WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear particle spectroscopy

  1. Nuclear spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ajzenberg-Selove, Fay

    1960-01-01

    Nuclear Spectroscopy, Part B focuses on the ways in which experimental data may be analyzed to furnish information about nuclear parameters and nuclear models in terms of which the data are interpreted.This book discusses the elastic and inelastic potential scattering amplitudes, role of beta decay in nuclear physics, and general selection rules for electromagnetic transitions. The nuclear shell model, fundamental coupling procedure, vibrational spectra, and empirical determination of the complex potential are also covered. This publication is suitable for graduate students preparing for exper

  2. High-spin nuclear spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    High-spin spectroscopy is the study of the changes in nuclear structure, properties, and behavior with increasing angular momentum. It involves the complex interplay between collective and single-particle motion, between shape and deformation changes, particle alignments, and changes in the pairing correlations. A review of progress in theory, experimentation, and instrumentation in this field is given. (DWL)

  3. Effect of PCSK9 Inhibition by Alirocumab on Lipoprotein Particle Concentrations Determined by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Michael J; Kereiakes, Dean; Pourfarzib, Ray; Winegar, Deborah; Banerjee, Poulabi; Hamon, Sara; Hanotin, Corinne; McKenney, James M

    2015-11-19

    In patients with discordance between low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and LDL particle (LDL-P) concentrations, cardiovascular risk more closely correlates with LDL-P. We investigated the effect of alirocumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, on lipoprotein particle concentration and size in hypercholesterolemic patients, using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Plasma samples were collected from patients receiving alirocumab 150 mg every 2 weeks (n=26) or placebo (n=31) during a phase II, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in patients (LDL cholesterol ≥100 mg/dL) on a stable atorvastatin dose. In this post hoc analysis, percentage change in concentrations of LDL-P, very-low-density lipoprotein particles, and high-density lipoprotein particles from baseline to week 12 was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. Alirocumab significantly reduced mean concentrations of total LDL-P (-63.3% versus -1.0% with placebo) and large (-71.3% versus -21.8%) and small (-54.0% versus +17.8%) LDL-P subfractions and total very-low-density lipoprotein particle concentrations (-36.4% versus +33.4%; all Plipoprotein particles increased with alirocumab (+11.2% versus +1.4% with placebo; Plipoprotein particles (2.8%) with alirocumab. LDL-P size remained relatively unchanged in both groups; however, very-low-density and high-density lipoprotein particle sizes increased to a significantly greater extent with alirocumab. Alirocumab significantly reduced LDL-C and LDL-P concentrations in hypercholesterolemic patients receiving stable atorvastatin therapy. These findings may be of particular relevance to patients with discordant LDL-C and LDL-P concentrations. URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01288443. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  4. Comparison between Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Estimating Coronary Heart Disease Risk Associated with LDL and HDL Particle Size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J. Arsenault; I. Lemieux; J.P. Després; N.J. Wareham; E.S.G. Stroes; J.J.P. Kastelein; K.T. Khaw; S.M. Boekholdt

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gradient gel electrophoresis (GGE) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are both widely accepted methods for measuring LDL and HDL particle size. However, whether or not GGE- or NMR-measured LDL or HDL particle size predicts coronary heart disease (CHD) risk to a similar ext

  5. Nuclear and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear and Particle Physics provides an introductory course on nuclear and particle physics for undergraduate and early-graduate students, which the author has taught for several years at the University of Zurich. It contains fundamentals on both nuclear and particle physics, giving emphasis to the discovery and history of developments in the field, and is experimentally/phenomenologically oriented. It contains detailed derivations of formulae such as 2–3 body phase space, the Weinberg-Salam model, and neutrino scattering. Originally published in German as Kern- und Teilchenphysik, several sections have been added to this new English version to cover modern topics, including updates on neutrinos, the Higgs boson, the top quark and bottom quark physics.

  6. Particle and nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Faessler, Amand

    1971-01-01

    Progress in Particle and Nuclear Physics, Volume 26 covers the significant advances in understanding the fundamentals of particle and nuclear physics. This volume is divided into four chapters, and begins with a brief overview of the various possible ideas beyond the standard model, the problem they address and their experimental tests. The next chapter deals with the basic physics of neutrino mass based on from a gauge theoretic point of view. This chapter considers the various extensions of the standard electroweak theory, along with their implications for neutrino physics. The discussio

  7. Nuclear structure of229Th from γ-ray spectroscopy study of233U α-particle decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barci, V.; Ardisson, G.; Barci-Funel, G.; Weiss, B.; El Samad, O.; Sheline, R. K.

    2003-09-01

    The level structure of 229Th, produced by α-particle decay of 233U, was studied with γ-ray spectroscopy measurements. The sources were continuously separated from daughters with ion-exchange chromatographic methods. Singles and coincidence measurements were performed with high-purity germanium detectors. Energies and intensities of about 220 γ rays were accurately determined. About 70 transitions were reported for the first time, especially in the 300 700 keV energy range. A 229Th level scheme was proposed, accounting for 220 transitions among 47 excited states. Alpha-particle feeding intensities and hindrance factors were deduced and compared to direct α-particle measurements; the agreement was found to be relatively good. The level structure was interpreted in the framework of rotational and/or reflection asymmetric models. The agreement with experimental data was shown to be satisfactory.

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Plutonium Content in Particles Collected from a Certified Reference Material by Total Nuclear Reaction Energy (Q Value) Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, M. P.; Hoover, A. S.; Rabin, M. W.; Bond, E. M.; Wolfsberg, L. E.; Schmidt, D. R.; Ullom, J. N.

    2016-08-01

    Microcalorimeters with embedded radioisotopes are an emerging category of sensor with advantages over existing methods for isotopic analysis of trace-level nuclear materials. For each nuclear decay, the energy of all decay products captured by the absorber (alpha particles, gamma rays, X-rays, electrons, daughter nuclei, etc.) is measured in one pulse. For alpha-decaying isotopes, this gives a measurement of the total nuclear reaction energy (Q value) and the spectra consist of well-separated, narrow peaks. We have demonstrated a simple mechanical alloying process to create an absorber structure consisting of a gold matrix with small inclusions of a radioactive sample. This absorber structure provides an optimized energy thermalization environment, resulting in high-resolution spectra with minimal tailing. We have applied this process to the analysis of particles collected from the surface of a plutonium metal certified reference material (CRM-126A from New Brunswick Laboratory) and demonstrated isotopic analysis by microcalorimeter Q value spectroscopy. Energy resolution from the Gaussian component of a Bortels function fit was 1.3 keV FWHM at 5244 keV. The collected particles were integrated directly into the detector absorber without any chemical processing. The ^{238}Pu/^{239}Pu and ^{240}Pu/^{239}Pu mass ratios were measured and the results confirmed against the certificate of analysis for the reference material. We also demonstrated inter-element analysis capability by measuring the ^{241}Am/^{239}Pu mass ratio.

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-23

    devices same is (C22-C24). A spectrometer based on adc SQUID that is ,I suitable for NQR and low-frequency NMR spectroscopy has is been developed (C25...relatively few papers that saE is have a primarily instrumental focus. This is due in part to s the tendency of spectrometer and probe vendors not to publish...from NOE data, etc. sNoe i This has been reflected in two trends in data processing SEN0S 12 hardware. Spectrometer vendors are starting to move awav 9

  10. Neural networks for nuclear spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, P.E.; Kangas, L.J.; Hashem, S.; Kouzes, R.T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    In this paper two applications of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in nuclear spectroscopy analysis are discussed. In the first application, an ANN assigns quality coefficients to alpha particle energy spectra. These spectra are used to detect plutonium contamination in the work environment. The quality coefficients represent the levels of spectral degradation caused by miscalibration and foreign matter affecting the instruments. A set of spectra was labeled with quality coefficients by an expert and used to train the ANN expert system. Our investigation shows that the expert knowledge of spectral quality can be transferred to an ANN system. The second application combines a portable gamma-ray spectrometer with an ANN. In this system the ANN is used to automatically identify, radioactive isotopes in real-time from their gamma-ray spectra. Two neural network paradigms are examined: the linear perception and the optimal linear associative memory (OLAM). A comparison of the two paradigms shows that OLAM is superior to linear perception for this application. Both networks have a linear response and are useful in determining the composition of an unknown sample when the spectrum of the unknown is a linear superposition of known spectra. One feature of this technique is that it uses the whole spectrum in the identification process instead of only the individual photo-peaks. For this reason, it is potentially more useful for processing data from lower resolution gamma-ray spectrometers. This approach has been tested with data generated by Monte Carlo simulations and with field data from sodium iodide and Germanium detectors. With the ANN approach, the intense computation takes place during the training process. Once the network is trained, normal operation consists of propagating the data through the network, which results in rapid identification of samples. This approach is useful in situations that require fast response where precise quantification is less important.

  11. Nuclear physics and particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistoni, G.

    2016-05-01

    The use of charged particles and nuclei in cancer therapy is one of the most successful cases of application of nuclear physics to medicine. The physical advantages in terms of precision and selectivity, combined with the biological properties of densely ionizing radiation, make charged particle approach an elective choice in a number of cases. Hadron therapy is in continuous development and nuclear physicists can give important contributions to this discipline. In this work some of the relevant aspects in nuclear physics will be reviewed, summarizing the most important directions of research and development.

  12. Nuclear physics and particle therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Battistoni G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of charged particles and nuclei in cancer therapy is one of the most successful cases of application of nuclear physics to medicine. The physical advantages in terms of precision and selectivity, combined with the biological properties of densely ionizing radiation, make charged particle approach an elective choice in a number of cases. Hadron therapy is in continuous development and nuclear physicists can give important contributions to this discipline. In this work some of the relevant aspects in nuclear physics will be reviewed, summarizing the most important directions of research and development.

  13. Particle physics using nuclear targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferbel, T.

    1978-01-01

    The use of nuclear targets in particle physics is discussed and some recent results obtained in studies of hadronic interactions on nuclei summarized. In particular experimental findings on inclusive production and on coherent dissociation of mesons and baryons at high energies are presented. 41 references.

  14. Particle physics using nuclear targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferbel, T.

    1978-01-01

    The use of nuclear targets in particle physics is discussed and some recent results obtained in studies of hadronic interactions on nuclei summarized. In particular experimental findings on inclusive production and on coherent dissociation of mesons and baryons at high energies are presented. 41 references.

  15. Experimental techniques in nuclear and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tavernier, Stefaan

    2009-01-01

    The book is based on a course in nuclear and particle physics that the author has taught over many years to physics students, students in nuclear engineering and students in biomedical engineering. It provides the basic understanding that any student or researcher using such instruments and techniques should have about the subject. After an introduction to the structure of matter at the subatomic scale, it covers the experimental aspects of nuclear and particle physics. Ideally complementing a theoretically-oriented textbook on nuclear physics and/or particle physics, it introduces the reader to the different techniques used in nuclear and particle physics to accelerate particles and to measurement techniques (detectors) in nuclear and particle physics. The main subjects treated are: interactions of subatomic particles in matter; particle accelerators; basics of different types of detectors; and nuclear electronics. The book will be of interest to undergraduates, graduates and researchers in both particle and...

  16. Nuclear physics with polarized particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2012-07-01

    The measurement of spin-polarization observables in reactions of nuclei and particles is of great utility and advantage when the effects of single-spin sub-states are to be investigated. Indeed, the unpolarized differential cross-section encompasses the averaging over the spin states of the particles, and thus loses details of the interaction process. This introductory text combines, in a single volume, course-based lecture notes on spin physics and on polarized-ion sources with the aim of providing a concise yet self-contained starting point for newcomers to the field, as well as for lecturers in search of suitable material for their courses and seminars. A significant part of the book is devoted to introducing the formal theory - a description of polarization and of nuclear reactions with polarized particles. The remainder of the text describes the physical basis of methods and devices necessary to perform experiments with polarized particles and to measure polarization and polarization effects in nuclear reactions. The book concludes with a brief review of modern applications in medicine and fusion energy research. For reasons of conciseness and of the pedagogical aims of this volume, examples are mainly taken from low-energy installations such as tandem Van de Graaff laboratories, although the emphasis of present research is shifting to medium- and high-energy nuclear physics. Consequently, this volume is restricted to describing non-relativistic processes and focuses on the energy range from astrophysical energies (a few keV) to tens of MeV. It is further restricted to polarimetry of hadronic particles. (orig.)

  17. Evolution of nuclear spectroscopy at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Mukherjee

    2001-07-01

    sophisticated experiments. Front line nuclear spectroscopy works are now being done and new informations are obtained for a large number of nuclei over a wide mass range. Currently Saha Institute is building a multi-element gamma heavy ion neutron array detector (MEGHNAD), which will have six high efficiency clover Ge detector together with charged particle ball and other accessories. The system is expected to be usable in 2002 and will be used in experiments using high energy heavy ions from VECC.

  18. Nuclear spectroscopy with Geant4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmiento Luis G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation toolkit Geant4 was originally developed at CERN for high-energy physics. Over the years it has been established as a swiss army knife not only in particle physics but it has seen an accelerated expansion towards nuclear physics and more recently to medical imaging and γ- and ion- therapy to mention but a handful of new applications. The validity of Geant4 is vast and large across many particles, ions, materials, and physical processes with typically various different models to choose from. Unfortunately, atomic nuclei with atomic number Z > 100 are not properly supported. This is likely due to the rather novelty of the field, its comparably small user base, and scarce evaluated experimental data. To circumvent this situation different workarounds have been used over the years. In this work the simulation toolkit Geant4 will be introduced with its different components and the effort to bring the software to the heavy and superheavy region will be described.

  19. Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geesaman, D.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [ed.

    1993-11-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  20. Studies of nuclear fuel by means of nuclear spectroscopy methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Peter

    2000-02-01

    This paper is a summary text of several works performed by the author regarding spectroscopic measurements on spent nuclear fuel. Methods for determining the decay heat of spent nuclear fuel by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy and for verifying the integrity of nuclear fuel by means of tomography is presented. A summary of work performed regarding gamma-ray detector technology for studies of fission gas release is presented.

  1. Alpha particle spectroscopy — A useful tool for the investigation of spent nuclear fuel from high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmbold, M.

    1984-06-01

    For more than a decade, alpha particle spectrometry of spent nuclear fuel has been used at the Kernforschungsanlage Jülich (KFA) in the field of research for the German high temperature reactor (HTR). Techniques used for the preparation of samples for alpha spectrometry have included deposition from aqueous solutions of spent fuel, annealing of fuel particles in an oven and the evaporation of fuel material by a laser beam. The resulting sources are very thin but of low activity and the alpha spectrometry data obtained from them must be evaluated with sophisticated computer codes to achieve the required accuracy. Measurements have been made on high and low enriched uranium fuel and on a variety of parameters relevant to the fuel cycle. In this paper the source preparation and data evaluation techniques will be discussed together with the results obtained to data, i.e. production of alpha active actinide isotopes, correlations between actinide isotopes and fission products, build up and transmutation of actinides during burn-up of HTR fuel, diffusion coefficients of actinides for fuel particle kernels and coating materials. All these KFA results have helped to establish the basis for the design, licensing and operation of HTR power plants, including reprocessing and waste management.

  2. Nuclear forensics using gamma-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Norman, Eric B

    2016-01-01

    Much of George Dracoulis's research career was devoted to utilizing gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the past several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low- resolution gamma ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  3. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, E. B.

    2016-09-01

    Much of George Dracoulis's research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  4. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Much of George Dracoulis’s research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  5. Overview. Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy. Section 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Styczen, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The 1994 year activity in the Nuclear Spectroscopy Department was like in previous years spread over large variety of subjects concerned with the in-beam nuclear spectroscopy and many nucleon transfer reactions, properties of high excited nuclear states, and the applied nuclear spectroscopy. The studies in the first two groups were mostly carried out in a vast international collaboration which enabled us to carry out experiments on highly sophisticated experimental facilities abroad like EUROGAM, GASP, HECTOR or OSIRIS, and others. Some preparations for `home` experiments have been carried out on the very much looked forward and recently obtained heavy ion beam from the cyclotron at the Warsaw University. The applied nuclear spectroscopy works, on the other hand, were based on using our own installations: an elaborated set-up for perturbed angular correlations, the RBS and PIXE set-ups at the Van de Graaff accelerator, the implanter, an atomic force microscope and several others. Much of the effort manifests itself in several valuable results which are summarized in the following pages. It is to be underlined that those results, as well as some new instrumentation developments were possible due to additional support via special grants and the promotion of the international cooperation by the State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN). (author).

  6. Foundations of nuclear and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Donnelly, T William; Holstein, Barry R; Milner, Richard G; Surrow, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    This textbook brings together nuclear and particle physics, presenting a balanced overview of both fields as well as the interplay between the two. The theoretical as well as the experimental foundations are covered, providing students with a deep understanding of the subject. In-chapter exercises ranging from basic experimental to sophisticated theoretical questions provide an important tool for students to solidify their knowledge. Suitable for upper undergraduate courses in nuclear and particle physics as well as more advanced courses, the book includes road maps guiding instructors on tailoring the content to their course. Online resources including color figures, tables, and a solutions manual complete the teaching package. This textbook will be essential for students preparing for further study or a career in the field who require a solid grasp of both nuclear and particle physics.

  7. A Vision of Nuclear and Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, Hugh E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This paper will consist of a selected, personal view of some of the issues associated with the intersections of nuclear and particle physics. As well as touching on the recent developments we will attempt to look at how those aspects of the subject might evolve over the next few years.

  8. Nuclear physics in particle therapy: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Marco; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-09-01

    Charged particle therapy has been largely driven and influenced by nuclear physics. The increase in energy deposition density along the ion path in the body allows reducing the dose to normal tissues during radiotherapy compared to photons. Clinical results of particle therapy support the physical rationale for this treatment, but the method remains controversial because of the high cost and of the lack of comparative clinical trials proving the benefit compared to x-rays. Research in applied nuclear physics, including nuclear interactions, dosimetry, image guidance, range verification, novel accelerators and beam delivery technologies, can significantly improve the clinical outcome in particle therapy. Measurements of fragmentation cross-sections, including those for the production of positron-emitting fragments, and attenuation curves are needed for tuning Monte Carlo codes, whose use in clinical environments is rapidly increasing thanks to fast calculation methods. Existing cross sections and codes are indeed not very accurate in the energy and target regions of interest for particle therapy. These measurements are especially urgent for new ions to be used in therapy, such as helium. Furthermore, nuclear physics hardware developments are frequently finding applications in ion therapy due to similar requirements concerning sensors and real-time data processing. In this review we will briefly describe the physics bases, and concentrate on the open issues.

  9. Nuclear physics in particle therapy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Marco; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-09-01

    Charged particle therapy has been largely driven and influenced by nuclear physics. The increase in energy deposition density along the ion path in the body allows reducing the dose to normal tissues during radiotherapy compared to photons. Clinical results of particle therapy support the physical rationale for this treatment, but the method remains controversial because of the high cost and of the lack of comparative clinical trials proving the benefit compared to x-rays. Research in applied nuclear physics, including nuclear interactions, dosimetry, image guidance, range verification, novel accelerators and beam delivery technologies, can significantly improve the clinical outcome in particle therapy. Measurements of fragmentation cross-sections, including those for the production of positron-emitting fragments, and attenuation curves are needed for tuning Monte Carlo codes, whose use in clinical environments is rapidly increasing thanks to fast calculation methods. Existing cross sections and codes are indeed not very accurate in the energy and target regions of interest for particle therapy. These measurements are especially urgent for new ions to be used in therapy, such as helium. Furthermore, nuclear physics hardware developments are frequently finding applications in ion therapy due to similar requirements concerning sensors and real-time data processing. In this review we will briefly describe the physics bases, and concentrate on the open issues.

  10. Applications of digital pulse processing in nuclear spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Grzywacz, R

    2003-01-01

    Data acquisition systems for nuclear spectroscopy have traditionally been based on hybrid systems with analog shaping amplifiers followed by analog-to-digital converters. Recently, however, new systems based on digital signal processing concepts have been developed. For example, one specific design, the Digital Gamma Finder (DGF-4C), has been used extensively for particle- and gamma-spectroscopy of nuclei far from stability. Using the DGF-4C, a variety of data acquisition systems have been implemented and used for measurements with semiconductor and scintillator detectors at recoil separators like the RMS at ORNL, the FRS at GSI and LISE at GANIL. Some novel features and unique advantages, such as trigger-less operation and pulse shape recording, are discussed in the context of selected studies.

  11. Nuclear spectroscopy in nuclei with Z ≥ 110

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, D., E-mail: D.Ackermann@gsi.de

    2015-12-15

    The nuclear structure of species at the extreme of highest atomic numbers Z and nuclear masses A promises to reveal intriguing new features of this exotic hadronic matter. Their stability itself they owe to quantum-mechanic effects only. They form metastable states which, governed by the subtle interplay of α decay and spontaneous fission versus quantum-mechanic stabilization via shell effects, are in some cases more robust against disintegration than their ground states. Following the isotopic and isotonic trends of single particle levels, as well as collective features like deformation, may reveal the path towards the gap in the level densities, expected for the next closed proton and neutron shells at the so-called “island of stability” of spherical superheavy nuclei. Their atomic configuration offers via X-ray spectroscopy a tool to identify the atomic number of heavy species, where other more traditional methods like evaporation residue (ER)–α correlation are not applicable.

  12. Elementary Particle Spectroscopy in Regular Solid Rewrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trell, Erik

    2008-10-01

    The Nilpotent Universal Computer Rewrite System (NUCRS) has operationalized the radical ontological dilemma of Nothing at All versus Anything at All down to the ground recursive syntax and principal mathematical realisation of this categorical dichotomy as such and so governing all its sui generis modalities, leading to fulfilment of their individual terms and compass when the respective choice sequence operations are brought to closure. Focussing on the general grammar, NUCRS by pure logic and its algebraic notations hence bootstraps Quantum Mechanics, aware that it "is the likely keystone of a fundamental computational foundation" also for e.g. physics, molecular biology and neuroscience. The present work deals with classical geometry where morphology is the modality, and ventures that the ancient regular solids are its specific rewrite system, in effect extensively anticipating the detailed elementary particle spectroscopy, and further on to essential structures at large both over the inorganic and organic realms. The geodetic antipode to Nothing is extension, with natural eigenvector the endless straight line which when deployed according to the NUCRS as well as Plotelemeian topographic prescriptions forms a real three-dimensional eigenspace with cubical eigenelements where observed quark-skewed quantum-chromodynamical particle events self-generate as an Aristotelean phase transition between the straight and round extremes of absolute endlessness under the symmetry- and gauge-preserving, canonical coset decomposition SO(3)×O(5) of Lie algebra SU(3). The cubical eigen-space and eigen-elements are the parental state and frame, and the other solids are a range of transition matrix elements and portions adapting to the spherical root vector symmetries and so reproducibly reproducing the elementary particle spectroscopy, including a modular, truncated octahedron nano-composition of the Electron which piecemeal enter into molecular structures or compressed to each

  13. Nuclear track radiography of 'hot' aerosol particles

    CERN Document Server

    Boulyga, S F; Kievets, M K; Lomonosova, E M; Zhuk, I V; Yaroshevich, O I; Perelygin, V P; Petrova, R I; Brandt, R; Vater, P

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear track radiography was applied to identify aerosol 'hot' particles which contain elements of nuclear fuel and fallout after Chernobyl NPP accident. For the determination of the content of transuranium elements in radioactive aerosols the measurement of the alpha-activity of 'hot' particles by SSNTD was used in this work, as well as radiography of fission fragments formed as a result of the reactions (n,f) and (gamma,f) in the irradiation of aerosol filters by thermal neutrons and high energy gamma quanta. The technique allowed the sizes and alpha-activity of 'hot' particles to be determined without extracting them from the filter, as well as the determination of the uranium content and its enrichment by sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Pu isotopes. Sensitivity of determination of alpha activity by fission method is 5x10 sup - sup 6 Bq per particle. The software for the system of image analysis was created. It ensured the identification of track clusters on an optical imag...

  14. Nuclear, particle and many body physics

    CERN Document Server

    Morse, Philip M; Feshbach, Herman

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear, Particle and Many Body Physics, Volume II, is the second of two volumes dedicated to the memory of physicist Amos de-Shalit. The contributions in this volume are a testament to the respect he earned as a physicist and of the warm and rich affection he commanded as a personal friend. The book contains 41 chapters and begins with a study on the renormalization of rational Lagrangians. Separate chapters cover the scattering of high energy protons by light nuclei; approximation of the dynamics of proton-neutron systems; the scattering amplitude for the Gaussian potential; Coulomb excitati

  15. Novel mercuric iodide polycrystalline nuclear particle counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieber, M. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)]|[Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Zuck, A.; Braiman, M.; Nissenbaum, J. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel); Turchetta, R.; Dulinski, W.; Husson, D.; Riester, J.L. [LEPSI, Strasbourg (France)

    1997-12-01

    Polycrystalline mercuric iodide nuclear radiation detectors have been produced in a novel technology. Unlike the normal single-crystal technology, there is no intrinsic limit to the surface on which these detectors can be produced. Detectors with areas up to about 1.5 cm{sup 2}, thicknesses from 30 to 600 {micro}m, and with single electrodes as well as microstrip and pixel contacts have been fabricated and successfully tested with photons in the range of 40--660 keV, {beta} particle`s emitted from a Sr-Y source, and high energy (100 GeV) muons. Results on both charge collection and counting efficiency are reported as well as some very preliminary imaging results. The experimental results on charge collection have been compared with simulation, and a combined {mu}{tau} product 10{sup {minus}7} cm{sup 2}/V for electrons has been estimated.

  16. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keevil, Stephen F [Department of Medical Physics, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Guy' s Hospital, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Division of Imaging Sciences, King' s College London, Guy' s Campus, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-21

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications. (topical review)

  17. Laser spectroscopy used in nuclear physics; La spectroscopie laser appliquee a la physique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Blanc, F

    2001-04-05

    The study of nuclear shapes is a basic topic since it constitutes an excellent ground for testing and validating nuclear models. Measurements of the electron quadrupolar moment, of the nuclear charge radius and of the magnetic dipolar moment shed light on the nuclear deformation. Laser spectroscopy is a specific tool for such measurements, it is based on the interaction of the nucleus with the surrounding electron cloud (hyperfine structure), it is then an external approach of the shape of the nucleus whereas the classical nuclear spectroscopy ({alpha}, {beta} or {gamma}) gives information on the deformation from the inside of the nucleus. The author describes 2 techniques of laser spectroscopy: the colinear spectroscopy directly applied to a beam issued from an isotope separator and the resonant ionization spectroscopy linked with atom desorption that allows the study of particular nuclei. In order to illustrate both methods some effective measurements are presented: - the colinear spectroscopy has allowed the achievement of the complete description of the isomeric state (T = 31 years) of hafnium-178; - The experiment Complis has revealed an unexpected even-odd zigzag effect on very neutron-deficient platinum isotopes; and - the comparison of 2 isotopes of gold and platinum with their isomers has shown that the inversion of 2 levels of neutron, that was found out by nuclear spectroscopy, is in fact a consequence of a change in the nuclear shape. (A.C.)

  18. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  19. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  20. UCLA Particle and Nuclear Physics Research Group, 1993 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.; Clajus, M.; Price, J.W.; Tippens, W.B.; White, D.B.

    1993-09-01

    The research programs of the UCLA Particle and Nuclear Physics Research Group, the research objectives, results of experiments, the continuing activities and new initiatives are presented. The primary goal of the research is to test the symmetries and invariances of particle/nuclear physics with special emphasis on investigating charge symmetry, isospin invariance, charge conjugation, and CP. Another important part of our work is baryon spectroscopy, which is the determination of the properties (mass, width, decay modes, etc.) of particles and resonances. We also measure some basic properties of light nuclei, for example the hadronic radii of {sup 3}H and {sup 3}He. Special attention is given to the eta meson, its production using photons, electrons, {pi}{sup {plus_minus}}, and protons, and its rare and not-so-rare decays. In Section 1, the physics motivation of our research is outlined. Section 2 provides a summary of the research projects. The status of each program is given in Section 3. We discuss the various experimental techniques used, the results obtained, and we outline the plans for the continuing and the new research. Details are presented of new research that is made possible by the use of the Crystal Ball Detector, a highly segmented NaI calorimeter and spectrometer with nearly 4{pi} acceptance (it was built and used at SLAC and is to be moved to BNL). The appendix contains an update of the bibliography, conference participation, and group memos; it also indicates our share in the organization of conferences, and gives a listing of the colloquia and seminars presented by us.

  1. Hyperuniformity disorder length spectroscopy for extended particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durian, D. J.

    2017-09-01

    The concept of a hyperuniformity disorder length h was recently introduced for analyzing volume fraction fluctuations for a set of measuring windows [Chieco et al., Phys. Rev. E 96, 032909 (2017)., 10.1103/PhysRevE.96.032909]. This length permits a direct connection to the nature of disorder in the spatial configuration of the particles and provides a way to diagnose the degree of hyperuniformity in terms of the scaling of h and its value in comparison with established bounds. Here, this approach is generalized for extended particles, which are larger than the image resolution and can lie partially inside and partially outside the measuring windows. The starting point is an expression for the relative volume fraction variance in terms of four distinct volumes: that of the particle, the measuring window, the mean-squared overlap between particle and region, and the region over which particles have nonzero overlap with the measuring window. After establishing limiting behaviors for the relative variance, computational methods are developed for both continuum and pixelated particles. Exact results are presented for particles of special shape and for measuring windows of special shape, for which the equations are tractable. Comparison is made for other particle shapes, using simulated Poisson patterns. And the effects of polydispersity and image errors are discussed. For small measuring windows, both particle shape and spatial arrangement affect the form of the variance. For large regions, the variance scaling depends only on arrangement but particle shape sets the numerical proportionality. The combined understanding permit the measured variance to be translated to the spectrum of hyperuniformity lengths versus region size, as the quantifier of spatial arrangement. This program is demonstrated for a system of nonoverlapping particles at a series of increasing packing fractions as well as for an Einstein pattern of particles with several different extended shapes.

  2. Nuclear Track Detectors. Searches for Exotic Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, G

    2008-01-01

    We used Nuclear Track Detectors (NTD) CR39 and Makrofol for many purposes: i) Exposures at the SPS and at lower energy accelerator heavy ion beams for calibration purposes and for fragmentation studies. ii) Searches for GUT and Intermediate Mass Magnetic Monopoles (IMM), nuclearites, Q-balls and strangelets in the cosmic radiation. The MACRO experiment in the Gran Sasso underground lab, with ~1000 m^2 of CR39 detectors (plus scintillators and streamer tubes), established an upper limit for superheavy GUT poles at the level of 1.4x10^-16 cm^-2 s^-1 sr^-1 for 4x10^-5 particles. iii) Environmental studies, radiation monitoring, neutron dosimetry.

  3. Pulsed electron-nuclear-electron triple resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, Hans; Bernardo, Marcelino

    1990-05-01

    A new experimental technique, pulsed electron-nuclear-electron triple resonance spectroscopy, is demonstrated. It is based on a modification of the pulse sequence for electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) in which two EPR and one NMR transition are irradiated. The irradiation of one EPR transition is detected via a second EPR transition. The nuclear hyperfine coupling, which separates these EPR transition frequencies, is the irradiated NMR transition. The major advantages of triple resonance spectroscopy include the ability to resolve overlapping nuclear resonances in the ENDOR spectrum and a more direct quantitative assignment of nuclear hyperfine and quadrupole couplings. The triple resonance experiment is an alternative to the recently proposed method of employing rapid magnetic field jumps between microwave pulses for generating hyperfine selective ENDOR spectra.

  4. Shape and topography corrections for planetary nuclear spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Hendricks, John S.

    2015-11-01

    The elemental composition of planetary surfaces can be determined using gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy. Most planetary bodies for which nuclear spectroscopy data have been acquired are round, and simple, analytic corrections for measurement geometry can be applied; however, recent measurements of the irregular asteroid 4 Vesta by Dawn required more detailed corrections using a shape model (Prettyman et al., Science 2012). In addition, subtle artifacts of topography have been observed in low altitude measurements of lunar craters, with potential implications for polar hydrogen content (Eke et al., JGR 2015). To explore shape and topography effects, we have updated the general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX to include a polygonal shape model (Prettyman and Hendricks, LPSC 2015). The shape model is fully integrated with the code’s 3D combinatorial geometry modules. A voxel-based acceleration algorithm enables fast ray-intersection calculations needed for Monte Carlo. As modified, MCNPX can model neutron and gamma ray transport within natural surfaces using global and/or regional shape/topography data (e.g. from photogrammetry and laser altimetry). We are using MCNPX to explore the effect of small-scale roughness, regional-, and global-topography for asteroids, comets and close-up measurements of high-relief features on larger bodies, such as the lunar surface. MCNPX can characterize basic effects on measurements by an orbiting spectrometer such as 1) the angular distribution of emitted particles, 2) shielding of galactic cosmic rays by surrounding terrain and 3) re-entrant scattering. In some cases, re-entrant scattering can be ignored, leading to a fast ray-tracing model that treats effects 1 and 2. The algorithm is applied to forward modeling and spatial deconvolution of epithermal neutron data acquired at Vesta. Analyses of shape/topography effects and correction strategies are presented for Vesta, selected small bodies and cratered

  5. Power quality considerations for nuclear spectroscopy applications: Grounding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Hernández, J.M., E-mail: josemanuel.garcia@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, ININ, Carretera México-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, 52750 Estado de México, México (Mexico); Instituto Tecnológico de Toluca, Departamento de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Av. Tecnológico S/N, ExRancho La Virgen, 52140 Metepec, México (Mexico); Ramírez-Jiménez, F.J., E-mail: fjr@ieee.org [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, ININ, Carretera México-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, 52750 Estado de México, México (Mexico); Instituto Tecnológico de Toluca, Departamento de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Av. Tecnológico S/N, ExRancho La Virgen, 52140 Metepec, México (Mexico); Mondragón-Contreras, L.; López-Callejas, R. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, ININ, Carretera México-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, 52750 Estado de México, México (Mexico); Instituto Tecnológico de Toluca, Departamento de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Av. Tecnológico S/N, ExRancho La Virgen, 52140 Metepec, México (Mexico); Torres-Bribiesca, M.A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, ININ, Carretera México-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, 52750 Estado de México, México (Mexico); and others

    2013-11-21

    Traditionally the electrical installations are designed for supplying power and to assure the personnel safety. In nuclear analysis laboratories, additional issues about grounding also must be considered for proper operation of high resolution nuclear spectroscopy systems. This paper shows the traditional ways of grounding nuclear spectroscopy systems and through different scenarios, it shows the effects on the more sensitive parameter of these systems: the energy resolution, it also proposes the constant monitoring of a power quality parameter as a way to preserve or to improve the resolution of the systems, avoiding the influence of excessive extrinsic noise. -- Highlights: •We analyze the performance of nuclear spectroscopy systems with different configurations of the grounding system. •The neutral to ground voltage is an indicator of the ground conditions, a high value may contribute to the increase of the FWHM in nuclear spectroscopy systems. •The use of an isolated ground system is the best option to preserve the best FWHM value. •The application of power quality concepts can help to guaranty the best configuration of the grounding system.

  6. Implementation of Quantum Logic Gates by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Jiang-Feng; WU Ji-Hui; SHI Ming-Jun; HAN Liang; ZHOU Xian-Yi; YE Bang-Jiao; WENG Hui-Ming; HAN Rong-Dian

    2000-01-01

    Using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques with a solution of cytosine molecules, we show an implementation of certain quantum logic gates (including NOT gate, square-root of NOT gate and controlled-NOT gate), which have central importance in quantum computing. In addition, experimental results show that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can efficiently measure the result of quantum computing without attendant wave-function collapse.

  7. Particle transfer spectroscopy using radioactive targets

    CERN Document Server

    Naumann, R A

    1976-01-01

    The practicality of general use of radioactive targets to study nuclei off the stability line by transfer spectroscopy is examined. Some advantages of this spectroscopic technique are illustrated with recent results from (p, t) and (t, p) stable target studies of negative parity core-coupled states systematically occurring in 4 adjacent odd silver isotopes. Preliminary results from the study of the /sup 205/Pb (t, p)/sup 207/Pb reaction using reactor produced 3*10/sup 7/ year lead 205 are given. (3 refs).

  8. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  9. Transport of large particles released in a nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poellaenen, R.; Toivonen, H.; Lahtinen, J.; Ilander, T.

    1995-10-01

    Highly radioactive particulate material may be released in a nuclear accident or sometimes during normal operation of a nuclear power plant. However, consequence analyses related to radioactive releases are often performed neglecting the particle nature of the release. The properties of the particles have an important role in the radiological hazard. A particle deposited on the skin may cause a large and highly non-uniform skin beta dose. Skin dose limits may be exceeded although the overall activity concentration in air is below the level of countermeasures. For sheltering purposes it is crucial to find out the transport range, i.e. the travel distance of the particles. A method for estimating the transport range of large particles (aerodynamic diameter d{sub a} > 20 {mu}m) in simplified meteorological conditions is presented. A user-friendly computer code, known as TROP, is developed for fast range calculations in a nuclear emergency. (orig.) (23 refs., 13 figs.).

  10. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Measuring Ternary Phase Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, Jennifer K.; Terrance, Jacob C.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry curriculum in which the ternary phase diagram of water, 1-propanol and n-heptane is measured using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The experiment builds upon basic concepts of NMR spectral analysis, typically taught in the undergraduate…

  11. SPECTRW: A software package for nuclear and atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalfas, C.A., E-mail: kalfas@inp.demokritos.gr [National Centre for Scientific Research Demokritos, Institute of Nuclear & Particle Physics, 15310 Agia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Axiotis, M. [National Centre for Scientific Research Demokritos, Institute of Nuclear & Particle Physics, 15310 Agia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Tsabaris, C. [Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, Institute of Oceanography, 46.7 Km Athens-Sounio Ave, P.O. Box 712, Anavyssos 19013 (Greece)

    2016-09-11

    A software package to be used in nuclear and atomic spectroscopy is presented. Apart from analyzing γ and X-ray spectra, it offers many additional features such as de-convolution of multiple photopeaks, sample analysis and activity determination, detection system evaluation and an embedded code for spectra simulation.

  12. Two level scheme solvers for nuclear spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Kaj; DiJulio, Douglas; Cederkäll, Joakim

    2011-10-01

    A program for building level schemes from γ-spectroscopy coincidence data has been developed. The scheme builder was equipped with two different algorithms: a statistical one based on the Metropolis method and a more logical one, called REMP (REcurse, Merge and Permute), developed from scratch. These two methods are compared both on ideal cases and on experimental γ-ray data sets. The REMP algorithm is based on coincidences and transition energies. Using correct and complete coincidence data, it has solved approximately half a million schemes without failures. Also, for incomplete data and data with minor errors, the algorithm produces consistent sub-schemes when it is not possible to obtain a complete scheme from the provided data.

  13. High-energy nuclear optics of polarized particles

    CERN Document Server

    Baryshevsky, Vladimir G

    2012-01-01

    The various phenomena caused by refraction and diffraction of polarized elementary particles in matter have opened up a new research area in the particle physics: nuclear optics of polarized particles. Effects similar to the well-known optical phenomena such as birefringence and Faraday effects, exist also in particle physics, though the particle wavelength is much less than the distance between atoms of matter. Current knowledge of the quasi-optical effects, which exist for all particles in any wavelength range (and energies from low to extremely high), will enable us to investigate different properties of interacting particles (nuclei) in a new aspect. This pioneering book will provide detailed accounts of quasi-optical phenomena in the particle polarization, and will interest physicists and professionals in experimental particle physics.

  14. Generation of narrow peaks in spectroscopy of charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbers, Dirk; Schmidt, Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    In spectroscopy of charged particles, narrow peaks may appear in continuous spectra if magnetic transport of the particles is involved. These artefacts, which so far have escaped the attention of investigators, can develop whenever geometric detection efficiency is less than 100%. As such peaks may be misinterpreted as new physics, their generation is investigated, both analytically and experimentally, for various detector configurations, including those used in searches for the spontaneous decay of the vacuum in heavy-ion collisions.

  15. Nuclear Dynamics at the Particle Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Tsoneva, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    Recently, new low-energy modes of excitation called pygmy resonances have been observed. Their distinct feature is the close connection to nuclear skin oscillations. A successful description of the pygmy resonances could be achieved in a microscopic theoretical approach which incorporates the density functional theory and QRPA formalism extended with multi-phonon degrees of freedom. The latter is found of crucial importance for the understanding of the fine structure of nuclear electric and magnetic excitations at low energies. Corresponding microscopic multi-phonon response functions are implemented in the studies of s-process of nucleosynthesis.

  16. Nuclear Dynamics at the Particle Threshold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nadia Tsoneva; Horst Lenske

    2015-01-01

    Recently, new low-energy modes of excitation called pygmy resonances have been observed. Their distinct feature is the close connection to nuclear skin oscillations. A successful description of the pygmy resonances could be achieved in a microscopic theoretical approach which incorporates the density functional theory and QRPA formalism extended with multi-phonon degrees of freedom. The latter is found of crucial importance for the understanding of the fine structure of nuclear electric and magnetic excitations at low energies. Corresponding microscopic multi-phonon response functions are implemented in the studies of s-process of nucleosynthesis.

  17. Particle production in antiproton induced nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The quantum molecular dynamics model has been improved to investigate the reaction dynamics induced by antiprotons. The reaction channels of elastic scattering, annihilation, charge exchange and inelastic collisions have been included in the model. Dynamics on particle production, in particular pions, kaons, antikaons and hyperons, is investigated in collisions of $\\overline{p}$ on $^{12}$C, $^{20}$Ne, $^{40}$Ca, $^{112}$Sn, $^{181}$Ta, $^{197}$Au and $^{238}$U from a low to high incident momentum. The rapidity and momentum distributions of $\\pi^{+}$ and protons from the LEAR measurements can be well reproduced. The impacts of system size and incident momentum on particle emissions are investigated from the inclusive spectra, transverse momentum and rapidity distributions. It is found that the annihilations of $\\overline{p}$ on nucleons are of importance on the particle production. Hyperons are mainly produced via meson induced reactions on nucleons and strangeness exchange collisions when the incident moment...

  18. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Pourmodheji; Ebrahim Ghafar-Zadeh; Sebastian Magierowski

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelera...

  19. Modeling Deep Burn TRISO particle nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M., E-mail: besmanntm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Stoller, R.E., E-mail: stollerre@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Samolyuk, G., E-mail: samolyukgd@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Schuck, P.C., E-mail: schuckpc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Golubov, S.I., E-mail: golubovsi@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Rudin, S.P., E-mail: srudin@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wills, J.M., E-mail: jxw@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Coe, J.D., E-mail: jcoe@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wirth, B.D., E-mail: bdwirth@utk.edu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0750 (United States); Kim, S., E-mail: sungtae@cae.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin, 1509 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Morgan, D.D., E-mail: ddmorgan@engr.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin, 1509 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Szlufarska, I., E-mail: izabela@engr.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin, 1509 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Under the DOE Deep Burn program TRISO fuel is being investigated as a fuel form for consuming plutonium and minor actinides, and for greater efficiency in uranium utilization. The result will thus be to drive TRISO particulate fuel to very high burn-ups. In the current effort the various phenomena in the TRISO particle are being modeled using a variety of techniques. The chemical behavior is being treated utilizing thermochemical analysis to identify phase formation/transformation and chemical activities in the particle, including kernel migration. Density functional theory is being used to understand fission product diffusion within the plutonia oxide kernel, the fission product's attack on the SiC coating layer, as well as fission product diffusion through an alternative coating layer, ZrC. Finally, a multiscale approach is being used to understand thermal transport, including the effect of radiation damage induced defects, in a model SiC material.

  20. Meta-material for nuclear particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, V.; Salvato, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Cirillo, M.; Scherillo, A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Vannozzi, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2017-02-01

    Superconducting strips coated with boron were engineered with a view to subnuclear particle detection. Combining the characteristics of boron as a generator of α-particles (as a consequence of neutron absorption) and the ability of superconducting strips to act as resistive switches, it is shown that fabricated Nb-boron and NbN-boron strips represent a promising basis for implementing neutron detection devices. In particular, the superconducting transition of boron-coated NbN strips generates voltage outputs of the order of a few volts thanks to the relatively higher normal state resitivity of NbN with respect to Nb. This result, combined with the relatively high transition temperature of NbN (of the order of 16 K for the bulk material), is an appealing prospect for future developments. The coated strips are meta-devices since their constituting material does not exist in nature and it is engineered to accomplish a specific task, i.e. generate an output voltage signal upon α-particle irradiation.

  1. Bibliography of integral charged particle nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, T.W.; Burt, J.S.

    1977-03-01

    This bibliography is divided into three main sections covering experimental, theoretical, and review references. The review section also includes compilation and evaluation references. Each section contains two subsections. The main subsection contains all references satisfying the criteria noted above and the second subsection is devoted to isotope production. The main subsections are ordered by increasing Z and A of the incident particle, then by increasing Z and A of the target nucleus. Within this order, the entries are ordered by residual nucleus and quantity (e.g., sigma(E)). Finally, the entries are ordered by outgoing particles or processes. All entries which have the same target, reaction, and quantity are grouped under a common heading with the most recent reference first. As noted above the second subsection is devoted to isotope production and is limited in the information it carries. Only those references which contain data on a definite residual nucleus or group of nuclei (e.g., fission fragments) are included in these subsections. Entries within these second subsections are ordered by increasing Z and A of the isotope produced and then by quantity. All references containing data on the same isotope production and quantity are grouped together. All lines within a group are ordered by increasing Z and A of the target and then of the incident particle. The final ordering is by increasing minimum energy.

  2. Novel mercuric iodide polycrystalline nuclear particles counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieber, M. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)]|[Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Zuck, A.; Braiman, M.; Nissenbaum, J. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Polycrystalline mercuric iodide nuclear radiation detectors having areas between 0.01 to 100 cm{sup 2} and thicknesses 30 to 600 microns, have been fabricated with single, linear strip and square pixel contact. The large area detectors 10 to 600 cm{sup 2} were produced by industrial ceramic equipment while the smaller ones, about 1 cm{sup 2} area, were produced in the laboratory. The large detectors still had large leakage currents and the production process is being revised. The smaller detectors were tested and their response to lower and higher gamma energy, beta and even 100 GeV muons at CERN will be reported.

  3. Measurement of nuclear moments and radii by collinear laser spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Geithner, W R; Lievens, P; Kotrotsios, G; Silverans, R; Kappertz, S

    2002-01-01

    %IS304 %title\\\\ \\\\Collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam has proven to be a widely applicable and very efficient tool for measurements of changes in mean square nuclear charge radii, nuclear spins, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments. Recent developments of extremely sensitive non-optical detection schemes enabled for some elements the extension of the measurements towards the very short-lived isotopes in the far wings of the ISOLDE production curves. The gain in sensitivity opens up new perspectives, particularly for measurements on lighter nuclei whose ground-state properties can be interpreted by large scale microscopic calculations instead of the more phenomenologic models used for heavier nuclei.\\\\ \\\\ For the sequence of argon isotopes $^{32-40}$Ar and $^{46}$Ar isotope shifts and nuclear moments were measured by optical pumping followed by state selective collisional ionization and detection of the $\\beta$-decay. Similarly, the low-background $\\alpha$-detection was used to extend earlie...

  4. Modeling Deep Burn TRISO Particle Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Samolyuk, German D [ORNL; Schuck, Paul C [ORNL; Rudin, Sven [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wills, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wirth, Brian D. [University of California, Berkeley; Kim, Sungtae [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Under the DOE Deep Burn program TRISO fuel is being investigated as a fuel form for consuming plutonium and minor actinides, and for greater efficiency in uranium utilization. The result will thus be to drive TRISO particulate fuel to very high burn-ups. In the current effort the various phenomena in the TRISO particle are being modeled using a variety of techniques. The chemical behavior is being treated utilizing thermochemical analysis to identify phase formation/transformation and chemical activities in the particle, including kernel migration. First principles calculations are being used to investigate the critical issue of fission product palladium attack on the SiC coating layer. Density functional theory is being used to understand fission product diffusion within the plutonia oxide kernel. Kinetic Monte Carlo techniques are shedding light on transport of fission products, most notably silver, through the carbon and SiC coating layers. The diffusion of fission products through an alternative coating layer, ZrC, is being assessed via DFT methods. Finally, a multiscale approach is being used to understand thermal transport, including the effect of radiation damage induced defects, in a model SiC material.

  5. Gas-silicon detector telescope for charged particle spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honkanen, A.; Oinonen, M.; Aeystoe, J. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Eskola, K. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Phys.; Jokinen, A. [PPE Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); ISOLDE Collaboration

    1997-08-11

    A gas-silicon detector telescope for charged particle spectroscopy has been constructed and tested. The lower detection limits were determined to be 155 keV for protons, 180 keV for deuterons and 350 keV for alpha particles. Typical energy resolution of the telescope measured for beta-delayed protons is 20 keV. Time resolution for the signals of the telescope was measured to be less than 10 ns. Examples of using the detector telescope in detection of beta-delayed proton activities are presented. (orig.).

  6. Extreme Spectroscopy: In situ nuclear materials behavior from optical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimbretiere, G.; Canizares, A.; Raimboux, N.; Omnee, R.; Duval, F.; Ammar, M.R.; Simon, P. [CNRS - UPR3079 CEMHTI, Universite d' Orleans, 45071Orleans cedex 2 (France); Desgranges, L.; Mohun, R. [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Jegou, C.; Magnin, M. [CEA/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Marcoule 30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N. [ICSM-UMR5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the nuclear industry, materials are regularly exposed to high temperature or/and irradiation and a better knowledge and understanding of their behavior under such extreme conditions is a key-point for improvements and further developments. Nowadays, Raman spectroscopy begins to be well known as a promising technique in the post mortem and remote characterization of nuclear materials exposed to extreme conditions. On this topic, at ANIMMA 2013 conference, we have presented some results about its implementation in the study of model or real nuclear fuel. However, the strength of Raman spectroscopy as in situ characterization tool is mainly its ability to be implemented remotely through optical fibers. Aware of this, implementation of other optical techniques can be considered in order to gain information not only on the structural dynamics of materials but also on the electronic charge carrier populations. In this paper, we propose to present our last advances in Raman characterization of nuclear materials and enlarge to the in situ use of complementary optical spectroscopies. Emphasis will be made on the information that can be gained to the behavior of the model fuel depleted UO{sub 2} under extreme conditions of high temperature and ionic irradiation: - In Situ Raman identification of the radiolysis alteration products of UO{sub 2} in contact with water under ionic irradiation. - In Situ Raman recording of the damaged dynamic of UO{sub 2} under inert atmosphere. - In Situ Raman and photo-luminescence study of virgin and damaged UO2 at high temperature. - In Situ study of electronic charge carriers' behavior in U{sub x}Th{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} solid solutions by mean of Iono- and Thermo- luminescence under and post- ionic irradiation. (authors)

  7. Confocal Scanner for Vertical Particle Tracks in the Nuclear Photoemulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Soroko, L M

    2005-01-01

    A confocal scanner for selective observation of the vertical particle tracks in the nuclear photoemulsion is described. The particle track being searched for is imaging at an angle of 45$^\\circ$ with respect to the optical axis of the system. The confocal scanner is provided with a new optical element, an "image hogonalizator", by means of which the extended image of the inclined vertical particle track is rotated over an angle of 90$^\\circ$. The stereoscopic version of the confocal scanner is presented as well. The described systems will be used in the experiments for investigation of the neutrino oscillations in the accelerators experiments.

  8. Atomic and nuclear physics with stored particles in ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, H J; Herfurth, F; Quint, W

    2002-01-01

    Trapping and cooling techniques play an increasingly important role in many areas of science. This review concentrates on recent applications of ion traps installed at accelerator facilities to atomic and nuclear physics such as mass spectrometry of radioactive isotopes, weak interaction studies, symmetry tests, determination of fundamental constants, laser spectroscopy, and spectroscopy of highly-charged ions. In addition, ion traps are proven to be extremely efficient devices for (radioactive) ion beam manipulation as, for example, retardation, accumulation, cooling, beam cleaning, charge-breeding, and bunching.

  9. Analysis algorithm for digital data used in nuclear spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085950; Sin, Mihaela

    Data obtained from digital acquisition systems used in nuclear spectroscopy experiments must be converted by a dedicated algorithm in or- der to extract the physical quantities of interest. I will report here the de- velopment of an algorithm capable to read digital data, discriminate between random and true signals and convert the results into a format readable by a special data analysis program package used to interpret nuclear spectra and to create coincident matrices. The algorithm can be used in any nuclear spectroscopy experimental setup provided that digital acquisition modules are involved. In particular it was used to treat data obtained from the IS441 experiment at ISOLDE where the beta decay of 80Zn was investigated as part of ultra-fast timing studies of neutron rich Zn nuclei. The results obtained for the half-lives of 80Zn and 80Ga were in very good agreement with previous measurements. This fact proved unquestionably that the conversion algorithm works. Another remarkable result was the improve...

  10. Detection of special nuclear materials with the associate particle technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasco, Cédric; Deyglun, Clément; Pérot, Bertrand; Eléon, Cyrille; Normand, Stéphane; Sannié, Guillaume; Boudergui, Karim; Corre, Gwenolé; Konzdrasovs, Vladimir; Pras, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the French trans-governmental R&D program against chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosives (CBRN-E) threats, CEA is studying the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) by neutron interrogation with fast neutrons produced by an associated particle sealed tube neutron generator. The deuterium-tritium fusion reaction produces an alpha particle and a 14 MeV neutron almost back to back, allowing tagging neutron emission both in time and direction with an alpha particle position-sensitive sensor embedded in the generator. Fission prompt neutrons and gamma rays induced by tagged neutrons which are tagged by an alpha particle are detected in coincidence with plastic scintillators. This paper presents numerical simulations performed with the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo computer code and with post processing software developed with the ROOT data analysis package. False coincidences due to neutron and photon scattering between adjacent detectors (cross talk) are filtered out to increase the selectivity between nuclear and benign materials. Accidental coincidences, which are not correlated to an alpha particle, are also taken into account in the numerical model, as well as counting statistics, and the time-energy resolution of the data acquisition system. Such realistic calculations show that relevant quantities of SNM (few kg) can be distinguished from cargo and shielding materials in 10 min acquisitions. First laboratory tests of the system under development in CEA laboratories are also presented.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of single subnanoliter ova

    CERN Document Server

    Grisi, Marco; Guidetti, Roberto; Harris, Nicola; Boero, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is, in principle, a promising candidate to study the intracellular chemistry of single microscopic living entities. However, due to sensitivity limitations, NMR experiments were reported only on very few and relatively large single cells down to a minimum volume of 10 nl. Here we show NMR spectroscopy of single ova at volume scales (0.1 and 0.5 nl) where life development begins for a broad variety of animals, humans included. We demonstrate that the sensitivity achieved by miniaturized inductive NMR probes (few pmol of 1H nuclei in some hours at 7 T) is sufficient to observe chemical heterogeneities among subnanoliter ova of tardigrades. Such sensitivities should allow to non-invasively monitor variations of concentrated intracellular compounds, such as glutathione, in single mammalian zygotes.

  12. Charged particle assisted nuclear reactions in solid state environment: renaissance of low energy nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kálmán, Péter

    2015-01-01

    The features of electron assisted neutron exchange processes in crystalline solids are survayed. It is stated that, contrary to expectations, the cross section of these processes may reach an observable magnitude even in the very low energy case because of the extremely huge increment caused by the Coulomb factor of the electron assisted processes and by the effect of the crystal-lattice. The features of electron assisted heavy charged particle exchange processes, electron assisted nuclear capure processes and heavy charged particle assisted nuclear processes are also overviewed. Experimental observations, which may be related to our theoretical findings, are dealt with. The anomalous screening phenomenon is related to electron assisted neutron and proton exchange processes in crystalline solids. A possible explanation of observations by Fleischmann and Pons is presented. The possibility of the phenomenon of nuclear transmutation is qualitatively explained with the aid of usual and charged particle assisted r...

  13. Particle physics contribution to the elimination of nuclear waste

    CERN Document Server

    Revol, Jean Pierre Charles

    2000-01-01

    Progress in particle accelerator technology makes it possible to use a proton accelerator to eliminate nuclear waste efficiently. The Energy Amplifier (EA) proposed by C. Rubbia and his group is a subcritical system driven by a proton accelerator. It is particularly attractive for destroying, through fission, transuranic elements produced by present nuclear reactors. The EA could also transform efficiently and at minimal cost long-lived fission fragments using the concept of Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) recently tested at CERN with the TARC experiment. The ARC concept can be extended to several other application domains (radioactive isotopes production for medicine and industry, neutron research applications, etc.).

  14. Particle-gamma and particle-particle correlations in nuclear reactions using Monte Carlo Hauser-Feshback model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Toshihiko [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Talou, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Watanabe, Takehito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chadwick, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for particle and {gamma}-ray emissions from an excited nucleus based on the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory are performed to obtain correlated information between emitted particles and {gamma}-rays. We calculate neutron induced reactions on {sup 51}V to demonstrate unique advantages of the Monte Carlo method. which are the correlated {gamma}-rays in the neutron radiative capture reaction, the neutron and {gamma}-ray correlation, and the particle-particle correlations at higher energies. It is shown that properties in nuclear reactions that are difficult to study with a deterministic method can be obtained with the Monte Carlo simulations.

  15. Nuclear overhauser spectroscopy of chiral CHD methylene groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustyniak, Rafal [Ecole Normale Supérieure – PSL Research University, Département de chimie (France); Stanek, Jan [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland); Colaux, Henri; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey [Ecole Normale Supérieure – PSL Research University, Département de chimie (France); Koźmiński, Wiktor [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland); Herrmann, Torsten [Université de Lyon/UMR 5280 CNRS/ENS Lyon/UCB Lyon 1, Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs (France); Ferrage, Fabien, E-mail: Fabien.Ferrage@ens.fr [Ecole Normale Supérieure – PSL Research University, Département de chimie (France)

    2016-01-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) can provide a great deal of information about structure and dynamics of biomolecules. The quality of an NMR structure strongly depends on the number of experimental observables and on their accurate conversion into geometric restraints. When distance restraints are derived from nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY), stereo-specific assignments of prochiral atoms can contribute significantly to the accuracy of NMR structures of proteins and nucleic acids. Here we introduce a series of NOESY-based pulse sequences that can assist in the assignment of chiral CHD methylene protons in random fractionally deuterated proteins. Partial deuteration suppresses spin-diffusion between the two protons of CH{sub 2} groups that normally impedes the distinction of cross-relaxation networks for these two protons in NOESY spectra. Three and four-dimensional spectra allow one to distinguish cross-relaxation pathways involving either of the two methylene protons so that one can obtain stereospecific assignments. In addition, the analysis provides a large number of stereospecific distance restraints. Non-uniform sampling was used to ensure optimal signal resolution in 4D spectra and reduce ambiguities of the assignments. Automatic assignment procedures were modified for efficient and accurate stereospecific assignments during automated structure calculations based on 3D spectra. The protocol was applied to calcium-loaded calbindin D{sub 9k}. A large number of stereospecific assignments lead to a significant improvement of the accuracy of the structure.

