WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear oversight erfahrungs

  1. Research and experience report 2010 - Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight; Erfahrungs- und Forschungsbericht 2010 - Entwicklungen im Bereich der Grundlagen der nuklearen Aufsicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-04-15

    This comprehensive annual report presents a review of the activities carried out by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) in the year 2010. The inspectorate's fields of activity - fuels and materials, significant internal and external events and occurrences, human factors, system behaviour and accident sequences, radiological protection and waste disposal - are reviewed. Information on incidents in Swiss nuclear facilities are reviewed in the ENSI Surveillance Report. The Research and Experience Report also provides information on a selection of particularly instructive incidents in nuclear facilities outside Switzerland. Incidents are analysed with a view to identifying any potential relevance to Swiss nuclear facilities. International co-operation is mentioned and current changes and developments related to plant surveillance are noted. Organisational aspects are discussed and various guidelines and directives are presented and discussed

  2. Research and experience report 2010 - Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight; Erfahrungs- und Forschungsbericht 2010 - Entwicklungen im Bereich der Grundlagen der nuklearen Aufsicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-04-15

    This comprehensive annual report presents a review of the activities carried out by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) in the year 2010. The inspectorate's fields of activity - fuels and materials, significant internal and external events and occurrences, human factors, system behaviour and accident sequences, radiological protection and waste disposal - are reviewed. Information on incidents in Swiss nuclear facilities are reviewed in the ENSI Surveillance Report. The Research and Experience Report also provides information on a selection of particularly instructive incidents in nuclear facilities outside Switzerland. Incidents are analysed with a view to identifying any potential relevance to Swiss nuclear facilities. International co-operation is mentioned and current changes and developments related to plant surveillance are noted. Organisational aspects are discussed and various guidelines and directives are presented and discussed

  3. Research and experience report 2007. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight; Erfahrungs- und Forschungsbericht 2007. Entwicklungen im Bereich der Grundlagen der nuklearen Aufsicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (HSK) reviews the aims, duties and responsibilities of the inspectorate and the work done during 2007. In the area of reactor safety, the research covered materials and the deterministic and probabilistic analysis of incidents and their consequences. In the area of radiation protection, the protection of persons and the environment in the vicinity of nuclear facilities from ionising radiation is addressed. In this area, accurate metrology and research to improve dosimetry and radiation analysis is discussed. In the area of transport and waste management, the HSK is focussing its efforts on research into the geological strata suitable for the final storage of highly radioactive, long-lived waste. Human factors, organisation and safety culture are quoted as playing a major role in nuclear safety. According to the report, greater attention is being given to these factors by those bodies responsible for nuclear regulation. Appendices present an overview of work done, international activities and publications along with the ENSI's guidelines.

  4. Research and experience report 2007. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight; Erfahrungs- und Forschungsbericht 2007. Entwicklungen im Bereich der Grundlagen der nuklearen Aufsicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (HSK) reviews the aims, duties and responsibilities of the inspectorate and the work done during 2007. In the area of reactor safety, the research covered materials and the deterministic and probabilistic analysis of incidents and their consequences. In the area of radiation protection, the protection of persons and the environment in the vicinity of nuclear facilities from ionising radiation is addressed. In this area, accurate metrology and research to improve dosimetry and radiation analysis is discussed. In the area of transport and waste management, the HSK is focussing its efforts on research into the geological strata suitable for the final storage of highly radioactive, long-lived waste. Human factors, organisation and safety culture are quoted as playing a major role in nuclear safety. According to the report, greater attention is being given to these factors by those bodies responsible for nuclear regulation. Appendices present an overview of work done, international activities and publications along with the ENSI's guidelines.

  5. Research and experience report 2012. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight; Erfahrungs- und Forschungsbericht 2012. Entwicklungen im Bereich der Grundlagen der nuklearen Aufsicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-04-15

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) acts upon the basis of the latest developments in science and technology. ENSI supports and coordinates safety research, the results of which influence directly its Guidelines, individual decisions and resources. Research projects also serve training purposes and maintain competence within ENSI and its experts. The research in fuels and materials covers the reactor core and the graded approach to barriers used for the confinement of radioactive materials. Based on test results from accidents involving a loss of coolant ENSI instructed the operators of Swiss nuclear power plants to review whether they were relevant to their own facilities. Ageing mechanisms affecting structural materials are crucial to the long-term operation of nuclear power plants. Specialised thematic databases are being created in order to facilitate a systematic analysis of relevant operating experience from numerous countries. In addition to damage that may result from events within nuclear power plants, the safety analyses also reflect external events. ENSI supports international projects conducting complex experiments and simulations of aircraft accidents and earthquakes. It is involved in some projects relating to flood risks. The effect of operator behaviour on accidents in nuclear power plants is the focus point of research into human factors which identifies and analyses certain operator errors influencing negatively the course of an accident. Proposals to improve accident procedures were developed. This research area also focuses on the influence of the control room layout on the performance of operating staff. System behaviour and accident sequences in nuclear power plants are analysed in conditions ranging from normal operations through to accidents resulting in core melt-down. The results are used for the quantitative evaluation of the plant risk in probabilistic safety analyses. Applied research in radiological protection ranges

  6. Research and experience report 2016 - Developments in the technical and legal basis for nuclear oversight; Erfahrungs- und Forschungsbericht 2016 - Entwicklungen im Bereich der Grundlagen der nuklearen Aufsicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-04-15

    Projects in the research programme of the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) contribute to the clarification of outstanding issues, establish fundamentals and develop the tools required for its regulatory activities. International projects deliver results that Switzerland could not achieve on its own and encourage cross-border networking. The research on fuels and materials covers the reactor core and the multiple barriers for the retainment of radioactive materials especially concerning high burn-up rates and safety criteria. In 2016, the Studsvik Cladding Integrity Project in Sweden commissioned a new test facility to investigate the behaviour of fuel rods in loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Research into structural materials focuses on ageing processes. In the NORA project at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), platinum is injected into the cooling system with a view to reducing corrosion. Projects conducted under the auspices of the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and relating to internal events and damage encourage the international exchange of information on incidents, accidents and component damage. Subject-specific databases are created on incidents involving fires or damage to passive metal components. In 2016 the OECD CODAP project prepared a report on reliability and integrity management in pressurised components. ENSI supports research projects on external events such as earthquakes, flooding, aircraft crashes and explosions. Within the OECD MECOS project, the behaviour of pipes subjected to powerful earthquakes was modelled; it showed improvements in the calculation of cyclic loading and on the limits for simulating elastic-plastic material behaviour under high loads. The impact of operator actions on incidents and accidents is the most important human factor in view of reducing uncertainty in probabilistic safety analyses, as well as the interfaces between humans and technical systems. System behaviour and accident sequences in

