied due to rapid training rate and gave the reliable classification performance. The input parameters of this ANN were extracted from varying signal received from experimental conditions such as the fluid pressure inside pipe, the shape and size of the leak area. Additional experiments were also carried out and with different objective which is to study the generation and characteristic of lamb and surface wave according to the pipe thickness

  18. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Masahide

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a constitution capable of previously and reliably preventing radioactivity from releasing into the atmosphere upon occurrence of main steam pipe rupture accidents in a main steam tunnel chamber. Constitution: The outer circumference at the penetration portion of a nuclear reactor container is tightly closed and the main steam tunnel chamber has a tightly closed vessel structure, which is cooled by a local cooler during normal operation. The main steam tunnel chamber is in communication with a pressure control chamber by way of a release line and a releaf valve is disposed at the midway of the release line. Upon occurrence of rupture accident to the main steam pipes in the main steam tunnel chamber, while steams are issued from the ruptured portion, they are discharged through the release line to the suppression chamber and condensated. As a result, excess pressure in the main steam tunnel can be prevented and when the rupture accident is detected, the main steam isolation valve is closed rapidly to interrupt the steam feeding, whereby the steam released from the ruptured pipeways is stopped to avoid the radioactivity release to the atmosphere. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. MDEP Technical Report TR-CSWG-02. Technical Report on Lessons Learnt on Achieving Harmonisation of Codes and Standards for Pressure Boundary Components in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This report was prepared by the Multinational Design Evaluation Program's (MDEP's) Codes and Standards Working Group (CSWG). The primary, long-term goal of MDEP's CSWG is to achieve international harmonisation of codes and standards for pressure-boundary components in nuclear power plants. The CSWG recognised early on that the first step to achieving harmonisation is to understand the extent of similarities and differences amongst the pressure-boundary codes and standards used in various countries. To assist the CSWG in its long-term goals, several standards developing organisations (SDOs) from various countries performed a comparison of their pressure-boundary codes and standards to identify the extent of similarities and differences in code requirements and the reasons for their differences. The results of the code-comparison project provided the CSWG with valuable insights in developing the subsequent actions to take with SDOs and the nuclear industry to pursue harmonisation of codes and standards. The results enabled the CSWG to understand from a global perspective how each country's pressure-boundary code or standard evolved into its current form and content. The CSWG recognised the important fact that each country's pressure-boundary code or standard is a comprehensive, living document that is continually being updated and improved to reflect changing technology and common industry practices unique to each country. The rules in the pressure-boundary codes and standards include comprehensive requirements for the design and construction of nuclear power plant components including design, materials selection, fabrication, examination, testing and overpressure protection. The rules also contain programmatic and administrative requirements such as quality assurance; conformity assessment (e.g., third-party inspection); qualification of welders, welding equipment and welding procedures; non-destructive examination (NDE) practices and

  20. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyokawa, Teruyuki; Soman, Yoshindo.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To constitute a heat exchanger as one unit by integrating primary and secondary coolant circuits with secondary coolant circuit and steam circuit into a single primary circuit and steam circuit. Constitution: A nuclear power plant comprises a nuclear reactor vessel, primary coolant pipeways and a leakage detection system, in which a dual-pipe type heat exchanger is connected to the primary circuit pipeway. The heat conduction tube of the heat exchanger has a dual pipe structure, in which the inside of the inner tube is connected to the primary circuit pipeway, the outside of the outer tube is connected to steam circuit pipeway and a fluid channel is disposed between the inner and outer tubes and the fluid channel is connected to the inside of an expansion tank for intermediate heat medium. The leak detection system is disposed to the intermediate heat medium expansion tank. Sodium as the intermediate heat medium is introduced from the intermediate portion (between the inner and outer tubes) by way of inermediate heat medium pipeways to the intermediate heat medium expansion tank and, further, to the intermediate portion for recycling. (Kawakami, Y.)

  1. Atucha I nuclear power plant surveillance programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinchuk, D [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1994-12-31

    After a review of the main characteristics of the Atucha I nuclear power plant and its pressure vessel, the embrittlement surveillance capsules and the irradiation conditions are described; Charpy impact tests and tensile tests were performed on the irradiated samples, and results are discussed and compared to theoretical calculations: transition temperature shifts, displacement per atom values. 6 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Atucha I nuclear power plant surveillance programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinchuk, D.

    1993-01-01

    After a review of the main characteristics of the Atucha I nuclear power plant and its pressure vessel, the embrittlement surveillance capsules and the irradiation conditions are described; Charpy impact tests and tensile tests were performed on the irradiated samples, and results are discussed and compared to theoretical calculations: transition temperature shifts, displacement per atom values. 6 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  3. Perspectives of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajda, Gy.

    2001-01-01

    In several countries the construction of nuclear power plants has been stopped, and in some counties several plants have been decommissioned or are planned to. Therefore, the question arises: have nuclear power plants any future? According to the author, the question should be reformulated: can mankind survive without nuclear power? To examine this challenge, the global power demand and its trends are analyzed. According to the results, traditional energy sources cannot be adequate to supply power. Therefore, a reconsideration of nuclear power should be imminent. The economic, environmental attractions are discussed as opposite to the lack of social support. (R.P.)

  4. Owners of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

    1996-11-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  5. Application of gamma-field measurement to computer-assisted management of pressurized water nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampel, R.; Schwedusch, F.

    1990-01-01

    The high requirements on NPP operation to be nuclear safe and optimal with regard to electricity production need high redundancy and diversity in the instrumentation being implemented. As a contribution of the Zittau Technical University to development of alternative measuring techniques for primary coolant circuit monitoring, application of gamma-field measurement for determination of reactor power and power distribution is described. Theoretical foundation and conclusions herefrom derived are explained. (author)

  6. Nuclear Security for Floating Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiba, James M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Scherer, Carolynn P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a lot of interest in small modular reactors. A specific type of these small modular reactors (SMR,) are marine based power plants called floating nuclear power plants (FNPP). These FNPPs are typically built by countries with extensive knowledge of nuclear energy, such as Russia, France, China and the US. These FNPPs are built in one country and then sent to countries in need of power and/or seawater desalination. Fifteen countries have expressed interest in acquiring such power stations. Some designs for such power stations are briefly summarized. Several different avenues for cooperation in FNPP technology are proposed, including IAEA nuclear security (i.e. safeguards), multilateral or bilateral agreements, and working with Russian design that incorporates nuclear safeguards for IAEA inspections in non-nuclear weapons states

  7. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This small folder presents a digest of some useful information concerning the nuclear power plants worldwide and the situation of nuclear industry at the end of 1997: power production of nuclear origin, distribution of reactor types, number of installed units, evolution and prediction of reactor orders, connections to the grid and decommissioning, worldwide development of nuclear power, evolution of power production of nuclear origin, the installed power per reactor type, market shares and exports of the main nuclear engineering companies, power plants constructions and orders situation, evolution of reactors performances during the last 10 years, know-how and development of nuclear safety, the remarkable facts of 1997, the future of nuclear power and the energy policy trends. (J.S.)

  8. A study of the pressure vessel steel of the WWER-440 unit 1 of the Kozloduy nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinova, E.; Velinov, N.; Avdjieva, T.; Mitov, I.; Rusanov, V.

    2017-11-01

    A comparison between highly neutron irradiated samples from the region of weld № 4 and low irradiated samples from weld № 1 taken from the pressure vessel of the WWER-440 Unit № 1 of the Kozloduy NPP has been performed. Measurements of the residual activity of samples from the outer surface of the reactor pressure vessel bottom corpus reveal very low activity of 60Co. Insofar as there the base and weld metal appear to be exposed to a very low neutron fluence, the samples from these locations can be considered as practically not affected and may serve as a reference basis for comparison with highly irradiated pressure vessel regions. The Mössbauer parameters isomer shift (IS) and quadrupole splitting (QS) were found to be absolutely irradiation insensitive. A stepwise reduction of the internal hyperfine magnetic field Bhf, each by about 2.6 T, was observed. This can be attributed to the replacement of one or two surrounding iron atoms as first nearest neighbors by non-iron alloying atoms. The Mössbauer experimental line widths for irradiated and non-irradiated samples are practically the same, which is a quite unexpected result. The area fraction ratio for the three main Zeeman sextet subspectra S1:S2:S3 shows very high irradiation sensitivity. For the bottom low irradiated region of the reactor vessel the values are S1:S2:S3 = 50.1:40.0:9.4. After seven years of operation between the pressure vessel annealing in 1989 and the autumn of 1996 when the samples from weld № 4 were taken the ratio changes strongly to S1:S2:S3 = 56.4:34.7:8.5. A possible explanation of this result is that neutron irradiation gives rise to a precipitation process involving predominantly alloying atoms as Ni, Mn, Cr, Mo and V which become mobile and precipitate in the form of carbides and/or P-rich phases and alloying atom aggregates. This "refinement" process lowers the partial area of subspectra S2 and S3 where alloying atoms are involved and leads to a higher area fraction of

  9. Nuclear reactor plant with a small gas-cooled HT reactor accommodated in a steel pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, J.; Elter, C.

    1986-01-01

    The plant has a small HT reactor and an He/He heat exchanger situated above this, with preferably two parallel circulating blowers connected after it. It also has at least one post-shutdown heat removal system, which is situated after the He/He heat exchanger in the direction of flow and which always has the total quantity of primary helium flowing through it. In one version of the design, the heat exchanger consists of two concentric bundles of helices connected after one another, which have primary helium flowing in one direction and secondary helium in the opposite direction. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Owners of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.S.

    1991-07-01

    This report indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies. The report includes all plants operating, under construction, docketed for NRC safety and environmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review, but does not include those plants announced but not yet under review or those plants formally cancelled. Part 1 of the report lists plants alphabetically with their associated applicants or licensees and percentage ownership. Part 2 lists applicants or licensees alphabetically with their associated plants and percentage ownership. Part 1 also indicates which plants have received operating licenses (OLS)

  11. Nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Hidehiro; Oya, Takashi

    1996-11-05

    The present invention provides a highly safe light water-cooled type nuclear power plant capable of reducing radiation dose by suppressing deposition of activated corrosion products by a simple constitution. Namely, equipments and pipelines for fluid such as pumps at least in one of fluid systems such as a condensate cleanup system are constituted by a material containing metal species such as Zn having an effect of suppressing deposition of radioactivity. Alternatively, the surface of these equipments and pipelines for fluids on which water passes is formed by a coating layer comprising a material containing a metal having a radiation deposition suppressing effect. As a result, radioactivity deposited on the equipments and pipelines for fluids is reduced. In addition, since the method described above may be applied only at least to a portion of the members constituting at least one of the systems for fluids, it is economical. Accordingly, radiation dose upon inspection of equipments and pipelines for fluids can be reduced simply and reliably. (I.S.)

  12. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Hidehiro; Oya, Takashi.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a highly safe light water-cooled type nuclear power plant capable of reducing radiation dose by suppressing deposition of activated corrosion products by a simple constitution. Namely, equipments and pipelines for fluid such as pumps at least in one of fluid systems such as a condensate cleanup system are constituted by a material containing metal species such as Zn having an effect of suppressing deposition of radioactivity. Alternatively, the surface of these equipments and pipelines for fluids on which water passes is formed by a coating layer comprising a material containing a metal having a radiation deposition suppressing effect. As a result, radioactivity deposited on the equipments and pipelines for fluids is reduced. In addition, since the method described above may be applied only at least to a portion of the members constituting at least one of the systems for fluids, it is economical. Accordingly, radiation dose upon inspection of equipments and pipelines for fluids can be reduced simply and reliably. (I.S.)

  13. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushijima, Susumu.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to prevent the degradation in the quality of condensated water in a case where sea water leakage should occur in a steam condenser of a BWR type nuclear power plant. Constitution: Increase in the ion concentration in condensated water is detected by an ion concentration detector and the leaking factor of sea water is calculated in a leaking factor calculator. If the sea water leaking factor exceeds a predetermined value, a leak generation signal is sent from a judging device to a reactor power control device to reduce the reactor power. At ehe same tiem, the leak generation signal is also sent to a steam condenser selection and isolation device to interrupt the sea water pump of a specified steam condenser based on the signal from the ion concentration detector, as well as close the inlet and outlet valves while open vent and drain valves to thereby forcively discharge the sea water in the cooling water pipes. This can keep the condensate desalting device from ion breaking and prevent the degradation in the quality of the reactor water. (Horiuchi, T.)

  14. Underground nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hideo.

    1997-01-01

    In an underground-type nuclear power plant, groups of containing cavities comprising a plurality of containing cavities connected in series laterally by way of partition walls are disposed in parallel underground. Controlled communication tunnels for communicating the containing cavities belonging to a control region to each other, and non-controlled communication tunnels for communicating containing cavities belonging to a non-controlled area to each other are disposed underground. A controlled corridor tunnel and a non-controlled corridor tunnel extended so as to surround the containing cavity groups are disposed underground, and the containing cavities belonging to the controlled area are connected to the controlled corridor tunnel respectively, and the containing cavities belonging to the non-controlled area are connected to the non-controlled corridor tunnel respectively. The excavating amount of earth and sand upon construction can be reduced by disposing the containing cavity groups comprising a plurality of containing cavities connected in series laterally. The time and the cost for the construction can be reduced, and various excellent effects can be provided. (N.H.)

  15. Public regulation of nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtheret, M.; Cormis, de

    1980-01-01

    The construction and operation of nuclear plants are subject to a complex system of governmental administration. The authors list the various governmental authorisations and rules applicable to these plants. In the first part, they describe the national regulations which relate specifically to nuclear plants, and emphasize the provisions which are intended to ensure the safety of the installations and the protection of the public against ionizing radiation. However, while the safety of nuclear plants is a major concern of the authorities, other interests are also protected. This is accomplished by various laws or regulations which apply to nuclear plants as well as other industrial installations. The duties which these texts, and the administrative practice based thereon, impose on Electricite de France are covered in the second part [fr

  16. Nuclear power plant V-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear power plant Bohunice V -1 is briefly described. This NPP consists from two reactor units. Their main time characteristics are (Reactor Unit 1, Reactor Unit 2): beginning of construction - 24 April 1972; first controlled reactor power - 27 November 1978, 15 March 1980; connection to the grid - 17 December 1978, 26 March 1980; commercial operation - 1 April 1980, 7 January 1981. This leaflet contains: NPP V-1 construction; Major technological equipment (Primary circuit: Nuclear reactor [WWER 440 V230 type reactor];Steam generator; Reactor Coolant Pumps; Primary Circuit Auxiliary Systems. Secondary circuit: Turbine generators, Nuclear power plant electrical equipment; power plant control) and technical data

  17. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1992-03-01

    The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO I and II were in operation for almost the whole third quarter of 1991. Longer interruptions in electricity generation were caused by the annual maintenances of the Loviisa plant units. The load factor average was 81.7 %. In a test conducted during the annual maintenance outage of Loviisa 1 it was detected that the check valve of the discharge line of one pressurized emergency make-up tank did not open sufficiently at the tank's hydrostatic pressure. In connection with a 1988 modification, a too tightly dimensioned bearing had been mounted on the valve's axle rod and the valve had not been duly tested after the operation. The event is classified as Level 1 on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Other events in this quarter which are classified according to the International Nuclear Event Scale are Level Zero (Below Scale). Occupational radiation doses and releases of radioactive material off-site were below authorised limits in this quarter. Only small amounts of radioactive materials originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  18. Major plant retrofits at Monticello nuclear generating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, D.E.; Hogg, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    For the past several years, Northern States Power (NSP) has been making major plant retrofits to Monticello Nuclear generating Station in order to improve plant availability and upgrade the plant components for the potential extension of the operating license (life extension). This paper discusses in detail three major retrofits that have been completed or in the process of completion; recirculation loop piping replacement, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) water level-instrumentation modification, core spray piping replacement, the authors will address the scope of work, design and installation concerns, and life extension considerations during the design and procurement process for these three projects

  19. Man and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    According to the Inst. fuer Unfallforschung/TUeV Rheinland, Koeln, the interpretation of empirical data gained from the operation of nuclear power plants at home and abroad during the period 1967-1975 has shown that about 38% of all reactor accidents were caused by human failures. These occured either during the design and construction, the commissioning, the reconditioning or the operation of the plants. This very fact stresses human responsibility for the safety of nuclear power plants, in spite of those plants being automated to a high degree and devices. (orig.) [de

  20. Radiochemistry in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, W.

    2007-01-01

    Radiochemistry is employed in nuclear power plants not as an end in itself but, among other things, as a main prerequisite of optimum radiation protection. Radiochemical monitoring of various loops provides important information about sources of radioactivity, activity distribution in the plant and its changes. In the light of these analytical findings, plant crews are able to take measures having a positive effect on radiation levels in the plant. The example of a BWR plant is used to show, among other things, how radiochemical analyses helped to reduce radiation levels in a plant and, as a consequence, to decrease clearly radiation exposure of the personnel despite higher workloads. (orig.)

  1. 1-Dimensional simulation of thermal annealing in a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel wall section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakos, J.T.; Rosinski, S.T.; Acton, R.U.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this work was to provide experimental heat transfer boundary condition and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section thermal response data that can be used to benchmark computer codes that simulate thermal annealing of RPVS. This specific protect was designed to provide the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) with experimental data that could be used to support the development of a thermal annealing model. A secondary benefit is to provide additional experimental data (e.g., thermal response of concrete reactor cavity wall) that could be of use in an annealing demonstration project. The setup comprised a heater assembly, a 1.2 in x 1.2 m x 17.1 cm thick [4 ft x 4 ft x 6.75 in] section of an RPV (A533B ferritic steel with stainless steel cladding), a mockup of the open-quotes mirrorclose quotes insulation between the RPV and the concrete reactor cavity wall, and a 25.4 cm [10 in] thick concrete wall, 2.1 in x 2.1 in [10 ft x 10 ft] square. Experiments were performed at temperature heat-up/cooldown rates of 7, 14, and 28 degrees C/hr [12.5, 25, and 50 degrees F/hr] as measured on the heated face. A peak temperature of 454 degrees C [850 degrees F] was maintained on the heated face until the concrete wall temperature reached equilibrium. Results are most representative of those RPV locations where the heat transfer would be 1-dimensional. Temperature was measured at multiple locations on the heated and unheated faces of the RPV section and the concrete wall. Incident heat flux was measured on the heated face, and absorbed heat flux estimates were generated from temperature measurements and an inverse heat conduction code. Through-wall temperature differences, concrete wall temperature response, heat flux absorbed into the RPV surface and incident on the surface are presented. All of these data are useful to modelers developing codes to simulate RPV annealing

  2. Nuclear Power Plant Simulation Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Fran

    1979-01-01

    Presents a nuclear power plant simulation game which is designed to involve a class of 30 junior or senior high school students. Scientific, ecological, and social issues covered in the game are also presented. (HM)

  3. Robotics for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraiwa, Takanori; Watanabe, Atsuo; Miyasawa, Tatsuo

    1984-01-01

    Demand for robots in nuclear power plants is increasing of late in order to reduce workers' exposure to radiations. Especially, owing to the progress of microelectronics and robotics, earnest desire is growing for the advent of intellecturized robots that perform indeterminate and complicated security work. Herein represented are the robots recently developed for nuclear power plants and the review of the present status of robotics. (author)

  4. Robotics for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraiwa, Takanori; Watanabe, Atsuo; Miyasawa, Tatsuo

    1984-10-01

    Demand for robots in nuclear power plants is increasing of late in order to reduce workers' exposure to radiations. Especially, owing to the progress of microelectronics and robotics, earnest desire is growing for the advent of intellecturized robots that perform indeterminate and complicated security work. Herein represented are the robots recently developed for nuclear power plants and the review of the present status of robotics.

  5. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollradt, J.

    1977-01-01

    A survey of the main questions of decommissioning of nuclear power plants will be given in the sight of German utilities (VDEW-Working group 'Stillegung'). The main topics are: 1) Definitions of decommissioning, entombment, removal and combinations of such alternatives; 2) Radioactive inventory (build up and decay); 3) Experience up to now; 4) Possibilities to dismantle are given by possibility to repair nuclear power plants; 5) Estimated costs, waste, occupational radiation dose; 6) German concept of decommissioning. (orig./HK) [de

  6. HRA qualitative analysis in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Licao; Zhang Li; Huang Shudong

    2004-01-01

    Human reliability analysis (HRA) is a very important part of probability safety assessment (PSA) in a nuclear power plant. Qualitative analysis is the basis and starting point of HRA. The purpose, the principle, the method and the procedure of qualitative HRA are introduced. SGTR, a pressurized nuclear power plant as an example, is used to illustrate it. (authors)

  7. Organizing nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, H.W.; Rekittke, K.

    1987-01-01

    With the preliminary culmination in the convoy plants of the high standard of engineered safeguards in German nuclear power plants developed over the past twenty years, the interest of operators has now increasingly turned to problems which had not been in the focus of attention before. One of these problems is the organization of nuclear power plant operation. In order to enlarge the basis of knowledge, which is documented also in the rules published by the Kerntechnischer Ausschuss (Nuclear Technology Committee), the German Federal Minister of the Interior has commissioned a study of the organizational structures of nuclear power plants. The findings of that study are covered in the article. Two representative nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany were selected for the study, one of them a single-unit plant run by an independent operating company in the form of a private company under German law (GmbH), the other a dual-unit plant operated as a dependent unit of a utility. The two enterprises have different structures of organization. (orig.) [de

  8. Loviisa nuclear power plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porkholm, K.; Nurmilaukas, P.; Tiihonen, O.; Haenninen, M.; Puska, E.