  16. Nuclear track radiography of 'hot' aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulyga, S.F.; Kievitskaja, A.I.; Kievets, M.K.; Lomonosova, E.M.; Zhuk, I.V.; Yaroshevich, O.I.; Perelygin, V.P.; Petrova, R.; Brandt, R.; Vater, P

    1999-06-01

    Nuclear track radiography was applied to identify aerosol 'hot' particles which contain elements of nuclear fuel and fallout after Chernobyl NPP accident. For the determination of the content of transuranium elements in radioactive aerosols the measurement of the {alpha}-activity of 'hot' particles by SSNTD was used in this work, as well as radiography of fission fragments formed as a result of the reactions (n,f) and ({gamma},f) in the irradiation of aerosol filters by thermal neutrons and high energy gamma quanta. The technique allowed the sizes and alpha-activity of 'hot' particles to be determined without extracting them from the filter, as well as the determination of the uranium content and its enrichment by {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu isotopes. Sensitivity of determination of alpha activity by fission method is 5x10{sup -6} Bq per particle. The software for the system of image analysis was created. It ensured the identification of track clusters on an optical image of the SSNTD surface obtained through a video camera and the determination of size and activity of 'hot' particles00.

  17. Characterization of a Continuous Wave Laser for Resonance Ionization Mass Spectroscopy Analysis in Nuclear Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    OF A CONTINUOUS WAVE LASER FOR RESONANCE IONIZATION MASS SPECTROSCOPY ANALYSIS IN NUCLEAR FORENSICS by Sunny G. Lau June 2015 Thesis...IONIZATION MASS SPECTROSCOPY ANALYSIS IN NUCLEAR FORENSICS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Sunny G. Lau 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...200 words) The application of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) to nuclear forensics involves the use of lasers to selectively ionize

  18. Nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology (NPAC) capability review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Antonio [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The present document represents a summary self-assessment of the status of the Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology (NPAC) capability across Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For the purpose of this review, we have divided the capability into four theme areas: Nuclear Physics, Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology, and Applied Physics. For each theme area we have given a general but brief description of the activities under the area, a list of the Laboratory divisions involved in the work, connections to the goals and mission of the Laboratory, a brief description of progress over the last three years, our opinion of the overall status of the theme area, and challenges and issues.

  19. Nuclear spectroscopy with Geant4. The superheavy challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Luis G.

    2016-12-01

    The simulation toolkit Geant4 was originally developed at CERN for high-energy physics. Over the years it has been established as a swiss army knife not only in particle physics but it has seen an accelerated expansion towards nuclear physics and more recently to medical imaging and γ- and ion- therapy to mention but a handful of new applications. The validity of Geant4 is vast and large across many particles, ions, materials, and physical processes with typically various different models to choose from. Unfortunately, atomic nuclei with atomic number Z > 100 are not properly supported. This is likely due to the rather novelty of the field, its comparably small user base, and scarce evaluated experimental data. To circumvent this situation different workarounds have been used over the years. In this work the simulation toolkit Geant4 will be introduced with its different components and the effort to bring the software to the heavy and superheavy region will be described.

  20. Data analysis techniques for nuclear and particle physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Pruneau, Claude

    2017-01-01

    This is an advanced data analysis textbook for scientists specializing in the areas of particle physics, nuclear physics, and related subfields. As a practical guide for robust, comprehensive data analysis, it focuses on realistic techniques to explain instrumental effects. The topics are relevant for engineers, scientists, and astroscientists working in the fields of geophysics, chemistry, and the physical sciences. The book serves as a reference for more senior scientists while being eminently accessible to advanced undergraduate and graduate students.

  1. Nuclear reactions induced by high-energy alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear reactions induced by high energy protons and heavier ions are included. Fundamental data needed in the shielding, dosimetry, and radiobiology of high energy particles produced by accelerators were generated, along with data on cosmic ray interaction with matter. The mechanism of high energy nucleon-nucleus reactions is also examined, especially for light target nuclei of mass number comparable to that of biological tissue.

  2. Characterising legacy spent nuclear fuel pond materials using microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, W R; Morris, K; Mosselmans, J F W; Thompson, O R; Banford, A W; Law, K; Pattrick, R A D

    2016-11-05

    Analysis of a radioactive, coated concrete core from the decommissioned, spent nuclear fuel cooling pond at the Hunterston-A nuclear site (UK) has provided a unique opportunity to study radionuclides within a real-world system. The core, obtained from a dividing wall and sampled at the fill level of the pond, exhibited radioactivity (dominantly (137)Cs and (90)Sr) heterogeneously distributed across both painted faces. Chemical analysis of the core was undertaken using microfocus spectroscopy at Diamond Light Source, UK. Mapping of Sr across the surface coatings using microfocus X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that Sr was bound to TiO2 particles in the paint layers, suggesting an association between TiO2 and radiostrontium. Stable Sr and Cs sorption experiments using concrete coupons were also undertaken to assess their interactions with the bulk concrete in case of a breach in the coating layers. μXRF and scanning electron microscopy showed that Sr was immobilized by the cement phases, whilst at the elevated experimental concentrations, Cs was associated with clay minerals in the aggregates. This study provides a crucial insight into poorly understood infrastructural contamination in complex systems and is directly applicable to the UK's nuclear decommissioning efforts.

  3. Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitriou, P., E-mail: P.Dimitriou@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramerstrasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Becker, H.-W. [Ruhr Universität Bochum, Gebäude NT05/130, Postfach 102148, Bochum 44721 (Germany); Bogdanović-Radović, I. [Department of Experimental Physics, Institute Rudjer Boskovic, Bijenicka Cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Chiari, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Firenze (Italy); Goncharov, A. [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, National Science Center, Akademicheskaya Str.1, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Jesus, A.P. [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal); Kakuee, O. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, End of North Karegar Ave., PO Box 14395-836, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kiss, A.Z. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), Bem ter 18/c, PO Box 51, 4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Lagoyannis, A. [National Center of Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Agia Paraskevi, P.O. Box 60228, 15310 Athens (Greece); Räisänen, J. [Division of Materials Physics, Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, PO Box 43, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Strivay, D. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Atomique et de Spectroscopie, Universite de Liège, Sart Tilman, B15 4000 Liège (Belgium); Zucchiatti, A. [Centro de Micro Análisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Faraday 3, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) is a powerful analytical technique that exploits the interactions of rapid charged particles with nuclei located near a sample surface to determine the composition and structure of the surface regions of solids by measurement of characteristic prompt γ rays. The potential for depth profiling of this technique has long been recognized, however, the implementation has been limited owing to insufficient knowledge of the physical data and lack of suitable user-friendly computer codes for the applications. Although a considerable body of published data exists in the nuclear physics literature for nuclear reaction cross sections with γ rays in the exit channel, there is no up-to-date, comprehensive compilation specifically dedicated to IBA applications. A number of PIGE cross-section data had already been uploaded to the Ion Beam Analysis Nuclear Data Library (IBANDL) ( (http://www-nds.iaea.org/ibandl)) by members of the IBA community by 2011, however a preliminary survey of this body of unevaluated experimental data has revealed numerous discrepancies beyond the uncertainty limits reported by the authors. Using the resources and coordination provided by the IAEA, a concerted effort to improve the situation was made within the Coordinated Research Project on the Development of a Reference Database for PIGE spectroscopy, from 2011 to 2015. The aim of the CRP was to create a data library for Ion Beam Analysis that contains reliable and usable data on charged particle γ-ray emission cross sections that would be made freely available to the user community. As the CRP has reached its completion, we shall present its main achievements, including the results of nuclear cross-section evaluations and the development of a computer code that will become available to the public allowing for the implementation of a standardless PIGE technique.

  4. Characterising legacy spent nuclear fuel pond materials using microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, W.R. [Research Centre for Radwaste Disposal, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Centre for Radiochemistry Research, Chemistry Building, The University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Morris, K. [Research Centre for Radwaste Disposal, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Mosselmans, J.F.W. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Thompson, O.R. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Banford, A.W. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Law, K. [Centre for Radiochemistry Research, Chemistry Building, The University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Pattrick, R.A.D., E-mail: richard.pattrick@manchester.ac.uk [Research Centre for Radwaste Disposal, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • A sample from a spent fuel pond wall has been analysed via X-ray spectroscopy. • Autoradiography shows a patchy distribution of radioactivity on the core face. • μXAS across a ‘hot spot’ showed Sr associates with the TiO{sub 2} pigment in the paint. • Original concrete coatings prove effective at limiting radionuclide migration. • Sorption studies show Sr immobilisation by the concrete and Cs by aggregate clasts. - Abstract: Analysis of a radioactive, coated concrete core from the decommissioned, spent nuclear fuel cooling pond at the Hunterston-A nuclear site (UK) has provided a unique opportunity to study radionuclides within a real-world system. The core, obtained from a dividing wall and sampled at the fill level of the pond, exhibited radioactivity (dominantly {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr) heterogeneously distributed across both painted faces. Chemical analysis of the core was undertaken using microfocus spectroscopy at Diamond Light Source, UK. Mapping of Sr across the surface coatings using microfocus X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that Sr was bound to TiO{sub 2} particles in the paint layers, suggesting an association between TiO{sub 2} and radiostrontium. Stable Sr and Cs sorption experiments using concrete coupons were also undertaken to assess their interactions with the bulk concrete in case of a breach in the coating layers. μXRF and scanning electron microscopy showed that Sr was immobilized by the cement phases, whilst at the elevated experimental concentrations, Cs was associated with clay minerals in the aggregates. This study provides a crucial insight into poorly understood infrastructural contamination in complex systems and is directly applicable to the UK’s nuclear decommissioning efforts.

  5. A Reconfigurable Instrument System for Nuclear and Particle Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Ziru; Li, Feng; Jiang, Xiao; Jin, Ge

    2014-04-01

    We developed a reconfigurable nuclear instrument system (RNIS) that could satisfy the requirements of diverse nuclear and particle physics experiments, and the inertial confinement fusion diagnostic. Benefiting from the reconfigurable hardware structure and digital pulse processing technology, RNIS shakes off the restrictions of cumbersome crates and miscellaneous modules. It retains all the advantages of conventional nuclear instruments and is more flexible and portable. RNIS is primarily composed of a field programmable hardware board and relevant PC software. Separate analog channels are designed to provide different functions, such as amplifiers, ADC, fast discriminators and Schmitt discriminators for diverse experimental purposes. The high-performance field programmable gate array could complete high-precision time interval measurement, histogram accumulation, counting, and coincidence anticoincidence measurement. To illustrate the prospects of RNIS, a series of applications to the experiments are described in this paper. The first, for which RNIS was originally developed, involves nuclear energy spectrum measurement with a scintillation detector and photomultiplier. The second experiment applies RNIS to a G-M tube counting experiment, and in the third, it is applied to a quantum communication experiment through reconfiguration.

  6. Some recent developments in nuclear charged particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelzer, H.

    1980-08-01

    The latest developments of large-area, position sensitive gas-filled ionization chambers are described. Multi-wire-proportional chambers as position-sensing and parallel-plate-avalanche counters as time-sensing detectors at low pressure (5 torr) have proven to be useful and reliable instruments in heavy ion physics. Gas (proportional) scintillation counters, used mainly for x-ray spectroscopy, have recently been applied as particle detectors. Finally, a brief description of a large plastic scintillator spectrometer, the Plastic Ball, is given and some of the first test and calibration data are shown.

  7. On the momentum distribution of particles participating in nuclear stopping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mandeep Kaur; Suneel Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear stopping is studied as a function of incident energy and charge of the fragment produced in central heavy-ion collisions (HIC) of $^{197}_{79}$Au+$^{197}_{79}$Au and $^{58}_{28}$Ni+$^{58}_{28}$Ni using stopping parameter VARXZ. Various momentum constraints were imposed to get better insight into the stopping. The comparison of measured and calculated values of stopping for protons reveals the significance of these constraints. Maximum stopping is obtained for the particles lying in the lowest range of the momentum distribution at all incident energies.

  8. Group theory in particle, nuclear, and hadron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, Syed Afsar

    2016-01-01

    This user-friendly book on group theory introduces topics in as simple a manner as possible and then gradually develops those topics into more advanced ones, eventually building up to the current state-of-the-art. By using simple examples from physics and mathematics, the advanced topics become logical extensions of ideas already introduced. In addition to being used as a textbook, this book would also be useful as a reference guide for graduates and researchers in particle, nuclear and hadron physics.

  9. Uranium aerosols at a nuclear fuel fabrication plant: Characterization using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, E.; Pettersson, H. B. L.; Fortin, C.; Eriksson, M.

    2017-05-01

    Detailed aerosol knowledge is essential in numerous applications, including risk assessment in nuclear industry. Cascade impactor sampling of uranium aerosols in the breathing zone of nuclear operators was carried out at a nuclear fuel fabrication plant. Collected aerosols were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Imaging revealed remarkable variations in aerosol morphology at the different workshops, and a presence of very large particles (up to ≅ 100 × 50 μm2) in the operator breathing zone. Characteristic X-ray analysis showed varying uranium weight percentages of aerosols and, frequently, traces of nitrogen, fluorine and iron. The analysis method, in combination with cascade impactor sampling, can be a powerful tool for characterization of aerosols. The uranium aerosol source term for risk assessment in nuclear fuel fabrication appears to be highly complex.

  10. Study of Particle Production and Nuclear Fragmentation in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions in Nuclear Emulsions

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % EMU11 \\\\ \\\\ We propose to use nuclear emulsions for the study of nuclear collisions of $^{207}$Pb, $^{197}$Au, and any other heavy-ion beams when they are available. We have, in the past, used $^{32}$S at 200A~GeV and $^{16}$O at 200A and 60A~GeV from CERN (Experiment EMU08) and at present the analysis is going on with $^{28}$Si beam from BNL at 14.5A~GeV. It will be important to compare the previous and the present investigations with the new $^{207}$Pb beam at 60-160A~GeV. We want to measure in nuclear emulsion, on an event by event basis, shower particle multiplicity, pseudorapidity density and density fluctuations of charged particles, charge multiplicity and angular distributions of projectile fragments, production and interaction cross-sections of heavily ionizing particles emitted from the target fragmentation. Special emphasis will be placed on the analysis of events produced in the central collisions which are selected on the basis of low energy fragments emitted from the target excitation. It woul...

  11. Frequency and Spatial Selectivity in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Jan O.

    1988-12-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The techniques presented in this thesis are concerned with the high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of liquids. A selective pulse, shaped according to the first half of a Gaussian curve, is developed; it gives a very narrow absorption-mode excitation profile. This characteristics is used in developing selective coherence transfer experiments in which an individual transition is irradiated by the selective pulse followed by irradiation with an intense non-selective pulse. By stepping the irradiation frequency of the selective pulse along in small increments, this experiment produces results similar to conventional two-dimensional homonuclear correlation spectroscopy. Such a method allows selected spectral regions of a conventional two-dimensional spectrum to be examined under higher resolution while avoiding the restrictions imposed by the sampling theorem. The technique is also extended to a third frequency dimension by irradiating two transitions simultaneously before applying a non-selective pulse which yields correlations between three coupled nuclei. The remainder of this thesis introduces a spatial localisation method based on a "straddle coil": two parallel coaxial surface coils, one on each side of the sample and supplied with radiofrequency pulses of opposite phase. This configuration can be used for spatial localisation experiments by applying a sequence of equal and opposite prepulses before acquiring the signal. The prepulses saturate the nuclear spins in all sample regions except the sensitive volume close to the median plane where the radiofrequency fields from the two coils cancel. Pulse sequences are proposed that are insensitive to radiofrequency offset over an appreciable range. The location of the sensitive volume can be tracked across the sample in the axial dimension by changing the ratio of the radiofrequency currents in the two coils.

  12. Spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles repeatedly cycle through Cajal bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, David; Pridalová-Hnilicová, Jarmila; Novotný, Ivan; Huranová, Martina; Blazíková, Michaela; Wen, Xin; Sapra, Aparna K; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2008-06-01

    The Cajal body (CB) is a nuclear structure closely associated with import and biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs). Here, we tested whether CBs also contain mature snRNPs and whether CB integrity depends on the ongoing snRNP splicing cycle. Sm proteins tagged with photoactivatable and color-maturing variants of fluorescent proteins were used to monitor snRNP behavior in living cells over time; mature snRNPs accumulated in CBs, traveled from one CB to another, and they were not preferentially replaced by newly imported snRNPs. To test whether CB integrity depends on the snRNP splicing cycle, two human orthologues of yeast proteins involved in distinct steps in spliceosome disassembly after splicing, hPrp22 and hNtr1, were depleted by small interfering RNA treatment. Surprisingly, depletion of either protein led to the accumulation of U4/U6 snRNPs in CBs, suggesting that reassembly of the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP was delayed. Accordingly, a relative decrease in U5 snRNPs compared with U4/U6 snRNPs was observed in CBs, as well as in nuclear extracts of treated cells. Together, the data show that particular phases of the spliceosome cycle are compartmentalized in living cells, with reassembly of the tri-snRNP occurring in CBs.

  13. TCAD simulation for alpha-particle spectroscopy using SIC Schottky diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Achintya; Duttagupta, Siddhartha P

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing requirement of alpha spectroscopy in the fields context of environmental radioactive contamination, nuclear waste management, site decommissioning and decontamination. Although silicon-based alpha-particle detection technology is mature, high leakage current, low displacement threshold and radiation hardness limits the operation of the detector in harsh environments. Silicon carbide (SiC) is considered to be excellent material for radiation detection application due to its high band gap, high displacement threshold and high thermal conductivity. In this report, an alpha-particle-induced electron-hole pair generation model for a reverse-biased n-type SiC Schottky diode has been proposed and verified using technology computer aided design (TCAD) simulations. First, the forward-biased I-V characteristics were studied to determine the diode ideality factor and compared with published experimental data. The ideality factor was found to be in the range of 1.4-1.7 for a corresponding temperature range of 300-500 K. Next, the energy-dependent, alpha-particle-induced EHP generation model parameters were optimised using transport of ions in matter (TRIM) simulation. Finally, the transient pulses generated due to alpha-particle bombardment were analysed for (1) different diode temperatures (300-500 K), (2) different incident alpha-particle energies (1-5 MeV), (3) different reverse bias voltages of the 4H-SiC-based Schottky diode (-50 to -250 V) and (4) different angles of incidence of the alpha particle (0°-70°).The above model can be extended to other (wide band-gap semiconductor) device technologies useful for radiation-sensing application. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Two-dimensional Nutation Echo Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbison, Gerard S.; Slokenbergs, Andris

    1990-04-01

    We discuss two new two-dimensional nuclear quadrupole resonance experiments, both based on the principle of nutation spectroscopy, which can be used to determine the asymmetry parameter, and thus the full quadrupolar tensor, of spin-3/2 nuclei at zero applied magnetic field. The first experiment is a simple nutation pulse sequence in which the first time period (t1) is the duration of the radiofrequency exciting pulse; and the second (t2) is the normal free-precession of a quadrupolar nucleus at zero-field. After double Fourier-transformation, the result is a 2 D spectrum in which the first frequency dimension is the nutation spectrum for the quadrupolar nucleus at zero-field. For polycrystalline samples this sequence generates powder lineshapes; the position of the singularities, in these lineshapes can be used to determine the asymmetry parameters η in a very straightforward manner, η has previously only been obtainable using Zeeman perturbed NQR methods. The second sequence is the same nutation experiment with a spin-echo pulse added. The virtue of this refocussing pulse is that it allows acquisition of nutation spectra from samples with arbitrary inhomogeneous linewidth; thus, asymmetry parameters can be determined even where the quadrupolar resonance is wider than the bandwidth of the spectrometer. Experimental examples of 35Cl, 81Br and 63Cu nutation and nutation-echo spectra are presented.

  15. Development of alpha spectroscopy method with solid state nuclear track detector using aluminium thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwaikat, N., E-mail: ndwaikat@kfupm.edu.sa [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, College of Sciences, Department of Physics, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-10-15

    This work presents the development of alpha spectroscopy method with Solid-state nuclear track detectors using aluminum thin films. The resolution of this method is high, and it is able to discriminate between alpha particles at different incident energy. It can measure the exact number of alpha particles at specific energy without needing a calibration of alpha track diameter versus alpha energy. This method was tested by using Cf-252 alpha standard source at energies 5.11 MeV, 3.86 MeV and 2.7 MeV, which produced by the variation of detector -standard source distance. On front side, two detectors were covered with two Aluminum thin films and the third detector was kept uncovered. The thickness of Aluminum thin films was selected carefully (using SRIM 2013) such that one of the films will block the lower two alpha particles (3.86 MeV and 2.7 MeV) and the alpha particles at higher energy (5.11 MeV) can penetrate the film and reach the detectors surface. The second thin film will block alpha particles at lower energy of 2.7 MeV and allow alpha particles at higher two energies (5.11 MeV and 3.86 MeV) to penetrate and produce tracks. For uncovered detector, alpha particles at three different energies can produce tracks on it. For quality assurance and accuracy, the detectors were mounted on thick enough copper substrates to block exposure from the backside. The tracks on the first detector are due to alpha particles at energy of 5.11 MeV. The difference between the tracks number on the first detector and the tracks number on the second detector is due to alpha particles at energy of 3.8 MeV. Finally, by subtracting the tracks number on the second detector from the tracks number on the third detector (uncovered), we can find the tracks number due to alpha particles at energy 2.7 MeV. After knowing the efficiency calibration factor, we can exactly calculate the activity of standard source. (Author)

  16. A study of heavy-heavy nuclear reactions. [nuclear research/nuclear particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations are presented for the reaction products in high energy collisions and of the atmospheric transport of particles such as protons, neutrons and other nucleons. The magnetic moments of charmed baryons are examined. Total cross sections which are required for cosmic heavy ion transport and shielding studies are also examined.

  17. Nuclear forward and inelastic spectroscopy on 125Te and Sb2125 Te3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, H.-C.; Hermann, R. P.; Sergueev, I.; Pelzer, U.; Möchel, A.; Claudio, T.; Perßon, J.; Rüffer, R.; Said, A.; Shvyd'ko, Yu. V.

    2010-09-01

    We report on the observation of nuclear forward and nuclear inelastic scattering of synchrotron radiation by 125Te and the application of both spectroscopic methods to tellurium compounds by using a high-resolution backscattering sapphire monochromator in combination with fast detection electronics. The lifetime of the nuclear resonance and the energy of the transition were determined to be 2.131(12) ns and 35493.12(30) eV, respectively. As applications, the nuclear inelastic spectrum in Sb2Te3 and the nuclear forward scattering by Te metal were measured. These measurements open the field of nuclear resonance spectroscopy on tellurium compounds such as thermoelectric and superconducting materials.

  18. Investigation of Rare Particle Production in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-09-02

    Our program is an investigation of the hadronization process through measurement of rare particle production in high energy nuclear interactions. Such collisions of heavy nuclei provide an environment similar in energy density to the conditions in the Big Bang. We are currently involved in two major experiments to study this environment, E896 at the AGS and STAR at RHIC. We have completed our physics running of E896, a search for the H dibaryon and measurement of hyperon production in AuAu collisions, and are in the process of analyzing the data. We have produced the electronics and software for the STAR trigger and will begin to use these tools to search for anti-nuclei and strange hadrons when RHIC turns on later this year.

  19. Viscous Particle Breakup within a Cooling Nuclear Fireball

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, J. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lock Haven Univ., Lock Haven, PA (United States); Knight, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dai, Z. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ramon, C. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reid, J. D. [Lock Haven Univ., Lock Haven, PA (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Following the surface detonation of a nuclear weapon, the Earth’s crust and immediate surroundings are drawn into the fireball and form melts. Fallout is formed as these melts incorporate radioactive material from the bomb vapor and cool rapidly. The resultant fallout plume and dispersion of radioactive contamination is a function of several factors including weather patterns and fallout particle shapes and size distributions. Accurate modeling of the size distributions of fallout forms an important data point for dispersion codes that calculate the aerial distribution of fallout. While morphological evidence for aggregation of molten droplets is well documented in fallout glass populations, the breakup of these molten droplets has not been similarly studied. This study documents evidence that quenched fallout populations preserve evidence of molten breakup mechanisms.

  20. Detection of Bioaerosols Using Single Particle Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (First-year Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Detection of Bioaerosols using Single Particle Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (First-year Report) by Dr. Kristan P. Gurton, Melvin Felton, and...Research Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-5934 February 2012 Detection of Bioaerosols using Single Particle Thermal Emission...October 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Detection of Bioaerosols using Single Particle Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (First-year Report) 5a. CONTRACT

  1. Atomic Force Microscopy-Infrared Spectroscopy of Individual Atmospheric Aerosol Particles: Subdiffraction Limit Vibrational Spectroscopy and Morphological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, Amy L; Kirpes, Rachel M; Merzel, Rachel L; Pratt, Kerri A; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Ault, Andrew P

    2017-09-05

    Chemical analysis of atmospheric aerosols is an analytical challenge, as aerosol particles are complex chemical mixtures that can contain hundreds to thousands of species in attoliter volumes at the most abundant sizes in the atmosphere (∼100 nm). These particles have global impacts on climate and health, but there are few methods available that combine imaging and the detailed molecular information from vibrational spectroscopy for individual particles particles down to 150 nm. By detecting photothermal expansion at frequencies where particle species absorb IR photons from a tunable laser, AFM-IR can study particles smaller than the optical diffraction limit. Combining strengths of AFM (ambient pressure, height, morphology, and phase measurements) with photothermal IR spectroscopy, the potential of AFM-IR is shown for a diverse set of single-component particles, liquid-liquid phase separated particles (core-shell morphology), and ambient atmospheric particles. The spectra from atmospheric model systems (ammonium sulfate, sodium nitrate, succinic acid, and sucrose) had clearly identifiable features that correlate with absorption frequencies for infrared-active modes. Additionally, molecular information was obtained with particles with a ∼150 nm shell and 300 nm core. The subdiffraction limit capability of AFM-IR has the potential to advance understanding of particle impacts on climate and health by improving analytical capabilities to study water uptake, heterogeneous reactivity, and viscosity.

  2. Alpha particle clusters and their condensation in nuclear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Peter; Funaki, Yasuro; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Röpke, Gerd; Tohsaki, Akihiro; Yamada, Taiichi

    2016-12-01

    In this article we review the present status of α clustering in nuclear systems. First of all, an important aspect is condensation in nuclear matter. Like for pairing, quartetting in matter is at the root of similar phenomena in finite nuclei. Cluster approaches for finite nuclei are shortly recapitulated in historical order. The α container model, recently been proposed by Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-Röpke (THSR), will be outlined and the ensuing condensate aspect of the Hoyle state at 7.65 MeV in 12C is investigated in some detail. A special case will be made with respect to the very accurate reproduction of the inelastic form factor from the ground to Hoyle state with the THSR description. The extended volume will be deduced. New developments concerning excitations of the Hoyle state will be discussed. After 15 years since the proposal of the α condensation concept a critical assessment of this idea will be given. Alpha gas states in other nuclei like 16O and 13C will be considered. An important aspect is the experimental evidence, both present and future ones. The THSR wave function can also describe configurations of one α particle on top of a doubly magic core. The cases of 20Ne and 212Po will be investigated.

  3. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Pourmodheji

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS. In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery.

  4. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-06-09

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery.

  5. Quantification of lipoprotein profiles by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aru, Violetta; Lam, Chloie; Khakimov, Bekzod

    2017-01-01

    Lipoproteins and their subfraction profiles have been associated to diverse diseases including Cardio Vascular Disease (CVD). There is thus a great demand for measuring and quantifying the lipoprotein profile in an efficient and accurate manner. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy...

  6. Trojan horse particle invariance: The impact on nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Bertulani, C. A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Blokhintsev, L. D.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Spartá, R.; Tumino, A.

    2014-05-01

    In the current picture of nuclear astrophysics indirect methods and, in particular, the Trojan Horse Method cover a crucial role for the measurement of charged particle induced reactions cross sections of astrophysical interest, in the energy range required by the astrophysical scenarios. To better understand its cornerstones and its applications to physical cases many tests were performed to verify all its properties and the possible future perspectives. The key to the method is the quasi-free break-up and some of its properties will be investigated in the present work. In particular, the Trojan Horse nucleus invariance will be studied and previous studies will be extended to the cases of the binary d(d, p)t and 6Li(d,α)4He reactions, which were tested using different quasi-free break-up's, namely 6Li and 3He. The astrophysical S(E)-factor were then extracted with the Trojan Horse formalism applied to the two different break-up schemes and compared with direct data as well as with previous indirect investigations. The very good agreement confirms the independence of binary indirect cross section on the chosen spectator particle also for these reactions.

  7. Trojan horse particle invariance: The impact on nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzone, R. G.; La Cognata, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [Universitá di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN (Italy); Bertulani, C. A. [Texas A and M University, Commerce (United States); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Blokhintsev, L. D. [Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lamia, L.; Spartá, R. [Universitá di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Tumino, A. [Universitá Kore, Enna (Italy)

    2014-05-02

    In the current picture of nuclear astrophysics indirect methods and, in particular, the Trojan Horse Method cover a crucial role for the measurement of charged particle induced reactions cross sections of astrophysical interest, in the energy range required by the astrophysical scenarios. To better understand its cornerstones and its applications to physical cases many tests were performed to verify all its properties and the possible future perspectives. The key to the method is the quasi-free break-up and some of its properties will be investigated in the present work. In particular, the Trojan Horse nucleus invariance will be studied and previous studies will be extended to the cases of the binary d(d, p)t and {sup 6}Li(d,α){sup 4}He reactions, which were tested using different quasi-free break-up's, namely {sup 6}Li and {sup 3}He. The astrophysical S(E)-factor were then extracted with the Trojan Horse formalism applied to the two different break-up schemes and compared with direct data as well as with previous indirect investigations. The very good agreement confirms the independence of binary indirect cross section on the chosen spectator particle also for these reactions.

  8. Lipoprotein Particle Size and Concentration by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Incident Type 2 Diabetes in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Samia; Otvos, James D.; Rosenson, Robert S.; Pradhan, Aruna; Buring, Julie E.; Ridker, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic dyslipoproteinemia is characterized by low HDL cholesterol and high triglycerides. We examined the association of lipoprotein particle size and concentration measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with clinical type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a prospective study of 26,836 initially healthy women followed for 13 years for incident type 2 diabetes (n = 1,687). Baseline lipids were measured directly and lipoprotein size and concentration by NMR. Cox regression models included nonlipid risk factors (age, race, smoking, exercise, education, menopause, blood pressure, BMI, family history, A1C, and C-reactive protein). NMR lipoproteins were also examined after further adjusting for standard lipids. RESULTS Incident diabetes was significantly associated with baseline HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and NMR-measured size and concentration of LDL, IDL, HDL, and VLDL particles. The associations of these particles differed substantially by size. Small LDLNMR and small HDLNMR were positively associated with diabetes (quintile 5 vs. 1 [adjusted hazard ratios and 95% CIs], 4.04 [3.21–5.09] and 1.84 [1.54–2.19], respectively). By contrast, large LDLNMR and large HDLNMR were inversely associated (quintile 1 vs. 5, 2.50 [2.12–2.95] and 4.51 [3.68–5.52], respectively). For VLDLNMR, large particles imparted higher risk than small particles (quintile 5 vs. 1, 3.11 [2.35–4.11] and 1.31 [1.10–1.55], respectively). Lipoprotein particle size remained significant after adjusting for standard lipids and nonlipid factors. CONCLUSIONS In this prospective study of women, NMR lipoprotein size and concentrations were associated with incident type 2 diabetes and remained significant after adjustment for established risk factors, including HDL cholesterol and triglycerides. PMID:20185808

  9. SPOUTED BED DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR COATED NUCLEAR FUEL PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Douglas W.

    2017-07-01

    High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) are fueled with tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated nuclear fuel particles embedded in a carbon-graphite fuel body. TRISO coatings consist of four layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide that are deposited on uranium ceramic fuel kernels (350µm – 500µm diameters) in a concatenated series of batch depositions. Each layer has dedicated functions such that the finished fuel particle has its own integral containment to minimize and control the release of fission products into the fuel body and reactor core. The TRISO coatings are the primary containment structure in the HTGR reactor and must have very high uniformity and integrity. To ensure high quality TRISO coatings, the four layers are deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using high purity precursors and are applied in a concatenated succession of batch operations before the finished product is unloaded from the coating furnace. These depositions take place at temperatures ranging from 1230°C to 1550°C and use three different gas compositions, while the fuel particle diameters double, their density drops from 11.1 g/cm3 to 3.0 g/cm3, and the bed volume increases more than 8-fold. All this is accomplished without the aid of sight ports or internal instrumentation that could cause chemical contamination within the layers or mechanical damage to thin layers in the early stages of each layer deposition. The converging section of the furnace retort was specifically designed to prevent bed stagnation that would lead to unacceptably high defect fractions and facilitate bed circulation to avoid large variability in coating layer dimensions and properties. The gas injection nozzle was designed to protect precursor gases from becoming overheated prior to injection, to induce bed spouting and preclude bed stagnation in the bottom of the retort. Furthermore, the retort and injection nozzle designs minimize buildup of pyrocarbon and silicon carbide on the

  10. Fast Fourier Transform Chlorine Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Iorio, Marie

    A nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer operating in the frequency range 1-40 MHz was updated for fast Fourier transform spectroscopy and coupled to a Nicolet 1180 computer and data acquisition system. It was used with a low temperature cryostat for studies shown down to liquid helium temperature and with a high pressure/low temperature system for studies down to liquid nitrogen temperature and up to six kilobars. The study of the ('35)Cl NQR spectrum of K(,2)OsCl(,6) at 298 K and 77 K revealed the presence of a satellite associated with the nearest neighbour chlorines to H('+) ion impurities located at vacant octahedral sties. This result is in agreement with the predictions of a point charge model calculation. A residence time for the H('+) ion was deduced and is consistent with the result obtained from dielectric measurements. A detailed study of the ('35)Cl NQR frequency in K(,2)ReCl(,6) was performed in the temperature range 85 - 130K where two structural phase transitions occur, and at pressures from 1 to 2643 bars. A number of unusual features were revealed and discussed as the possible signature of incommensurate behavior. The primary effect of the pressure was to alter the temperatures at which the phase transitions occurred. Contrary to the behavior expected, the transition temperature for the antiferrorotative transition has a negative pressure coefficient. The spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times for the ('35)Cl and ('37)Cl isotopes of the one dimensional XY system, PrCl(,3), were measured at 4.2K. The spin-lattice relaxation is exponential and dominated by magnetic dipole -dipole interactions. The spin-spin relaxation is non-exponential and dominated by electric quadrupolar interactions arising from the coupling of the electric dipole moment at the praseodymium site and the quadrupole moment of the chlorine ion. The temperature dependence of the spin-spin relaxation time was investigated. At 17.4 K both magnetic dipolar and electric

  11. Possibility of Systematic Study of Supernova Explosions by Nuclear Imaging Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Takada, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    An all-sky monitor with nuclear imaging spectroscopy is a promising tool for the systematic study of supernova explosions. In particular, progenitor scenarios of type-Ia supernovae, which are not yet well understood, can be resolved using light curves in the nuclear gamma-ray band. Here we report an expected result of an all-sky monitor with imaging spectroscopy using electron-tracking Compton camera, which will enable us to observe nuclear gamma-ray lines from type-Ia supernovae.

  12. A time-correlation function approach to nuclear dynamical effects in X-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Karsten, Sven; Aziz, Saadullah G; Ivanov, Sergei D; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Modern X-ray spectroscopy has proven itself as a robust tool for probing the electronic structure of atoms in complex environments. Despite working on energy scales that are much larger than those corresponding to nuclear motions, taking nuclear dynamics and the associated nuclear correlations into account may be of importance for X-ray spectroscopy. Recently, we have developed an efficient protocol to account for nuclear dynamics in X-ray absorption and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra [Karsten \\textit{et al.} arXiv:1608.03436], based on ground state molecular dynamics accompanied with state-of-the-art calculations of electronic excitation energies and transition dipoles. Here, we present an alternative derivation of the formalism and elaborate on the developed simulation protocol on the examples of gas phase and bulk water. The specific spectroscopic features stemming from the nuclear motions are analyzed and traced down to the dynamics of electronic energy gaps and transition dipole correlation ...

  13. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, Moshe [LNS at Avery Point, University of Connecticut, Groton, CT 06340-6097, USA and Wright Lab, Dept. of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8124 and the Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) of the Technical Design Report (TDR) (United States)

    2015-02-24

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O. All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the {sup 12}C(α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  14. Ising Spectroscopy II: Particles and poles at T>Tc

    CERN Document Server

    Zamolodchikov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    I discuss particle content of the Ising field theory (the scaling limit of the Ising model in a magnetic field), in particular the evolution of its mass spectrum under the change of the scaling parameter. I consider both real and pure imaginary magnetic field. Here I address the high-temperature regime, where the spectrum of stable particles is relatively simple (there are from one to three particles, depending on the parameter). My goal is to understand analytic continuations of the masses to the domain of the parameter where they no longer exist as the stable particles. I use the natural tool -- the $2\\to 2$ elastic scattering amplitude, with its poles associated with the stable particles, virtual and resonance states in a standard manner. Concentrating attention on the "real" poles (those corresponding to stable and virtual states) I propose a scenario on how the pattern of the poles evolves from the integrable point $T=T_c,\\ H\

  15. In-situ removal and characterisation of uranium-containing particles from sediments surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P. G.; Griffiths, I.; Jones, C. P.; Stitt, C. A.; Davies-Milner, M.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Yamashiki, Y.; Richards, D. A.; Scott, T. B.

    2016-03-01

    Traditional methods to locate and subsequently study radioactive fallout particles have focused heavily on autoradiography coupled with in-situ analytical techniques. Presented here is the application of a Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope with both backscattered electron and energy dispersive spectroscopy detectors, along with a micromanipulator setup and electron-hardening adhesive to isolate and remove individual particles before synchrotron radiation analysis. This system allows for a greater range of new and existing analytical techniques, at increased detail and speed, to be applied to the material. Using this method, it was possible to erform detailed energy dispersive spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation characterisation of material likely ejected from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant found within a sediment sample collected from the edge of the 30 km exclusion zone. Particulate material sub-micron in maximum dimension examined during this work via energy dispersive spectroscopy was observed to contain uranium at levels between 19.68 and 28.35 weight percent, with the application of synchrotron radiation spectroscopy confirming its presence as a major constituent. With great effort and cost being devoted to the remediation of significant areas of eastern Japan affected by the incident, it is crucial to gain the greatest possible understanding of the nature of this contamination in order to inform the most appropriate clean-up response.

  16. Physical and chemical study of single aerosol particles using optical trapping cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-30

    benefits from the stable ringdown baseline stability of this pulsed UV -CRDS system that offers a laser beam in a wide wavelength range from visible to...measure wavelength-dependent single particle extinction for different types of particles and in different wavelength regions ( Visible - UV ). We found: (1...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We report a new single-aerosol particle scope using an optical trapping-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OT-CRDS) technique

  17. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Matrix-isolated Amorphous Carbon Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnaiter, M.; Mutschke, H.; Henning, Th.; Lindackers, D.; Strecker, M.; Roth, P.

    1996-06-01

    In view of the interstellar 217.5 nm and the circumstellar 230--250 nm extinction features, the UV extinction behavior of small matrix-isolated amorphous carbon grains is investigated experimentally. The particles were produced in a flame by burning acetylene with oxygen at low pressure. To prevent coagulation, the condensing primary soot grains (average diameter ~6 nm) were extracted by a molecular beam technique into a high-vacuum chamber. There they were deposited into a layer of solid argon, isolated from each other. The particle mass and size were controlled using a particle mass spectrometer. The measured UV extinction of the matrix-isolated particles is compared with measurements on samples produced in the conventional way by collecting carbon smoke on substrate as well as with scattering calculations for small spheres and ellipsoides. The laboratory data give a good representation of the circumstellar extinction feature observed in the spectrum of V348 Sgr.

  18. Noninvasive particle sizing using camera-based diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, Otto Højager Attermann; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Falster, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    , but their low spatial resolution limits their validity ranges for the coefficients. To cover a wider range of coefficients, we use camera-based spectroscopic oblique incidence reflectometry. We develop a noninvasive technique for acquisition of apparent particle size distributions based on this approach. Our......Diffuse reflectance measurements are useful for noninvasive inspection of optical properties such as reduced scattering and absorption coefficients. Spectroscopic analysis of these optical properties can be used for particle sizing. Systems based on optical fiber probes are commonly employed...... technique is validated using stable oil-in-water emulsions with a wide range of known particle size distributions. We also measure the apparent particle size distributions of complex dairy products. These results show that our tool, in contrast to those based on fiber probes, can deal with a range...

  19. Nuclear Ground State Properties in Strontium by Fast Beam Laser Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Hyperfine structures and isotope shifts of strontium isotopes with A=78 to A=100 were measured by collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy. Nuclear spins, moments and changes in mean square charge radii are extracted from the data. The spins and moments of most of the odd isotopes are explained in the framework of the single particle model. The changes in mean square charge radii show a decrease with increasing neutron number below the N=50 shell closure. Above N=50 the charge radii increase regularly up to N=59 before revealing a strong discontinuity, indicating the onset of strong ground state deformation. A comparison of the droplet model shows that for the transitional isotopes below and above N=50, the zero point quadrupole motion describes part of the observed shell effect. Calculations carried out in the Hartree-Fock plus BCS model suggest an additional change in the surface region of the charge distribution at spherical shape. From these calculations it is furthermore proposed, that the isotopes $^7

  20. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  1. Coupling Nuclear Induced Phonon Propagation with Conversion Electron Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    by analogy, the nucleus) recoils with a recoil energy ER when firing a bullet (the γ-ray). A more in-depth discussion of the recoil energy loss can...Number of Mössbauer Peaks 1 The next consideration was the geometry of the absorber. The absorber not only had to fit in the CEMS detector opening ...Methodology, vol. 7. Plenum Press, New York. (1971) 24. Spikerman, J.J. Mossbauer Spectroscopy Instruction Manual for the MS-1200. Ranger Scientific

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy studies of proteins-glycoconjugates interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis work has been focused on the analysis of the structural requisites for recognition and binding between proteins and glycoconjugates, essential for the comprehension of mechanisms of paramount importance in chemistry, biology and biomedicine. A large variety of techniques, such as crystallographic analysis, titration microcalorimetry (ITC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescence spectroscopy, allows the elucidation of molecular recognition events. In the last years...

  3. Celebrating 40 years of research in Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adcock, Colin D.; Martin, Alan D.; Schwenk, Achim

    2015-09-01

    2015 marks the 40th anniversary of Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics. This editorial provides a brief history of the journal, and introduces a unique collection of invited articles from leading authors to celebrate the occasion.

  4. Theoretical investigations of single particle spectroscopies of novel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randeria, Mohit [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-02-24

    The project focused on three areas in the theoretical investigation of quantum materials. The first was novel magnetism in low dimensional systems, especially chiral magnetism and topological spin textures that can arise in thin films and at interfaces. The second related to high temperature superconductivity, and particularly on understanding puzzling features of quantum oscillations. The third related to collaborations with experimentalists on angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of high Tc superconductors and charge density wave materials.

  5. Precision Nuclear Beta Spectroscopy as a Probe for BSM Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprow, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    The shape of nuclear beta decay spectra is sensitive to new physics such as scalar and tensor currents, and weak magnetism. By selecting an appropriate nuclear species, it is possible to disentangle these effects. 45Ca, which undergoes a predominantly Gamow-Teller transition with an end-point energy of 256 keV, is an excellent probe for tensor couplings. Recently, the 45Ca beta decay spectrum was measured in the Caltech/UCNA 4 π magnetic spectrometer instrumented with large, highly-pixelated Si detectors at the Los Alamos National Laboratory UCN facility. This detection system, in conjunction with an extremely thin foil source preparation, allows for a full reconstruction of events to build a precise spectrum. Preliminary results of the analysis of this data will be presented.

  6. Advances in Zero-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Theis, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In the course of the last century, Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has become a powerful and ubiquitous analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure, and function. Traditionally, the great analytical power of NMR comes at the cost of mobility and large expenses for cryogenic cooling. This thesis presents how zero-field NMR detected with an atomic magnetometer is emerging as a new, potentially portable and cost-effective modality of NMR with the ability of providing ...

  7. Development of a utility system for charged particle nuclear reaction data by using intelligentPad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Shigeyoshi; Ohbayashi, Yoshihide [Information Processing Center, Kitami Institute of Technology, Kitami, Hokkaido (Japan); Masui, Hiroshi [Meme Media Laboratory, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Kato, Kiyoshi [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Chiba, Masaki [Faculty of Social Information, Sapporo Gakuin Univ., Ebetsu, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a utility system, WinNRDF2, for a nuclear charged particle reaction data of NRDF (Nuclear Reaction Data File) on the IntelligentPad architecture. By using the system, we can search the experimental data of a charged particle reaction of NRDF. Furthermore, we also see the experimental data by using graphic pads which was made through the CONTIP project. (author)

  8. Experimental wrap-up: p ( d ) A — particle production and nuclear modification factors

    CERN Document Server

    Morsch, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The 6th International Conference on Hard and Electromagnetic Probes in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions was held in November 2013 in Cape Town, South Africa. This contribution is a summary of the results presented on particle production and nuclear modification factors in p–A like collisions.

  9. Nuclear planetology: understanding planetary mantle and crust formation in the light of nuclear and particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Goetz

    2017-04-01

    conceptual model constraining the evolution of a rocky planet like Earth or Mercury from a stellar precursor of the oldest population to a Fe-C BLD, shifting through different spectral classes in a HR diagram after massive decompression and tremendous energy losses. In the light of WD/BLD cosmochronology [1], solar system bodies like Earth, Mercury and Moon are regarded as captured interlopers from the Galactic bulge, Earth and Moon possibly representing remnants of an old binary system. Such a preliminary scenario is supported by similar ages obtained from WD's for the Galactic halo [1] and, independently, by means of 187Re-232Th-238U nuclear geochronometry [3, 4], together with recent observations extremely metal-poor stars from the cosmic dawn in the bulge of the Milky Way [8]. This might be further elucidated in the near future by Th/U cosmochronometry based upon a nuclear production ratio Th/U = 0.96 [9] and additionally by means of a newly developed nucleogeochronometric age dating method for stellar spectroscopy [9-11]. The model shall stimulate geochemical data interpretation from a different perspective, to constrain the evolution and differentiation of planetary or lunar crusts and mantles in general. [1] Fontaine et al. (2001), Public. Astron. Soc. of the Pacific 113, 409-435. [2] Roller (2015), Abstract T34B-0407, AGU Spring Meeting 2015. [3] Roller (2016), Goldschmidt Conf. Abstr. 26, 2642. [4] Roller (2015), Goldschmidt Conf. Abstr. 25, 2672. [5] Roller (2015), Geophys. Res. Abstr. 18, EGU2016-33. [6] Arevalo et al. (2010), Chem. Geol. 271, 70-85. [7] Roller (2015), Geophys. Res. Abstr. 17, EGU2015-2399. [8] Howes et al. (2015), Nature 527, 484-487. [9] Roller (2016), JPS Conf. Proc., Nuclei in the Cosmos (NIC XIV), Niigata, Japan, subm. (NICXIV-001); NICXIV Abstr. #1570244284. [10] Roller (2016), JPS Conf. Proc., Nuclei in the Cosmos (NIC XIV), Niigata, Japan, subm. (NICXIV-002); NICXIV Abstr. #1570244285. [11] Roller (2016), JPS Conf. Proc., Nuclei in the

  10. Nuclear fuel particles in the environment - characteristics, atmospheric transport and skin doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poellaenen, R

    2002-05-01

    In the present thesis, nuclear fuel particles are studied from the perspective of their characteristics, atmospheric transport and possible skin doses. These particles, often referred to as 'hot' particles, can be released into the environment, as has happened in past years, through human activities, incidents and accidents, such as the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. Nuclear fuel particles with a diameter of tens of micrometers, referred to here as large particles, may be hundreds of kilobecquerels in activity and even an individual particle may present a quantifiable health hazard. The detection of individual nuclear fuel particles in the environment, their isolation for subsequent analysis and their characterisation are complicated and require well-designed sampling and tailored analytical methods. In the present study, the need to develop particle analysis methods is highlighted. It is shown that complementary analytical techniques are necessary for proper characterisation of the particles. Methods routinely used for homogeneous samples may produce erroneous results if they are carelessly applied to radioactive particles. Large nuclear fuel particles are transported differently in the atmosphere compared with small particles or gaseous species. Thus, the trajectories of gaseous species are not necessarily appropriate for calculating the areas that may receive large particle fallout. A simplified model and a more advanced model based on the data on real weather conditions were applied in the case of the Chernobyl accident to calculate the transport of the particles of different sizes. The models were appropriate in characterising general transport properties but were not able to properly predict the transport of the particles with an aerodynamic diameter of tens of micrometers, detected at distances of hundreds of kilometres from the source, using only the current knowledge of the source term. Either the effective release height has

  11. Interferometric measurement of charged particle spectra (Fourier-spectroscopy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselbach, F. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik; Schaefer, A. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik; Wachendorfer, H. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik

    1995-09-01

    Fourier spectroscopy, the most fundamental and, at least in principle, the most precise spectroscopy method, has been introduced by A.A. Michelson at the end of the last century. The method was restricted to electromagnetic waves until an optical component to shift the interfering wave packets longitudinally was invented [G. Moellensted and G. Wohland, Electron Microscopy 1980, eds. P. Bredoro and G. Boom, 7th Europ. Congr. on Electron Microscopy Foundation, Leiden, Vol. 1, p. 28] and refined [H. Gauch, Diploma thesis, University Tuebingen (1983); I. Daberkow et al., Joint Meeting on Electron Microscopy, Antwerp, Belgium, 1983, Program and Abstract Book, p. 100] to such a degree of perfection that the longitudinal shift could be controlled to a fraction of a percent of the wavelength. The Fourier spectrometer for charged matter waves is made up by a wave front splitting electron optical biprism in combination with crossed electric and magnetic fields (Wien-filter) as a wave-packet-shifting device. The contrast of the interference fringes as a function of the longitudinal shift is recorded by a CCD-line-camera, transferred to a PC and Fourier analyzed subsequently. As an example the spectrum of a field emission electron source was analyzed. At an energy of the electrons of 1 keV about 12 000 fringes with a contrast exceeding 10% were recorded. The measured full width at half maximum was 0.6 eV{+-}80 meV. The total error of 80 meV contains 40 meV error due to insufficient sampling of data and 40 meV since about 2000 low contrast fringes were neglected. The action of crossed electric and magnetic fields on electron wave packets including the major problems arising from their weak focusing action for the new method of spectroscopy is discussed extensively. (orig.).

  12. Random matrix theory in biological nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacelle, S

    1984-01-01

    The statistical theory of energy levels or random matrix theory is presented in the context of the analysis of chemical shifts of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of large biological systems. Distribution functions for the spacing between nearest-neighbor energy levels are discussed for uncorrelated, correlated, and random superposition of correlated energy levels. Application of this approach to the NMR spectra of a vitamin, an antibiotic, and a protein demonstrates the state of correlation of an ensemble of energy levels that characterizes each system. The detection of coherent and dissipative structures in proteins becomes feasible with this statistical spectroscopic technique. PMID:6478032

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of living systems : Applications in comparative physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanDenThillart, G; VanWaarde, A

    The most attractive feature of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is the noninvasive and nondestructive measurement of chemical compounds in intact tissues. MRS already has many applications in comparative physiology, usually based on observation of P-31, since the levels of phosphorus

  14. 19F-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: 19F-Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19F-NMR) was used to study host-guest ... least-squares curve fitting program, KINFIT, to obtain the formation constant of CD-drug complex. ..... It is interesting to note that, methylated.

  15. Communication: The origin of many-particle signals in nonlinear optical spectroscopy of non-interacting particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-07-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy signals detected by fluorescence from dilute samples of N non-interacting molecules are usually adequately described by simply multiplying the single molecule response by N. We show that signals that scale with higher powers of N are generated by the joint detection of several particles. This can be accomplished by phase sensitive detection such as phase cycling, photo-acoustic modulation, or by Hanbury-Brown Twiss photon coincidence. Such measurements can dissect the ensemble according to the number of excited particles.

  16. Characterisation of PEGylated PLGA nanoparticles comparing the nanoparticle bulk to the particle surface using UV/vis spectroscopy, SEC, {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spek, S.; Haeuser, M. [Institute of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, University of Muenster, Corrensstrasse 48, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Schaefer, M.M. [nanoAnalytics, Heisenbergstrasse 11, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Langer, K., E-mail: k.langer@wwu.de [Institute of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, University of Muenster, Corrensstrasse 48, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We compared nanoparticles prepared on the basis of PLGA and PEG–PLGA for their polymeric composition in the particle bulk and on the surface. • We validated three analytical methods (UV/vis, SEC, {sup 1}H NMR) for quantification of the polymeric stabiliser PVA and {sup 1}H NMR for the quantification of PEG. • In the case of PEG–PLGA as starting material we observed significant PEG contents not only on the surface but even in the particle bulk. • We observed an unexpected accumulation of the polymeric stabiliser PVA on PEGylated particle surfaces. - Abstract: Hypothesis: The bulk and the surface structure of nanoparticles based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and PLGA–PEG copolymer is expected to consist of different polymer compositions. An enrichment of hydrophilic PEG on the surface in combination with an accumulation of PLGA in the bulk is anticipated. Hence, the imbalance between bulk and surface composition should be detectable by suitable analytical methods. Experiments: Nanoparticles were assembled using an emulsion-evaporation method with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as stabiliser. Mixtures of PLGA and PLGA–PEG copolymer were applied to achieve variably PEGylated nanoparticles. The nanoparticle composition was analysed with respect to PLGA, PVA and PEG, comparing the polymer content of the nanoparticle bulk to the surface. For the bulk, PVA was quantified by a UV/vis spectroscopic method as well as size exclusion chromatography (SEC), and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. PEG determination of the bulk was carried out using quantitative {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. Surface composition was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Findings: For the characterisation of the polymer composition {sup 1}H NMR, SEC, and XPS-methods were successfully established and validated. Unexpectedly, a significant PEG content was detected within the particle bulk. The comparison of

  17. The Dependence of Average Multiplicity of Produced Charged Particles on Interacting Projectile Nucleons in Nuclear Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ayaz Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present articles an attempt has been made for the determination of multiplicity distributions of the secondary charged particles produced in the central region of relativistic heavy ion collisions. Due to sophisticated measurement in the nuclear emulsion experiment only some particles having special criteria could be selected as central collision events with consenting accuracy.

  18. Negotiated identities of chemical instrumentation: the case of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, 1956-1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jody A

    2003-05-01

    What is an NMR spectrometer? Beginning with this seemingly simple question, I will explore the development of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy between the years 1956 and 1969 from two vantage points: the organic chemists who used the new instrument, and Varian Associates-the makers of the first NMR spectrometers-. Through an examination of the articles and advertisements published in the Journal of Organic Chemistry, I will draw two conclusions. First, organic chemists and Varian Associates (along with other actors) are co-responsible for the development of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (i.e., NMR spectroscopy was not created by a single actor). Second, by changing the way NMR spectrometers are used, organic chemists attempted to change to the identity of the instrument. Similarly, when Varian Associates advertised their NMR spectrometers in a different way, they, too, attempted to change the identity of the instrument.

  19. One- and Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy with a Diamond Quantum Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, J. M.; Chang, K.; Armijo, J.; Cujia, K.; Rosskopf, T.; Maze, J. R.; Degen, C. L.

    2016-05-01

    We report on Fourier spectroscopy experiments performed with near-surface nitrogen-vacancy centers in a diamond chip. By detecting the free precession of nuclear spins rather than applying a multipulse quantum sensing protocol, we are able to unambiguously identify the NMR species devoid of harmonics. We further show that, by engineering different Hamiltonians during free precession, the hyperfine coupling parameters as well as the nuclear Larmor frequency can be selectively measured with up to five digits of precision. The protocols can be combined to demonstrate two-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy. Presented techniques will be useful for mapping nuclear coordinates in molecules deposited on diamond sensor chips, en route to imaging their atomic structure.

  20. Nuclear dynamical correlation effects in X-ray spectroscopy from a time-domain perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Karsten, Sven; Aziz, Saadullah G; Bokarev, Sergey I; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    To date X-ray spectroscopy has become a routine tool that can reveal highly local and element-specific information on the electronic structure of atoms in complex environments. Here, we focus on nuclear dynamical effects in X-ray spectra and develop a rigorous time-correlation method employing ground state molecular dynamics simulations. The importance of nuclear correlation phenomena is demonstrated by comparison against the results from the conventional sampling approach for gas phase water. In contrast to the first-order absorption, second-order resonant inelastic scattering spectra exhibit pronounced fingerprints of nuclear motions. The developed methodology does not depend on the accompanying electronic structure method in principle as well as on the spectral range and, thus, can be applied to, e.g., UV and X-ray photo-electron and Auger spectroscopies.

  1. Nuclear single-particle states: dynamical shell model and energy density functional methods

    CERN Document Server

    Bortignon, P F; Sagawa, H

    2010-01-01

    We discuss different approaches to the problem of reproducing the observed features of nuclear single-particle (s.p.) spectra. In particular, we analyze the dominant energy peaks, and the single-particle strength fragmentation, using the example of neutron states in 208Pb. Our main emphasis is the interpretation of that fragmentation as due to particle-vibration coupling (PVC). We compare with recent Energy Density Functional (EDF) approaches, and try to present a critical perspective.

  2. Nuclear Waste Removal Using Particle Beams Incineration with Fast Neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Revol, Jean Pierre Charles

    1997-01-01

    The management of nuclear waste is one of the major obstacles to the acceptability of nuclear power as a main source of energy for the future. TARC, a new experiment at CERN, is testing the practicality of Carlo Rubbia's idea to make use of Adiabatic Resonance Crossing to transmute long-lived fission fragments into short-lived or stable nuclides. Spallation neutrons produced in a large Lead assembly have a high probability to be captured at the energies of cross-section resonances in elements such as 99Tc, 129I, etc. An accelerator-driven sub-critical device using Thorium (Energy Amplifier) would be very effective in eliminating TRansUranic elements which constitute the most dangerous part of nuclear waste while producing from it large amounts of energy. In addition, such a system could transform, at a high rate and little energetic cost, long-lived fission fragments into short-lived elements.

  3. Laser tweezers: spectroscopy of optically trapped micron-sized particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, K.M.; Livett, M.K.; Nugent, K.W. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Information is often obtained about biological systems by analysis of single cells in the system. The optimum conditions for this analysis are when the cells are living and in their natural surroundings as they will be performing their normal functions and interactions. Analysis of cells can be difficult due to their mobility. Laser tweezing is a non contact method that can be employed to overcome this problem and provides a powerful tool in the analysis of functions and interactions at single cell level. In this investigation Raman spectra of a molecule of {beta} - carotene, dissolved in microdroplets of oil was obtained. The droplets were trapped using Nd-YAG beam and a low intensity Ar{sup +} beam was used to analyse the trapped particles. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Chemical structures in pyrodextrin determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yanjie; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2016-10-20

    Glycosidic linkages in a pyrodextrin were identified by NMR spectroscopy for the first time. Pyrodextrin was prepared by slurrying waxy maize starch at pH 3, filtering and drying at 40°C to 10-15% moisture content, then heating at 170°C for 4h. (1)H and (13)C NMR resonances of the pyrodextrin were assigned with the assistance of 2D techniques including COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, and HMBC, all measured on a 500MHz instrument. During dextrinization, native waxy maize starch was hydrolyzed and extensively branched with new glycosidic linkages. The resulting pyrodextrin became 100% soluble in water and produced lower viscosity solutions at 30% solids. There were only 1.2% reducing ends (α-form) detected in the pyrodextrin, but 1,6-anhydro-β-d-glucopyranosyl units accounted for 5.2% of repeating units and they were thought to be at the potential reducing end. New glycosyl linkages including α-1,6, β-1,6, α-1,2, and β-1,2 were identified. The total non-α-1,4 linkages in the pyrodextrin were about 17.8% compared to 5.8% in a maltodextrin prepared by α-amylase digestion. Transglycosidation and depolymerization occurred during dextrinization, and the resulting pyrodextrin was highly branched.