  7. Research and experience report 2012. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight; Erfahrungs- und Forschungsbericht 2012. Entwicklungen im Bereich der Grundlagen der nuklearen Aufsicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-04-15

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) acts upon the basis of the latest developments in science and technology. ENSI supports and coordinates safety research, the results of which influence directly its Guidelines, individual decisions and resources. Research projects also serve training purposes and maintain competence within ENSI and its experts. The research in fuels and materials covers the reactor core and the graded approach to barriers used for the confinement of radioactive materials. Based on test results from accidents involving a loss of coolant ENSI instructed the operators of Swiss nuclear power plants to review whether they were relevant to their own facilities. Ageing mechanisms affecting structural materials are crucial to the long-term operation of nuclear power plants. Specialised thematic databases are being created in order to facilitate a systematic analysis of relevant operating experience from numerous countries. In addition to damage that may result from events within nuclear power plants, the safety analyses also reflect external events. ENSI supports international projects conducting complex experiments and simulations of aircraft accidents and earthquakes. It is involved in some projects relating to flood risks. The effect of operator behaviour on accidents in nuclear power plants is the focus point of research into human factors which identifies and analyses certain operator errors influencing negatively the course of an accident. Proposals to improve accident procedures were developed. This research area also focuses on the influence of the control room layout on the performance of operating staff. System behaviour and accident sequences in nuclear power plants are analysed in conditions ranging from normal operations through to accidents resulting in core melt-down. The results are used for the quantitative evaluation of the plant risk in probabilistic safety analyses. Applied research in radiological protection ranges

  8. Research and experience report 2015 - Developments in the technical and legal basis for nuclear oversight; Erfahrungs- und Forschungsbericht 2015 - Entwicklungen im Bereich der Grundlagen der nuklearen Aufsicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-04-15

    Projects in the research programme of the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) contribute to the clarification of outstanding issues, establish fundamentals and develop the tools required for its regulatory activities. International projects deliver results that Switzerland could not achieve on its own and encourage international networking. The research on fuels and materials covers the reactor core and the multiple barriers for the retainment of radioactive materials. In 2015 the OECD Halden Reactor Project developed new methods for measuring the thermal conductivity of fuel and the creep of cladding materials during irradiation in the reactor and ageing processes. The PISA project of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) focused on the deterministic and probabilistic assessment of the integrity of reactor pressure vessels. Under the auspices of the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency, specific databases are being created on damage to passive metal components and electrical cables. The OECD FIRE project completed its report into the combination of fires with other events; half of these events are linked to electric arcing. ENSI research projects address external events such as earthquakes, flooding, aircraft crashes and explosions. A project of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers is investigating pre-stressed reinforced concrete slabs under explosive loads. Other OECD projects consider the effects of severe earthquakes on reinforced concrete walls and pipelines. The ROES PSI project is expanding the application of methods for assessing operator errors that can negatively influence the course of an accident. System behaviour and accident sequences in nuclear power plants are analysed in conditions ranging from normal operations through to accidents involving core meltdown. The results of computer models are used for the quantitative identification of plant risk in probabilistic safety analyses. The STARS PSI project improves the basic principles for

  9. Research and experience report 2008. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight; Erfahrungs- und Forschungsbericht 2008. Entwicklungen im Bereich der Grundlagen der nuklearen Aufsicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-04-15

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (ENSI) reviews research into regulatory safety and the work done during 2008. In the area of reactor safety, research - in addition to research into materials - was concentrated primarily on safety and reliability analyses. ENSI supports projects looking at ageing mechanisms such as fatigue, corrosion, embrittlement and the development of cracks under a range of environmental conditions. Topics such as the interaction between core meltdown and water and concrete as well as the development of methods and computer codes are covered. In the area of transport and waste management, ENSI is focussing its efforts on research into the geological strata suitable for the final storage of highly radioactive, long-lived waste. Human and organisational factors and safety culture now account for an increasing part of the work of this regulatory body. Appendices present an overview of work done, international activities, publications and the basic principles of the new ENSI guidelines.

  10. Research and experience report 2009. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight; Erfahrungs- und Forschungsbericht 2009. Entwicklungen im Bereich der Grundlagen der nuklearen Aufsicht/Rapport sur la recherche et les experiences en 2009. Developpements dans les bases techniques et legales pour la surveillance nucleaire/Research and experience report 2009. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-04-15

    In terms of research into regulatory safety, ENSI awards and coordinates research projects designed to develop current scientific knowledge and expertise and to make the results available to the regulatory process. ENSI currently supports research in four different areas: Reactor Safety; Radiological Protection; Transport and Waste Management; and Human Influence, Organisation and Safety Culture. Research in reactor safety focuses on materials research of relevance to the monitoring of ageing mechanisms such as fatigue, corrosion, embrittlement and the development of cracks, together with research into incidents and accidents and their relevance to improvements in safety analyses. It investigates issues such as the interaction between core meltdown and water and concrete, as well as the development of methodologies and software. In addition, ENSI is a partner in a range of international database projects giving it access to information on the causes, frequency and characteristics of individual incidents. The aim of radiological protection is to protect personnel, local people and the environment in the vicinity of nuclear facilities from ionising radiation. ENSI supports research into dosimetry and radio analysis. Another area of particular importance is research designed to improve the methodologies used to monitor the release of radioactive materials into the environment. In the area of transport and waste management, ENSI investigates the suitability of geological strata for the deep storage of radioactive waste. Experiments are being conducted at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory into the geological, hydro-geological, geochemical and rock-mechanical properties of the Opalinus clay. ENSI is supporting an experiment designed to characterise the fracture generation in the excavation damage zone of a gallery triggered by stress changes in the surrounding rock. The research is also looking at the chemical reactions occurring in a deep repository, together with the