    1992-12-01

    The APROS Simulation Environment has been developed since 1986 by Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). It provides tools, solution algorithms and process components for use in different simulation systems for design, analysis and training purposes. One of its main nuclear applications is the Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant Analyzer (LPA). The Loviisa Plant Analyzer includes all the important plant components both in the primary and in the secondary circuits. In addition, all the main control systems, the protection system and the high voltage electrical systems are included. (orig.)

  9. Building of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Takashi.

    1997-01-01

    A first nuclear plant and a second nuclear power plant are disposed in adjacent with each other in a building for a nuclear reactor. A reactor container is disposed in each of the plants, and each reactor container is surrounded by a second containing facility. A repairing chamber capable of communicating with the secondary containing facilities for both of the secondary containing facilities is disposed being in contact with the second containing facility of each plant for repairing control rod driving mechanisms or reactor incorporated-type recycling pumps. Namely, the repairing chamber is in adjacent with the reactor containers of both plants, and situated between both of the plants as a repairing chamber to be used in common for both plants. Air tight inlet/exit doors are formed to the inlets/exits of both plants of the repairing chamber. Space for the repairing chamber can be reduced to about one half compared with a case where the repairing chamber is formed independently on each plant. (I.N.)

  10. TVA's nuclear power plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews TVA's nuclear power plant design and construction experience in terms of schedule and capital costs. The completed plant in commercial operation at Browns Ferry and six additional plants currently under construction represent the nation's largest single commitment to nuclear power and an ultimate investment of $12 billion by 1986. The presentation is made in three separate phases. Phase one will recapitulate the status of the nuclear power industry in 1966 and set forth the assumptions used for estimating capital costs and projecting project schedules for the first TVA units. Phase two describes what happened to the program in the hectic early 1979's in terms of expansion of scope (particularly for safety features), the dramatic increase in regulatory requirements, vendor problems, stretchout of project schedules, and unprecedented inflation. Phase three addresses the assumptions used today in estimating schedules and plant costs for the next ten-year period

  11. Periodic inspection of CANDU nuclear power plant containment components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    This Standard is one in a series intended to provide uniform requirements for CANDU nuclear power plants. It provides requirements for the periodic inspection of containment components including the containment pressure suppression systems

  12. Nuclear plant simulation using the Nuclear Plant Analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beelman, R.J.; Laats, E.T.; Wagner, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA), a state-of-the-art computerized safety analysis and engineering tool, was employed to simulate nuclear plant response to an abnormal transient during a training exercise at the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) in Washington, DC. Information relative to plant status was taken from a computer animated color graphics display depicting the course of the transient and was transmitted to the NRC Operations Center in a manner identical to that employed during an actual event. Recommendations from the Operations Center were implemented during on-line, interactive execution of the RELAP5 reactor systems code through the NPA allowing a degree of flexibility in training exercises not realized previously. When the debriefing was conducted, the RELAP5 calculations were replayed by way of the color graphics display, adding a new dimension to the debriefing and greatly enhancing the critique of the exercise

  13. Political pressure on nuclear - responsibility or business?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrech, Rastislav; Holy, Robert

    2001-01-01

    respectively). Without this compromise of the Slovak Government we would not be invited to talks on joining the European Union. There is a similar situation in Bulgaria and Lithuania. The governments of the countries were forced to a compromise solutions and promised that Kozloduy or Ignalina NPP's respectively would be shut down in a close future, to be invited to talks about joining the EU. Another example is Sweden. Based on the pressure of greens to shut down NPP's, the unit 1 of Barsebaeck was shut down (in 1999 - with no technical justification) for a huge governmental compensation to the operator. This resulted in increased electricity imports from Danish and German coal-fired plants - causing indirect rise in CO 2 emission by 4 million tons per year (8 % of the total Swedish emissions). This is probably why 78% of the Swedish disagree with nuclear power phaseout. It is confirmed that the plans of premature shutdown of Barsebaeck-2 is postponed from the originally suggested date (1st July 2001). In Germany also more than 60 % of the population believes that step-by-step shut down of NPP's is not realistic in short-term. There are indices from other countries with well-developed nuclear power industry, such as USA, France, and Finland, that nuclear power renaissance can be expected in the future. The fresh examples of the Czech Temelin NPP and Mochovce (Slovakia) are very similar: halt of construction due to financial reasons, replacement of some plant systems, completion under a strong opposition and political pressure of greens supported by Austrian Government, the same accusations and complaints, etc. The opponents also have similar scenarios in both cases. The Austrian and greens started massive campaigns prior to initial fuel loading and were trying very hard to postpone the commissioning process. Austria lost the nuclear war in Slovakia and so will they lose in the Czech Republic. The compromise promised by the Czech Prime Minister - development of a new

  14. Nuclear plant analyzer development and analysis applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laats, E.T.

    1984-10-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is being developed as the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) state of the art safety analysis and engineering tool to address key nuclear plant safety issues. This paper describes four applications of the NPA in assisting reactor safety analyses. Two analyses evaluated reactor operating procedures, during off-normal operation, for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and a boiling water reactor (BWR), respectively. The third analysis was performed in support of a reactor safety experiment conducted in the Semiscale facility. The final application demonstrated the usefulness of atmospheric dispersion computer codes for site emergency planning purposes. An overview of the NPA and how it supported these analyses are the topics of this paper

  15. Safety in Swiss nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederqvist, H.

    1992-01-01

    Safety-related facilities and equipment are continuously backfitted in Swiss nuclear power plants. In the Beznau-1 and -2 nuclear generating units, the measures taken under the heading of 'Backfitting of Emergency Systems' included provisions to enhance the protection against earthquakes, airplane crash, and fire; in addition, the emergency power system was upgraded. In Muehleberg, the stack exhaust air monitoring system was optimized. The containment pressure suppression system of the plant has been designed to withstand a hypothetical accident exceeding the design basis. The BKM-Crud computer simulation model simulates steps taken to reduce radiation exposure. The power of Swiss nuclear power stations will be raised by 4% to 15% within the 'Energy 2000' action program. (orig.) [de

  16. Development of a decommissioning plan for nuclear power plant 'Krsko'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tankosic, Djurica; Fink, Kresimir

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant 'Krsko' (NEK), is the only nuclear power plant in Yugoslavia, is a two-loop, Westinghouse-design, pressurized water reactor rated at 632 MWe. When NEK applied for an operating license in 1981, it did not have to explain how the plant would be decommissioned and decommissioning provisions were not part of the licensing process. Faced with mounting opposition to nuclear power and a real threat that the plant would be shut down, the plant management developed a Mission Plan for resolving the decommissioning problem. The Mission Plan calls for a preliminary decommissioning plan to be prepared and submitted to the local regulatory body before the end of 1992

  17. ALARA at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Implementation of the ALARA principle at nuclear power plants presents a continuing challenge for health physicists at utility corporate and plant levels, for plant designers, and for regulatory agencies. The relatively large collective doses at some plants are being addressed through a variety of dose reduction techniques. Initiatives by the ICRP, NCRP, NRC, INPO, EPRI, and BNL ALARA Center have all contributed to a heightened interest and emphasis on dose reduction. The NCRP has formed Scientific Committee 46-9 which is developing a report on ALARA at Nuclear Power Plants. It is planned that this report will include material on historical aspects, management, valuation of dose reduction ($/person-Sv), quantitative and qualitative aspects of optimization, design, operational considerations, and training. The status of this work is summarized in this report

  18. World nuclear power plant capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report provides the background information for statistics and analysis developed by NUKEM in its monthly Market Report on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The assessments in this Special Report are based on the continuous review of individual nuclear power plant projects. This Special Report begins with tables summarizing a variety of nuclear power generating capacity statistics for 1990. It continues with a brief review of the year's major events regarding each country's nuclear power program. The standard NUKEM Market Report tables on nuclear plant capacity are given on pages 24 and 25. Owing to space limitations, the first year shown is 1988. Please refer to previous Special Reports for data covering earlier years. Detailed tables for each country list all existing plants as well as those expected by NUKEM to be in commercial operation by the end of 2005. An Appendix containing a list of abbreviations can be found starting on page 56. Only nuclear power plants intended for civilian use are included in this Special Report. Reactor lifetimes are assumed to be 35 years for all light water reactors and 30 years for all other reactor types, unless other data or definite decommissioning dates have been published by the operators. (orig./UA) [de

  19. Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Nuclear Power Plant Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wati, Nurokhim

    2008-01-01

    Management of spent nuclear fuel from Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) reactor had been studied to anticipate program of NPP operation in Indonesia. In this paper the quantity of generated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is predicted based on the national electrical demand, power grade and type of reactor. Data was estimated using Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) NPP type 1.000 MWe and the SNF management overview base on the experiences of some countries that have NPP. There are four strategy nuclear fuel cycle which can be developed i.e: direct disposal, reprocessing, DUPlC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel In Candu) and wait and see. There are four alternative for SNF management i.e : storage at the reactor building (AR), away from reactor (AFR) using wet centralized storage, dry centralized storage AFR and prepare for reprocessing facility. For the Indonesian case, centralized facility of the wet type is recommended for PWR or BWR spent fuel. (author)

  20. Prestressed reactor vessel for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, J.; Schwiers, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    With usual pressure vessels for nuclear reactor plants, especially for gas-cooled nuclear reactors, the load occurring due to the inner overpressure, especially the tensile load affecting the vessel top and/or bottom, their axis of inertia being horizontal, shall be compensated without a supplementary modification in design of the top and/or the bottom. This is attained by choosing an appropriate prestressing system of the vessel wall in the field the top and/or the bottom, so that the top and/or the bottom form a tension vault directed towards the interior of the vessel. (orig.) [de

  1. Nuclear power plant with a safety enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, W.; Krueger, J.; Ropers, J.; Schabert, H.P.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear power plant has a safety enclosure for a nuclear reactor. A fuel element storage basin is also located in this safety enclosure and a fuel element lock extends through the enclosure, with a cross-sectional size proportioned for the endwise passage of fuel elements, the lock including internal and external valves so that a fuel element may be locked endwise safely through the lock. The lock, including its valves, being of small size, does not materially affect the pressure resistance of the safety enclosure, and it is more easily operated than a lock large enough to pass people and fuel element transport vessels

  2. LWR nuclear power plant component failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W.H.

    1980-10-01

    An analysis of the most significant light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant component failures, from information in the computerized Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) data bank, shows that for both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) plants the component category most responsible for reactor shutdowns is valves. Next in importance for PWR shutdowns is steam generators followed by seals of all kinds. For BWR plants, seals, and pipes and pipe fittings are the second and third most important component failure categories which lead to reactor shutdown. The data are for records extending from early 1972 through September 1978. A list of the most significant component categories and a breakdown of the number of component citations for both PWR and BWR reactor types are presented

  3. CAS medium-size nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelweith, L.; Weiss, A.

    1977-01-01

    CEA has developed a range of pressurized water reactors of the type CAS Compact, which are adapted to civil ship propulsion, or to electric power production, combined possibly with heat production, up to outputs equivalent to 125MW(e). Nuclear plants equipped with these reactors are suitable for medium-size electric networks, especially in developing countries, because they are easily adaptable, owing to their flexibility; they can be installed and used in a variety of ways (on land, floating installation, combination of electric power and other production, etc.); they can be used as training reactors by countries wishing to limit their investment plans before undertaking a wider nuclear development. Examples of two possible realizations are presented: as a floating plant, and as a combined electric and desalting plant. (author)

  4. Owners of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.S.

    1979-12-01

    The following list indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies as of December 1, 1979. The list includes all plants licensed to operate, under construction, docketed for NRC safety and envionmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review. It does not include those plants announced but not yet under review or those plants formally cancelled. In many cases, ownership may be in the process of changing as a result of antitrust license conditions and hearings, altered financial conditions, changed power needs, and other reasons. However, this list reflects only those ownership percentages of which the NRC has been formally notified

  5. Latina nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-03-01

    In the period under review, the Latina power plant produced 1009,07 million kWh with a utilization factor of 72% and an availability factor of 80,51%. The disparity between the utilization and availability factors was mainly due to the shutdown of the plant owing to trade union strife. The reasons for non-availability (19,49%) were almost all related to the functioning of the conventional part and the general servicing of the plant (18 September-28 October). During the shutdown for maintenance, an inspection of the steel members and parts of the core stabilizing structure was made in order to check for the familiar oxidation phenomena caused by CO 2 ; the results of the inspection were all satisfactory. Operation of the plant during 1974 was marked by numerous power cutbacks as a result of outages of the steam-raising units (leaks from the manifolds) and main turbines (inspection and repairs to the LP rotors). Since it was first brought into commercial operation, the plant has produced 13,4 thousand million kWh

  6. Maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashgari, Farbod.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is about maintenance of nuclear power plants. In part one, the outage management of nuclear power plants has described. Meaning of the outage and objectives of outage management is given in introduction. The necessity of a long-term outage strategy is shown in chapter one. The main parts of an outage are as follows: Planning; Preparation; Execution, Each of them and also post-outage review have been explained in the followed chapters. Part two deals with technical details of main primary components of nuclear power plant type WWER. After an introduction about WWER reactors, in each chapter first the general and detailed description of main primary components has given and then their maintenance schedules and procedures. Chapter about reactor and steam generator is related to both types of WWER-440 and WWER-1000, but chapter about reactor coolant pump has specified to WWER-1000 to be more in details.(author)

  7. Safety analysis of Oi nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The transient phenomena in Oi nuclear power plant were analyzed, especially on the water level fluctuation and the capability of natural circulation in the primary loop, under the assumptions that the feed water for steam generators is totally lost, and the relief valve on the pressurizer, which is actuated due to the pressure rise in the primary system, is stuck and kept open. These assumptions are related to the TMI accident. The analysing conditions are 1) the main feed water flow is totally lost suddenly during the rated power operation of the reactor, 2) two motor-driven auxiliary feed water pumps are started manually fifteen minutes after the accident initiation, 3) one relief valve on the pressurizer is opened fifteen seconds after the accident initiation and kept open, 4) the reactor is scrammed thirty three seconds after the accident initiation, 5) the turbine is tripped 33.5 seconds after the accident initiation, etc. Two cases were analysed, namely 3,800 seconds and 1,200 seconds after the accident initiation. The analytical code RELEP4/Mod5/U2/J1 was utilized for this analysis. The level fluctuation in the pressurizer after the accident initiation, the flow rate fluctuation through the pressurizer relief valve, especially that of steam, liquid single phase and two phase flows, the water level in the upper plenum in the pressure vessel, the change of flow rate at core inlet, the average pressure in the core, and the temperature fluctuation of coolant in the core, the variation of void fraction in the core, and the change of surface temperature of fuel rods are presented as the analysis results, and they are evaluated. It is recognized that the plant safety is kept under the assumed accident conditions in the Oi nuclear power plant. (Nakai, Y.)

  8. Space nuclear reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Ranken, W.A.; Koenig, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements for electrical and propulsion power for space are expected to increase dramatically in the 1980s. Nuclear power is probably the only source for some deep space missions and a major competitor for many orbital missions, especially those at geosynchronous orbit. Because of the potential requirements, a technology program on space nuclear power plant components has been initiated by the Department of Energy. The missions that are foreseen, the current power plant concept, the technology program plan, and early key results are described

  9. Nuclear power plant V-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear power plant Bohunice V -2 is briefly described. This NPP consists from two reactor units. Their main time characteristics are (Reactor Unit 1, Reactor Unit 2): beginning of construction - December 1976; first controlled reactor power - 7 August 1984, 2 August 1985; connection to the grid - 20 August 1984, 9 August 1985; commercial operation - 14 February 1985, 18 December 1985. This leaflet contains: NPP V-2 construction; Major technological equipment [WWER 440 V230 type reactor; Nuclear Power plant operation safety (Safety barriers; Safety systems [Active safety systems, Passive safety systems]); Centralized heat supply system; Scheme of Bohunice V-2 NPP and technical data

  10. Nuclear plant undergrounding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.C.; Bastidas, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    Under Section 25524.3 of the Public Resources Code, the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission (CERCDC) was directed to study ''the necessity for '' and the effectiveness and economic feasibility of undergrounding and berm containment of nuclear reactors. The author discusses the basis for the study, the Sargent and Lundy (S and L) involvement in the study, and the final conclusions reached by S and L

  11. Challenges for new nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschi, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    In the past 20 years, numerous new nuclear plant designs have been introduced in the hope of generating a mixture of features and benefits that generated enough enthusiasm amongst the utility industry decision makers to move forward with a new nuclear generation. Not only has there not been enough enthusiasm, there has been little interest in building new plants with advanced features, especially in the U.S. Compounding this predicament are the changing paradigms to which a new plant would be measured. The near hiatus on new plant orders is the clear cause of the significant consolidation in the nuclear industry. Regardless whether the disappearance of old-line nuclear companies is over or not, some paradigms for new generation designs are unmovable, while others are still under discussion as to their role in future plant designs. This paper will address those design goals that Westinghouse deems already having earned the rank of exemplar, and those still open to debate. Because it is my hope that this paper will lead to a fruitful discussion period, I will provide a list of what I feel are the champion design requirements, and those I consider the contenders. (author)

  12. Robotics for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Ryoichi; Kimura, Motohiko; Abe, Akira

    1993-01-01

    A continuing need exists for automatic or remote-controlled machines or robots which can perform inspection and maintenance tasks in nuclear power plants. Toshiba has developed several types of monofunctional and multi- functional robots for such purposes over the past 20 years, some of which have already been used in actual plants. This paper describes new multifunctional robots for inspection and maintenance. An inspection robot has been applied in an actual plant for two years for performance testing. Maintenance robots for grinding tasks have also been developed, which can be easily teleoperated by the operator using automatic control. These new robots are expected to be applied to actual inspection and maintenance work in nuclear power plants. (author)

  13. Worldwide nuclear-plant performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surrey, J.; Thomas, S.

    1980-01-01

    The authors compare the performance of different reactor systems to identify the determinants of plant performance, to examine the evidence of technological maturation, and to discover the principal causes of outage or unavailability. In the light of the findings, they discuss the implications for the UK regarding reactor choice and technology development. They make no judgements about the relative merits of nuclear and fossil-fuel plants, or about safety. (author)

  14. Decommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friske, A.; Thiele, D.

    1988-01-01

    The IAEA classification of decommissioning stages is outlined. The international development hitherto observed in decommissioning of nuclear reactors and nuclear power stations is presented. The dismantling, cutting and decontamination methods used in the decommissioning process are mentioned. The radioactive wastes from decommissioning are characterized, the state of the art of their treatment and disposal is given. The radiation burdens and the decommissioning cost in a decommissioning process are estimated. Finally, some evaluation of the trends in the decommissioning process of nuclear power plants is given. 54 refs. (author)

  15. Nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Asano, Takashi

    1997-12-22

    A steam dryer/gas water separator storage pool of a BWR type reactor is connected to a sucking pipeline of a fuel pool cleaning pump and a sucking pipeline of a cleaning pump of a suppression pool (S/P) respectively by way of a drainage pipeline and a draining pipeline. Pool water from the storage pool passed through the drainage pipeline is pressurized by a fuel pool cleaning pump, and then cleaned by a filtration desalting device, and drained to S/P. At the same time, the pool water from the storage pool passed through the draining pipeline, and pressurized by the S/P cleaning system pump and cleaned by the filtration desalting device in the same manner, and then drained to the S/P. When the water in the storage pool is reduced and the sucking pressure of the fuel pool cleaning pump is lowered to cause possibility that the integral operation of the pump is difficult, the remained water is drained only by the S/P cleaning system pump. (I.N.)

  16. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This 2003 version of Elecnuc contents information, data and charts on the nuclear power plants in the world and general information on the national perspectives concerning the electric power industry. The following topics are presented: 2002 highlights; characteristics of main reactor types and on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; the worldwide status of nuclear power plants on 2002/12/3; units distributed by countries; nuclear power plants connected to the Grid by reactor type groups; nuclear power plants under construction; capacity of the nuclear power plants on the grid; first electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit; electrical generation from nuclear plants by country at the end 2002; performance indicator of french PWR units; trends of the generation indicator worldwide from 1960 to 2002; 2002 cumulative Load Factor by owners; nuclear power plants connected to the grid by countries; status of license renewal applications in Usa; nuclear power plants under construction; Shutdown nuclear power plants; exported nuclear power plants by type; exported nuclear power plants by countries; nuclear power plants under construction or order; steam generator replacements; recycling of Plutonium in LWR; projects of MOX fuel use in reactors; electricity needs of Germany, Belgium, Spain, Finland, United Kingdom; electricity indicators of the five countries. (A.L.B.)

  17. Layout of the safety analysis report for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactor or boiling water reactor in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, E.

    1980-01-01

    For a licence according to paragraph 7 of the Atomic Energy Act to construct and operate a nuclear power plant, the applicant has to submit a safety analysis report, which must describe the site, the plant, all hazards in connection with the plant and the proposed safety precautions. For the structure and the content of a safety analysis report, a first guideline was published in 1959. Only a few safety analysis reports were prepared nearly strictly according to this guideline. In 1976 a second guideline was published for a standard safety analysis report. The lecture deals with the guidelines. A survey over the structure and content of the German safety analysis reports will be given. The experience gained by the new safety analysis reports will be discussed. (orig.)