  5. [Particle Size and Number Density Online Analysis for Particle Suspension with Polarization-Differentiation Elastic Light Scattering Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-kang; Fang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The basic principle of polarization-differentiation elastic light scattering spectroscopy based techniques is that under the linear polarized light incidence, the singlely scattered light from the superficial biological tissue and diffusively scattered light from the deep tissue can be separated according to the difference of polarization characteristics. The novel point of the paper is to apply this method to the detection of particle suspension and, to realize the simultaneous measurement of its particle size and number density in its natural status. We design and build a coaxial cage optical system, and measure the backscatter signal at a specified angle from a polystyrene microsphere suspension. By controlling the polarization direction of incident light with a linear polarizer and adjusting the polarization direction of collected light with another linear polarizer, we obtain the parallel polarized elastic light scattering spectrum and cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum. The difference between the two is the differential polarized elastic light scattering spectrum which include only the single scattering information of the particles. We thus compare this spectrum to the Mie scattering calculation and extract the particle size. We then also analyze the cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum by applying the particle size already extracted. The analysis is based on the approximate expressions taking account of light diffusing, from which we are able to obtain the number density of the particle suspension. We compare our experimental outcomes with the manufacturer-provided values and further analyze the influence of the particle diameter standard deviation on the number density extraction, by which we finally verify the experimental method. The potential applications of the method include the on-line particle quality monitoring for particle manufacture as well as the fat and protein density detection of milk products.

  6. Particle and nuclear physics instrumentation and its broad connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarteau, M.; Lipton, R.; Nicholson, H.; Shipsey, I.

    2016-10-01

    Subatomic physics shares with other basic sciences the need to innovate, invent, and develop tools, techniques, and technologies to carry out its mission to explore the nature of matter, energy, space, and time. In some cases, entire detectors or technologies developed specifically for particle physics research have been adopted by other fields of research or in commercial applications. In most cases, however, the development of new devices and technologies by particle physics for its own research has added value to other fields of research or to applications beneficial to society by integrating them in the existing technologies. Thus, detector research and development has not only advanced the current state of technology for particle physics, but has often advanced research in other fields of science and has underpinned progress in numerous applications in medicine and national security. At the same time particle physics has profited immensely from developments in industry and applied them to great benefit for the use of particle physics detectors. This symbiotic relationship has seen strong mutual benefits with sometimes unexpected far reach.

  7. Combined electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy study of corroded Magnox sludge from a legacy spent nuclear fuel storage pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, Colin R.; Goddard, David T.; Sarsfield, Mark J.; Taylor, Robin J.

    2011-05-01

    Samples of filtered particulates and sludges, formed from corroding magnesium alloy clad uranium metal ("Magnox") fuel elements, collected from one of the legacy nuclear fuel storage ponds located at Sellafield (UK) were investigated by Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray analysis (ESEM/EDX), micro-Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR). ESEM imaging confirmed the dominant morphology to be clusters of interlocking platelets typical of brucite (Mg(OH) 2). EDX analysis was suggestive of some conversion to the related phase, hydrotalcite (Mg 6Al 2(CO 3)(OH) 16·4H 2O), due to elevated levels of Al associated with Mg. Other apparent morphologies were less commonly observed including flaky sheets, consistent with earlier stages of Magnox alloy corrosion. In a few specific cases, rods were also observed suggestive of some conversion to Mg-hydroxycarbonate phases. Discrete phases rich in U were also identified. Fluorescence in the Raman spectroscopy also indicated surface coatings of organic macromolecules and iron sulphide on hematite containing particles, attributed to microbial activity within the open air pond. Some specific differences in the solid phases between pond areas with differing conditions were apparent.

  8. Instrumental correction of counting losses in nuclear pulse spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, G. P.

    1985-05-01

    The virtual pulse generator (VPG) method of counting loss correction [1-3] is the first truly quantitative instrumental correction procedure taking into account both dead-time and pileup losses of a spectroscopy system over its full operative range of counting rates without the need for fast signal detection channels [4-6] or ambiguous post-processing of data [7,8], or the necessity to process artificial test pulses in addition to the detector signals [9]. Consequently, the VPG method is not limited in test frequency thus enabling the on-line generation of loss correction factors of sufficient statistical accuracy within extremely short periods of time. By adding weighting factors to the channels addressed by the analog-to-digital converter during the course of the measurement (instead of one as in conventional pulse height analysis) real-time correction of counting losses is made possible with millisecond time of response. Increased statistical accuracy may be achieved when using the VPG principle for loss-dependent prolonging of the measuring time similar to the live-time clock method. Both real-time and live-time modes of operation are provided for in a commercially available VPG correction module [10]. After a description of the set-up procedure of the module in connection with a likewise commercial semi-Gaussian shaping amplifier the performance of the VPG correction is exemplified to a level of 0.2% with the aid of repetitive two-source measurements in both the real-time and the live-time mode of operation.

  9. Study of the Neutron Deficient Pb and Bi Isotopes by Simultaneous Atomic- and Nuclear-Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Kessler, T

    2002-01-01

    We propose to study systematically nuclear properties of the neutron deficient lead $^{183-189}$Pb, $^{191g}$Pb, $^{193g}$Pb and bismuth isotopes $^{188-200}$Bi by atomic spectroscopy with the ISOLDE resonance ionisation laser ion source (RILIS) combined with simultaneous nuclear spectroscopy at the detection set-up. The main focus is the determination of the mean square charge radii of $^{183-190}$Pb and $^{188-193}$Bi from which the influence of low-lying intruder states should become obvious. Also the nuclear spin and magnetic moments of ground-states and long-lived isomers will be determined unambiguously through evaluation of the hyperfine structure, and new isomers could be discovered. The decay properties of these nuclei can be measured by $\\alpha$-$\\gamma$ and $\\beta$-$\\gamma$ spectroscopy. With this data at hand, possible shape transitions around mid-shell at N$\\sim$104 will be studied. This data is crucial for the direct test of nuclear theory in the context of intruder state influence (e.g. energy ...

  10. The use of dielectric spectroscopy for the characterization of polymer-induced flocculation of polystyrene particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Vittrup; Keiding, Kristian

    2008-01-01

    in dilute suspensions. Thus, techniques usable for flocculation characterization in high-solids suspensions are desirable. This study investigates the use of dielectric spectroscopy to monitor the flocculation of polystyrene particles with a cationic polymer. The frequency-dependent permittivity is modeled...

  11. Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of silver within surrogate high temperature gas reactor fuel coated particles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roberts, DE

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available been studied with femtosecond Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (femto-LIBS). The SiC layer of the TRISO coated particle is the main barrier to metallic and gaseous fission products of which 110mAg is of particular interest for direct cycle high...

  12. DC SQUID Spectrometers for Nuclear Quadrupole and Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TonThat, Dinh M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUJD) is a very sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order of 1 μΦ0Hz-1/2 at liquid helium temperature (Φ0=h/2e). This inherent flux sensitivity of the SQUID is used in a spectrometer for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR.)and nuclear quadruple resonance (NQR). The processing magnetic field from the nuclear spins is coupled to the SQUID by mean of a flux transformer. The SQUID NMR spectrometer is used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time T1 of solid 129Xe at 4.2 K down to 0.1 mT.

  13. A new detector array for charged particle spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cowin, R L; Chappell, S P G; Clarke, N M; Freer, M; Fulton, B R; Cunningham, R A; Curtis, N; Dillon, G; Lilley, J; Jones, C D; Lee, P; Rae, W D M

    1999-01-01

    A compact and highly segmented detector array consisting of 44 gas-silicon-caesium iodide, position sensitive, particle identification detector telescopes and up to 10 position-sensitive, silicon strip detectors has been constructed for the study of light-ion-heavy-ion reactions including cluster break-up in the energy range 5-15 MeV/nucleon. The detectors are housed in a purpose built vacuum chamber. The telescopes are placed in fixed positions, covering the forward hemisphere from 3 to 30 deg. in the laboratory with the target placed at 535 mm from the front of the telescopes or 6-52 deg. with the target placed at 215 mm. The strip detectors are placed in any of 30 fixed positions in the forward hemisphere. For 85 MeV sup 1 sup 2 C ions the telescope energy resolution (gas plus silicon) is 345 keV with an angular resolution of 0.03 deg. . Using the gas-silicon section ions with Z up to 21 can be identified. For ions that pass through the silicon isotopic identification is achieved using the silicon-CsI comb...

  14. Tracing airborne particles after Japan's nuclear plant explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Hisashi; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2011-11-01

    The powerful Tohoku earthquake and consequent tsunami that occurred off the east coast of Japan on 11 March 2011 devastated dozens of coastal cities and towns, causing the loss of more than 15,000 lives and leaving close to 4000 people still missing. Although nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, located on the Pacific coast, stopped their operation automatically upon the occurrence of the Mw 9.0 quake [Showstack, 2011], the cooling system for nuclear fuel broke down. From 12 to 16 March, vapor and hydrogen blasts destroyed the buildings that had contained the reactors, resulting in the release into the atmosphere of radioactive materials such as sulfur-35, iodine-131, cesium-134, and cesium-137, which collectively can cause harmful health effects such as tissue damage and increased risk of cancer (particularly in children), depending on dose. Most of those materials emitted from the power plant rained out onto the grounds within its vicinity and forced tens of thousands within a 20-kilometer radius to evacuate (residents to the northwest of the site within about 40 kilometers also were moved from their homes). Some of the radioactive materials were transported and then detected at such distant locations as North America and Europe, although the level of radiation dose was sufficiently low not to affect human health in any significant manner.

  15. Application of laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy for determination of plutonium concentration in nuclear waste solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surugaya, Naoki; Sato, Soichi; Jitsukata, Syu; Watahiki, Masaru

    2008-04-01

    Laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy was used in a quantitative analysis of Pu in HNO3 medium. Plutonium was quantitatively oxidized to Pu(VI) using Ce(IV). The photoacoustic measurement of Pu(VI) with maximum absorption at 830.5 nm was subsequently performed to determine the concentration. The photoacoustic signal was linearly proportional to the Pu(VI) ion concentration. The detection limit of Pu(VI) was estimated to be 0.5 microg mL(-1) (3sigma) in 3 M HNO3. By the proposed method, Pu concentration was successfully determined in a nuclear waste solution for use in nuclear materials management.

  16. Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriou, P.; Becker, H.-W.; Bogdanović-Radović, I.; Chiari, M.; Goncharov, A.; Jesus, A. P.; Kakuee, O.; Kiss, A. Z.; Lagoyannis, A.; Räisänen, J.; Strivay, D.; Zucchiatti, A.

    2016-03-01

    Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) is a powerful analytical technique that exploits the interactions of rapid charged particles with nuclei located near a sample surface to determine the composition and structure of the surface regions of solids by measurement of characteristic prompt γ rays. The potential for depth profiling of this technique has long been recognized, however, the implementation has been limited owing to insufficient knowledge of the physical data and lack of suitable user-friendly computer codes for the applications. Although a considerable body of published data exists in the nuclear physics literature for nuclear reaction cross sections with γ rays in the exit channel, there is no up-to-date, comprehensive compilation specifically dedicated to IBA applications. A number of PIGE cross-section data had already been uploaded to the Ion Beam Analysis Nuclear Data Library (IBANDL)

  17. Neutron-activation analysis of hot particles from the vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyul`, A.Yu.; Kolesov, G.M.; Cherkezyan, V.O. [V.I. Vernadskii Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-04-10

    A considerable portion of the radioactive contamination of the surface layers of soil after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant was caused by hot particles or aggregates with a diameter of several tens microns and a specific activity >n{center_dot}10{sup {minus}11} Ci. They consist of primary particles of the dispersed material of the nuclear fuel and secondary particles formed as a result of the interaction of the fuel and uranium fission products with the structural materials of the reactor and the destroyed active zone. The radionuclide composition of the hot particles characterizes the nuclear fuel used and the temperature conditions in the reactor during the first weeks after the accident and their chemical composition reflects the conditions and processes leading to their formation, which must be known in order; to ascertain the mechanism of the formation of the radioactive emission from the reactor and to evaluate the degree of ecological danger posed by the particles. All this promotes the urgency and importance of studying the radiation-chemical characteristics of such hot particles. Their small sizes and masses impose definite restrictions; on the investigative methods used, which must be highly sensitive and must offer the possibility of performing a nondestructive analysis. One such method is neutron-activation analysis. The purpose of the present investigation was to apply instrumental neutron-activation analysis to the simultaneous determination of the elemental composition of hot particles and establishment of the isotopic composition of the uranium in them.

  18. Nanostructure of metallic particles in light water reactor used nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Edgar C., E-mail: edgar.buck@pnnl.gov; Mausolf, Edward J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • An extraordinary nano-structure has been observed in the noble metal particles that form in UO{sub 2} reactor fuels. • The composition of the particles was highly variable with low levels of uranium and plutonium present in the particles. • This nano-structure may play an important role in the behavior of nuclear fuels under accident conditions. - Abstract: An extraordinary nano-structure has been observed in the metallic (Mo–Tc–Ru–Rh–Pd) particles that are known to form during irradiated in light water nuclear reactor fuels. This structure points possible high catalytic reactivity through the occurrence of a very high surface area as well as defect sites. We have analyzed separated metallic particles from dissolved high burn-up spent nuclear fuel using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The larger particles vary in diameter between ∼10 and ∼300 nm and possess a hexagonally close packed epsilon-ruthenium structure. These particles are not always single crystals but often consist of much smaller crystallites on the order of 1–3 nm in diameter with evidence suggesting the occurrence of some amorphous regions. It is possible that neutron irradiation and fission product recoils generated the unusual small crystallite size. The composition of the metallic particles was variable with low levels of uranium present in some of the particles. We hypothesize that the uranium may have induced the formation of the amorphous (or frustrated) metal structure. This unique nano-structure may play an important role in the environmental behavior of nuclear fuels.

  19. Digital nuclear radiation spectroscopy: Hardware requirements to minimize energy resolution degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riva, M., E-mail: Marco.Riva@enea.it; Esposito, B.; Marocco, D.; Belli, F.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Systematic requirement analysis of the digitizing process. • Synthetic pulses with different Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM). • Statistical and systematic error study. • Effects of the pulse amplitude reduction respect to the full scale on the error. • Hardware architecture considerations. - Abstract: Nuclear radiation spectroscopy is now often relying on digital acquisition techniques. The present paper addresses the problem of analyzing the requirements of the digitizer in terms of sampling frequency and number of bits to minimize the energy resolution degradation caused by the digitizing process. The analysis is performed using synthetic pulses (with different amplitude and Full Width Half Maximum) of typical nuclear spectroscopy detectors and the pulse area as energy estimate. Additional relevant issues, such as the hardware architecture and the data throughput speed, are also discussed.

  20. Nuclear structure of elements with 100 ≤ Z ≤ 109 from alpha spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, M.; Heßberger, F. P.; Lopez-Martens, A.

    2015-12-01

    Significant technical progress concerning the availability of intense heavy-ion beams and highly-efficient and sophisticated detection devices has made nuclear-structure investigations possible in the region of superheavy nuclei. Exciting new results have been obtained by applying α spectroscopy as well as α-γ and internal-conversion-electron coincidence spectroscopy. The present review article gives an overview of the experimental techniques and methods with specific attention to the recent developments of digital signal and data processing giving access to half-life ranges of less than a few microseconds. The presentation of the experimental results and the physics discussion will be focused on nuclear structure systematics in even-Z nuclei along the N = 151 , 153 ,and 155 isotonic lines, where most progress has been achieved in the last 10 years.

  1. Study of polonium isotopes ground state properties by simultaneous atomic- and nuclear-spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Koester, U H; Kalaninova, Z; Imai, N

    2007-01-01

    We propose to systematically study the ground state properties of neutron deficient $^{192-200}$Po isotopes by means of in-source laser spectroscopy using the ISOLDE laser ion source coupled with nuclear spectroscopy at the detection setup as successfully done before by this collaboration with neutron deficient lead isotopes. The study of the change in mean square charge radii along the polonium isotope chain will give an insight into shape coexistence above the mid-shell N = 104 and above the closed shell Z = 82. The hyperfine structure of the odd isotopes will also allow determination of the nuclear spin and the magnetic moment of the ground state and of any identifiable isomer state. For this study, a standard UC$_{x}$ target with the ISOLDE RILIS is required for 38 shifts.

  2. Billion-Fold Enhancement in Sensitivity of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Magnesium Ions in Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Gottberg, Alexander; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. 31Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 107 magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry.

  3. Billion-fold enhancement in sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for magnesium ions in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottberg, Alexander; Stachura, Monika; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-12-15

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. (31)Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 10(7) magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry.

  4. Nuclear Power Plant Construction Scheduling Problem with Time Restrictions: A Particle Swarm Optimization Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Kuan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear power plant construction scheduling, a project is generally defined by its dependent preparation time, the time required for construction, and its reactor installation time. The issues of multiple construction teams and multiple reactor installation teams are considered. In this paper, a hierarchical particle swarm optimization algorithm is proposed to solve the nuclear power plant construction scheduling problem and minimize the occurrence of projects failing to achieve deliverables within applicable due times and deadlines.

  5. Exploratory study of nuclear reaction data utility framework of Japan charged particle reaction data group (JCPRG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masui, Hiroshi; Ohnishi, Akira; Kato, Kiyoshi [Hokkaido Univ., Graduate School of Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Ohbayasi, Yosihide [Hokkaido Univ., Meme Media Lab., Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Aoyama, Shigeyoshi [Kitami Institute of Technology, Information Processing Center, Kitami, Hokkaido (Japan); Chiba, Masaki [Sapporo Gakuin Univ., Faculty of Social Information, Ebetsu, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    Compilation, evaluation and dissemination are essential pieces of work for the nuclear data activities. We, Japan charged particle data group, have researched the utility framework for the nuclear reaction data on the basis of recent progress of computer and network technologies. These technologies will be not only for the data dissemination but for the compilation and evaluation assistance among the many corresponding researchers of all over the world. In this paper, current progress of our research and development is shown. (author)

  6. Laser assisted nuclear decay spectroscopy: A new method for studying neutron-deficient francium

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Kara Marie

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive decay studies of rare isotopes produced at radioactive ion beam facilities have often been hindered by the presence of isobaric and isomeric contamination. The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN uses laser radiation to stepwise excite and ionize an atomic beam in a particular isomeric state. Deflection of this selectively ionized beam of exotic nuclei, from the remaining neutral contaminants, allows ultra-sensitive detection of rare isotopes and nuclear structure measurements in background-free conditions.\

  7. Glass transition temperatures of epoxy resins by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutenberg, A.C.; Dorsey, G.F.; Peck, C.G.

    1976-04-21

    Pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to measure the glass transition temperatures of cured epoxy resins. These measurements make it possible to monitor the cure and determine the glass transition temperature as a function of the curing conditions and the concentration of the components. Knowledge of the glass transition temperature of the cured epoxies allows screening of them for a number of uses, including adhesives and coatings operations.

  8. Systematic study of pre-irradiation effects in high efficiency CVD diamond nuclear particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Marinelli, M; Milani, E; Paoletti, A; Pillon, M; Tucciarone, A; Verona-Rinati, G

    2002-01-01

    Many outstanding properties of diamond can, in principle, lead to the development of radiation detectors with interesting capabilities. In particular, diamond-based nuclear particle detectors are good candidates to replace silicon-based detectors in several fields, e.g. in high-flux applications such as next generation particle-accelerator experiments or beam monitoring. However, the high concentration of defects (grain boundaries, impurities) in synthetic diamond films can strongly limit the detector's performance. A significant increase in the efficiency of CVD diamond detectors is achieved by means of pre-irradiation (pumping) with beta particles. We report here on a systematic study of the effects of pumping in high-quality microwave CVD diamond films. The efficiency (eta) and charge collection distance (CCD) of nuclear particle detectors based on these films depend on the methane content in the growth gas mixture and on the film thickness. Both efficiency and CCD behave in a markedly different way in the...

  9. An alpha particle detector for a portable neutron generator for the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausladen, P. A.; Neal, J. S.; Mihalczo, J. T.

    2005-12-01

    A recoil alpha particle detector has been developed for use in a portable neutron generator. The associated particle sealed tube neutron generator (APSTNG) will be used as an interrogation source for the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS). With the coincident emission of 14.1 MeV neutrons and 3.5 MeV alpha particles produced by the D-T reaction, alpha detection determines the time and direction of the neutrons of interest for subsequent use as an active nuclear materials interrogation source. The alpha particle detector uses a ZnO(Ga) scintillator coating applied to a fiber optic face plate. Gallium-doped zinc oxide is a fast (inorganic scintillator with a high melting point (1975 °C). One detector has been installed in an APSTNG and is currently being tested. Initial results include a measured efficiency for 3.5 MeV alphas of 90%.

  10. Using Moessbauer spectroscopy as key technique in the investigation of nanosized magnetic particles for drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, P. C., E-mail: pcmor@unb.br [Universidade de Brasilia, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil)

    2008-01-15

    This paper describes how cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suspended as ionic or biocompatible magnetic fluids, can be used as a platform to built complex nanosized magnetic materials, more specifically magnetic drug delivery systems. In particular, the paper is addressed to the discussion of the use of the Moessbauer spectroscopy as an extremely useful technique in supporting the investigation of key aspects related to the properties of the hosted magnetic nanosized particle. Example of the use of the Moessbauer spectroscopy in accessing information regarding the nanoparticle modification due to the empirical process which provides long term chemical stability is included in the paper.

  11. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  12. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Morrissey, Michael J; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining ground in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension on this work to molecules will be introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for particular applications.

  13. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Síle Nic Chormaic

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications.

  14. Correlations in Particle Production in Nuclear Collisions at LHC Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Sputowska, Iwona

    New data on forward-backward charged particle correlations and multiplicity uctuations in Pb+Pb collisions at p sNN = 2.76 TeV measured by the ALICE detector at CERN are presented. The analysis focuses on the dependence of (a) the correlation coecient bcorr, (b) the intensive quantity ! and (c) the strongly-intensive quantity as a function of (1) the pseudorapidity gap (2) the centrality of the collision and (3) the width of the centrality bin. The considered observables are studied for Pb+Pb data with two dierent centrality estimators. The centrality selection methods are based on charged particle multiplicity measurement by the ALICE VZERO detector and on determination of energy carried by spectator systems by the Zero Degree Calorimeter. A strong dependence of the measured magnitude of forward-backward correlation (bcorr), and of the size of multiplicity uctuations (!), is observed as a function of the ap- plied centrality estimator and as a function of the size of centrality window. A dominant eect on ...

  15. Uses of alpha particles, especially in nuclear reaction studies and medical radionuclide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qaim, Syed M.; Spahn, Ingo; Scholten, Bernhard; Neumaier, Bernd [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Medizin (INM), Nuklearchemie (INM-5)

    2016-11-01

    Alpha particles exhibit three important characteristics: scattering, ionisation and activation. This article briefly discusses those properties and outlines their major applications. Among others, α-particles are used in elemental analysis, investigation and improvement of materials properties, nuclear reaction studies and medical radionuclide production. The latter two topics, dealing with activation of target materials, are treated in some detail in this paper. Measurements of excitation functions of α-particle induced reactions shed some light on their reaction mechanisms, and studies of isomeric cross sections reveal the probability of population of high-spin nuclear levels. Regarding medical radionuclides, an overview is presented of the isotopes commonly produced using α-particle beams. Consideration is also given to some routes which could be potentially useful for production of a few other radionuclides. The significance of α-particle induced reactions to produce a few high-spin isomeric states, decaying by emission of low-energy conversion or Auger electrons, which are of interest in localized internal radiotherapy, is outlined. The α-particle beam, thus broadens the scope of nuclear chemistry research related to development of non-standard positron emitters and therapeutic radionuclides.

  16. Nuclear and particle physics in the early universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1981-01-01

    Basic principles and implications of Big Bang cosmology are reviewed, noting the physical evidence of a previous universe temperature of 10,000 K and theoretical arguments such as grand unification decoupling indicating a primal temperature of 10 to the 15th eV. The Planck time of 10 to the -43rd sec after the Big Bang is set as the limit before which gravity was quantized and nothing is known. Gauge theories of elementary particle physics are reviewed for successful predictions of similarity in weak and electromagnetic interactions and quantum chromodynamic predictions for strong interactions. The large number of photons in the universe relative to the baryons is considered and the grand unified theories are cited as showing the existence of baryon nonconservation as an explanation. Further attention is given to quark-hadron phase transition, the decoupling for the weak interaction and relic neutrinos, and Big Bang nucleosynthesis.

  17. New generation nuclear fuel structures: dense particles in selectively soluble matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickafus, Kurt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, David J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Brian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pattillo, Steve G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a technology for dispersing sub-millimeter sized fuel particles within a bulk matrix that can be selectively dissolved. This may enable the generation of advanced nuclear fuels with easy separation of actinides and fission products. The large kinetic energy of the fission products results in most of them escaping from the sub-millimeter sized fuel particles and depositing in the matrix during burning of the fuel in the reactor. After the fuel is used and allowed to cool for a period of time, the matrix can be dissolved and the fission products removed for disposal while the fuel particles are collected by filtration for recycle. The success of such an approach would meet a major goal of the GNEP program to provide advanced recycle technology for nuclear energy production. The benefits of such an approach include (1) greatly reduced cost of the actinide/fission product separation process, (2) ease of recycle of the fuel particles, and (3) a radiation barrier to prevent theft or diversion of the recycled fuel particles during the time they are re-fabricated into new fuel. In this study we describe a method to make surrogate nuclear fuels of micrometer scale W (shell)/Mo (core) or HfO2 particles embedded in an MgO matrix that allows easy separation of the fission products and their embedded particles. In brief, the method consists of physically mixing W-Mo or hafnia particles with an MgO precursor. Heating the mixture, in air or argon, without agitation, to a temperature is required for complete decomposition of the precursor. The resulting material was examined using chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and micro X-ray computed tomography and found to consist of evenly dispersed particles in an MgO + matrix. We believe this methodology can be extended to actinides and other matrix materials.

  18. Biomolecular interactions in HCV nucleocapsid-like particles as revealed by vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Casado, Arantxa; Molina, Marina; Carmona, Pedro

    2007-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) occurs in the form of 55-65 nm spherical particles, but the structure of the virion remains to be clarified. Structural studies of HCV have been hampered by the lack of an appropriate cell culture system. However, structural analyses of HCV components can provide an essential framework for understanding of the molecular mechanism of virion assembly. This article reviews the potential of vibrational spectroscopy aimed at the knowledge of HCV structural biology, particularly regarding biomolecular interactions in nucleocapsid-like particles obtained in vitro.

  19. Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy applied to extraterrestrial particles returned from the asteroid Itokawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, U.; Maiwald, M.; Hanke, F.; Braune, M.; Pavlov, S. G.; Schröder, S.; Weber, I.; Busemann, H.; Sumpf, B.; Tränkle, G.; Hübers, H.-W.

    2017-09-01

    Two extraterrestrial particles from the asteroid Itokawa are investigated applying Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy (SERDS). These particles were returned by the Hayabusa mission of the Japanese Space Agency JAXA. For SERDS a diode laser based microsystem light source at 488 nm is used for excitation. It has been found that fluorescence signals masking the Raman spectral features of interest can be substantially separated by applying SERDS. Therefore, SERDS improves the information obtained from the Raman spectra and enables a reliable analysis for investigations on extraterrestrial samples.

  20. Determination of particle size distribution and elastic properties of silica microcapsules by ultrasound spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Tran, Thao; Shibata, Daisuke; Norisuye, Tomohisa; Nakanishi, Hideyuki; Tran-Cong-Miyata, Qui

    2016-07-01

    The acoustical properties of silica microcapsules synthesized by the interfacial polymerization of sodium silicate were studied by ultrasound spectroscopy. The experimental data were reproduced by the Waterman-Truell dispersion relation with the scattering function theory proposed by Goodman and Stern for hollow particles in liquid. The particle size distributions were successfully evaluated by the analysis and were found to be in good agreement with those obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The formation of such silicate microcapsules synthesized through water/oil/water emulsion as a template was also monitored.

  1. Simultaneous ion luminescence imaging and spectroscopy of individual aerosol particles with external proton or helium microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kada, Wataru, E-mail: kada.wataru@gunma-u.ac.jp [Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Satoh, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Akihito; Koka, Masashi; Kamiya, Tomihiro [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Simultaneous microscopic imaging and spectroscopy of individual aerosol particles were performed with an external microbeam. Visible luminescence induced by the external microbeam was successfully used as a probe to detect organic contaminants in the targets. Combined ion luminescence (IL)/particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of the aerosol targets revealed microscopic chemical and elemental composition distributions under ambient atmospheric conditions. The simple confocal micro-optics for the IL spectroscopy and microscopic imaging were sufficiently sensitive for detecting these molecules at sub-parts per million concentrations and at a wavelength resolution of less than 5 nm. The IL spectra were monitored to prevent severe damage to the samples. Furthermore, our IL system has the advantage that it is simple to add to a conventional micro-PIXE system.

  2. Calibrations of CR39 and Makrofol nuclear track detectors and search for exotic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Auriemma, G; Bakari, D; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Brigida, M; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Caruso, R; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Chiarusi, T; Choudhary, B C; Coutu, S; Cozzi, M; De Cataldo, G; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; De Vincenzi, M; Dekhissi, H; Derkaoui, J; Di Credico, A; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Grassi, M; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Heinz, R; Iarocci, E; Katsavounidis, E; Katsavounidis, I; Kearns, E; Kim, H; Kumar, A; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longley, N P; Longo, M J; Loparco, F; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Matteuzzi, D; Mazziotta, M N; Michael, D G; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Pistilli, P; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Rrhioua, A; Satriano, C; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Serra, P; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Vakili, M; Walter, C W; Webb, R; 10.1016/S0920-5632(03)02249-7

    2003-01-01

    We present the final results of the search for exotic massive particles in the cosmic radiation performed with the MACRO underground experiment. Magnetic monopoles and nuclearites flux upper limits obtained with the CR39 nuclear track subdetector, the scintillation and streamer tube subdetectors are given. Searches at high altitude with the SLIM experiment are in progress.

  3. AFTER@LHC: a precision machine to study the interface between particle and nuclear physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansberg J.P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We outline the opportunities to study with high precision the interface between nuclear and particle physics, which are offered by a next generation and multi-purpose fixed-target experiment exploiting the proton and ion LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal.

  4. AFTER@LHC: a precision machine to study the interface between particle and nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lansberg, J P; Brodsky, S J; Chambert, V; Didelez, J P; Genolini, B; Ferreiro, E G; Fleuret, F; Hadjidakis, C; Lorce, C; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Rosier, P; Schienbein, I; Scomparin, E; Uggerhoj, U I

    2014-01-01

    We outline the opportunities to study with high precision the interface between nuclear and particle physics, which are offered by a next generation and multi-purpose fixed-target experiment exploiting the proton and ion LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal.

  5. Solar neon abundances from gamma-ray spectroscopy and He-3-rich particle events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, D. V.; Ramaty, R.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1988-01-01

    Ambient solar atmospheric abundances derived from gamma-ray spectroscopy are compared with observations of solar energetic particles. Agreement is found between the gamma-ray-derived Ne/O ratio and the corresponding mean ratio for He-3-rich flares. Both of these values are significantly higher than inferred coronal Ne/O ratios. It is suggested that the mean Ne/O ratio in He-3-rich flares reflects the composition of the flare plasma rather than the acceleration process.

  6. Development of an inertial confinement fusion platform to study charged-particle-producing nuclear reactions relevant to nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Bacher, A.; Brune, C. R.; Casey, D. T.; Forrest, C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Sayre, D. B.; Bionta, R. M.; Bourgade, J.-L.; Caggiano, J. A.; Cerjan, C.; Craxton, R. S.; Dearborn, D.; Farrell, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Garcia, E. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hale, G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hohensee, M.; Holunga, D. M.; Hoppe, M.; Janezic, R.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kim, Y. H.; Knauer, J. P.; Kohut, T. R.; Lahmann, B.; Landoas, O.; Li, C. K.; Marshall, F. J.; Masse, L.; McEvoy, A.; McKenty, P.; McNabb, D. P.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T. G.; Paris, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Pino, J.; Radha, P. B.; Remington, B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Robey, H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rosse, B.; Rubery, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Sanchez, J.; Schmitt, M.; Schoff, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Seka, W.; Sio, H.; Stoeckl, C.; Tipton, R. E.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the development of a platform to study astrophysically relevant nuclear reactions using inertial-confinement fusion implosions on the OMEGA and National Ignition Facility laser facilities, with a particular focus on optimizing the implosions to study charged-particle-producing reactions. Primary requirements on the platform are high yield, for high statistics in the fusion product measurements, combined with low areal density, to allow the charged fusion products to escape. This is optimally achieved with direct-drive exploding pusher implosions using thin-glass-shell capsules. Mitigation strategies to eliminate a possible target sheath potential which would accelerate the emitted ions are discussed. The potential impact of kinetic effects on the implosions is also considered. The platform is initially employed to study the complementary T(t,2n)α, T(3He,np)α and 3He(3He,2p)α reactions. Proof-of-principle results from the first experiments demonstrating the ability to accurately measure the energy and yields of charged particles are presented. Lessons learned from these experiments will be used in studies of other reactions. The goals are to explore thermonuclear reaction rates and fundamental nuclear physics in stellar-like plasma environments, and to push this new frontier of nuclear astrophysics into unique regimes not reachable through existing platforms, with thermal ion velocity distributions, plasma screening, and low reactant energies.

  7. Collinear Laser Spectroscopy of Potassium Nuclear Charge Radii beyond N = 28

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078903; Jochim, Selim

    Nuclear ground-state properties, such as spin, charge radius, and magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments are important quantities to describe the nucleus. The comparison of experimental data to shell-model calculations gives insight in the underlying nuclear structure and composition of ground-state wave functions. Spins and charge radii can also be used to test the predictions of state-of-the-art microscopic models. This work contributes to these studies providing new measurements in the region of the nuclear chart around the magic proton number Z = 20. The data have been obtained at the collinear laser spectroscopy setup COLLAPS located at the radioactive-ion-beam facility ISOLDE at CERN. Using bunched-beam laser spectroscopy hyperne structure spectra of the potassium isotopes with mass number A = 48 51 could be recorded for the first time. Ground-state spins and isotope shifts could be deduced for 4851K contributing to the evolution of the d3=2 orbital beyond the shell closure at the magi...

  8. Characterization study of cesium concentrated particles in the soils near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satou, Yukihiko; Sueki, Keisuke; Sasa, Kimikazu; Adachi, Kouji; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2015-04-01

    Radionuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident contaminated a vast area. Two types of contamination, spread and spot types, were observed in soils with autoradiography using an imaging plate. Other samples such as dust filters, vegetation, X-ray films, and so on, also indicate the spot type contamination in the early stage of the FDNPP accident. The source of spot type contamination is well known as hot particles at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) accident in 1986. Hot particles were divided into two groups, fuel hot particles and fission product particles, and they were emitted directly from reactor core with phreatic explosion and fire. In contrast, the official reports of the FDNPP accident did not conforme core explosion. In addition, the emitted total amount of Uranium was very few (Yamamoto et al., 2014). Thus, the spot type contaminations were not identified as the same of hot particles yet. Therefore, the present study aimed to pick up and identify the spot contaminations in soils. Surface soil samples were collected at 20 km northwest from the FDNPP in June 2013. Soils were spread in plastic bags for autoradiography with imaging plate analysis. Then, the soil particles were collected on a sticky carbon tape and analyzed by SEM-EDS to detect radioactive particles. Finally, particles were confirmed to contain photo peaks in the γ-spectrum by a germanium semiconductor detector. Four radioactive particles were isolated from the soil samples in the present study. Detected γ-ray emission radionuclides were only Cs-134 and Cs-137. The X-ray spectra on the SEM-EDS of all particles showed a Cs peak as well as O, Fe, Zn, and Rb peaks, and these elements were distributed uniformly within the particles. In addition, uniform distribution of Si was also shown. Moreover, U was detected from one of the particles, but U concentration was very low and existed locally in the particle. These characters are very similar to previous

  9. Electron mean free path from angle-dependent photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles

    CERN Document Server

    Goldmann, Maximilian; West, Adam H C; Yoder, Bruce L; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    We propose angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles as an alternative way to determine the electron mean free path of low energy electrons in solid and liquid materials. The mean free path is obtained from fits of simulated photoemission images to experimental ones over a broad range of different aerosol particle sizes. The principal advantage of the aerosol approach is twofold. Firstly, aerosol photoemission studies can be performed for many different materials, including liquids. Secondly, the size-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectrons can be exploited in addition to size-dependent changes in their kinetic energy. These finite size effects depend in different ways on the mean free path and thus provide more information on the mean free path than corresponding liquid jet, thin film, or bulk data. The present contribution is a proof of principle employing a simple model for the photoemission of electrons and preliminary experimental data for potassium chloride aerosol particles.

  10. ACADEMIC TRAINING: Probing nature with high precision; particle traps, laser spectroscopy and optical combs

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    17, 18, 19 June LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Probing nature with high precision; particle traps, laser spectroscopy and optical combs by G. GABRIELSE / Harvard University, USA Experiments with atomic energy scales probe nature and its symmetries with exquisite precision. Particle traps allow the manipulation of single charged particles for months at a time, allow the most accurate comparison of theory and experiment, and promise to allow better measurement of fundamental quantities like the fine structure constant. Ions and atoms can be probed with lasers that are phase locked to microwave frequency standards via optical combs, thus calibrating optical sources in terms of the official cesium second. A series of three lectures will illustrate what can be measured and discuss key techniques.  ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  11. Particle accelerators and nuclear energy: the challenge of reliability; Acceleradores de particulas y energia nuclear: el desafio de la fiabilidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brucker, R.; Fernandez Ramos, P.

    2011-07-01

    High energy particle accelerators, that used to serve a purpose only in fundamental research, will soon be used in industrial applications of nuclear energy. In this context, they will be submitted to unprecedented (as far as such machines are concerned) reliability requirements. In order to meet them, reliability studies need to be carried out. This article describes the experience gained by Empresarios Agrupados in that field (with the Eurotrans and Ifmif projects) and presents their future activities in the framework of the Myrrha project, that is aimed at building the first ADS reactor in the world. (Author)

  12. Structure, Dynamics, and Assembly of Filamentous Bacteriophages by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opella, Stanley J.; Zeri, Ana Carolina; Park, Sang Ho

    2008-05-01

    Filamentous bacteriophages serve as model systems for the development and implementation of spectroscopic methods suitable for biological supramolecular assemblies. Not only are their coat proteins small and readily prepared in the laboratory, but they also have two primary roles as membrane proteins and as the principal structural element of the virus particles. As a bacterial system, they are readily labeled with stable isotopes, and this has opened possibilities for the many nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies described in this review. In particular, solid-state NMR of aligned samples has been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of both the membrane-bound forms of coat proteins in phospholipid bilayers and structural forms in virus particles, which has led to an analysis of the assembly mechanism for virus particles as they are extruded through the cell membrane.

  13. Information flow and protein dynamics: the interplay between nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Nina; Amero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics, and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells. PMID:25999971

  14. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mozin, Vladimir [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Campbell, Luke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hunt, Alan W. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Reedy, Edward T. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Seipel, Heather A. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Modeling capabilities were added to an existing framework and codes were adapted as needed for analyzing experiments and assessing application-specific assay concepts including simulation of measurements over many short irradiation/spectroscopy cycles. The code package was benchmarked against the data collected at the IAC for small targets and assembly-scale data collected at LANL. A study of delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy for nuclear safeguards was performed for a variety of assemblies in the extensive NGSI spent fuel library. The modeling results indicate that delayed gamma-ray responses can be collected from spent fuel assemblies with statistical quality sufficient for analyzing their isotopic composition using a 1011 n/s neutron generator and COTS detector instrumentation.

  15. Information Flow and Protein Dynamics: the Interplay Between Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina ePastor

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemometrics to identify pine nuts that cause taste disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobler, Helmut; Monakhova, Yulia B; Kuballa, Thomas; Tschiersch, Christopher; Vancutsem, Jeroen; Thielert, Gerhard; Mohring, Arne; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2011-07-13

    Nontargeted 400 MHz (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used in the context of food surveillance to reveal Pinus species whose nuts cause taste disturbance following their consumption, the so-called pine nut syndrome (PNS). Using principal component analysis, three groups of pine nuts were distinguished. PNS-causing products were found in only one of the groups, which however also included some normal products. Sensory analysis was still required to confirm PNS, but NMR allowed the sorting of 53% of 57 samples, which belong to the two groups not containing PNS species. Furthermore, soft independent modeling of class analogy was able to classify the samples between the three groups. NMR spectroscopy was judged as suitable for the screening of pine nuts for PNS. This process may be advantageous as a means of importation control that will allow the identification of samples suitable for direct clearance and those that require further sensory analysis.

  17. Novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium for measurement of spins and moments of exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Takeshi, E-mail: takeshi@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakui, Takashi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Yang, Xiaofei [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Physics, Peking University, Chengfu Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Fujita, Tomomi [Department of Physics, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Imamura, Kei; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tetsuka, Hiroki; Tsutsui, Yoshiki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501,Japan (Japan); Mitsuya, Yosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Ichikawa, Yuichi [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ishibashi, Yoko [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Yoshida, Naoki; Shirai, Hazuki [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ebara, Yuta; Hayasaka, Miki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501,Japan (Japan); Arai, Shino; Muramoto, Sosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Development of a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium. • Observation of the Zeeman resonance with the {sup 85}Rb beam introduced into helium. • Demonstration of deducing the nuclear spins from the observed resonance spectrum. -- Abstract: We have been developing a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method “OROCHI” for determining spins and moments of exotic radioisotopes. In this method, we use superfluid helium as a stopping material of energetic radioisotope beams and then stopped radioisotope atoms are subjected to in situ laser spectroscopy in superfluid helium. To confirm the feasibility of this method for rare radioisotopes, we carried out a test experiment using a {sup 85}Rb beam. In this experiment, we have successfully measured the Zeeman resonance signals from the {sup 85}Rb atoms stopped in superfluid helium by laser-RF double resonance spectroscopy. This method is efficient for the measurement of spins and moments of more exotic nuclei.

  18. In-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes: From atomic physics to nuclear structure

    CERN Multimedia

    Rothe, S

    2014-01-01

    The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source RILIS [1] at the CERN-ISOLDE on-line radioactive ion beam facility is essential for ion beam production for the majority of experiments, but it is also powerful tool for laser spectroscopy of rare isotopes. A series of experiments on in-source laser spectroscopy of polonium isotopes [2, 3] revealed the nuclear ground state properties of 191;211;216;218Po. However, limitations caused by the isobaric background of surface-ionized francium isotopes hindered the study of several neutron rich polonium isotopes. The development of the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) [4] and finally its integration at ISOLDE has led to a dramatic suppression of surface ions. Meanwhile, the RILIS laser spectroscopy capabilities have advanced tremendously. Widely tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) lasers were installed to complement the established dye laser system. Along with a new data acquisition system [5], this more versatile laser setup enabled rst ever laser spectroscopy of the radioact...

  19. Ultra-sensitive in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy for nuclear astrophysics at LUNA

    CERN Document Server

    Caciolli, A; Bemmerer, D; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Confortola, F; Corvisiero, P; Costantini, H; Elekes, Z; Formicola, A; Fülöp, Z; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyurky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Laubenstein, M; Lemut, A; Limata, B; Marta, M; Mazzocchi, C; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P

    2008-01-01

    Ultra-sensitive in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy studies for nuclear astrophysics are performed at the LUNA (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) 400 kV accelerator, deep underground in Italy's Gran Sasso laboratory. By virtue of a specially constructed passive shield, the laboratory gamma-ray background for E_\\gamma < 3 MeV at LUNA has been reduced to levels comparable to those experienced in dedicated offline underground gamma-counting setups. The gamma-ray background induced by an incident alpha-beam has been studied. The data are used to evaluate the feasibility of sensitive in-beam experiments at LUNA and, by extension, at similar proposed facilities.

  20. Use of Nuclear Spin Noise Spectroscopy to Monitor Slow Magnetization Buildup at Millikelvin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Peat, David; Owers‐Bradley, John

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At ultralow temperatures, longitudinal nuclear magnetic relaxation times become exceedingly long and spectral lines are very broad. These facts pose particular challenges for the measurement of NMR spectra and spin relaxation phenomena. Nuclear spin noise spectroscopy is used to monitor proton spin polarization buildup to thermal equilibrium of a mixture of glycerol, water, and copper oxide nanoparticles at 17.5 mK in a static magnetic field of 2.5 T. Relaxation times determined in such a way are essentially free from perturbations caused by excitation radiofrequency pulses, radiation damping, and insufficient excitation bandwidth. The experimental spin‐lattice relaxation times determined on resonance by saturation recovery with spin noise detection are consistently longer than those determined by using pulse excitation. These longer values are in better accordance with the expected field dependence trend than those obtained by on‐resonance experiments with pulsed excitation. PMID:27305629

  1. Heat shock-induced interactions among nuclear HSFs detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Chan-Gi, E-mail: changipack@amc.seoul.kr [Asan Institute for Life Sciences, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sang-Gun [Dept. of Pathology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Seosuk-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    The cellular response to stress is primarily controlled in cells via transcriptional activation by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 is well-known to form homotrimers for activation upon heat shock and subsequently bind to target DNAs, such as heat-shock elements, by forming stress granules. A previous study demonstrated that nuclear HSF1 and HSF2 molecules in live cells interacted with target DNAs on the stress granules. However, the process underlying the binding interactions of HSF family in cells upon heat shock remains unclear. This study demonstrate for the first time that the interaction kinetics among nuclear HSF1, HSF2, and HSF4 upon heat shock can be detected directly in live cells using dual color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS). FCCS analyses indicated that the binding between HSFs was dramatically changed by heat shock. Interestingly, the recovery kinetics of interaction between HSF1 molecules after heat shock could be represented by changes in the relative interaction amplitude and mobility. - Highlights: • The binding interactions among nuclear HSFs were successfully detected. • The binding kinetics between HSF1s during recovery was quantified. • HSF2 and HSF4 strongly formed hetero-complex, even before heat shock. • Nuclear HSF2 and HSF4 bound to HSF1 only after heat shock.

  2. Zero and Ultra-Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Via Optical Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, John Woodland

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is among the most powerful analytical tools available to the chemical and biological sciences for chemical detection, characterization, and structure elucidation. NMR experiments are usually performed in large magnetic fields in order to maximize sensitivity and increase chemical shift resolution. However, the high magnetic fields required for conventional NMR necessitate large, immobile, and expensive superconducting magnets, limiting the use of the technique. New hyperpolarization and non-inductive detection methods have recently allowed for NMR measurements in the inverse regime of extremely low magnetic fields. Whereas a substantial body of research has been conducted in the high-field regime, taking advantage of the efficient coherent control afforded by a spectroscopy dominated by coupling to the spectrometer, the zero- and ultra-low-field (ZULF) regime has remained mostly unexplored. In this dissertation, we investigate the applicability of ZULF-NMR as a novel spectroscopic technique complimentary to high-field NMR. In particular, we consider various aspects of the ZULF-NMR experiment and the dynamics of nuclear spins under various local spin coupling Hamiltonians. We first survey zero-field NMR experiments on systems dominated by the electron-mediated indirect spin-spin coupling (J-coupling). The resulting J-spectra permit precision measurement of chemically relevant information due to the exquisite sensitivity of J-couplings to subtle changes in molecular geometry and electronic structure. We also consider the effects of weak magnetic fields and residual dipolar couplings in anisotropic media, which encode information about nuclear magnetic moments and geometry, and further resolve topological ambiguities by lifting degeneracies. By extending the understanding of the interactions that contribute to ZULF-NMR spectra, this work represents a significant advancement towards a complete description of zero- and ultra

  3. Emission of spherical cesium-bearing particles from an early stage of the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kouji; Kajino, Mizuo; Zaizen, Yuji; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident released radioactive materials into the environment over the entire Northern Hemisphere in March 2011, and the Japanese government is spending large amounts of money to clean up the contaminated residential areas and agricultural fields. However, we still do not know the exact physical and chemical properties of the radioactive materials. This study directly observed spherical Cs-bearing particles emitted during a relatively early stage (March 14-15) of the accident. In contrast to the Cs-bearing radioactive materials that are currently assumed, these particles are larger, contain Fe, Zn, and Cs, and are water insoluble. Our simulation indicates that the spherical Cs-bearing particles mainly fell onto the ground by dry deposition. The finding of the spherical Cs particles will be a key to understand the processes of the accident and to accurately evaluate the health impacts and the residence time in the environment.

  4. Photo-spectroscopy of mixtures of catalyst particles reveals their age and type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerssens, M M; Wilbers, A; Kramer, J; de Peinder, P; Mesu, G; Nelissen, B J; Vogt, E T C; Weckhuysen, B M

    2016-07-01

    Within a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) unit, a mixture of catalyst particles that consist of either zeolite Y (FCC-Y) or ZSM-5 (FCC-ZSM-5) is used in order to boost the propylene yield when processing crude oil fractions. Mixtures of differently aged FCC-Y and FCC-ZSM-5 particles circulating in the FCC unit, the so-called equilibrium catalyst (Ecat), are routinely studied to monitor the overall efficiency of the FCC process. In this study, the age of individual catalyst particles is evaluated based upon photographs after selective staining with substituted styrene molecules. The observed color changes are linked to physical properties, such as the micropore volume and catalytic cracking activity data. Furthermore, it has been possible to determine the relative amount of FCC-Y and FCC-ZSM-5 in an artificial series of physical mixtures as well as in an Ecat sample with unknown composition. As a result, a new practical tool is introduced in the field of zeolite catalysis to evaluate FCC catalyst performances on the basis of photo-spectroscopic measurements with an off-the-shelf digital single lens reflex (DSLR) photo-camera with a macro lens. The results also demonstrate that there is an interesting time and cost trade-off between single catalyst particle studies, as performed with e.g. UV-vis, synchrotron-based IR and fluorescence micro-spectroscopy, and many catalyst particle photo-spectroscopy studies, making use of a relatively simple DSLR photo-camera. The latter approach offers clear prospects for the quality control of e.g. FCC catalyst manufacturing plants.

  5. Measurements of the mass absorption cross section of atmospheric soot particles using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmann, S.; Birmili, W.; Weinhold, K.; Müller, K.; Spindler, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-11-01

    Soot particles are a major absorber of shortwave radiation in the atmosphere. The mass absorption cross section is an essential quantity to describe this light absorption process. This work presents new experimental data on the mass absorption cross section of soot particles in the troposphere over Central Europe. Mass absorption cross sections were derived as the ratio between the light absorption coefficient determined by multiangle absorption photometry (MAAP) and the soot mass concentration determined by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman method is sensitive to graphitic structures present in the particle samples and was calibrated in the laboratory using Printex®90 model particles. Mass absorption cross sections were determined for a number of seven observation sites, ranging between 3.9 and 7.4 m2 g-1depending on measurement site and observational period. The highest values were found in a continentally aged air mass in winter, where soot particles were assumed to be mainly internally mixed. Our values are in the lower range of previously reported values, possibly due to instrumental differences to the former photometer and mass measurements. Overall, a value of 5.3m2 g-1from orthogonal regression over all samples is considered to be representative for the soot mass absorption cross section in the troposphere over Central Europe.

  6. 4-D single particle tracking of synthetic and proteinaceous microspheres reveals preferential movement of nuclear particles along chromatin – poor tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athale Chaitanya

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamics of nuclear organization, nuclear bodies and RNPs in particular has been the focus of many studies. To understand their function, knowledge of their spatial nuclear position and temporal translocation is essential. Typically, such studies generate a wealth of data that require novel methods in image analysis and computational tools to quantitatively track particle movement on the background of moving cells and shape changing nuclei. Results We developed a novel 4-D image processing platform (TIKAL for the work with laser scanning and wide field microscopes. TIKAL provides a registration software for correcting global movements and local deformations of cells as well as 2-D and 3-D tracking software. With this new tool, we studied the dynamics of two different types of nuclear particles, namely nuclear bodies made from GFP-NLS-vimentin and microinjected 0.1 μm – wide polystyrene beads, by live cell time-lapse microscopy combined with single particle tracking and mobility analysis. We now provide a tool for the automatic 3-D analysis of particle movement in parallel with the acquisition of chromatin density data. Conclusions Kinetic analysis revealed 4 modes of movement: confined obstructed, normal diffusion and directed motion. Particle tracking on the background of stained chromatin revealed that particle movement is directly related to local reorganization of chromatin. Further a direct comparison of particle movement in the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm exhibited an entirely different kinetic behaviour of vimentin particles in both compartments. The kinetics of nuclear particles were slightly affected by depletion of ATP and significantly disturbed by disruption of actin and microtubule networks. Moreover, the hydration state of the nucleus had a strong impact on the mobility of nuclear bodies since both normal diffusion and directed motion were entirely abolished when cells were challenged with 0.6 M

  7. Accelerated Detection of Viral Particles by Combining AC Electric Field Effects and Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Robert Tomkins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A detection method that combines electric field-assisted virus capture on antibody-decorated surfaces with the “fingerprinting” capabilities of micro-Raman spectroscopy is demonstrated for the case of M13 virus in water. The proof-of-principle surface mapping of model bioparticles (protein coated polystyrene spheres captured by an AC electric field between planar microelectrodes is presented with a methodology for analyzing the resulting spectra by comparing relative peak intensities. The same principle is applied to dielectrophoretically captured M13 phage particles whose presence is indirectly confirmed with micro-Raman spectroscopy using NeutrAvidin-Cy3 as a labeling molecule. It is concluded that the combination of electrokinetically driven virus sampling and micro-Raman based signal transduction provides a promising approach for time-efficient and in situ detection of viruses.

  8. Application of nuclear particle tracks: A scanning x-ray microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, P.J.

    1991-09-30

    The scanning x-ray microscope (SXM) is a short-wavelength analog of a near-field optical-scanning microscope, promising spatial resolution of {approximately}100{angstrom} up to {approximately}5 keV x-ray energy. A portion of a synchrotron x-ray beam streams through an etched nuclear particle track in an opaque membrane and impinges on an object within the narrow stream. Scattered or transmitted x-rays are detected with a photon counter. The SXM is feasible because a useful number of synchrotron x-rays, even from a bend magnet, will stream through a small diameter pore. The properties and limitations of the SXM are discussed together with other submicroscopic applications of nuclear particle tracks. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Nuclear in-medium effects of strange particles in proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics of strange particles produced in proton induced nuclear reactions near threshold energies has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport model. The in-medium modifications on particle production in dense nuclear matter are considered through corrections on the elementary cross sections via the effective mass and the mean-field potentials. It is found that the attractive antikaon-nucleon potential enhances the subthreshold $\\overline{K}$ production and also influences the structure of inclusive spectra. The strangeness production is strongly suppressed in proton induced reactions in comparison to heavy-ion collisions. The measured K$^{-}$/K$^{+}$ ratios in the $^{12}$C+$^{12}$C and p+$^{12}$C collisions from KaoS collaboration have been well explained with inclusion of the in-medium potentials.

  10. Monitoring lactic acid production during milk fermentation by in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouteille, R; Gaudet, M; Lecanu, B; This, H

    2013-04-01

    When fermenting milk, lactic bacteria convert part of α- and β-lactoses into d- and l- lactic acids, causing a pH decrease responsible for casein coagulation. Lactic acid monitoring during fermentation is essential for the control of dairy gel textural and organoleptic properties, and is a way to evaluate strain efficiency. Currently, titrations are used to follow the quantity of acids formed during jellification of milk but they are not specific to lactic acid. An analytical method without the use of any reagent was investigated to quantify lactic acid during milk fermentation: in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Two methods using in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared: (1) d- and l-lactic acids content determination, using the resonance of their methyl protons, showing an increase from 2.06 ± 0.02 to 8.16 ± 0.74 g/L during 240 min of fermentation; and (2) the determination of the α- and β-lactoses content, decreasing from 42.68 ± 0.02 to 30.76 ± 1.75 g/L for the same fermentation duration. The ratio between the molar concentrations of produced lactic acids and consumed lactoses enabled cross-validation, as the value (2.02 ± 0.18) is consistent with lactic acid bacteria metabolism.

  11. Emission of spherical cesium-bearing particles from an early stage of the Fukushima nuclear accident

    OpenAIRE

    Kouji Adachi; Mizuo Kajino; Yuji Zaizen; Yasuhito Igarashi

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident released radioactive materials into the environment over the entire Northern Hemisphere in March 2011, and the Japanese government is spending large amounts of money to clean up the contaminated residential areas and agricultural fields. However, we still do not know the exact physical and chemical properties of the radioactive materials. This study directly observed spherical Cs-bearing particles emitted during a relatively early stage (March 14–15) of the acci...

  12. Further evidence of nuclear reactions in the Pd/D lattice: emission of charged particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpak, Stanislaw; Mosier-Boss, Pamela A; Gordon, Frank E

    2007-06-01

    Almost two decades ago, Fleischmann and Pons reported excess enthalpy generation in the negatively polarized Pd/D-D2O system, which they attributed to nuclear reactions. In the months and years that followed, other manifestations of nuclear activities in this system were observed, viz. tritium and helium production and transmutation of elements. In this report, we present additional evidence, namely, the emission of highly energetic charged particles emitted from the Pd/D electrode when this system is placed in either an external electrostatic or magnetostatic field. The density of tracks registered by a CR-39 detector was found to be of a magnitude that provides undisputable evidence of their nuclear origin. The experiments were reproducible. A model based upon electron capture is proposed to explain the reaction products observed in the Pd/D-D2O system.

  13. Automatic track recognition for large-angle minimum ionizing particles in nuclear emulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Fukuda, T; Ishida, H; Matsumoto, T; Matsuo, T; Mikado, S; Nishimura, S; Ogawa, S; Shibuya, H; Sudou, J; Ariga, A; Tufanli, S

    2014-01-01

    We previously developed an automatic track scanning system which enables the detection of large-angle nuclear fragments in the nuclear emulsion films of the OPERA experiment. As a next step, we have investigated this system's track recognition capability for large-angle minimum ionizing particles $(1.0 \\leq |tan \\theta| \\leq 3.5)$. This paper shows that, for such tracks, the system has a detection efficiency of 95$\\%$ or higher and reports the achieved angular accuracy of the automatically recognized tracks. This technology is of general purpose and will likely contribute not only to various analyses in the OPERA experiment, but also to future experiments, e.g. on low-energy neutrino and hadron interactions, or to future research on cosmic rays using nuclear emulsions carried by balloons.