  11. Nuclear Oversight Function at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozin, B.; Kavsek, D.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear oversight function is used at the Krsko NPP constructively to strengthen safety and improve performance. Nuclear safety is kept under constant examination through a variety of monitoring techniques and activities, some of which provide an independent review. The nuclear oversight function at the Krsko NPP is accomplished by Quality and Nuclear Oversight Division (SKV). SKV has completed its mission through a combination of compliance, performance and effectiveness-based assessments. The performance-based assessment is an assessment using various techniques (observations, interviews, walk-downs, document reviews) to assure compliance with standards and regulations, obtain insight into performance, performance trends and also to identify opportunities to improve effectiveness of implementation. Generally, the performance-based approach to oversight function is based on some essential elements. The most important one which is developed and implemented is an oversight program (procedure). The program focuses on techniques, activities and objectives commensurate with their significance to plant operational safety. These techniques and activities are: self-assessments, assessments, audits, performance indicators, monitoring of corrective action program (CAP), industry independent reviews (such as IAEA's OSART and WANO Peer Review), industry benchmarking etc. Graded approach is an inherent product of a performance based program and ranking process. It is important not only to focus on the highest ranked performance based attributes but to lead to effective utilization of an oversight program. The attributes selected for oversight need to be based on plant specific experience, current industry operating experience, supplier's performance and quality issues. Collaboration within the industry and effective utility oversight of processes and design activities are essential for achieving good plant performance. So the oversight program must integrate relevant

  12. Human factors in nuclear safety oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.

    1989-01-01

    The mission of the nuclear safety oversight function at the Savannah River Plant is to enhance the process and nuclear safety of site facilities. One of the major goals surrounding this mission is the reduction of human error. It is for this reason that several human factors engineers are assigned to the Operations assessment Group of the Facility Safety Evaluation Section (FSES). The initial task of the human factors contingent was the design and implementation of a site wide root cause analysis program. The intent of this system is to determine the most prevalent sources of human error in facility operations and to assist in determining where the limited human factors resources should be focused. In this paper the strategy used to educate the organization about the field of human factors is described. Creating an awareness of the importance of human factors engineering in all facets of design, operation, and maintenance is considered to be an important step in reducing the rate of human error

  13. Regulatory oversight of nuclear safety in Finland. Annual report 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kainulainen, E. (ed.)

    2012-07-01

    The report constitutes the report on regulatory control in the field of nuclear energy which the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is required to submit once a year to the Ministry of Employment and the Economy pursuant to Section 121 of the Nuclear Energy Decree. The report is also delivered to the Ministry of Environment, the Finnish Environment Institute, and the regional environmental authorities of the localities in which a nuclear facility is located. The regulatory control of nuclear safety in 2011 included the design, construction and operation of nuclear facilities, as well as nuclear waste management and nuclear materials. The first parts of the report explain the basics of nuclear safety regulation included as part of STUK's responsibilities, as well as the objectives of the operations, and briefly introduce the objects of regulation. The chapter concerning the development and implementation of legislation and regulations describes changes in nuclear legislation, as well as the progress of STUK's YVL Guide revision work. The section concerning the regulation of nuclear facilities contains an overall safety assessment of the nuclear facilities currently in operation or under construction. The chapter concerning the regulation of the final disposal project for spent nuclear fuel de-scribes the preparations for the final disposal project and the related regulatory activities. The section concerning nuclear non-proliferation describes the nuclear non-proliferation control for Finnish nuclear facilities and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel, as well as measures required by the Additional Protocol of the Safeguards Agreement. The chapter describing the oversight of security arrangements in the use of nuclear energy discusses oversight of the security arrangements in nuclear power plants and other plants, institutions and functions included within the scope of STUK's regulatory oversight. The chapter also discusses the national and

  14. Regulatory oversight on nuclear safety in Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, T-T. [Atomic Energy Council, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-01

    Taiwan is a densely populated island and over 98% of its energy is imported, 16.5% of which is nuclear, in the form of materials and services. Ensuring that the most stringent nuclear safety standards are met therefore remains a priority for the government and the operator, Taiwan power Company (Taipower). There are eight nuclear power reactors in Taiwan, six of which are in operation and two are under construction. The first began operating nearly 40 years ago. For the time being the issue of whether to decommission or extend life of the operating units is also being discussed and has no conclusion yet. Nuclear energy has been a hot issue in debate over the past decades in Taiwan. Construction of Lungmen nuclear power plant, site selection of a final low-level waste disposal facility, installation of spent fuel dry storage facilities and safety of the currently operating nuclear power reactors are the issues that all Taiwanese are concerned most. In order to ensure the safety of nuclear power plant, the Atomic Energy Council (AEC) has implemented rigorous regulatory work over the past decades. After the Fukushima accident, AEC has conducted a reassessment program to re-evaluate all nuclear power plants in Taiwan, and asked Taipower to follow the technical guidelines, which ENSREG has utilized to implement stress test over nuclear power plants in Europe. In addition, AEC has invited two expert teams from OECD/NEA and ENSREG to conduct peer reviews of Taiwan's stress test national report in 2013. My presentation will focus on activities regulating safety of nuclear power programs. These will cover (A) policy of nuclear power regulation in Taiwan, (B)challenges of the Lungmen Plant, (C) post-Fukushima safety re-assessment, and (D)radioactive waste management. (author)

  15. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites

  16. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-03-01

    Experience across the international nuclear industry and in other technical fields over the past few decades has demonstrated the importance of a healthy safety culture in maintaining the safety of workers, the public and the environment. Both regulators and the nuclear industry recognize the need for licensees to develop a strong safety culture in order to support successful and sustainable nuclear safety performance. Progress over recent years can be observed in the rapid development of approaches to overseeing licensees' safety culture. This publication follows on and complements earlier publications on safety culture, from the publication Safety Culture (Safety Series No. 75-INSAG-4 (1991)), published after the Chernobyl accident, to the more recently published Safety Requirements on The Management System for Facilities and Activities (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-3 (2006)), which states that the management system is to be used to promote and support a strong safety culture. A number of attempts have been made at both the international and national levels to establish practical approaches to regulatory oversight of safety culture. During 2010 and 2011, two projects were conducted by the IAEA under the scope of the Safe Nuclear Energy - Regional Excellence Programme within the Norwegian Cooperation Programme with Bulgaria and Romania. These projects were implemented at the Bulgarian and Romanian regulatory bodies. They encompassed the development of a specific process to oversee licensees' safety culture, and involved 30 experts from 17 countries and 22 organizations. The IAEA continues to support Member States in the area of safety culture through its projects on safety management and capacity building. This publication addresses the basics of regulatory oversight of safety culture, describes the approaches currently implemented at several regulatory bodies around the world and, based on these examples, proposes a path to developing such a process