  18. Nuclear plant aging research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissenberg, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, has established the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program in its Division of Engineering Technology. Principal contractors for this program include Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The program goals are: to identify and characterize time-dependent degradation (aging) of nuclear plant safety-related electrical and mechanical components which could lead to loss of safety function; to identify and recommend methods for detecting and trending aging effects prior to loss of safety function so that timely maintenance can be implemented; and to recommend maintenance practices for mitigating the effects of aging. Research activities include prioritization of system and component aging in nuclear plants, characterization of aging degradation of specific components including identification of functional indicators useful for trending degradation, and testing of practical methods and devices for measuring the functional indicators. Aging assessments have been completed on electric motors, snubbers, motor-operated valves, and check valves. Testing of trending methods and devices for motor-operated valves and check valves is in progress

  19. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yoko; Kato, Naoyoshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the reducing speed of nuclear reactor water level after the water level has reached a turbine trip level to trip the turbine thereby preventing cooling systems or the likes from undesired operation upon separation caused by the reduction of the reactor water level to a low water level before the water level control is switched to the manual control. Constitution: Two feedwater pumps arranged in parallel are operated in usual operation to feedwater to a BWR type reactor. If a trouble should occur in a feedwater controller to increase the feedwater rate and the reactor water level, one of the feedwater pumps is tripped by a signal from a feedwater pump trip device. Then, when the trip level is reached again the remaining pump is tripped. In this way, the sudden decrease in the feedwater rate and the reactor water level can be prevented. (Yoshino, Y.)

  20. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Ryuji; Yamanari, Shozo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent contamination of reactor water by suppression pool water upon isolation of a BWR type reactor. Constitution: In a cooling system upon reactor separation and a high pressure core spray system of a BWR type reactor, a controller comprises an AND circuit which outputs a valve switching signal upon input of a low level signal for condensate storage tank water and a high level signal for a suppression pool water level. This can prevent the injection of suppression pool water into the reactor in the event other than loss of coolant accident. The valve is switched only when the suppression pool water level signal takes a high level and loss of coolant accident signal is present, and the water of the suppression water is pumped into the reactor. In the case, other than the loss of coolant accident, the valve is not switched even when a high level signal for the suppression pool water level is detected. (Horiuchi, T.)

  1. Actions concerning nuclear power plant life evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocron, M.; Fabbri, S.; Mizrahi, R.; Savino, E.J.; Versaci, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    One of the main activities to be undertaken by CNEA will be to provide technological assistance to NASA in problems concerning NPP operation. Works on life extensions of NPP are included in these activities. To fulfill these requirements the Atomic Energy National Commission (CNEA) has constituted a technical committee for Nuclear Power Plants Support (CAPCEN). CAPCEN should be the knowledge reservoir of those issues concerning the performance, safety and life extension of Nuclear Power Plants. One of CAPCEN's most important activities is to promote research work connected with such issues. The main technical areas are: Pressure Vessel and Piping, Heat Exchanges and Fuel Channels and Reactor Inner Components. Efforts are focused on the identification of the main components susceptible of ageing, the study of their ageing mechanisms, the follow-up of their behaviour during operation, and the measures taken to extend their life. (author)

  2. Method of diagnosing a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaoki, Tetsuo; Kawano, Koji

    1983-01-01

    Purpose : To exactly diagnose a nuclear power plant even upon occurrence of an abnormal state. Method : A statistical data calculation device prepares multidimensional vectors on every statistical amount for the unit of flowrate, pressure, temperature and neutron flux data in a nuclear power plant. A comparison-and-reference device compares them with the statistical amount rendered into multi-dimensional vectors corresponding to the generation of abnormality on every time in a normal operation for each of the fluctuation amount stored in a comparison and reference-value-store device. The diagnosis device performs diagnosis while using both of the standard pattern previously prepared and stored in the comparison and standard-value-store device and the pattern learnt and stored in the comparison and reference-value-store device. (Seki, T.)

  3. Passive Nuclear Plants Program (UPDATE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chimeno, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    The light water passive plants program (PCNP), today Advanced Nuclear Power Plants Program (PCNA), was constituted in order to reach the goals of the Spanish Electrical Sector in the field of advanced nuclear power plants, optimize the efforts of all Spanish initiatives, and increase joint presence in international projects. The last update of this program, featured in revision 5th of the Program Report, reflects the consolidation of the Spanish sector's presence in International programs of the advanced power plants on the basis of the practically concluded American ALWR program. Since the beginning of the program , the PCNP relies on financing from the Electrical sector, Ocide, SEPI-Endesa, Westinghouse, General Electric, as well as from the industrial cooperators, Initec, UTE (Initec- Empresarios Agrupados), Ciemat, Enusa, Ensa and Tecnatom. The program is made up of the following projects, already concluded: - EPRI's Advanced Light Water Plants Certification Project - Westinghouse's AP600 Project - General Electric's SBWR Project (presently paralyzed) and ABWR project Currently, the following project are under development, at different degrees of advance: - EPP project (European Passive Plant) - EBWR project (European Advanced Boiling Water Reactor)

  4. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Eizo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent boiling of saturated water in the drain tank of a humidity separator by charging cooling water in the drain tank upon power decrease of a turbine. Constitution: Saturated water is separated from high pressure turbine exhausts in a humidity separator and stored in a drain tank. The saturated water in the drain tank is controlled to a constant level and the excess water is sent to a condensator and a feedwater heater. A cooling water feed pipe is branched as a cooling water feed pipe from the exhaust side of a reactor feedwater pump and connected by way of a closing valve to a spray nozzle provided in the drain tank. While the closing valve is usually closed to keep the water level constant in the drain tank, the closing valve is opened upon sudden decrease in the turbine power to charge the condensates by way of the cooling water feed pipe to the drain tank. Thus, the saturated water is mixed with the dondensates and the temperature is lowered to prevent boiling of the saturated water. (Kawakami, Y.)

  5. Nuclear power plants and house-building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    In this report, it is studied where and under what conditions houses can be built in the neighbourhood of nuclear power plants. Building norms and location distances are investigated. First, the Dutch and foreign norms with respect to population densities are listed. Only industrial, densely populated neighbour countries are considered. Next, it is calculated what consequences for housing a nuclear station may have within a radius of 20 km. Using these calculations it is studied whether the existing Dutch requirements are satisfied. Because it is expected that the norms are likely to be tightened up under the pressure of the nuclear controversy, the existing Dutch situation is also compared with the tighter foreign norms. Finally, the results of the study are summarized and some conclusions are drawn. (Auth.)

  6. SCW Pressure-Channel Nuclear Reactor Some Design Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioro, Igor L.; Khan, Mosin; Hopps, Victory; Jacobs, Chris; Patkunam, Ruban; Gopaul, Sandeep; Bakan, Kurtulus

    Concepts of nuclear reactors cooled with water at supercritical pressures were studied as early as the 1950s and 1960s in the USA and Russia. After a 30-year break, the idea of developing nuclear reactors cooled with SuperCritical Water (SCW) became attractive again as the ultimate development path for water cooling. The main objectives of using SCW in nuclear reactors are: 1) to increase the thermal efficiency of modern Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) from 30-35% to about 45-48%, and 2) to decrease capital and operational costs and hence decrease electrical energy costs (˜1000 US/kW or even less). SCW NPPs will have much higher operating parameters compared to modern NPPs (pressure about 25 MPa and outlet temperature up to 625°C), and a simplified flow circuit, in which steam generators, steam dryers, steam separators, etc., can be eliminated. Also, higher SCW temperatures allow direct thermo-chemical production of hydrogen at low cost, due to increased reaction rates. Pressure-tube or pressure-channel SCW nuclear reactor concepts are being developed in Canada and Russia for some time. Some design features of the Canadian concept related to fuel channels are discussed in this paper. The main conclusion is that the development of SCW pressure-tube nuclear reactors is feasible and significant benefits can be expected over other thermal-energy systems.

  7. Contamination of occupational radiation exposure in nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors; Kontamination und berufliche Strahlenexposition in KKW mit Druckwasserreaktoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Sebastian; Bruhn, Gerd; Artmann, Andreas; Sentuc, Florence-Nathalie; Tiessen, Olga

    2017-12-15

    In the precursor project of this study a simulation procedure was developed, consisting of a 3D-CAD model, a mathematical method for coordinate transformation, the software MicroShield and an empiric job model, to calculate the occupational exposure for definable jobs at the primary circuit. It was validated for inspection and maintenance jobs at PWRs of the second and third KWU/Siemens generation. With that the aptitude of this tool for prognosis of radiation exposure was demonstrated. Adhering contaminations within the primary circuit are considered as relevant sources, whereas activated core-near components are neglected. In this study, the model was extended by PWR of the so-called Convoy generation, which differ from older plants in the material composition and consequently in the relevant nuclide vectors. With information from a visit at a nuclear power plant and conversation with the staff, the model could be adjusted appropriately. The radionuclide Cobalt-60 is indeed less important compared to older plant-types, but it is still the dominant nuclide in facilities of the fourth KWU/Siemens generation, so that it is used as reference nuclide. Due to the contemporary planned final shut-down of the three Convoy plants (besides other), dismantling work was set into focus of simulation. Simulation was conducted and results compared for Convoy plants and for plants of the older generations two and three. Furthermore, by comparative simulations the question was answered if full system decontamination in Convoy plants before dismantling lead to benefits that justify this measure. The determined dose saving during unmounting works at the steam generators caused by the decontamination is remarkable. An abdication of decontamination at this location would lead to doses much higher than the occupational job dose during steam generator dismantling in a decontaminated generation 2 facility.

  8. Relative costs to nuclear plants: international experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Jair Albo Marques de

    1992-03-01

    This work approaches the relative costs to nuclear plants in the Brazil. It also presents the calculation methods and its hypothesis to determinate the costs, and the nacional experience in costs of investment, operating and maintenance of the nuclear plants

  9. Cooling water recipients for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, F.-E.; Saetre, H.J.

    1971-10-01

    The hydrographical and hydrological conditions at 17 prospective nuclear power plant sites in the Oslofjord district are evaluated with respect to their suitability as recipients for thermal discharges from nuclear power plants. No comparative evaluations are made. (JIW)

  10. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inami, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Minoru.

    1995-01-01

    In a condensate cleanup system and a reactor water cleanup system of a BWR-type reactor, in which primary coolants flow, there is disposed a filtering and desalting device using hollow thread membrane filter and ion exchange resin for a condensate cleanup system, and using a high temperature filter made of a metal, a metal oxide or ceramics as a filtering material and a precoat filter made of a powdery ion exchange resin as a filtering material for a reactor water cleanup system. This can completely remove cruds generated in the condensate system. Since the reactor water cleanup system comprises the powdery resin precoat-type filtering and desalting device and the high temperature filter using ceramics, ionic impurities such as radioactive materials can be removed. Accordingly, cruds are not carried into the inside of the reactor, and since the radioactive concentration in the reactor water is reduced, radiation exposure upon periodical inspection can be minimized almost to zero, to attain a clean plant. (T.M.)

  11. Advanced nuclear plant control complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarola, K.; Jamison, S.; Manazir, R.M.; Rescorl, R.L.; Harmon, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel in the control room. A separate data processing system, which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board. The discrete indicator and alarm system and the data processing system receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accidental conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof. (author)

  12. Docommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essmann, J.

    1981-01-01

    The German utilities operating nuclear power plants have long concerned themselves with aspects of decommissioning and for this purpose an engineering company was given a contract to study the entire spectrum of decommissioning. The results of this study have been available in autumn 1980 and it is possible to discuss all the aspects of decommissioning on a new basis. Following these results no change in the design concept of LWR nuclear power plants in operation or under construction is necessary because the techniques, necessary for decommissioning, are fully available today. The technical feasibility of decommissioning for power plants of Biblis A and KRB type has been shown in detail. The calculations of the quantity of waste produced during removal of a nuclear power plant could be confirmed and it could be determined with high procedure. The radiation dose to the decommissioning personnel is in the range of the radiation protection regulations and is in the same range as the radiation dose to the personnel within a yearly inservice inspection. (AF)

  13. Fire prevention in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayla, J.P.; Jacquet-Francillon, J.; Matarozzo, F.

    2014-01-01

    About 80 fire starts are reported in EDF nuclear power plants every year but only 3 or 4 turn into a real fire and none has, so far, has led to a major safety failure of a nuclear plant. A new regulation has been implemented in july 2014 that strengthens the concept of defense in depth, proposes an approach that is proportionate to the stakes and risks, this proportionality means that the requirements for a power reactor are not the same as for a nuclear laboratory, and imposes an obligation or result rather than of means. The second article deals with the fire that broke out in the waste silo number 130 at La Hague plant in january 1981. The investigation showed that the flammability of the silo content had been underestimated. The third article presents the consequences of the fire that broke out in a power transformer at the Cattenom plant in june 2013. The fire was rapidly brought under control thanks to the immediate triggering of the emergency plan. The article details also the feedback experience of this event. (A.C.)

  14. Health protection and industrial safety. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The standard applies to components of the primary circuit including its auxiliary facilities, and of the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors; to lifting gear and load take-ups for the transport of nuclear fuel and primary circuit components, and to elevators within the containment. Part 2 specifies testing, test periods, test methods, and documentation

  15. PWR heavy equipments manufacture for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boury, C.; Terrien, J.F.

    1983-10-01

    The manufacture of boilers has been imported by the French nuclear program to the societe FRAMATOME. FRAMATOME, because of the size of this market, has constructed two special plants for manufacturing of nuclear components (vapor generators, reactor tanks, pressurizers); these two high technical facilities are presented: production, staff training, technical overseas assistance, and technical and economical repercussions on the industrial vicinity [fr

  16. Atucha I nuclear power plant transients analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano, J.; Schivo, M.

    1987-01-01

    A program for the transients simulation thermohydraulic calculation without loss of coolant (KWU-ENACE development) to evaluate Atucha I nuclear power plant behaviour is used. The program includes systems simulation and nuclear power plants control bonds with real parameters. The calculation results show a good agreement with the output 'protocol' of various transients of the nuclear power plant, keeping the error, in general, lesser than ± 10% from the variation of the nuclear power plant's state variables. (Author)

  17. Pipe restraints for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keever, R.E.; Broman, R.; Shevekov, S.

    1976-01-01

    A pipe restraint for nuclear power plants in which a support member is anchored on supporting surface is described. Formed in the support member is a semicylindrical wall. Seated on the semicylindrical wall is a ring-shaped pipe restrainer that has an inner cylindrical wall. The inner cylindrical wall of the pipe restrainer encircles the pressurized pipe. In a modification of the pipe restraint, an arched-shaped pipe restrainer is disposed to overlie a pressurized pipe. The ends of the arch-shaped pipe restrainer are fixed to support members, which are anchored in concrete or to a supporting surface. A strap depends from the arch-shaped pipe restrainer. The pressurized pipe is supported by the depending strap

  18. Fighting fires in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantom, L.F.; Weldon, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    Since the Browns Ferry incident, the specter of fires at nuclear plants has been the focus of attention by NRC, the utilities, and the public. There are sophisticated hardware and software available - in the form of fire-protection systems and equipment and training and fire-protection programs. Potential fire losses at nuclear faclities can be staggering. Thus, it behooves all those involved to maximize fire-protection security while simultaneously minimizing the chance of human error, which cancels out the effectiveness of the most up-to-date protective systems and devices

  19. Studies on the effectiveness of measures to maintain the integrity of pressurized components in German nuclear power plants. Final report; Untersuchungen zur Wirksamkeit von Massnahmen zur Sicherstellung der Integritaet druckfuehrender Komponenten in deutschen Kernkraftwerken. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmas, M.; Jendrich, U.; Michel, F.; Reck, H.; Schimpfke, T.; Walter, M.; Wenke, R.

    2013-03-15

    The overall objective of the project was to investigate the effectiveness of measures to maintain the as-built quality of the pressure-retaining components in German nuclear power plants. In particular, investigations were performed on the application of the break preclusion concept, existing monitoring systems and the significance of the pressure test as part of the inspection concept. Moreover, the KompInt knowledge base has been updated. Break preclusion for pipes was applied in all German plants already during planning or after commissioning to a varying extent. The basic features of the required assessments were considered in the German nuclear regulations for the first time by inclusion in the safety requirements for nuclear power plants of 2012. The requirements for assessments, differing in their degree of detail, in the interpretations of these safety requirements and in the safety standard KTA 3206 are still in the draft stage. For the first time, the vessels as well as housings of valves and pumps are also included in the concept. Through the use of advanced monitoring systems it was possible in German plants at an early stage to establish modes of operation that minimise the load on components, to carry out appropriate technical backfitting measures, and to identify damages. In plant areas where local water chemistry parameters may result that deviate from the specification, the effectiveness of water chemistry monitoring is limited. In this case, other operational measures must be taken. The results of the simulations performed with the help of the GRS-developed PROST computer code to determine the significance of pressure tests lead - in accordance with the results of operating experience evaluation - to the conclusion that pressure tests carried out within the pressure-retaining boundary contribute to safeguarding the integrity. The user-friendliness of the KompInt knowledge base has been increased by changing over to a new hardware, a software

  20. QA programs in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingson, A.C.

    1976-01-01

    As an overview of quality assurance programs in nuclear power plants, the energy picture as it appears today is reviewed. Nuclear power plants and their operations are described and an attempt is made to place in proper perspective the alleged ''threats'' inherent in nuclear power. Finally, the quality assurance programs being used in the nuclear industry are described

  1. 4. Nuclear power plant component failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear power plant component failures are dealt with in relation to reliability in nuclear power engineering. The topics treated include classification of failures, analysis of their causes and impacts, nuclear power plant failure data acquisition and processing, interdependent failures, and human factor reliability in nuclear power engineering. (P.A.). 8 figs., 7 tabs., 23 refs

  2. MARS, 600 MWth NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumo, M.; Naviglio, A.; Sorabella, L.

    2004-01-01

    MARS (Multipurpose Advanced Reactor, inherently Safe) is a 600 MWth, single loop, pressurized light water reactor (PWR), developed at the Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Energy Conversion of the University of Rome ''La Sapienza''. The design was focused to a multipurpose reactor to be used in high population density areas also for industrial heat production and, in particular, for water desalting. Using the well-proven technology and the operation experience of PWRs, the project introduces a lot of innovative features hugely improving the safety performance while keeping the cost of KWh competitive with traditional large power plants. Extensive use of passive safety, in depth plant simplification and decommissioning oriented design were the guidelines along the design development. The latest development in the plant design, in the decommissioning aspects and in the experimental activities supporting the project are shown in this paper

  3. Configuration management of plant modifications for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritsch, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    Due to the increasing complexity of nuclear power plant operation, regulatory pressure, and the large numbers of people required to operate and support the stations, the control of plant modifications at these plants needs to be expanded and improved. The aerospace and defense industries, as well as the owners or operators of large energy projects have established configuration management programs (CMPs) to control plant design changes. These programs are composed of well-defined functions for identifying, evaluating, recording, tracking, issuing, and documenting the established baseline conditions, as well as required changes to these baseline conditions. The purpose of this paper is to describe a recommended CMP for plant modifications consisting of a computerized data base installed on the utility's computer to provide a central storage of plant design and operations data necessary to control the following activities as they are affected by plant design changes: training; record management; operations; maintenance; health physics; planning/scheduling; procurement/inventory control; outage management (including modifications); and emergency response

  4. Maintenance of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, J. M.; Sanchez, J. T.

    2002-01-01

    With this article about the Maintenance in nuclear power plants we will try to give to see the importance of this kind of installations but the problems found by the clients and contractors to face it, and some possible solutions to improve it. It is necessary to understand this problem like something inner to the installation and must be considerate like a benefit for the same. Of course, there must be adequate Sevices Companies in direct relation with the installation that take the responsibility of assuming and understanding the correct fulfillment of the fixed milestones to get the optimal working of the whole plant systems. (Author)

  5. Extended fuel cycle operation for pressurized water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestri, G.J. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear steam turbine power plant system having an arrangement therein for extended fuel cycle operation is described. The power plant includes a turbine connected at its inlet to a source of motive fluid having a predetermined pressure associated therewith. The turbine has also connected thereto an extraction conduit which extracts steam from a predetermined location therein for use in an associated apparatus. A bypass conduit is provided between a point upstream of the inlet and the extraction conduit. A flow control device is provided within the bypass conduit and opens when the pressure of the motive steam supply drops beneath the predetermined pressure as a result of reactivity loss within the nuclear reactor. Opening of the bypass conduit provides flow to the associated apparatus and at the same time provides an increased flow orifice to maintain fluid flow rate at a predetermined level

  6. Application of analysis technology in nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaoka, Keiko; Miura, Hiromi; Umeda, Kenji

    1996-01-01

    Recently, thanks to the rapid improvement of EWS performance, the authors have been able to carry out design evaluation comparatively, easily, utilizing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology. The Nuclear Plant Engineering Department has carried out some analyses in the past several years with the main purpose of evaluating the design of nuclear reactor internals. These studies included ''Thermal Hydraulic Analysis for Top Plenum'' and ''Flow Analysis for Lower Plenum''. It is considered to be a special matter in thermal hydraulic analysis of the top plenum that temperature distribution has been estimated with a relatively small number of meshes by means of an imaginary spray nozzle, and in the flow analysis for the lower plenum that flow distribution has been found to change largely, depending on the reactor internals. One of the ways to confirm the safety of nuclear plants, detailed structural analysis, is required for all possible combinations of transient and load conditions during operation. In particular, it is very important to clarify the thermal stress behavior under operating conditions and to evaluate fatigue analysis in accordance with the Code Requirements. However, it is very complicated and it takes a lot of time. A new system was developed which can operate continuously all of the definitions of the analytical model, the analyzation of pressurized thermal and external stress, and editing reports. In this paper, the authors introduce this system and apply it to a pressurized water reactor

  7. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all the numerical data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the French CEA/DSE/SEE Elecnuc database. The following aspects are reviewed: 1997 highlights; main characteristics of the reactor types in operation, under construction or on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1997; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and on order; capacity of nuclear power plants in operation; net and gross capacity of nuclear power plants on the grid and in commercial operation; forecasts; first power generation of nuclear origin per country, achieved or expected; performance indicator of PWR units in France; worldwide trend of the power generation indicator; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction, on order, planned, cancelled, shutdown, and exported; planning of steam generators replacement; MOX fuel program for plutonium recycling. (J.S.)