  14. Charged particle-induced nuclear fission reactions – Progress and prospects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Kailas; K Mahata

    2014-12-01

    The nuclear fission phenomenon continues to be an enigma, even after nearly 75 years of its discovery. Considerable progress has been made towards understanding the fission process. Both light projectiles and heavy ions have been employed to investigate nuclear fission. An extensive database of the properties of fissionable nuclei has been generated. The theoretical developments to describe the fission phenomenon have kept pace with the progress in the corresponding experimental measurements. As the fission process initiated by the neutrons has been well documented, the present article will be restricted to charged particle-induced fission reactions. The progress made in recent years and the prospects in the area of nuclear fission research will be the focus of this review.

  15. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a new approach to study humic material?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knicker, Heike; Lange, Sascha; van Rossum, Barth; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Compared to solution NMR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectra suffer from broad resonance lines and low resolution. This could be overcome by the use of 2-dimenstional solid-state NMR pulse sequences. Until recently, this approach has been unfeasible as a routine tool in soil chemistry, mainly because of the low NMR sensitivity of the respective samples. A possibility to circumvent those sensitivity problems represents high-field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR spectroscopy (Barnes et al., 2008), allowing considerable signal enhancements (Akbey et al., 2010). This is achieved by a microwave-driven transfer of polarization from a paramagnetic center to nuclear spins. Application of DNP to MAS spectra of biological systems (frozen solutions) showed enhancements of the factor 40 to 50 (Hall et al., 1997). Enhancements of this magnitude, thus may enable the use of at least some of the 2D solid-state NMR techniques that are presently already applied for pure proteins but are difficult to apply to soil peptides in their complex matrix. After adjusting the required acquisition parameters to the system "soil organic matter", lower but still promising enhancement factors were achieved. Additional optimization was performed and allowed the acquisition of 2D 13C and 15N solid-state NMR spectra of humified 13C and 15N enriched plant residues. Within the present contribution, the first solid-state DNP NMR spectra of humic material are presented. Those data demonstrate the great potential of this approach which certainly opens new doors for a better understanding of biochemical processes in soils, sediments and water. Akbey, Ü., Franks, W.T., Linden, A., Lange, S., Griffin, R.G., van Rossum, B.-J., Oschkinat, H., 2010. Dynamic nuclear polarization of deuterated proteins. Angewandte Chemie International Edition 49, 7803-7806. Barnes, A.B., De Paëpe, G., van der Wel, P.C.A., Hu, K.N., Joo, C.G., Bajaj, V.S., Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L., Sirigiri, J.R., Herzfeld, J

  16. Self-healing capacity of nuclear glass observed by NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, Thibault; Martel, Laura; Mir, Anamul H.; Somers, Joseph; Jégou, Christophe; Peuget, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    Safe management of high level nuclear waste is a worldwide significant issue for which vitrification has been selected by many countries. There exists a crucial need for improving our understanding of the ageing of the glass under irradiation. While external irradiation by ions provides a rapid simulation of damage induced by alpha decays, short lived actinide doping is more representative of the reality. Here, we report radiological NMR experiments to compare the damage in International Simplified Glass (ISG) when irradiated by these two methods. In the 0.1 mole percent 244Cm doped glass, accumulation of high alpha decay only shows small modifications of the local structure, in sharp contrast to heavy ion irradiation. These results reveal the ability of the alpha particle to partially repair the damage generated by the heavy recoil nuclei highlighting the radiation resistance of nuclear glass and the difficulty to accurately simulate its behaviour by single ion beam irradiations.

  17. Gold micro- and nano-particles for surface enhanced vibrational spectroscopy of pyridostigmine bromide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Fesenko, Olena; Kavelin, Vladyslav

    2017-01-01

    Triangular gold microprisms and spherical silica nanoparticles with attached gold nano-islands were examined as an active nanostructures for the surface enhanced Raman and infrared spectroscopy. These particles were probed for the detection of pyridostigmine bromide as a safe analog of military...... compound sarin. Raman and infrared spectral bands of the pyridostigmine bromide were measured. Detailed correlation of obtained spectral bands with specific vibrations in pyridostigmine bromide was done. Silica nanoparticles with attached gold nano-islands showed more essential enhancement of the Raman...

  18. Magnetic particle spectroscopy allows precise quantification of nanoparticles after passage through human brain microvascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, C.; Slabu, I.; Wiekhorst, F.; Bergemann, C.; von Eggeling, F.; Hochhaus, A.; Trahms, L.; Clement, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Crossing the blood-brain barrier is an urgent requirement for the treatment of brain disorders. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are a promising tool as carriers for therapeutics because of their physical properties, biocompatibility, and their biodegradability. In order to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles with endothelial cell layers in detail, in vitro systems are of great importance. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells are a well-suited blood-brain barrier model. Apart from generating optimal conditions for the barrier-forming cell units, the accurate detection and quantification of SPIONs is a major challenge. For that purpose we use magnetic particle spectroscopy to sensitively and directly quantify the SPION-specific iron content. We could show that SPION concentration depends on incubation time, nanoparticle concentration and location. This model system allows for further investigations on particle uptake and transport at cellular barriers with regard to parameters including particles’ shape, material, size, and coating.

  19. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of ovarian cyst fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, E A; Moolenaar, S H; Massuger, L F; Boonstra, H; Engelke, U F; de Jong, J G; Wevers, R A

    2000-08-01

    Most ovarian tumors are cystic structures containing variable amounts of fluid. Several studies of ovarian cyst fluid focus on one specific metabolite using conventional assay systems. We examined the potential of (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in evaluation of the overall metabolic composition of cyst fluid from different ovarian tumors. Ovarian cyst fluid samples obtained from 40 patients with a primary ovarian tumor (12 malignant and 28 benign) were examined. After deproteinization and pD standardization, we performed (1)H-NMR spectroscopy on a 600 MHz instrument. With (1)H-NMR spectroscopy we found detectable concentrations of 36 metabolites with high intersample variation. A number of unassigned resonances as well as unexpected metabolites were found. We introduce an overall inventory of the low-molecular-weight metabolites in ovarian cyst fluid with corresponding resonances. Significant differences in concentration (p overview of low-molecular-weight proton-containing metabolities present in ovarian cyst fluid samples. The metabolic composition of cyst fluid differs significantly between benign and malignant ovarian tumors. Furthermore, differences between benign subgroups possibly related to histopathological behaviour can be detected. The presence of N-acetyl aspartic acid and 5-oxoproline exclusively in serous cystadenoma samples is remarkable. Future studies will concentrate on these findings and explore the possibilities of extrapolating information from the in vitro studies to in vivo practice, in which metabolic differences between malignant and benign subtypes can be of great importance in a pre-operative phase.

  20. Internet accessible hot cell with gamma spectroscopy at the Missouri S and T nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Edwin [Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 203 Fulton Hall, 300 W. 13th St., Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Mueller, Gary, E-mail: gmueller@mst.edu [Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 203 Fulton Hall, 300 W. 13th St., Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Castano, Carlos; Usman, Shoaib; Kumar, Arvind [Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 203 Fulton Hall, 300 W. 13th St., Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > A dual-chambered internet-accessible heavily shielded facility has been built. > The facility allows distance users to analyze neutron irradiated samples remotely. > The Missouri S and T system uses computer automation with user feedback. > The system can analyze multiple samples and assist several researchers concurrently. - Abstract: A dual-chambered internet-accessible heavily shielded facility with pneumatic access to the University of Missouri Science and Technology (Missouri S and T) 200 kW Research Nuclear Reactor (MSTR) core has been built and is currently available for irradiation and analysis of samples. The facility allows authorized distance users engaged in collaborative activities with Missouri S and T to remotely manipulate and analyze neutron irradiated samples. The system consists of two shielded compartments, one for multiple sample storage, and the other dedicated exclusively for radiation measurements and spectroscopy. The second chamber has multiple detector ports, with graded shielding, and has the capability to support gamma spectroscopy using radiation detectors such as an HPGe detector. Both these chambers are connected though a rapid pneumatic system with access to the MSTR nuclear reactor core. This new internet-based system complements the MSTR's current bare pneumatic tube (BPT) and cadmium lined pneumatic tube (CPT) facilities. The total transportation time between the core and the hot cell, for samples weighing 10 g, irradiated in the MSTR core, is roughly 3.0 s. This work was funded by the DOE grant number DE-FG07-07ID14852 and expands the capabilities of teaching and research at the MSTR. It allows individuals who do not have on-site access to a nuclear reactor facility to remotely participate in research and educational activities.

  1. Experimental evidence of independence of nuclear de-channeling length on the particle charge sign

    CERN Document Server

    Bagli, E; Mazzolari, A; Bandiera, L; Germogli, G; Sytov, A I; De Salvador, D; Berra, A; Prest, M; Vallazza, E

    2016-01-01

    Under coherent interactions, particles undergo correlated collisions with the crystal lattice and their motion result in confinement in the fields of atomic planes, i.e. particle channeling. Other than coherently interacting with the lattice, particles also suffer incoherent interactions with individual nuclei and may leave their bounded motion, i.e., they de-channel. This latter is the main limiting factor for applications of coherent interactions in crystal-assisted particle steering. We experimentally investigated the nature of dechanneling of 120 GeV/c $e^{-}$ and $e^{+}$ in a bent silicon crystal at H4-SPS external line at CERN. We found out that while channeling efficiency differs significantly for $e^{-}$ ($4\\pm2$ $\\%$) and $e^{+}$ ($53\\pm2$ $\\%$), their nuclear dechanneling length is comparable, $(0.7\\pm0.1)$ mm for $e^{-}$ and $(0.85\\pm0.15)$ mm for $e^{+}$. The experimental proof of the equality of the nuclear dechanneling length for positrons and electrons is interpreted in terms of similar dynamic...

  2. Detection of tire tread particles using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prochazka, David, E-mail: prochazka.d@fme.vutbr.cz [Brno University of Technology, Institute of Physical Engineering, Technická 2, 616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Brno University of Technology, Central European Institute of Technology, Technická 3058/10, CZ-616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Bilík, Martin [Brno University of Technology, Institute of Forensic Engineering, Údolní 244/53, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Prochazková, Petra [Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Kamenice 735/5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Klus, Jakub; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Jan [Brno University of Technology, Central European Institute of Technology, Technická 3058/10, CZ-616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Novotný, Karel [Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Kamenice 735/5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Brno University of Technology, Central European Institute of Technology, Technická 3058/10, CZ-616 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Ticová, Barbora [Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Kamenice 735/5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Bradáč, Albert; Semela, Marek [Brno University of Technology, Institute of Forensic Engineering, Údolní 244/53, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); and others

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this paper is a study of the potential of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for detection of tire tread particles. Tire tread particles may represent pollutants; simultaneously, it is potentially possible to exploit detection of tire tread particles for identification of optically imperceptible braking tracks at locations of road accidents. The paper describes the general composition of tire treads and selection of an element suitable for detection using the LIBS method. Subsequently, the applicable spectral line is selected considering interferences with lines of elements that might be present together with the detected particles, and optimization of measurement parameters such as incident laser energy, gate delay and gate width is performed. In order to eliminate the matrix effect, measurements were performed using 4 types of tires manufactured by 3 different producers. An adhesive tape was used as a sample carrier. The most suitable adhesive tape was selected from 5 commonly available tapes, on the basis of their respective LIBS spectra. Calibration standards, i.e. an adhesive tape with different area content of tire tread particles, were prepared for the selected tire. A calibration line was created on the basis of the aforementioned calibration standards. The linear section of this line was used for determination of the detection limit value applicable to the selected tire. Considering the insignificant influence of matrix of various types of tires, it is possible to make a simple recalculation of the detection limit value on the basis of zinc content in a specific tire. - Highlights: • LIBS experimental measurement parameters for tire tread particles were optimize. • Calibration curve was prepared. • Limit of detection was determined.

  3. Study of a Particle Based Films Cure Process by High-Frequency Eddy Current Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Patsora

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Particle-based films are today an important part of various designs and they are implemented in structures as conductive parts, i.e., conductive paste printing in the manufacture of Li-ion batteries, solar cells or resistive paste printing in IC. Recently, particle based films were also implemented in the 3D printing technique, and are particularly important for use in aircraft, wind power, and the automotive industry when incorporated onto the surface of composite structures for protection against damages caused by a lightning strike. A crucial issue for the lightning protection area is to realize films with high homogeneity of electrical resistance where an in-situ noninvasive method has to be elaborated for quality monitoring to avoid undesirable financial and time costs. In this work the drying process of particle based films was investigated by high-frequency eddy current (HFEC spectroscopy in order to work out an automated in-situ quality monitoring method with a focus on the electrical resistance of the films. Different types of particle based films deposited on dielectric and carbon fiber reinforced plastic substrates were investigated in the present study and results show that the HFEC method offers a good opportunity to monitor the overall drying process of particle based films. Based on that, an algorithm was developed, allowing prediction of the final electrical resistance of the particle based films throughout the drying process, and was successfully implemented in a prototype system based on the EddyCus® HFEC device platform presented in this work. This prototype is the first solution for a portable system allowing HFEC measurement on huge and uneven surfaces.

  4. Normal mode analysis of pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin via nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) and resonance raman spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Y.; Wang, H.; George, S.J.; Smith, M.C.; Adams, M.W.W.; Jenney, F.E., Jr.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E.E.; Zhao, J.; Yoda, Y.; Dey, A.; Solomon, E.I.; Cramer, S.P.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS); Univ. of California; LBNL; Stanford Univ.; Univ. of Georgia; SPring-8

    2005-10-26

    We have used {sup 57}Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study the Fe(S{sub cys})4 site in reduced and oxidized rubredoxin (Rd) from Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf). The oxidized form has also been investigated by resonance Raman spectroscopy. In the oxidized Rd NRVS, strong asymmetric Fe-S stretching modes are observed between 355 and 375 cm{sup -1}; upon reduction these modes shift to 300-320 cm{sup -1}. This is the first observation of Fe-S stretching modes in a reduced Rd. The peak in S-Fe-S bend mode intensity is at {approx}150 cm{sup -1} for the oxidized protein and only slightly lower in the reduced case. A third band occurs near 70 cm{sup -1} for both samples; this is assigned primarily as a collective motion of entire cysteine residues with respect to the central Fe. The {sup 57}Fe partial vibrational density of states (PVDOS) were interpreted by normal mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields. The three main bands were qualitatively reproduced using a D{sub 2d} Fe(SC){sub 4} model. A C{sub 1} Fe(SCC){sub 4} model based on crystallographic coordinates was then used to simulate the splitting of the asymmetric stretching band into at least 3 components. Finally, a model employing complete cysteines and 2 additional neighboring atoms was used to reproduce the detailed structure of the PVDOS in the Fe-S stretch region. These results confirm the delocalization of the dynamic properties of the redox-active Fe site. Depending on the molecular model employed, the force constant KFe-S for Fe-S stretching modes ranged from 1.24 to 1.32 mdyn/Angstrom. KFe-S is clearly diminished in reduced Rd; values from {approx}0.89 to 1.00 mdyn/Angstrom were derived from different models. In contrast, in the final models the force constants for S-Fe-S bending motion, HS-Fe-S, were 0.18 mdyn/Angstrom for oxidized Rd and 0.15 mdyn/Angstrom for reduced Rd. The NRVS technique demonstrates great promise for the observation and quantitative

  5. Climate effects of a hypothetical regional nuclear war: Sensitivity to emission duration and particle composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Lindvall, Jenny; Ekman, Annica M. L.; Svensson, Gunilla

    2016-11-01

    Here, we use a coupled atmospheric-ocean-aerosol model to investigate the plume development and climate effects of the smoke generated by fires following a regional nuclear war between emerging third-world nuclear powers. We simulate a standard scenario where 5 Tg of black carbon (BC) is emitted over 1 day in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere. However, it is likely that the emissions from the fires ignited by bomb detonations include a substantial amount of particulate organic matter (POM) and that they last more than 1 day. We therefore test the sensitivity of the aerosol plume and climate system to the BC/POM ratio (1:3, 1:9) and to the emission length (1 day, 1 week, 1 month). We find that in general, an emission length of 1 month substantially reduces the cooling compared to the 1-day case, whereas taking into account POM emissions notably increases the cooling and the reduction of precipitation associated with the nuclear war during the first year following the detonation. Accounting for POM emissions increases the particle size in the short-emission-length scenarios (1 day/1 week), reducing the residence time of the injected particle. While the initial cooling is more intense when including POM emission, the long-lasting effects, while still large, may be less extreme compared to the BC-only case. Our study highlights that the emission altitude reached by the plume is sensitive to both the particle type emitted by the fires and the emission duration. Consequently, the climate effects of a nuclear war are strongly dependent on these parameters.

  6. Applications of LaBr3(Ce) Gamma-ray Spectrometer Arrays for Nuclear Spectroscopy and Radionuclide Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, PH; Shearman, R.; Daniel, T.; Lorusso, G.; Collins, SM; Judge, SM; Bell; Pearce, AK; Gurgi, LA; Rudigier, M.; Podolyák, Zs; Mărginean, N.; Mărginean, R.; Kisyov, S.

    2016-10-01

    An overview of the use of discrete energy gamma-ray detectors based on cerium- doped LaBr3 scintillators for use in nuclear spectroscopy is presented. This review includes recent applications of such detectors in mixed, 'hybrid' gamma-ray coincidence detection arrays such ROSPHERE at IFIN-HH, Bucharest; EXILL+FATIMA at ILL Grenoble, France; GAMMASPHERE+FATIMA at Argonne National Laboratory, USA; FATIMA + EURICA, at RIKEN, Japan; and the National Nuclear Array (NANA) at the UK's National Physical Laboratory. This conference paper highlights the capabilities and limitations of using these sub-nanosecond 'fast-timing', medium-resolution gamma-ray detectors for both nuclear structure research and radionuclide standardisation. Potential future application of such coincidence scintillator arrays in measurements of civilian nuclear fuel waste evaluation and assay is demonstrated using coincidence spectroscopy of a mixed 134,7Cs source.

  7. RADIOACTIVE POLLUTION ESTIMATE FOR FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR POWER PLANT BY A PARTICLE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Saito

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available On Mar 12, 2011, very wide radioactive pollution occurred by a hydrogen explosion in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. A large amount of radioisotopes started with four times of explosions. With traditional atmospheric diffusion models could not reconstruct radioactive pollution in Fukushima. Then, with a particle model, this accident was reconstructed from meteorological archive and Radar- AMeDAS. Calculations with the particle model were carried out for Mar 12, 15, 18 and 20 when east southeast winds blew for five hours continuously. Meteorological archive is expressed by wind speeds and directions in five-km grid every hour with eight classes of height till 3000 m. Radar- AMeDAS is precipitation data in one-km grid every thirty minutes. Particles are ten scales of 0.01 to 0.1 mm in diameter with specific weight of 2.65 and vertical speeds given by Stokes equation. But, on Mar 15, it rained from 16:30 and then the particles fell down at a moment as wet deposit in calculation. On the other hand, the altitudes on the ground were given by DEM with 1 km-grid. The spatial dose by emitted radioisotopes was referred to the observation data at monitoring posts of Tokyo Electric Power Company. The falling points of radioisotopes were expressed on the map using the particle model. As a result, the same distributions were obtained as the surface spatial dose of radioisotopes in aero-monitoring by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. Especially, on Mar 15, the simulated pollution fitted to the observation, which extended to the northwest of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and caused mainly sever pollution. By the particle model, the falling positions on the ground were estimated each particle size. Particles with more than 0.05 mm of size were affected by the topography and blocked by the mountains with the altitudes of more than 700 m. The particle model does not include the atmospheric stability, the source height, and

  8. Radioactive Pollution Estimate for Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant by a Particle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Keisuke; Ogawa, Susumu

    2016-06-01

    On Mar 12, 2011, very wide radioactive pollution occurred by a hydrogen explosion in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. A large amount of radioisotopes started with four times of explosions. With traditional atmospheric diffusion models could not reconstruct radioactive pollution in Fukushima. Then, with a particle model, this accident was reconstructed from meteorological archive and Radar- AMeDAS. Calculations with the particle model were carried out for Mar 12, 15, 18 and 20 when east southeast winds blew for five hours continuously. Meteorological archive is expressed by wind speeds and directions in five-km grid every hour with eight classes of height till 3000 m. Radar- AMeDAS is precipitation data in one-km grid every thirty minutes. Particles are ten scales of 0.01 to 0.1 mm in diameter with specific weight of 2.65 and vertical speeds given by Stokes equation. But, on Mar 15, it rained from 16:30 and then the particles fell down at a moment as wet deposit in calculation. On the other hand, the altitudes on the ground were given by DEM with 1 km-grid. The spatial dose by emitted radioisotopes was referred to the observation data at monitoring posts of Tokyo Electric Power Company. The falling points of radioisotopes were expressed on the map using the particle model. As a result, the same distributions were obtained as the surface spatial dose of radioisotopes in aero-monitoring by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. Especially, on Mar 15, the simulated pollution fitted to the observation, which extended to the northwest of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and caused mainly sever pollution. By the particle model, the falling positions on the ground were estimated each particle size. Particles with more than 0.05 mm of size were affected by the topography and blocked by the mountains with the altitudes of more than 700 m. The particle model does not include the atmospheric stability, the source height, and deposit speeds. The

  9. Particle swarm optimization with random keys applied to the nuclear reactor reload problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneses, Anderson Alvarenga de Moura [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Fundacao Educacional de Macae (FUNEMAC), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade Professor Miguel Angelo da Silva Santos; Machado, Marcelo Dornellas; Medeiros, Jose Antonio Carlos Canedo; Schirru, Roberto [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mails: ameneses@con.ufrj.br; marcelo@lmp.ufrj.br; canedo@lmp.ufrj.br; schirru@lmp.ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    In 1995, Kennedy and Eberhart presented the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), an Artificial Intelligence metaheuristic technique to optimize non-linear continuous functions. The concept of Swarm Intelligence is based on the socials aspects of intelligence, it means, the ability of individuals to learn with their own experience in a group as well as to take advantage of the performance of other individuals. Some PSO models for discrete search spaces have been developed for combinatorial optimization, although none of them presented satisfactory results to optimize a combinatorial problem as the nuclear reactor fuel reloading problem (NRFRP). In this sense, we developed the Particle Swarm Optimization with Random Keys (PSORK) in previous research to solve Combinatorial Problems. Experiences demonstrated that PSORK performed comparable to or better than other techniques. Thus, PSORK metaheuristic is being applied in optimization studies of the NRFRP for Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant. Results will be compared with Genetic Algorithms and the manual method provided by a specialist. In this experience, the problem is being modeled for an eight-core symmetry and three-dimensional geometry, aiming at the minimization of the Nuclear Enthalpy Power Peaking Factor as well as the maximization of the cycle length. (author)

  10. Nature versus nurture: functional assessment of restoration effects on wetland services using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundareshwar, P.V.; Richardson, C.J.; Gleason, R.A.; Pellechia, P.J.; Honomichl, S.

    2009-01-01

    Land-use change has altered the ability of wetlands to provide vital services such as nutrient retention. While compensatory practices attempt to restore degraded wetlands and their functions, it is difficult to evaluate the recovery of soil biogeochemical functions that are critical for restoration of ecosystem services. Using solution 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, we examined the chemical forms of phosphorus (P) in soils from wetlands located across a land-use gradient. We report that soil P diversity, a functional attribute, was lowest in farmland, and greatest in native wetlands. Soil P diversity increased with age of restoration, indicating restoration of biogeochemical function. The trend in soil P diversity was similar to documented trends in soil bacterial taxonomic composition but opposite that of soil bacterial diversity at our study sites. These findings provide insights into links between ecosystem structure and function and provide a tool for evaluating the success of ecosystem restoration efforts. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Reactive surface organometallic complexes observed using dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Pump, Eva

    2016-08-15

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy (DNP SENS) is an emerging technique that allows access to high-sensitivity NMR spectra from surfaces. However, DNP SENS usually requires the use of radicals as an exogenous source of polarization, which has so far limited applications for organometallic surface species to those that do not react with the radicals. Here we show that reactive surface species can be studied if they are immobilized inside porous materials with suitably small windows, and if bulky nitroxide bi-radicals (here TEKPol) are used as the polarization source and which cannot enter the pores. The method is demonstrated by obtaining significant DNP enhancements from highly reactive complelxes [(equivalent to Si-O-)W(Me)(5)] supported on MCM-41, and effects of pore size (6.0, 3.0 and 2.5 nm) on the performance are discussed.

  12. Dynamics of ferrocene in molecular sieves probed by Mossbauer spectroscopy and nuclear resonant scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asthalter, T [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitat Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Sergueev, I [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Buerck, U van; Wagner, F E [Experimentalphysik E13, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Haerter, P [Anorganische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Kornatowski, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, D-45470 Muelheim (Germany); Klingelhoefer, S; Behrens, P, E-mail: t.asthalter@ipc.uni-stuttgart.d [Anorganische Chemie, Leibniz-Universitaet Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2010-03-01

    A detailed study on the slow dynamics of ferrocene in the unidimensional channels of the molecular sieves SSZ-24 and AlPO{sub 4}-5 has been carried out, using Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS), nuclear forward scattering (NFS) and synchrotron radiation-based perturbed angular correlations (SRPAC). In both host systems, anisotropic rotational dynamics is observed above 100 K. For SSZ-24, this anisotropy persists even above the bulk melting temperature of ferrocene. Various theoretical models are exploited for the study of anisotropic discrete jump rotations for the first time. The experimental data can be described fairly well by a jump model that involves reorientations of the molecular axis on a cone mantle with an opening angle dependant on temperature.

  13. High-performance gamma spectroscopy for equipment retrieval from Hanford high-level nuclear waste tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Gary L.; Hillesand, K. E.; Goodwin, S. G.; Kessler, S. F.; Killian, E. W.; Legare, D.; Nelson, Joseph V., Jr.; Richard, R. F.; Nordquist, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The cleanup of high level defense nuclear waste at the Hanford site presents several progressive challenges. Among these is the removal and disposal of various components from buried active waste tanks to allow new equipment insertion or hazards mitigation. A unique automated retrieval system at the tank provides for retrieval, high pressure washing, inventory measurement, and containment for disposal. Key to the inventory measurement is a three detector HPGe high performance gamma spectroscopy system capable of recovering data at up to ninety per cent saturation (200,000 counts per second). Data recovery is based on a unique embedded electronic pulser and specialized software to report the inventory. Each of the detectors have different shielding specified through Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP program. This shielding provides performance over a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude. System description, calibration issues and operational experiences are discussed.

  14. Nuclear structure corrections for μ4He+ and μ3He+ spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo Dinur, Nir; Ji, Chen; Hernandez, Oscar; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-09-01

    The proton charge radius was recently determined from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy with tenfold improved precision but 7 . 9 σ disagreement with the accepted value, leading to the ``proton radius puzzle''. To further investigate, and to obtain precise radii, these measurements were repeated in μ4He+ and μ3He+. This may also shed light on the discrepancy between isotope-shift measurements of the 4He -3He radius difference. However, the precision of radii determined from the muonic experiments is limited by the uncertainties in the nuclear structure corrections. We present first ab-initio calculations of these corrections that reduced the uncertainties from 20 % to the few percent goal. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada. This work was supported in parts by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (Grant Number SAPIN-2015-00031).

  15. Nuclear moments of neutron-deficient iridium isotopes from laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Verney, D; Cabaret, L A; Crawford, J; Duong, H T; Genevey, J; Huber, G; Ibrahim, F; Krieg, M; Lee, J K P; Lunney, M D; Obert, J; Oms, J; Pinard, J; Putaux, J C; Roussière, B; Sauvage, J; Sebastian, V

    2000-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy measurements have been performed on neutron- deficient iridium isotopes. The hyperfine structure and isotope shift of the optical Ir I transition 5d/sup 7/6s/sup 2/ /sup 4/F/sub 9/2/ to 5d/sup 7/6s6p /sup 6/F/sub 11/2/ at 351.5 nm have been studied for the /sup 182-189/Ir, /sup 186/Ir/sup m/ and /sup 191,193/Ir isotopes. The nuclear magnetic and quadrupole moments were obtained from the HFS measurements and the changes of the mean square charge radii from the IS measurements. A large mean square charge radius change between /sup 187/Ir and /sup 186/Ir and between /sup 186/Ir/sup m/ and /sup 186/Ir/sup g/ has been observed. (18 refs).

  16. Communication: Vibrational and vibronic coherences in the two dimensional spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, Julian; Falge, Mirjam; Hildenbrand, Heiko; Engel, Volker [Universität Würzburg, Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Emil-Fischer-Str. 42, Campus Nord, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany); Gomez, Sandra; Sola, Ignacio R. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-28

    We theoretically investigate the photon-echo spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear quantum dynamics. Two situations are treated. In the first case, the Born-Oppenheimer (adiabatic) approximation holds. It is then possible to interpret the two-dimensional (2D) spectra in terms of vibrational motion taking place in different electronic states. In particular, pure vibrational coherences which are related to oscillations in the time-dependent third-order polarization can be identified. This concept fails in the second case, where strong non-adiabatic coupling leads to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-approximation. Then, the 2D-spectra reveal a complicated vibronic structure and vibrational coherences cannot be disentangled from the electronic motion.

  17. Registration of alpha particles in Makrofol-E nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rammah, Y.S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University, Shebin El-Koom (Egypt); Abdalla, Ayman M., E-mail: aymanabdalla62@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Najran University, P. O. Box. 11001, Najran (Saudi Arabia); Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Najran University (Saudi Arabia); Ashraf, O., E-mail: osama.ashraf@edu.asu.edu.eg [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11575 (Egypt); Ashry, A.H. [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11575 (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Makrofol-E detectors have been irradiated with alpha particles and fission fragments. • Fast detection of alpha particles in Makrofol-E detectors. • Bulk etching rate was calculated from fission track diameters. - Abstract: Fast detection of alpha particles in the range from 1 to 5 MeV in Makrofol-E polycarbonate nuclear track detectors (PCTDs) using a new chemical etchant was investigated. {sup 252}Cf and {sup 241}Am-thin open sources were used for irradiating Makrofol-E detectors with fission fragments and alpha particles in air at normal pressure and temperature (NPT). A chain of experimental work has been carried out using new etchants to register alpha particle in short time in Makrofol-E polycarbonate detectors. The etching efficiency were exhibited a clear dependence on the amount of methanol in the etching solution and etching time. The optimized chemical condition obtained at this stage of development for 200 μm Makrofol-E detectors are (8 ml of 10 N NaOH + 2 ml CH{sub 3}OH) etching solutions at 60 °C for 3 h. In this study; it is possible to observe energy detection windows for Makrofol-E detectors according to applied etching duration. Makrofol-E introduced the characteristic Bragg peak, which indicates the advantages of this detector as alpha spectrometer. Consequently, the suggested new etchant can be developed for heavy ions detection and monitoring radon levels and its daughters.

  18. Particle Physics Models for the 17 MeV Anomaly in Beryllium Nuclear Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Jonathan L; Galon, Iftah; Gardner, Susan; Smolinsky, Jordan; Tait, Tim M P; Tanedo, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The 6.8$\\sigma$ anomaly in excited 8Be nuclear decays via internal pair creation is fit well by a new particle interpretation. In a previous analysis, we showed that a 17 MeV protophobic gauge boson provides a particle physics explanation of the anomaly consistent with all existing constraints. Here we begin with a review of the physics of internal pair creation in 8Be decays and the characteristics of the observed anomaly. To develop its particle interpretation, we provide an effective operator analysis for excited 8Be decays to particles with a variety of spins and parities and show that these considerations exclude simple models with scalar or pseudoscalar particles. We discuss the required couplings for a gauge boson to give the observed signal, highlighting the significant dependence on the precise mass of the boson and isospin mixing and breaking effects. We present anomaly-free extensions of the Standard Model that contain protophobic gauge bosons with the desired couplings to explain the 8Be anomaly. ...

  19. Device for fracturing silicon-carbide coatings on nuclear-fuel particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, L.J.; Willey, M.G.; Tiegs, S.M.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

    This invention is a device for fracturing particles. It is designed especially for use in hot cells designed for the handling of radioactive materials. In a typical application, the device is used to fracture a hard silicon-carbide coating present on carbon-matrix microspheres containing nuclear-fuel materials, such as uranium or thorium compounds. To promote remote control and facilitate maintenance, the particle breaker is pneumatically operated and contains no moving parts. It includes means for serially entraining the entrained particles on an anvil housed in a leak-tight chamber. The flow rate of the gas is at a value effecting fracture of the particles; preferably, it is at a value fracturing them into product particulates of fluidizable size. The chamber is provided with an outlet passage whose cross-sectional area decreases in the direction away from the chamber. The outlet is connected tangentially to a vertically oriented vortex-flow separator for recovering the product particulates entrained in the gas outflow from the chamber. The invention can be used on a batch or continuous basis to fracture the silicon-carbide coatings on virtually all of the particles fed thereto.

  20. Report from IPNS research plan committee on particle and nuclear physics studies at JHF 50-GeV proton synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Enyo, H; Okada, Y

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the evaluations and suggestions of IPNS research programs for JHF 50-GeV proton synchrotron. The following subjects are described: the role of JHF for particle and nuclear physics, neutrino oscillation experiment, physics of rare decay K(+) and high intense muon sources, strangeness nuclear physics, experiments of hadron physics and antiproton science experiments. (J.P.N.)

  1. Properties of baculovirus particles displaying GFP analyzed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivola, Jouni; Ojala, Kirsi; Michel, Patrik O; Vuento, Matti; Oker-Blom, Christian

    2002-12-01

    Recombinant baculovirus particles displaying green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the major envelope glycoprotein gp64 of the Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) were characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). FCS detected Brownian motion of single, intact recombinant baculovirus display particles with a diffusion coefficient (D) of (2.89 +/- 0.74) x 10(-8) cm2s(-1) and an apparent hydrodynamic radius of 83.35 +/- 21.22 nm. In the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Triton X-100, and octylglucoside, the diffusion time was reduced to the 0.2 ms range (D = 7.57 x 10(-7) cm2s(-1)), showing that the fusion proteins were anchored in the viral envelope. This allowed for a calculation of the number of single gp64 fusion proteins incorporated in the viral membrane. A mean value of 3.2 fluorescent proteins per virus particle was obtained. Our results show that FCS is the method of choice for studying enveloped viruses such as a display virus with one component being GFP.

  2. Chemical characterization of single micro- and nano-particles by optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, Francisco J.; Fernández-Bravo, Angel; Javier Laserna, J.

    2014-10-01

    Spectral identification of individual micro- and nano-sized particles by the sequential intervention of optical catapulting, optical trapping and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is presented. The three techniques are used for different purposes. Optical catapulting (OC) serves to put the particulate material under inspection in aerosol form. Optical trapping (OT) permits the isolation and manipulation of individual particles from the aerosol, which are subsequently analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Once catapulted, the dynamics of particle trapping depends both on the laser beam characteristics (power and intensity gradient) and on the particle properties (size, mass and shape). Particles are stably trapped in air at atmospheric pressure and can be conveniently manipulated for a precise positioning for LIBS analysis. The spectra acquired from the individually trapped particles permit a straightforward identification of the material inspected. Variability of LIBS signal for the inspection of Ni microspheres was 30% relative standard deviation. OC-OT-LIBS permits the separation of particles in a heterogeneous mixture and the subsequent analysis of the isolated particle of interest. In order to evaluate the sensitivity of the approach, the number of absolute photons emitted by a single trapped particle was calculated. The limit of detection (LOD) for Al2O3 particles was calculated to be 200 attograms aluminium.

  3. Corrosion at Nuclear Power Plant from Mössbauer Spectroscopy Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slugeň, V.; Lipka, J.; Dekan, J.; Tóth, I.; Smieško, I.

    2010-07-01

    Steam generators of four VVER-440 units at nuclear power plants V-1 and V-2 in Jaslovske Bohunice (Slovakia) were gradually changed by new original "Bohunice" design in the 1994-1998 period. Corrosion processes before and after these design and material changes in Bohunice secondary circuit were studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy during the last 25 years. Innovations in the feed water pipeline design as well as material composition improvements were evaluated positively. Mössbauer spectroscopy studies of phase composition of corrosion products were performed on real specimens scrapped from water pipelines or in the form of filters deposits. The corrosion of new feed water pipelines system (from austenitic steel) in combination to innovated operation regimes goes dominantly to magnetite. The hematite presence is mostly on the internal surface of steam generator body and its concentration increases towards the top of the body. In the results interpretation it is necessary to consider also erosion as well as scope and type of maintenance activities. The long-term study of phase composition of corrosion products at VVER reactors is one of precondition for the safe operation over the projected NPP lifetime. Keywords: Enter Keywords here. Text should remain 10-pt.

  4. [Characterization of biochar by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong-yu; Jin, Jie; Yan, Yu; Han, Lan-fang; Kang, Ming-jie; Wang, Zi-ying; Zhao, Ye; Sun, Ke

    2014-12-01

    The wood (willow branch) and grass (rice straw) materials were pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300, 450 and 600 °C) to obtain the biochars used in the present study. The biochars were characterized using elementary analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and solid state 13C cross-polarization and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR) to illuminate the structure and composition of the biochars which were derived from the different thermal temperatures and biomass. The results showed that the H/C, O/C and (O+N)/C ratios of the biochars decreased with the increase in the pyrolysis temperatures. The surface polarity and ash content of the grass-derived biochars were higher than those of the wood-derived biochars. The minerals of the wood-derived biochars were mainly covered by the organic matter; in contrast, parts of the mineral surfaces of the grass-derived biochars were not covered by organic matter? The 13C NMR of the low temperature-derived biochars revealed a large contribution of aromatic carbon, aliphatic carbon, carboxyl and carbonyl carbon, while the high temperature-derived biochars contained a large amount of aromatic carbon. Moreover, the wood-derived biochars produced at low heat treatment temperatures contained more lignin residues than grass-derived ones, probably due to the existence of high lignin content in the feedstock soures of wood-derived biochars. The results of the study would be useful for environmental application of biochars.

  5. Nuclear Spectroscopy with Copper Isotopes of Extreme N/Z Ratios

    CERN Multimedia

    La commara, M; Roeckl, E; Van duppen, P L E; Schmidt, K A; Lettry, J

    2002-01-01

    The collaboration aims to obtain detailed nuclear spectroscopy information on isotopes close to the magic proton number Z=28 Very neutron-rich and neutron-deficient copper isotopes are ionized with the ISOLDE resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) to provide beams with low cross contamination.\\\\ \\\\On the neutron-deficient side the high $Q_\\beta$-values of $^{56}$Cu (15~MeV) and $^{57}$Cu (8.8~MeV) allow to study levels at high excitation energies in the doubly magic nucleus $^{56}$Ni and the neighbouring $^{57}$Ni. On the neutron-rich side the spectroscopy with separated copper isotopes allows presently the closest approach to the doubly magic $^{78}$Ni at an ISOL facility. Up to now no suitable target material with a rapid release was found for nickel itself. A slow release behaviour has to be assumed also for the chemically similar elements iron and cobalt.\\\\ \\\\Using a narrow-bandwidth dye laser and tuning of the laser frequency allows to scan the hyperfine splittings of the copper isotopes and isome...

  6. Application of two-dimensional J-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to differentiation of beer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatib, Alfi [Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Wilson, Erica G. [Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Kim, Hye Kyong [Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Lefeber, Alfons W.M. [Division of NMR, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Erkelens, Cornelis [Division of NMR, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Choi, Young Hae [Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)]. E-mail: y.choi@chem.leidenuniv.nl; Verpoorte, Robert [Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2006-02-16

    A number of ingredients in beer that directly or indirectly affect its quality require an unbiased wide-spectrum analytical method that allows for the determination of a wide array of compounds for its efficient control. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a method that clearly meets this description as the broad range of compounds in beer is detectable. However, the resulting congestion of signals added to the low resolution of {sup 1}H NMR spectra makes the identification of individual components very difficult. Among two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques that increase the resolution, J-resolved NMR spectra were successfully applied to the analysis of 2-butanol extracts of beer as overlapping signals in {sup 1}H NMR spectra were fully resolved by the additional axis of the coupling constant. Principal component analysis based on the projected J-resolved NMR spectra showed a clear separation between all of the six brands of pilsner beer evaluated in this study. The compounds responsible for the differentiation were identified by 2D NMR spectra including correlated spectroscopy and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation spectra together with J-resolved spectra. They were identified as nucleic acid derivatives (adenine, uridine and xanthine), amino acids (tyrosine and proline), organic acid (succinic and lactic acid), alcohol (tyrosol and isopropanol), cholines and carbohydrates.

  7. Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics 2003 Relativistic Heavy Ion Parallel Session Summary

    CERN Document Server

    Nagle, J L

    2003-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) came online in 2000, and the last three years have provided a wealth of new experimental data and theoretical work in this new energy frontier for nuclear physics. The transition from quarks and gluons bound into hadrons to a deconfined quark-gluon plasma is expected to occur at these energies, and the effort to understand the time evolution of these complex systems has been significantly advanced. The heavy ion parallel session talks from the Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics (CIPANP) 2003 are posted at: http://www.phenix.bnl.gov/WWW/publish/nagle/CIPANP/. We provide a brief summary of these sessions here.

  8. A 12-bit multichannel ADC for pixel detectors in particle physics and nuclear imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Modern pixel detectors in nuclear and particle physics experiments and also in nuclear imaging,starve for highly integrated application specified integrated circuit(ASIC),whereas in China the study of ASIC still stays far away from practical application.The lack of ASIC strictly limits the research and development of domestic high energy physics field.A 12-bit multichannel ADC designed for high density readout is introduced as a major candidate for solution.A precise model is discussed and the simulation fully agrees with the model,which indicates a key principle of design.Design is performed according to the given rule,and novel layout techniques are carried out.Measurement results in all aspects are also obtained,showing an excellent real performance,which satisfies the practical requirement.

  9. Neutron activation analysis via nuclear decay kinetics using gamma-ray spectroscopy at SFU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Thomas; Chester, Aaron; Starosta, Krzysztof; Williams, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool used in a variety of fields including nuclear and analytical chemistry, environmental science, and health risk management. At SFU, the Germanium detector for Elemental Analysis and Radiation Studies (GEARS), a low-background shielded high-purity germanium gamma-ray detector, has been used recently in all of the above fields. The current project aims to expand upon the number of applications for which GEARS can be used while enhancing its current functionality. A recent addition to the SFU Nuclear Science laboratory is the Thermo Scientific P 385 neutron generator. This device provides a nominal yield of 3 ×108 neutrons/s providing the capacity for neutron activation analysis, opening a major avenue of research at SFU which was previously unavailable. The isotopes created via neutron activation have a wide range of half-lives. To measure and study isotopes with half-lives above a second, a new analogue data acquisition system has been installed on GEARS allowing accurate measurements of decay kinetics. This new functionality enables identification and quantification of the products of neutron activation. Results from the neutron activation analysis of pure metals will be presented.

  10. Nuclear moments and deformation changes in the lightest Pt isotopes measured by laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Roussière, B; Crawford, J; Duong, H T; Genevey, J; Girod, M; Huber, G; Ibrahim, F; Krieg, M; Le Blanc, F; Lee, J K P; Obert, J; Oms, J; Peru, S; Pinard, J; Putaux, J C; Sauvage, J; Sebastian, V; Zemlyanoi, S G; Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Lettry, Jacques

    1999-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy measurements are performed with the lightest neutron-deficient platinum isotopes using the experimental setup COMPLIS installed at the ISOLDE-Booster facility. The hyperfine spectra of /sup 182-178/Pt and /sup 183m/Pt are recorded for the first time from the optical transition 5d/sup 9/6s/sup 3/D/sub 3/ to 5d/sup 9/6p/sup 3/P/sub 2/. The variation in the mean-square charge radius of these nuclei and the magnetic and quadrupole (for I>or=1) moments of the odd isotope nuclei are found. A large deformation change between the /sup 183g/Pt and /sup 183m/Pt nuclei, quite large inverted odd-even staggering of the charge radius around the neutron midshell N=104, and a nuclear deformation drop in the region A=179 are revealed. All the results are discussed in terms of nuclear shape variation and are compared with the results of Hartree-Fock- Bogoliubov calculations involving the Gogny force. Comparison of the deformation measured from /sup 183g, m/Pt to the odd-odd isotone /sup 184g, m/Au shows that...

  11. Nuclear modification factor of charged particles and light-flavour hadrons in p--Pb collisions measured by ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00360943

    2016-01-01

    The hot and dense strongly interacting Quark-Gluon Plasma (sQGP) created in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions can be probed by studying high-$p_{\\rm T}$ particle production and parton energy loss. Similar measurements performed in p-Pb collisions may help in determining whether initial or final state nuclear effects play a role in the observed suppression of hadron production at high-$p_{\\rm T}$ in Pb--Pb collisions. By examining the nuclear modification factors through the comparison of identified hadron yields in different collision systems one can gain insight into particle production mechanisms and nuclear effects.

  12. The neutron a tool and an object in nuclear and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Börner, Hans G

    2012-01-01

    The reactor-based laboratory at the Institut Laue-Langevin is recognized as the world's most productive and reliable source of slow neutrons for the study of low energy particle and nuclear physics. The book highlightsthe impact of about 600 very diverse publications about work performedin these fields during the pastmore than 30 years of reactor operation at this institute.On one hand neutronsare used as a tool to generate nuclei in excited states for studying their structure and decay, in particular fission. Uniquely sensitive experiments can tell us a great deal about the symmetry character

  13. Perspectives on Entangled Nuclear Particle Pairs Generation and Manipulation in Quantum Communication and Cryptography Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Dănilă

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Entanglement between two quantum elements is a phenomenon which presents a broad application spectrum, being used largely in quantum cryptography schemes and in physical characterisation of the universe. Commonly known entangled states have been obtained with photons and electrons, but other quantum elements such as quarks, leptons, and neutrinos have shown their informational potential. In this paper, we present the perspective of exploiting the phenomenon of entanglement that appears in nuclear particle interactions as a resource for quantum key distribution protocols.

  14. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mozin, Vladimir [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Campbell, Luke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hunt, Alan W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Reedy, Edward T.E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Seipel, Heather [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    High-­energy, beta-delayed gamma-­ray spectroscopy is a potential, non-­destructive assay techniques for the independent verification of declared quantities of special nuclear materials at key stages of the fuel cycle and for directly assaying nuclear material inventories for spent fuel handling, interim storage, reprocessing facilities, repository sites, and final disposal. Other potential applications include determination of MOX fuel composition, characterization of nuclear waste packages, and challenges in homeland security and arms control verification. Experimental measurements were performed to evaluate fission fragment yields, to test methods for determining isotopic fractions, and to benchmark the modeling code package. Experimental measurement campaigns were carried out at the IAC using a photo-­neutron source and at OSU using a thermal neutron beam from the TRIGA reactor to characterize the emission of high-­energy delayed gamma rays from 235U, 239Pu, and 241Pu targets following neutron induced fission. Data were collected for pure and combined targets for several irradiation/spectroscopy cycle times ranging from 10/10 seconds to 15/30 minutes.The delayed gamma-ray signature of 241Pu, a significant fissile constituent in spent fuel, was measured and compared to 239Pu. The 241Pu/239Pu ratios varied between 0.5 and 1.2 for ten prominent lines in the 2700-­3600 keV energy range. Such significant differences in relative peak intensities make it possible to determine relative fractions of these isotopes in a mixed sample. A method for determining fission product yields by fitting the energy and time dependence of the delayed gamma-­ray emission was developed and demonstrated on a limited 235U data set. De-­convolution methods for determining fissile fractions were developed and tested on the experimental data. The use of high count-­rate LaBr3 detectors

  15. Phytate Hydrolysis in Rat Gastrointestinal Tracts, as Observed by 31P Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Alan; Richards, Colin P.; Trimble, Mary L.

    1983-01-01

    Phytate hydrolysis was followed through rat gastrointestinal tracts by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. No phytate hydrolysis products were detected in the diet, stomach, or small intestine. It was concluded that cecal bacteria were responsible for phytate hydrolysis, which continued in the colon and fecal pellet.

  16. Using Light Charged Particles to Probe the Asymmetry Dependence of the Nuclear Caloric Curve

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Alan B; Kohley, Zachary; Cammarata, Paul J; Hagel, Kris; Heilborn, Lauren; Mabiala, Justin; May, Larry W; Marini, Paola; Raphelt, Andrew; Souliotis, George A; Wuenschel, Sara; Zarrella, Andrew; Yennello, Sherry J

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we observed a clear dependence of the nuclear caloric curve on neutron-proton asymmetry $\\frac{N-Z}{A}$ through examination of fully reconstructed equilibrated quasi-projectile sources produced in heavy ion collisions at E/A = 35 MeV. In the present work, we extend our analysis using multiple light charged particle probes of the temperature. Temperatures are extracted with five distinct probes using a kinetic thermometer approach. Additionally, temperatures are extracted using two probes within a chemical thermometer approach (Albergo method). All seven measurements show a significant linear dependence of the source temperature on the source asymmetry. For the kinetic thermometer, the strength of the asymmetry dependence varies with the probe particle species in a way which is consistent with an average emission-time ordering.

  17. Single-sheet identification method of heavy charged particles using solid state nuclear track detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M F Zaki; A Abdel-Naby; A Ahmed Morsy

    2007-08-01

    The theoretical and experimental investigations of the penetration of charged particles in matter played a very important role in the development of modern physics. Solid state nuclear track detectors have become one of the most important tools for many branches of science and technology. An attempt has been made to examine the suitability of the single-sheet particle identification technique in CR-39 and CN-85 polycarbonate by plotting track cone length vs. residual range for different heavy ions in these detectors. So, the maximum etchable ranges of heavy ions such as 93Nb, 86Kr and 4He in CR-39 and 4He and 132Xe in CN-85 polycarbonate have been determined. The ranges of these ions in these detectors have also been computed theoretically using the Henke–Benton program. A reasonably good agreement has been observed between the experimentally and theoretically computed values.

  18. Compressed Sensing in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy/Spectroscopy for Observation of Quasi-Particle Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi-Ohno, Yoshinori; Haze, Masahiro; Yoshida, Yasuo; Hukushima, Koji; Hasegawa, Yukio; Okada, Masato

    2016-09-01

    We applied a method of compressed sensing to the observation of quasi-particle interference (QPI) by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy to improve efficiency and save measurement time. To solve an ill-posed problem owing to the scarcity of data, the compressed sensing utilizes the sparseness of QPI patterns in momentum space. We examined the performance of a sparsity-inducing algorithm called least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), and demonstrated that LASSO enables us to recover a double-circle QPI pattern of the Ag(111) surface from a dataset whose size is less than that necessary for the conventional Fourier transformation method. In addition, the smallest number of data required for the recovery is discussed on the basis of cross validation.

  19. Nanoplasmonic Photoluminescence Spectroscopy at Single-Particle Level: Sensing for Ethanol Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhaoke; Majima, Tetsuro

    2016-02-18

    Surface plasmon resonances of metal nanoparticles have shown significant promise for the use of solar energy to drive catalytic chemical reactions. More importantly, understanding and monitoring such catalytic reactions at single-nanoparticle level is crucial for the study of local reaction processes. Herein, using plasmonic photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, we describe a novel sensing method for catalytic ethanol oxidation reactions at the single-nanoparticle level. The Au nanorod monitors the interfacial interaction with ethanol during the catalytic reaction through the PL intensity changes in the single-particle PL spectra. The analysis of energy relaxation of excited electron-hole pairs indicates the relationship between the PL quenching and ethanol oxidation reaction on the single Au nanorod.

  20. Charged particle nuclear modification factor in PbPb at 5.02 TeV with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Baty, Austin Alan

    2016-01-01

    In the high-luminosity 5.02 TeV collision-energy per nucleon pair PbPb and pp data provided by LHC in 2015, CMS measured the nuclear modification factor of charged particles from a transverse momentum of 0.7 GeV/c to 400 GeV/c in the central rapidity region. The centrality dependence of the nuclear modification factor is explored in several bins of collision centrality, from the most central 0-5pct to the peripheral 50-70pct centrality range. Comparisons of the measured nuclear modification factor of charged particles at 5.02 TeV are made to theory calculations and to measurements at lower collision energies. The nuclear modification factors are also compared to the measurements at 2.76 TeV with charged particles and fully reconstructed jets.

  1. Photoluminescence detection of alpha particle using DAM-ADC nuclear detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, Ayman M., E-mail: aymanabdalla62@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Science and Arts, Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Najran University, P.O. Box: 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Harraz, Farid A., E-mail: fharraz68@yahoo.com [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Najran University, P.O. Box: 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Nanostructured Materials and Nanotechnology Division, Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), P.O. Box: 87 Helwan, Cairo 11421 (Egypt); Ali, Atif M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Al-Sayari, S.A. [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Najran University, P.O. Box: 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); College of Science and Arts-Sharoura, Najran University (Saudi Arabia); Al-Hajry, A. [Department of Physics, College of Science and Arts, Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Najran University, P.O. Box: 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-09-11

    The photoluminescence (PL) and UV–vis spectral analysis of DAM-ADC (diallyl maleate: DAM, polyallyl diglycol carbonate: ADC) nuclear detector are demonstrated for the first time. The DAM-ADC surfaces were exposed to thin {sup 241}Am disk source that emits alpha particles with activity 333 kBq. It is found that the track density of the irradiated samples remarkably influences the PL characteristics of the DAM-ADC detector. The spectral peak heights and the integrated intensities under the peaks exhibit linear correlations with correlation coefficient R{sup 2}=0.9636 and 0.9806, respectively for different alpha particle fluences ranging from 8.16–40.82×10{sup 7} particles/cm{sup 2}. Additionally, a correlation coefficient R{sup 2}=0.9734 was achieved for the UV–vis spectral analysis. The linear fitting functions, along with the corresponding fitting parameters were evaluated in each case. Both the PL and the UV–vis data of the irradiated DAM-ADC samples showed considerable spectral differences, and hence they would be used to offer sensitive approaches for alpha particle detection.

  2. Photoluminescence detection of alpha particle using DAM-ADC nuclear detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ayman M.; Harraz, Farid A.; Ali, Atif M.; Al-Sayari, S. A.; Al-Hajry, A.

    2016-09-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) and UV-vis spectral analysis of DAM-ADC (diallyl maleate: DAM, polyallyl diglycol carbonate: ADC) nuclear detector are demonstrated for the first time. The DAM-ADC surfaces were exposed to thin 241Am disk source that emits alpha particles with activity 333 kBq. It is found that the track density of the irradiated samples remarkably influences the PL characteristics of the DAM-ADC detector. The spectral peak heights and the integrated intensities under the peaks exhibit linear correlations with correlation coefficient R2=0.9636 and 0.9806, respectively for different alpha particle fluences ranging from 8.16-40.82×107 particles/cm2. Additionally, a correlation coefficient R2=0.9734 was achieved for the UV-vis spectral analysis. The linear fitting functions, along with the corresponding fitting parameters were evaluated in each case. Both the PL and the UV-vis data of the irradiated DAM-ADC samples showed considerable spectral differences, and hence they would be used to offer sensitive approaches for alpha particle detection.

  3. Implementation of a real-time adaptive digital shaping for nuclear spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regadío, Alberto, E-mail: aregadio@srg.aut.uah.es [Department of Computer Engineering, Space Research Group, Universidad de Alcalá, 28805 Alcalá de Henares (Spain); Electronic Technology Area, Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial, 28850 Torrejón de Ardoz (Spain); Sánchez-Prieto, Sebastián, E-mail: ssanchez@srg.aut.uah.es [Department of Computer Engineering, Space Research Group, Universidad de Alcalá, 28805 Alcalá de Henares (Spain); Prieto, Manuel, E-mail: mprieto@srg.aut.uah.es [Department of Computer Engineering, Space Research Group, Universidad de Alcalá, 28805 Alcalá de Henares (Spain); Tabero, Jesús, E-mail: taberogj@inta.es [Electronic Technology Area, Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial, 28850 Torrejón de Ardoz (Spain)

    2014-01-21

    This paper presents the structure, design and implementation of a new adaptive digital shaper for processing the pulses generated in nuclear particle detectors. The proposed adaptive algorithm has the capacity to automatically adjust the coefficients for shaping an input signal with a desired profile in real-time. Typical shapers such as triangular, trapezoidal or cusp-like ones can be generated, but more exotic unipolar shaping could also be performed. A practical prototype was designed, implemented and tested in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Particular attention was paid to the amount of internal FPGA resources required and to the sampling rate, making the design as simple as possible in order to minimize power consumption. Lastly, its performance and capabilities were measured using simulations and a real benchmark.

  4. Impact of Oriented Clay Particles on X-Ray Spectroscopy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, A. J. M. S.; Syazwani, R. N.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the engineering properties of the mineralogy and microfabic of clayey soils is very complex and thus very difficult for soil characterization. Micromechanics of soils recognize that the micro structure and mineralogy of clay have a significant influence on its engineering behaviour. To achieve a more reliable quantitative evaluation of clay mineralogy, a proper sample preparation technique for quantitative clay mineral analysis is necessary. This paper presents the quantitative evaluation of elemental analysis and chemical characterization of oriented and random oriented clay particles using X-ray spectroscopy. Three different types of clays namely marine clay, bentonite and kaolin clay were studied. The oriented samples were prepared by placing the dispersed clay in water and left to settle on porous ceramic tiles by applying a relatively weak suction through a vacuum pump. Images form a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was also used to show the comparison between the orientation patterns of both the sample preparation techniques. From the quantitative analysis of the X-ray spectroscopy, oriented sampling method showed more accuracy in identifying mineral deposits, because it produced better peak intensity on the spectrum and more mineral content can be identified compared to randomly oriented samples.

  5. Understanding of the mechanical and structural changes induced by alpha particles and heavy ions in the French simulated nuclear waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakurt, G.; Abdelouas, A.; Guin, J.-P.; Nivard, M.; Sauvage, T.; Paris, M.; Bardeau, J.-F.

    2016-07-01

    Borosilicate glasses are considered for the long-term confinement of high-level nuclear wastes. External irradiations with 1 MeV He+ ions and 7 MeV Au5+ ions were performed to simulate effects produced by alpha particles and by recoil nuclei in the simulated SON68 nuclear waste glass. To better understand the structural modifications, irradiations were also carried out on a 6-oxides borosilicate glass, a simplified version of the SON68 glass (ISG glass). The mechanical and macroscopic properties of the glasses were studied as function of the deposited electronic and nuclear energies. Alpha particles and gold ions induced a volume change up to -0.7% and -2.7%, respectively, depending on the glass composition. Nano-indentations tests were used to determine the mechanical properties of the irradiated glasses. A decrease of about -22% to -38% of the hardness and a decrease of the reduced Young's modulus by -8% were measured after irradiations. The evolution of the glass structure was studied by Raman spectroscopy, and also 11B and 27Al Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) on a 20 MeV Kr irradiated ISG glass powder. A decrease of the silica network connectivity after irradiation with alpha particles and gold ions is deduced from the structural changes observations. NMR spectra revealed a partial conversion of BO4 to BO3 units but also a formation of AlO5 and AlO6 species after irradiation with Kr ions. The relationships between the mechanical and structural changes are also discussed.