  17. Health physics self-assessment and the nuclear regulatory oversight process at a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, R.S.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has developed improvements in their Nuclear Power Plant inspection, assessment and enforcement practices. The objective of these changes was to link regulatory action with power plant performance through a risk- informed process which is intended to enhance objectivity. One of the Strategic Performance Areas of focus by the U.S. NRC is radiation safety. Two cornerstones, Occupational Radiation Safety and Public Radiation Safety, make up this area. These cornerstones are being evaluated through U.S. NRC Performance Indicators (PI) and baseline site inspections. Key to the U.S. NRC's oversight program is the ability of the licensee to implement a self-assessment program which pro-actively identifies potential problems and develops improvements to enhance management's effectiveness. The Health Physics Self-Assessment Program at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) identifies radiation protection-related weakness or negative trends. The intended end result is improved performance through rapid problem identification, timely evaluation, corrective action and follow-up effectiveness reviews. A review of the radiation protection oversight process and the SONGS Health Physics Self-Assessment Program will be presented. Lessons learned and management tools, which evaluate workforce and Health Physics (HP) staff performance to improve radiological practices, are discussed. (author)

  18. A Study on the Construct Validity of Safety Culture Oversight Model for Nuclear Power Operating Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Su Jin; Choi, Young Sung; Oh, Jang Jin

    2015-01-01

    In Korea, the safety policy statement declared in 1994 by government stressed the importance of safety culture and licensees were encouraged to manage and conduct their self-assessments. A change in regulatory position about safety culture oversight was made after the event of SBO cover-up in Kori unit 1 and several subsequent falsification events. Since then KINS has been developing licensee's safety culture oversight system including conceptual framework of oversight, prime focus area for oversight, and specific details on regulatory expectations, all of which are based on defence-in-depth (DiD) safety enhancement approach. Development and gathering of performance data which is related to actual 'safety' of nuclear power plant are needed to identify the relationship between safety culture and safety performance. Authors consider this study as pilot which has a contribution on verifying the construct validity of the model and the effectiveness of survey based research. This is the first attempt that the validity of safety culture oversight model has been investigated with empirical data obtained from Korean nuclear power operating organization

  19. A Study on the Construct Validity of Safety Culture Oversight Model for Nuclear Power Operating Organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Su Jin; Choi, Young Sung; Oh, Jang Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In Korea, the safety policy statement declared in 1994 by government stressed the importance of safety culture and licensees were encouraged to manage and conduct their self-assessments. A change in regulatory position about safety culture oversight was made after the event of SBO cover-up in Kori unit 1 and several subsequent falsification events. Since then KINS has been developing licensee's safety culture oversight system including conceptual framework of oversight, prime focus area for oversight, and specific details on regulatory expectations, all of which are based on defence-in-depth (DiD) safety enhancement approach. Development and gathering of performance data which is related to actual 'safety' of nuclear power plant are needed to identify the relationship between safety culture and safety performance. Authors consider this study as pilot which has a contribution on verifying the construct validity of the model and the effectiveness of survey based research. This is the first attempt that the validity of safety culture oversight model has been investigated with empirical data obtained from Korean nuclear power operating organization.

  20. The role of Quality Oversight in nuclear and hazardous waste management and environmental restoration at Westinghouse Hanford Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouad, H.Y.

    1994-05-01

    The historical factors that led to the waste at Hanford are outlined. Westinghouse Hanford Company mission and organization are described. The role of the Quality Oversight organization in nuclear hazardous waste management and environmental restoration at Westinghouse Hanford Company is delineated. Tank Waste Remediation Systems activities and the role of the Quality Oversight organization are described as they apply to typical projects. Quality Oversight's role as the foundation for implementation of systems engineering and operation research principles is pointed out

  1. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Safety Culture Oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieracki, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    The NRC recognises that it is important for all organizations performing or overseeing regulated activities to establish and maintain a positive safety culture commensurate with the safety and security significance of their activities and the nature and complexity of their organizations and functions. The NRC’s approach to safety culture is based on the premise that licencees bear the primary responsibility for safety. The NRC provides oversight of safety culture through expectations detailed in policy statements, safety culture assessor training for NRC inspectors, the oversight process, and the Allegations and Enforcement Programs. The NRC’s Safety Culture Policy Statement (SCPS) sets forth the Commission’s expectation that individuals and organizations establish and maintain a positive safety culture commensurate with the safety and security significance of their activities and the nature and complexity of their organizations and functions. The SCPS is not a regulation. It applies to all licencees, certificate holders, permit holders, authorisation holders, holders of quality assurance program approvals, vendors and suppliers of safety-related components, and applicants for a licence, certificate, permit, authorisation, or quality assurance program approval, subject to NRC authority.

  2. Nuclear safety and security culture - an integrated approach to regulatory oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronea, M.; Ciurea Ercau, C.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the development and implementation of regulatory guidelines for the oversight of safety and security culture within licensees organizations. CNCAN (the National Commission for Nuclear Activities of Romania) has used the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) attributes for a strong safety culture as the basis for its regulatory guidelines providing support to the reviewers and inspectors for recognizing and gathering information relevant to safety culture. These guidelines are in process of being extended to address also security culture, based on the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 7 document Nuclear Security Culture: Implementing Guide. Recognizing that safety and security cultures coexist and need to reinforce each other because they share the common objective of limiting risk and that similar regulatory review and inspection processes are in place for nuclear security oversight, an integrated approach is considered justified, moreover since the common elements of these cultures outweigh the differences. (authors)

  3. The Nuclear Regulator's Role in Assessing Licensee. Oversight of Vendor and Other Contracted Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Contracted services are an integral part of the design, construction and operation of a nuclear facility. Changes in the nuclear industry sector, including varied availability of nuclear expertise, the expansion of the international supply market and the introduction of new technologies, have tended to increase licensees' use of contracted services. These changes have created challenges for licensees and regulators related to the retention of nuclear expertise, the effective management of the interfaces between the licensees and contractors, and the oversight of contractor manufacturing quality in the context of greater multinational diversity. The regulatory body must address these challenges to provide assurance that the licensees maintain their responsibility for the safety of the facilities, regardless of who provides goods and services or where the activities involved in the supply chain take place. This report is intended to assist regulatory bodies in assessing their current practices for the regulatory oversight of licensees' use of contractors, and adapting them where necessary to meet the evolving situation