  8. 77 FR 47121 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... for Nuclear Power Plant Personnel,'' endorses the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) report NEI 06-11...(c)(25). Pursuant to 10 CFR 51.22(b), no environmental impact statement or environmental assessment... hereafter in effect. The facility consists of two pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) located in Calvert...

  9. 1984 availability of the world's nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeless, A.; Oszuszky, F.

    1985-01-01

    This survey of the availability of the world's nuclear power plants in 1984 coveres 250 units (the CMEA countries excluded) with an aggregate 184,500 MWe, which are arranged by types of reactor and geographic distribution. The utilization of nuclear power plant capacity attained an average of 66% in 1984, which is an increase by 3 percentage points in the utilization of capacity over the previous year's level (63%). Capacity utilization in pressurized water reactors 1984 (69%) was 4 percentage points higher than it was in boiling water reactors (65%). The ranking list of the world's nuclear power plants is headed by one heavy water reactor and one gas cooled reactor each (98%), followed by five generating units, i.e., two pressurized water reactors, two boiling water reactors, and one heavy water reactor (all 95%). The best German nuclear power plants were Grafenrheinfeld (89%, position No. 20) and Unterweser and Stade (88%, position No. 25). (orig.) [de

  10. Nuclear power plant life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rorive, P.; Berthe, J.; Lafaille, J.P.; Eussen, G.

    1998-01-01

    Several definitions can be given to the design life of a nuclear power plant just as they can be attributed to the design life of an industrial installation: the book-keeping life which is the duration of the provision for depreciation of the plant, the licensed life which corresponds to the duration for which the plant license has been granted and beyond which a new license should be granted by the safety authorities, the design life which corresponds to the duration specified for ageing and fatigue calculations in the design of some selected components during the plant design phase, the technical life which is the duration of effective technical operation and finally the economic life corresponding to the duration of profitable operation of the plant compared with other means of electricity production. Plant life management refers to the measures taken to cope with the combination of licensed, design, technical and economical life. They can include repairs and replacements of components which have arrived to the end of their life due to known degradation processes such as fatigue, embrittlement, corrosion, wear, erosion, thermal ageing. In all cases however, it is of great importance to plan the intervention so as to minimise the economic impact. Predictive maintenance is used together with in-service inspection programs to fulfil this goal. The paper will go over the methodologies adopted in Belgium in all aspects of electrical, mechanical and civil equipment for managing plant life. (author)

  11. Expert robots in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.S.; Fisher, J.J.; DeVries, K.R.; Martin, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Expert robots enhance a safety and operations in nuclear plants. E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Savannah River Laboratory, is developing expert mobile robots for deployment in nuclear applications at the Savannah River Plant. Knowledge-based expert systems are being evaluated to simplify operator control, to assist in navigation and manipulation functions, and to analyze sensory information. Development work using two research vehicles is underway to demonstrate semiautonomous, intelligence, expert robot system operation in process areas. A description of the mechanical equipment, control systems, and operating modes is presented, including the integration of onboard sensors. A control hierarchy that uses modest computational methods is being used to allow mobile robots to autonomously navigate and perform tasks in known environments without the need for large computer systems

  12. Expert robots in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.S.; Fisher, J.J.; DeVries, K.R.; Martin, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Expert robots will enhance safety and operations in nuclear plants. E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Savannah River Laboratory, is developing expert mobile robots for deployment in nuclear applications at the Savannah River Plant. Knowledge-based expert systems are being evaluated to simplify operator control, to assist in navigation and manipulation functions, and to analyze sensory information. Development work using two research vehicles is underway to demonstrate semiautonomous, intelligent, expert robot system operation in process areas. A description of the mechanical equipment, control systems, and operating modes is presented, including the integration of onboard sensors. A control hierarchy that uses modest computational methods is being used to allow mobile robots to autonomously navigate and perform tasks in known environments without the need for large computer systems

  13. Low speed turbines for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugol'nikov, V.V.; Kosyak, Yu.F.; Virchenko, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    Work of the Kharkov turbine plant on planning and manufacture for nuclear power plants of low-speed (1500 rpm) turbines with a power of 500-1000 MW is described. The selection of a construction diagram for the turbine assembly, determined basically by the presence or absence of parts of average pressure, is considered. Special construction features of the condenser and turbine are described. Turbine K-500, with a rate of 1500 rpm, was calculated for operation in a two-loop nuclear power plant with saturated steam with intermediate separation and two-stage steam regeneration. On the base of this turbine, three models of 1000-MW turbines were developed. The first model has a cylinder of average pressure (TsSD) and a lateral condenser. The second has no TsSD but a low location of the condensers. The third has no TsSD and the condensers are located laterally. Calculations of the heat efficiency of the three types of turbines showed that several advantages are offered by the model with a TsSD. Better aerodynamic properties of the exhaust nozzles and condensers with lateral location allows decreasing the specific heat consumption to 0.5-1% or, at the same power, a 10-20% decrease in cooling water consumption

  14. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This 2005 edition of the Elecnuc booklet summarizes in tables all numerical data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the PRIS database managed by the IAEA. The following aspects are reviewed: 2004 highlights; main characteristics of reactor types; map of the French nuclear power plants on 2005/01/01; worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 2004; units distributed by countries; nuclear power plants connected to the grid by reactor-type group; nuclear power plants under construction on 2004; evolution of nuclear power plant capacities connected to the grid; first electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit; electrical generation from nuclear power plants by country at the end 2004; performance indicator of PWR units in France; trend of the generation indicator worldwide; 2004 load factor by owners; units connected to the grid by countries at 12/31/2004; status of licence renewal applications in USA; nuclear power plants under construction at 12/31/2004; shutdown reactors; exported nuclear capacity in net MWe; exported and national nuclear capacity connected to the grid; exported nuclear power plants under construction or order; exported and national nuclear capacity under construction or order; recycling of plutonium in LWR; Mox licence plant projects; Appendix - historical development; acronyms, glossary

  15. Nuclear power plants and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agudo, E.G.; Penteado Filho, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    The question of nuclear power plants is analysed in details. The fundamental principles of reactors are described as well as the problems of safety involved with the reactor operation and the quantity and type of radioactive released to the environment. It shows that the amount of radioactive is very long. The reactor accidents has occurred, as three mile island, are also analysed. (M.I.A.)

  16. Operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, P.

    1988-04-01

    The textbook for training nuclear power plant personnel is centred on the most important aspects of operating modes of WWER-440 reactors. Attention is devoted to the steady state operation of the unit, shutdown, overhaul with refuelling, physical and power start-up. Also given are the regulations of shift operation and the duties of individual categories of personnel during the shift and during the change of shifts. (Z.M.). 3 figs., 1 tab

  17. Nuclear power plants - Quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This International Standard defines principles for the establishment and implementation of quality assurance programmes during all phases of design, procurement, fabrication, construction, commissioning, operation, maintenance and decommissioning of structures, systems and components of nuclear power plants. These principles apply to activities affecting the quality of items, such as designing, purchasing, fabricating, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, erecting, installing, testing, commissioning, operating, inspecting, maintaining, repairing, refuelling and modifying and eventually decommissioning. The manner in which the principles described in this document will be implemented in different organizations involved in a specific nuclear power project will depend on regulatory and contractual requirements, the form of management applied to a nuclear power project, and the nature and scope of the work to be performed by different organizations

  18. Exploiting nuclear plants in time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Lionel

    2011-02-01

    This document outlines that the French fleet of 58 reactors is only 25 year old in average, and that nuclear safety is strongly regulated, and notably relies on improved indicators and on a decennial re-assessment. It outlines that nuclear energy is a response to energy challenges and that it is therefore relevant to operate the nuclear fleet beyond the initially foreseen lifetime (40 years). Due to maintenance and renewal activities, plants are supposed to be safer and more efficient. To guarantee an always safer and more efficient operation in time, five actions are highlighted: decennial controls, installation and equipment modifications, control and anticipation of installation and equipment wear, competencies and ability renewal, better knowledge of techniques and technologies

  19. Community attitudes toward nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peelle, E.

    1982-01-01

    Among the many effects of the accident at Three Mile Island are impacts upon other communities that currently host nuclear-power reactors. Because studies on communities' reactions not immediately available, this chapter reviews existing studies and speculates about possible effects. The patterns and variations in impacts on and responses of nuclear host communities have been the subject of studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Oak Ridge, Tennessee) since 1972. This essay presents results from four post-licensing studies of host communities - Plymouth, Massachusetts, and Waterford, Connecticut (PL-1), and Brunswick, North Carolina, and Appling-Toombs counties, Georgia (PL-2) - along with case study and attitude survey information from two additional communities in which reactors are under construction: Hartsville, Tennessee, and Cherokee County, South Carolina. Differences and similarities between the sites have been assessed in terms of differences in input and social structure; factors affecting the generally favorable attitudes toward local nuclear plants are discussed

  20. Nuclear plant analyzer desktop workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beelman, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    In 1983 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) commissioned the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA). The NPA was envisioned as a graphical aid to assist reactor safety analysts in comprehending the results of thermal-hydraulic code calculations. The development was to proceed in three distinct phases culminating in a desktop reactor safety workstation. The desktop NPA is now complete. The desktop NPA is a microcomputer based reactor transient simulation, visualization and analysis tool developed at INEL to assist an analyst in evaluating the transient behavior of nuclear power plants by means of graphic displays. The NPA desktop workstation integrates advanced reactor simulation codes with online computer graphics allowing reactor plant transient simulation and graphical presentation of results. The graphics software, written exclusively in ANSI standard C and FORTRAN 77 and implemented over the UNIX/X-windows operating environment, is modular and is designed to interface to the NRC's suite of advanced thermal-hydraulic codes to the extent allowed by that code. Currently, full, interactive, desktop NPA capabilities are realized only with RELAP5

  1. Neutron doze distribution in capsules for surveillance of radiation embrittlement of pressure vessel in Krsko nuclear power plant; Porazdelitev nevtronske doze v sondah za kontrolo povecanja krhkosri tlacne posode JE Krsko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najzer, M; Remec, I; Kodeli, I [Institut Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Yugoslavia)

    1984-07-01

    Calculation of neutron fluence and spectrum distribution in the capsule with samples for radiation embrittlement of PWR pressure vessel surveillance program of Krsko nuclear power plant is presented. Two dimensional computer code DOT 3 has been used and neutron cross sections were taken from DLC-2D library. result is that fluence magnitude in the capsules changes for up to 70%, so when evaluating results of mechanical tests of samples it is necessary to take into account actual position of samples within the capsule. (author)

  2. Occupational dose control in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktorsson, C.; Lochard, J.; Benedittini, M.; Baum, J.; Khan, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Reduction in occupational exposure at nuclear power plants is desirable not only in the interest of the health and safety of plant personnel, but also because it enhances the safety and reliability of the plants. This report summarises the current trends of doses to workers at nuclear power plants and the achievements and developments regarding methods for their reduction

  3. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

  4. Nuclear plant life cycle costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durante, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Life cycle costs of nuclear power plants in the United States are discussed. The author argues that these costs have been mishandled or neglected. Decommissioning costs have escalated, e.g. from $328 per unit in 1991 to $370 in 1993 for the Sacramento Municipal Utility District, though they still only amount to less than 0.1 cent per kWh. Waste management has been complicated in the U.S. by the decision to abandon civilian reprocessing; by the year 2000, roughly 30 U.S. nuclear power units will have filled their storage pools; dry storage has been delayed, and will be an expense not originally envisaged. Some examples of costs of major component replacement are provided. No single component has caused as much operational disruption and financial penalties as the steam generator. Operation and maintenance costs have increased steadily, and now amount to more than 70% of production costs. A strategic plan by the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (of U.S. utilities) will ensure that the ability to correctly operate and maintain a nuclear power plant is built into the original design. 6 figs

  5. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purvis, James W.

    1999-01-01

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented

  6. 78 FR 4477 - Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR Edition.'' The new subsection is the Standard Review Plan... Nuclear Power Plants: Integral Pressurized Water Reactor (iPWR) Edition.'' DATES: Comments must be filed... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0268] Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power...

  7. Deuterium ingress at rolled joints in Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos Nervi, J. E.; Schroeter, F.

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium ingress model at the Rolled Joint has been extensively used for CANDU Nuclear Power Plants Operators in the Life Management of the Pressure Tubes. The importance of understanding the model is vital to avoid delayed hydride cracking at the Rolled Joint. This work reports the first step on develop the model presented on literature to be used in Argentinean CANDU 6, Embalse Nuclear Power Plant. (author)

  8. French nuclear plant safeguard pump qualification testing: EPEC test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guesnon, H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the specifications to which nuclear power plant safeguard pumps must be qualified, and surveys the qualification methods and program used in France to verify operability of the pump assembly and major pump components. The EPEC test loop is described along with loop capabilities and acheivements up to now. This paper shows, through an example, the Medium Pressure Safety Injection Pump designed for service in 1300 MW nuclear power plants, and the interesting possibilities offered by qualification testing

  9. Nuclear reactor plants and control systems therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Boer, G.A.; de Hex, M.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor plant is described comprising at least two hydraulically separated but thermally interconnected heat conveying circuits, of which one is the reactor circuit filled with a non-water medium and the other one is the water-steam-circuit equipped with a steam generator, a feed water conduit controlled by a valve and a steam turbine, and a control system mainly influenced by the pressure drop caused in said feed water conduit and its control valve and having a value of at least 10 bars at full load

  10. Piping engineering for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curto, N.; Schmidt, H.; Muller, R.

    1988-01-01

    In order to develop piping engineering, an adequate dimensioning and correct selection of materials must be secured. A correct selection of materials together with calculations and stress analysis must be carried out with a view to minimizing or avoiding possible failures or damages in piping assembling, which could be caused by internal pressure, weight, temperature, oscillation, etc. The piping project for a nuclear power plant is divided into the following three phases. Phase I: Basic piping design. Phase II: Final piping design. Phase III: Detail engineering. (Author)

  11. Ventilation-air conditioner system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Ryuji; Sugisaki, Toshihiko.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns a ventilation-air conditioner system which enables, upon occurrence of accidents in a nuclear power plant, continuous operation for other adjacent nuclear power plants with no effect of accidents. Air supply system and exhaust system are operated during usual operaiton. If loss of coolants accidents should occur in an adjacent nuclear power plants, operation is switched from ventilation operaiton to the operation of re-cycling system based on an AND logic of three signals, that is, a pressure HIGH signal for the reactor container, a water level LOW signal for the reactor and a radioactivity signal of the ventilation-air conditioner sytem on the side of air supply in the nuclear power plant. Thus, nuclear reactor buildings of the nuclear power plant are from the external atmosphere. Therefore, the radioactivity HIGH signal for switching to the emergency air conditioner system of the nuclear power plant is not actuated due to the loss of coolant accidents in the adjacent nuclear power plant. In addition, since the atmospheric temperature in the nuclear reactor building can be maintained by a cooling device disposed to the recycling system, reactor shutdown can be prevented. (I.S.)

  12. Training device for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoessow, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    A simulated nuclear energy power plant system with visible internal working components comprising a reactor adapted to contain a liquid with heating elements submerged in the liquid and capable of heating the liquid to an elevated temperature, a steam generator containing water and a heat exchanger means to receive the liquid at an elevated temperature, transform the water to steam, and return the spent liquid to the reactor; a steam turbine receiving high energy steam to drive the turbine and discharging low energy steam to a condenser where the low energy steam is condensed to water which is returned to the steam generator; an electric generator driven by the turbine; indicating means to identify the physical status of the reactor and its contents; and manual and automatic controls to selectively establish normal or abnormal operating conditions in the reactor, steam generator, pressurizer, turbine, electric generator, condenser, and pumps; and to be selectively adjusted to bring the reactor to acceptable operating condition after being placed in an abnormal operation. This device is particularly useful as an education device in demonstrating nuclear reactor operations and in training operating personnel for nuclear reactor systems and also as a device for conducting research on various safety systems to improve the safety of nuclear power plants

  13. Changing nuclear plant operating limits during startup and shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, E.C.; Carlson, R.W.; Ray, N.K.; Roarty, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    During startup and shutdown operation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants, a low pressure decay heat removal system is used to maintain core cooling. During these phases of operation, there are numerous operating practices and design limits to meet special and sometimes conflicting requirements unique to these operations. This paper evaluates the impact and interdependencies of recent issues on plant operation and design

  14. Cooling facility of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kenji; Nagasaki, Hideo.

    1992-01-01

    In a cooling device of a nuclear power plant, an exhaust pipe for an incondensible gas is branched. One of the branched exhaust pipes is opened in a pressure suppression pool water in a suppression chamber containing pool water and the other is opened at a lower portion of a dry well incorporating a pressure vessel. In a state where the pressure in the dry well is higher than that in the suppression chamber, an off-gas is exhausted effectively by way of the exhaustion pipe in communication with the suppression chamber. In a state where there is no difference between the pressures and the opening end of the exhaustion pipe in communication with the suppression chamber is sealed with water, off-gas is exhausted by way of the exhaustion pipe in communication with the lower portion of the dry well. Then, since the incondensible gas in a heat transfer pipe is not accumulated, after-heat can be removed efficiently. Satisfactory cooling is maintained even after the coincidence of the pressures in the dry well with that in the suppression chamber, to decrease a pressure in a reactor container. (N.H.)

  15. Concept of underground nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Sotoaki

    1976-01-01

    The concept of constructing nuclear power plants on the sea or underground as the future sitting is based on moving the present power plants on the ground with actual results to the sea or underground without changing the design. The underground nuclear power plants have many similar points to underground hydro-electric power stations with many achievements in the construction viewpoint, though they have their proper difficult problems. Of course, it requires to excavate larger underground caves than the case of underground hydro-electric power plants. The maximum dimensions of the caves have been determined through experience in practice. Therefore the developments of design theory and construction technique are desirable in this field. In discussing underground construction, two evaluating methods are considered for the shielding effect of base rocks. The minimum vertical distance up to ground surface from the center of the cave differs depending upon the in-cave pressure, and the conditions of base rock, soil and underground water in case of the accident assumed in the design, and is approximately 60m, if the cave is assumed to be an indefinite cylindrical shape, by the safer side calculation in the above two evaluations. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  16. Improving operator quality at Genkai Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwano, Takeshi.

    1989-01-01

    Improvement in operator quality, or improvement in an operator's skill and professional knowledge, is of prime importance because of its great influence on safe and steady plant operation. This paper describes the education and training of reactor operators at the Genkai pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant with respect to the following topics: organization of Genkai power plant; education and training program management; training at the Nuclear Training Center; training and education on-site including emergency procedures training, normal operating procedures training, informational study of emergency conditions in existing plants, and all-around training of operators; qualifying tests for supervisors; and operator motivation

  17. Radiation embrittlement of Spanish nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bros, J.; Ballesteros, A.; Lopez, A.

    1993-01-01

    Commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants contain a series of pressure vessel steel surveillance capsules as the principal means of monitoring radiation effects on the pressure vessel. Changes in fracture toughness are more severe in surveillance capsules than in reactor vessel materials because of their proximity of the reactor core. Therefore, it is possible to predict changes in fracture toughness of the reactor vessel materials. This paper describes the status of the reactor vessel surveillance program relating to Spanish nuclear power plants. To date, twelve capsules have been removed and analyzed from seven of the nine Spanish reactors in operation. The results obtained from the analysis of these capsules are compared with the predictions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, by means of measured and expected increase of the nil-ductility transition reference temperature (RT NDT ). The comparison is made considering the different variables normally included in the studies of radiation response of reactor pressure vessel materials, such as copper content of steel, level of neutron fluence above 1 MeV, base metal or weld metal, and so forth. The surveillance data have been used for determining the adjusted reference temperatures and upper shelf energies at any time. The results have shown that the seven pressure vessels are in excellent condition to continue operating with safety against brittle fracture beyond the design life, without the need to recuperate the degraded properties of the materials by annealing of the vessel

  18. Nuclear power plant operating experience. Annual report, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, M.R.

    1979-12-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of reports issued annually that summarizes the operating experience of US nuclear power plants in commercial operation. Power generation statistics, plant outages, reportable occurrences, fuel element performance, occupational radiation exposure for each plant are presented. Summary highlights of these areas are discussed. The report includes 1978 data from 65 plants - 25 boiling water reactor plants and 40 pressurized water reactor plants. Discussion of radioactive effluents which has been a part of this report in previous years, has not been included in this issue because of late acquisition of data

  19. Nuclear Power Plants in the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2002 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from 65 electric power companies and other nuclear organizations in 28 countries and regions around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 19 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities; and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  20. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2007/2008 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from electric power companies and other nuclear organizations around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 18 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; effect of the Niigata-ken chuetsu-oki earthquake; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  1. Nuclear Power Plants in the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc. (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 2003 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from 81 electric power companies and other nuclear organizations in 33 countries and regions around the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 19 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; status of MOX use in the world; location of the plants; the plants in the world; directory of the plants; nuclear fuel cycle facilities; and so forth. (J.P.N.)

  2. Maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migaud, D.; Hutin, J.P.; Jouette, I.; Eymond, P.; Devie, P.; Cudelou, C.; Magnier, S.; Frydman, M.