  6. Evaluation of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and collagen by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; Avaliacao da polivinilpirrolidona e do colageno por ressonancia magnetica nuclear de baixo campo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paula de M.; Tavares, Maria I.B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Professora Eloisa Mano]. E-mail: pmcosta@ima.ufrj.br

    2005-07-01

    Blends of natural and synthetic polymers represent a new class of materials with better mechanical properties and biocompatibility than those of the single components. Collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) are well known for their important biological properties. The blending of collagen with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) makes it possible to obtain new materials in which strong interactions between the synthetic and biological components occur. Do to the excellent biocompatibility of these polymers, this blend has been much studied intending biomedical applications. And a one technique that can provide important information on molecular mobility, compatibility and even evaluate the interactions that can occur with these polymers is the Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Thus, the purpose of this work is to evaluate collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. From the values of relaxation times obtained, we can conclude that these materials have different interactions, and different mobility domains, confirming the heterogeneity and complexity of these materials. (author)

  7. Thermodynamic and noise considerations for the detection of microscopic particles in a gas by Photoacoustic Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Das, K K; Lehmann, K; Scully, M O; Das, Kunal K.; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.; Lehmann, Kevin; Scully, Marlan O.

    2004-01-01

    We develop a simple thermodynamic model to describe the heat transfer mechanisms and generation of acoustic waves in photoacoustic Raman spectroscopy by small particulate suspensions in a gas. Using Langevin methods to describe the thermal noise we study the signal and noise properties, and from the noise equivalent power we determine the minimum number density of the suspended particles that can be detected. We find that for some relevant cases, as few as 100 particles per cubic meter can be detected.

  8. The Role of Nuclear Fragmentation in Particle Therapy and Space Radiation Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Cary; La Tessa, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The transport of the so-called HZE particles (those having high charge, Z, and energy, E) through matter is crucially important both in space radiation protection and in the clinical setting where heavy ions are used for cancer treatment. HZE particles are usually considered those having Z > 1, though sometimes Z > 2 is meant. Transport physics is governed by two types of interactions, electromagnetic (ionization energy loss) and nuclear. Models of transport, such as those used in treatment planning and space mission planning must account for both effects in detail. The theory of electromagnetic interactions is well developed, but nucleus-nucleus collisions are so complex that no fundamental physical theory currently describes them. Instead, interaction models are generally anchored to experimental data, which in some areas are far from complete. The lack of fundamental physics knowledge introduces uncertainties in the calculations of exposures and their associated risks. These uncertainties are greatly compounded by the much larger uncertainties in biological response to HZE particles. In this article, we discuss the role of nucleus-nucleus interactions in heavy charged particle therapy and in deep space, where astronauts will receive a chronic low dose from galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and potentially higher short-term doses from sporadic, unpredictable solar energetic particles (SEPs). GCRs include HZE particles; SEPs typically do not and we, therefore, exclude them from consideration in this article. Nucleus-nucleus collisions can result in the breakup of heavy ions into lighter ions. In space, this is generally beneficial because dose and dose equivalent are, on the whole, reduced in the process. The GCRs can be considered a radiation field with a significant high-LET component; when they pass through matter, the high-LET component is attenuated, at the cost of a slight increase in the low-LET component. Not only are the standard measures of risk

  9. Relations between aliphatics and silicate components in 12 stratospheric particles deduced from vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merouane, S.; Djouadi, Z.; Le Sergeant d' Hendecourt, L., E-mail: sihane.merouane@ias.u-psud.fr [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS, UMR-8617, Université Paris Sud, Bâtiment 121, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2014-01-10

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are among the most pristine extraterrestrial samples available in the laboratory for analyses with moderate to high spatial- and spectral-resolution spectroscopic techniques. Their composition can provide precious information on the early stages of the solar nebula as well as on the processes on the surfaces of different small bodies in the solar system from which IDPs originate. In this work, we have analyzed six anhydrous IDPs and six stratospheric particles possibly of cosmic origin through infrared (IR) and Raman micro-spectroscopy to study and investigate their silicate and organic components. We find that the length/ramification of the aliphatic organics given by the CH{sub 2}/CH{sub 3} ratios in the IDPs is closely linked to the silicate family (pyroxene or olivine) present in the samples. Both IR and Raman data suggest that this relation is not correlated with either aqueous (as evidenced by the absence of aqueous related minerals) or thermal processes (as deduced from Raman measurements). Therefore, this observation might be related to the initial path of formation of the organics on the silicate surfaces, thus tracing a possible catalytic role that silicates would play in the formation and/or ramification of organic matter in the primitive nebula.

  10. Comparison of digital and analogue data acquisition systems for nuclear spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Adili, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Pomp, S.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2010-12-01

    In the present investigation the performance of digital data acquisition (DA) and analogue data acquisition (AA) systems are compared in neutron-induced fission experiments. The DA results are practically identical to the AA results in terms of angular-, energy- and mass-resolution, and both compare very well with literature data. However, major advantages were found with the digital techniques. DA allows for a very efficient α-particle pile-up correction. This is important when considering the accurate measurement of fission-fragment characteristics of highly α-active actinide isotopes relevant for the safe operation of Generation IV reactors and the successful reduction of long-lived radioactive nuclear waste. In case of a strong α-emitter, when applying the α-particle pile-up correction, the peak-to-valley ratio of the energy distribution was significantly improved. In addition, DA offers a very flexible expanded off-line analysis and reduces the number of electronic modules drastically, leading to an increased stability against electronic drifts when long measurement times are required.

  11. Understanding of the mechanical and structural changes induced by alpha particles and heavy ions in the French simulated nuclear waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakurt, G., E-mail: karakurt_gokhan@yahoo.fr [SUBATECH, UMR 6457CNRS-IN2P3, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, 4 rue Alfred Kastler, 44307 Nantes (France); Abdelouas, A. [SUBATECH, UMR 6457CNRS-IN2P3, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, 4 rue Alfred Kastler, 44307 Nantes (France); Guin, J.-P.; Nivard, M. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, Université de Rennes 1 – UMR 62051 IPR, 263 avenue du Général Leclerc, 35042 Rennes (France); Sauvage, T. [Laboratoire CEMHTI (Conditions Extrêmes et Matériaux: Haute Température et Irradiation), CNRS UPR, 3079 Orléans (France); Paris, M. [Institut des Matériaux Jean ROUXEL, Université de Nantes, UMR 6502 CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 03 (France); Bardeau, J.-F. [Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans, UMR CNRS 6283, avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans (France)

    2016-07-15

    Borosilicate glasses are considered for the long-term confinement of high-level nuclear wastes. External irradiations with 1 MeV He{sup +} ions and 7 MeV Au{sup 5+} ions were performed to simulate effects produced by alpha particles and by recoil nuclei in the simulated SON68 nuclear waste glass. To better understand the structural modifications, irradiations were also carried out on a 6-oxides borosilicate glass, a simplified version of the SON68 glass (ISG glass). The mechanical and macroscopic properties of the glasses were studied as function of the deposited electronic and nuclear energies. Alpha particles and gold ions induced a volume change up to −0.7% and −2.7%, respectively, depending on the glass composition. Nano-indentations tests were used to determine the mechanical properties of the irradiated glasses. A decrease of about −22% to −38% of the hardness and a decrease of the reduced Young's modulus by −8% were measured after irradiations. The evolution of the glass structure was studied by Raman spectroscopy, and also {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) on a 20 MeV Kr irradiated ISG glass powder. A decrease of the silica network connectivity after irradiation with alpha particles and gold ions is deduced from the structural changes observations. NMR spectra revealed a partial conversion of BO{sub 4} to BO{sub 3} units but also a formation of AlO{sub 5} and AlO{sub 6} species after irradiation with Kr ions. The relationships between the mechanical and structural changes are also discussed. - Highlights: • Mechanical and structural properties of two borosilicate glass compositions irradiated with alpha particles and heavy ions were investigated. • Both kinds of particles induced a decrease of the hardness, reduced Young's modulus and density. • Electronic and nuclear interactions are responsible for the changes observed. • The evolution of the mechanical properties under irradiation is linked

  12. Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1991 "for his contributions to the development of the methodology of high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy": Richard R. Ernst

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    Prof. Richard R. Ernst presents "The domestication of nuclear spins by chemists and biologists".The usage of nuclear spins in chemistry and biology for exploring the structure and dynamics of matter is discussed. The main emphasis is put on the methodological aspects of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that are responsible for the success of this powerful analytical technique.

  13. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  14. Prediction of the micro-thermo-mechanical behaviors in dispersion nuclear fuel plates with heterogeneous particle distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yijie; Wang, Qiming; Cui, Yi; Huo, Yongzhong; Ding, Shurong; Zhang, Lin; Li, Yuanming

    2011-11-01

    Dispersion nuclear fuel elements have promising prospects to be used in advanced nuclear reactors and disposal of nuclear wastes. They consist of fuel meat and cladding, and the fuel meat is a kind of composite fuel in which the fuel particles are embedded in the non-fissile matrix. Prediction of the micro-thermo-mechanical behaviors in dispersion nuclear plates is of importance to their irradiation safety and optimal design. In this study, the heterogeneity of the fuel particles along the thickness direction in the fuel meat is considered. The 3D finite element models have been developed respectively for two cases: (1) variation of fuel particle-particle (PP) distances for the particles near the mid-plane of the fuel meat; (2) variation of the particle-cladding (PC) distances for the fuel particles near the interface between the fuel meat and the cladding. The respective finite strain constitutive relations are developed for the fuel particle, metal matrix and cladding. The developed virtual temperature method is used to simulate irradiation swelling of the fuel particles and irradiation growth of the metal cladding. Effects of the heterogeneous distributions of the fuel particles on the micro temperature fields and the micro stress-strain fields are investigated. The obtained results indicate that: (1) as a whole, the maximum Mises stress, equivalent plastic strain and first principal stress at the matrix between the two closest particles increase with decreasing the particle-particle (PP) distance; existence of large first principal stresses there may be the main factor that induces the matrix failure; (2) variation of the particle-cladding (PC) distance has remarkable effects on the interfacial normal stress and shear stress at the interface between the fuel meat and the cladding; the first principal stress at the cladding near the interface increases dramatically when the fuel particle is closer and closer to the cladding. Thus, the proper distance between the

  15. Multisectional linear ion trap and novel loading method for optical spectroscopy of electron and nuclear transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoev, Alexey A; Troyan, Victor I; Borisyuk, Peter V; Krasavin, Andrey V; Vasiliev, Oleg S; Palchikov, Vitaly G; Avdeev, Ivan A; Chernyshev, Denis M; Poteshin, Sergey S

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need for the development of atomic and nuclear frequency standards because of the important contribution of methods for precision time and frequency measurements to the development of fundamental science, technology, and the economy. It is also conditioned by their potential use in optical clocks and quantum logic applications. It is especially important to develop a universal method that could allow one to use ions of most elements effectively (including ones that are not easily evaporated) proposed for the above-mentioned applications. A linear quadrupole ion trap for the optical spectroscopy of electron and nuclear transitions has been developed and evaluated experimentally. An ion source construction is based on an ultra-high vacuum evaporator in which a metal sample is subjected to an electron beam of energy up to 1 keV, resulting in the appearance of gaseous atoms and ions of various charge state. The linear ion trap consists of five successive quadrupole sections including an entrance quadrupole section, quadrupole mass filter, quadrupole ion guide, ion-trap section, and exit quadrupole section. The same radiofrequency but a different direct current voltage feeds the quadrupole sections. The instrument allows the mass and energy selected trapping of ions from ion beams of various intensities and their localization in the area of laser irradiation. The preliminary results presented show that the proposed instrument and methods allow one to produce effectively up to triply charged thorium ions as well as to trap ions for future spectroscopic study. The instrument is proposed for future use in optical clocks and quantum logic application development.

  16. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  17. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kada, W.; Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y.; Onoda, S.; Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y.; Shikata, S.; Makino, T.; Koka, M.; Hanaizumi, O.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  18. Sensitive Detection and Identification of Isovanillin Aerosol Particles at the pg/cm3 Mass Concentration Level using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-24

    Particles at the pg/cm3 Mass Concentration Level Using Raman Spectroscopy* R. L. Aggarwal1, S. Di Cecca, L. W. Farrar, Shabshelowitz, A...and identification of isovanillin (C8H8O3, CAS No. 621‐59‐0; Molecular mass 152.15; Density 1.41) aerosol particles of mass concentration MC of 1.8...optical particle sizer. (iv) Aerosol flow cell, fabricated by the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center (ECBC), with two

  19. Registration of alpha particles in Makrofol-E nuclear track detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammah, Y. S.; Abdalla, Ayman M.; Ashraf, O.; Ashry, A. H.

    2016-06-01

    Fast detection of alpha particles in the range from 1 to 5 MeV in Makrofol-E polycarbonate nuclear track detectors (PCTDs) using a new chemical etchant was investigated. 252Cf and 241Am-thin open sources were used for irradiating Makrofol-E detectors with fission fragments and alpha particles in air at normal pressure and temperature (NPT). A chain of experimental work has been carried out using new etchants to register alpha particle in short time in Makrofol-E polycarbonate detectors. The etching efficiency were exhibited a clear dependence on the amount of methanol in the etching solution and etching time. The optimized chemical condition obtained at this stage of development for 200 μm Makrofol-E detectors are (8 ml of 10 N NaOH + 2 ml CH3OH) etching solutions at 60 °C for 3 h. In this study; it is possible to observe energy detection windows for Makrofol-E detectors according to applied etching duration. Makrofol-E introduced the characteristic Bragg peak, which indicates the advantages of this detector as alpha spectrometer. Consequently, the suggested new etchant can be developed for heavy ions detection and monitoring radon levels and its daughters.

  20. Application of X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy to the study of nuclear structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanshan

    One of key technologies for the next generation nuclear systems are advanced materials, including high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistance core materials and so on. Local structure determination in these systems, which often are crystallographically intractable, is critical to gaining an understanding of their properties. In this thesis, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), including Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), is used to examine the geometric and electronic structure of nuclear structural materials under varying conditions. The thesis is divided into two main sections. The first examines the structural analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) which are dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y-Ti-O enriched nano-features, resulting in remarkable high temperature creep strength and radiation damage resistance. Titanium and Yttrium K-edge XAS shows commercial alloys MA957 and J12YWT more closely resemble the as received Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti (wt. %) powders, and mechanically alloyed (MA) powders with 0.25Y2O3 (wt. %). It shows that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix. In contrast, annealed powders and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidated alloys show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y2Ti2O7 and, especially, TiO. The second section describes corrosion studies of Pb with 316L stainless steel, molybdenum and spinet (MgAl2O4) at high temperature by XAS. The corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials by liquid lead at elevated temperatures is an issue that must be considered when designing advanced nuclear systems and high-power spallation neutron targets. The results of ex-situ studies show that a Mo substrate retained a smooth and less corroded surface than 316L stainless steel sample at elevated temperature. In

  1. Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry, magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Frank; Remmer, Hilke; Kuhlmann, Christian; Wawrzik, Thilo; Arami, Hamed; Ferguson, R. Mathew; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2014-06-01

    Sensitivity and spatial resolution in magnetic particle imaging are affected by magnetic properties of the nanoparticle tracers used during imaging. Here, we have carried out a comprehensive magnetic characterization of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles that were designed for MPI. We used ac susceptometry, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry, and magnetic particle spectroscopy to evaluate the tracer's magnetic core size, hydrodynamic size, and magnetic anisotropy. Our results present a self-consistent set of magnetic and structural parameters for the tracers that is consistent with direct measurements of size using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering and that can be used to better understand their MPI performance.

  2. Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry, magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Frank; Remmer, Hilke; Kuhlmann, Christian; Wawrzik, Thilo [Institute of Electrical Measurement and Fundamental Electrical Engineering, TU Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Str. 66, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Arami, Hamed; Ferguson, R. Mathew [Department of Materials Science and Engineering Box 352120, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Krishnan, Kannan M., E-mail: kannanmk@uw.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering Box 352120, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Sensitivity and spatial resolution in magnetic particle imaging are affected by magnetic properties of the nanoparticle tracers used during imaging. Here, we have carried out a comprehensive magnetic characterization of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles that were designed for MPI. We used ac susceptometry, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry, and magnetic particle spectroscopy to evaluate the tracer's magnetic core size, hydrodynamic size, and magnetic anisotropy. Our results present a self-consistent set of magnetic and structural parameters for the tracers that is consistent with direct measurements of size using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering and that can be used to better understand their MPI performance.

  3. An investigation of strong sodium retention mechanisms in nanopore environments using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Daniel R; Schulthess, Cristian P; Giotto, Marcus V

    2012-01-03

    Recent experimental research into the adsorption of various cations on zeolite minerals has shown that nanopore channels of approximately 0.5 nm or less can create an effect whereby the adsorption of ions, especially those that are weakly hydrated, can be significantly enhanced. This enhanced adsorption occurs due to the removal of hydrating water molecules which in turn is caused by the nanopore channel's small size. A new adsorption model, called the nanopore inner-sphere enhancement (NISE) effect, has been proposed that explains this unusual adsorption mechanism. To further validate this model a series of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy studies is presented here. NMR spectra were gathered for Na adsorbed on three zeolite minerals of similar chemical composition but differing nanoporosities: zeolite Y with a limiting dimension of 0.76 nm, ZSM-5 with a limiting dimension of 0.51 nm, and mordenite with a limiting dimension of 0.26 nm. The NMR experiments validated the predictions of the NISE model whereby Na adsorbed via outer-sphere on zeolite Y, inner-sphere on ZSM-5, and a combination of both mechanisms on mordenite. The strong Na adsorption observed in these nanoporous minerals conflicts with sodium's general designation as a weak electrolyte.

  4. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based investigation on propylene glycol toxicosis in a Holstein cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raun Birgitte-Marie L

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is unknown which metabolites are responsible for propylene glycol (PG-induced toxicosis, and a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms explaining incidences of abnormal behaviour of dairy cows fed PG is therefore needed. Methods The study included three cows of which one developed PG toxicosis. In order to investigate how the metabolism of PG differed in the cow developing toxicosis, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy was applied on ruminal fluids and blood plasma samples obtained before and after feeding with PG. Results PG toxicosis was characterized by dyspnea and ruminal atony upon intake of concentrate containing PG. The oxygen saturation of arterial blood haemoglobin and the oxygen pressure in arterial blood decreased along with the appearance of the clinical symptoms. NMR revealed differences in plasma and ruminal content of several metabolites between the cow responding abnormally to PG and the two control cows. Conclusion It is concluded that PG-toxicosis is likely caused by pulmonary vasoconstriction, but no unusual metabolites directly related to induction of this condition could be detected in the plasma or the ruminal fluid.

  5. On-line monitoring of chemical reactions by using bench-top nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, E; Perlo, J; Duchateau, A L L; Verzijl, G K M; Litvinov, V M; Blümich, B; Casanova, F

    2014-10-06

    Real-time nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy measurements carried out with a bench-top system installed next to the reactor inside the fume hood of the chemistry laboratory are presented. To test the system for on-line monitoring, a transfer hydrogenation reaction was studied by continuously pumping the reaction mixture from the reactor to the magnet and back in a closed loop. In addition to improving the time resolution provided by standard sampling methods, the use of such a flow setup eliminates the need for sample preparation. Owing to the progress in terms of field homogeneity and sensitivity now available with compact NMR spectrometers, small molecules dissolved at concentrations on the order of 1 mmol L(-1) can be characterized in single-scan measurements with 1 Hz resolution. Owing to the reduced field strength of compact low-field systems compared to that of conventional high-field magnets, the overlap in the spectrum of different NMR signals is a typical situation. The data processing required to obtain concentrations in the presence of signal overlap are discussed in detail, methods such as plain integration and line-fitting approaches are compared, and the accuracy of each method is determined. The kinetic rates measured for different catalytic concentrations show good agreement with those obtained with gas chromatography as a reference analytical method. Finally, as the measurements are performed under continuous flow conditions, the experimental setup and the flow parameters are optimized to maximize time resolution and signal-to-noise ratio.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the structure elucidation and biosynthesis of natural products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meksuriyen, D.

    1988-01-01

    Examination of a chloroform extract of Dracaena loureiri Gagnep (Agavaceae), a Thia medicinal plant possessing antibacterial activity, has led to the isolation of fifteen flavenoids. The biogenic relationships among these flavenoids isolated were briefly discussed. Definition of the skeleton and the unambiguous assignment of all of the protons of the isolates was achieved through extensive 2D-homonuclear chemical shift correlation, nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) difference spectroscopy and 2D-NOE experiments. The {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra of staurosporine, a potent biologically active agent from Streptomyces staurosporeus, were unambiguously assigned by using 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation, NOE, {sup 1}H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence via direct coupling and via multiple-bond coupling for resonance assignments of protonated and nonprotonated carbons, respectively. S. Staurosporeus was found to utilize endogenous and exogenous D- and L-isomers of trytophan in the production of staurosporine. The biosynthesis of staurosporine was examined by employing carbon-14, tritium, and carbon-13 labeled precursors.

  7. Absolute quantification for benzoic acid in processed foods using quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-09-15

    The absolute quantification method of benzoic acid (BA) in processed foods using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was developed and validated. BA levels were determined using proton signals (δ(H) 7.53 and 7.98) referenced to 2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulfonate-d(6) sodium salt (DSS-d(6)) after simple solvent extraction from processed foods. All recoveries from several kinds of processed foods, spiked at their specified maximum Japanese usage levels (0.6-2.5 g kg(-1)) and at 0.13 g kg(-1) and 0.063 g kg(-1), were greater than 80%. The limit of quantification was confirmed as 0.063 g kg(-1) in processed foods, which was sufficiently low for the purposes of monitoring BA. The accuracy of the proposed method is equivalent to the conventional method using steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The proposed method was both rapid and simple. Moreover, it provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. Therefore, the proposed method is a useful and practical tool for determining BA levels in processed foods.

  8. Absolute quantitative analysis for sorbic acid in processed foods using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-07-13

    An analytical method using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance (qHNMR) spectroscopy was applied and validated for the absolute quantification of sorbic acid (SA) in processed foods. The proposed method showed good linearity. The recoveries for samples spiked at the maximum usage level specified for food in Japan and at 0.13 g kg(-1) (beverage: 0.013 g kg(-1)) were larger than 80%, whereas those for samples spiked at 0.063 g kg(-1) (beverage: 0.0063 g kg(-1)) were between 56.9 and 83.5%. The limit of quantification was 0.063 g kg(-1) for foods (and 0.0063 g kg(-1) for beverages containing Lactobacillus species). Analysis of the SA content of commercial processed foods revealed quantities equal to or greater than those measured using conventional steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography quantification. The proposed method was rapid, simple, accurate, and precise, and provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. It could therefore be used as an alternative to the quantification of SA in processed foods using conventional method.

  9. High-resolution monochromator for iron nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy of biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Yoshitaka; Okada, Kyoko; Wang, Hongxin; Cramer, Stephen P.; Seto, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    A new high-resolution monochromator for 14.4-keV X-rays has been designed and developed for the Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy of biological samples. In addition to high resolution, higher flux and stability are especially important for measuring biological samples, because of the very weak signals produced due to the low concentrations of Fe-57. A 24% increase in flux while maintaining a high resolution better than 0.9 meV is achieved in the calculation by adopting an asymmetric reflection of Ge, which is used as the first crystal of the three-bounce high-resolution monochromator. A 20% increase of the exit beam size is acceptable to our biological applications. The higher throughput of the new design has been experimentally verified. A fine rotation mechanics that combines a weak-link hinge with a piezoelectric actuator was used for controlling the photon energy of the monochromatic beam. The resulting stability is sufficient to preserve the intrinsic resolution.

  10. Studying radiolytic ageing of nuclear power plant electric cables with FTIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levet, A; Colombani, J; Duponchel, L

    2017-09-01

    Due to the willingness to extend the nuclear power plants length of life, it is of prime importance to understand long term ageing effect on all constitutive materials. For this purpose gamma-irradiation effects on insulation of instrumentation and control cables are studied. Mid-infrared spectroscopy and principal components analysis (PCA) were used to highlight molecular modifications induced by gamma-irradiation under oxidizing conditions. In order to be closer to real world conditions, a low dose rate of 11Gyh(-1) was used to irradiate insulations in full cable or alone with a dose up to 58 kGy. Spectral differences according to irradiation dose were extracted using PCA. It was then possible to observe different behaviors of the insulation constitutive compounds i.e. ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) and aluminium trihydrate (ATH). Irradiation of insulations led to the oxidation of their constitutive polymers and a modification of filler-polymer ratio. Moreover all these modifications were observed for insulations alone or in full cable indicating that oxygen easily diffuses into the material. Spectral contributions were discussed considering different degradation mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Serum Metabolomic Profiling of Sulphur Mustard-Exposed Individuals Using (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Zahra; Ghanei, Mostafa; Panahi, Yunus; Arjmand, Mohammad; Sadeghi, Sedigheh; Mirkhani, Fatemeh; Parvin, Shahram; Salehi, Maryam; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Vahabi, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Sulphur mustard is an alkylating agent that reacts with different cellular components, causing acute and delayed complications that may remain for decades after exposure. This study aimed to identify differentially expressed metabolites between mustard-exposed individuals suffering from chronic complications compared with unexposed individuals as the control group. Serum samples were obtained from 15 mustard-exposed individuals and 15 apparently healthy unexposed individuals. Metabolomic profiling was performed using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and analyses were carried out using Chenomex and MATLAB softwares. Metabolites were identified using Human Metabolome Database, and the main metabolic pathways were identified using MetaboAnalyst software. Chemometric analysis of serum samples identified 11 differentially expressed metabolites between mustard-exposed and unexposed groups. The main pathways that were influenced by sulphur mustard exposure were related to vitamin B6 (down-regulation), bile acid (up-regulation) and tryptophan (down-regulation) metabolism. Metabolism of vitamin B6, bile acids and tryptophan are the most severely impaired pathways in individuals suffering from chronic mustard-induced complications. These findings may find implications in the monitoring of exposed patients and identification of new therapeutic approaches.

  12. Hydride bridge in [NiFe]-hydrogenase observed by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Hideaki; Krämer, Tobias; Wang, Hongxin; Schilter, David; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; van Gastel, Maurice; Neese, Frank; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Gee, Leland B.; Scott, Aubrey D.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2015-08-01

    The metabolism of many anaerobes relies on [NiFe]-hydrogenases, whose characterization when bound to substrates has proven non-trivial. Presented here is direct evidence for a hydride bridge in the active site of the 57Fe-labelled fully reduced Ni-R form of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F [NiFe]-hydrogenase. A unique `wagging' mode involving H- motion perpendicular to the Ni(μ-H)57Fe plane was studied using 57Fe-specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. On Ni(μ-D)57Fe deuteride substitution, this wagging causes a characteristic perturbation of Fe-CO/CN bands. Spectra have been interpreted by comparison with Ni(μ-H/D)57Fe enzyme mimics [(dppe)Ni(μ-pdt)(μ-H/D)57Fe(CO)3]+ and DFT calculations, which collectively indicate a low-spin Ni(II)(μ-H)Fe(II) core for Ni-R, with H- binding Ni more tightly than Fe. The present methodology is also relevant to characterizing Fe-H moieties in other important natural and synthetic catalysts.

  13. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D

    2013-09-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-(57)Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4](=) and 10%-(57)Fe and 90%-(54)Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4](=) has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3-4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements.

  14. Mechanical behaviors of the dispersion nuclear fuel plates induced by fuel particle swelling and thermal effect II: Effects of variations of the fuel particle diameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shurong; Wang, Qiming; Huo, Yongzhong

    2010-02-01

    In order to predict the irradiation mechanical behaviors of plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements, the total burnup is divided into two stages: the initial stage and the increasing stage. At the initial stage, the thermal effects induced by the high temperature differences between the operation temperatures and the room temperature are mainly considered; and at the increasing stage, the intense mechanical interactions between the fuel particles and the matrix due to the irradiation swelling of fuel particles are focused on. The large-deformation thermo-elasto-plasticity finite element analysis is performed to evaluate the effects of particle diameters on the in-pile mechanical behaviors of fuel elements. The research results indicate that: (1) the maximum Mises stresses and equivalent plastic strains at the matrix increase with the fuel particle diameters; the effects of particle diameters on the maximum first principal stresses vary with burnup, and the considered case with the largest particle diameter holds the maximum values all along; (2) at the cladding near the interface between the fuel meat and the cladding, the Mises stresses and the first principal stresses undergo major changes with increasing burnup, and different variations exist for different particle diameter cases; (3) the maximum Mises stresses at the fuel particles rise with the particle diameters.

  15. Mechanical behaviors of the dispersion nuclear fuel plates induced by fuel particle swelling and thermal effect I: Effects of variations of the fuel particle volume fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiming; Yan, Xiaoqing; Ding, Shurong; Huo, Yongzhong

    2010-05-01

    A new method of modeling the in-pile mechanical behaviors of dispersion nuclear fuel elements is proposed. Considering the irradiation swelling together with the thermal effect, numerical simulations of the in-pile mechanical behaviors are performed with the developed finite element models for different fuel particle volume fractions of the fuel meat. The effects of the particle volume fractions on the mechanical performances of the fuel element are studied. The research results indicate that: (1) the maximum Mises stresses and equivalent plastic strains at the matrix increase with the particle volume fractions at each burnup; the locations of the maximum first principal stresses shift with increasing burnup; at low burnups, the maximum first principal stresses increase with the particle volume fractions; while at high burnups, the 20% volume fraction case holds the lowest value; (2) at the cladding, the maximum equivalent plastic strains and the tensile principal stresses increase with the particle volume fractions; while the maximum Mises stresses do not follow this order at high burnups; (3) the maximum Mises stresses at the fuel particles increase with the particle volume fractions, and the particles will engender plastic strains until the particle volume fraction reaches high enough.

  16. 3-D imaging of particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wertheim

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that 3 to 5% of total lung cancer deaths in the UK may be associated with elevated radon concentration. Radon gas levels can be assessed using CR-39 plastic detectors which are often assessed by 2-D image analysis of surface images. 3-D analysis has the potential to provide information relating to the angle at which alpha particles impinge on the detector. In this study we used a "LEXT" OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan to image tracks on five CR-39 detectors. We were able to identify several patterns of single and coalescing tracks from 3-D visualisation. Thus this method may provide a means of detailed 3-D analysis of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors.

  17. 3-D imaging of particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2010-05-01

    It has been suggested that 3 to 5% of total lung cancer deaths in the UK may be associated with elevated radon concentration. Radon gas levels can be assessed using CR-39 plastic detectors which are often assessed by 2-D image analysis of surface images. 3-D analysis has the potential to provide information relating to the angle at which alpha particles impinge on the detector. In this study we used a "LEXT" OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) to image tracks on five CR-39 detectors. We were able to identify several patterns of single and coalescing tracks from 3-D visualisation. Thus this method may provide a means of detailed 3-D analysis of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors.

  18. Characteristics of particle production in high energy nuclear collisions a model-based analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Guptaroy, P; Bhattacharya, S; Bhattacharya, D P

    2002-01-01

    The present work pertains to the production of some very important negatively charged secondaries in lead-lead and gold-gold collisions at AGS, SPS and RHIC energies. We would like to examine here the role of the particular version of sequential chain model (SCM), which was applied widely in the past in analysing data on various high-energy hadronic collisions, in explaining now the latest findings on the features of particle production in the relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The agreement between the model of our choice and the measured data is found to be modestly satisfactory in cases of the most prominent and abundantly produced varieties of the secondaries in the above-stated two nuclear collisions. (25 refs).

  19. Measurement and evaluation of the excitation functions for alpha particle induced nuclear reactions on niobium

    CERN Document Server

    Tarkanyi, F; Szelecsenyi, F; Sonck, M; Hermanne, A

    2002-01-01

    Alpha particle induced nuclear reactions were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural niobium targets up to 43 MeV. Excitation functions were measured for the production of sup 9 sup 6 sup m sup g Tc, sup 9 sup 5 sup m Tc, sup 9 sup 5 sup g Tc, sup 9 sup 4 sup g Tc, sup 9 sup 5 sup m sup g Nb and sup 9 sup 2 sup m Nb. Cumulative cross-sections, thick target yields and activation functions were deduced and compared with available literature data. Applications of the excitation functions in the field of thin layer activation techniques and beam monitoring are also discussed.

  20. γ-Particle coincidence technique for the study of nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagatto, V.A.B., E-mail: vinicius.zagatto@gmail.com [Instituto de Física da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, J.R.B.; Allegro, P.R.P.; Chamon, L.C.; Cybulska, E.W.; Medina, N.H.; Ribas, R.V.; Seale, W.A.; Silva, C.P.; Gasques, L.R. [Instituto de Física da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Zahn, G.S.; Genezini, F.A.; Shorto, J.M.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (Brazil); Lubian, J.; Linares, R. [Instituto de Física da Universidade Federal Fluminense (Brazil); Toufen, D.L. [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil); Silveira, M.A.G. [Centro Universitário da FEI (Brazil); Rossi, E.S. [Centro Universitário FIEO – UNIFIEO (Brazil); Nobre, G.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Saci-Perere γ ray spectrometer (located at the Pelletron AcceleratorLaboratory – IFUSP) was employed to implement the γ-particle coincidence technique for the study of nuclear reaction mechanisms. For this, the {sup 18}O+{sup 110}Pd reaction has been studied in the beam energy range of 45–54 MeV. Several corrections to the data due to various effects (energy and angle integrations, beam spot size, γ detector finite size and the vacuum de-alignment) are small and well controlled. The aim of this work was to establish a proper method to analyze the data and identify the reaction mechanisms involved. To achieve this goal the inelastic scattering to the first excited state of {sup 110}Pd has been extracted and compared to coupled channel calculations using the São Paulo Potential (PSP), being reasonably well described by it.

  1. PIXE characterization of CsI(Tl) scintillators used for particle detection in nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, N.; Casini, G.; Frosini, M.; Tobia, G.; Marchi, T.

    2008-05-01

    Particle-Induced X-ray Emission has been used to measure Thallium concentration in several CsI(Tl) scintillators from different manufacturers, in order to check their nominal declared values and correlate their behaviour with actual Tl concentration. Indeed, both Tl doping level and its uniformity affect light emission of these detectors, which are largely employed in nuclear physics experiments. In some of the examined crystals Tl concentration values from PIXE measurements came out to be quite different from those declared. This allowed us to explain apparent anomalies in the trend of their α/γ-induced light yield ratio versus Tl content. In some cases, the presence of unexpected contaminants was also pointed out.

  2. PIXE characterization of CsI(Tl) scintillators used for particle detection in nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, N. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Sezione di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy)], E-mail: grassi@fi.infn.it; Casini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Sezione di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Frosini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Tobia, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-Sezione di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Marchi, T. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    Particle-Induced X-ray Emission has been used to measure Thallium concentration in several CsI(Tl) scintillators from different manufacturers, in order to check their nominal declared values and correlate their behaviour with actual Tl concentration. Indeed, both Tl doping level and its uniformity affect light emission of these detectors, which are largely employed in nuclear physics experiments. In some of the examined crystals Tl concentration values from PIXE measurements came out to be quite different from those declared. This allowed us to explain apparent anomalies in the trend of their {alpha}/{gamma}-induced light yield ratio versus Tl content. In some cases, the presence of unexpected contaminants was also pointed out.

  3. $\\gamma$ and fast-timing spectroscopy of the doubly magic $^{132}$Sn and its one- and two-neutron particle/hole neighbours

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to use fast-timing and spectroscopy to study five nuclei including the doubly magic $^{132}$Sn and its four neighbours: two-neutron hole $^{130}$Sn, one-neutron hole $^{131}$Sn, one-neutron particle $^{133}$Sn and two-neutron particle $^{134}$Sn. There is an increasing interest in these nuclei since they serve to test nuclear models using state-of-the-art interactions and many body approaches, and they provide information relevant to deduce single particle states. In addition properties of these nuclei are very important to model the astrophysical $\\textit{r-process}$. The present ISOLDE facility provides unique capabilities to study these Sn nuclei populated in the $\\beta$-decay of In isomers, produced from a UCx target unit equipped with neutron converter and ionized with RILIS, capable of selective isomer ionization. The increased production yields for $^{132}$In are estimated to be 200 larger than in the previous work done at OSIRIS. We will use the recently commissioned Isolde Decay Station (I...

  4. Magnetic nanoparticles in different biological environments analyzed by magnetic particle spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwa, Norbert; Seidel, Maria; Radon, Patricia; Wiekhorst, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Quantification of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNP) in biological systems like cells, tissue, or organs is of vital importance for development of novel biomedical applications, e.g. magnetofection, drug targeting or hyperthermia. Among others, the recently developed magnetic measurement technique magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) provides signals that are specific for MNP. MPS is based on the non-linear magnetic response of MNP exposed to a strong sinusoidal excitation field of up to 25 mT amplitude and 25 kHz frequency. So far, it has been proven a powerful tool for quantification of MNP in biological systems. In this study we investigated in detail the influence of typical biological media on the magnetic behavior of different MNP systems by MPS. The results reveal that amplitude and shape (ratio of harmonics) of the MPS spectra allow for perceptively monitoring changes in MNP magnetism caused by different physiological media. Additionally, the observed linear correlation between MPS amplitude and shape alterations can be used to reduce the quantification uncertainty for MNP suspended in a biological environment.

  5. High resolution spectroscopy of a small number of particles in a solid

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, T A

    2000-01-01

    The technique of single molecule spectroscopy in solids is investigated, with the view to extending this technique to the detection of single ions of titanium in sapphire. High-resolution experimental apparatus was set-up to study single particles in solids and to allow hole-burning experiments to be carried out. Hole-burning processes were investigated in samples of uranium doped strontium tungstate with concentrations of 500 ppm and 200 ppm. Hole-burning at different laser intensities revealed a homogeneous linewidth of (6.3 +- 0.1) MHz for the stronger doped sample. The weaker doped sample was determined to have a homogeneous linewidth less than the laser linewidth. The relaxation behaviour of holes, monitored between 10-20 K, was also examined. The relaxation process was found to be similar to an activated process with an attempt frequency of 309 s sup - sup 1 and it was concluded that the process was some form of tunnelling with strong phonon coupling. Repeatable, stable single molecules of terrylene in ...

  6. Clay particles - potential of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) for studying interlayer spacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, N; Smith, S V [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Guagliardo, P; Williams, J [Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Physics, University of Western Australia, WA 6009 (Australia); Musumeci, A; Martin, D, E-mail: nfg@ansto.gov.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, University of Queensland, QLD (Australia)

    2011-01-01

    Characterisation of clays is generally achieved by traditional methods, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, clays are often difficult to characterise due to lack of long-range order, thus these tools are not always reliable. Because interlayer spacing in clays can be adjusted to house molecules, there is growing interest to use these materials for drug delivery. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was examined as an alternative tool to characterise a series of well-known clays. XRD of two layered double hydroxides; MgAl-LDH and MgGd-LDH, natural hectorite, fluoromica and laponite, and their PALS spectra were compared. XRD data was used to calculate the interlayer d- spacing in these materials and results show a decrease in interlayer spacing as the heavy metal ions are substituted for those of large ionic radii. Similar results were obtained for PALS data. This preliminary study suggests PALS has potential as a routine tool for characterising clay particles. Further work will examine the sensitivity and reliability of PALS to percent of metal doping and hydration in clay microstructure.

  7. Beyond the Quasi-Particle picture in Nuclear Matter calculations using Green's function techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, H S

    2006-01-01

    Widths of low-lying states in nuclei are of the order of 30 MeV. These large widths are a consequence of the strong interactions leading to a strongly correlated many body system at the typical densities of nuclear matter. Nevertheless "traditional" Brueckner calculations treat these states as quasiparticles i.e. with spectral functions of zero widths. The width is related to the imaginary part of the selfenergy and is included selfconsistently in an extension of the Brueckner theory using T-matrix and Green's function techniques. A more general formulation applicable also to non-equilibrium systems is contained in the Kadanoff-Baym (KB) equations while still maintaining the basic many-body techniques of Bruecknet theory. In the present work the two-time KB-equations are time-stepped along the imaginary time-axis to calculate the binding energy of nuclear matter as a function of density, including the spectral widths self-consistently. These zero temperature calculations are compared with quasi-particle calcu...

  8. Carriers of the PCSK9 R46L Variant Are Characterized by an Antiatherogenic Lipoprotein Profile Assessed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy-Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Rutger; Boyer, Marjorie; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Hovingh, G Kees; Kastelein, John J P; Wareham, Nicholas; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Arsenault, Benoit J

    2017-01-01

    Carriers of the PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9) R46L genetic variant (rs11591147) are characterized by low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease. We studied the impact of the R46L variant on lipoprotein size and composition. Lipoprotein size and composition were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 2373 participants of the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition)-Norfolk study. After adjusting for age, sex, and cardiovascular disease status, carriers of the R46L variant (n=77) were characterized by lower concentrations of very low-density lipoprotein particles (85.8±26.2 versus 99.0±33.3 nmol/L; Plipoprotein particles (1479.7±396.8 versus 1662.9±458.3 nmol/L; Plipoprotein(a) (11.1 [7.2-28.6] versus 12.4 [6.7-29.1] mg/dL; Plipoprotein particle and very low-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein particle sizes were comparable in carriers and noncarriers. Carriers were characterized by lower secretory phospholipase A2 (4.2±0.9 versus 4.6±1.3 nmol/mL/min; P=0.004) and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity (47.5±14.1 versus 52.4±16.2 nmol/mL/min; P=0.02) compared with noncarriers. Results of this study suggest that carriers of the PCSK9 R46L genetic variant have lower very low-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein particle concentrations, lower lipoprotein(a) levels, and lower secretory phospholipase A2 and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity compared with noncarriers. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Classification of hot particles from the Chernobyl accident and nuclear weapons detonations by non-destructive methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheltonozhsky, V; Mück, K; Bondarkov, M

    2001-01-01

    Both after the Chernobyl accident and nuclear weapon detonations, agglomerates of radioactive material, so-called hot particles, were released or formed which show a behaviour in the environment quite different from the activity released in gaseous or aerosol form. The differences in their characteristic properties, in the radionuclide composition and the uranium and actinide contents are described in detail for these particles. While nuclear bomb hot particles (both from fission and fusion bombs) incorporate well detectable trace amounts of 60Co and 152Eu, these radionuclides are absent in Chernobyl hot particles. In contrast, Chernobyl hot particles contain 125Sb and 144Ce which are absent in atomic bomb HPs. Obvious differences are also observable between fusion and fission bombs' hot particles (significant differences in 152Eu/l55Eu, 154Eu/155Eu and 238Pu/239Pu ratios) which facilitate the identification of HPs of unknown provensence. The ratio of 239Pu/240Pu in Chernobyl hot particles could be determined by a non-destructive method at 1:1.5. A non-destructive method to determine the content of non-radioactive elements by Kalpha-emission measurements was developed by which inactive Zr, Nb, Fe and Ni could be verified in the particles.

  10. Nuclear moments and differences in mean square charge radii of short-lived neon isotopes by collinear laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Geithner, R W

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear moments and charge radii of short-lived neon isotopes were measured by the use of collinear laser spectroscopy at the on-line mass separator ISOLDE at CERN. After a general introduction the semiclassical theory of atomic spectra is given and the relevant properties are calculated for neon. The atomic physics section is followed by a description of the experimental setup of the collinear laser spectroscopy experiment at ISOLDE. From the mass separator an isotopically clean ion beam with a kinetic energy of 60 keV is delivered to the experiments. In collinear laser spectroscopy the incoming ion beam from the mass separator is superimposed to a single frequency cw laser beam. The frequency of the atomic transition $\

  11. Quantum Dynamics and Spectroscopy of Ab Initio Liquid Water: The Interplay of Nuclear and Electronic Quantum Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Markland, Thomas E

    2017-03-22

    Understanding the reactivity and spectroscopy of aqueous solutions at the atomistic level is crucial for the elucidation and design of chemical processes. However, the simulation of these systems requires addressing the formidable challenges of treating the quantum nature of both the electrons and nuclei. Exploiting our recently developed methods that provide acceleration by up to 2 orders of magnitude, we combine path integral simulations with on-the-fly evaluation of the electronic structure at the hybrid density functional theory level to capture the interplay between nuclear quantum effects and the electronic surface. Here we show that this combination provides accurate structure and dynamics, including the full infrared and Raman spectra of liquid water. This allows us to demonstrate and explain the failings of lower-level density functionals for dynamics and vibrational spectroscopy when the nuclei are treated quantum mechanically. These insights thus provide a foundation for the reliable investigation of spectroscopy and reactivity in aqueous environments.

  12. The Role of Nuclear Fragmentation in Particle Therapy and Space Radiation Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cary eZeitlin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The transport of so-called HZE particles (those having high charge, Z, and energy, E through matter is crucially important both in space radiation protection and in the clinical setting where heavy ions are used for cancer treatment. Transport physics is governed by two types of interactions, electromagnetic (ionization energy loss and nuclear. Models of transport such as those used in treatment planning and space mission planning must account for both effects in detail. The theory of electromagnetic interactions is well developed, but nucleus-nucleus collisions are so complex that no fundamental physical theory currently describes them. Instead, interaction models are generally anchored to experimental data, which in some areas are far from complete. The lack of fundamental physics knowledge introduces uncertainties in the calculations of exposures and their associated risks. These uncertainties are greatly compounded by the much larger uncertainties in biological response to HZE particles. In this article, we discuss the role of nucleus-nucleus interactions in heavy charged particle therapy and in deep space, where astronauts will receive a chronic low dose from Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs and potentially higher short-term doses from sporadic, unpredictable Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs. GCRs include HZE particles; SEPs typically do not and we therefore exclude them from consideration in this article. Nucleus-nucleus collisions can result in the breakup of heavy ions into lighter ions. In space, this is generally beneficial because dose and dose equivalent are, on the whole, reduced in the process. The GCRs can be considered a radiation field with a significant high-LET component; when they pass through matter, the high-LET component is attenuated, at the cost of a slight increase in the low-LET component. Not only are the standard measures of risk reduced by fragmentation, but it can be argued that fragmentation also reduces the

  13. Associated-particle sealed-tube neutron probe: Detection of explosives, contraband, and nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.

    1996-05-01

    Continued research and development of the APSTNG shows the potential for practical field use of this technology for detection of explosives, contraband, and nuclear materials. The APSTNG (associated-particle sealed-tube generator) inspects the item to be examined using penetrating 14-MeV neutrons generated by the deuterium-tritium reaction inside a compact accelerator tube. An alpha detector built into the sealed tube detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron emitted in a cone encompassing the volume to be inspected. Penetrating high-energy gamma-rays from the resulting neutron reactions identify specific nuclides inside the volume. Flight-times determined from the detection times of gamma-rays and alpha-particles separate the prompt and delayed gamma-ray spectra and allow a coarse 3-D image to be obtained of nuclides identified in the prompt spectrum. The generator and detectors can be on the same side of the inspected object, on opposite sides, or with intermediate orientations. Thus, spaces behind walls and other confined regions can be inspected. Signals from container walls can be discriminated against using the flight-time technique. No collimators or shielding are required, the neutron generator is relatively small, and commercial-grade electronics are employed. The use of 14-MeV neutrons yields a much higher cross-section for detecting nitrogen than that for systems based on thermal-neutron reactions alone, and the broad range of elements with significant 14-MeV neutron cross-sections extends explosives detection to other elements including low-nitrogen compounds, and allows detection of many other substances. Proof-of-concept experiments have been successfully performed for conventional explosives, chemical warfare agents, cocaine, and fissionable materials.

  14. 3D imaging of particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2009-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionizing decay products is known to cause lung cancer in human. In the U.K., it has been suggested that 3 to 5 % of total lung cancer deaths can be linked to elevated radon concentrations in the home and/or workplace. Radon monitoring in buildings is therefore routinely undertaken in areas of known risk. Indeed, some organisations such as the Radon Council in the UK and the Environmental Protection Agency in the USA, advocate a ‘to test is best' policy. Radon gas occurs naturally, emanating from the decay of 238U in rock and soils. Its concentration can be measured using CR?39 plastic detectors which conventionally are assessed by 2D image analysis of the surface; however there can be some variation in outcomes / readings even in closely spaced detectors. A number of radon measurement methods are currently in use (for examples, activated carbon and electrets) but the most widely used are CR?39 solid state nuclear track?etch detectors (SSNTDs). In this technique, heavily ionizing alpha particles leave tracks in the form of radiation damage (via interaction between alpha particles and the atoms making up the CR?39 polymer). 3D imaging of the tracks has the potential to provide information relating to angle and energy of alpha particles but this could be time consuming. Here we describe a new method for rapid high resolution 3D imaging of SSNTDs. A ‘LEXT' OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope was used in confocal mode to successfully obtain 3D image data on four CR?39 plastic detectors. 3D visualisation and image analysis enabled characterisation of track features. This method may provide a means of rapid and detailed 3D analysis of SSNTDs. Keywords: Radon; SSNTDs; confocal laser scanning microscope; 3D imaging; LEXT

  15. Absolute quantitative analysis for sorbic acid in processed foods using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuki, Takashi, E-mail: ohtsuki@nihs.go.jp [National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko [National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method using qHNMR was applied and validated to determine SA in processed foods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method has good accuracy, precision, selectiveness, and linearity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed method is more rapid and simple than the conventional method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that the proposed method is reliable for the accurate determination of SA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method can be used for the monitoring of SA in processed foods. - Abstract: An analytical method using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance (qHNMR) spectroscopy was applied and validated for the absolute quantification of sorbic acid (SA) in processed foods. The proposed method showed good linearity. The recoveries for samples spiked at the maximum usage level specified for food in Japan and at 0.13 g kg{sup -1} (beverage: 0.013 g kg{sup -1}) were larger than 80%, whereas those for samples spiked at 0.063 g kg{sup -1} (beverage: 0.0063 g kg{sup -1}) were between 56.9 and 83.5%. The limit of quantification was 0.063 g kg{sup -1} for foods (and 0.0063 g kg{sup -1} for beverages containing Lactobacillus species). Analysis of the SA content of commercial processed foods revealed quantities equal to or greater than those measured using conventional steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography quantification. The proposed method was rapid, simple, accurate, and precise, and provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. It could therefore be used as an alternative to the quantification of SA in processed foods using conventional method.

  16. Application of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a nuclear proliferation detection technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) potentially possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal verification technology. Some of these ideal traits are: very high selectivity and specificity to allow the deconvolution of a mixture of the chemicals of interest, high sensitivity in order to measure a species at trace levels, high reliability and long-term durability, applicability to a wide range of chemicals capability for sensing in a variety of environmental conditions, independence of the physical state of the chemical capability for quantitative analysis, and finally, but no less important capability for full signal development within seconds. In this presentation, the potential of RRS as a detection/identification technology for chemicals pertinent to nuclear materials production and processing will be assessed. A review of the basic principles behind this technique, both theoretical and experimental, will be discussed along with some recent results obtained in this laboratory. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy hv promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, therefore providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. The enhancement of a Raman signal occurs when the excitation frequency is isoenergetic with an allowed electronic transition. Under resonance conditions, scattering cross-sections have been enhanced up to 6 orders of magnitude, thereby allowing the measurement of resonance Raman spectra from concentrations as dilute as 20 ppb for PAHs (with the potential of pptr). In detection/verification programs, this condition translates to increased sensitivity (ppm/ppb) and increased probing distance (m/km).

  17. Application of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a nuclear proliferation detection technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-03-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) potentially possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal verification technology. Some of these ideal traits are: very high selectivity and specificity to allow the deconvolution of a mixture of the chemicals of interest, high sensitivity in order to measure a species at trace levels, high reliability and long-term durability, applicability to a wide range of chemicals capability for sensing in a variety of environmental conditions, independence of the physical state of the chemical capability for quantitative analysis, and finally, but no less important capability for full signal development within seconds. In this presentation, the potential of RRS as a detection/identification technology for chemicals pertinent to nuclear materials production and processing will be assessed. A review of the basic principles behind this technique, both theoretical and experimental, will be discussed along with some recent results obtained in this laboratory. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy hv promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, therefore providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. The enhancement of a Raman signal occurs when the excitation frequency is isoenergetic with an allowed electronic transition. Under resonance conditions, scattering cross-sections have been enhanced up to 6 orders of magnitude, thereby allowing the measurement of resonance Raman spectra from concentrations as dilute as 20 ppb for PAHs (with the potential of pptr). In detection/verification programs, this condition translates to increased sensitivity (ppm/ppb) and increased probing distance (m/km).

  18. Nuclear export and import of human hepatitis B virus capsid protein and particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Cheng Li

    Full Text Available It remains unclear what determines the subcellular localization of hepatitis B virus (HBV core protein (HBc and particles. To address this fundamental issue, we have identified four distinct HBc localization signals in the arginine rich domain (ARD of HBc, using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and fractionation/Western blot analysis. ARD consists of four tight clustering arginine-rich subdomains. ARD-I and ARD-III are associated with two co-dependent nuclear localization signals (NLS, while ARD-II and ARD-IV behave like two independent nuclear export signals (NES. This conclusion is based on five independent lines of experimental evidence: i Using an HBV replication system in hepatoma cells, we demonstrated in a double-blind manner that only the HBc of mutant ARD-II+IV, among a total of 15 ARD mutants, can predominantly localize to the nucleus. ii These results were confirmed using a chimera reporter system by placing mutant or wild type HBc trafficking signals in the heterologous context of SV40 large T antigen (LT. iii By a heterokaryon or homokaryon analysis, the fusion protein of SV40 LT-HBc ARD appeared to transport from nuclei of transfected donor cells to nuclei of recipient cells, suggesting the existence of an NES in HBc ARD. This putative NES is leptomycin B resistant. iv We demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation that HBc ARD can physically interact with a cellular factor TAP/NXF1 (Tip-associated protein/nuclear export factor-1, which is known to be important for nuclear export of mRNA and proteins. Treatment with a TAP-specific siRNA strikingly shifted cytoplasmic HBc to nucleus, and led to a near 7-fold reduction of viral replication, and a near 10-fold reduction in HBsAg secretion. v HBc of mutant ARD-II+IV was accumulated predominantly in the nucleus in a mouse model by hydrodynamic delivery. In addition to the revised map of NLS, our results suggest that HBc could shuttle rapidly between nucleus and cytoplasm via a novel

  19. Production of high-PT cumulative particles in proton-nuclear interactions at 50 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ammosov, V V; Viktorov, V A; Gapienko, V A; Gapienko, G S; Gres, V N; Korotkov, V A; Mysnik, A I; Prudkoglyad, A F; Sviridov, Yu M; Semak, A A; Terekhov, V I; Uglekov, V Ya; Ukhanov, M N; Chuiko, B V; Baldin, A A; Shimanskiy, S S

    2014-01-01

    The data on production of cumulative particles in the high transverse momenta domain (up to ~ 3.5 GeV/c) in proton-nuclear interactions are presented for the first time. An indication on the local character of particle production in the cumulative domain is obtained. The observed strong dependence of the particle production cross section on the atomic mass of the target does not fit the A - dependence obtained in the pre-cumulative and cumulative domains for low transverse momenta at constant part of the exponent. The experiment was performed at U70 (IHEP) with the extracted 50 GeV/c proton beam.

  20. Investigation of uranium isotopic signatures in real-life particles from a nuclear facility by thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraiem, Monia; Richter, Stephan; Kühn, Heinz; Stefaniak, Elzbieta A; Kerckhove, Giovani; Truyens, Jan; Aregbe, Yetunde

    2011-04-15

    An improved method was recently developed for the isotopic analysis of single-reference uranium oxide particles for nuclear safeguards. This method is a combination of analytical tools including in situ SEM micromanipulation, filament carburization and multiple ion counting (MIC) detection, which is found to improve sensitivity for thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) isotope ratio analysis. The question was raised whether this method could be applied for the detection of nuclear signatures in real-life particles with unknown isotopic composition. Therefore, environmental dust was collected in different locations within a nuclear facility. The screening of the samples to find the uranium particles of interest was performed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) detector. The comparison of the measurement results to reference data evaluated by international safeguards authorities was of key importance for data interpretation. For the majority of investigated particles, detection of uranium isotopic signatures provided information on current and past nuclear feed operations that compared well with facility declarations.

  1. The sixth Conference on Advanced Topics in the Interdisciplinary Fields of Particle Physics, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ The sixth Conference on Advanced Topics in the Interdisciplinary Fields of Particle Paysics.Nuclear Paysic8and Cosmology was held on July 22-27,2007 in Lijiang,Yunan Province.Over 70 scientists who were activelv working in the fields attended the conference and 42 physicists gave talks.9 papers have been selected to be published in the proceedings.

  2. Advances in nuclear particle dosimetry for radiation protection and medicine - Ninth Symposium on Neutron Dosimetry (Editorial Material, English)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoetelief, J; Bos, A J.; Schuhmacher, H; McDonald, Joseph C.; Schultz, F W.; Pihet, P

    2004-12-15

    The Ninth Symposium on Neutron Dosimetry has been expanded to cover not only neutron radiation but heavy charged particle dosimetry as well. The applications are found in such fields as radiation protection, aircrew dosimetry, medicine, nuclear power and accelerator health physics. Scientists from many countries from around the world presented their work, and described the latest developments in techniques and instrumentation.

  3. Investigating the lignocellulosic composition during delignification using confocal raman spectroscopy, cross-polarization magic angle spinning carbon 13 - nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS 13C- NMR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chunilall, Viren

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available spectroscopy, Cross-Polarization Magic Angle Spinning Carbon 13 - Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP/MAS 13C-NMR) spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in conjunction with image analysis. The confocal Raman results showed that there were differences...

  4. Chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis of heavy crude oil mixtures with emphasis in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Sandra L. [Department of Chemistry, QOPNA, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Silva, Artur M.S., E-mail: artur.silva@ua.pt [Department of Chemistry, QOPNA, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Ribeiro, Jorge C. [Petrogal SA, Laboratory of Matosinhos Refinery, Rua Belchior Robles, 4452-852 Leca da Palmeira, Matosinhos (Portugal); Martins, Fernando G. [LEPAE, University of Porto, Engineering Faculty, Department of Chemical Engineering, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Da Silva, Francisco A.; Silva, Carlos M. [Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2011-11-30

    Graphical abstract: The chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques used to characterize heavy crude oils, although more focused in the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as the technique of choice, due to its capability to provide great information on the chemical nature of individual types of proton and carbon atoms in different and complex mixtures of crude oils are described. This review is based on 65 references and describes in a critical and interpretative ways the advantages of the NMR spectroscopy as a main technique to be used in crude oil refining industries that want to characterize crude oil fractions and the obtained refined products. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chromatogrfaphic and spectroscopic techniques used to characterize heavy crude oils have been reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This review describes in a critical and interpretative ways the advantages of the NMR spectroscopy as a main technique to be used in crude oil refining industries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The progress in the interpretation of the NMR spectra and of different multivariate data analyses and their potential in the identification and characterization of hydrocarbons and their physical and chemical properties have also been reviewed. - Abstract: The state of the art in the characterization of heavy crude oil mixtures is presented. This characterization can be done by different techniques, such as gas chromatography (GC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), thin layer chromatography (TLC), infrared spectroscopy (IR), Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS). Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is the technique of choice due to its capability to provide information on the chemical nature of individual types of hydrogen and carbon atoms in different and complex mixtures of crude oils. The progress made in the interpretation of the NMR spectra with the development of new NMR

  5. Decay spectroscopy for nuclear astrophysics: β- and β-delayed proton decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trache, L.; Banu, A.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Simmons, E.; Spiridon, A.; Tribble, R. E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Jokinen, A.; Äysto, J.; Davinson, T.; Lotay, G.; Woods, P. J.; Pollacco, E.