  4. Research and experience report 2013. Developments in the technical and legal areas of nuclear monitoring; Erfahrungs- und Forschungsbericht 2013. Entwicklungen im Bereich der Grundlagen der nuklearen Aufsicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-04-15

    The research into regulatory safety carried out by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) serves to clarify outstanding issues, establish fundamentals and develop the tools that ENSI requires for the fulfillment of its responsibilities. The programme is divided into seven areas: 1) research on fuels and materials covers the reactor core and the multiple successive barriers used for the containment of radioactive materials. It is concentrated on high burn-ups and safety criteria. Research into structural materials is focused on ageing mechanisms. The NORA Project at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) looked into the addition of platinum to the coolant as a way of reducing crack formation in primary circuits; 2) the OECD Projects on internal events and damage encourage international exchange of experience on incidents. Specific data bases facilitate a systematic analysis of relevant operating experience from numerous countries. In the field of damage to the influence of pressurised conduits, an overview report on flow-accelerated corrosion was submitted; 3) ENSI supports international projects on external events, including complex experiments and simulations of aircraft crashes and earthquakes. Earthquakes were simulated by shaking-table tests on models of reinforced concrete structures. The structural load-bearing reserves of safety-critical buildings in the event of an earthquake were studied. The Extreme Events Platform is looking at issues related to flood risks; 4) concerning human factors, the research is looking at the reliability of operator behaviour under various conditions. A methodology developed by PSI analyses operator errors with a negative impact on the course of an accident. Research continued into the optimum way to design simulator tests and into the effects of earthquakes on the reliability of operator behaviour; 5) System behaviour and accident sequences in nuclear power plants are analysed in various conditions ranging from normal

  5. Research and experience report 2014. Developments in the technical and legal areas of nuclear monitoring; Erfahrungs- und Forschungsbericht 2014. Entwicklungen im Bereich der Grundlagen der nuklearen Aufsicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-04-15

    The research into regulatory safety carried out by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) serves to develop the tools that ENSI requires for the fulfilment of its responsibilities. The programme is divided into seven areas: 1) research on fuels and materials covers the reactor core and the multiple successive barriers used for the containment of radioactive materials. It is concentrated on high burn-ups and safety criteria. Research into structural materials is focused on ageing mechanisms. The SAFE Project has been investigating the formation and growth of cracks in materials used in reactor cooling circuits. The researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) obtained results on how the hydrogen present in hot water as well as the sequence of mechanical stresses affect crack development; 2) the OECD Projects on internal events and damage encourage international exchange of experience on incidents. Specific data bases facilitate the analysis of relevant operating experience from many countries. The ICDE Project, which is looking at common-cause failures in the components used in nuclear power plants, published an overview report on heat exchangers; 3) ENSI supports research projects on external events such as aircraft crashes, flooding and earthquakes. The Swiss Seismological Service (SED) published a report on ground motion attenuation as a function of increasing distance to the earthquake's source. By incorporating data from countries with high seismic activity, the SED has improved the attenuation model for Switzerland. The international SMART project has been looking at the impact of severe earthquakes on nuclear power plant buildings in order to represent the dynamic behaviour and vulnerability of reinforced concrete structures; 4) as far as human factors are concerned, the Halden Reactor Project completed informative simulation studies. A comparative study of 10 operator groups revealed marked variability in the way unforeseen situations

  6. Regulatory oversight of safety culture in nuclear installations - New IAEA developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerhoas, Anne; )

    2012-01-01

    Ms. Anne Kerhoas described the IAEA work on guidance for regulatory oversight of safety culture. She summarised the various IAEA, OECD/NEA and ANS meetings that have been held on the topic between 1995 and 2011. The IAEA has carried out two recent projects with the Bulgarian and Romanian regulatory bodies to develop a safety culture oversight program. The work was funded by the Norwegian government and has involved 30 experts from 17 different countries. Draft guidance for regulators on how to monitor licensee safety culture has also been produced (IAEA-TECDOC-DD1070). The document is intended to provide practical guidance on oversight strategies and is applicable to a wide range of nuclear installations, including nuclear power plants, fuel cycle facilities, research reactors and waste management facilities. A number of principles for regulatory oversight of safety culture were summarised. For example, the primary responsibility for safety remains with the licensee, safety culture oversight should be performed at all stages of the life cycle of the nuclear installation, and multiple data collection methods should be used. The overall approach to safety culture described in the draft IAEA Tech doc includes a range of approaches to build up a meaningful picture of the licensee's safety culture. These include interviews, observations, review of documents, review of events, discussions and surveys. The importance of ongoing discussion with the licensee throughout the process to develop a deeper shared understanding of issues was emphasised. The results of the Chester 2 workshop will be used as an input to finalization of the draft Tech Doc

  7. Regulatory oversight of maintenance activities at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pape, M.

    1997-01-01

    Regulation of nuclear safety in the UK is based on monitoring of compliance with licence conditions. This paper discusses legislation aspects, license conditions, license requirements for maintenance and maintenance activities in the UK. It also addresses the regulator utility interaction, the regulatory inspection of maintenance and the trends in maintenance. (author)

  8. Regulatory oversight strategy for chemistry program at Canadian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameswaran; Ram

    2012-09-01

    Chemistry program is one of the essential programs for the safe operation of a nuclear power plant. It helps to ensure the necessary integrity, reliability and availability of plant structures, systems and components important to safety. Additionally, the program plays an important role in asset preservation, limiting radiation exposure and environmental protection. A good chemistry program will minimize corrosion of materials, reduce activation products, minimize of the buildup of radioactive material leading to occupational radiation exposure and it helps limit the release of chemicals and radioactive materials to the environment. The legal basis for the chemistry oversight at Canadian NPPs is established by the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and its associated regulations. It draws on the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's regulatory framework and NPP operating license conditions that include applicable standards such as CAN/CSA N286-05 Management System Requirements for Nuclear Power Plants. This paper focuses on the regulatory oversight strategy used in Canada to assess the performance of chemistry program at the nuclear power plants (NPPs) licensed by CNSC. The strategy consists of a combination of inspection and performance monitoring activities. The activities are further supported from information gathered through staff inspections of cross-cutting areas such as maintenance, corrective-action follow-ups, event reviews and safety related performance indicators. (authors)