    2016-01-01

    This document gathers different articles concerning the maintenance of the French nuclear power plants. The first article analyses the impact of the recent law on the energetic transition that sets the share of nuclear power at 50% of the electricity produced by 2025. A consequence may be the decommissioning of 17 to 20 reactors by 2025 and the huge maintenance program called 'Grand Carenage' whose aim is to extend operating life over 40 years will have to be re-considered in order to avoid useless expenses. The second article shows that in 2015 the French nuclear reactor fleet got very good results in terms of availability and safety. There were 49 scheduled outages and among them some ended ahead of time. The third article describes the specificities of the maintenance of a nuclear power plant, for instance the redundancy of some systems implies that maintenance has to deal with systems that have never functioned but must be ready to operate at any moment. Another specificity is the complexity of a nuclear power plant that implies an essential phase of preparation for maintenance operations. Because of safety requirements any maintenance operation has to be controlled, checked and may provide feedback. The fourth article presents the 'Grand Carenage' maintenance program that involves the following operations: the replacement of steam generators, the re-tubing of condensers, the replacement of the filtering drums used for cooling water, the testing of the reactor building, the hydraulic test of the primary circuit and the inspection of the reactor vessel. The fifth article focuses on the organization of the work-site for maintenance operations and the example of the Belleville-sur-Loire is described in the sixth article. Important maintenance operations like 'Grand Carenage' requires a strong collaboration with a network of specialized enterprises and as no reactor (except Flamanville EPR) is being built in France, maintenance

  3. Nuclear Plant Integrated Outage Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstberger, C. R.; Coulehan, R. J.; Tench, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is a discussion of an emerging concept for improving nuclear plant outage performance - integrated outage management. The paper begins with an explanation of what the concept encompasses, including a scope definition of the service and descriptions of the organization structure, various team functions, and vendor/customer relationships. The evolvement of traditional base scope services to the integrated outage concept is addressed and includes discussions on changing customer needs, shared risks, and a partnership approach to outages. Experiences with concept implementation from a single service in 1984 to the current volume of integrated outage management presented in this paper. We at Westinghouse believe that the operators of nuclear power plants will continue to be aggressively challenged in the next decade to improve the operating and financial performance of their units. More and more customers in the U. S. are looking towards integrated outage as the way to meet these challenges of the 1990s, an arrangement that is best implemented through a long-term partnering with a single-source supplier of high quality nuclear and turbine generator outage services. This availability, and other important parameters

  4. Effect of special features of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharf, H.

    1986-01-01

    Special features of nuclear power plants are reported with the Muelheim-Kaerlich pressurized water reactor as the reference plant. This nuclear reactor uses 'Once Through Steam Generators (OTSG)' with 'Integrated Economizer' to provide the turbine with superheated steam. The implementation of OTSG allows to operate the plant with constant steam pressure over the entire power range, and with constant main coolant temperature over a power range from 15% power to 100% power. Control of the plant during power operation is provided by the 'Integrated Control System', which simultaneously sends signals to the plant's subsystems reactor, OTSG, and turbine to get optimum response of the plant during power transients. The characteristics of this 'Integrated Control System' and its different modes of operation are presented. (orig./GL)

  5. Analysis of the loss of coolant accident due to the faiture in the open position of two pressurizer relief valves, for Angra-1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, C.F.

    1981-06-01

    A study of the modeling techniques adequate for simulating the loss of coolant accident caused by stuck open pressurizer relief valves, using the RELAP4-MOD5 code, is performed and the model developed is applied to the analysis of this kind of accident for the Central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto Unit (Angra 1). The thermal hydraulic behavior of the reactor cooling system, when subjected to a loss of main feedwater followed by the failure in the open position of two pressurizer relief valves, is determined. The relief valves are assumed to fail in the totally open position, delivering the maximum massflow through the discharge line. The RELAP4-MOD5 code is shown to be adequate for this kind of analysis, and the detailed prediction of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the Reactor Coolant System is thus possible. The eficiency of the emergency core cooling system of Angra 1 is demonstrated, the fuel elements remaining covered by the coolant during all the accident, and the peak clad temperatures are kept within design limites, ensuring the integrity of the core. (Author) [pt

  6. Structural mechanics in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Liangbi

    1998-01-01

    The main research works in structural mechanics in reactor technology are emphatically introduced. It is completed by structural mechanics engineers at Shanghai Nuclear Research and Design Institute associated with the design and construction problems for Qinshan NPP Unit 1 and Pakistani CHASNUPP. About structural mechanics problem for the containment, the rock and soft soil two different bases are considered. For the later the interaction between soil and structure is carefully studied. About the structural mechanics problem for the equipment and pipings, the three dimensional stress and fracture analyses are studied. For the structural dynamics problem, including flow induced vibration, the response analyses under earthquake and loss coolant accident loadings are studied. For pipings, the leak before break technique has been emphatically introduced. A lot of mathematical models, the used computer codes, analytical calculations and experimental results are also introduced. This is a comprehensive description about structural mechanics problem in pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

  7. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercks, D. R.

    1993-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power- gener-ating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with and analyzing radioactive compo-nents are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in serv-ice. The failures discussed are (1) intergranular stress- corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (2) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressurized water reactor, (3) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (4) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor.

  8. The fourth nuclear power plant in Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogarin, Mauro

    2017-01-15

    Since 2006 the nuclear sector in Argentina has aimed at recovering and strengthening its capabilities and facilities. Part of the challenge posed by this revival has been to also accompany the development of activities with a higher level of responsibility for safety and the environment. Among the strategic decisions taken in recent years, one main highlight is the construction of the nuclear power plant CAREM25 entirely with Argentine technology and design under the responsibility of the National Atomic Energy Commission. On February 4, 2015, the Ministry of Federal Planning and the National Energy Administration (NEA) signed the agreement for cooperation and construction of pressurized water reactor (PWR) with ACP-1000 technology, developed in the Peoples Republic of China.

  9. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power-generating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with an analyzing radioactive components are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in service. The failures discussed are (1) intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (2) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressurized water reactor, (3) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (4) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor

  10. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.

    1992-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power generating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with and analyzing radioactive components are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in service. The failures discussed are (a) intergranular stress corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (b) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressure water reactor, (c) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (d) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor

  11. Simulators for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancarani, A.; Zanobetti, D.

    1983-01-01

    The different types of simulator for nuclear power plants depend on the kind of programme and the degree of representation to be achieved, which in turn determines the functions to duplicate. Different degrees correspond to different simulators and hence to different choices in the functions. Training of nuclear power plant operators takes advantage of the contribution of simulators of various degrees of complexity and fidelity. Reduced scope simulators are best for understanding basic phenomena; replica simulators are best used for formal qualification and requalification of personnel, while modular mini simulators of single parts of a plant are best for replay and assessment of malfunctions. Another category consists of simulators for the development of assistance during operation, with the inclusion of disturbance and alarm analysis. The only existing standard on simulators is, at present, the one adopted in the United States. This is too stringent and is never complied with by present simulators. A description of possible advantages of a European standard is therefore offered: it rests on methods of measurement of basic simulator characteristics such as fidelity in values and time. (author)

  12. Nuclear plant analyzer program for Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shier, W.; Kennett, R.

    1993-01-01

    An interactive nuclear plant analyzer(NPA) has been developed for use by the Bulgarian technical community in the training of plant personnel, the development and verification of plant operating procedures, and in the analysis of various anticipated operational occurrences and accident scenarios. The current NPA includes models for a VVER-440 Model 230 and a VVER-1000 Model 320 and is operational on an IBM RISC6000 workstation. The RELAP5/MOD2 computer code has been used for the calculation of the reactor responses to the interactive commands initiated by the NPA operator. The interactive capabilities of the NPA have been developed to provide considerable flexibility in the plant actions that can be initiated by the operator. The current capabilities for both the VVER-440 and VVER-1000 models include: (1) scram initiation; (2) reactor coolant pump trip; (3) high pressure safety injection system initiation; (4) low pressure safety injection system initiation; (5) pressurizer safety valve opening; (6) steam generator relief/safety valve opening; (7) feedwater system initiation and trip; (8) turbine trip; and (9) emergency feedwater initiation. The NPA has the capability to display the results of the simulations in various forms that are determined by the model developer. Results displayed on the reactor mask are shown through the user defined, digital display of various plant parameters and through color changes that reflect changes in primary system fluid temperatures, fuel and clad temperatures, and the temperature of other metal structures. In addition, changes in the status of various components and systems can be initiated and/or displayed both numerically and graphically on the mask. This paper provides a description of the structure of the NPA, a discussion of the simulation models used for the VVER-440 and the VVER-1000, and an overview of the NPA capabilities. Typical results obtained using both simulation models will be discussed

  13. Advanced plant design recommendations from Cook Nuclear Plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, W.L.

    1993-01-01

    A project in the American Electric Power Service Corporation to review operating and maintenance experience at Cook Nuclear Plant to identify recommendations for advanced nuclear plant design is described. Recommendations so gathered in the areas of plant fluid systems, instrument and control, testing and surveillance provisions, plant layout of equipment, provisions to enhance effective maintenance, ventilation systems, radiological protection, and construction, are presented accordingly. An example for a design review checklist for effective plant operations and maintenance is suggested

  14. I and C upgrading at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiri, A.

    2003-01-01

    Continuing the operation of existing nuclear power plants will help reduce the number of new base-load nuclear and fossil power plants that need to be built. Old nuclear power plants in Canada are operating with analog instrumentation and control systems. For a number of reasons, such as changes and improvements in the applicable standards and design, maintenance problems due to the lack of spares, technical obsolescence, the need to increase power production, availability, reliability and safety, and in order to reduce operation and maintenance costs, instrumentation and control upgrading at nuclear power plants in a cost effective manner should be considered the greatest priority. Failures of instrumentation and control (I and C) due to aging and obsolescence issues may have an immediate negative impact on plant reliability and availability and also affect long-term plant performance and safety. In today's competitive marketplace, power plants are under pressure to cut spending on maintenance while reducing the risk of equipment failure that could cause unplanned outage. To improve plant safety and availability, old nuclear power plants will require investment in new technologies that can improve the performance and reduce the costs of generation by addressing the long term reliability of systems by up-grading to modem digital instrumentation and control and optimization opportunities. Boiler drum level control at nuclear power plants is critical for both plant protection and equipment safety and applies equality to high and low levels of water within the boiler drum. Plant outage studies at Pickering Nuclear have identified boiler drum level control and feed water control systems as major contributors to plant unavailability. Ways to improve transient and steady state response, upgrading existing poor analog control systems for boiler level and feed-water control systems at Pickering Nuclear, with enhanced and robust controller will be discussed in this paper

  15. Double containment shell for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.

    1977-01-01

    A double containment shell is proposed for nuclear power plants, especially those equipped with pressurized water reactors. The shell offers increased environmental protection from primary circuit accidents. The inner shell is built of steel or concrete while the outer shell is always built of concrete. The space between the two shells is filled with water and is provided with several manholes and with stiffeners designed for compensation for load due to the water hydrostatic pressure. Water serves the airtight separation of the containment shell inside from the environment and the absorption of heat released in a primary circuit accident. In case the inner shell is made of concrete, it is provided with heat-removal tubes in-built in its walls ensuring rapid heat transfer from the inside of the containment to the water in the interwall space. (Z.M.)

  16. Applications of lasers in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Rupam; Sanyal, D.N.; Sil, Jaydeb

    2013-01-01

    Applications of lasers in nuclear power plants: Bellow lip cutting and high pressure feeder coupling stud (HPFC) cutting during en-masse coolant channel replacement (EMCCR) campaign at Narora Atomic Power Station Reactor 1 in May 2006; cutting of pressure tubes from Madras Atomic Power Station 1 (MAPS-1) for easy storage in April 2005; In-situ cutting of selected coolant channel S-7 at Kakrapar Atomic Power Station (KAPS-2) (cutting of 12 mm thick end fitting and 4 mm thick liner tube of stainless steel from inside) in January 2005; Development of a miniature cutting mechanism for steam generator tubes (14 mm i.d.) from inside, In-situ bellow repair for secondary shutdown system; LASER welding may be deployed for End shield of MAPS-1 leak repair

  17. Hydrogen risk reduction in Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movahed, M.A.; Travis, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    In case of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant with core melt and hydrogen production, the hydrogen risk is one of the main concerns. It may jeopardize the containment integrity due to violent deflagration that can lead to DDT (Deflagration Detonation Transient) or even detonation of proper hydrogen mitigation means are not available. The design of the EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor) Hydrogen mitigation and control system is based on the lumped parameter code WAVCO and the 3D code GASFLOW. The concept consists of recombiners and igniters to cope with all scenarios including those without steam. The system has been checked to avoid DDT by the 7λ criteria that's implemented in GASFLOW. Future analysis could deal with determining dynamic pressure loads, if appropriate, and some sensitivity studies to check the hydrogen control measures with respect to different source locations and mass flow rates. Also a conditional criterion for determining the likelihood of fast deflagration should be developed. (author)

  18. Maintenance of process instrumentation in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.

    2006-01-01

    The resurgence of the nuclear power industry at a time when the nuclear plant I and C workforce is diminishing due to aging and retirements has been the motivation for writing this book. This book compiles 30 years of practical knowledge gained by the author and his staff in testing the I and C systems of nuclear power plants around the world. It focuses on process temperature and pressure sensors and the verification of these sensors' calibration and response time. In spite of great advances in electronics, computers, and measurement technologies, important process parameters such as temperature and pressure are still measured with conventional sensing techniques found in RTDs, thermocouples, and conventional pressure and differential pressure sensors. Furthermore, no improved technology providing comparable performance is currently on the horizon. Therefore, it is important to understand how these sensors function and the testing techniques for verifying their performance. This book is intended to help provide this understanding. (orig.)

  19. Nuclear power plant V-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In this leaflet the short history of commissioning of Bohunice V-2 NPP is reviewed (beginning of construction December 1976; First controlled reactor power, Reactor Unit 1 (RU1): 7 August 1984, Reactor Unit 2 (RU2): 2 August 1985; Connection to the grid: RU1 20 August 1984, RU2 9 August 1985; Commercial operation: RU1 14 February 1985, RU2 18 December 1985. The scheme of the nuclear reactor WWER 440/V213 is depicted. The major technological equipment are described. Principles of nuclear power plant operation safety (safety barriers, active and passive safety systems, centralized heat supply system, as well as technical data of the Bohunice V-2 NPP are presented

  20. Nuclear power plant V-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In this leaflet the short history of commissioning of Bohunice V-1 NPP is reviewed (beginning of construction 24 April 1972; First controlled reactor power, Reactor Unit 1 (RU1): 27 November 1978, Reactor Unit 2 (RU2): 15 March 1980; Connection to the grid: RU1 17 December 1978, RU2 26 March 1980; Commercial operation: RU1 1 April 1980, RU2 7 January 1981. The scheme of the nuclear reactor WWER 440/V230 is depicted. The major technological equipment (primary circuit, nuclear reactor, steam generators, reactor coolant pumps, primary circuit auxiliary systems, secondary circuit, turbine generators, NPP electrical equipment, and power plant control) are described. Technical data of the Bohunice V-1 NPP are presented

  1. Developments in nuclear power plant water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzetti, K.; Wood, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper illustrates the changing role of water chemistry in current operation of nuclear power plants. Water chemistry was sometimes perceived as the cause of materials problems, such as denting in PWR steam generators and intergranular stress corrosion cracking in BWRs. However, starting in the last decade, new chemistry options have been introduced to mitigate stress corrosion cracking and reduce fuel performance concerns. In BWRs and PWRs alike, water chemistry has evolved to successfully mitigate many problems as they have developed. The increasing complexity of the chemistry alternatives, coupled with the pressures to increase output and reduce costs, have demonstrated the need for new approaches to managing plant chemistry, which are addressed in the final part of this paper. (orig.)

  2. Feedwater system in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Tadayuki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To improve the control property of a steam turbine for a feedwater pump and plant operation characteristics where water is supplied at a low rate. Structure: In a nuclear power plant where feedwater pumps of the reactor are driven by a steam turbine, the main feedwater duct on the discharge side of the feedwater pumps is provided with a cut-off valve and is connected parallel with a bypass duct having a pressure compensated flow control valve. With this arrangement, at the time when the rate of feedwater is high the cut-off valve is open so that water supplied from the feedwater pumps driven by the steam turbine is supplied through the main feedwater duct to the reactor while in case when the rate of feedwater is low the flow control valve is opened to let the water be supplied through the bypass duct. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Gundremmingen (KRB) nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-03-01

    Plant reliability and availability during 1973 was very good despite an unscheduled shutdown in October. A temporal availability of 79.42% and an operating availability of 79.07% yielded a usable current production of 1 634 000 000 000 kWh. In May, during the five-week inspection and refueling period, several machines and items of equipment were overhauled in addition to the major generator strip-down, and checks were also carried out on the safety and protection systems throughout the plant. Particular attention was paid to the fire-protection system so that, for example, a fire-protection valve was installed in the turbine oil circuit. The heating system was made independent of oil supplies and considerable economies were achieved by converting it from oil-firing to secondary steam operation. During October copper deposits from a feedwater pre-heater were discovered in the reactor core. The plant had to be shut down for five weeks in order to clean the reactor out with various items of cleaning equipment. After the plant had been started up again, it proved necessary to take the pre-heater releasing copper out of service. This was possible without any noteworthy loss of power. For further operation, it will be necessary to fit the pre-heater with high-grade steel tubes. Throughout the remainder of the year, the power plant operated under full load without any particular malfunction occurring. At the beginning of the year increasing amount of activity in the reactor water pointed to fuel element damage. It was possible to operate the plant at a constant, low level of water activity during the second half of the year after refuelling and the removal of the faulty elements. Faultless plant operation can likewise be expected for 1974. Owing to the officially required pressure test on the reactor pressure vessel, the inspection time will probably extend over six weeks. It is expected that plant availability during 1974 will exceed the 1973 figure

  4. Slovak Electric, plc, Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In this popular scientific brochure a brief description of construction scheme of Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant is presented. Electricity generation in a nuclear power plant is described. Instrumentation and control system as well as nuclear safety principles applied on the NPP are presented

  5. Nuclear power plants in populated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachsmann, F.

    1973-01-01

    The article first deals with the permanently increasing demand for electical power. Considering the ever growing energy demand which can no longer be covered by conventional power plants, it has become necessary to set up nuclear power plants of larger range. The author presents in a survey the basic function of nuclear power plants as well as the resulting risks and safety measures. The author concludes that according to present knowledge there is no more need to erect nuclear power plants outside densely populated urban areas but there is now the possibility of erecting nuclear power plants in densely populated areas. (orig./LH) [de

  6. Pressure vessel for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulten, R.; Kugeler, K.; Kugeler, M.; Petersen, K.; Decken, C.B. von der.

    1983-01-01

    This construction of a container, which is pressure-relieved by axial-central tensioning cables or reinforcing cables distributed over the circumference, makes a reduction of the wall thickness for the floor and roof, which was previously 2.5 metres by about 40% possible, and thus reduce manufacturing and cost problems. This is achieved by an appreciable increase of the prestressing exerted by the tensioning cables as this is taken up, not by the elasticity of the roof and floor, but instead by an intermediate part of pressure-resisting material. Such a container consists of a vertical cylindrical jacket of, for example, 20 metres diameter and 18 metres height, of a roof and floor of, for example, 1.50 metres thickness each and the intermediate part, which keeps the spacing of floor and roof as a central piece. This intermediate part which is taken through seals through the container can be imagined as a double tube of outside tube diameter of, for example, 4 metres and inside tube diameter of 2 metres with both tubes having thick walls. 4 tensioning cables displaced vertically by 900 run in the cylindrical annulus between the outer and inner tubes which are brought to the required pretension, e.g. 80,000 tonnes by nuts situated on the outside. The inner tube projects through the floor and roof. Its openings act as manholes and for the introduction of pipelines. These can, for example, carry a cooling medium for a reactor core via further ducts into the inside of the container. Container wall, floor and roof and the intermediate part in the form of a double tube are made up of cast steel segments or sectors in several layers. (RW)

  7. Design of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    The criteria of design and safety, applied internationally to systems and components of PWR type reactors, are described. The main criteria of the design analysed are: thermohydraulic optimization; optimized arrangement of buildings and components; low costs of energy generation; high level of standardization; application of specific safety criteria for nuclear power plants. The safety criteria aim to: assure the safe reactor shutdown; remove the residual heat and; avoid the release of radioactive elements for environment. Some exemples of safety criteria are given for Angra-2 and Angra-3 reactors. (M.C.K.) [pt

  8. Off-shore nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, T.

    1980-01-01

    In order to avoid losses of energy and seawater pollution an off-shore nuclear power plant is coupled with a power plant which utilizes the temperature difference between seawater and hot reactor cooling water. According to the invention the power plant has a working media loop which is separated from the nuclear power plant. The apparative equipment and the operational characteristics of the power plant are the subject of the patent. (UWI) [de

  9. Overview of the Italian activities in the field of life management of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pini, A.