    2012-02-01

    In several radiative proton capture reactions important in novae and XRBs, the resonant parts play the capital role. We use decay spectroscopy techniques to find these resonances and study their properties. We have developed techniques to measure beta- and beta-delayed proton decay of sd-shell, proton-rich nuclei produced and separated with the MARS recoil spectrometer of Texas A&M University. The short-lived radioactive species are produced in-flight, separated, then slowed down (from about 40 MeV/u) and implanted in the middle of very thin Si detectors. This allows us to measure protons with energies as low as 200 keV from nuclei with lifetimes of 100 ms or less. At the same time we measure gamma-rays up to 8 MeV with high resolution HPGe detectors. We have studied the decay of 23Al, 27P, 31Cl, all important for understanding explosive H-burning in novae. The technique has shown a remarkable selectivity to beta-delayed charged-particle emission and works even at radioactive beam rates of a few pps. The states populated are resonances for the radiative proton capture reactions 22Na(p,γ)23Mg (crucial for the depletion of 22Na in novae), 26mAl(p,γ)27Si and 30P(p,γ)31S (bottleneck in novae and XRB burning), respectively. Lastly, results with a new detector that allowed us to measure down to about 80 keV proton energy are announced.

  6. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  7. Internet end-to-end performance monitoring for the High Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, W.

    2000-02-22

    Modern High Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics (HENP) experiments at Laboratories around the world present a significant challenge to wide area networks. Petabytes (1015) or exabytes (1018) of data will be generated during the lifetime of the experiment. Much of this data will be distributed via the Internet to the experiment's collaborators at Universities and Institutes throughout the world for analysis. In order to assess the feasibility of the computing goals of these and future experiments, the HENP networking community is actively monitoring performance across a large part of the Internet used by its collaborators. Since 1995, the pingER project has been collecting data on ping packet loss and round trip times. In January 2000, there are 28 monitoring sites in 15 countries gathering data on over 2,000 end-to-end pairs. HENP labs such as SLAC, Fermi Lab and CERN are using Advanced Network's Surveyor project and monitoring performance from one-way delay of UDP packets. More recently several HENP sites have become involved with NLANR's active measurement program (AMP). In addition SLAC and CERN are part of the RIPE test-traffic project and SLAC is home for a NIMI machine. The large End-to-end performance monitoring infrastructure allows the HENP networking community to chart long term trends and closely examine short term glitches across a wide range of networks and connections. The different methodologies provide opportunities to compare results based on different protocols and statistical samples. Understanding agreement and discrepancies between results provides particular insight into the nature of the network. This paper will highlight the practical side of monitoring by reviewing the special needs of High Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics experiments and provide an overview of the experience of measuring performance across a large number of interconnected networks throughout the world with various methodologies. In particular, results

  8. Characteristics and fabrication of cermet spent nuclear fuel casks: ceramic particles embedded in steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Swaney, P.M.; Tiegs, T.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Cermets are being investigated as an advanced material of construction for casks that can be used for storage, transport, or disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Cermets, which consist of ceramic particles embedded in steel, are a method to incorporate brittle ceramics with highly desirable properties into a strong ductile metal matrix with a high thermal conductivity, thus combining the best properties of both materials. Traditional applications of cermets include tank armor, vault armor, drill bits, and nuclear test-reactor fuel. Cermets with different ceramics (DUO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, etc.) are being investigated for the manufacture of SNF casks. Cermet casks offer four potential benefits: greater capacity (more SNF assemblies) for the same gross weight cask, greater capacity (more SNF assemblies) for the same external dimensions, improved resistance to assault, and superior repository performance. These benefits are achieved by varying the composition, volume fraction, and particulate size of the ceramic particles in the cermet with position in the cask body. Addition of depleted uranium dioxide (DUO{sub 2}) to the cermet increases shielding density, improves shielding effectiveness, and increases cask capacity for a given cask weight or size. Addition of low-density aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to the outer top and bottom sections of the cermet cask, where the radiation levels are lower, can lower cask weight without compromising shielding. The use of Al2O3 and other oxides, in appropriate locations, can increase resistance to assault. Repository performance may be improved by compositional control of the cask body to (1) create a local geochemical environment that slows the long-term degradation of the SNF and (2) enables the use of DUO{sub 2} for longterm criticality control. While the benefits of using cermets follow directly from their known properties, the primary challenge is to develop low-cost methods to fabricate

  9. Application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and vibrational spectroscopy for the characterisation of fruit products and beverages

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    O trabalho apresentado nesta tese pretendeu desenvolver e aplicar métodos espectroscópicos, em especial espectroscopia de ressonância magnética nuclear e técnicas acopladas, e também espectroscopia de infravermelho, para estudar a composição e a bioquímica de frutos e bebidas. No Capítulo I, apresenta-se o estado do conhecimento sobre a composição e bioquímica dos alimentos em análise neste trabalho, evidenciando-se os aspectos que justificam o seu estudo mais aprofundado e ...

  10. Particles identification using nuclear emulsion in OPERA; Identification des particules par les emulsions nucleaires dans OPERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manai, K

    2007-10-15

    The Opera experiment will try to confirm the {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations by the appearance of the {nu}{sub {tau}} in a pure {nu}{sub {mu}} beam. Indeed, a neutrino beam almost pure is produced at CERN (CNGS Beam) and sent to the Opera detector. The detector is composed of two muons spectrometers and a target formed by walls of bricks. Each brick is an alternation of lead plates and emulsions. This modular structure allows to reconstruct the kink topology of the {tau} lepton decay with a high spatial resolution. The great challenge of the Opera experiment is to detect the {nu}{sub {tau}} interactions with the less uncertainty. To reduce this uncertainty it is essential to identify with the greatest efficiency any background event not including a tau particle. My work permits to reduce background. My principal contribution concerns the selection development, the reconstruction and the muons identification at low energy. This work is based on the setting of variables related to the deposit energy and the multiple scattering. Previously, only deposit energy was used in the analyses of pion/muon separation. This study allows doubling the muon identification efficiency at low energy. This leads to increase the background events rejection in Opera and to decrease the contamination by 30%. I also studied the nuclear emulsions capacity to identify charged particles through the analysis of a test beam carried out by the Nagoya group. This test contains protons and pions with different energies. My work proves that the European scan system gives comparable results with those obtained by the Japanese scan system. (author)

  11. The use of dielectric spectroscopy in the investigation of the effect of polymer choice on the flocculation of polystyrene particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Vittrup; Hinge, Mogens; Keiding, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    The flocculation of colloidal suspensions using synthetic polymeric flocculants is an important operation in separation processes. Optimizing flocculant use requires insight into the underlying mechanisms governing flocculation. As most existing methods for the online characterization of floccula......The flocculation of colloidal suspensions using synthetic polymeric flocculants is an important operation in separation processes. Optimizing flocculant use requires insight into the underlying mechanisms governing flocculation. As most existing methods for the online characterization...... of flocculation processes can only be used on dilute suspensions, new methods applicable at high solid content levels are of interest. This study used dielectric spectroscopy to investigate the mechanisms involved in the flocculation of polystyrene particles with three different cationic polymers. We observed...... that the relaxation time of the dielectric dispersion increased as particle flocculation was initiated. Reduction of particle charge due to polymer addition was found to reduce the magnitude of the dielectric dispersion, whereas the formation of aggregates increased it. This resulted in decreasing magnitude when...

  12. Size distribution of radioactive particles collected at Tokai, Japan 6 days after the nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yutaka; Yasuda, Kenichiro; Magara, Masaaki

    2014-06-01

    Airborne radioactive particles released by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident in 2011 were collected with a cascade low-pressure impactor at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in Tokai, Japan, 114 km south of the FDNPP. Size-fractionated samples were collected twice, in the periods of March 17-April 1, 2011, and May 9-13, 2011. These size-fractionated samplings were carried out in the earliest days at a short distance from the FDNPP. Radioactivity of short-lived nuclides (several ten days of half-life) was determined as well as (134)Cs and (137)Cs. The elemental composition of size-fractionated samples was also measured. In the first collection, the activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of (129m)Te, (140)Ba, (134)Cs, (136)Cs and (137)Cs was 1.5-1.6 μm, while the diameter of (131)I was 0.45 μm. The diameters of (134)Cs and (137)Cs in the second collection were expressed as three peaks at fractions was 0.91. A distribution map of (134)Cs/(137)Cs - (136)Cs/(137)Cs ratios was helpful in understanding the change of radioactive Cs composition. The Cs composition of size fractions released from the three reactors at the FDNPP via different processes.

  13. Highly sensitive detection of protein biomarkers via nuclear magnetic resonance biosensor with magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeun, Minhong; Park, Sungwook; Lee, Hakho; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    Magnetic-based biosensors are attractive for on-site detection of biomarkers due to the low magnetic susceptibility of biological samples. Here, we report a highly sensitive magnetic-based biosensing system that is composed of a miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) device and magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles (NFPs). The sensing performance, also identified as the transverse relaxation (R2) rate, of the NMR device is directly related to the magnetic properties of the NFPs. Therefore, we developed magnetically engineered NFPs (MnMg-NFP) and used them as NMR agents to exhibit a significantly improved R2 rate. The magnetization of the MnMg-NFPs was increased by controlling the Mn and Mg cation concentration and distribution during the synthesis process. This modification of the Mn and Mg cation directly contributed to improving the R2 rate. The miniaturized NMR system, combined with the magnetically engineered MnMg-NFPs, successfully detected a small amount of infectious influenza A H1N1 nucleoprotein with high sensitivity and stability.

  14. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, T., E-mail: tomomi.fujita@riken.jp [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Imamura, K.; Yang, X. F. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (Japan); Ueno, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Shimoda, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuo, Y. [Hosei University, Department of Advanced Sciences (Japan); Collaboration: OROCHI Collaboration

    2015-11-15

    A new laser spectroscopic method named “OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)” has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with {sup 84−87}Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes.

  15. UCTM2: An updated User friendly Configurable Trigger, scaler and delay Module for nuclear and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bourrion, O; Derome, L; Pignol, G

    2016-01-01

    We developed a highly integrated and versatile electronic module to equip small nuclear physics experiments and lab teaching classes: the User friendly Configurable Trigger, scaler and delay Module for nuclear and particle physics (UCTM). It is configurable through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and provides a large number of possible trigger conditions without any Hardware Description Language (HDL) required knowledge. This new version significantly enhances the previous capabilities by providing two additional features: signal digitization and time measurements. The design, performances and a typical application are presented.

  16. UCTM2: An updated User friendly Configurable Trigger, scaler and delay Module for nuclear and particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourrion, O.; Boyer, B.; Derome, L.; Pignol, G.

    2016-06-01

    We developed a highly integrated and versatile electronic module to equip small nuclear physics experiments and lab teaching classes: the User friendly Configurable Trigger, scaler and delay Module for nuclear and particle physics (UCTM). It is configurable through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and provides a large number of possible trigger conditions without any Hardware Description Language (HDL) required knowledge. This new version significantly enhances the previous capabilities by providing two additional features: signal digitization and time measurements. The design, performances and a typical application are presented.

  17. UCTM2: An updated User friendly Configurable Trigger, scaler and delay Module for nuclear and particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourrion, O., E-mail: olivier.bourrion@lpsc.in2p3.fr; Boyer, B.; Derome, L.; Pignol, G.

    2016-06-11

    We developed a highly integrated and versatile electronic module to equip small nuclear physics experiments and lab teaching classes: the User friendly Configurable Trigger, scaler and delay Module for nuclear and particle physics (UCTM). It is configurable through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and provides a large number of possible trigger conditions without any Hardware Description Language (HDL) required knowledge. This new version significantly enhances the previous capabilities by providing two additional features: signal digitization and time measurements. The design, performances and a typical application are presented.

  18. Nuclear Data Resources for Capture gamma-Ray Spectroscopy and Related Topics

    CERN Document Server

    Pritychenko, B

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear reaction data play an important role in nuclear reactor, medical, and fundamental science and national security applications. The wealth of information is stored in internally adopted ENDF-6 and EXFOR formats. We present a complete calculation of resonance integrals, Westcott factors, thermal and Maxwellian-averaged cross sections for Z=1-100 using evaluated nuclear reaction data. The addition of newly-evaluated neutron reaction libraries, and improvements in data processing techniques allows us to calculate nuclear industry and astrophysics parameters, and provide additional insights on all currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations will be discussed and an overview of the latest reaction data developments will be given.

  19. Nuclear Data Resources for Capture gamma-Ray Spectroscopy and Related Topics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritychenko, B.; Pritychenko,B.

    2011-08-18

    Nuclear reaction data play an important role in nuclear reactor, medical, and fundamental science and national security applications. The wealth of information is stored in internally adopted ENDF-6 and EXFOR formats. We present a complete calculation of resonance integrals, Westcott factors, thermal and Maxwellian-averaged cross sections for Z = 1-100 using evaluated nuclear reaction data. The addition of newly-evaluated neutron reaction libraries, and improvements in data processing techniques allows us to calculate nuclear industry and astrophysics parameters, and provide additional insights on all currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations will be discussed and an overview of the latest reaction data developments will be given.

  20. Fast high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy through indirect zero-quantum coherence detection in inhomogeneous fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Han-Ping; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yan-Qin; Wei, Zhi-Liang; Cai, Shu-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Zhong

    2014-06-01

    In many cases, high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are virtually impossible to obtain by conventional nuclear magnetic resonance methods because of inhomogeneity of magnetic field and inherent heterogeneity of sample. Although conventional intramolecular zero-quantum coherence (ZQC) can be used to obtain high-resolution spectrum in inhomogeneous field, the acquisition takes rather long time. In this paper, a spatially encoded intramolecular ZQC technique is proposed to fast acquire high-resolution NMR spectrum in inhomogeneous field. For the first time, the gradient-driven decoding technique is employed to selectively acquire intramolecular ZQC signals. Theoretical analyses and experimental observations demonstrate that high-resolution NMR spectral information can be retrieved within several scans even when the field inhomogeneity is severe enough to erase most spectral information. This work provides a new way to enhance the acquisition efficiency of high-resolution intramolecular ZQC spectroscopy in inhomogeneous fields.

  1. Laser spectroscopy of cadmium isotopes: probing the nuclear structure between the neutron 50 and 82 shell closures

    CERN Multimedia

    Blaum, K; Stroke, H H; Krieger, A R

    We propose to study the isotopic chain of cadmium with high-resolution laser spectroscopy for the first time. Our goal is to determine nuclear spins, moments and root-mean-square charge radii of ground and isomeric states between the neutron 50 and 82 shell closures, contributing decisively to a better understanding of the nuclear structure in the vicinity of the doubly-magic $^{100}$Sn and $^{132}$Sn. On the neutron-rich side this is expected to shed light on a shell-quenching hypothesis and consequently on the duration of the r-process along the waiting-point nuclei below $^{130}$Cd. On the neutron-deficient side it may elucidate the role of the cadmium isotopes in the rp-process for rapidly accreting neutron stars.

  2. Quantitative analysis of water heavy by NMR spectroscopy; aplicacion de la resonancia magnetica nuclear al analisis cuantitativo de agua pesada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Gil, V.

    1975-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance has been applied to a wide variety of quantitative problems. A typical example has been the determination of isotopic composition. In this paper two different analytical methods for the determination of water in deuterium oxide are described. The first one, employs acetonitril as an internal standard compound and in the second one calibration curve of signal integral curve versus amount of D{sub 2}O is constructed. Both methods give results comparable to those of mass spectrometry of IR spectroscopy. (Author) 5 refs.

  3. Cross polarization, magic-angle spinning /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of soil humic fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz-Jimenez, C.; Hawkins, B.L.; Maciel, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Cross polarization, magic-angle spinning /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize humic fractions isolated from different soils. The humic acid fractions are more aromatic than the humin fractions, probably due to the higher polysaccharide content of humins. However, fulvic acid fractions are more aromatic than the corresponding humic acid and humin fractions. These results can be interpreted in terms of the isolation procedure, because the high affinity of Polyclar AT for phenols results in higher aromaticities as compared with other isolation methods (e.g. charcoal).

  4. Ethanol reassimilation and ethanol tolerance in Pitchia stipitis CBS 6054 as studied by [sup 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoog, K.; Hahn-Haegerdal, B. (Univ. of Lund (Sweden)); Degn, H.; Jacobsen, H.S.; Jacobsen, J.P. (Univ. of Odense (Denmark))

    1992-08-01

    Ethanol reassimilation in Pichia stipitis CBS 6054 was studied by using continuous cultures, and the oxidation of [1-[sup 13]C] ethanol was monitored by in vivo and in vitro [sup 13]C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Acetate was formed when ethanol was reassimilated. The ATP/ADP ratio and the carbon dioxide production decreased, whereas the malate dehydrogenase activity increased, in ethanol-reassimilating cells. The results are discussed in terms of the low ethanol tolerance in P. stipitis compared with that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  5. Classification and Processing Optimization of Barley Milk Production Using NIR Spectroscopy, Particle Size, and Total Dissolved Solids Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasenka Gajdoš Kljusurić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Barley is a grain whose consumption has a significant nutritional benefit for human health as a very good source of dietary fibre, minerals, vitamins, and phenolic and phytic acids. Nowadays, it is more and more often used in the production of plant milk, which is used to replace cow milk in the diet by an increasing number of consumers. The aim of the study was to classify barley milk and determine the optimal processing conditions in barley milk production based on NIR spectra, particle size, and total dissolved solids analysis. Standard recipe for barley milk was used without added additives. Barley grain was ground and mixed in a blender for 15, 30, 45, and 60 seconds. The samples were filtered and particle size of the grains was determined by laser diffraction particle sizing. The plant milk was also analysed using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS, in the range from 904 to 1699 nm. Furthermore, conductivity of each sample was determined and microphotographs were taken in order to identify the structure of fat globules and particles in the barley milk. NIR spectra, particle size distribution, and conductivity results all point to 45 seconds as the optimal blending time, since further blending results in the saturation of the samples.

  6. A comparison of single particle tracking and temporal image correlation spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of endosome motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, F. W.; Wustner, D.

    2013-01-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used for measu......Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used...... for measurement of intracellular vesicle transport. Here, we present an extensive comparison of SPT and TICS. First we examine the effect of photobleaching, shading and noise on SPT and TICS analysis using simulated image sequences. To this end, we developed a simple photophysical model, which relates spatially...... varying illumination intensity to the bleaching propensity and fluorescence intensity of the moving particles. We found that neither SPT nor TICS are affected by photobleaching per se, but the transport parameters obtained by both methods are sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the number...

  7. A comparison of single particle tracking and temporal image correlation spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of endosome motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, F. W.; Wustner, D.

    2013-01-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used for measu......Single particle tracking (SPT) is becoming a standard method to extract transport parameters from time-lapse image sequences of fluorescent vesicles in living cells. Another method to obtain these data is temporal image correlation spectroscopy (TICS), but this method is less often used...... for measurement of intracellular vesicle transport. Here, we present an extensive comparison of SPT and TICS. First we examine the effect of photobleaching, shading and noise on SPT and TICS analysis using simulated image sequences. To this end, we developed a simple photophysical model, which relates spatially...... varying illumination intensity to the bleaching propensity and fluorescence intensity of the moving particles. We found that neither SPT nor TICS are affected by photobleaching per se, but the transport parameters obtained by both methods are sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the number...

  8. Measurements of charged particle spectra and nuclear modification factor in p+Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Balek, Petr

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC obtained the sample of p+Pb data at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}={}$5.02TeV with integrated luminosity of 25nb${}^{-1}$, which can be compared to the pp data obtained by interpolating pp measurements at $\\sqrt{s}={}$2.76TeV and 7TeV. Due to the excellent capabilities of the ATLAS detector, and its stable operation in heavy ion as well as proton-proton physics runs, the data allow measurements of the nuclear modification factor, ratio of heavy ion charged particle spectra divided by pp reference, in different centrality classes over a wide range of rapidity. The charged particle nuclear modification factor is found to vary significantly as a function of transverse momentum with a stronger dependence in more peripheral collisions.

  9. Intra-Nuclear Single-Particle Tracking (I-SPT) to Reveal the Functional Architecture of Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Récamier, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome architecture needs to be investigated in relation with the chemical function of DNA. The kinetics of gene expression, DNA replication, and repair are driven by the mechanisms by which a functional nuclear protein finds its substrate in the nucleus. Single-particle tracking (SPT) is a method to quantify fluorescent molecules dynamics from the tracks of the single molecules recorded by high-resolution microscopes. SPT offers direct observation of the movement and single-molecule resolution. Usually SPT is performed on membranes because of higher contrast. Here, we introduce a novel method to record the trajectories of weakly fluorescent molecules in the nucleus of living cells. I-SPT uses some specific detection and analysis tools to enable the computation of reliable statistics on nuclear particle movement.

  10. Applications of Hubble Volume in Atomic Physics, Nuclear Physics, Particle Physics, Quantum Physics and Cosmic Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. V. S. Seshavatharam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an attempt is made to emphasize the major shortcomings of standard cosmology. It can be suggested that, the current cosmological changes can be understood by studying the atom and the atomic nucleus through ground based experiments. If light is coming from the atoms of the gigantic galaxy, then redshift can be interpreted as an index of the galactic atomic ‘light emission mechanism’. In no way it seems to be connected with ‘galaxy receding’. With ‘cosmological increasing (emitted photon energy’, observed cosmic redshift can be considered as a measure of the age difference between our galaxy and any observed galaxy. If it is possible to show that, (from the observer older galaxy’s distance increases with its ‘age’, then ‘galaxy receding’ and ‘accelerating universe’ concepts can be put for a revision at fundamental level. At any given cosmic time, the product of ‘critical density’ and ‘Hubble volume’ gives a characteristic cosmic mass and it can be called as the ‘Hubble mass’. Interesting thing is that, Schwarzschild radius of the ‘Hubble mass’ again matches with the ‘Hubble length’. Most of the cosmologists believe that this is merely a coincidence. At any given cosmic time,’Hubble length’ can be considered as the gravitational or electromagnetic interaction range. If one is willing to think in this direction, by increasing the number of applications of Hubble mass and Hubble volume in other areas of fundamental physics like quantum physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics and particle physics - slowly and gradually - in a progressive way, concepts of ‘Black hole Cosmology’ can be strengthened and can also be confirmed.

  11. Particle number scale invariant feature of the states around the critical point of the first order nuclear shape phase transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We study systematically the evolutive behaviors of some energy ratios,E2 transition rate ratios and isomer shift in the nuclear shape phase transitions.We find that the quantities sensitive to the phase transition and independent of free parameter(s) are approximately particle number N scale invariant around the critical point of the first order phase transition,similar to that in the second order phase transition.

  12. Particle number scale invariant feature of the states around the critical point of the first order nuclear shape phase transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu; HOU ZhanFeng; LIU YuXin

    2009-01-01

    We study systematically the evolutive behaviors of some energy ratios,E2 transition rate ratios and Isomer shift in the nuclear shape phase transitions.We find that the quantities sensitive to the phase transition and independent of free parameter(s) are approximately particle number N scale invariant around the critical point of the first order phase transition,similar to that in the second order phase transition.

  13. The 15th AINSE nuclear and particle conference at the 6th APPC and 11th AIP congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The 1994 AINSE conference was held in Brisbane, at Griffith University in conjunction with the 6th APPC and the 11th Australian Institute of Physics Congress. It focused on physics of elementary particles and fields, nuclear reactions and scattering, neutrinos and dark matter. The proceedings booklet contains the conference programme and talks summaries. Seventy one papers out of the 73 contributions were indexed separately for inclusion in the INIS database.

  14. Interaction domains and nuclear targeting signals in subunits of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle-associated splicing factor SF3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Jung; Ferfoglia, Fabio; Raleff, Flore; Krämer, Angela

    2011-04-15

    Human splicing factor SF3a is a component of the mature U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) and its three subunits of 60, 66, and 120 kDa are essential for splicing in vitro and in vivo. The SF3a heterotrimer forms in the cytoplasm and enters the nucleus independently of the U2 snRNP. Here, we have analyzed domains required for in vitro interactions between the SF3a subunits. Our results indicate that the SF3a66-SF3a120 interaction is mediated by a 27-amino acid region in SF3a120 C-terminal to the second suppressor-of-white-apricot and prp21/spp91 domain and amino acids 108-210 of SF3a66. Neither of these sequences contains known structural motifs, suggesting that the interaction domains are novel. Moreover, an ∼100-amino acid region, including the SURP2 domain of SF3a120 but extending into neighboring regions, is sufficient for binding to SF3a60. Analysis of determinants for nuclear import of SF3a demonstrates that SF3a120 provides the major nuclear localization signal and SF3a60 contributes to nuclear import.

  15. Capabilities of UV Coronagraphic Spectroscopy for Studying the Source Regions of Solar Energetic Particles and the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Kohl, J L; Gardner, L D; Lin, J; Raymond, J C; Strachan, L; Kohl, John L.; Cranmer, Steven R.; Gardner, Larry D.; Lin, Jun; Raymond, John C.; Strachan, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    We summarize the unique capabilities of UV coronagraphic spectroscopy for determining the detailed plasma properties (e.g., density, temperature, outflow speed, composition) of the source regions of both transient phenomena such as CMEs, flares, and solar energetic particles (SEPs) and more time-steady solar wind streams. UVCS/SOHO observations have provided the first detailed diagnostics of the physical conditions of CME plasma in the extended corona. It provided new insights into the roles of shock waves, reconnection, and magnetic helicity in CME eruptions. We summarize past observations and discuss the diagnostic potential of UV coronagraphic spectroscopy for characterizing two possible sites of SEP production: CME shocks and reconnection current sheets. UVCS/SOHO has also led to fundamentally new views of the acceleration region of the solar wind. Understanding the physical processes in this region, which ranges from the low corona (1.1 to 1.5 Rsun) past the sonic points (greater than 5 Rsun), is key to ...

  16. The rapidity and centrality dependence of nuclear modification factors at RHIC - what does bulk particle production tell us about the nuclear medium?

    CERN Document Server

    Samset, B H; Bearden, I G; Beavis, D; Besliu, C; Budick, B; Bøggild, H; Chasman, C; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Cibor, J; Debbe, R; Enger, E; Gaardhøje, J J; Germinario, M; Hagel, K; Ito, H; Jipa, A; Jundt, F; Jordre, J I; Jorgensen, C E; Karabowicz, R; Kim, E J; Kozik, T; Larsen, T M; Lee, J H; Lee, Y K; Lindal, S; Løvhøiden, G; Majka, Z; Makeev, A; McBreen, B; Mikelsen, M; Murray, M; Natowitz, J B; Neumann, B; Nielsen, B S; Norris, J; Ouerdane, D; Planeta, R; Rami, F; Ristea, C; Ristea, O; Röhrich, D; Sandberg, D; Sanders, S J; Scheetz, R A; Staszel, P; Tveter, T S; Videbaek, F; Wada, R; Yin, Z; Zgura, I S

    2004-01-01

    The BRAHMS experiment at RHIC has measured the production of charged hadrons as a function of pseudorapidity and transverse momentum in Au+Au, d+Au and p+p collisions at a common energy of sqrt(s_NN)=200GeV, and from these spectra we construct the nuclear modification factors for both ``hot'' and ``cold'' nuclear matter. In this contribution I will show how these factors evolve with pseudorapidity and collision centrality. We see a Cronin-like enhancement in d+Au collisions at midrapidity, going to a strong suppression at eta >= 2. In central Au+Au collisions we find a suppression both at mid- and forward rapidities that vanishes for peripheral collisions. We interpret this as signs of several different medium related effects modifying bulk particle production in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at RHIC energies.

  17. Nuclear effects on ion heating within the small-angle charged-particle elastic-scattering regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, A.; Hale, G. M.

    1984-10-01

    The effects of nuclear forces (in contrast to pure Coulomb interaction) on the ion heating rate which results from small-angle scattering processes between charged particles in plasmas are investigated within the framework of Fokker-Planck theory. These effects are included through the addition of analytic Coulomb-nuclear interference and nuclear elastic cross sections in the scattering integrals of the dynamical friction coefficient and dispersion tensor. It is found that corrections to traditional Fokker-Planck predictions of the ion-ion energy exchange rate can be calculated and that these corrections are sensitive to the choice of the maximum scattering angle defining the cutoff between small- and large-angle scattering.

  18. Influence of particle size distribution on the analysis of pellets of plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel [NAPTISA Research Support Center “Technology and Innovation for a Sustainable Agriculture”, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Santos Jr, Dário [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Prof. Artur Riedel, 275, 09972-270 Diadema, SP (Brazil); Silva Gomes, Marcos da; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Guerra, Marcelo Braga Bueno [NAPTISA Research Support Center “Technology and Innovation for a Sustainable Agriculture”, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Krug, Francisco José, E-mail: fjkrug@cena.usp.br [NAPTISA Research Support Center “Technology and Innovation for a Sustainable Agriculture”, Center for Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, University of São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    Pellets of sieved plant materials (150, 106, 75, 53 and 20 μm sieve apertures) were prepared and analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and the results for Ca, K, Mg, P, B and Mn were discussed as a function of particle size distribution. This parameter is of key importance for appropriate test sample presentation in the form of pressed pellets for quantitative analysis by LIBS. Experiments were carried out with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm, and a spectrometer with Echelle optics and an intensified charge-coupled device. Results indicated that smaller particles yielded up to 50% emission signal intensities' enhancement and attained better measurements' precision (site-to-site variation). Moreover, matrix effects were reduced by analyzing pellets prepared from < 75 μm sieved fractions (mean particle size = 32 μm; d{sub 95} = 102 μm) and by using a 50 J cm{sup −2} laser fluence (220 mJ per pulse; 750 μm laser spot size). The preparation of pellets from laboratory samples with monomodal particle size distributions, where most particles were smaller than 100 μm, was decisive for improving analyte micro-homogeneity within the test samples and for attaining lower coefficients of variation of measurements, typically lower than 10% (n = 10 sites per pellet; 20 laser pulses per site). - Highlights: • First systematic study on the effects of particle size distribution. • Most appropriate particle sizes for pellet preparation depend on laser fluence. • Data can be used for sampling strategies aiming at LIBS analysis of plant materials.

  19. Photo-spectroscopy of mixtures of catalyst particles reveals their age and type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, M M; Wilbers, A; Kramer, J; de Peinder, P; Mesu, G; Nelissen, B J; Vogt, E T C; Weckhuysen, B M

    2016-01-01

    Within a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) unit, a mixture of catalyst particles that consist of either zeolite Y (FCC-Y) or ZSM-5 (FCC-ZSM-5) is used in order to boost the propylene yield when processing crude oil fractions. Mixtures of differently aged FCC-Y and FCC-ZSM-5 particles circulating in the

  20. Experimental study of the burned of nuclear fuel by the gamma spectroscopy method; Estudio experimental del quemado de combustible nuclear por el metodo de espectrometria gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amador V, P.

    2009-07-01

    Accurate information on nuclear fuel burnup is of vital importance in reactor operation, fuel management and fuel-characteristics studies. Conventionally fuel management of the TRIGA III Reactor from the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) is done through the thermal balance method (management) of the power generated during reactor operation, since it is known that with 1.24 grams of {sup 235}U is possible to generate a power or 1 MW per day during the reactor operation. On the other hand, it is possible to calculate the operation time in days during a power of 1 MW with the help of the data registered in logs. With the information just mentioned one can calculate the quantity of {sup 235}U consumed in the fuel during a complete period of irradiation. In order to compare and prove that the burnup values, calculated through the thermal balance method, are correct, the ININ implemented, for the first time, the gamma-ray spectroscopy method as an experimental technique to calculate the burnup of several fuel elements. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is a nondestructive method, so that the integrity of the fuel element is not affected which is of great importance. Since there is a direct relation between the activity of {sup 137}Cs contained in the fuel elements and a series of constants which are unique for the radioisotope and for the high resolution system, the problem just simplifies in measuring the {sup 137}Cs activities. Furthermore the {sup 137}Cs concentration equation was developed theoretically and I wrote a computer program (AMAVAL) in Fortran. The task of this program is to calculate the concentrations and the activity through the use of the equation just mentioned and the history of each fuel element. The purpose of this is to compare and validate the experimental activities with the theoretical ones for each fuel element. (Author)

  1. Group-theoretical construction of finite-momentum and multi-particle operators for lattice hadron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Justina; Jhang, You-Cyuan; Juge, Keisuke J.; Lenkner, David; Morningstar, Colin; Wong, Chik Him

    2012-01-01

    Determining the spectrum of hadronic excitations from Monte Carlo simulations requires the use of interpolating operators that couple to multi-particle states. Recent algorithmic advances have made the inclusion of multi-hadron operators in spectroscopy calculations a practical reality. In this talk, a procedure for constructing a set of multi-hadron interpolators that project onto the states of interest is described. To aid in the interpretation of simulation data, operators are designed to transform irreducibly under the lattice symmetry group. The identification of a set of optimal single-hadron interpolators for states with non-zero momenta is an essential intermediate step in this analysis.

  2. Simultaneous electromyography and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy--with application to muscle fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Thomsen, C; Sinkjaer, T;

    1992-01-01

    The electromyogram (EMG) is often used to study human muscle fatigue, but the changes in the electromyographic signals during muscle contraction are not well understood in relation to muscle metabolism. The 31P NMR spectroscopy is a semi-quantitative non-invasive method for studying the metabolic...... changes in human muscle. The aim of this study was to develop a method by which EMG and NMR spectroscopy measurements could be performed simultaneously. All measurements were performed in a whole body 1.5 Tesla NMR scanner. A calf muscle ergometer, designed for use in a whole body NMR scanner, was used....... The subject had the left foot strapped to the ergometer. The anterior tibial EMG was recorded by bipolar surface electrodes. A surface coil was strapped to the anterior tibial muscle next to the EMG electrodes. Simultaneous measurements of surface EMG and surface coil 31P NMR spectroscopy were performed...

  3. A novel non-linear recursive filter design for extracting high rate pulse features in nuclear medicine imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajedi, Salar; Kamal Asl, Alireza; Ay, Mohammad R; Farahani, Mohammad H; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-06-01

    Applications in imaging and spectroscopy rely on pulse processing methods for appropriate data generation. Often, the particular method utilized does not highly impact data quality, whereas in some scenarios, such as in the presence of high count rates or high frequency pulses, this issue merits extra consideration. In the present study, a new approach for pulse processing in nuclear medicine imaging and spectroscopy is introduced and evaluated. The new non-linear recursive filter (NLRF) performs nonlinear processing of the input signal and extracts the main pulse characteristics, having the powerful ability to recover pulses that would ordinarily result in pulse pile-up. The filter design defines sampling frequencies lower than the Nyquist frequency. In the literature, for systems involving NaI(Tl) detectors and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), with a signal bandwidth considered as 15 MHz, the sampling frequency should be at least 30 MHz (the Nyquist rate), whereas in the present work, a sampling rate of 3.3 MHz was shown to yield very promising results. This was obtained by exploiting the known shape feature instead of utilizing a general sampling algorithm. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed filter enhances count rates in spectroscopy. With this filter, the system behaves almost identically as a general pulse detection system with a dead time considerably reduced to the new sampling time (300 ns). Furthermore, because of its unique feature for determining exact event times, the method could prove very useful in time-of-flight PET imaging.

  4. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, R. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, Dalton Nuclear Institute, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Whitehaven, Cumbria, CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Jones, A.N., E-mail: Abbie.Jones@manchester.ac.uk [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite

  5. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A. N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated 'D'peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of 'G' and 'D' in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure.

  6. Temporal evolution of tubular initial conditions and their influence on two-particle correlations in relativistic nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, R.P.G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil); Grassi, F., E-mail: grassi@if.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hama, Y. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil); Qian, W.-L. [Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (Brazil)

    2012-06-06

    Relativistic nuclear collisions data on two-particle correlations exhibit structures as function of relative azimuthal angle and rapidity. A unified description of these near-side and away-side structures is proposed for low to moderate transverse momentum. It is based on the combined effect of tubular initial conditions and hydrodynamical expansion. Contrary to expectations, the hydrodynamics solution shows that the high-energy density tubes (leftover from the initial particle interactions) give rise to particle emission in two directions and this is what leads to the various structures. This description is sensitive to some of the initial tube parameters and may provide a probe of the strong interaction. This explanation is compared with an alternative one where some triangularity in the initial conditions is assumed. A possible experimental test is suggested.

  7. Evaluation of Cyanex 923-coated magnetic particles for the extraction and separation of lanthanides and actinides from nuclear waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaibu, B.S. [Chemical Sciences Division, Regional Research Laboratory (CSIR), Thiruvananthapuram-695019 (India); Reddy, M.L.P. [Chemical Sciences Division, Regional Research Laboratory (CSIR), Thiruvananthapuram-695019 (India)]. E-mail: mlpreddy@yahoo.co.uk; Bhattacharyya, A. [Radiochemistry Division, B.A.R.C, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Manchanda, V.K. [Radiochemistry Division, B.A.R.C, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2006-06-15

    In the magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process, tiny ferromagnetic particles coated with solvent extractant are used to selectively separate radionuclides and hazardous metals from aqueous waste streams. The contaminant-loaded particles are then recovered from the waste solutions using a magnetic field. The contaminants attached to the magnetic particles are subsequently removed using a small volume of stripping agent. In the present study, Cyanex 923 (trialkylphosphine oxide) coated magnetic particles (cross-linked polyacrylamide and acrylic acid entrapping charcoal and iron oxide, 1:1:1, particle size=1-60 {mu}m) are being evaluated for the possible application in the extraction and separation of lanthanides and actinides from nuclear waste streams. The uptake behaviour of Th(IV), U(VI), Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid solutions was investigated by batch studies. The effects of sorption kinetics, extractant and nitric acid concentrations on the uptake behaviour of metal ions were systematically studied. The influence of fission products (Cs(I), Sr(II)) and interfering ions including Fe(III), Cr(VI), Mg(II), Mn(II), and Al(III) were investigated. The recycling capacity of the extractant-coated magnetic particles was also evaluated.

  8. Evaluation of Cyanex 923-coated magnetic particles for the extraction and separation of lanthanides and actinides from nuclear waste streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaibu, B. S.; Reddy, M. L. P.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Manchanda, V. K.

    2006-06-01

    In the magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process, tiny ferromagnetic particles coated with solvent extractant are used to selectively separate radionuclides and hazardous metals from aqueous waste streams. The contaminant-loaded particles are then recovered from the waste solutions using a magnetic field. The contaminants attached to the magnetic particles are subsequently removed using a small volume of stripping agent. In the present study, Cyanex 923 (trialkylphosphine oxide) coated magnetic particles (cross-linked polyacrylamide and acrylic acid entrapping charcoal and iron oxide, 1:1:1, particle size=1-60 μm) are being evaluated for the possible application in the extraction and separation of lanthanides and actinides from nuclear waste streams. The uptake behaviour of Th(IV), U(VI), Am(III) and Eu(III) from nitric acid solutions was investigated by batch studies. The effects of sorption kinetics, extractant and nitric acid concentrations on the uptake behaviour of metal ions were systematically studied. The influence of fission products (Cs(I), Sr(II)) and interfering ions including Fe(III), Cr(VI), Mg(II), Mn(II), and Al(III) were investigated. The recycling capacity of the extractant-coated magnetic particles was also evaluated.

  9. Fundamental problems of nuclear physics, atomic-power engineering and nuclear technologies : LXIV international conference «Nucleus 2014», July 1-4, 2014, Minsk, Belarus (LXIV meeting on nuclear spectroscopy and nuclear structure) : Book of abstracts / Editor А.К. Vlasnikov.

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The scientific program of the conference covers almost all problems in nuclear physics and its applications such as: neutron-rich nuclei, nuclei far from stability valley, giant resonances, many-phonou and many-quasiparticle states in nuclei, high-spui and super-deformed states in nuclei, synthesis of super-heavy elements, reactions with radioactive nuclear beams, heavy ions, nucleons and elementary particles, fusion and fission of nuclei, manybody problem in nuclear physics, m...

  10. Nuclear structure studies of rare francium isotopes using Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084441

    It was known for many years that nuclei possessing certain numbers of protons (Z) and neutrons (N), called the magic numbers (8,20,28,50,82,126...), exhibit characteristic behavior and are in general more stable than their neighboring isotopes. As the capabilities of producing isotopes with more extreme values of Z and N increased, it was realized that those spherical nuclei only represent a small fraction of the total number of isotopes and that most isotopes are deformed. In order to study exotic isotopes and their deformation, it was necessary to develop new experimental techniques that would be powerful enough to be able to cope with very small production yields, but precise enough to measure the nuclear properties (such as radii and moments) with relatively small uncertainties. One technique that can measure nuclear properties of scarcely produced isotopes is in-source resonant ionization, but this technique does not allow for sufficient precision to deduce nuclear quadrupole moments. Furthermore, this t...

  11. Nuclear-Motion Effects in Attosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy of Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bækhøj, Jens E; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the characteristic effects of nuclear motion on attosecond transient absorption spectra in molecules by calculating the spectrum for different model systems. Two models of the hydrogen molecular ion are considered: one where the internuclear separation is fixed, and one where the nuclei are free to vibrate. The spectra for the fixed nuclei model are similar to atomic spectra reported elsewhere, while the spectra obtained in the model including nuclear motion are very different and dominated by extremely broad absorption features. These broad absorption features are analyzed and their relation to molecular dissociation investigated. The study of the hydrogen molecular ion validates an approach based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and a finite electronic basis. This latter approach is then used to study the three-dimensional hydrogen molecule including nuclear vibration. The spectrum obtained from H$_2$ is compared to the result of a fixed-nuclei calculation. In the attosecond transient ab...

  12. Detection of zinc and lead in water using evaporative preconcentration and single-particle laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Järvinen, Samu T., E-mail: samu.jarvinen@tut.fi; Saarela, Jaakko; Toivonen, Juha

    2013-08-01

    A novel laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)-based measurement method for metals in water is demonstrated. In the presented technology a small amount of sodium chloride is dissolved in the sample solution before spraying the sample into a tubular oven. After water removal monodisperse dry NaCl aerosol particles are formed where trace metals are present as additives. A single-particle LIBS analysis is then triggered with a scattering based particle detection system. Benefits are the highly increased metal concentration in the LIBS focal volume and the static NaCl-matrix which can be exploited in the signal processing procedure. Emitted light from the emerged plasma plume is collected with wide angle optics and dispersed with a grating spectrometer. In an aqueous solution, the respective limits of detection for zinc and lead were 0.3 ppm and 0.1 ppm using a relatively low 14 mJ laser pulse energy. Zn/Na peak intensity ratio calibration curve for zinc concentration was also determined and LIBS signal dependence on laser pulse energy was investigated. - Highlights: • Metals in a water sample are preconcentrated inside drying salt water droplets. • LIBS measurement from a single 5 μm dry salt particle using low laser pulse energy. • Stable sodium matrix can be utilized in the signal processing. • 0.3 ppm and 0.1 ppm detection limits in water obtained for Zn and Pb respectively.

  13. Detection of Special Nuclear Material from Delayed Neutron Emission Induced by a Dual-Particle Monoenergetic Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Michael F.; Nattress, J.; Jovanovic, I

    2016-06-30

    Detection of unique signatures of special nuclear materials is critical for their interdiction in a variety of nuclear security and nonproliferation scenarios. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from fission of uranium induced in dual-particle active interrogation based on the 11B(d,n gamma)12C nuclear reaction. Majority of the fissions are attributed to fast fission induced by the incident quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. A Li-doped glass–polymer composite scintillation neutron detector, which displays excellent neutron/γ discrimination at low energies, was used in the measurements, along with a recoil-based liquid scintillation detector. Time- dependent buildup and decay of delayed neutron emission from 238U were measured between the interrogating beam pulses and after the interrogating beam was turned off, respectively. Characteristic buildup and decay time profiles were compared to the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups, finding a good agreement between the measurement and nuclear data. This method is promising for detecting fissile and fissionable materials in cargo scanning applications and can be readily integrated with transmission radiography using low-energy nuclear reaction sources.

  14. Deliquescence and Efflorescence Processes of Aerosol Particles Studied by in situ FTIR and Raman Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-jun Zhao; Feng Wang; Kun Zhang; Qing-xuan Zeng; Yun-hong Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Deliquescence and efflorescence are the two most important physicochemical processes of aerosol particles.In deliquescence and efflorescence cycles of aerosol particles,many fundamental problems need to be investigated in detail on the molecular level,including ion and molecule interactions in supersaturated aerosols,metastable solid phases that may be formed,and microscopic structures and deliquescence mechanisms of aerosol particles.This paper presents a summary of the progress made in recent investigations of deliquescence and efflorescence processes of aerosol particles by four common spectral techniques,which are known as Raman/electrodynamic balance,Fourier transform infrared/aerosol flow tube,Fourier transform infrared/attenuated total reflection,and confocal Raman on a quartz substrate.

  15. Development of nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance spectroscopy under 10 GPa class pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, R; Uchida, Y; Hirayama, K; Yamazaki, T; Fukazawa, H; Kohori, Y [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Takeshita, N, E-mail: hideto@nmr.s.chiba-u.ac.j [JST, TRIP, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    The high pressure nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) are conventionally performed up to 3 GPa using piston cylinder cell. However, the NMR/NQR measurements beyond this pressure range are scarcely performed owing to the technical difficulty. Recently, we developed new high pressure NMR/NQR technique using cubic anvil apparatus in which highly hydrostatic pressure was obtained. Using the new method, the {sup 63}Cu-NQR signal of Cu{sub 2}O was observed up to 7.2GPa with high sensitivity. The use of MgO gasket in mini-cubic anvil apparatus was examined for enlarging pressure range.

  16. Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitriou, P.; Becker, H.-W.; Bogdanović-Radović, I.; M. Chiari; Goncharov, A.; Jesus, A. P.; Kakuee, O.; Kiss, A. Z.; Lagoyannis, A.; Räisänen, J.; Strivay, David; Zucchiatti, A.

    2016-01-01

    Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) is a powerful analytical technique that exploits the interactions of rapid charged particles with nuclei located near a sample surface to determine the composition and structure of the surface regions of solids by measurement of characteristic prompt γ rays. The potential for depth profiling of this technique has long been recognized, however, the implementation has been limited owing to insufficient knowledge of the physical data and lack of suitabl...

  17. Simultaneous electromyography and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy--with application to muscle fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Thomsen, C; Sinkjaer, T

    1992-01-01

    changes in human muscle. The aim of this study was to develop a method by which EMG and NMR spectroscopy measurements could be performed simultaneously. All measurements were performed in a whole body 1.5 Tesla NMR scanner. A calf muscle ergometer, designed for use in a whole body NMR scanner, was used...

  18. Germanium detectors for nuclear spectroscopy: Current research and development activity at LNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napoli, D. R., E-mail: daniel.r.napoli@lnl.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Maggioni, G., E-mail: maggioni@lnl.infn.it; Carturan, S.; Gelain, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy “G. Galilei”, University of Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35121 Padova (Italy); Eberth, J. [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Straße 77, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Grimaldi, M. G.; Tatí, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania (Italy); Riccetto, S. [University of Camerino and INFN of Perugia (Italy); Mea, G. Della [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padova (Italy); University of Trento (Italy)

    2016-07-07

    High-purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors have reached an unprecedented level of sophistication and are still the best solution for high-resolution gamma spectroscopy. In the present work, we will show the results of the characterization of new surface treatments for the production of these detectors, studied in the framework of our multidisciplinary research program in HPGe detector technologies.

  19. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-basedmetabonomic study in patients with cirrhosis and hepaticencephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    AIM To identify plasma metabolites used as biomarkersin order to distinguish cirrhotics from controls and encephalopathics.METHODS: A clinical study involving stable cirrhoticpatients with and without overt hepatic encephalopathywas designed. A control group of healthy volunteers wasused. Plasma from those patients was analysed using1H - nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Weused the Carr Purcell Meiboom Gill sequence to processthe sample spectra at ambient probe temperature. Weused a gated secondary irradiation field for water signalsuppression. Samples were calibrated and referencedusing the sodium trimethyl silyl propionate peak at0.00 ppm. For each sample 128 transients (FID's)were acquired into 32 K complex data points over aspectral width of 6 KHz. 30 degree pulses were appliedwith an acquisition time of 4.0 s in order to achievebetter resolution, followed by a recovery delay of 12s, to allow for complete relaxation and recovery ofthe magnetisation. A metabolic profile was created forstable cirrhotic patients without signs of overt hepaticencephalopathy and encephalopathic patients as wellas healthy controls. Stepwise discriminant analysis wasthen used and discriminant factors were created todifferentiate between the three groups.RESULTS: Eighteen stabled cirrhotic patients, eighteenpatients with overt hepatic encephalopathy and seventeenhealthy volunteers were recruited. Patients with cirrhosishad significantly impaired ketone body metabolism, ureasynthesis and gluconeogenesis. This was demonstratedby higher concentrations of acetoacetate (0.23 ± 0.02vs 0.05 ± 0.00, P 〈 0.01), and b-hydroxybutarate (0.58± 0.14 vs 0.08 ± 0.00, P 〈 0.01), lower concentrationsof glutamine (0.44 ± 0.08 vs 0.63 ± 0.03, P 〈 0.05),histidine (0.16 ± 0.01 vs 0.36 ± 0.04, P 〈 0.01) andarginine (0.08 ± 0.01 vs 0.14 ± 0.02, P 〈 0.03) andhigher concentrations of glutamate (1.36 ± 0.25 vs0.58 ± 0.04, P 〈 0.01), lactate (1

  20. Activation cross sections of $\\alpha$-particle induced nuclear reactions on hafnium and deuteron induced nuclear reaction on tantalum: production of $^{178}$W/$^{178m}$Ta generator

    CERN Document Server

    Tárk'anyi, F; Ditrói, F; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V; Uddin, M S

    2014-01-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of charged particle production routes of medically relevant radionuclei, the excitation function for indirect production of $^{178m}$Ta through $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,xn)$^{178}$W-$^{178m}$Ta nuclear reaction was measured for the first time up to 40 MeV. In parallel, the side reactions $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,x)$^{179,177,176,175}$W, $^{183,182,178g,177,176,175}$Ta, $^{179m,177m,175}$Hf were also assessed. Stacked foil irradiation technique and $\\gamma$-ray spectrometry were used. New experimental cross section data for the $^{nat}$Ta(d,xn)$^{178}$W reaction are also reported up to 40 MeV. The measured excitation functions are compared with the results of the ALICE-IPPE, and EMPIRE nuclear reaction model codes and with the TALYS 1.4 based data in the TENDL-2013 library. The thick target yields were deduced and compared with yields of other charged particle ((p,4n), (d,5n) and ($^3$He,x)) production routes for $^{178}$W.

  1. Insights on fission products behaviour in nuclear severe accident conditions by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, E.; Bès, R.; Martin, Ph; Pontillon, Y.; Ducros, G.; Solari, P. L.

    2016-04-01

    Many research programs have been carried out aiming to understand the fission products behaviour during a Nuclear Severe Accident. Most of these programs used highly radioactive irradiated nuclear fuel, which requires complex instrumentation. Moreover, the radioactive character of samples hinders an accurate chemical characterisation. In order to overcome these difficulties, SIMFUEL stand out as an alternative to perform complementary tests. A sample made of UO2 doped with 11 fission products was submitted to an annealing test up to 1973 K in reducing atmosphere. The sample was characterized before and after the annealing test using SEM-EDS and XAS at the MARS beam-line, SOLEIL Synchrotron. It was found that the overall behaviour of several fission products (such as Mo, Ba, Pd and Ru) was similar to that observed experimentally in irradiated fuels and consistent with thermodynamic estimations. The experimental approach presented in this work has allowed obtaining information on chemical phases evolution under nuclear severe accident conditions, that are yet difficult to obtain using irradiated nuclear fuel samples.

  2. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  3. Towards nuclear magnetic resonance micro-spectroscopy and micro-imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, P.J.M. van; Janssen, J.W.G.; Kentgens, A.P.M.

    2004-01-01

    The first successful experiments demonstrating Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) were a spin-off from the development of electromagnetic technology and its introduction into civilian life in the late forties. It was soon discovered that NMR spectra held chemically relevant information making it usefu

  4. Phosphorus-doped thin silica films characterized by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H.J.; Skibsted, J.; Kristensen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of 31P and 29Si have been achieved for a thin silica film doped with only 1.8% 31P and deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on a pure silicon wafer. The observation of a symmetric 31P chemical shift tensor is consistent...

  5. Production and characterization of monodisperse plutonium, uranium, and mixed uranium-plutonium particles for nuclear safeguard applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranebo, Y; Niagolova, N; Erdmann, N; Eriksson, M; Tamborini, G; Betti, M

    2010-05-15

    In order to prevent nuclear proliferation, the isotopic analysis of uranium and plutonium microparticles has strengthened the means in international safeguards for detecting undeclared nuclear activities. In order to ensure accuracy and precision in the analytical methodologies used, the instrumental techniques need to be calibrated. The objective of this study was to produce and characterize particles consisting of U, Pu, and mixed U-Pu, suitable for such reliability verifications. A TSI vibrating orifice aerosol generator in connection with a furnace system was used to produce micrometer sized, monodispersed particles from reference U and Pu materials in solution. The particle masses (in the range of 3-6 pg) and sizes (approximately 1.5 microm) were controlled by the experimental conditions and the parameters for the aerosol generator. Size distributions were obtained from scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed that the particle composition agreed with the starting material used. A secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS) was used to characterize the isotopic composition of the particles. Isobaric and polyatomic interference in the SIMS spectra was identified. In order to obtain accurate estimates of the interference, a batch of Pu particles were produced of mainly (242)Pu. These were used for SIMS analysis to characterize the relative ionization of Pu and U hydride ions and to determine the SIMS useful yields of U and Pu. It was found that U had a higher propensity to form the hydride than Pu. Useful yields were determined at a mass resolution of 450 for U-Pu particles: (1.71 +/- 0.15) % for Pu and (0.72 +/- 0.06) % for U. For Pu particles: (1.65 +/- 0.14) % for Pu. This gave a relative sensitivity factor between U and Pu (RSF(U:Pu)) of 2.4 +/- 0.2. However, the RSF(U:Pu) showed large fluctuations during the sputtering time for each analyses of the mixed U-Pu particles, in the range of 1.9-3.4.

  6. Reflectance spectroscopy from TiO2 particles embedded in polyurethane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Canulescu, Stela; Johansen, Villads Egede

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a physical simulation carried out using TiO2-Polyurethane composite coating on bright aluminium surface to understand the light scattering effect for designing white surfaces. Polyurethane matrix is selected due to the matching refractive index (1.7) with Al2O3...... layer on anodized aluminium surfaces. Three different TiO2 particle distributions were dispersed in polyurethane and spin coated onto high gloss and caustic etched aluminium substrates. Reflectance spectra of TiO2-polyurethane films of various concentrations were analysed using an integrating sphere....... The results show that the TiO2-polyurethane coatings have a high diffuse reflectance as a result of multiple scattering from TiO2 particles. Diffuse reflectance spectra of TiO2 containing films vary weakly with particle concentration and reach a steady state value at a concentration of 0.75 wt.%. Using...

  7. Time-resolved photoelectron nano-spectroscopy of individual silver particles: Perspectives and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohmer, Martin; Bauer, Michael; Leissner, Till

    2010-01-01

    Simultaneous time- and energy-resolved two-photon photoemission with nanometer resolution is demonstrated for the first time. We monitor the energy dependence of the decay dynamics of electron excitations in individual silver particles, which were deposited from a gas aggregation cluster source o...... onto a silicon substrate. We show furthermore that the near-field enhancement due to plasmon-resonant excitation is an efficient means to address individual nanometer-sized particles using photoemission electron microscopy. (C) 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH Co. KGaA, Weinheim......Simultaneous time- and energy-resolved two-photon photoemission with nanometer resolution is demonstrated for the first time. We monitor the energy dependence of the decay dynamics of electron excitations in individual silver particles, which were deposited from a gas aggregation cluster source...

  8. Application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and kinetic modeling for elucidation of adsorption chemistry in uptake of tetracycline by zeolite beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin; Liu, Huijuan; Zheng, Yu-Ming; Qu, Jiuhui; Chen, J Paul

    2011-02-01

    Extensive usage of tetracycline has resulted in its contamination in surface water and groundwater. The adsorption of tetracycline on zeolite beta was systematically investigated for the decontamination of the antibiotic polluted water in this study. Ninety percent of uptake by the zeolite beta occured in 0.25h, and the adsorption equilibrium was obtained within 3h, which was well described by an intraparticle diffusion model. The adsorption generally increased when pH was increased from 4.0 to 5.0, and then decreased significantly as the pH was further increased, which was caused by the pH-dependent speciation of tetracycline and surface charge of zeolite beta. Both Freundlich and Langmuir equations well described the adsorption isotherm. A thermodynamic analysis showed that the sorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. Aluminum atoms in the zeolite played a crucial role in the uptake; the adsorption increased with the increasing aluminum content in zeolite. The UV-Visible spectroscopy study showed that the spectra of tetracycline changed upon the interaction with zeolite beta, which could be ascribed to the formation of complexes of tetracycline and aluminum atoms in the zeolite surface. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study further confirmed the participation of Al in the tetracycline adsorption. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies showed that the amino functional groups in tetracycline were involved in the complexation with the zeolite surface.