  9. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chockie, Alan [Chockie Group International, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2005-09-15

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  10. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chockie, Alan

    2005-09-01

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  11. Regulatory oversight report 2008 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-04-01

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (ENSI) reports on the work carried out by the Inspectorate in 2008. This report reviews the regulatory activities in the four Swiss nuclear power stations and in four further nuclear installations in various Swiss research facilities. It deals with topics such as operational details, technologies in use, radiation protection, radioactive wastes, emergency dispositions, personnel and provides an assessment of operations from the safety point of view. Also, the transportation of nuclear materials - both nuclear fuels and nuclear wastes - is reported on. General topics discussed include probabilistic safety analyses and accident management, earthquake damage analysis and agreements on nuclear safety. The underground disposal of highly-radioactive nuclear wastes and work done in the rock laboratories are discussed, as are proposals for additional nuclear power stations

  12. Regulatory oversight report 2007 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-04-01

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (HSK) reports on the work carried out by the Inspectorate in 2007. This report reviews the regulatory activities in the four Swiss nuclear power stations and in four further nuclear installations in various Swiss research facilities. It deals with topics such as operational details, technologies in use, radiation protection, radioactive wastes, emergency dispositions and personnel and provides an assessment of operations from the point of view of safety. Also, the transportation of nuclear materials - both nuclear fuels and nuclear wastes - is reported on. General topics discussed include probabilistic safety analyses and accident management. Finally, the disposal of nuclear wastes and work done in the rock laboratories in Switzerland is commented on

  13. Regulatory oversight report 2012 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland. These include the five nuclear power plants, the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) and the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), at the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL) and at the University of Basel. Using a combination of inspections, regulatory meetings, examinations and analyses together with reports from the licensees of individual facilities, ENSI obtains the required overview of nuclear safety in the relevant facilities. It ensures that the facilities comply with the regulations and operate as required by law. Its regulatory responsibilities also include the transport of radioactive materials from and to nuclear facilities and the preparations for a deep geological repository for nuclear waste. ENSI maintains its own emergency organisation. It formulates and updates its own guidelines which stipulate the criteria for evaluating the current activities and future plans of the operators of nuclear facilities. ENSI produces regular reports on its regulatory activities and nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear facilities. It fulfils its statutory obligation to provide the public with information on particular events and findings in nuclear facilities. In 2012, the five nuclear power plants in Switzerland were all operated safely. 34 events were reported; on the international INES scale of 0 to 7, ENSI rated 33 events as Level 0 and 1 as Level 1. ENSI evaluates the safety of each nuclear power plant as part of a systematic safety evaluation taking account of both reportable events and other findings, in particular the results of more than 400 inspections conducted by ENSI during 2012. ZWILAG consists of several interim storage halls, a conditioning plant and an incineration/melting plant. At the end of 2012, the cask storage hall contained 40 transport/storage casks

  14. Regulatory oversight report 2016 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-06-01

    ENSI, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, assesses and monitors safety in the Swiss nuclear facilities. These include the five nuclear power plants: Beznau Units 1 and 2 (KKB1 and KKB2), Muehleberg (KKM), Goesgen (KKG) and Leibstadt (KKL), the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (Zwilag) in Wuerenlingen together with the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the University of Basel (UniB) and the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL). Using a combination of inspections, regulatory meetings, checks, analyses and the reporting of the operators of individual facilities, ENSI obtains the required overview of nuclear safety in these facilities. It ensures that they operate as required by law. ENSI's regulatory responsibilities also include the transport of radioactive materials from and to nuclear facilities and preparations for a deep geological repository for radioactive waste. ENSI maintains its own emergency organisation, which is an integral part of the national emergency structure that would be activated in the event of a serious incident at a nuclear facility in Switzerland. ENSI reports periodically on its supervisory activities. It informs the public about special events and findings in the nuclear installations. All five nuclear power plants in Switzerland operated safely during the past year. Nuclear safety at all plants in operation was rated as good or satisfactory. In 2016, there were 31 reportable events at the nuclear power plants. 30 events were rated Level 0 (event of no or low safety significance) on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES) and one was rated Level 1 (anomaly) at KKL. Zwilag consists of several interim storage buildings, a conditioning plant and a plasma plant (incineration/melting plant). At the end of 2016, the cask storage hall contained 56 transport/storage casks with spent fuel assemblies and vitrified residue

  15. Regulatory oversight report 2010 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-06-01

    Acting as the regulatory body of the Swiss Confederation, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, ENSI, assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland. This includes the five nuclear power plants (NPPs), the plant-based interim storage facilities, the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) at Wuerenlingen, the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the two universities of Basel and Lausanne, the transport of radioactive materials from and to nuclear facilities and the preparation for a deep geologic repository for radioactive waste. Using inspections, surveillance meetings, reviews and analyses as well as reports from plant licensees, ENSI obtains the required overview of the safety of the nuclear facilities. It maintains its own emergency organisation, which is an integral part of the national emergency structure. The legislative framework at the basis of the activity of ENSI specifies the criteria by which it evaluates the activities and plans of the operators of nuclear facilities. ENSI provides the public with information on particular events and observations relating to nuclear facilities. The five nuclear power plants in Switzerland (Beznau Units 1 und 2, Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt) were all operated safely in 2010. Last year, there were 39 notifiable events in Switzerland: 4 events affected both Beznau Units, 10 events the Goesgen NPP, 6 the Leibstadt NPP and 13 the Muehleberg NPP and 6 in other facilities. Based on the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) of 0-7, ENSI rated 38 events as Level 0, and as INES Level 2 the event on 31 August 2010 during maintenance work at the Leibstadt NPP, where a diver was exposed to radiation in excess of the maximum annual exposure rate of 20 mSv. The ZWILAG at Wuerenlingen consists of several interim storage halls, a conditioning plant and the plasma plant (incineration/melting plant). At the end of 2010, the cask storage hall contained 34 transport/storage casks with spent