    1994-01-01

    Overview of the Italian activities in the field of life management of nuclear power plants is presented, including the following issues: nuclear energy scenario in Italy, study of reactor pressure vessel, piping and containment integrity, seismic risk analysis

  10. Nuclear power. Volume 1. Nuclear power plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DESIGN is intended to be used as a working reference book for management, engineers and designers, and as a graduate-level text for engineering students. The book is designed to combine theory with practical nuclear power engineering and design experience, and to give the reader an up-to-date view of the status of nuclear power and a basic understanding of how nuclear power plants function. Volume 1 contains the following chapters; (1) nuclear reactor theory; (2) nuclear reactor design; (3) types of nuclear power plants; (4) licensing requirements; (5) shielding and personnel exposure; (6) containment and structural design; (7) main steam and turbine cycles; (8) plant electrical system; (9) plant instrumentation and control systems; (10) radioactive waste disposal (waste management) and (11) conclusion

  11. Nuclear power plant operation 2016. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2017-05-15

    A report is given on the operating results achieved in 2016, events important to plant safety, special and relevant repair, and retrofit measures from nuclear power plants in Germany. Reports about nuclear power plants in Belgium, Finland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Spain will be published in a further issue.

  12. Environmental survey around EDF nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulquier, L.

    1992-01-01

    Description of various types of environmental test carried out under the responsibility of the Operator of nuclear power plants in France, with taking Fessenheim nuclear power plant as an example: permanent monitoring of radioactivity, periodic radioecological assessments, main results of measurements taken, showing that there are no detectable effects of the plant on the environment, policy of openness by publication of these results

  13. Nuclear plant analyzer development and analysis applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laats, E.T.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is being developed as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) state of the art safety analysis and engineering tool to address key nuclear plant safety issues. The NPA integrates the NRC's computerized reactor behavior simulation codes such as RELAP5 and TRAC-BWR, both of which are well-developed computer graphics programs, and large repositories of reactor design and experimental data. Utilizing the complex reactor behavior codes as well as the experiment data repositories enables simulation applications of the NPA that are generally not possible with more simplistic, less mechanistic reactor behavior codes. These latter codes are used in training simulators or with other NPA-type software packages and are limited to displaying calculated data only. This paper describes four applications of the NPA in assisting reactor safety analyses. Two analyses evaluated reactor operating procedures, during off-normal operation, for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and a boiling water reactor (BWR), respectively. The third analysis was performed in support of a reactor safety experiment conducted in the Semiscale facility. The final application demonstrated the usefulness of atmospheric dispersion computer codes for site emergency planning purposes. An overview of the NPA and how it supported these analyses are the topics of this paper

  14. Radioactive waste processing method for a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Kuriyama, O

    1976-06-04

    Object is to subject radioactive liquid waste in a nuclear power plant to reverse permeation process after which it is vaporized and concentrated thereby decreasing the quantity of foam to be used to achieve effective concentration of the liquid waste. Liquid waste containing a radioactive material produced from a nuclear power plant is first applied with pressure in excess of osmotic pressure by a reverse permeation device and is separated into clean water and concentrated liquid by semi-permeable membrane. Next, the thus reverse-permeated and concentrated waste is fed to an evaporator which control foaming by the foam and then further reconcentrated for purification of the liquid waste.

  15. AP1000 plant construction in China: Ansaldo Nucleare contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frogheri, Monica; Saiu, Gianfranco

    2009-01-01

    On 24th of July 2007 Westinghouse Electric Co. signed landmark contracts with China's State Nuclear Power Technology Corporation (SNPTC), to provide four AP1000 nuclear power plants in China. The AP1000 is a two-loop 1117 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). It is based on proven technology, but with an emphasis on safety features that rely on natural driving forces, such as pressurized gas, gravity flow, natural circulation flow and convection. Ansaldo Nucleare has provided a significant support to the passive plant technology development and, starting from 2000, is cooperating with Westinghouse to development of the AP1000 Plant. In the frame of the AP1000 Chinese agreement, Ansaldo Nucleare, in Joint Venture with Mangiarotti Nuclear, has signed a contract with Westinghouse for the design and the supply of innovative components to be installed in the first AP1000 unit to be constructed at the Sanmen site. The contract includes: the design of the steel containment vessel, preparation of construction and fabrication, specifications, design and supply of SCV mechanical penetrations, air locks and equipment hatches. Moreover, Ansaldo Nucleare is in charge of the final design of the AP1000 PRHR-HX and together with Mangiarotti Nuclear will supply the component for the Sanmen Unit 1 NPP. The paper presents an overview of the design and manufacturing activities performed by Ansaldo Nucleare and its partners for the AP1000 plant in China. (authors)

  16. Commercialization of nuclear power plant decommissioning technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    The commercialization of nuclear power plant decommissioning is presented as a step in the commercialization of nuclear energy. Opportunities for technology application advances are identified. Utility planning needs are presented

  17. Heat recovery from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safa, H.

    2012-01-01

    The thermodynamic efficiency of a standard Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is around 33%. Therefore, about two third of the heat generated by the nuclear fuel is literally wasted in the environment. Given the fact that the steam coming out from the high pressure turbine is superheated, it could be advantageously used for non electrical applications, particularly for district heating. Considering the technological improvements achieved these last years in heat piping insulation, it is now perfectly feasible to envisage heat transport over quite long distances, exceeding 200 km, with affordable losses. Therefore, it could be energetically wise to revise the modifications required on present reactors to perform heat extraction without impeding the NPP operation. In this paper, the case of a French reactor is studied showing that a large fraction of the wasted nuclear heat can be actually recovered and transported to be injected in the heat distribution network of a large city. Some technical and economical aspects of nuclear district heating application are also discussed. (author)

  18. Heat exchanger. [Nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, C; Brisseaux, A

    1976-01-19

    This invention concerns a heat exchanger between a fluid flowing through a tube and a gas. Such an exchanger can be used, inter alia, for removing calories that cannot be used for generating electricity in a thermal or nuclear power station. This exchanger can withstand any pressure surges in the system and even the use of a high vapour pressure coolant such as ammonia, since the fluid flows in a round tube with low pressure drops (both with respect to the fluid to be cooled and the cooling air). It is rigid enough to stand up to being moved and handled as well as to gusts of wind. It is formed of units that can be handled without difficulty and that are easily dismantable and interchangeable, even in service, and it is easily maintained. The exchange area is high for a minimum frontal area and this enables the size of the supporting frame to be reduced and makes it easy to hide it behind a screen of trees should this prove necessary. Finally, it is composed of a small number of standard units thus reducing the industrial production cost. These units are rectangular plates, each one being a flat tubular coil fitted between two flat parallel sheet metal plates having on their outer sides flat top raised bosses. These units are assembled together by the tops of the bosses so as to form an exchanger bank, each bank comprising two collectors to which the bank coils are tightly connected.

  19. TOSHIBA CAE system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machiba, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Norio

    1990-01-01

    TOSHIBA aims to secure safety, increase reliability and improve efficiency through the engineering for nuclear power plant using Computer Aided Engineering (CAE). TOSHIBA CAE system for nuclear power plant consists of numbers of sub-systems which had been integrated centering around the Nuclear Power Plant Engineering Data Base (PDBMS) and covers all stage of engineering for nuclear power plant from project management, design, manufacturing, construction to operating plant service and preventive maintenance as it were 'Plant Life-Cycle CAE System'. In recent years, TOSHIBA has been devoting to extend the system for integrated intelligent CAE system with state-of-the-art computer technologies such as computer graphics and artificial intelligence. This paper shows the outline of CAE system for nuclear power plant in TOSHIBA. (author)

  20. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-06-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear and radiation safety, which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers significant. Also other events of general interest are reported. The reports also include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the plants' production and load factors

  1. Safety culture in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weihe, G. von; Pamme, H.

    2003-01-01

    Experience shows that German nuclear power plants have always been operated reliably and safely. Over the years, the safety level in these plants has been raised considerably so that they can stand any comparison with other countries. This is confirmed by the two reports published by the Federal Ministry for the Environment on the nuclear safety convention. Behind this, there must obviously stand countless appropriate 'good practices' and a safety management system in nuclear power plants. (orig.) [de

  2. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-03-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear and radiation safety, which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Also other events of general interest are reported. The reports also include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the plants' production and load factors

  3. HVDC transmission from nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yukio; Takenaka, Kiyoshi; Taniguchi, Haruto; Ueda, Kiyotaka

    1980-01-01

    HVDC transmission directly from a nuclear power plant is expected as one of the bulk power transmission systems from distant power generating area. Successively from the analysis of HVDC transmission from BWR-type nuclear power plant, this report discusses dynamic response characteristics of HVDC transmission (double poles, two circuits) from PWR type nuclear power plant due to dc-line faults (DC-1LG, 2LG) and ac-line faults (3LG) near inverter station. (author)

  4. Basic safety principles for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shiguan

    1989-01-01

    To ensure the safety operation of nuclear power plant, one should strictly adhere to the implelmentation of safety codes and the establishment of nuclear safety code system, as well as the applicable basic safety principles of nuclear power plants. This article briefly introduce the importance of nuclear codes and its economic benefits and the implementation of basic safety principles to be accumulated in practice for many years by various countries

  5. Final Report for the 1st Surveillance Test of the Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (Capsule 2) of Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai (and others)

    2007-04-15

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 1st surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Daejon after the capsule was transported from Ulchin site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Ulchin Unit 4 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsule 2 is 4.306E+18n/cm{sup 2}. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.918 for the 1st testing and the calculational uncertainty,7.0% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide 1.190, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 3.615E+18n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 6th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 16 and 32EFPY would reach 8.478E+18 and 1.673E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Ulchin Unit 4 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life.

  6. Final Report for the 1st Surveillance Test of the Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (CAPSULE 2) of Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai (and others)

    2006-12-15

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 1st surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejon after the capsule was transported from Ulchin site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Ulchin unit 3 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsule 2 is 4.674E 18n/cm{sup 2}. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.920 for the 1st testing and the calculational uncertainty,7.0% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide 1.190, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 3.913E 18n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 6th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 16 and 32EFPY would reach 9.249E 18 and 1.834E 19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Ulchin unit 3 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life.

  7. Pump selection and application in a pressurized water reactor electric generating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitch, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Various pump applications utilized in a nuclear pressurized water reactor electric generating plant are described. Emphasis is on pumps installed in the auxiliary systems of the primary nuclear steam supply system. Hydraulic and mechanical details, the ASME Code (Nuclear Design), materials, mechanical seals, shaft design, seismic qualification, and testing are addressed

  8. Qualification of nuclear power plant operations personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    With the ultimate aim of reducing the possibility of human error in nuclear power plant operations, the Guidebook discusses the organizational aspects, the staffing requirements, the educational systems and qualifications, the competence requirements, the ways to establish, preserve and verify competence, the specific aspects of personnel management and training for nuclear power plant operations, and finally the particular situations and difficulties to be overcome by utilities starting their first nuclear power plant. An important aspect presented in the Guidebook is the experience in training and qualification of nuclear power plant personnel in various countries: Argentina, Belgium, Canada, Czechoslovakia, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom and United States of America

  9. The operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosche, D.

    1992-01-01

    The duties to be performed in managing the operation of a nuclear power plant are highly diverse, as will be explained in this contribution by the examples of the Grafenrheinfeld Nuclear Power Station. The excellent safety record and the high availabilities of German nuclear power plants demonstrate that their operators have adopted the right approaches. Systematic evaluation of the operating experience accumulated inhouse and in other plants is of great significance in removing weak spots and improving operation. The manifold and complex activities in the structure of organization and of activities in a nuclear power plant require a high degree of division of labor. (orig.) [de

  10. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1991-02-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 and TVO I and II were in commercial operation for most of the time. The annual maintenance outages of the Loviisa plant units were held during the report period. All events during this quarter are classified as Level hero (Below Scale) on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were below authorised limits. Only small amounts of radioactive substances originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  11. Emergency control centers for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Guidance is provided for the development and implementation of emergency control centers for nuclear power plants, including nuclear plant control room, nuclear plant company headquarters, emergency control center, and nuclear plant alternate emergency control center. Requirements and recommendations are presented for the mission, communications, instrumentation and equipment associated with each type of control center. Decisional aids, manning requirements and resources are also given; the decision aids cover both the accident assessment and protective action areas. Both normal and alternate means of communications are considered. Off-site emergency control centers, although not covered in the strict sense by this standard, are considered in an appendix

  12. Electromagnetic compatibility of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabayan, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    Lately, there has been a mounting concern about the electromagnetic compatibility of nuclear-power-plant systems mainly because of the effects due to the nuclear electromagnetic pulse, and also because of the introduction of more-sophisticated and, therefore, more-susceptible solid-state devices into the plants. Questions have been raised about the adequacy of solid-state-device protection against plant electromagnetic-interference sources and transients due to the nuclear electromagnetic pulse. In this paper, the author briefly reviews the environment, and the coupling, susceptibility, and vulnerability assessment issues of commercial nuclear power plants

  13. Nuclear accidents and safety measures of domestic nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Zurong; Che Shuwei; Pan Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Based on the design standards for the safety of nuclear and radiation in nuclear power plants, the three accidents in the history of nuclear power are analyzed. And the main factors for these accidents are found out, that is, human factors and unpredicted natural calamity. By combining the design and operation parameters of domestic nuclear plants, the same accidents are studied and some necessary preventive schemes are put forward. In the security operation technology of domestic nuclear power plants nowadays, accidents caused by human factors can by prevented completely. But the safety standards have to be reconsidered for the unpredicted neutral disasters. How to reduce the hazard of nuclear radiation and leakage to the level that can be accepted by the government and public when accidents occur under extreme conditions during construction and operation of nuclear power plants must be considered adequately. (authors)

  14. Waste from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The report presents proposals for organizing and financing of the treatment and deposition of spent fuel and radioactive waste. Decommissioning of plants is taken into consideration. The proposals refer to a program of twelve reactors. A relatively complete model for the handling of radioactive waste in Sweden is at hand. The cost for the years 1980 to 2000 is estimated at approx 1040 million SKr. Also the expense to dispose of the rest of the waste is calculated up to the year 2060, when the waste is planned to be put into final deposit. The state must have substantial influence over the organization which should be closely connected to the nuclear industry. Three different types of organization are discussed, namely (i) a company along with a newly created authority, (ii) a company along with the existing Nuclear Power Inspectorate or (iii) a company along with a board of experts. The proposals for financing the cost of handling nuclear waste are given in chief outlines. The nuclear industry should reserve means to special funds. The allocations are calculated to 1.4 oere per delivered kWh up to and including the year 1980. The accumulated allocations for 1979 should thus amount to 1310 million SKr. The charge for supervision and for certain research and development is recommended to be 0.1 oere per kWh which corresponds to approx 23 million SKr for 1980. The funds should be assured by binding agreements which must be approved by the state. The amounts are given in the monetary value of the year 1979. (G.B.)

  15. Enhanced removal of ethanolamine from secondary system of nuclear power plant wastewater by novel hybrid nano zero-valent iron and pressurized ozone initiated oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Son Dong; Mallampati, Srinivasa Reddy; Lee, Byoung Ho

    2017-07-01

    Monoethanolamine (shortly ethanolamine (ETA)), usually used as a corrosion inhibitor, is a contaminant of wastewater from the secondary cooling system of nuclear power plants (NPPs) and is not readily biodegradable. We conducted various experiments, including treatments with nano zero-valent iron (nZVI), nano-iron/calcium, and calcium oxide (nFe/Ca/CaO) with ozone (O 3 ) or hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) to reduce the concentration of ETA and to decrease the chemical demand of oxygen (COD) of these wastewaters. During this study, wastewater with ETA concentration of 7465 mg L -1 and COD of 6920 mg L -1 was used. As a result, the ETA concentration was reduced to 5 mg L -1 (a decrease of almost 100%) and COD was reduced to 2260 mg L -1 , a reduction of 67%, using doses of 26.8 mM of nZVI and 1.5 mM of H 2 O 2 at pH 3 for 3 h. Further treatment for 48 h allowed a decrease of COD by almost 97%. Some mechanistic considerations are proposed in order to explain the degradation pathway. The developed hybrid nano zero-valent iron-initiated oxidation process with H 2 O 2 is promising in the treatment of ETA-contaminated wastewaters.

  16. Data retrieval techniques for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sozzi, G.L.; Dahl, C.C.; Gross, R.S.; Voeller, J.G. III

    1995-01-01

    Data retrieval, processing retrieved data, and maintaining the plant documentation system to reflect the as-built condition of the plant are challenging tasks for most existing nuclear facilities. The information management systems available when these facilities were designed and constructed are archaic by today's standards. Today's plant documentation systems generally include hard copy drawings and text, drawings in various CAD formats, handwritten information, and incompatible databases. These existing plant documentation systems perpetuate inefficiency for the plant technical staff in the performance of their daily activities. This paper discusses data retrieval techniques and tools available to nuclear facilities to minimize the impacts of the existing plant documentation system on plant technical staff productivity

  17. Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) safety in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, L.

    1980-01-01

    The multidisciplinary aspects of the activities involved in the nuclear power plant (NPP) licensing, are presented. The activities of CNEN's technical staff in the licensing of Angra-1 and Angra-2 power plants are shown. (E.G.) [pt

  18. Development of nuclear power plant Risk Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaoming; Sun Jinlong; Ma Chao; Wang Lin; Gu Xiaohui; Bao Zhenli; Qu Yong; Zheng Hao

    2014-01-01

    Risk Monitor is a tool to monitor the real-time risk of a nuclear power plant for risk management and comprehensive decision-making, which has been widely used all over the world. The nuclear power plant Risk Monitor applies the real-time risk model with low-complicacy that could reflect the plant's actual configuration, automatically reads the plant's configuration information from the engineering system through the developed interface, and efficiently analyzes the plant's risk Dy the intelligent parallel-computing method in order to provide the risk basement for the safety management of nuclear power plant. This paper generally introduces the background, architecture, functions and key technical features of a nuclear power plant Risk Monitor, and validates the risk result, which could well reflect the plant's risk information and has a significant practical value. (authors)

  19. Microcomputer simulation of PWR power plant pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, L.R.A. de; Calixto Neto, J.; Martinez, A.S.; Schirru, R.

    1990-01-01

    It is presented a method for the simulation of the pressurizer behavior of a PWR power plant. The method was implanted in a microcomputer, and it considers all the devices for the pressure control (spray and relief valves, heaters, controller, etc.). The physical phenomena and the PID (Proportional + Integral + Derivative) controller were mathematically represented by linear relations, uncoupled, discretized in the time. There are three different algorithms which take into account the non-linear effects introduced by the variation of the physical properties due to the temperature and pressure, and also the mutual effects between the physical phenomena and the PID controller. (author)

  20. Plant for the delivery of long-distance steam combined with a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller, K.H.

    1976-01-01

    It is proposed that long-distance steam should not be directly discharged in order to avoid each posibility of spreading radioactively contaminated steam. As a heat transmitter, a surface heat exchanger should be chosen, the heating steam of the nuclear power station heating pressurized water whose pressure is higher then that of the heating steam. Long-distance steam generation then results from expanding the pressurized water. The plant is described in detail. (UWI) [de

  1. 76 FR 1469 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2 Environmental Assessment... Plant, LLC, the licensee, for operation of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2... Impact Statement for License Renewal of Nuclear Plants, Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (NUREG-1437...

  2. Investigations of gas explosions in a nuclear coal gasification plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, K.

    1981-01-01

    The safety research program on gas cloud explosions is performed in the context of the German project of the Prototype Plant Nuclear Process Heat. By the work within this project, it is tried to extend the use of nuclear energy to non-electric application. The programme comprises efforts in several scientific disciplines. The final goal is to provide a representative pressure-time-function or a set of such functions. These functions should be the basis for safe design and construction of the nuclear reactor system of a coal gasification plant. No result yet achieved contradicts the assumption that released process gas is only able to deflagrate. It should be possible to demonstrate that, if unfavourable configurations are avoided, a design pressure of 300 mbar is sufficient to withstand an explosion of process gas; this pressure should never be exceeded by process gas explosions irrespective of gas mass released and distance to release point, except possibly in relatively small areas

  3. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1993-09-01

    Quarterly reports on the operation of Finnish nuclear power plants describe events and observations, relating to nuclear safety and radiation protection which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Safety-enhancing modifications at the nuclear power plants and issues relating to the use of nuclear energy which are of general interest are also reported. The reports include a summary of the radiation safety of plant personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the first quarter of 1993, a primary feedwater system pipe break occurred at Loviisa 2, in a section of piping after a feedwater pump. The break was erosion-corrosion induced. Repairs and inspections interrupted power generation for seven days. On the International Nuclear Event Scale the event is classified as a level 2 incident. Other events in the first quarter of 1993 had no bearing on nuclear safety and radiation protection

  4. Dukovany nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Presentation covers recommended safety issues for the Dukovany NPP which have been solved with satisfactory conclusions. Safety issues concerned include: radiation safety; nuclear safety; security; emergency preparedness; health protection at work; fire protection; environmental protection; chemical safety; technical safety. Quality assurance programs at all stages on NPP life time is described. Report includes description of NPP staff training provision, training simulator, emergency operating procedures, emergency preparedness, Year 2000 problem, inspections and life time management. Description of Dukovany Plant Safety Analysis Projects including integrity of the equipment, modernisation, equipment innovation and safety upgrading program show that this approach corresponds to the actual practice applied in EU countries, and fulfilment of current IAEA requirements for safety enhancement of the WWER 440/213 units in the course of MORAWA Equipment Upgrading program

  5. Nuclear power plants in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennings, U.; Stuermer, W.

    1993-01-01

    Under the influence of the polarization between belief in progress, on the one hand, and the moral rigorism of our society, on the other hand, the risks of modern large technical systems have helped the highest level of technical safety to be attained in Germany. It has been reached especially by opting for maximum quality, maximum utility and reliability, complete documentation, continuous in-service checks during operation and, last but not least, by including man and human fallibility. Our concern should be that this strategy pursued in the Western industrialized countries becomes the rule, at least in its main characteristics, also in the Eastern countries. The hazards associated with reactors in Eastern countries affect us all, and it is especially the safety of those reactors which is causing concern. The experience accumulated with the 417 nuclear power plants now in operation, especially the incidents and accidents, shows that hazard potential management is admissible only with a highly developed safety strategy. (orig.) [de

  6. Nuclear power plant annunciator systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.L.

    1983-08-01

    Analyses of nuclear power plant annunciator systems have uncovered a variety of problems. Many of these problems stem from the fact that the underlying philosophy of annunciator systems have never been elucidated so as to impact the initial annunciator system design. This research determined that the basic philosophy of an annunciator system should be to minimize the potential for system and process deviations to develop into significant hazards. In order to do this the annunciator system should alert the operators to the fact that a system or process deviation exists, inform the operators as to the priority and nature of the deviation, guide the operators' initial responses to the deviation, and confirm whether operators responses corrected the deviation. Annunciator design features were analyzed to determine to what degree they helped the system meet the functional criteria, the priority for implementing specific design features, and the cost and ease of implementing specific design features

  7. Nuclear Power Plant Module, NPP-1: Nuclear Power Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelaw, Robert L.

    The purpose of the Nuclear Power Plant Modules, NPP-1, is to determine the total cost of electricity from a nuclear power plant in terms of all the components contributing to cost. The plan of analysis is in five parts: (1) general formulation of the cost equation; (2) capital cost and fixed charges thereon; (3) operational cost for labor,…

  8. Final report for the 5th surveillance test of the reactor pressure vessel material (capsule Y) of Yonggwang Nuclear Power Plant unit 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sam Lai; Kim, ByoungChul; Chang, Kee Ok (and others)

    2006-02-15

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 5th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Daejeon after the capsule was transported from Yonggwang site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Yonggwang unit 2 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules U, V, X, W and Y are 5.777E+18, 1.5371E+19, 3.7634E+19, 4.3045E+19, and 4.8662E+19n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.953 for the 1st through 5th testing and the calculational uncertainty,7.2% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide 1.190, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.659E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 13th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 48, 56 and 64EFPY would reach 3.625E+19, 5.293E+19, 6.127E+19 and 6.960E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Yonggwang unit 2 showed that there would be no problem for the Pressurized Thermal Shock(PTS) during the operation until design life.