  9. Correlating nuclear frequencies by two-dimensional ELDOR-detected NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminker, Ilia; Wilson, Tiffany D; Savelieff, Masha G; Hovav, Yonatan; Zimmermann, Herbert; Lu, Yi; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2014-03-01

    ELDOR (Electron Double Resonance)-detected NMR (EDNMR) is a pulse EPR experiment that is used to measure the transition frequencies of nuclear spins coupled to electron spins. These frequencies are further used to determine hyperfine and quadrupolar couplings, which are signatures of the electronic and spatial structures of paramagnetic centers. In recent years, EDNMR has been shown to be particularly useful at high fields/high frequencies, such as W-band (∼95 GHz, ∼3.5 T), for low γ quadrupolar nuclei. Although at high fields the nuclear Larmor frequencies are usually well resolved, the limited resolution of EDNMR still remains a major concern. In this work we introduce a two dimensional, triple resonance, correlation experiment based on the EDNMR pulse sequence, which we term 2D-EDNMR. This experiment allows circumventing the resolution limitation by spreading the signals in two dimensions and the observed correlations help in the assignment of the signals. First we demonstrate the utility of the 2D-EDNMR experiment on a nitroxide spin label, where we observe correlations between (14)N nuclear frequencies. Negative cross-peaks appear between lines belonging to different MS electron spin manifolds. We resolved two independent correlation patterns for nuclear frequencies arising from the EPR transitions corresponding to the (14)N mI=0 and mI=-1 nuclear spin states, which severely overlap in the one dimensional EDNMR spectrum. The observed correlations could be accounted for by considering changes in the populations of energy levels that S=1/2, I=1 spin systems undergo during the pulse sequence. In addition to these negative cross-peaks, positive cross-peaks appear as well. We present a theoretical model based on the Liouville equation and use it to calculate the time evolution of populations of the various energy levels during the 2D-EDNMR experiment and generated simulated 2D-EDMR spectra. These calculations show that the positive cross-peaks appear due to

  10. Correlating nuclear frequencies by two-dimensional ELDOR-detected NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminker, Ilia; Wilson, Tiffany D.; Savelieff, Masha G.; Hovav, Yonatan; Zimmermann, Herbert; Lu, Yi; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2014-03-01

    ELDOR (Electron Double Resonance)-detected NMR (EDNMR) is a pulse EPR experiment that is used to measure the transition frequencies of nuclear spins coupled to electron spins. These frequencies are further used to determine hyperfine and quadrupolar couplings, which are signatures of the electronic and spatial structures of paramagnetic centers. In recent years, EDNMR has been shown to be particularly useful at high fields/high frequencies, such as W-band (∼95 GHz, ∼3.5 T), for low γ quadrupolar nuclei. Although at high fields the nuclear Larmor frequencies are usually well resolved, the limited resolution of EDNMR still remains a major concern. In this work we introduce a two dimensional, triple resonance, correlation experiment based on the EDNMR pulse sequence, which we term 2D-EDNMR. This experiment allows circumventing the resolution limitation by spreading the signals in two dimensions and the observed correlations help in the assignment of the signals. First we demonstrate the utility of the 2D-EDNMR experiment on a nitroxide spin label, where we observe correlations between 14N nuclear frequencies. Negative cross-peaks appear between lines belonging to different MS electron spin manifolds. We resolved two independent correlation patterns for nuclear frequencies arising from the EPR transitions corresponding to the 14N mI = 0 and mI = -1 nuclear spin states, which severely overlap in the one dimensional EDNMR spectrum. The observed correlations could be accounted for by considering changes in the populations of energy levels that S = 1/2, I = 1 spin systems undergo during the pulse sequence. In addition to these negative cross-peaks, positive cross-peaks appear as well. We present a theoretical model based on the Liouville equation and use it to calculate the time evolution of populations of the various energy levels during the 2D-EDNMR experiment and generated simulated 2D-EDMR spectra. These calculations show that the positive cross-peaks appear due

  11. Radiocesium and radioiodine in soil particles agitated by agricultural practices: Field observation after the Fukushima nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, N., E-mail: nyamag@affrc.go.jp [National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3, Kan-non-dai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8604 (Japan); Eguchi, S.; Fujiwara, H.; Hayashi, K. [National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3, Kan-non-dai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8604 (Japan); Tsukada, H. [Institute for Environmental Sciences, 1-7 Ienomae, Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    Three weeks after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, we determined the activity concentrations of {sup 131}I, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs in atmospheric dust fugitively resuspended from soil particles due to soil surface perturbation by agricultural practices. The atmospheric concentrations of {sup 131}I, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs increased because of the agitation of soil particles by a hammer-knife mower and a rotary tiller. Coarse soil particles were primarily agitated by the perturbation of the soil surface of Andosols. For dust particles smaller than 10 {mu}m, the resuspension factors of radiocesium during the operation of agricultural equipment were 16-times higher than those under background condition. Before tillage, most of the radionuclides accumulated within a few cm of the soil surface. Tillage diluted their concentration in the uppermost soil layer. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Agricultural practices transmit soil-derived radionuclides to the atmosphere. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coarse soil particles were primarily agitated by the perturbation of soil surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tillage diluted the concentrations of radionuclides in the uppermost soil layer.

  12. Optical signatures of molecular particles via mass-selected cluster spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    A new molecular beam apparatus was developed to study optical absorption in cold (less than 100 K) atomic clusters and complexes produced by their condensation with simple molecular gases. In this instrument, ionized clusters produced in a laser vaporization nozzle source are mass selected and studied with photodissociation spectroscopy at visible and ultraviolet wavelengths. This new approach can be applied to synthesize and characterize numerous particulates and weakly bound complexes expected in planetary atmospheres and in comets.

  13. high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in studies of Picrotoxanolides of Coriaria. Coryamyrtin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguirre Galvis Luis Enrique

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Spectral evidence by Protonic Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (400
    MAHz and 90 MHz of the analeptic sesquiterpene lactone coriamyrtin, isolated from the colombian plant Coriaria microphyUn, Poir., is discussed, and analogies are made with the spectra of authentic samples of picrotin and picrotoxinin.Se discute la evidencia espectroscópica de Resonancia Magnética
    Nuclear Protónica (400MHz y 90 MHz para coriamirtina, una lactona sesquiterpénica de carácter analéptico, aislada de la planta colombiana Coriasia microphyUn, Poir., mediante analogías con espectros de muestras autenticadas de picrotina y picrotoxinina.

  14. Antisymmetric Couplings Enable Direct Observation of Chirality in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    King, Jonathan P; Blanchard, John W

    2016-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that a term in the nuclear spin Hamiltonian, the antisymmetric \\textit{J}-coupling, is fundamentally connected to molecular chirality. We propose and simulate a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment to observe this interaction and differentiate between enantiomers without adding any additional chiral agent to the sample. The antisymmetric \\textit{J}-coupling may be observed in the presence of molecular orientation by an external electric field. The opposite parity of the antisymmetric coupling tensor and the molecular electric dipole moment yields a sign change of the observed coupling between enantiomers. We show how this sign change influences the phase of the NMR spectrum and may be used to discriminate between enantiomers.

  15. Nuclear data needs and sensitivities for illicit substance detection using fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micklich, B.J.; Harper, M.K.; Sagalovsky, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1994-05-01

    Results from analysis of fast-neutron transmission spectra in the interrogation of luggage for illicit substances are quite sensitive to the neutron total cross section data employed. Monte Carlo and analytical techniques are used to explore the uses for such data and to demonstrate the sensitivity of these results to various total cross sections employed in the analysis. The status of total cross section information required for materials commonly found in containers having both illicit and benign substances, with particular attention to the matter of data uncertainties, is considered in the context of the available nuclear data. Deficiencies in the contemporary nuclear data base for this application are indicated and suggestions are offered for new measurements or evaluations.

  16. Alternatives to Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement Spectroscopy Presat and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill Presat for NMR-Based Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guennec, Adrien; Tayyari, Fariba; Edison, Arthur S

    2017-09-05

    NMR metabolomics are primarily conducted with 1D nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY) presat for water suppression and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) presat as a T2 filter to remove macromolecule signals. Others pulse sequences exist for these two objectives but are not often used in metabolomics studies, because they are less robust or unknown to the NMR metabolomics community. However, recent improvements on alternative pulse sequences provide attractive alternatives to 1D NOESY presat and CPMG presat. We focus this perspective on PURGE, a water suppression technique, and PROJECT presat, a T2 filter. These two pulse sequences, when optimized, performed at least on par with 1D NOESY presat and CPMG presat, if not better. These pulse sequences were tested on common samples for metabolomics, human plasma, and urine.

  17. Is it Possible to Extract Brain Metabolic Pathways Information from In Vivo H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Data?

    CERN Document Server

    de Lara, Alejandro Chinea Manrique

    2010-01-01

    In vivo H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an important tool for performing non-invasive quantitative assessments of brain tumour glucose metabolism. Brain tumours are considered as fast-growth tumours because of their high rate of proliferation. In addition, tumour cells exhibit profound genetic, biochemical and histological differences with respect to the original non-transformed cellular types. Therefore, there is a strong interest from the clinical investigator point of view in understanding the role of brain metabolites in normal and pathological conditions and especially on the development of early tumour detection techniques. Unfortunately, current diagnosis techniques ignore the dynamic aspects of these signals. It is largely believed that temporal variations of NMR Spectra are noisy or just simply do not carry enough information to be exploited by any reliable diagnosis procedure. Thus, current diagnosis procedures are mainly based on empirical observations extracted from single avera...

  18. Investigation of bacterial spore structure by high resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuschner, R G; Lillford, P J

    2001-01-22

    High resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) in combination with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of spores of Bacillus cereus, an outer coatless mutant B. subtilis 322, an inner coatless mutant B. subtilis 325 and of germinated spores of B. subtilis CMCC 604 were carried out. Structural differences in the coats, mainly protein of spores were reflected by NMR spectra which indicated also differences in molecular mobility of carbohydrates which was partially attributed to the cortex. Dipicolinic acid (DPA) of spores of B. cereus displayed a high degree of solid state order and may be crystalline. Heat activation was studied on spores of B. subtilis 357 lux + and revealed a structural change when analysed by TEM but this was not associated with increases in molecular mobility since no effects were measured by NMR.

  19. Nanocrystalline tin oxide: Possible origin of its weak ferromagnetism deduced from nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Lian, Yadong; Gu, Min; Yu, Ji; Tang, Tong B.; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Weiyi

    2016-09-01

    Nanocrystalline tin oxide was fabricated, with molar ratio O/Sn determined as 1.40, 1.55, 1.79, 1.92 and 1.96 from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. They displayed weak ferromagnetism, the sample with O/Sn = 1.55 showing the maximum saturation magnetization reaching almost 8 ×10-3 emu /g at room temperature. 119Sn nuclear magnetic resonance allowed the deduction, based on four resolved resonance peaks, that their Sn ions had four possible coordination numbers, namely 3, 4, 5 and 6. The relative fraction of 4-coordinated cations was the one found to bear positive linear correlation with saturation magnetization of the sample. It is surmised that magnetism in tin oxide results mainly from 4-coordination Sn ions, of valance about +3, as estimated from the binding energies of their 3d photoelectron emission levels.

  20. Molecular interactions between green tea catechins and cheese fat studied by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidinejad, Ali; Birch, Edward J; Hindmarsh, Jason; Everett, David W

    2017-01-15

    Molecular integrations between green tea catechins and milk fat globules in a cheese matrix were investigated using solid-state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Full-fat cheeses were manufactured containing free catechin or free green tea extract (GTE), and liposomal encapsulated catechin or liposomal encapsulated GTE. Molecular mobility of the carbon species in the cheeses was measured by a wide-line separation technique. The (1)H evolution frequency profile of the (13)C peak at 16ppm obtained for the control cheese and cheeses containing encapsulated polyphenols (catechin or GTE) were similar, however, the spectrum was narrower for cheeses containing free polyphenols. Differences in spectral width indicates changes in the molecular mobility of --CH3- or -C-C-PO4- species through hydrophobic and/or cation-π associations between green tea catechins and cheese fat components. However, the similar spectral profile suggests that encapsulation protects cheese fat from interaction with catechins.

  1. The online chemical analysis of single particles using aerosol beams and time of flight mass spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, O.; Weiss, M.; Verheijen, P.J.T.; Marijnissen, J.C.M.; Scarlett, B.

    This paper describes an on-line instrument, capable of measuring the size and chemical composition of single aerosol particles. Possible applications include monitoring aerosol reactors and studying atmospheric chemistry. The main conclusion is that a working prototype has been built and tested. It

  2. Time-resolved photoelectron nano-spectroscopy of individual silver particles: Perspectives and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohmer, Martin; Bauer, Michael; Leissner, Till

    2010-01-01

    Simultaneous time- and energy-resolved two-photon photoemission with nanometer resolution is demonstrated for the first time. We monitor the energy dependence of the decay dynamics of electron excitations in individual silver particles, which were deposited from a gas aggregation cluster source o...

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Status and perspectives of in-vivo NMR spectroscopy as a medical diagnostic technique. Kernresonanzspektroskopie. Stand und Perspektiven der in-vivo-NMR-Spektroskopie in der medizinischen Diagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueterjans, H.

    1987-01-01

    Contributions by various authors who are working in the field of NMR imaging present the current status and the perspectives of in-vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, explaining not only the scientific and medical aspects, but also technical and physical principles as well as questions concerning practical organisation and training, and points of main interest for further research activities. (orig./TRV).

  4. A review of TRISO-coated particle nuclear fuel performance models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bing; LIANG Tongxiang; TANG Chunhe

    2006-01-01

    The success of high temperature gas cooled reactor depends upon the safety and quality of the coated particle fuel. The understanding and evaluation of this fuel requires the development of an integrated mechanistic fuel performance model that fully describes the mechanical and physicochemical behavior of the fuel particle under irradiation. In this paper, a review of the analytical capability of some of the existing computer codes for coated particle fuel was performed. These existing models and codes include FZJ model, JAERI model, Stress3 model, ATLAS model, PARFUME model and TIMCOAT model. The theoretic model, methodology, calculation parameters and benchmark of these codes were classified. Based on the failure mechanism of coated particle, the advantage and limits of the models were compared and discussed. The calculated results of the coated particles for China HTR-10 by using some existing code are shown. Finally, problems and challenges in fuel performance modeling were listed.

  5. Definition of the intermediates and mechanism of the anticancer drug bleomycin using nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei V.; Bell, Caleb B.; Wong, Shaun D.; Wilson, Samuel A.; Kwak, Yeonju; Chow, Marina S.; Zhao, Jiyong; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.

    2010-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) is a glycopeptide anticancer drug capable of effecting single- and double-strand DNA cleavage. The last detectable intermediate prior to DNA cleavage is a low spin FeIII peroxy level species, termed activated bleomycin (ABLM). DNA strand scission is initiated through the abstraction of the C-4′ hydrogen atom of the deoxyribose sugar unit. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) aided by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are applied to define the natures of FeIIIBLM and ABLM as (BLM)FeIII─OH and (BLM)FeIII(η1─OOH) species, respectively. The NRVS spectra of FeIIIBLM and ABLM are strikingly different because in ABLM the δFe─O─O bending mode mixes with, and energetically splits, the doubly degenerate, intense O─Fe─Nax transaxial bends. DFT calculations of the reaction of ABLM with DNA, based on the species defined by the NRVS data, show that the direct H-atom abstraction by ABLM is thermodynamically favored over other proposed reaction pathways. PMID:21149675

  6. Structural and dynamic properties of amorphous solid dispersions: the role of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Amrit; Geppi, Marco; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2014-09-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) are one of the frontier strategies to improve solubility and dissolution rate of poorly soluble drugs and hence tackling the growing challenges in oral bioavailability. Pharmaceutical performance, physicochemical stability, and downstream processability of ASD largely rely on the physical structure of the product. This necessitates in-depth characterization of ASD microstructure. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) techniques bear the ultimate analytical capabilities to provide the molecular level information on the dynamics and phase compositions of amorphous dispersions. SS-NMR spectroscopy/relaxometry, as a single and nondestructive technique, can reveal diverse and critical structural information of complex ASD formulations that are barely amenable from any other existing technique. The purpose of the current article is to review the recent most important studies on various sophisticated and information-rich one-dimensional and two-dimensional SS-NMR spectroscopy/relaxometry for the analysis of molecular mobility, miscibility, drug-carrier interactions, crystallinity, and crystallization in ASD. Some specific examples on microstructural elucidations of challenging ASD using multidimensional and multinuclear SS-NMR are presented. Additionally, some relevant examples on the utility of solution-NMR and NMR-imaging techniques for the investigation of the dissolution behavior of ASD are gathered.

  7. Application of cryoprobe 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate analysis for the verification of corsican honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donarski, James A; Jones, Stephen A; Charlton, Adrian J

    2008-07-23

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR) and multivariate analysis techniques have been used to classify honey into two groups by geographical origin. Honey from Corsica (Miel de Corse) was used as an example of a protected designation of origin product. Mathematical models were constructed to determine the feasibility of distinguishing between honey from Corsica and that from other geographical locations in Europe, using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Honey from 10 different regions within five countries was analyzed. (1)H NMR spectra were used as input variables for projection to latent structures (PLS) followed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and genetic programming (GP). Models were generated using three methods, PLS-LDA, two-stage GP, and a combination of PLS and GP (PLS-GP). The PLS-GP model used variables selected by PLS for subsequent GP calculations. All models were generated using Venetian blind cross-validation. Overall classification rates for the discrimination of Corsican and non-Corsican honey of 75.8, 94.5, and 96.2% were determined using PLS-LDA, two-stage GP, and PLS-GP, respectively. The variables utilized by PLS-GP were related to their (1)H NMR chemical shifts, and this led to the identification of trigonelline in honey for the first time.

  8. Noninvasive measurement of brain glycogen by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and its application to the study of brain metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Nolawit; Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Oz, Gülin

    2011-12-01

    Glycogen is the reservoir for glucose in the brain. Beyond the general agreement that glycogen serves as an energy source in the central nervous system, its exact role in brain energy metabolism has yet to be elucidated. Experiments performed in cell and tissue culture and animals have shown that glycogen content is affected by several factors, including glucose, insulin, neurotransmitters, and neuronal activation. The study of in vivo glycogen metabolism has been hindered by the inability to measure glycogen noninvasively, but, in the past several years, the development of a noninvasive localized (13) C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method has allowed the study of glycogen metabolism in the conscious human. With this technique, (13) C-glucose is administered intravenously, and its incorporation into and washout from brain glycogen is tracked. One application of this method has been to the study of brain glycogen metabolism in humans during hypoglycemia: data have shown that mobilization of brain glycogen is augmented during hypoglycemia, and, after a single episode of hypoglycemia, glycogen synthesis rate is increased, suggesting that glycogen stores rebound to levels greater than baseline. Such studies suggest that glycogen may serve as a potential energy reservoir in hypoglycemia and may participate in the brain's adaptation to recurrent hypoglycemia and eventual development of hypoglycemia unawareness. Beyond this focused area of study, (13) C NMR spectroscopy has a broad potential for application in the study of brain glycogen metabolism and carries the promise of a better understanding of the role of brain glycogen in diabetes and other conditions.

  9. Metabolic profile of different Italian cultivars of hazelnut (Corylus avellana) by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciubba, Fabio; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Gianferri, Raffaella; Impellizzeri, Danilo; Mannina, Luisa; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Venditti, Alessandro; Delfini, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution proton NMR spectroscopy was performed on three Italian hazelnut cultivars, Tonda di Giffoni, Mortarella and Tonda Gentile Romana, and it allowed to define their metabolic profile. The hazelnuts were grown in the same pedoclimatic conditions in the Monti Cimini (Latium) area. The samples were obtained by using a modified Bligh-Dyer extraction protocol which did not give rise to artefacts arising from the demolition of macromolecular structures such as proteins and polysaccharides. Metabolites belonging to different chemical classes (amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, lipids and miscellaneous compounds) were identified and quantified. The three cultivars were discriminated by means of univariate (ANOVA) and multivariate (PCA) statistical analysis.

  10. Studying phase structure of burned ferrous manganese ores by method of nuclear gamma-resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Shayakhmetov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the given article there are presented the results of studying the phase structure of burned ferrous manganese ores of Zhomart and Zapadny Kamys deposits of by the method of Mossbauer spectroscopy. There is established a variety of iron location forms in the studied materials and their quantitative content that allows to define the degree of completing regenerative processes at magnetizing roasting, and also the processes of formation of solid solutions (Fe1-XMX3O4 and stabilization of Fe1-XO from eutectoid disintegration at cooling.

  11. IAEA coordinated research project on nuclear data for charged-particle monitor reactions and medical isotope production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capote, Roberto; Nichols, Alan L.; Nortier, Francois Meiring; Carlson, Brett V.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Hermanne, Alex; Hussain, Mazhar; Ignatyuk, Anatoly V.; Kellett, Mark A.; Kibédi, Tibor; Kim, Guinyun; Kondev, Filip G.; Lebeda, Ondrej; Luca, Aurelian; Naik, Haladhara; Nagai, Yasuki; Spahn, Ingo; Suryanarayana, Saraswatula V.; Tárkányi, Ferenc T.; Verpelli, Marco

    2017-09-01

    An IAEA coordinated research project was launched in December 2012 to establish and improve the nuclear data required to characterise charged-particle monitor reactions and extend data for medical radionuclide production. An international team was assembled to undertake work addressing the requirements for more accurate cross-section data over a wide range of targets and projectiles, undertaken in conjunction with a limited number of measurements and more extensive evaluations of the decay data of specific radionuclides. These studies are nearing completion, and are briefly described below.

  12. X-Ray Spectroscopy, The Ellen Richards Prize, and Nuclear Proliferation: The Inspiring Life of Katherine Chamberlain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geramita, Matthew

    2008-04-01

    In 1924, Katherine Chamberlain became the first woman to receive a doctorate in physics from the University of Michigan. As one of the first women in the world to earn a doctorate in physics, Katherine reached a level prominence in the scientific community that few women had achieved. As a scientist, Katherine studied the outer energy levels of various elements using x-ray spectroscopy at the University of Michigan. In her thesis, she showed the potential for x-rays to reduce highly oxidized compounds and in 1925 won the Ellen Richards Prize for the world's best scientific paper by a woman. As an educator, she taught an introduction to photography course for thirty-five years in the hopes of creating new ways to inspire a love for physics in her students. As a community leader, she worked with The United World Federalists and The Michigan Memorial Phoenix Project to find peaceful uses for nuclear energy. Looking at these aspects of Chamberlain's life offers a unique perspective on the physics community of the 1920's, physics education, and the nuclear panic that followed WWII.

  13. Charged-particle spectroscopy for diagnosing shock ρR and strength in NIF implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M Gatu; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M J-E; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G W; Dewald, E; Döppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S; Hicks, D G; Landen, O L; London, R; Mackinnon, A; Meezan, N; Prasad, R R; Ralph, J; Richardson, M; Rygg, J R; Sepke, S; Weber, S; Zacharias, R; Moses, E; Kilkenny, J; Nikroo, A; Sangster, T C; Glebov, V; Stoeckl, C; Olson, R; Leeper, R J; Kline, J; Kyrala, G; Wilson, D

    2012-10-01

    The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-(3)He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and (3)He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total ρR through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

  14. Dynamic nuclear polarization NMR spectroscopy allows high-throughput characterization of microporous organic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Frédéric; Chong, Samantha Y; McDonald, Tom O; Adams, Dave J; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc A; Cooper, Andrew I

    2013-10-16

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) solid-state NMR was used to obtain natural abundance (13)C and (15)N CP MAS NMR spectra of microporous organic polymers with excellent signal-to-noise ratio, allowing for unprecedented details in the molecular structure to be determined for these complex polymer networks. Sensitivity enhancements larger than 10 were obtained with bis-nitroxide radical at 14.1 T and low temperature (∼105 K). This DNP MAS NMR approach allows efficient, high-throughput characterization of libraries of porous polymers prepared by combinatorial chemistry methods.

  15. Development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging/spectroscopy for improved petroleum recovery. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrufet, M.A.; Flumerfelt, F.W.; Walsh, M.P.; Watson, A.T.

    1994-04-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to develop and apply Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI) and CT X-Ray Scanning methods for determining rock, fluid, and petrophysical properties and for fundamental studies of multiphase flow behavior in porous media. Specific objectives are divided into four subtasks: (1) development of NMRI and CT scanning for the determination of rock-fluid and petrophysical properties; (2) development of NMRI and CT scanning for characterizing conventional multiphase displacement processes; (3) development of NMR and CT scanning for characterizing dispersed phase processes; and (4) miscible displacement studies.

  16. Development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging/spectroscopy for improved petroleum recovery. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrufet, M.A.; Flumerfelt, F.W.; Walsh, M.P.; Watson, A.T.

    1994-04-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to develop and apply Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI) and CT X-Ray Scanning methods for determining rock, fluid, and petrophysical properties and for fundamental studies of multiphase flow behavior in porous media. Specific objectives are divided into four subtasks: (1) development of NMRI and CT scanning for the determination of rock-fluid and petrophysical properties; (2) development of NMRI and CT scanning for characterizing conventional multiphase displacement processes; (3) development of NMR and CT scanning for characterizing dispersed phase processes; and (4) miscible displacement studies.

  17. Combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations to Characterize Carvedilol Polymorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Carlos A; San Gil, Rosane A S; Borré, Leandro B; Pires, José Ricardo; Vaiss, Viviane S; Resende, Jackson A L C; Leitão, Alexandre A; De Alencastro, Ricardo B; Leal, Katia Z

    2016-09-01

    The experiments of carvedilol form II, form III, and hydrate by (13)C and (15)N cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP MAS) are reported. The GIPAW (gauge-including projector-augmented wave) method from DFT (density functional theory) calculations was used to simulate (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts. A very good agreement was found for the comparison between the global results of experimental and calculated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts for carvedilol polymorphs. This work aims a comprehensive understanding of carvedilol crystalline forms employing solution and solid-state NMR as well as DFT calculations.

  18. Developing hyperpolarized krypton-83 for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Zackary I.

    This dissertation discusses the production of highly nonequilibrium nuclear spin polarization, referred to as hyperpolarization or hp, in the nuclear spin I = 9/2 noble gas isotope krypton-83 using spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP). This nonequilibrium polarization yields nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals that are enhanced three or more orders of magnitude above those of thermally polarized krypton and enables experiments that would otherwise be impossible. Krypton-83 possesses a nuclear electric quadrupole moment that dominates the longitudinal (T1) relaxation due to coupling of the quadrupole moment to fluctuating electric field gradients generated by distortions to the spherical symmetry of the electronic environment. Relaxation slows polarization buildup and limits the maximum signal intensity but makes krypton-83 a sensitive probe of its environment. The gas-phase krypton-83 longitudinal relaxation rate increases linearly with total gas density due to binary collisions. Density independent relaxation, caused by the formation of krypton-krypton van der Waals molecules and surface adsorption, also contributes to the observed rate. Buffer gases suppress van der Waals molecule mediated relaxation by breaking apart the weakly bound krypton dimers. Surface relaxation is gas composition independent and therefore more difficult to suppress. However, this relaxation mechanism makes hp krypton-83 sensitive to important surface properties including surface-to-volume ratio, surface chemistry, and surface temperature. The presence of surfaces with high krypton adsorption affinities (i.e. hydrophobic surfaces) accelerates the relaxation times and can produce T1 contrast in hp krypton-83 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tobacco smoke deposited on surfaces generates strong T1 contrast allowing the observation of smoke deposition with spatial resolution. Conversely, water adsorption on surfaces significantly lengths the T1 times due competitive surface adsorption

  19. An Interdigitated Pixel PIN Detector for Energetic Particle Spectroscopy in Space

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    We describe a new two-dimensional position-sensitive detector, now under development, for use in space-borne energetic particle spectrometers. The novel feature of this device is the use of interdigitated pixels to provide both dimensions of position information from a single side of the detector, while a measurement of the energy deposition is derived from the opposite side. An advantage of this approach is that significant reductions in the complexity, power, and weight of th...

  20. A Metabolic Study on Colon Cancer Using 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Zamani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Colorectal carcinoma is the third cause of cancer deaths in the world. For diagnosis, invasive methods like colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy are used, and noninvasive screening tests are not very accurate. We decided to study the potential of 1HNMR spectroscopy with metabolomics and chemometrics as a preliminary noninvasive test. We obtained a distinguishing pattern of metabolites and metabolic pathways between colon cancer patient and normal. Methods. Sera were obtained from confirmed colon cancer patients and the same number of healthy controls. Samples were sent for 1HNMR spectroscopy and analysis was carried out Chenomex and MATLAB software. Metabolites were identified using Human Metabolic Data Base (HDMB and the main metabolic cycles were identified using Metaboanalyst software. Results. 15 metabolites were identified such as pyridoxine, orotidine, and taurocholic acid. Main metabolic cycles involved were the bile acid biosynthesis, vitamin B6 metabolism, methane metabolism, and glutathione metabolism. Discussion. The main detected metabolic cycles were also reported earlier in different cancers. Our observations corroborated earlier studies that suggest the importance of lowering serum LCA/DCA and increasing vitamin B6 intake to help prevent colon cancer. This work can be looked upon as a preliminary step in using 1HNMR analysis as a screening test before invasive procedures.

  1. The electric potential of particles in interstellar space released from a nuclear waste payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A. C.

    1980-01-01

    Mechanisms for charging a grain in the interplanetary medium include: (1) capture of solar wind electrons; (2) capture of solar wind protons; (3) ejection of electrons through the photoelectric effect due to the solar radiation; (4) escape of beta particles from beta emitters in the grain; and (5) escape of alpha particles from alpha emitters in the grain. The potentials on both nonradioactive and radioactive grains are considered with relation to particle size and time, and the distance from the Sun. Numerical results are presented where the waste mix is assumed to be PW-4b.

  2. Dark Matter Particle Spectroscopy at the LHC: Generalizing MT2 to Asymmetric Event Topologies

    CERN Document Server

    Konar, Partha; Matchev, Konstantin T; Park, Myeonghun

    2009-01-01

    We consider SUSY-like missing energy events at hadron colliders and critically examine the common assumption that the missing energy is the result of two identical missing particles. In order to experimentally test this hypothesis, we generalize the subsystem MT2 variable to the case of asymmetric event topologies, where the two SUSY decay chains terminate in different "children" particles. In this more general approach, the endpoint MT2max of the MT2 distribution now gives the mass Mp(Mc(a),Mc(b)) of the parent particle as a function of two input children masses Mc(a) and Mc(b). We propose two methods for an independent determination of the individual children masses Mc(a) and Mc(b). First, in the presence of upstream transverse momentum P(UTM) the corresponding function Mp(Mc(a),Mc(b),P(UTM)) is independent of P(UTM) at precisely the right values of the children masses. Second, the previously discussed MT2 "kink" is now generalized to a "ridge" on the 2-dimensional surface Mp(Mc(a),Mc(b)). As we show in sev...

  3. Detection of Ni, Pb and Zn in water using electrodynamic single-particle levitation and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Järvinen, Samu T., E-mail: samu.jarvinen@tut.fi; Saari, Sampo; Keskinen, Jorma; Toivonen, Juha

    2014-09-01

    We report the development of a unique laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based method for the trace metal analysis of water. The method is further applied to the analysis of aqueous samples containing known concentrations of nickel, lead and zinc. Effects that reduce the sensitivity of the LIBS analysis of aqueous samples were avoided in the presented technology by performing the LIBS analysis from a single dried salt particle which was levitated in an electric field. The salt is added to the water sample prior to analysis. A single-droplet generator injects a droplet of the solution to the measurement chamber. The droplet is trapped using electrodynamic balance technology and metals are highly concentrated as the water from the droplet rapidly evaporates without a need for additional heating. The resultant solid 7 μm particle is levitated with a high spatial stability in the LIBS focal volume. The constant mass and position of the particle enable the high reproducibility of the LIBS signal. The limits of detection in the original solution were recorded low 60 ppb, 60 ppb, and 50 ppb for nickel, lead, and zinc, respectively using low, 14 mJ excitation pulse energy. The methodology is applicable to the online monitoring of industrial waters due to the achieved sensitivity and robust instrumentation. - Highlights: • A single droplet of the water sample is trapped electrodynamically. • Metals in the droplet are rapidly preconcentrated as the water evaporates. • LIBS measurement from a single 7 μm dry salt particle using low laser pulse energy • Repeatable LIBS signal due to constant sample position and mass • Obtained detection limits for Ni, Pb and Zn were 60 ppb, 60 ppb and 50 ppb, respectively.

  4. Sampling considerations when analyzing micrometric-sized particles in a liquid jet using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faye, C.B.; Amodeo, T.; Fréjafon, E. [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS/DRC/CARA/NOVA), Parc Technologique Alata, BP 2, 60550 Verneuil-En-Halatte (France); Delepine-Gilon, N. [Institut des Sciences Analytiques, 5 rue de la Doua, 69100 Villeurbanne (France); Dutouquet, C., E-mail: christophe.dutouquet@ineris.fr [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS/DRC/CARA/NOVA), Parc Technologique Alata, BP 2, 60550 Verneuil-En-Halatte (France)

    2014-01-01

    Pollution of water is a matter of concern all over the earth. Particles are known to play an important role in the transportation of pollutants in this medium. In addition, the emergence of new materials such as NOAA (Nano-Objects, their Aggregates and their Agglomerates) emphasizes the need to develop adapted instruments for their detection. Surveillance of pollutants in particulate form in waste waters in industries involved in nanoparticle manufacturing and processing is a telling example of possible applications of such instrumental development. The LIBS (laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy) technique coupled with the liquid jet as sampling mode for suspensions was deemed as a potential candidate for on-line and real time monitoring. With the final aim in view to obtain the best detection limits, the interaction of nanosecond laser pulses with the liquid jet was examined. The evolution of the volume sampled by laser pulses was estimated as a function of the laser energy applying conditional analysis when analyzing a suspension of micrometric-sized particles of borosilicate glass. An estimation of the sampled depth was made. Along with the estimation of the sampled volume, the evolution of the SNR (signal to noise ratio) as a function of the laser energy was investigated as well. Eventually, the laser energy and the corresponding fluence optimizing both the sampling volume and the SNR were determined. The obtained results highlight intrinsic limitations of the liquid jet sampling mode when using 532 nm nanosecond laser pulses with suspensions. - Highlights: • Micrometric-sized particles in suspensions are analyzed using LIBS and a liquid jet. • The evolution of the sampling volume is estimated as a function of laser energy. • The sampling volume happens to saturate beyond a certain laser fluence. • Its value was found much lower than the beam diameter times the jet thickness. • Particles proved not to be entirely vaporized.

  5. The particle swarm optimization algorithm applied to nuclear systems surveillance test planning; Otimizacao aplicada ao planejamento de politicas de testes em sistemas nucleares por enxame de particulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Newton Norat

    2006-12-15

    This work shows a new approach to solve availability maximization problems in electromechanical systems, under periodic preventive scheduled tests. This approach uses a new Optimization tool called PSO developed by Kennedy and Eberhart (2001), Particle Swarm Optimization, integrated with probabilistic safety analysis model. Two maintenance optimization problems are solved by the proposed technique, the first one is a hypothetical electromechanical configuration and the second one is a real case from a nuclear power plant (Emergency Diesel Generators). For both problem PSO is compared to a genetic algorithm (GA). In the experiments made, PSO was able to obtain results comparable or even slightly better than those obtained b GA. Therefore, the PSO algorithm is simpler and its convergence is faster, indicating that PSO is a good alternative for solving such kind of problems. (author)

  6. Study of Nuclear Moments and Mean Square Charge Radii by Collinear Fast-Beam Laser Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The collinear fast-beam laser technique is used to measure atomic hyperfine structures and isotope shifts of unstable nuclides produced at ISOLDE. This gives access to basic nuclear ground-state and isomeric-state properties such as spins, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments, and the variation of the nuclear mean square charge radius within a sequence of isotopes. \\\\ \\\\ Among the various techniques used for this purpose, the present approach is of greatest versatility, due to the direct use of the beams from the isotope separator. Their phase-space properties are exploited to achieve high sensitivity and resolution. The optical spectra of neutral atoms are made accessible by converting the ion beams into fast atomic beams. This is accomplished in the charge-exchange cell which is kept at variable potential ($\\pm$10~kV) for Doppler-tuning of the effective laser wavelength. The basic optical resolution of 10$^{-8}$ requires a 10$^{-5}$ stability of the 60~kV main acceleration voltage and low energy ...

  7. Nanostructure of Metallic Particles in Light Water Reactor Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Edgar C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mausolf, Edward J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mcnamara, Bruce K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Soderquist, Chuck Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schwantes, Jon M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-11

    The extraordinary nano-structure of metallic particles in light water reactor fuels points to possible high reactivity through increased surface area and a high concentration of high energy defect sites. We have analyzed the metallic epsilon particles from a high burn-up fuel from a boiling water reactor using transmission electron microscopy and have observed a much finer nanostructure in these particles than has been reported previously. The individual round particles that varying in size between ~20 and ~50 nm appear to consist of individual crystallites on the order of 2-3 nm in diameter. It is likely that in-reactor irradiation induce displacement cascades results in the formation of the nano-structure. The composition of these metallic phases is variable yet the structure of the material is consistent with the hexagonal close packed structure of epsilon-ruthenium. These findings suggest that unusual catalytic behavior of these materials might be expected, particularly under accident conditions.

  8. NMR Spectroscopy of the Hydrated Layer of Composite Particles Based on Nanosized Al2O3 and Vitreous Humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turov, V. V.; Gerashchenko, I. I.; Markina, A. I.

    2013-11-01

    The hydrated layer of composite particles prepared using Al2O3 and cattle vitreous humor was investigated using NMR spectroscopy. It was found that water bound to Al2O3 nanoparticles was present in the form of clusters with different degrees of association and energies of interaction with the surface. Water bound to the surface of the Al2O3/vitreous humor composite became more uniform upon immobilization of vitreous humor components on the surface of the Al2O3. With this, the clusters of adsorbed water had characteristics that were close to those found in air and weakly polar CHCl3 media. Addition of polar CH3CN led to the formation of very small water clusters. PMR spectra of the surface of the Al2O3/vitreous humor composite in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid differentiated four types of hydrated structures that differed in the degree of water association.

  9. Spectroscopy of size dependent many-particle effects in single self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Savio, C.

    2006-02-20

    Single InAs quantum dots (QDs) grown with the Stranski-Krastanov method in a In{sub 0.12}Ga{sub 0.88}As quantum well embedded in GaAs and emitting in the near infrared have been optically investigated. To perform QD spectroscopy at low temperatures a very stable micro-photoluminescence ({mu}-PL) microscope set-up fully integrated in a liquid helium (LHe) cryostate has been successfully developed. The system is based on the cold finger technique and a Fourier Transform (FT) spectrometer combined with a nitrogen cooled Ge detector. Photoluminescence of the QDs was excited non resonantly with a He-Ne laser and single dot spectroscopy was carried out at temperatures below 60 K. The experimental set-up allows mapping of the optical emission by recording spectra for every point of a scan grid. This mapping mode is used to acquire optical images and to locate a particular dot for investigation. Series of measurement on a single QD were normally performed over a long time (from a few days to a week), with the need of daily adjustment in the sub-micrometer range. At low excitation power a single sharp line (E{sub x}) arising from recombination of a single exciton in the dot is observed. Varying the excitation density the spectra become more complex, with appearance of the biexciton emission line (E{sub xx}) on the lower energies side of the E{sub x} line, followed by emission from excitons occupying higher shells in the dot. Measured biexciton binding energies and power dependence are in good agreement with values reported in the literature. The temperature dependence of the optical emission was investigated. The energy shows the characteristic decrease related to the shrinking of the semiconductor band gap, while the linewidth evolution is compatible with broadening due to coupling with acoustic and optical phonons. A statistics of biexciton binding energies over a dozen of dots was acquired and the results compared with single QD spectroscopy data available in the

  10. Green coffee oil analysis by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, Nicola; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Navarini, Luciano; Schievano, Elisabetta; Mammi, Stefano

    2013-06-15

    In this work, we show how an extensive and fast quantification of the main components in green coffee oil can be achieved by NMR, with minimal sample manipulation and use of organic solvents. The approach is based on the integration of characteristic NMR signals, selected because of their similar relaxation properties and because they fall in similar spectral regions, which minimizes offset effects. Quantification of glycerides, together with their fatty acid components (oleic, linoleic, linolenic and saturated) and minor species (caffeine, cafestol, kahweol and 16-O-methylcafestol), is achieved in less than 1h making use of (1)H and (13)C spectroscopy. The compositional data obtained are in reasonable agreement with classical chromatographic analyses.

  11. Low energy nuclear spin excitations in Ho metal investigated by high resolution neutron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, Tapan; Jalarvo, Niina

    2013-04-17

    We have investigated the low energy excitations in metallic Ho by high resolution neutron spectroscopy. We found at T = 3 K clear inelastic peaks in the energy loss and energy gain sides, along with the central elastic peak. The energy of this low energy excitation, which is 26.59 ± 0.02 μeV at T = 3 K, decreased continuously and became zero at TN ≈ 130 K. By fitting the data in the temperature range 100-127.5 K with a power law we obtained the power-law exponent β = 0.37 ± 0.02, which agrees with the expected value β = 0.367 for a three-dimensional Heisenberg model. Thus the energy of the low energy excitations can be associated with the order parameter.

  12. Gallium Arsenide detectors for X-ray and electron (beta particle) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioliou, G.; Barnett, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Results characterizing GaAs p+-i-n+ mesa photodiodes with a 10 μm i layer for their spectral response under illumination of X-rays and beta particles are presented. A total of 22 devices, having diameters of 200 μm and 400 μm, were electrically characterized at room temperature. All devices showed comparable characteristics with a measured leakage current ranging from 4 nA/cm2 to 67 nA/cm2 at an internal electric field of 50 kV/cm. Their unintentionally doped i layers were found to be almost fully depleted at 0 V due to their low doping density. 55Fe X-ray spectra were obtained using one 200 μm diameter device and one 400 μm diameter device. The best energy resolution (FWHM at 5.9 keV) achieved was 625 eV using the 200 μm and 740 eV using the 400 μm diameter device, respectively. Noise analysis showed that the limiting factor for the energy resolution of the system was the dielectric noise; if this noise was eliminated by better design of the front end of the readout electronics, the achievable resolution would be 250 eV. 63Ni beta particle spectra obtained using the 200 μm diameter device showed the potential utility of these detectors for electron and beta particle detection. The development of semiconductor electron spectrometers is important particularly for space plasma physics; such devices may find use in future space missions to study the plasma environment of Jupiter and Europa and the predicted electron impact excitation of water vapor plumes from Europa hypothesized as a result of recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) UV observations.

  13. Dark Matter Particle Spectroscopy at the LHC: Generalizing M(T2) to Asymmetric Event Topologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konar, Partha; /Florida U.; Kong, Kyoungchul; /SLAC; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun; /Florida U.

    2012-04-03

    We consider SUSY-like missing energy events at hadron colliders and critically examine the common assumption that the missing energy is the result of two identical missing particles. In order to experimentally test this hypothesis, we generalize the subsystem M{sub T2} variable to the case of asymmetric event topologies, where the two SUSY decay chains terminate in different 'children' particles. In this more general approach, the endpoint M{sub T2(max)} of the M{sub T2} distribution now gives the mass {tilde M}p({tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)}, {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}) of the parent particles as a function of two input children masses {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)} and {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}. We propose two methods for an independent determination of the individual children masses M{sub c}{sup (a)} and M{sub c}{sup (b)}. First, in the presence of upstream transverse momentum PUTM the corresponding function {tilde M}p({tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)}, {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}, P{sub UTM}) is independent of P{sub UTM} at precisely the right values of the children masses. Second, the previously discussed MT2 'kink' is now generalized to a 'ridge' on the 2-dimensional surface {tilde M}p({tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)}, {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}). As we show in several examples, quite often there is a special point along that ridge which marks the true values of the children masses. Our results allow collider experiments to probe a multi-component dark matter sector directly and without any theoretical prejudice.

  14. Dynamics of Rhodobacter capsulatus [2Fe-2S] Ferredoxin VI and Aquifex aeolicus Ferredoxin 5 Via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) and Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Yuming; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko; Wang, Hongxin; Guo, Yisong; Smith, Matt C.; Meyer, Jacques; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2008-06-24

    We have used (57)Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study the Fe(2)S(2)(Cys)(4) sites in oxidized and reduced [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins from Rhodobacter capsulatus (Rc FdVI) and Aquifex aeolicus (Aa Fd5). In the oxidized forms, nearly identical NRVS patterns are observed, with strong bands from Fe-S stretching modes peaking around 335 cm(-1), and additional features observed as high as the B(2u) mode at approximately 421 cm(-1). Both forms of Rc FdVI have also been investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. There is good correspondence between NRVS and Raman frequencies, but because of different selection rules, intensities vary dramatically between the two kinds of spectra. For example, the B(3u) mode at approximately 288 cm(-1), attributed to an asymmetric combination of the two FeS(4) breathing modes, is often the strongest resonance Raman feature. In contrast, it is nearly invisible in the NRVS, as there is almost no Fe motion in such FeS(4) breathing. NRVS and RR analysis of isotope shifts with (36)S-substituted into bridging S(2-) ions in Rc FdVI allowed quantitation of S(2-) motion in different normal modes. We observed the symmetric Fe-Fe stretching mode at approximately 190 cm(-1) in both NRVS and RR spectra. At still lower energies, the NRVS presents a complex envelope of bending, torsion, and protein modes, with a maximum at 78 cm(-1). The (57)Fe partial vibrational densities of states (PVDOS) were interpreted by normal-mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields. Progressively more complex D(2h) Fe(2)S(2)S'(4), C(2h) Fe(2)S(2)(SCC)(4), and C(1) Fe(2)S(2)(Cys)(4) models were optimized by comparison with the experimental spectra. After modification of the CHARMM22 all-atom force field by the addition of refined Fe-S force constants, a simulation employing the complete protein structure was used to reproduce the PVDOS, with better results in the low frequency protein mode region. This process was then repeated

  15. Material degradation of liquid organic semiconductors analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Fukushima

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Liquid organic light-emitting diodes (liquid OLEDs are unique devices consisting only of liquid organic semiconductors in the active layer, and the device performances have been investigated recently. However, the device degradation, especially, the origin has been unknown. In this study, we show that material degradation occurs in liquid OLEDs, whose active layer is composed of carbazole with an ethylene glycol chain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR experiments clearly exhibit that the dimerization reaction of carbazole moiety occurs in the liquid OLEDs during driving the devices. In contrast, cleavages of the ethylene glycol chain are not detected within experimental error. The dimerization reaction is considered to be related to the device degradation.

  16. Characterization of yogurts made with milk solids nonfat by rheological behavior and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yan Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of adding milk solids nonfat (MSNF on the physical properties and microstructure of yogurts was investigated. The physical properties of fat free yogurt, fat free with MSNF yogurt, whole fat yogurt, and whole fat with MSNF yogurt were analyzed using shear viscosity, viscoelasticity, and texture analysis. The two yogurts with MSNF had higher consistency coefficient (K, storage modulus (G′, yield stress, and hardness. To gain insight into the multiphase system, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and brightfield microscope images were acquired. The addition of MSNF significantly modified NMR relaxation time; T1 values were reduced significantly. Brightfield microscope images showed that the size of the protein network of the two yogurts with MSNF added was greater than that of the two yogurts without MSNF added. The microstructural information supported the physical information. The results showed that the increase in MSNF contributed positively to strengthening the physical/mechanical properties of yogurt.

  17. The Determination of Deuterium and Tritium in Effluent Wastewater by Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attalla, A.; Birkbeck, J. C.

    1985-04-01

    A pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) procedure was developed for the quantitative determination of deuterium and tritium in radioactive, effluent, wastewater to aid in the design of an efficient combined electrolytic/catalytic exchange system for the recovery of these hydrogen isotopes. The deuterium and tritium NMR signals were observed at 9.210 and 45.7 MHz, respectively. Ten different effluent water samples were analyzed for deuterium and tritium to establish base-line data for the preparation of standard reference samples. The hydrogen isotope concentrations ranged from 0.11 to 2.40 g deuterium and from 2.0 to 21.0 mg tritium per liter of processed sample. The standard deviation of the hydrogen isotope determinations is +- 0.017 g deuterium and +- 0.06 mg tritium per liter of processed effluent water. In the future, the effectiveness of specially prepared and analyzed (calorimetry) effluent samples as tritium standards will be investigated.

  18. A reactor for high-throughput high-pressure nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, N. J.; Knapp, S. M. M.; Landis, C. R.

    2015-10-01

    The design of a reactor for operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of high-pressure gas-liquid reactions is described. The Wisconsin High Pressure NMR Reactor (WiHP-NMRR) design comprises four modules: a sapphire NMR tube with titanium tube holder rated for pressures as high as 1000 psig (68 atm) and temperatures ranging from -90 to 90 °C, a gas circulation system that maintains equilibrium concentrations of dissolved gases during gas-consuming or gas-releasing reactions, a liquid injection apparatus that is capable of adding measured amounts of solutions to the reactor under high pressure conditions, and a rapid wash system that enables the reactor to be cleaned without removal from the NMR instrument. The WiHP-NMRR is compatible with commercial 10 mm NMR probes. Reactions performed in the WiHP-NMRR yield high quality, information-rich, and multinuclear NMR data over the entire reaction time course with rapid experimental turnaround.

  19. Tracking of the nuclear wavepacket motion in cyanine photoisomerization by ultrafast pump-dump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhengrong; Nakamura, Takumi; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei

    2011-06-01

    Understanding ultrafast reactions, which proceed on a time scale of nuclear motions, requires a quantitative characterization of the structural dynamics. To track such structural changes with time, we studied a nuclear wavepacket motion in photoisomerization of a prototype cyanine dye, 1,1'-diethyl-4,4'-cyanine, by ultrafast pump-dump-probe measurements in solution. The temporal evolution of wavepacket motion was examined by monitoring the efficiency of stimulated emission dumping, which was obtained from the recovery of a ground-state bleaching signal. The dump efficiency versus pump-dump delay exhibited a finite rise time, and it became longer (97 fs → 330 fs → 390 fs) as the dump pulse was tuned to longer wavelengths (690 nm → 950 nm → 1200 nm). This result demonstrates a continuous migration of the leading edge of the wavepacket on the excited-state potential from the Franck-Condon region toward the potential minimum. A slowly decaying feature of the dump efficiency indicated a considerable broadening of the wavepacket over a wide range of the potential, which results in the spread of a population distribution on the flat S(1) potential energy surface. The rapid migration as well as broadening of the wavepacket manifests a continuous nature of the structural dynamics and provides an intuitive visualization of this ultrafast reaction. We also discussed experimental strategies to evaluate reliable dump efficiencies separately from other ultrafast processes and showed a high capability and possibility of the pump-dump-probe method for spectroscopic investigation of unexplored potential regions such as conical intersections.

  20. Discriminating poststroke depression from stroke by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based metabonomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jianqi Xiao,1,* Jie Zhang,2,* Dan Sun,3,* Lin Wang,4,* Lijun Yu,5 Hongjing Wu,5 Dan Wang,5 Xuerong Qiu5 1Department of Neurosurgery, The First Hospital of Qiqihar City, Qiqihar, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Central Hospital of Jiamusi City, Jiamusi, 3Department of Geriatrics, General Hospital of Daqing Oil Field, Daqing, 4Department of Nursing, 5Department of Neurology, The First Hospital of Qiqihar City, Qiqihar, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Poststroke depression (PSD, the most common psychiatric disease that stroke survivors face, is estimated to affect ~30% of poststroke patients. However, there are still no objective methods to diagnose PSD. In this study, to explore the differential metabolites in the urine of PSD subjects and to identify a potential biomarker panel for PSD diagnosis, the nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomic method was applied. Ten differential metabolites responsible for discriminating PSD subjects from healthy control (HC and stroke subjects were found, and five of these metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers (lactate, α-hydroxybutyrate, phenylalanine, formate, and arabinitol. The panel consisting of these five metabolites provided excellent performance in discriminating PSD subjects from HC and stroke subjects, achieving an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.946 in the training set (43 HC, 45 stroke, and 62 PSD subjects. Moreover, this panel could classify the blinded samples from the test set (31 HC, 33 stroke, and 32 PSD subjects with an area under the curve of 0.946. These results laid a foundation for the future development of urine-based objective methods for PSD diagnosis and investigation of PSD pathogenesis. Keywords: poststroke depression, PSD, stroke, nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR, metabonomic

  1. UCTM: A User friendly Configurable Trigger, scaler and delay Module for nuclear and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bourrion, O; Derome, L

    2011-01-01

    A configurable trigger scaler and delay NIM module has been designed to equip nuclear physics experiments and lab teaching classes. It is configurable through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and provides a large number of possible trigger conditions without any Hardware Description Language (HDL) required knowledge. The design, performances and typical applications are presented.

  2. On The Potential of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Diamonds in Solid-State and Dissolution (13) C NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretschneider, Christian O; Akbey, Ümit; Aussenac, Fabien; Olsen, Greg L; Feintuch, Akiva; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a versatile option to improve the sensitivity of NMR and MRI. This versatility has elicited interest for overcoming potential limitations of these techniques, including the achievement of solid-state polarization enhancement at ambient conditions, and the maximization of (13) C signal lifetimes for performing in vivo MRI scans. This study explores whether diamond's (13) C behavior in nano- and micro-particles could be used to achieve these ends. The characteristics of diamond's DNP enhancement were analyzed for different magnetic fields, grain sizes, and sample environments ranging from cryogenic to ambient temperatures, in both solution and solid-state experiments. It was found that (13) C NMR signals could be boosted by orders of magnitude in either low- or room-temperature solid-state DNP experiments by utilizing naturally occurring paramagnetic P1 substitutional nitrogen defects. We attribute this behavior to the unusually long electronic/nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times characteristic of diamond, coupled with a time-independent cross-effect-like polarization transfer mechanism facilitated by a matching of the nitrogen-related hyperfine coupling and the (13) C Zeeman splitting. The efficiency of this solid-state polarization process, however, is harder to exploit in dissolution DNP-enhanced MRI contexts. The prospects for utilizing polarized diamond approaching nanoscale dimensions for both solid and solution applications are briefly discussed.

  3. Searching for low-lying multi-particle thresholds in lattice spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Mahbub, M Selim; Leinweber, Derek B; Williams, Anthony G

    2013-01-01

    We explore the Euclidean-time tails of odd-parity nucleon correlation functions in a search for the S-wave pion-nucleon scattering-state threshold contribution. The analysis is performed using 2+1 flavor 32^3 x 64 PACS-CS gauge configurations available via the ILDG. Correlation matrices composed with various levels of fermion source/sink smearing are used to project low-lying states. The consideration of 25,600 fermion propagators reveals the presence of more than one state in what would normally be regarded as an eigenstate-projected correlation function. This observation is in accord with the scenario where the eigenstates contain a strong mixing of single and multi-particle states but only the single particle component has a strong coupling to the interpolating field. Employing a two-exponential fit to the eigenvector-projected correlation function, we are able to confirm the presence of two eigenstates. The lower-lying eigenstate is consistent with a N-pi scattering threshold and has a relatively small co...

  4. Nondestructive evaluation of crystallized-particle size in lactose-powder by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Satoshi; Hatakeyama, Sakura; Imai, Yoh; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2014-03-01

    Transmission-type terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is applied to evaluate crystallized lactose particle of size below 30 μm, which is far too small compared to the wavelength of incident terahertz (THz)-wave. The THz-absorption spectrum of lactose is successfully deconvoluted by Lorentzian to two spectra with peaks at 17.1 cm-1 (0.53 THz) and 45.6 cm-1 (1.37 THz) derived from α-lactose monohydrate, and a spectrum at 39.7 cm-1 (1.19 THz) from anhydrous β-lactose after removal of the broad-band spectrum by polynomial cubic function. Lactose is mainly crystallized into α-lactose monohydrate from the supersaturated solution at room temperature with a small amount of anhydrous β-lactose below 4%. The absorption feature is dependent on the crystallized particle size and the integrated intensity ratio of the two absorptions due to α-lactose monohydrate is correlated in linear for the size.

  5. Rapid Mapping of Lithiation Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxide Particles with Operando X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, Lea; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Vallerie; Marone, Federica; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-02-24

    Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs), layered transition metal oxides (LiMO2, where M = Co, Mn, Ni, or mixtures thereof) have been materials of choice for LIB cathodes. During cycling, the transition metals change their oxidation states, an effect that can be tracked by detecting energy shifts in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can therefore be used to visualize and quantify lithiation kinetics in transition metal oxide cathodes; however, in-situ measurements are often constrained by temporal resolution and X-ray dose, necessitating compromises in the electrochemistry cycling conditions used or the materials examined. We report a combined approach to reduce measurement time and X-ray exposure for operando XAS studies of lithium ion batteries. A highly discretized energy resolution coupled with advanced post-processing enables rapid yet reliable identification of the oxidation state. A full-field microscopy setup provides sub-particle resolution over a large area of battery electrode, enabling the oxidation state within many transition metal oxide particles to be tracked simultaneously. Here, we apply this approach to gain insights into the lithiation kinetics of a commercial, mixed-metal oxide cathode material, nickel cobalt aluminium oxide (NCA), during (dis)charge and its degradation during overcharge.

  6. Rapid Mapping of Lithiation Dynamics in Transition Metal Oxide Particles with Operando X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, Lea; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Vallerie; Marone, Federica; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Since the commercialization of lithium ion batteries (LIBs), layered transition metal oxides (LiMO2, where M = Co, Mn, Ni, or mixtures thereof) have been materials of choice for LIB cathodes. During cycling, the transition metals change their oxidation states, an effect that can be tracked by detecting energy shifts in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can therefore be used to visualize and quantify lithiation kinetics in transition metal oxide cathodes; however, in-situ measurements are often constrained by temporal resolution and X-ray dose, necessitating compromises in the electrochemistry cycling conditions used or the materials examined. We report a combined approach to reduce measurement time and X-ray exposure for operando XAS studies of lithium ion batteries. A highly discretized energy resolution coupled with advanced post-processing enables rapid yet reliable identification of the oxidation state. A full-field microscopy setup provides sub-particle resolution over a large area of battery electrode, enabling the oxidation state within many transition metal oxide particles to be tracked simultaneously. Here, we apply this approach to gain insights into the lithiation kinetics of a commercial, mixed-metal oxide cathode material, nickel cobalt aluminium oxide (NCA), during (dis)charge and its degradation during overcharge. PMID:26908198

  7. Nuclear spin of odd-odd α emitters based on the behavior of α -particle preformation probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, M.; Adel, A.; Botros, M. M.

    2016-05-01

    The preformation probabilities of an α cluster inside radioactive parent nuclei for both odd-even and odd-odd nuclei are investigated. The calculations cover the isotopic chains from Ir to Ac in the mass regions 166 ≤A ≤215 and 77 ≤Z ≤89 . The calculations are employed in the framework of the density-dependent cluster model. A realistic density-dependent nucleon-nucleon (N N ) interaction with a finite-range exchange part is used to calculate the microscopic α -nucleus potential in the well-established double-folding model. The main effect of antisymmetrization under exchange of nucleons between the α and daughter nuclei has been included in the folding model through the finite-range exchange part of the N N interaction. The calculated potential is then implemented to find both the assault frequency and the penetration probability of the α particle by means of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation in combination with the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition. The correlation of the α -particle preformation probability and the neutron and proton level sequences of the parent nucleus as obtained in our previous work is extended to odd-even and odd-odd nuclei to determine the nuclear spin and parities. Two spin coupling rules are used, namely, strong and weak rules to determine the nuclear spin for odd-odd isotopes. This work can be a useful reference for theoretical calculation of undetermined nuclear spin of odd-odd nuclei in the future.

  8. Hanbury Brown-Twiss Interferometry in High Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, Ulrich W

    1998-01-01

    I review recent applications of two-particle intensity interferometry in high energy physics, concentrating on relativistic heavy ion collisions. By measuring hadronic single-particle spectra and two-particle correlations in hadron-hadron or heavy-ion collisions, the size and dynamical state of the collision fireball at freeze-out can be reconstructed. I discuss the relevant theoretical methods and their limitations. By applying the formalism to recent pion correlation data from Pb+Pb collisions at CERN we demonstrate that the collision zone has undergone strong transverse growth before freeze-out (by a factor 2 in each direction), and that it expands both longitudinally and transversally. From the thermal and flow energy density at freeze-out the energy density at the onset of transverse expansion can be estimated from conservation laws. It comfortably exceeds the critical value for the transition to color deconfined matter.