  16. Regulatory oversight report 2011 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate ENSI, acting as the regulatory body of the Swiss Confederation, assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland. These include five nuclear power plants, the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) at Wuerenlingen together with the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the two universities of Basel and Lausanne. ENSI ensures that the facilities comply with regulations and operate according to the law. Its regulatory responsibilities also include the transport of radioactive materials to and from nuclear facilities and the preparations for a deep geologic repository for nuclear waste. It maintains its own emergency organisation, which is an integral part of a national emergency structure. Building on the legislative framework, ENSI also formulates and updates its own guidelines. It provides the public with information on particular events and findings in nuclear facilities. In 2011, all five nuclear power reactors in Switzerland (Beznau Units 1 and 2, Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt) were operated safely and ENSI concluded that they had complied with their approved operating conditions. There were 27 reportable events in the nuclear power plants in Switzerland: 7 at Beznau, 5 at Goesgen, 11 at Leibstadt und 4 at Muehleberg. On the international INES scale of 0 to 7, ENSI rated 26 events as Level 0. One event, at the Muehleberg nuclear power plant, was rated as INES Level 1. This related to a potential blockage of the emergency water intake system in the event of extreme flooding. The operator BKW shut down the Muehleberg plant ahead of the scheduled maintenance date and upgraded the system. ZWILAG consists of several interim storage halls, a conditioning plant and a plasma plant (incineration/melting plant). At the end of 2011, the cask storage hall contained 34 transport/storage casks with fuel assemblies and vitrified residue packages

  17. Regulatory oversight report 2015 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland. These include the five nuclear power plants (Beznau Units 1 and 2, Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt), the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (Zwilag) at Wuerenlingen together with the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the University of Basel and the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL), as well as the transport of radioactive materials and the preparatory work for a deep geological repository for nuclear waste. Using a combination of inspections, regulatory meetings, examinations and analyses together with reports from the licensees of individual facilities, ENSI obtains the required overview of nuclear safety in these facilities. ENSI maintains its own emergency organization. It provides the public with information on particular events and findings in nuclear facilities. ENSI publishes an annual Radiological Protection Report and a Research and Experience Report. Chapters 1 to 4 of this Surveillance Report deal with operational experience, systems technology, radiological protection and management of the 5 Swiss nuclear power plants. Chapter 5 deals with Zwilag. Chapters 6 and 7 are devoted to the nuclear facilities at PSI and the research reactor at EPFL as well as the decommissioned University of Basel’s research reactor. Chapter 8 covers the transport of radioactive materials. The subject of Chapter 9 is the deep geological storage of radioactive waste including work within the framework of the Sectoral Plan. Finally, Chapter 10 deals with generic issues relevant to all facilities such as probabilistic safety analyses. In 2015, all five nuclear power plants in Switzerland were safely operated and ENSI concluded that each had adhered to its approved operating conditions. There were 34 reportable events at the nuclear power plants; 32 events were rated at Level 0 on

  18. Role of the Regulatory Body in Implementing Defence in Depth in Nuclear Installations - Regulatory Oversight in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sheikh, B. M., E-mail: badawymel@yahoo.com [Egyptian Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority Cairo (Egypt)

    2014-10-15

    The fundamental objective of all nuclear safety regulatory bodies is to ensure that nuclear facilities are operated at all times in an acceptably safe manner including the safe conduct of decommissioning activities. Defence in depth is recognized as one of the fundamental safety principles that underlie the safety of nuclear power plants. Defence in depth is implemented to provide a graded protection against a wide variety of transients, incidents and accidents, including equipment failures and human errors within nuclear power plants and events initiated outside plants. The Regulator Body plays an important role in implementing defence in depth in nuclear installations in the context of a clear allocation of responsibilities with an operating organization. This role starting with setting safety objectives and by its own independent review and technical assessment of the safety justifications provided by the operating organization in addition to safety culture investigating within relevant organizations. This paper briefly reviews this role in normal operation and post accidents, and its effects on overall nuclear safety in nuclear installations with reference to Egyptian regulatory oversight. (author)

  19. Experience with Regulatory Strategies in Nuclear Power Oversight. Part 1: An International Exploratory Study. Part 2: Workshop Discussions and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melber, Barbara [Melber Consulting, Seattle, WA (United States); Durbin, Nancy E. [Nancy E. Durbin Consulting, Kirkland, WA (United States); Tael, Irene (ed.) [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-03-01

    This report presents the results of a study which explored the use of six different regulatory strategies for oversight of commercial nuclear power facilities: prescriptive, case-based, outcome-based, risk-based, process-based, and self-assessment strategies. Information was collected on experiences with the use of these different regulatory strategies from experts from nuclear regulatory agencies in Canada, Finland, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. Systematic, structured open-ended interviews with expert regulators with extensive experience were used in order to understand how regulatory strategies are applied in practice. Common patterns were identified regarding: Experts' perspectives on the major benefits and difficulties of using specific regulatory strategies; Experts' experiences with using regulatory strategies for three areas of oversight-design and modifications, quality systems, and training and qualifications; Expert views of the consequences of different regulatory strategies; Issues that emerged in the interviews regarding regulatory strategies. The major benefit of a prescriptive strategy was that it is clear about requirements and expectations. The major difficulties were that it takes responsibility away from the licensee, it requires a high use of regulator resources and is rigid and difficult to change. A case-based strategy had the key benefit of flexibility for adapting regulatory responses to unique situations, but the difficulties of being considered arbitrary, inconsistent, and unfair and requiring heavy resource use. An outcome-based strategy had the main benefit of allowing licensees to decide the best way to operate m order to meet safety goals, but the major difficulty of identifying appropriate ways to measure safety performance. The major benefit of a risk strategy was its use co prioritize safety issues and allocate resources. However, it was considered inappropriate to use as a stand alone strategy

  20. Experience with Regulatory Strategies in Nuclear Power Oversight. Part 1: An International Exploratory Study. Part 2: Workshop Discussions and Conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, Barbara; Durbin, Nancy E.; Tael, Irene