  9. The 4th surveillance test and evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel material (capsule W) of Younggwang nuclear power plant unit1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwon Jae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-08-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 4th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejeon after the capsule was transported from Yonggwang site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Yonggwang unit 1 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules U, V, X and W are 5.555E+18, 1.662E+19, 3.358E+19, and 4.521E+19 n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of measurement versus calculation, was 0.859 for the 1st through 4th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 11.80% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide 1.190, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.551E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 12th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 40, 48 and 56EFPY would reach 3.929E+19, 4.880E+19, 5.831E+19 and 6.782E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Yonggwang unit 1 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life. 4 refs., 41 figs., 35 tabs. (Author)

  10. The 4th surveillance test and evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel material (capsule W) of Yonggwang nuclear power plant unit 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwon Jae; Gong, Un Sik; Chang, Jong Hwa; Joo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Joon Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-02-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 4th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejeon after the capsule was transported from Kori site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Yonggwang unit 2 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules U, V, X and W are 5.762E+18, 1.5391E+19, 3.5119E+19, and 4.2610E+19 n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of measurement versus calculation, was 0.899 for the 1st through 4th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 12.3% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide DG-1053, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.357E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 11th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 40, 48 and 56EFPY would reach 3.525E+19, 4.337E+19, 5.148E+19 and 5.960E+19 n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Yonggwang unit 2 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life. 48 refs., 35 figs., 42 tabs. (Author)

  11. Plant life management optimized utilization of existing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watzinger, H.; Erve, M.

    1999-01-01

    For safe, reliable and economical nuclear power generation it is of central importance to understand, analyze and manage aging-related phenomena and to apply this information in the systematic utilization and as-necessary extension of the service life of components and systems. An operator's overall approach to aging and plant life management which also improves performance characteristics can help to optimize plant operating economy. In view of the deregulation of the power generation industry with its increased competition, nuclear power plants must today also increasingly provide for or maintain a high level of plant availability and low power generating costs. This is a difficult challenge even for the newest, most modern plants, and as plants age they can only remain competitive if a plant operator adopts a strategic approach which takes into account the various aging-related effects on a plant-wide basis. The significance of aging and plant life management for nuclear power plants becomes apparent when looking at their age: By the year 2000 roughly fifty of the world's 434 commercial nuclear power plants will have been in operation for thirty years or more. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency, as many as 110 plants will have reached the thirty-year service mark by the year 2005. In many countries human society does not push the construction of new nuclear power plants and presumably will not change mind within the next ten years. New construction licenses cannot be expected so that for economical and ecological reasons existing plants have to be operated unchallengeably. On the other hand the deregulation of the power production market is asking just now for analysis of plant life time to operate the plants at a high technical and economical level until new nuclear power plants can be licensed and constructed. (author)

  12. Management of nuclear power plants lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutin, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    The factors influencing the management of the service life of nuclear power plants can be of various types and the 'heaviest' ones have to be managed through robust and explicit approaches involving all actors. However, the mastery of the service life starts with the mastery of the technical problems, in particular the physical aging of the facilities. This mastery requires to foresee and anticipate the problems and thus a good understanding of the phenomena involved. This article presents: 1 - the general problem of service life management: lifetime concept, situation of French power plants, service life management policy; 2 - aging mechanisms: embrittlement of steel under irradiation, swelling of materials, thermal aging, fatigue, stress corrosion, aqueous corrosion of metals, corrosion-erosion, mechanisms of concrete degradation, mechanisms of elastomers and polymers degradation, wear; 3 - non-replaceable parts: reactor vessel, containment building; 4 - replaceable parts: cables, instrumentation and control system, core internals, primary loop piping, auxiliary primary piping, pressurizer, primary pump, steam generator tubes, other Ni-Cr-Fe alloy parts, secondary loop piping, turbine, alternator; 5 - non-technical aspects: perenniality of the industrial support, evolution of safety requirements, public acceptance, economical aspects, knowledge and information systems; 6 - situation in foreign countries: status of the world nuclear park, lifetime notion in foreign countries, situation in the USA. (J.S.)

  13. Health protection and industrial safety. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The standard applies to components of the primary circuit including its auxiliary facilities, and of the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors; to lifting gear and load take-ups for the transport of nuclear fuel and primary circuit components; to elevators within the containment, electrical installations, and piping and valves of radiation protection monitoring equipment. Part 1 defines the terms and specifies engineered safety requirements

  14. Method for the construction of a nuclear reactor with a prestressed concrete pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, J.; Schwiers, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    Method for the construction of nuclear reactors with prestressed concrete pressure vessel, providing during the initial stage of construction of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel a support structure around the liner. This enables an early mounting of core components in clean conditions as well as load reductions for final concreting in layers of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel. By applying the support structure, the overall assembly time of these nuclear power plant is considerably reduced without extra cost. (orig.) [de

  15. Specific safety aspects of the water-steam cycle important to nuclear power plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, C.G.

    1986-01-01

    The water-steam cycle in a nuclear power plant is similar to that used in conventional power plants. Some systems and components are required for the safe nuclear power plant operation and therefore are designed according to the safety criteria, rules and regulations applied in nuclear installations. The aim of this report is to present the safety characteristics of the water-steam cycle of a nuclear power plant with pressurized water reactor, as applied for the design of the nuclear power plants Angra 2 and Angra 3. (Author) [pt

  16. Maintenance of process instrumentation in nuclear power plants

    CERN Document Server

    Hashemian, H M

    2006-01-01

    Compiles 30 years of practical knowledge gained by the author and his staff in testing the I and C systems of nuclear power plants around the world. This book focuses on process temperature and pressure sensors and the verification of these sensors' calibration and response time.

  17. Are atomic power plants saver than nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeglin, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    It is rather impossible to establish nuclear power plants against the resistance of the population. To prevail over this resistance, a clarification of the citizens-initiatives motives which led to it will be necessary. This is to say: It is quite impossible for our population to understand what really heappens in nuclear power plants. They cannot identify themselves with nuclear power plants and thus feel very uncomfortable. As the total population feels the same way it is prepared for solidarity with the citizens-initiatives even if they believe in the necessity of nuclear power plants. Only an information-policy making transparent the social-psychological reasons of the population for being against nuclear power plants could be able to prevail over the resistance. More information about the technical procedures is not sufficient at all. (orig.) [de

  18. Vapour pressure of caesium over nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faircloth, R.L.; Pummery, F.C.W.

    1976-01-01

    The vapour pressure of caesium over a fine-grained isotropic moulded gilsocarbon nuclear graphite intended for use in the manufacture of fuel tubes for the high temperature reactor has been determined as a function of temperature and concentration by means of the Knudsen effusion technique. The concentration range 0 to 10 μg caesium/g graphite was investigated and it was concluded that a Langmuir adsorption situation exists under these conditions. (author)

  19. Analysis of nuclear reactor pressure vessel flanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.A.N. de; Augusto, O.B.

    1985-01-01

    This work proposes a methodology for the structural analysis of high diameter nuclear reactor pressure vessel flanges. In the analysis the vessel is divided into shell-of-revolution elements, the flanges are represented by rigid rings, and the bolts are treated as beams. The flexibility method is used for solving the problem, and the results are compared with results obtained by the finite element method. (Author) [pt

  20. Low Pressure Nuclear Thermal Rocket (LPNTR) concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsthaler, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    A background and a description of the low pressure nuclear thermal system are presented. Performance, mission analysis, development, critical issues, and some conclusions are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: LPNTR's inherent advantages in critical NTR requirement; reactor trade studies; reference LPNTR; internal configuration and flow of preliminary LPNTR; particle bed fuel assembly; preliminary LPNTR neutronic study results; multiple LPNTR engine concept; tank and engine configuration for mission analysis; LPNTR reliability potential; LPNTR development program; and LPNTR program costs

  1. Life management plants at nuclear power plants PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, G.

    2014-01-01

    Since in 2009 the CSN published the Safety Instruction IS-22 (1) which established the regulatory framework the Spanish nuclear power plants must meet in regard to Life Management, most of Spanish nuclear plants began a process of convergence of their Life Management Plants to practice 10 CFR 54 (2), which is the current standard of Spanish nuclear industry for Ageing Management, either during the design lifetime of the plant, as well as for Long-Term Operation. This article describe how Life Management Plans are being implemented in Spanish PWR NPP. (Author)

  2. The compact simulator for Tihange nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueben, M.

    1982-01-01

    After an introduction about the simulators for nuclear plants, a description is given of the compact simulator for the Tihange nuclear power plant as well as the simulated circuits and equipments such as the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The extent of simulation, the functions used by the instructor, the use of the simulator, the formation programme and construction planning are described. (AF)

  3. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1994-03-01

    In the third quarter of 1993, all of Finland's four nuclear power plant units were in power operation, with the exception of the annual maintenance outages of the Loviisa units. The load factor average of the plant units was 83.6 %. None of the events which occurred during this annual quarter had any bearing on nuclear or radiation safety. (4 figs., 5 tabs.)

  4. Radiological characterization of nuclear plants under decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mincarini, M.

    1989-01-01

    In the present work a description of major problems encountered in qualitative and quantitative radiological characterization of nuclear plants for decommissioning and decontamination purpose is presented. Referring to several nuclear plant classes activation and contamination processes, direct and indirect radiological analysis and some italian significant experience are descripted

  5. Accidents with nuclear power plants, ch. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    A recalculation of the consequences of nuclear power plant accidents is presented taking into account different parameters or different quantities than those usually accepted. A case study of a nuclear power plant planned for the Eems-river estuary in the Netherlands is presented

  6. Slovak Electric, plc, Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this popular scientific brochure a brief description of history construction of Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant is presented. The chart of electricity generation in WWER 440/V-213 nuclear power plant is described. Operation and safety improvements at Mochovce NPP as well as environment protection are presented. Basic data of Mochovce NPP are included

  7. Quality assurance in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, M.T. de

    1981-01-01

    The factors related to the licensing procedures of a nuclear power plant (quality assurance and safety analysis) are presented and discussed. The consequences of inadequate attitudes towards these factors are shown and suggestions to assure the safety of nuclear power plants in Brazil are presented. (E.G.) [pt

  8. Medical consequences of a nuclear plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, S.E.; Reizenstein, P.; Stenke, L.

    1987-01-01

    The report gives background information concerning radiation and the biological medical effects and damages caused by radiation. The report also discusses nuclear power plant accidents and efforts from the medical service in the case of a nuclear power plant accident. (L.F.)

  9. HVDC transmission from isorated nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Kiyoshi; Takasaki, Masahiro; Ichikawa, Tatemi; Hayashi, Toshiyuki

    1985-01-01

    HVDC transmission directly from nuclear power plant is considered as one of the patterns of long distance and large capacity transmission system. This reports considers two route HVDC transmission from PWR type nuclear power plant, and analyzes dynamic response characteristics due to bus fault, main protection failure and etc. using the AC-DC Power System Simulator. (author)

  10. EPRI nuclear power plant decommissioning technology program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Karen S.; Bushart, Sean P.; Naughton, Michael; McGrath, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is a non-profit research organization that supports the energy industry. The Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Technology Program conducts research and develops technology for the safe and efficient decommissioning of nuclear power plants. (author)

  11. Slovak Electric, plc, Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant in 1998 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Operation and electric power generation; (2) Nuclear and radiation safety; (3) Maintenance and scheduled refuelling out-gages; (4) Investment and WWER units upgrading; (5) Power Plants Personnel; (6) Public relations

  12. Structural integrity evaluation of PWR nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Julio R.B.; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    1999-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is the most important structural component of a PWR nuclear power plant. It contains the reactor core and is the main component of the primary system pressure boundary, the system responsible for removing the heat generated by the nuclear reactions. It is considered not replaceable and, therefore, its lifetime is a key element to define the plant life as a whole. Three critical issues related to the reliability of the RPV structural integrity come out by reason of the radiation damage imposed to the vessel material during operation. These issues concern the definition of pressure versus temperature limits for reactor heatup and cooldown, pressurized thermal shock evaluation and assessment of reactor vessels with low upper shelf Charpy impact energy levels. This work aims to present the major aspects related to these topics. The requirements for preventing fracture of the RPV are reviewed as well as the available technology for assessing the safety margins. For each mentioned problem, the several steps for structural integrity evaluation are described and the analysis methods are discussed. (author)

  13. Possible research program on a large scale nuclear pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear pressure vessel structural integrity is actually one of the main items in the nuclear plants safety field. An international study group aimed at investigating the feasibility of a ''possible research program'' on a scale 1:1 LWR pressure vessel. This report presents the study group's work. The different research programs carried out or being carried out in various countries of the European Community are presented (phase I of the study). The main characteristics of the vessel considered for the program and an evaluation of activities required for making them available are listed. Research topic priorities from the different interested countries are summarized in tables (phase 2); a critical review by the study group of the topic is presented. Then, proposals for possible experimental programs and combination of these programs are presented, only as examples of possible useful research activities. The documents pertaining to the results of phase I inquiry performed by the study group are reported in the appendix

  14. Study of characteristic response of pressure control system in order to obtain the design parameters of the new control system MARK V1 turbine in Cofrentes nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo Anaya, M. Jose; Ruiz Bueno, Gregorio; Vauqer Perez, Juan I.; Curiel Nieva, Marceliano

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained from the IBE-CNC/DAQ-090827 project, conducted by the company Titania Servicios Tecnologicos, S.L. in collaboration with the Instituto de Seguridad Industrial, Radiofisica y Medioambiental (ISIRYM), in the Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, for the company Iberdrola Generacion S.A. The objective is the acquisition of the pressure sensor signal and the measurement at points C85 and N32 from the cabin of the Turbine Control System in Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant. With the study of previous data, one can obtain the Bode plot of the crossed signals as requested in the technical specification IM 0191 I. Frequency response (i.e. how the system varies its gain and offset depending on the frequency) defines the dynamics. (author)

  15. Aircraft, ships, spacecraft, nuclear plants and quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, M.G.

    1984-05-01

    A few quality assurance programs outside the purview of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission were studied to identify features or practices which the NRC could use to enhance its program for assuring quality in the design and construction of nuclear power plants. The programs selected were: the manufacture of large commercial transport aircraft, regulated by the Federal Aviation Administration; US Navy shipbuilding; commercial shipbuilding regulated by the Maritime Administration and the US Coast Guard; Government-owned nuclear plants under the Department of Energy; spacecraft under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration; and the construction of nuclear power plants in Canada, West Germany, France, Japan, Sweden, and the United Kingdom

  16. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1992-09-01

    The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO I and II were in operation for almost all the time in the first quarter of 1992. The load factor average was 99.8%. All events which are classified on the International Nuclear Event Scale were level 0/below scale on the Scale. Occupational radiation doses and releases of radioactive material off-site remained well below authorised limits. Only quantities of radioactive material insignificant to radiation exposure, originating from the nuclear power plants, were detected in samples collected in the vicinity of the nuclear power plants

  17. Materials qualification for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braconi, F.

    1987-01-01

    The supply of materials to be used in the fabrication of components submitted to pressure destined to Atucha II nuclear power plant must fulfill the quality assurance requirements in accordance with the international standards. With the aim of promoting the national participation in CNA II, ENACE had the need to adapt these requirements to the national industry conditions and to the availability of official entities' qualification and inspection. As a uniform and normalized assessment for the qualification of materials did not exist in the country, ENACE had to develop a materials suppliers qualification system. This paper presents a suppliers qualification procedure, its application limits and the alternative procedures for the acceptance of individual stock and for the stock materials purchase. (Author)

  18. Psychological characteristics of licensed nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajwaj, T.; Ford, T.; McGee, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    The safe production of electricity by nuclear power plants has been the focus of considerable attention. Much of this concern has been focused on equipment and procedural issues, with less attention to the psychological factors that affect the operations staff of the plants, i.e., those individuals who are most directly responsible for a plant's operations. Stress and type A qualities would be significant for these individuals because of their relationships to job performance and health. Of equal significance would be work-related factors, such as job involvement and work pressure. Also of interest would be hostile tendencies because of the need for cooperation and communications among operations staff. Two variables could influence these psychological factors. One is the degree of responsibility for a plant's nuclear reactors. The individuals with the greatest responsibility are licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). There are also individuals with less direct responsibilities who are not licensed. A second variable is the operating status of the plant, whether or not the plant is currently producing electricity. Relative to ensuring the safe operation of nuclear power plants, these data suggest a positive view of licensed operators. Of interest are the greater stress scores in the licensed staff of the operating plant in contrast with their peers in the nonoperating plant

  19. Millstone nuclear power plant emergency system assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmad Khusyairi

    2011-01-01

    U.S.NRC determined an obligation to build a nuclear power plant emergency response organization for both on-site and off-site. Millstone Nuclear Power Plants have 3 nuclear reactors and 2 of 3 still in commercial operation. Reactor unit 1, BWR type has been permanently shut down in 1998, while the two others, units 2 and 3 obtain the extended operating license respectively until 2035 and 2045. As a nuclear installation has the high potential radiological impact, Millstone nuclear power plant emergency response organization must establish both on-site or off-site. Emergency response organization that is formed must involve several state agencies, both state agencies and municipality. They have specific duties and functions in a state of emergency, so that protective measures can be undertaken in accordance with the community that has been planned. Meanwhile, NRC conduct their own independent assessment of nuclear power plant emergencies. (author)

  20. Development of life evaluation technology for nuclear power plant components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, J. D. [Yeungnam Univ., Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, K. J. [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2001-03-15

    This research focuses on development of reliable life evaluation technology for nuclear power plant (NPP) components, and is divided into two parts, development of life evaluation systems for pressurized components and evaluation of applicability of emerging technology to operating plants. For the development of life evaluation system for nuclear pressure vessels, the following seven topics are covered: development of expert systems for integrity assessment of pressurized components, development of integrity evaluation systems of steam generator tubes, prediction of failure probability for NPP components based on probabilistic fracture mechanics, development of fatigue damage evaluation technique for plant life extension, domestic round robin analysis for pressurized thermal shock of reactor vessels, domestic round robin analysis of constructing P--T limit curves for reactor vessels, and development of data base for integrity assessment. For evaluation of applicability of emerging technology to operating plants, on the other hand, the following eight topics are covered: applicability of the Leak-Before-Break analysis to Cast S/S piping, collection of aged material tensile and toughness data for aged Cast S/S piping, finite element analyses for load carrying capacity of corroded pipes, development of Risk-based ISI methodology for nuclear piping, collection of toughness data for integrity assessment of bi-metallic joints, applicability of the Master curve concept to reactor vessel integrity assessment, measurement of dynamic fracture toughness, and provision of information related to regulation and plant life extension issues.

  1. Modelling of nuclear power plant decommissioning financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemš, J; Knápek, J; Králík, T; Hejhal, M; Kubančák, J; Vašíček, J

    2015-06-01

    Costs related to the decommissioning of nuclear power plants create a significant financial burden for nuclear power plant operators. This article discusses the various methodologies employed by selected European countries for financing of the liabilities related to the nuclear power plant decommissioning. The article also presents methodology of allocation of future decommissioning costs to the running costs of nuclear power plant in the form of fee imposed on each megawatt hour generated. The application of the methodology is presented in the form of a case study on a new nuclear power plant with installed capacity 1000 MW. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Inspection during operation of a nuclear power plant in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Bernal, R.