  9. Dielectron spectroscopy in cold nuclear matter; Dielektronen-Spektroskopie in kalter Kernmaterie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Michael

    2011-02-18

    The subject of this thesis is the production of light mesons and baryonic resonances in p+Nb collisions at E{sub kin}=3.5 GeV via their decay in e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs and their kinematic observables. This reaction system in particular allows for the production of vector mesons in approximately cold nuclear matter and the study of expected in-medium effects. The experiment was conducted at the dielectron spectrometer HADES at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH. In total, 64827{+-}294 signal pairs with an pair opening angle {alpha}{sub ee}>9 and e{sup +}/e{sup -} momenta 80 550 MeV/c{sup 2}). Inclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} production cross sections inside the HADES acceptance were calculated by analyzing the simultaneously measured charged pions and by comparing the obtained {pi}{sup -} yields to an independent data set. For the vector mesons one obtains {sigma}{sub {omega}}{sub ,acc}=(65.8{+-}4.6(stat){+-}18.4(sys)) nb and {sigma}{sub {phi}}{sub ,acc}=(7.8{+-}1.7(stat){+-}2.2 (sys)) nb. A comparison with cross sections in free p+p collisions at E{sub kin}=3.5 GeV results in the nuclear modification factors R{sub pA} as well as their scaling {alpha} with the nuclear mass number A and their dependence on the pair lab momenta p{sub ee}. While absorption is not important for the {phi} meson ({alpha}{sub {phi}} {approx}1), scaling factors {alpha} {approx}0.7 are established for the quasi free decay (p{sub ee}>800 MeV/c) of all other hadrons. From an adapted Glauber model calculation a minimal absorption >or similar 35% of all contributing hadrons in nuclei can be deduced. At smaller pair momenta different scaling factors are obtained. The {omega} meson is absorbed with a higher probability ({alpha}{sub {omega}}=0.62), but for all other sources above the {pi}{sup 0

  10. Trend of Gross Beta Radioactivity in Air Particles and Rainwater of around the Domestic Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Jungmin; Shin, Daeyewn; Kim, Soongpyung; Ju, Sundong [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); OH, Youngsoo; Kim, Byunggyu; Kim, Sunsik [Hanbit Nuclear Power Site, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Investigating items can be distinguished into two parts, regional radiation and concentrations of environmental radioactivity, and in environmental radioactivity, to access the internal exposure dose, gross beta-radioactivity of particles in air and rainwater specimen are being tested. Gross beta-radioactivity quickly shows whether radiation is unusual or no since most of nuclide released in radioactive emergency while operating an atomic energy facility emits beta rays, and the method used to test it is simple. Looking at the years of analyzed results of particles in air and rainwater around the facility for gross beta-radioactivity, they have a constant trend. The cause of the trend was investigated with a doubt that something else rather than operation of a nuclear power plant might have caused this trend. Due to high gross beta radioactivity concentration in winter, sometimes, radioactivity concentration five times higher than reported last five years average gross beta radioactivity concentration is detected. Looking at the contents investigated above, we can see nuclear power plants have correlation with surrounding gross beta radioactivity concentration. Precipitation has negative correlation, and the weight of air particles and concentration of component element have positive correlation. Our country is influenced by northwest wind in winter. China which is located northwest, has heavy air pollution and smog due to industrialization and there was a report saying it is affecting Korea. Therefore, not because of management of power plants but because of change in season, it can be misunderstood that operating power plants is causing the increased gross beta radioactivity concentration. Based on this investigation, more research to find various causes of gross beta radioactivity concentration in winter is necessary.

  11. 4D scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy: Single-particle imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortalan, Volkan; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2011-07-20

    We report the development of 4D scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy (ST-UEM). The method was demonstrated in the imaging of silver nanowires and gold nanoparticles. For the wire, the mechanical motion and shape morphological dynamics were imaged, and from the images we obtained the resonance frequency and the dephasing time of the motion. Moreover, we demonstrate here the simultaneous acquisition of dark-field images and electron energy loss spectra from a single gold nanoparticle, which is not possible with conventional methods. The local probing capabilities of ST-UEM open new avenues for probing dynamic processes, from single isolated to embedded nanostructures, without being affected by the heterogeneous processes of ensemble-averaged dynamics. Such methodology promises to have wide-ranging applications in materials science and in single-particle biological imaging.

  12. Composition variations in Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} thin films analyzed by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, particle induced X-ray emission, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Dahyun [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Opanasyuk, A.S.; Koval, P.V.; Ponomarev, A.G. [Department of Electronics and Computer Technology, Sumy State University, Sumy UA-40007 (Ukraine); Jeong, Ah Reum; Kim, Gee Yeong; Jo, William [Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Hyeonsik, E-mail: hcheong@sogang.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Compositional and structural studies of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe) thin films were carried out by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy. CZTSe thin films with different compositions were deposited on sodalime glass by co-evaporation. The composition of the films measured by two different methods, EDS and PIXE, showed significant differences. Generally, the Zn/Sn ratio measured by EDS is larger than that measured by PIXE. Both the micro-PIXE and the micro-Raman imaging results indicated the compositional and structural inhomogeneity of the sample. - Highlights: • Particle induced X-ray emission was used to analyze the composition of CZTSe films. • Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy tends to underestimate the Sn composition. • Local Raman intensity is related with the composition rather than the crystallinity.

  13. Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy for In Situ Monitoring of Ceramic Nuclear Waste Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Braeden M.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    The use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is presented as a non-contact method for in situ monitoring of ceramic waste forms. Single-phase materials of zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7), pyrochlore (Nd2Ti2O7), and hollandite (BaCs0.3Cr2.3Ti5.7O16 and BaCs0.3CrFeAl0.3Ti5.7O16) were characterized. The refractive index and dielectric properties in THz frequencies demonstrate the ability to distinguish between these materials. Differences in processing methods show distinct changes in both the THz-TDS spectra and optical and dielectric properties of these ceramic phases. The temperature dependence of the refractive index and relative permittivity of pyrochlore and zirconolite materials in the range of 25-200 °C is found to follow an exponential increasing trend. This can also be used to monitor the temperature of the ceramic waste forms on storage over extended geological time scales.

  14. Neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy structural studies of protein-DNA complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, E.M.; Catasti, P.; Chen, X.; Gupta, G.; Imai, B.; Moyzis, R.; Ratliff, R.; Velupillai, S.

    1996-03-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project sought to employ advanced biophysical measurements to study the structure of nucleosomes and the structure of origins of DNA replication. The fundamental repeating unit of human chromosomes is the nucleosome, which contains about 200 base pairs of DNA and 9 histone proteins. Genome replication is strictly associated with the reversible acetylations of histones that unfold chromatin to allow access of factors to origins of DNA replications. The authors have studied two major structural problems: (1) the effects of histone acetylation on nucleosome structure, and (2) the structure of DNA origins of replication. They have recently completed preliminary X-ray scattering experiments at Stanford on positioned nucleosomes with defined DNA sequence and length, histone composition and level of acetylation. These experiments have shown that lengths of the DNA and acetylations of the histone H4 result in nucleosome structural changes. To understand internucleosomal interactions and the roles of histone H1 the authors have made preliminary x-ray scatter studies on native dinucleosomes that have demonstrated the feasibility of these experiments. The DNA sequence of the yeast replication origin has been synthesized for structure determination by multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

  15. Direct affinity of dopamine to lipid membranes investigated by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matam, Yashasvi; Ray, Bruce D; Petrache, Horia I

    2016-04-08

    Dopamine, a naturally occurring neurotransmitter, plays an important role in the brain's reward system and acts on sensory receptors in the brain. Neurotransmitters are contained in lipid membraned vesicles and are released by exocytosis. All neurotransmitters interact with transport and receptor proteins in glial cells, on neuronal dendrites, and at the axonal button, and also must interact with membrane lipids. However, the extent of direct interaction between lipid membranes in the absence of receptors and transport proteins has not been extensively investigated. In this report, we use UV and NMR spectroscopy to determine the affinity and the orientation of dopamine interacting with lipid vesicles made of either phosphatidylcholine (PC) or phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids which are primary lipid components of synaptic vesicles. We quantify the interaction of dopamine's aromatic ring with lipid membranes using our newly developed method that involves reference spectra in hydrophobic environments. Our measurements show that dopamine interacts with lipid membranes primarily through the aromatic side opposite to the hydroxyl groups, with this aromatic side penetrating deeper into the hydrophobic region of the membrane. Since dopamine's activity involves its release into extracellular space, we have used our method to also investigate dopamine's release from lipid vesicles. We find that dopamine trapped inside PC and PS vesicles is released into the external solution despite its affinity to membranes. This result suggests that dopamine's interaction with lipid membranes is complex and involves both binding as well as permeation through lipid bilayers, a combination that could be an effective trigger for apoptosis of dopamine-generating cells.

  16. Development of the measurement technique for nuclear data with prompt gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Shoji; Furutaka, Kazuyoshi; Harada, Hideo [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    2002-09-01

    To obtain the thermal neutron capture cross sections of radioactive fission product nuclides as the basic data on transmutation study, a measurement technique with prompt gamma-ray spectroscopy was developed. When daughter nuclides after neutron irradiations are stable, measuring the neutron capture cross sections is impossible. Therefore, a new technique was developed to investigate these. With this, the level schemes from the information of the prompt {gamma}-rays emitted during neutron irradiation are constructed, and the cross section is deduced with the emission probabilities of prompt {gamma}-rays. The measurement system for this technique was developed, and was effective. The system enables obtaining information on the cascade {gamma}-rays necessary for constructing the level-scheme. By measuring {sup nat}Pd, the partial level-scheme was constructed, and two new levels at 1906 keV and 2400 keV were identified. By using this technique, the neutron capture cross sections of nuclides that can't be measured by an activation method can be measured. (author)

  17. Altered phospholipid metabolism in schizophrenia: a phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Fahr, Wolfgang; Englisch, Susanne; Esser, Andrea; Tunc-Skarka, Nuran; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Ende, Gabriele; Zink, Mathias

    2013-12-30

    Phospholipid (PL) metabolism is investigated by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Inconsistent alterations of phosphocholine (PC), phosphoethanolamine (PE), glycerophosphocholine (GPC) and glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE) have been described in schizophrenia, which might be overcome by specific editing techniques. The selective refocused insensitive nuclei-enhanced polarization transfer (RINEPT) technique was applied in a cross-sectional study involving 11 schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients (SZP) on stable antipsychotic monotherapy and 15 matched control subjects. Metabolite signals were found to be modulated by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) content and gray matter/brain matter ratio. Corrected metabolite concentrations of PC, GPC and PE differed between patients and controls in both subcortical and cortical regions, whereas antipsychotic medication exerted only small effects. Significant correlations were found between the severity of clinical symptoms and the assessed signals. In particular, psychotic symptoms correlated with PC levels in the cerebral cortex, depression with PC levels in the cerebellum and executive functioning with GPC in the insular and temporal cortices. In conclusion, after controlling for age and tissue composition, this investigation revealed alterations of metabolite levels in SZP and correlations with clinical properties. RINEPT 31P MRS should also be applied to at-risk-mental-state patients as well as drug-naïve and chronically treated schizophrenic patients in order to enhance the understanding of longitudinal alterations of PL metabolism in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential Effects of Dry Eye Disorders on Metabolomic Profile by 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Galbis-Estrada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We used 1H NMR spectroscopy to analyze the metabolomic profile of reflex tears from patients with dry eye disorders (DEDs. 90 subjects were divided into 2 groups: (1 patients with DEDs (DEDG; n = 55 and (2 healthy subjects (CG; n = 35. Additionally, the DEDG was subdivided into 2 subgroups based on DED severity: mild-to-moderate and moderate (n = 22 and n = 33, resp.. Personal interviews and systematized ophthalmologic examinations were carried out. Reflex tears (20–30 μL were collected by gently rubbing in the inferior meniscus of both eyelids with a microglass pipette and stored at −80°C until analysis. NMR spectra were acquired using a standard one-dimensional pulse sequence with water suppression. Data were processed and transferred to MATLAB for further chemometric analysis. Main differences in tear composition between DEDG and CG were found in cholesterol, N-acetylglucosamine, glutamate, creatine, amino-n-butyrate, choline, acetylcholine, arginine, phosphoethanolamine, glucose, and phenylalanine levels. This metabolic fingerprint helped also to discriminate between the three additional subgroups of DEDG. Our results suggest that tear metabolic differences between DEDG and CG identified by NMR could be useful in understanding ocular surface pathogenesis and improving biotherapy.

  19. Molecular Level Structure and Dynamics of Electrolytes Using 17O Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugesan, Vijayakumar; Han, Kee Sung; Hu, Jianzhi; Mueller, Karl T.

    2017-03-19

    Electrolytes help harness the energy from electrochemical processes by serving as solvents and transport media for redox-active ions. Molecular-level interactions between ionic solutes and solvent molecules – commonly referred to as solvation phenomena – give rise to many functional properties of electrolytes such as ionic conductivity, viscosity, and stability. It is critical to understand the evolution of solvation phenomena as a function of competing counterions and solvent mixtures to predict and design the optimal electrolyte for a target application. Probing oxygen environments is of great interest as oxygens are located at strategic molecular sites in battery solvents and are directly involved in inter- and intramolecular solvation interactions. NMR signals from 17O nuclei in battery electrolytes offer nondestructive bulk measurements of isotropic shielding, electric field gradient tensors, and transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates, which are excellent means for probing structure, bonding, and dynamics of both solute and solvent molecules. This article describes the use of 17O NMR spectroscopy in probing the solvation structures of various electrolyte systems ranging from transition metal ions in aqueous solution to lithium cations in organic solvent mixtures.

  20. Analysis of Soft Drinks Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: A Mentorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Arkim; Myers, Craig; Crull, George; Curtis, Michael; Pasciak Patterson, Pamela

    1999-10-01

    This mentorship was designed to expose a student to the laboratory routine for a chemist at Bristol Myers Squibb Company (BMS). The student visited BMS, collaborated with BMS scientists, and actually completed a project on site. He was asked to determine the identity of an unknown sample of soft drink retrieved from a fictitious crime scene using NMR spectroscopy. He designed an experiment to test the unknown sample and used samples of purified sugar, purified caffeine, purified citric acid, Coke, Diet Coke, Pepsi, Mountain Dew, Diet 7-Up, and Sam's Diet Cola as controls. The results were analyzed and presented in a final report. The student was able to determine if the unknown contained sugar, caffeine, Nutrasweet, or sodium benzoate. He learned how to compile relevant information, conduct an experiment, collect and analyze data, draw conclusions, and prepare and edit a formal report. In addition to learning the uses of NMR, he also learned some of its limitations. In the final report, he was encouraged to reflect on the difficulties a scientist might encounter when trying to identify NMR peaks without an "ingredient list" like those of the soft drink cans. The experience was rewarding for the student and all scientists involved.

  1. Metabolomics with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in a Drosophila melanogaster Model of Surviving Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalov, Veli; Amathieu, Roland; Triba, Mohamed N.; Clément, Marie-Jeanne; Reyes Uribe, Laura; Le Moyec, Laurence; Kaynar, Ata Murat

    2016-01-01

    Patients surviving sepsis demonstrate sustained inflammation, which has been associated with long-term complications. One of the main mechanisms behind sustained inflammation is a metabolic switch in parenchymal and immune cells, thus understanding metabolic alterations after sepsis may provide important insights to the pathophysiology of sepsis recovery. In this study, we explored metabolomics in a novel Drosophila melanogaster model of surviving sepsis using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), to determine metabolite profiles. We used a model of percutaneous infection in Drosophila melanogaster to mimic sepsis. We had three experimental groups: sepsis survivors (infected with Staphylococcus aureus and treated with oral linezolid), sham (pricked with an aseptic needle), and unmanipulated (positive control). We performed metabolic measurements seven days after sepsis. We then implemented metabolites detected in NMR spectra into the MetExplore web server in order to identify the metabolic pathway alterations in sepsis surviving Drosophila. Our NMR metabolomic approach in a Drosophila model of recovery from sepsis clearly distinguished between all three groups and showed two different metabolomic signatures of inflammation. Sham flies had decreased levels of maltose, alanine, and glutamine, while their level of choline was increased. Sepsis survivors had a metabolic signature characterized by decreased glucose, maltose, tyrosine, beta-alanine, acetate, glutamine, and succinate. PMID:28009836

  2. Molecular microstructure in thermotropic liquid crystals studied by nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusiol, Daniel J.; Anoardo, Estaban [Cordoba Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance studies in Nematic and Smectic C thermotropic liquid crystalline mesophases of p-heptyl azoxyanizole are reported. The local molecular microstructure is modeled from NQR spectra. In the Smectic C mesophase, the NQR data is explained by assuming two features: biaxiality in the electric field gradients at the sites occupied by {sup 14} N nuclei, and the elemental unit cell of the mesophase is composed by two Hp AB molecules. These bimolecular units coexist together with single ,molecules and the relative proportions change with temperature, the quantity of individual molecules being predominant as the temperature approaches the Nematic phase transition. At the lowest temperatures in the Nematic mesophase the NQR spectrum behaves similarly to the corresponding at low temperatures in the SmC mesophase; this means that we can propose again the existence of huge number of bio molecular and biaxial unit cells. At higher temperatures the transition to single molecular units is deduced from NQR spectra. That transition is characterized by the one describing the passage from a partially disordered molecular system - the system is conserving some local anisotropic properties of symmetry from the crystalline solid state - to a partially ordered system that resembles an oriented liquid. (author)

  3. Electron momentum spectroscopy of dimethyl ether taking account of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael Simon, E-mail: michael.deleuze@uhasselt.be [Center of Molecular and Materials Modelling, Hasselt University, Agoralaan Gebouw D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Watanabe, Noboru; Kojima, Masataka; Takahashi, Masahiko [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-10-07

    The influence of nuclear dynamics in the electronic ground state on the (e,2e) momentum profiles of dimethyl ether has been analyzed using the harmonic analytical quantum mechanical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics approaches. In spite of fundamental methodological differences, results obtained with both approaches consistently demonstrate that molecular vibrations in the electronic ground state have a most appreciable influence on the momentum profiles associated to the 2b{sub 1}, 6a{sub 1}, 4b{sub 2}, and 1a{sub 2} orbitals. Taking this influence into account considerably improves the agreement between theoretical and newly obtained experimental momentum profiles, with improved statistical accuracy. Both approaches point out in particular the most appreciable role which is played by a few specific molecular vibrations of A{sub 1}, B{sub 1}, and B{sub 2} symmetries, which correspond to C–H stretching and H–C–H bending modes. In line with the Herzberg-Teller principle, the influence of these molecular vibrations on the computed momentum profiles can be unraveled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  4. Metabolomics with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in a Drosophila melanogaster Model of Surviving Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veli Bakalov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients surviving sepsis demonstrate sustained inflammation, which has been associated with long-term complications. One of the main mechanisms behind sustained inflammation is a metabolic switch in parenchymal and immune cells, thus understanding metabolic alterations after sepsis may provide important insights to the pathophysiology of sepsis recovery. In this study, we explored metabolomics in a novel Drosophila melanogaster model of surviving sepsis using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, to determine metabolite profiles. We used a model of percutaneous infection in Drosophila melanogaster to mimic sepsis. We had three experimental groups: sepsis survivors (infected with Staphylococcus aureus and treated with oral linezolid, sham (pricked with an aseptic needle, and unmanipulated (positive control. We performed metabolic measurements seven days after sepsis. We then implemented metabolites detected in NMR spectra into the MetExplore web server in order to identify the metabolic pathway alterations in sepsis surviving Drosophila. Our NMR metabolomic approach in a Drosophila model of recovery from sepsis clearly distinguished between all three groups and showed two different metabolomic signatures of inflammation. Sham flies had decreased levels of maltose, alanine, and glutamine, while their level of choline was increased. Sepsis survivors had a metabolic signature characterized by decreased glucose, maltose, tyrosine, beta-alanine, acetate, glutamine, and succinate.

  5. Determination of scutellarin in breviscapine preparations using quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzuo Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to develop the selection criteria of proton signals for the determination of scutellarin using quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR, which is the main bioactive compound in breviscapine preparations for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease. The methyl singlet signal of 3-(trimethylsilylpropionic-2,2,3,3-d4 acid sodium salt was selected as the internal standard for quantification. The molar concentration of scutellarin was determined by employing different proton signals. To obtain optimum proton signals for the quantification, different combinations of proton signals were investigated according to two selection criteria: the recovery rate of qNMR method and quantitative results compared with those obtained with ultra-performance liquid chromatography. As a result, the chemical shift of H-2′ and H-6′ at δ 7.88 was demonstrated as the most suitable signal with excellent linearity range, precision, and recovery for determining scutellarin in breviscapine preparations from different manufacturers, batch numbers, and dosage forms. Hierarchical cluster analysis was employed to evaluate the determination results. The results demonstrated that the selection criteria of proton signals established in this work were reliable for the qNMR study of scutellarin in breviscapine preparations.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based metabolomics to identify novel biomarkers of alcohol-dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Mostafa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol misuse is a ravaging public health and social problem. Its harm can affect the drinkers and the whole society. Alcohol-dependence is a phase of alcohol misuse in which the drinker consumes excessive amounts of alcohol and has a continuous urge to consume alcohol. Current methods of alcohol dependence diagnoses are questionnaires and some biomarkers. However, both methods lack specificity and sensitivity. Metabolomics is a scientific field which deals with the identification and the quantification of the metabolites present in the metabolome using spectroscopic techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. Metabolomics helps to indicate the perturbation in the levels of metabolites in cells and tissues due to diseases or ingestion of any substances. NMR is one of the most widely used spectroscopic techniques in metabolomics because of its reproducibility and speed. Some recent metabolomics studies were conducted on alcohol consumption and alcohol misuse in animals and humans. However, few focused on identifying alcohol dependence novel biomarkers. A sensitive and specific technique such as NMR based metabolomics applied to find novel biomarkers in plasma and urine can be useful to diagnose alcohol-dependence.

  7. Introduction of the Floquet-Magnus expansion in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugène S; Charpentier, Thibault

    2011-07-28

    In this article, we present an alternative expansion scheme called Floquet-Magnus expansion (FME) used to solve a time-dependent linear differential equation which is a central problem in quantum physics in general and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in particular. The commonly used methods to treat theoretical problems in solid-state NMR are the average Hamiltonian theory (AHT) and the Floquet theory (FT), which have been successful for designing sophisticated pulse sequences and understanding of different experiments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the FME scheme in the context of solid state NMR and we compare this approach with other series expansions. We present a modified FME scheme highlighting the importance of the (time-periodic) boundary conditions. This modified scheme greatly simplifies the calculation of higher order terms and shown to be equivalent to the Floquet theory (single or multimode time-dependence) but allows one to derive the effective Hamiltonian in the Hilbert space. Basic applications of the FME scheme are described and compared to previous treatments based on AHT, FT, and static perturbation theory. We discuss also the convergence aspects of the three schemes (AHT, FT, and FME) and present the relevant references.

  8. Isoscalar monopole resonance of the alpha particle: a prism to nuclear Hamiltonians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir; Leidemann, Winfried; Orlandini, Giuseppina

    2013-01-25

    We present an ab initio study of the isoscalar monopole excitations of (4)He using different realistic nuclear interactions, including modern effective field theory potentials. In particular we concentrate on the transition form factor F(M) to the narrow 0(+) resonance close to threshold. F(M) exhibits a strong potential model dependence, and can serve as a kind of prism to distinguish among different nuclear force models. Compared to the measurements obtained from inelastic electron scattering off ^{4}He, one finds that the state-of-the-art theoretical transition form factors are at variance with experimental data, especially in the case of effective field theory potentials. We discuss some possible reasons for such a discrepancy, which still remains a puzzle.

  9. The isoscalar monopole resonance of the alpha particle: a prism to nuclear Hamiltonians

    CERN Document Server

    Bacca, S; Leidemann, W; Orlandini, G

    2012-01-01

    We present an ab-initio study of the isoscalar monopole excitations of 4He using different realistic nuclear interactions, including modern effective field theory potentials. In particular we concentrate on the transition form factor $F_{\\cal M}$ to the narrow $0^+$ resonance close to threshold. F_M exhibits a strong potential model dependence, and can serve as a kind of prism to distinguish among different nuclear force models. Comparing to the measurements obtained from inelastic electron scattering off 4He, one finds that the state-of-the-art theoretical transition form factors are at variance with experimental data, especially in the case of effective field theory potentials. We discuss some possible reasons for such discrepancy, which still remains a puzzle.

  10. Single-particle and collective properties around closed shells probed by in-source laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cocolios, Thomas Elias; Van Duppen, P

    2010-01-01

    Resonant laser ionisation is a very versatile tool in nuclear physics, used for the production of clean radioactive ion beams as well as for the study of ground-state and isomer properties. In this Ph.D. work, many aspects of resonant laser ionisation are investigated, from improving the performance of laser ion sources at ISOL facilities to the measurement of magnetic dipole moments and charge radii. The LISOL gas catcher ion source relies on resonant laser ionisation for increased efficiency and selectivity. Using a $^{252}$Cf fission source, the element dependence of the non-resonant contribution to the ion beam has been investigated. The efficiency of extraction for a non-laser-ionised element ranges from 0.03% for krypton to 74% for ceasium. A relationship with the ionisation potential is proposed, although a few elements like rubidium and cerium do not verify this relationship. In order to suppress those non-resonantly-ionised elements, two new approaches are proposed. First, the dual-chamber gas catche...

  11. Single-particle and collective properties around closed shells probed by in-source laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cocolios, Thomas Elias; Van Duppen, P

    2010-01-01

    Resonant laser ionisation is a very versatile tool in nuclear physics, used for the production of clean radioactive ion beams as well as for the study of ground-state and isomer properties. In this Ph.D. work, many aspects of resonant laser ionisation are investigated, from improving the performance of laser ion sources at ISOL facilities to the measurement of magnetic dipole moments and charge radii. The LISOL gas catcher ion source relies on resonant laser ionisation for increased efficiency and selectivity. Using a $^{252}$Cf fission source, the element dependence of the non-resonant contribution to the ion beam has been investigated. The efficiency of extraction for a non-laser-ionised element ranges from 0.03% for krypton to 74% for ceasium. A relationship with the ionisation potential is proposed, although a few elements like rubidium and cerium do not verify this relationship. In order to suppress those non-resonantly-ionised elements, two new approaches are proposed. First, the dual-chamber gas catche...

  12. Characterization of the AT180 epitope of phosphorylated Tau protein by a combined nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amniai, Laziza [CNRS-UMR 8576 UGSF-IFR 147, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Lippens, Guy, E-mail: guy.lippens@univ-lille1.fr [CNRS-UMR 8576 UGSF-IFR 147, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Landrieu, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.landrieu@univ-lille1.fr [CNRS-UMR 8576 UGSF-IFR 147, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} pThr231 of the Tau protein is necessary for the binding of the AT180 antibody. {yields} pSer235 of the Tau protein does not interfere with the AT180 recognition of pThr231. {yields} Epitope mapping is efficiently achieved by combining NMR and FRET spectroscopy. -- Abstract: We present here the characterization of the epitope recognized by the AT180 monoclonal antibody currently used to define an Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related pathological form of the phosphorylated Tau protein. Some ambiguity remains as to the exact phospho-residue(s) recognized by this monoclonal: pThr231 or both pThr231 and pSer235. To answer this question, we have used a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize in a qualitative and quantitative manner the phospho-residue(s) essential for the epitope recognition. Data from the first step of NMR experiments are used to map the residues bound by the antibodies, which were found to be limited to a few residues. A fluorophore is then chemically attached to a cystein residue introduced close-by the mapped epitope, at arginine 221, by mutagenesis of the recombinant protein. The second step of Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the AT180 antibody tryptophanes and the phospho-Tau protein fluorophore allows to calculate a dissociation constant Kd of 30 nM. We show that the sole pThr231 is necessary for the AT180 recognition of phospho-Tau and that phosphorylation of Ser235 does not interfere with the binding.

  13. Surface chemistry of group 11 atomic layer deposition precursors on silica using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallister, Peter J.; Barry, Seán T.

    2017-02-01

    The use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) as thin film deposition techniques has had a major impact on a number of fields. The deposition of pure, uniform, conformal thin films requires very specific vapour-solid reactivity that is largely unknown for the majority of ALD and CVD precursors. This work examines the initial chemisorption of several thin film vapour deposition precursors on high surface area silica (HSAS) using 13C, 31P, and quantitative 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two copper metal precursors, 1,3-diisopropyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper (I) hexamethyldisilazide (1) and 1,3-diethyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper(I) hexamethyldisilazide (2), and one gold metal precursor, trimethylphosphine gold(III) trimethyl (3), are examined. Compounds 1 and 2 were found to chemisorb at the hydroxyl surface-reactive sites to form a ||-O-Cu-NHC surface species and fully methylated silicon (||-SiMe3, due to reactivity of the hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) ligand on the precursor) at 150 °C and 250 °C. From quantitative 29Si solid-state NMR (SS-NMR) spectroscopy measurements, it was found that HMDS preferentially reacts at geminal disilanol surface sites while the copper surface species preferentially chemisorbed to lone silanol surface species. Additionally, the overall coverage was strongly dependent on temperature, with higher overall coverage of 1 at higher temperature but lower overall coverage of 2 at higher temperature. The chemisorption of 3 was found to produce a number of interesting surface species on HSAS. Gold(III) trimethylphosphine, reduced gold phosphine, methylated phosphoxides, and graphitic carbon were all observed as surface species. The overall coverage of 3 on HSAS was only about 10% at 100 °C and, like the copper compounds, had a preference for lone silanol surface reactive sites. The overall coverage and chemisorbed surface species have implications to the overall growth rate and purity of

  14. DRAGON: Monte Carlo Generator of Particle Production from a Fragmented Fireball in Ultrarelativistic Nuclear Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasik, Boris

    2010-11-01

    A Monte Carlo generator of the final state of hadrons emitted from an ultrarelativistic nuclear collision is introduced. An important feature of the generator is a possible fragmentation of the fireball and emission of the hadrons from fragments. Phase space distribution of the fragments is based on the blast wave model extended to azimuthally non-symmetric fireballs. Parameters of the model can be tuned and this allows to generate final states from various kinds of fireballs. A facultative output in the OSCAR1999A format allows for a comprehensive analysis of phase-space distributions and/or use as an input for an afterburner. DRAGON's purpose is to produce artificial data sets which resemble those coming from real nuclear collisions provided fragmentation occurs at hadronisation and hadrons are emitted from fragments without any further scattering. Its name, DRAGON, stands for DRoplet and hAdron GeneratOr for Nuclear collisions. In a way, the model is similar to THERMINATOR, with the crucial difference that emission from fragments is included.

  15. A no-tune no-match wideband probe for nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy in the VHF range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfetter, Hermann; Petrovic, Andreas; Eggenhofer, Heidi; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy is a method for the characterization of chemical compounds containing so-called quadrupolar nuclei. Similar to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the sample under investigation is irradiated with strong radiofrequency (RF) pulses, which stimulate the emission of weak RF signals from the quadrupolar nuclei. The signals are then amplified and Fourier transformed so as to obtain a spectrum. In principle, narrowband NQR spectra can be measured with NMR spectrometers. However, pure NQR signals require the absence of a static magnetic field and several special applications require the characterization of a substance over a large bandwidth, e.g. 50-100% of the central frequency, which is hardly possible with standard NMR equipment. Dedicated zero-field NQR equipment is not widespread and current concepts employ resonating probes which are tuned and matched over a wide range by using mechanical capacitors driven by stepper motors. While providing the highest signal to noise ratio (SNR) such probes are slow in operation and can only be operated from dedicated NMR consoles. We developed a low-cost NQR wideband probe without tuning and matching for applications in the very high frequency (VHF) range below 300 MHz. The probe coil was realized as part of a reactive network which approximates an exponential transmission line. The input reflection coefficient of the two developed prototype probe coils is ≤ 20 dB between 90-145 MHz and 74.5-99.5 MHz, respectively. Two wideband NQR spectra of published test substances were acquired with an SNR of better than 20 dB after sufficient averaging. The measured signals and the SNR correspond very well to the theoretically expected values and demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Because there is no need for tuning and matching, our probes can be operated easily from any available NMR console.

  16. Characterisation of human embryonic stem cells conditioning media by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A MacIntyre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell culture media conditioned by human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs provide a complex supplement of protein and metabolic factors that support in vitro proliferation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. However, the conditioning process is variable with different media batches often exhibiting differing capacities to maintain hESCs in culture. While recent studies have examined the protein complement of conditioned culture media, detailed information regarding the metabolic component of this media is lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a (1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1H-NMR metabonomics approach, 32 metabolites and small compounds were identified and quantified in media conditioned by passage 11 HFFs (CMp11. A number of metabolites were secreted by HFFs with significantly higher concentration of lactate, alanine, and formate detected in CMp11 compared to non-conditioned media. In contrast, levels of tryptophan, folate and niacinamide were depleted in CMp11 indicating the utilisation of these metabolites by HFFs. Multivariate statistical analysis of the (1H-NMR data revealed marked age-related differences in the metabolic profile of CMp11 collected from HFFs every 24 h over 72 h. Additionally, the metabolic profile of CMp11 was altered following freezing at -20°C for 2 weeks. CM derived from passage 18 HFFs (CMp18 was found to be ineffective at supporting hESCs in an undifferentiated state beyond 5 days culture. Multivariate statistical comparison of CMp11 and CMp18 metabolic profiles enabled rapid and clear discrimination between the two media with CMp18 containing lower concentrations of lactate and alanine as well as higher concentrations of glucose and glutamine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: (1H-NMR-based metabonomics offers a rapid and accurate method of characterising hESC conditioning media and is a valuable tool for monitoring, controlling and optimising hESC culture media preparation.

  17. Alpha particle spectroscopy for CR-39 detector utilizing matrix of energy equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awad, E.M. [Department of General Sciences, Yanbu Industrial College, PO Box 30436, Madinat Yanbu Al-Sinaiya (Saudi Arabia); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Menofia University, Shebin El-Koom (Egypt)], E-mail: ayawad@yahoo.com; Soliman, A.A. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education (AL-Arish), Suez Canal University, AL-Arish 45111 (Egypt); Department of Mathematics, Teacher' s College (Bisha), King Khalid University, Bisha, PO Box 551 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: asoliman_99@yahoo.com; Rammah, Y.S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Menofia University, Shebin El-Koom (Egypt)

    2007-10-01

    A method for determining alpha-particle energy using CR-39 detector by utilizing matrix of energy equation was described. The matrix was composed from two axes; the track minor axis (m) and diameter of etched out track end (d) axis of some selected elliptical tracks. The energy E in (m,d) coordinate was approximated by matrix of energy equations given by: E{sub k}={sigma}{sub i,j=0}{sup 2}a{sub ij}d{sub k}{sup i}m{sub k}{sup j}, which was identified using two different approaches. First, i and j were treated as power exponents for d and m. The adjusting parameters values a{sub ij} were obtained and the energy of a given track was deduced directly from it. Second, i and j were treated as indices of some chosen tracks that were fitted to obtain iso-energy curves that were superimposed on m-d scatter plot as calibration curves. The energy between any two successive iso-energy curves in this case was assumed varied linearly with d for a given m. The energy matrix in both cases was solved numerically. Results of the two approaches were compared.

  18. Determining Enzyme Kinetics for Systems Biology with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann J. Eicher

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Enzyme kinetics for systems biology should ideally yield information about the enzyme’s activity under in vivo conditions, including such reaction features as substrate cooperativity, reversibility and allostery, and be applicable to enzymatic reactions with multiple substrates. A large body of enzyme-kinetic data in the literature is based on the uni-substrate Michaelis–Menten equation, which makes unnatural assumptions about enzymatic reactions (e.g., irreversibility, and its application in systems biology models is therefore limited. To overcome this limitation, we have utilised NMR time-course data in a combined theoretical and experimental approach to parameterize the generic reversible Hill equation, which is capable of describing enzymatic reactions in terms of all the properties mentioned above and has fewer parameters than detailed mechanistic kinetic equations; these parameters are moreover defined operationally. Traditionally, enzyme kinetic data have been obtained from initial-rate studies, often using assays coupled to NAD(PH-producing or NAD(PH-consuming reactions. However, these assays are very labour-intensive, especially for detailed characterisation of multi-substrate reactions. We here present a cost-effective and relatively rapid method for obtaining enzyme-kinetic parameters from metabolite time-course data generated using NMR spectroscopy. The method requires fewer runs than traditional initial-rate studies and yields more information per experiment, as whole time-courses are analyzed and used for parameter fitting. Additionally, this approach allows real-time simultaneous quantification of all metabolites present in the assay system (including products and allosteric modifiers, which demonstrates the superiority of NMR over traditional spectrophotometric coupled enzyme assays. The methodology presented is applied to the elucidation of kinetic parameters for two coupled glycolytic enzymes from Escherichia coli

  19. Automatic Characterization of Cross-section Coated Particle Nuclear Fuel using Greedy Coupled Bayesian Snakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Jeffery R [ORNL; Aykac, Deniz [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    We describe new image analysis developments in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. We previously reported a non-iterative, Bayesian approach for locating the boundaries of different particle layers in cross-sectional imagery. That method, however, had to be initialized by manual preprocessing where a user must select two points in each image, one indicating the particle center and the other indicating the first layer interface. Here, we describe a technique designed to eliminate the manual preprocessing and provide full automation. With a low resolution image, we use 'EdgeFlow' to approximate the layer boundaries with circular templates. Multiple snakes are initialized to these circles and deformed using a greedy Bayesian strategy that incorporates coupling terms as well as a priori information on the layer thicknesses and relative contrast. We show results indicating the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. An empirical approach to the theory of particle and nuclear phenomena: Review and some new ideas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raja Ramanna; Sudhir R Jain

    2001-08-01

    Experimental data on masses and lifetimes of unstable particles falls into a pattern, a brief review of some interesting consequences is presented here. From the experience in semiclassical methods and recent advances in quantum chromodynamics, it is proposed that an appropriate generalization of the Gutzwiller trace formula for field theories may lead to a systematic semiclassical chromodynamics theory. The theory can be developed to get appropriate dynamics leading to an explanation of pattern discovered in the empirical data.

  1. Nonaqueous magnetic nanoparticle suspensions with controlled particle size and nuclear magnetic resonance properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meledandri, Carla J; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Ghosh, Swapankumar; Brougham, Dermot F

    2008-12-16

    We report the preparation of monodisperse maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticle suspensions in heptane, by thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine surfactants. By varying the surfactant/Fe precursor mole ratio during synthesis, control was exerted both over the nanocrystal core size, in the range from 3 to 6 nm, and over the magnetic properties of the resulting nanoparticle dispersions. We report field-cycling 1H NMR relaxation analysis of the superparamagnetic relaxation rate enhancement of nonaqueous suspensions for the first time. This approach permits measurement of the relaxivity and provides information on the saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy energy of the suspended particles. The saturation magnetization was found to be in the expected range for maghemite particles of this size. The anisotropy energy was found to increase significantly with decreasing particle size, which we attribute to increased shape anisotropy. This study can be used as a guide for the synthesis of maghemite nanoparticles with selected magnetic properties for a given application.

  2. Metabolomic analysis of urine with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy in patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Filippo; Lussu, Milena; Bandino, Fabrizio; Noto, Antonio; Peppi, Marcello; Chuchueva, Natalia; Atzori, Luigi; Fanos, Vassilios; Puxeddu, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a frequent emergency, with unknown aetiology and usually treated with empiric therapy. Steroids represent the only validated treatment but prognosis is unpredictable and the possibility to select the patients who will not respond to steroids could avoid unnecessary treatments. Metabolomic profiling of the biofluids target the analysis of the final product of genic expression and enzymatic activity, defining the biochemical phenotype of a whole biologic system. We studied the metabolomics of the urine of a cohort of patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss, correlating the metabolic profiles with the clinical outcomes. Metabolomic profiling of urine samples was performed by (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy in combination with multivariate statistical approaches. 26 patients were included in the study: 5 healthy controls, 13 patients who did not recover after treatment at 6 months while the remaining 8 patients recovered from the hearing loss. The orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis score plot showed a significant separation between the two groups, responders and non-responders after steroid therapy, R(2)Y of 0.83, Q(2) of 0.38 and p value sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a specific disease with unclear systemic changes, but our data suggest that there are different types of this disorder or patients predisposed to effective action of steroids allowing the recover after treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 33S nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of biological samples obtained with a laboratory model 33S cryogenic probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Saito, Yuta; Sato, Naoki; Takao, Tomoaki; Koshiba, Seizo; Maeda, Hideaki

    2010-05-01

    (33)S nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is limited by inherently low NMR sensitivity because of the quadrupolar moment and low gyromagnetic ratio of the (33)S nucleus. We have developed a 10 mm (33)S cryogenic NMR probe, which is operated at 9-26 K with a cold preamplifier and a cold rf switch operated at 60 K. The (33)S NMR sensitivity of the cryogenic probe is as large as 9.8 times that of a conventional 5 mm broadband NMR probe. The (33)S cryogenic probe was applied to biological samples such as human urine, bile, chondroitin sulfate, and scallop tissue. We demonstrated that the system can detect and determine sulfur compounds having SO(4)(2-) anions and -SO(3)(-) groups using the (33)S cryogenic probe, as the (33)S nuclei in these groups are in highly symmetric environments. The NMR signals for other common sulfur compounds such as cysteine are still undetectable by the (33)S cryogenic probe, as the (33)S nuclei in these compounds are in asymmetric environments. If we shorten the rf pulse width or decrease the rf coil diameter, we should be able to detect the NMR signals for these compounds.

  4. AIDA: A 16-channel amplifier ASIC to read out the advanced implantation detector array for experiments in nuclear decay spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, D. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Coleman-Smith, P. J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Davinson, T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I. H. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Page, R. D. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Thomas, S. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    We have designed a read-out ASIC for nuclear decay spectroscopy as part of the AIDA project - the Advanced Implantation Detector Array. AIDA will be installed in experiments at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in GSI, Darmstadt. The AIDA ASIC will measure the signals when unstable nuclei are implanted into the detector, followed by the much smaller signals when the nuclei subsequently decay. Implant energies can be as high as 20 GeV; decay products need to be measured down to 25 keV within just a few microseconds of the initial implants. The ASIC uses two amplifiers per detector channel, one covering the 20 GeV dynamic range, the other selectable over a 20 MeV or 1 GeV range. The amplifiers are linked together by bypass transistors which are normally switched off. The arrival of a large signal causes saturation of the low-energy amplifier and a fluctuation of the input voltage, which activates the link to the high-energy amplifier. The bypass transistors switch on and the input charge is integrated by the high-energy amplifier. The signal is shaped and stored by a peak-hold, then read out on a multiplexed output. Control logic resets the amplifiers and bypass circuit, allowing the low-energy amplifier to measure the subsequent decay signal. We present simulations and test results, demonstrating the AIDA ASIC operation over a wide range of input signals. (authors)

  5. Nuclear structure of {sup 37,} {sup 38}Si investigated by decay spectroscopy of {sup 37,} {sup 38}Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiger, K.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Faestermann, T.; Hinke, C. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E12, Garching (Germany); Nishimura, S.; Chen, R.; Kurata-Nishimura, M.; Lorusso, G. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Li, Z. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Peking University, Department of Physics, Beijing (China); Utsuno, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); University of Tokyo, Center for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (Japan); Kruecken, R. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E12, Garching (Germany); TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Miyashita, Y.; Sugimoto, K.; Yoshinaga, K. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Physics, Chiba (Japan); Shimizu, N. [University of Tokyo, Center for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (Japan); Sumikama, T. [Tohoku University, Department of Physics, Miyagi (Japan); Watanabe, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama (Japan); Beihang University, International Research Center for Nuclei and Particles in the Cosmos, Beijing (China); Beihang University, School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beijing (China)

    2015-09-15

    We present a study on the β decays of the neutron-rich isotopes {sup 37}Al and {sup 38}Al, produced by projectile fragmentation of a {sup 48}Ca beam with an energy E = 345 A MeV at the RIKEN Nishina Center. The half-lives of {sup 37}Al and {sup 38}Al have been measured to 11.5(4)ms and 9.0(7)ms, respectively, using the CAITEN implantation and decay detector setup. The level schemes for {sup 37}Si and {sup 38}Si were deduced by employing γ-γ coincidence spectroscopy following the event-by-event identification of the implanted nuclei. Comparison to large scale nuclear shell model calculations allowed for a tentative assignment of spin and parity of the populated states. The data indicate that the classical shell gap at magic neutron number N = 28 between the νf{sub 7/2} and νp{sub 3/2} orbits gets reduced by 0.3 MeV in this region leading to low-energy states with intruder configuration in {sup 37}Si. (orig.)

  6. Frequency-comb referenced collinear laser spectroscopy of Be+ for nuclear structure investigations and many-body QED tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, A.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Geppert, Ch.; Blaum, K.; Bissell, M. L.; Frömmgen, N.; Hammen, M.; Kreim, K.; Kowalska, M.; Krämer, J.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Sánchez, R.; Tiedemann, D.; Yordanov, D. T.; Zakova, M.

    2017-01-01

    Transition frequencies of the 2s ^2{{S}}_{1/2} → 2p ^2 {{P}}_{1/2, 3/2} transitions in Be^+ were measured in stable and short-lived isotopes at ISOLDE (CERN) using collinear laser spectroscopy and frequency-comb-referenced dye lasers. Quasi-simultaneous measurements in copropagating and counterpropagating geometry were performed to become independent from acceleration voltage determinations for Doppler-shift corrections of the fast ion beam. Isotope shifts and fine-structure splittings were obtained from the transition frequencies measured with a frequency comb with accuracies better than 1 MHz and led to a precise determination of the nuclear charge radii of ^{7,10-12}Be relative to the stable isotope 9Be. Moreover, an accurate determination of the 2 p fine-structure splitting allowed a test of high-precision bound-state QED calculations in the three-electron system. Here, we describe the laser spectroscopic method in detail, including several tests that were carried out to determine or estimate systematic uncertainties. Final values from two experimental runs at ISOLDE are presented, and the results are discussed.

  7. Dynamics of water-alcohol mixtures: Insights from nuclear magnetic resonance, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and triplet solvation dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, D.; Schuster, B.; Rosenstihl, M.; Schneider, S.; Blochowicz, T.; Stühn, B.; Vogel, M. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Hochschulstraße 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Talluto, V.; Walther, T. [Institut für Angewandte Physik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 7, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-03-21

    We combine {sup 2}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS), and triplet solvation dynamics (TSD) to investigate molecular dynamics in glass-forming mixtures of water and propylene glycol in very broad time and temperature ranges. All methods yield consistent results for the α process of the studied mixtures, which hardly depends on the composition and shows Vogel-Fulcher temperature dependence as well as Cole-Davidson spectral shape. The good agreement between BDS and TDS data reveals that preferential solvation of dye molecules in microheterogeneous mixtures does not play an important role. Below the glass transition temperature T{sub g}, NMR and BDS studies reveal that the β process of the mixtures shows correlation times, which depend on the water concentration, but exhibit a common temperature dependence, obeying an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of E{sub a} = 0.54  eV, as previously reported for mixtures of water with various molecular species. Detailed comparison of NMR and BDS correlation functions for the β process unravels that the former decay faster and more stretched than the latter. Moreover, the present NMR data imply that propylene glycol participates in the β process and, hence, it is not a pure water process, and that the mechanism for molecular dynamics underlying the β process differs in mixtures of water with small and large molecules.

  8. Thermal Lens Spectroscopy as a 'new' analytical tool for actinide determination in nuclear reprocessing processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canto, Fabrice; Couston, Laurent; Magnaldo, Alastair [CEA-Valrho DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LCAM BP17171 30207 Bagnols/Ceze cedex (France); Broquin, Jean-Emmanuel [IMEP/ENSERG 23 rue des Martyrs BP257 38016 Grenoble (France); Signoret, Philippe [UM2/IES UMR 5214. Place Eugene Bataillon 34095 Montpellier cedex5 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Thermal Lens Spectroscopy (TLS) consists of measuring the effects induced by the relaxation of molecules excited by photons. Twenty years ago, the Cea already worked on TLS. Technologic reasons impeded. But, needs in sensitive analytical methods coupled with very low sample volumes (for example, traces of Np in the COEX{sup TM} process) and also the reduction of the nuclear wastes encourage us to revisit this method thanks to the improvement of optoelectronic technologies. We can also imagine coupling TLS with micro-fluidic technologies, decreasing significantly the experiments cost. Generally two laser beams are used for TLS: one for the selective excitation by molecular absorption (inducing the thermal lens) and one for probing the thermal lens. They can be coupled with different geometries, collinear or perpendicular, depending on the application and on the laser mode. Also, many possibilities of measurement have been studied to detect the thermal lens signal: interferometry, direct intensities variations, deflection etc... In this paper, one geometrical configuration and two measurements have been theoretically evaluated. For a single photodiode detection (z-scan) the limit of detection is calculated to be near 5*10{sup -6} mol*L{sup -1} for Np(IV) in dodecane. (authors)

  9. Zebrafish brain lipid characterization and quantification by ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Amerongen, Yvonne F; Roy, Upasana; Spaink, Herman P; de Groot, Huub J M; Huster, Daniel; Schiller, Jürgen; Alia, A

    2014-06-01

    Lipids play an important role in many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and Huntington's disease. Zebrafish models for these diseases have been recently developed. The detailed brain lipid composition of the adult zebrafish is not known, and therefore, the representativeness of these models cannot be properly evaluated. In this study, we characterized the total lipid composition of healthy adult zebrafish using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A close resemblance of the zebrafish brain composition is shown in comparison to the human brain. Moreover, several lipids involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases (i.e., cholesterol, phosphatidylcholine, docosahexaenoic acid, and further, polyunsaturated fatty acids) are detected and quantified. These lipids might represent useful biomarkers in future research toward human therapies. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with high-performance thin-layer chromatography was used for further characterization of zebrafish brain lipids. Our results show that the lipid composition of the zebrafish brain is rather similar to the human brain and thus confirms that zebrafish represents a good model for studying various brain diseases.

  10. Frequency-comb based collinear laser spectroscopy of Be for nuclear structure investigations and many-body QED tests

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, A; Geppert, Ch; Blaum, K; Bissell, M L; Frömmgen, N; Hammen, M; Kreim, K; Kowalska, M; Krämer, J; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Sánchez, R; Tiedemann, D; Yordanov, D T; Zakova, M

    2016-01-01

    Absolute transition frequencies of the $2s\\,^2{\\rm{S}}_{1/2}$ $\\rightarrow$ $2p\\,^2{\\rm{P}}_{1/2,3/2}$ transitions in Be$^+$ were measured with a frequency comb in stable and short-lived isotopes at ISOLDE (CERN) using collinear laser spectroscopy. Quasi-simultaneous measurements in copropagating and counterpropagating geometry were performed to become independent from acceleration voltage determinations for Doppler-shift corrections of the fast ion beam. Isotope shifts and fine structure splittings were obtained from the absolute transition frequencies with accuracies better than 1\\,MHz and led to a precise determination of the nuclear charge radii of $^{7,10-12}$Be relative to the stable isotope $^9$Be. Moreover, an accurate determination of the $2p$ fine structure splitting allowed a test of high-precision bound-state QED calculations in the three-electron system. Here, we describe the laser spectroscopic method in detail, including several tests that were carried out to determine or estimate systematic un...

  11. Kinetic and equilibrium constants of phytic acid and ferric and ferrous phytate derived from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heighton, Lynne; Schmidt, Walter F; Siefert, Ronald L

    2008-10-22

    Inositol phosphates are metabolically derived organic phosphates (P) that increasingly appear to be an important sink and source of P in the environment. Salts of myo-inositol hexakisdihydrogen phosphate (IHP) or more commonly phytate are the most common inositol phosphates in the environment. IHP resists acidic dephosphorylation and enzymatic dephosphorylation as ferric or ferrous IHP. Mobility of IHP iron complexes is potentially pH and redox responsive, making the time scale and environmental fate and transport of the P associated with the IHP of interest to the mass balance of phosphorus. Ferric and ferrous complexes of IHP were investigated by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( (1)H NMR) and enzymatic dephosphorylation. Ferrous IHP was found to form quickly and persist for a longer period then ferric IHP. Dissociation constants derived from (1)H NMR experiments of chemically exchanging systems at equilibrium were 1.11 and 1.19 and formation constants were 0.90 and 0.84 for ferric and ferrous IHP, respectively. The recovery of P from enzymatic dephosphorylation of ferric and ferrous IHP was consistent with the magnitude of the kinetic and equilibrium rate constants.

  12. Application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in food adulteration determination: the example of Sudan dye I in paprika powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaxi; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Shenlin; Lu, Xiaonan

    2017-06-01

    Carcinogenic Sudan I has been added illegally into spices for an apparent freshness. (1)H solution and solid-state (SS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies were applied and compared for determination of Sudan I in paprika powders (PPs). For solution NMR, PPs spiked with Sudan I were extracted with acetonitrile, centrifuged, rotor-evaporated, and re-dissolved in DMSO-d6 for spectral collection. For SSNMR, Sudan I contaminated PPs were mixed with DMSO-d6 solution and used for spectral collection. Linear regression models constructed for quantitative analyses resulted in the average accuracies for unknown samples as 98% and 105%, respectively. Limits of detection for the solution NMR and SSNMR spectrometers were 6.7 and 128.6 mg kg(-1), while the limits of quantification were 22.5 and 313.7 mg kg(-1). The overall analysis time required by both methods was similar (35 and 32 min). Both NMR techniques are feasible for rapid and accurate determination of Sudan I adulteration in PPs.

  13. Some Aspects of Multi-Particle Productions in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ayaz Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made for the study of multiparticle production due to the collisions of 28Si and 12C projectiles with nuclear emulsion nuclei (target at an energy of 4.5A GeV/c. Here we have studied the integral multiplicity distribution; total multiplicity charged distributions and our findings had been found in good agreement with the other works in the field of experimental high energy physics. Moreover, finally, we discussed the multiplicity correlations in terms of on Charge/Projectile (Q/Zbeam.

  14. Espectroscopia de Ressonância Magnética Nuclear de 13C no estudo de rotas biossintéticas de produtos naturais 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy in the studies of biosythetic routes of natural products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando César de Macedo Júnior

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available During the last five decades, as a result of an interaction between natural product chemistry, synthetic organic chemistry, molecular biology and spectroscopy, scientists reached an extraordinary level of comprehension about the natural processes by which living organisms build up complex molecules. In this context, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, allied with isotopic labeling, played a determinant role. Nowadays, the widespread use of modern NMR techniques allows an even more detailed picture of the biochemical steps by accurate manipulation of the atomic nuclei. This article focuses on the development of such techniques and their impact on biosynthetic studies.

  15. Investigating α-particle radiation damage in phyllosilicates using synchrotron microfocus-XRD/XAS: implications for geological disposal of nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, W. R.; Pearce, C. I.; Pimblott, S. M.; Haigh, S. J.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Pattrick, R. A. D.

    2014-12-01

    The response of mineral phases to the radiation fields that will be experienced in a geological disposal facility (GDF) for nuclear waste is poorly understood. Phyllosilicates are critical phases in a GDF with bentonite clay as the backfill of choice surrounding high level wastes in the engineered barrier, and clays and micas forming the most important reactive component of potential host rocks. It is essential that we understand changes in mineral properties and behaviour as a result of damage from both α and γ radiation over long timescales. Radiation damage has been demonstrated to affect the physical integrity and oxidation state1 of minerals which will also influence their ability to react with radionuclides. Using the University of Manchester's newly commissioned particle accelerator at the Dalton Cumbrian Facility, UK, model phyllosilicate minerals (e.g. biotite, chlorite) were irradiated with high energy (5MeV) alpha particles at controlled dose rates. This has been compared alongside radiation damage found in naturally formed 'radiohalos' - spherical areas of discolouration in minerals surrounding radioactive inclusions, resulting from alpha particle penetration, providing a natural analogue to study lattice damage under long term bombardment1,2. Both natural and artificially irradiated samples have been analysed using microfocus X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high resolution X-ray diffraction mapping on Beamline I18 at Diamond Light Source; samples were probed for redox changes and long/short range disorder. This was combined with lattice scale imaging of damage using HR-TEM (TitanTM Transmission Electron Microscope). The results show aberrations in lattice parameters as a result of irradiation, with multiple damage-induced 'domains' surrounded by amorphous regions. In the naturally damaged samples, neo-formed phyllosilicate phases are shown to be breakdown products of highly damaged regions. A clear reduction of the Fe(III) component has been

  16. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified into primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and of gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance with wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C

  17. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified as primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance to wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C ratio

  18. Automation and heat transfer characterization of immersion mode spectroscopy for analysis of ice nucleating particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Charlotte M.; Stokes, M. Dale; Hill, Thomas C.; DeMott, Paul J.; DeWald, Jesse T.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2017-07-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INPs) influence cloud properties and can affect the overall precipitation efficiency. Developing a parameterization of INPs in global climate models has proven challenging. More INP measurements - including studies of their spatial distribution, sources and sinks, and fundamental freezing mechanisms - must be conducted in order to further improve INP parameterizations. In this paper, an immersion mode INP measurement technique is modified and automated using a software-controlled, real-time image stream designed to leverage optical changes of water droplets to detect freezing events. For the first time, heat transfer properties of the INP measurement technique are characterized using a finite-element-analysis-based heat transfer simulation to improve accuracy of INP freezing temperature measurement. The heat transfer simulation is proposed as a tool that could be used to explain the sources of bias in temperature measurements in INP measurement techniques and ultimately explain the observed discrepancies in measured INP freezing temperatures between different instruments. The simulation results show that a difference of +8.4 °C between the well base temperature and the headspace gas results in an up to 0.6 °C stratification of the aliquot, whereas a difference of +4.2 °C or less results in a thermally homogenous water volume within the error of the thermal probe, ±0.2 °C. The results also show that there is a strong temperature gradient in the immediate vicinity of the aliquot, such that without careful placement of temperature probes, or characterization of heat transfer properties of the water and cooling environment, INP measurements can be biased toward colder temperatures. Based on a modified immersion mode technique, the Automated Ice Spectrometer (AIS), measurements of the standard test dust illite NX are reported and compared against six other immersion mode droplet assay techniques featured in Hiranuma et al. (2015) that used

  19. Investigation of rare particle production in high energy nuclear collisions. Progress report, December 15, 1997--December 14, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, H.J.; Engelage, J.

    1998-11-01

    The program is an investigation of the hadronization process through experimental measurement of rare particle production in high energy nuclear interactions. These interactions provide an environment similar in energy density to the conditions in the Big Bang. The authors are currently involved in two major experiments to study this environment, E896 at the AGS and STAR at RHIC. They have completed the first physics running of E896, a search for the H dibaryon and measurement of hyperon production in AuAu collisions, and are in the process of analyzing the data. They have prototyped the STAR trigger and are in the process of fabricating its components and installing them in the STAR detector.

  20. Progress in development of silica aerogel for particle- and nuclear-physics experiments at J-PARC

    CERN Document Server

    Tabata, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the advancement in hydrophobic silica aerogel development for use as Cherenkov radiators and muonium production targets. These devices are scheduled for use in several particle- and nuclear-physics experiments that are planned in the near future at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. Our conventional method to produce aerogel tiles with an intermediate index of refraction of approximately 1.05 is extended so that we can now produce aerogel tiles with lower indices of refraction (i.e., 1.03-1.04) and higher indices of refraction (i.e., 1.075-1.08); each with excellent transparency. A new production method, called pin drying, was optimized to produce larger area aerogels consistently with an ultrahigh index of refraction (>1.10). In addition, for use as a thermal-muonium-emitting material at room temperature, dedicated low-density aerogels were fabricated using the conventional method.