    1977-01-01

    The control and surveillance activities, as well as the operating data and results of the three nuclear power plants presently in operation: Jose Cabrera, Santa Maria de Garona and Vandellos, are summarized. The first two are light-water type, with different pressure and boiling characteristics and the third is of the gas-graphite type. The main aspects, from an inspection point of view, of the experience obtained in these three plants are analyzed. (author) [es

  3. Cooling towers of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikyska, L.

    1986-01-01

    The specifications are given of cooling towers of foreign nuclear power plants and a comparison is made with specifications of cooling towers with natural draught in Czechoslovak nuclear power plants. Shortcomings are pointed out in the design of cooling towers of Czechoslovak nuclear power plants which have been derived from conventional power plant design. The main differences are in the adjustment of the towers for winter operation and in the designed spray intensity. The comparison of selected parameters is expressed graphically. (J.B.)

  4. Nuclear power plants and their insurances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schludi, H.N.

    1984-01-01

    From the commencement of building to the time of decommissioning of nuclear power plants, the insurances provide continuous coverage, i.e. for construction, nuclear liability, nuclear energy hazards insurance, fire insurance, machinery insurance. The respective financial security is quantified. (DG) [de

  5. Lifting devices in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The regulation applies to lifts, cranes, winches, rail trolleys, load pick-up equipment and fuel charging machines for LWR reactors, as far as these are employed in plants for the production or fission of nuclear fuels or for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels or for the storage or other uses of nuclear fuels. (orig.) 891 HP [de

  6. Anatomy of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Q.O.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the Q model which attempts to classify arguments for use in the discussion on the pros and cons of nuclear power. The basic principles of nuclear energy production, operation of a nuclear power plant and a comparison with other electric power sources are presented and discussed. (ELC)

  7. Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, H.L.; Naus, D.J.; Norris, W.E.

    1998-12-01

    Safety-related nuclear power plant (NPP) structures are designed to withstand loadings from a number of low-probability external and interval events, such as earthquakes, tornadoes, and loss-of-coolant accidents. Loadings incurred during normal plant operation therefore generally are not significant enough to cause appreciable degradation. However, these structures are susceptible to aging by various processes depending on the operating environment and service conditions. The effects of these processes may accumulate within these structures over time to cause failure under design conditions, or lead to costly repair. In the late 1980s and early 1990s several occurrences of degradation of NPP structures were discovered at various facilities (e.g., corrosion of pressure boundary components, freeze- thaw damage of concrete, and larger than anticipated loss of prestressing force). Despite these degradation occurrences and a trend for an increasing rate of occurrence, in-service inspection of the safety-related structures continued to be performed in a somewhat cursory manner. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) published the first of several new requirements to help ensure that adequate in-service inspection of these structures is performed. Current regulatory in-service inspection requirements are reviewed and a summary of degradation experience presented. Nondestructive examination techniques commonly used to inspect the NPP steel and concrete structures to identify and quantify the amount of damage present are reviewed. Finally, areas where nondestructive evaluation techniques require development (i.e., inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary, and thick heavily reinforced concrete sections are discussed.

  8. Nuclear reactor kinetics and plant control

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Understanding time-dependent behaviors of nuclear reactors and the methods of their control is essential to the operation and safety of nuclear power plants. This book provides graduate students, researchers, and engineers in nuclear engineering comprehensive information on both the fundamental theory of nuclear reactor kinetics and control and the state-of-the-art practice in actual plants, as well as the idea of how to bridge the two. The first part focuses on understanding fundamental nuclear kinetics. It introduces delayed neutrons, fission chain reactions, point kinetics theory, reactivit

  9. Fire prevention in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The causes and frequency of fires at nuclear power plants in various countries are briefly given. Methods are described of fire hazard assessment at nuclear power plants, such as Gretener's method and the probabilistic methods. Approaches to the management of nuclear reactor fire protection in various countries as well as the provisions to secure such protection are dealt with. An overview and the basic characteristics of fire detection and extinguishing systems is presented. (Z.S.). 1 tab

  10. Fire protection at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    The guide presents specific requirements for the design and implementation of fire protection arrangements at nuclear power plants and for the documents relating to the fire protection that are to be submitted to STUK (Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority). Inspections of the fire protection arrangements to be conducted by STUK during the construction and operation of the power plants are also described in this guide. The guide can also be followed at other nuclear facilities

  11. Knowledge preservation strategies for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koruna, S.; Bachmann, H.

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear industry is currently facing several challenges. An internal threat to the safety and operations of nuclear power plants is the loss of those employees who hold knowledge that is either critical to operations or safety. This report discusses the possibilities to preserve knowledge in nuclear power plants. Dependent on the degree of tacitness two different knowledge preservation strategies can be discerned: personalization and codification. The knowledge preservation activities discussed are valued according to the criteria: cost, immediacy of availability and completeness

  12. Chemistry management system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Katsumi; Maeda, Katsuji

    1998-01-01

    Recently, the chemistry management in the nuclear power plants has been changing from the problem solution to the predictive diagnosis and maintenance. It is important to maintain the integrity of plant operation by an adequate chemistry control. For these reasons, many plant operation data and chemistry analysis data should be collected and treated effectively to evaluate chemistry condition of the nuclear power plants. When some indications of chemistry anomalies occur, quick and effective root cause evaluation and countermeasures should be required. The chemistry management system has been developed as to provide sophisticate chemistry management in the nuclear power plants. This paper introduces the concept and functions of the chemistry management system for the nuclear power plants. (author)

  13. Data feature: World nuclear power plant capacity 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    At this point, the future of the nuclear power industry remains largely in doubt. The gloomy predictions about global warming have done little to convince politicians and the public of the benefits of nuclear power. Meanwhile, the setbacks to nuclear have continued apace: The United States has failed to take the expected lead in ordering new nuclear plants. And President-elect Bill Clinton does not consider nuclear a major part of his energy strategy. The situation looks equally bleak in other countries. Canada's biggest utility, Ontario Hydro, was forced under intense political pressure to defer its ambitious nuclear expansion program until after the year 2010. In Europe, the suspension of France's Superphenix fast-breeder reactor in June could stop progress on the technology indefinitely. And the Finnish parliament dropped plans for expansion of nuclear power from its national energy strategy. Developing and semi-industrialized countries, such as Brazil and Argentina, have shown little progress, taking upwards of twenty years to complete plants already under construction. Nuclear's problems seem always to hinge on economics. Nuclear has little chance of revival during the current global recession, especially in countries fighting for their long-term economic survival. That is why NUKEM believes nuclear power will not grow much in the CIS and Eastern Europe beyond the projects already in the advanced stages of construction. What's more, the longer countries such as Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and Finland keep their nuclear expansion plans on hold, the harder it will be to get the political support to restart them. So far in 1992, only two nuclear plants, with a combined capacity of 1,520 MWe, have gone into commercial operation. One more 1,330 MWe reactor may start up by year's end. By then, NUKEM expects world nuclear plant capacity to stand at 330.3 GWe

  14. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1991-08-01

    In the Quarterly Reports on the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants such events and observations are described relating to nuclear and radiation safety which the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety considers safety significant. Also other events of general interest are reported. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the plants' workers and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. The Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 as well as TVO I and II were in commercial operation during the whole first quarter of 1991. The load factor average was 99.1 %. Failures have been detected in the uppermost spacing lattices of nuclear fuel bundles removed from the Loviisa nuclear reactors. Further investigations into the significance of the failures have been initiated. In this quarter, renewed cooling systems for the instrumentation area were introduced at Loviisa 1. The modifications made in the systems serve to ensure reliable cooling of the area even during the hottest summer months when the possibility exists that the temperature of the automation equipment could rise too high causing malfunctions which could endanger plant safety. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were below prescribed limits in this quarter. Only small amounts of radioactive substances originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  15. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all the numerical data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the French CEA/DSE/SEE Elecnuc database. The following aspects are reviewed: 1999 highlights; main characteristics of the reactor types in operation, under construction or on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1999; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and on order; capacity of nuclear power plants in operation; net and gross capacity of nuclear power plants on the grid and in commercial operation; grid connection forecasts; world electric power market; electronuclear owners and share holders in EU, capacity and load factor; first power generation of nuclear origin per country, achieved or expected; performance indicator of PWR units in France; worldwide trend of the power generation indicator; 1999 gross load factor by operator; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction, on order, planned, cancelled, shutdown, and exported; planning of steam generators replacement; MOX fuel program for plutonium recycling. (J.S.)

  16. Human factors in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes some of the human factors problems in nuclear power plants and the technology that can be employed to reduce those problems. Many of the changes to improve the human factors in existing plants are inexpensive, and the expected gain in human reliability is substantial. The human factors technology is well-established and there are practitioners in most countries that have nuclear power plants. (orig.) [de

  17. Human factors in nuclear power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, A.D.

    1980-08-01

    This report describes some of the human factors problems in nuclear power plants and the technology that can be employed to reduce those problems. Many of the changes to improve the human factors in existing plants are inexpensive, and the expected gain in human reliability is substantial. The human factors technology is well-established and there are practitioners in most countries that have nuclear power plants

  18. Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Prabir [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Labbe, Pierre [Electricity of France (EDF); Naus, Dan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2013-01-01

    A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

  19. Dosimetry in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lastra B, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    To control the occupationally exposed personnel dose working at the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant, two types of dosemeters are used, the thermoluminescent (TLD) which is processed monthly, and the direct reading dosemeter that is electronic and works as daily control of personal dose. In the case of the electronic dosemeters of direct reading conventional, the readings and dose automatic registers and the user identity to which he was assigned to each dosemeter was to carry out the restricted area exit. In activities where the ionizing radiation sources are not fully characterized, it is necessary to relocate the personal dosemeter or assigned auxiliary dosemeters (TLDs and electronics) to determine the dose received by the user to both whole body and in any specific area of it. In jobs more complicated are used a tele dosimetry system where the radiation protection technician can be monitoring the user dose to remote control, the data transmission is by radio. The dosimetry activities are documented in procedures that include dosemeter inventories realization, the equipment and dosemeters calibration, the dosimetry quality control and the discrepancies investigation between the direct reading and TLD systems. TLD dosimetry to have technical expertise in direct and indirect dosimetry and two technicians in TLD dosimetry; electronic dosimetry to have 4 calibration technicians. For the electronic dosemeters are based on a calibrator source of Cesium-137. TLD dosemeters to have an automatic radiator, an automatic reader which can read up to 100 TLD dosemeters per hour and a semiautomatic reader. To keep the equipment under a quality process was development a process of initial entry into service and carried out a periodic verification of the heating cycles. It also has a maintenance contract for the equipment directly with the manufacturer to ensure their proper functioning. The vision in perspective of the dosimetry services of Laguna Verde nuclear power plant

  20. Nuclear Power Plants in the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Developmental trends on nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 1999 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from 72 electric companies in 31 nations and regions in the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 19 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; location of the plants; the plants in the world; and so forth. And, it also has some survey results on the 'Liberalization of electric power markets and nuclear power generation' such as some 70% of respondents in nuclear power for future option, gas-thermal power seen as power source with most to gain from liberalization, merits on nuclear power generation (environmental considerations and supply stability), most commonly voiced concern about new plant orders in poor economy, and so forth. (G.K.)

  1. Effects of nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, P.R.; Manweiler, R.W.; Davis, R.R.

    1977-09-01

    The electromagnetic pulse (EMP) from a high-altitude nuclear detonation consists of a transient pulse of high intensity electromagnetic fields. These intense fields induce current and voltage transients in electrical conductors. Although most nuclear power plant cables are not directly exposed to these fields, the attenuated EMP fields that propagate into the plant will couple some EMP energy to these cables. The report predicts the probable effects of the EMP transients that could be induced in critical circuits of safety-related systems. It was found that the most likely consequence of EMP for nuclear plants is an unscheduled shutdown. EMP could prolong the shutdown period by the unnecessary actuation of certain safety systems. In general, EMP could be a nuisance to nuclear power plants, but it is not considered a serious threat to plant safety

  2. Seismic reevaluation of existing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennart, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The codes and regulations governing Nuclear Power Plant seismic analysis are continuously becoming more stringent. In addition, design ground accelerations of existing plants must sometimes be increased as a result of discovery of faulting zones or recording of recent earthquakes near the plant location after plant design. These new factors can result in augmented seismic design criteria. Seismic reanalysius of the existing Nuclear Power Plant structures and equipments is necessary to prevent the consequences of newly postulated accidents that could cause undue risk to the health or safety of the public. This paper reviews the developments of seismic analysis as applied to Nuclear Power Plants and the methods used by Westinghouse to requalify existing plants to the most recent safety requirements. (author)

  3. Nuclear plant data systems - some emerging directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.D.; Humphress, G.B.; McCullough, L.D.; Tashjian, B.M.

    1983-01-01

    Significant changes have occurred in recent years in the nuclear power industry to accentuate the need for data systems to support information flow and decision making. Economic conditions resulting in rapid inflation and larger investments in new and existing plants and the need to plan further ahead are primary factors. Government policies concerning environmental control, as well as minimizing risk to the public through increased nuclear safety regulations on operating plants are additional factors. The impact of computer technology on plant data systems, evolution of corporate and plant infrastructures, future plant data, system designs and benefits, and decision making capabilities and data usage support are discussed. (U.K.)

  4. Examining work structure in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauman, M.B.; Boulette, M.D.; Van Cott, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the assessment of the work structure of ten nuclear power plants. Work structure factors are those factors that relate to the way in which work at all levels in a plant is organized, staffed, managed, rewarded, and perceived by plant personnel. Questionnaires given to a cross-section of personnel at the plants were the primary source of data collection. Structured ''critical incident'' interviews were conducted to verify the questionnaire results. The study revealed that a variety of work structure factor problem areas do exist in nuclear power plants. The paper highlights a prioritized set of candidate research themes to be considered in EPRI's Work Structure and Performance Research Program

  5. Surveillance system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizeracki, M.T.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated surveillance system for nuclear power plant application. The author explores an expanded role for closed circuit television, with remotely located cameras and infrared scanners as the basic elements. The video system, integrated with voice communication, can enhance the safe and efficient operation of the plant, by improving the operator's knowledge of plant conditions. 7 refs

  6. Nuclear power plant containment construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Danisch, R.; Strickroth, E.

    1975-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Plant Containment Construction includes the spherical steel safety enclosure for the reactor and the equipment associated with the reactor and requiring this type of enclosure. This steel enclosure is externally structurally protected against accident by a concrete construction providing a foundation for the steel enclosure and having a cylindrical wall and a hemispherical dome, these parts being dimensioned to form an annular space surrounding the spherical steel enclosure, the latter and the concrete construction heretofore being concentrically arranged with respect to each other. In the disclosed construction the two parts are arranged with their vertical axis horizontally offset from each other so that opposite to the offsetting direction of the concrete construction a relatively large space is formed in the now asymmetrical annular space in which reactor auxiliary equipment not requiring enclosure by the steel containment vessel or safety enclosure, may be located outside of the steel containment vessel and inside of the concrete construction where it is structurally protected by the latter

  7. Development of life evaluation technology for nuclear power plant components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Yun Jae; Choi, Jae Boong [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2002-03-15

    This project focuses on developing reliable life evaluation technology for nuclear power plant components, and is divided into two parts, development of a life evaluation system for nuclear pressure vessels and evaluation of applicability of emerging technology to operating plants. For the development of life evaluation system for nuclear pressure vessels, the following seven topics are covered in this project: defect assessment method for steam generator tubes, development of fatigue monitoring system, assessment of corroded pipes, domestic round robin analysis for constructing P-T limit curve for RPV, development of probabilistic integrity assessment technique, effect of aging on strength of dissimilar welds, applicability of LBB to cast stainless steel, and development of probabilistic piping fracture mechanics.

  8. Nuclear plant life - A business decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joosten, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    Regarding the future of the nuclear power option, many scenarios have been put forth over the years. The most commonly accepted projections for installed nuclear capacity show it growing at a rate of about 2% per year throughout the next few decades. These projections appear modes on the surface. However, underlying the projections are critical assumptions and sometimes misconceptions about the lifetimes of existing reactors and how they are determined. The notion of a 40 year plant life is very common. Consequently, many projections start either with the assumption that no plants will be retired in the near terms or with the assumption that each retired plant will be replaced by another nuclear plant after 40 years. Effectively, these assumptions yield future projections for installed capacity that might be characterized as low growth, medium growth and high growth scenarios - or grow, grow, grow. The question remains as to whether or not these assumptions accurately model the driving forces and constraints to nuclear development. After all, there is no scientific basis for believing that all plants, PWRs BWRs, RBMKs, etc., should have the same 40 year life. Most power plant owners purchase the plant for the main reason of supplying electrical power to their consumer. For these owners, electricity production is a day to day commercial activity with various alternatives on how to achieve the prime objective. The decision of which electricity generation alternative to select (gas, coal, nuclear or renewable energy) and how long to operate the plant before replacing it with a new one is essentially a business decision. The paper discusses ageing, the nuclear plant life decision process, the factors which influence the decision and their ramifications regarding the near term growth of nuclear power capacity. The modelling of nuclear plant lifetimes is also discussed. (author). 5 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  9. Humid scraping method to obtain samples for the analysis of D2 incorporated in the pressure tubes of Embalse Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binetti, Edgardo O.; Cerutti, Carlos R.

    1999-01-01

    From ten fuel channels of the CNE reactor four samples of each channel were taken by means of the Humid Scraping method in order to evaluate the equivalent hydrogen content by incorporating deuterium in the pressure tubes. With these data, it is possible to make a list of priorities of channels for future replacement of spacer rings between pressure and calandria tubes, using Slarette equipment. (author)

  10. After-heat removing device in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, K [Nippon Atomic Industry Group Co. Ltd., Tokyo

    1977-01-14

    Purpose: To prevent water hammer in a BWR type reactor or the like by moving water in pipe lines having stagnant portions in an after-heat removing device. Constitution: To a reactor container, is provided a recycling pump which constitutes a closed loop type recycling system in a nuclear power plant together with a pressure vessel and pipe lines. A pump and a heat exchanger are provided outside of the reactor container and they are connected to up- and down-streams of the recycling pump to form an after-heat removing device in the plant. Upon shutdown of the nuclear power plant, since water in the stagnant portion flows to the intake port of the recycling pump and water from the reactor is spontaneously supplemented thereafter to the stagnant portion, neither pressurized water nor heated steam is generated and thus water hammer is prevented.

  11. Nuclear power plant's safety and risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, L.F.

    1975-01-01

    Starting with a comprehensive safety strategy as evolved over the past years and the present legal provisions for the construction and operation of nuclear power plants, the risk of the intended operation, of accidents and unforeseen events is discussed. Owing to the excellent safety record of nuclear power plants, main emphasis in discussing accidents is given to the precautionary analysis within the framework of the licensing procedure. In this context, hypothetical accidents are mentioned only as having been utilized for general risk comparisons. The development of a comprehensive risk concept for a completely objective safety assessment of nuclear power plants remains as a final goal. (orig.) [de

  12. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottosson, C.

    1989-05-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment

  13. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenninen, R.; Koponen, H.; Nevander, O.; Paltemaa, R.; Poellaenen, I.; Rannila, P.; Valtonen, K.; Vilkamo, O.

    1988-02-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment

  14. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimburger, H.

    1988-08-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment

  15. Fuzzy logic control of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Liangzhong; Guo Renjun; Ma Changwen

    1996-01-01

    The main advantage of the fuzzy logic control is that the method does not require a detailed mathematical model of the object to be controlled. In this paper, the shortcomings and limitations of the model-based method in nuclear power plant control were presented, the theory of the fuzzy logic control was briefly introduced, and the applications of the fuzzy logic control technology in nuclear power plant controls were surveyed. Finally, the problems to be solved by using the fuzzy logic control in nuclear power plants were discussed

  16. Maintenance planning for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattu, R.K.; Cooper, S.E.; Lauderdale, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Maintenance planning for nuclear power plants is similar to that in other industrial plants but it is heavily influenced by regulatory rules, with consequent costs of compliance. Steps by the nuclear industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address that problem include development of guidelines for maintenance of risk-critical equipment, using PRA-based techniques to select a set of equipment that requires maintenance and reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) approaches for determining what maintenance is required. The result of the process is a program designed to ensure effective maintenance of the equipment most critical to plant safety. (author)

  17. Heat supply from nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stach, V [Ustav Jaderneho Vyzkumu CSKAE, Rez (Czechoslovakia)

    1978-05-01

    The current state of world power production and consumption is assessed. Prognoses made for the years 1980 to 2000 show that nuclear energy should replace the major part of fossil fuels not only in the production of power but also in the production of heat. In this respect high-temperature reactors are highly prospective. The question is discussed of the technical and economic parameters of dual-purpose heat and power plants. It is, however, necessary to solve problems arising from the safe siting of nuclear heat and power plants and their environmental impacts. The economic benefits of combined power and heat production by such nuclear plants is evident.

  18. Methods of assessing nuclear power plant risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skvarka, P.; Kovacz, Z.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of safety evalution is based on safety criteria -standards or set qualitative values of parameters and indices used in designing nuclear power plants, incorporating demands on the quality of equipment and operation of the plant, its siting and technical means for achieving nuclear safety. The concepts are presented of basic and optimal risk values. Factors are summed up indispensable for the evaluation of the nuclear power plant risk and the present world trend of evaluation based on probability is discussed. (J.C.)

  19. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenninen, R.

    1988-09-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tabulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hzard to the personnel or the environment

  20. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    This general review of the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants concentrates on such events and discoveries related to nuclear and radiation safety as the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, regards as noteworthy. The report also includes a summary of the radiation safety of the personnel and the environment, as well as tubulated data on the production and load factors of the plants. In the report period, no event essentially degraded plant safety nor posed a radiation hazard to the personnel or the environment