    2005-03-01

    This report presents the results of a study which explored the use of six different regulatory strategies for oversight of commercial nuclear power facilities: prescriptive, case-based, outcome-based, risk-based, process-based, and self-assessment strategies. Information was collected on experiences with the use of these different regulatory strategies from experts from nuclear regulatory agencies in Canada, Finland, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. Systematic, structured open-ended interviews with expert regulators with extensive experience were used in order to understand how regulatory strategies are applied in practice. Common patterns were identified regarding: Experts' perspectives on the major benefits and difficulties of using specific regulatory strategies; Experts' experiences with using regulatory strategies for three areas of oversight-design and modifications, quality systems, and training and qualifications; Expert views of the consequences of different regulatory strategies; Issues that emerged in the interviews regarding regulatory strategies. The major benefit of a prescriptive strategy was that it is clear about requirements and expectations. The major difficulties were that it takes responsibility away from the licensee, it requires a high use of regulator resources and is rigid and difficult to change. A case-based strategy had the key benefit of flexibility for adapting regulatory responses to unique situations, but the difficulties of being considered arbitrary, inconsistent, and unfair and requiring heavy resource use. An outcome-based strategy had the main benefit of allowing licensees to decide the best way to operate m order to meet safety goals, but the major difficulty of identifying appropriate ways to measure safety performance. The major benefit of a risk strategy was its use co prioritize safety issues and allocate resources. However, it was considered inappropriate to use as a stand alone strategy and a

  1. The oversight of nuclear safety - a mission in the service of the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melin, J.

    2001-01-01

    A country introducing nuclear power in their energy strategy has a life long obligation to the public. The obligation is not a question of energy production. It is an obligation to maintain safety during the phase of construction, energy production as well as for the disposal of waste and spent fuel. One part of this obligation and responsibility to the public is a matter of trust. A responsible government should never accept that fear related to Nuclear Power is a lack in trust. Trust can never be regulated or forced upon the public. Trust is something you have to earn. We must remember that we as Nuclear Safety Regulators have a mission in the service of the public. We are by the public seen as guarantor for the safety of Nuclear Installations in our countries. Our aim must be that the public is trusting that our work will lead to a safe operation of Nuclear Installations. (author)

  2. Research and experience report 2010 - Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-04-01

    This comprehensive annual report presents a review of the activities carried out by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) in the year 2010. The inspectorate's fields of activity - fuels and materials, significant internal and external events and occurrences, human factors, system behaviour and accident sequences, radiological protection and waste disposal - are reviewed. Information on incidents in Swiss nuclear facilities are reviewed in the ENSI Surveillance Report. The Research and Experience Report also provides information on a selection of particularly instructive incidents in nuclear facilities outside Switzerland. Incidents are analysed with a view to identifying any potential relevance to Swiss nuclear facilities. International co-operation is mentioned and current changes and developments related to plant surveillance are noted. Organisational aspects are discussed and various guidelines and directives are presented and discussed

  3. For sustainable participation by civil society in Europe in the oversight of nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delalonde, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    The Aarhus Convention on access to information, public participation in decision-making and access to justice in environmental matters, was signed in 1998 by the European Community and European countries including the 27 Member States of the European Union (EU). That same year, the Committee of the Regions adopted a resolution on nuclear safety and local and regional democracy. These two texts indicate strong political and legal recognition of access to information and participation in the nuclear field. Ten years later, it would seem to be important to observe how these principles are actually implemented. As of 2009, the ANCCLI and the European Commission opened an 18-month European dialogue on the practical application of the Aarhus Convention in the nuclear field. The principle of this approach, called ACN for Aarhus Convention and Nuclear, is to promote feedback about practical application of the Aarhus Convention in the nuclear field in the various European countries, and to share this feedback in order to identify both difficulties and good practices and to initiate progress jointly with the various stakeholders concerned (authorities, civil society, operators, experts, local authorities, etc.). It is also an opportunity to look at the conditions for sustainable participation by civil society in monitoring nuclear issues. (author)

  4. Research and experience report 2007. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (HSK) reviews the aims, duties and responsibilities of the inspectorate and the work done during 2007. In the area of reactor safety, the research covered materials and the deterministic and probabilistic analysis of incidents and their consequences. In the area of radiation protection, the protection of persons and the environment in the vicinity of nuclear facilities from ionising radiation is addressed. In this area, accurate metrology and research to improve dosimetry and radiation analysis is discussed. In the area of transport and waste management, the HSK is focussing its efforts on research into the geological strata suitable for the final storage of highly radioactive, long-lived waste. Human factors, organisation and safety culture are quoted as playing a major role in nuclear safety. According to the report, greater attention is being given to these factors by those bodies responsible for nuclear regulation. Appendices present an overview of work done, international activities and publications along with the ENSI's guidelines

  5. Research and experience report 2012. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) acts upon the basis of the latest developments in science and technology. ENSI supports and coordinates safety research, the results of which influence directly its Guidelines, individual decisions and resources. Research projects also serve training purposes and maintain competence within ENSI and its experts. The research in fuels and materials covers the reactor core and the graded approach to barriers used for the confinement of radioactive materials. Based on test results from accidents involving a loss of coolant ENSI instructed the operators of Swiss nuclear power plants to review whether they were relevant to their own facilities. Ageing mechanisms affecting structural materials are crucial to the long-term operation of nuclear power plants. Specialised thematic databases are being created in order to facilitate a systematic analysis of relevant operating experience from numerous countries. In addition to damage that may result from events within nuclear power plants, the safety analyses also reflect external events. ENSI supports international projects conducting complex experiments and simulations of aircraft accidents and earthquakes. It is involved in some projects relating to flood risks. The effect of operator behaviour on accidents in nuclear power plants is the focus point of research into human factors which identifies and analyses certain operator errors influencing negatively the course of an accident. Proposals to improve accident procedures were developed. This research area also focuses on the influence of the control room layout on the performance of operating staff. System behaviour and accident sequences in nuclear power plants are analysed in conditions ranging from normal operations through to accidents resulting in core melt-down. The results are used for the quantitative evaluation of the plant risk in probabilistic safety analyses. Applied research in radiological protection ranges

  6. Research and experience report 2016 - Developments in the technical and legal basis for nuclear oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-04-01

    Projects in the research programme of the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) contribute to the clarification of outstanding issues, establish fundamentals and develop the tools required for its regulatory activities. International projects deliver results that Switzerland could not achieve on its own and encourage cross-border networking. The research on fuels and materials covers the reactor core and the multiple barriers for the retainment of radioactive materials especially concerning high burn-up rates and safety criteria. In 2016, the Studsvik Cladding Integrity Project in Sweden commissioned a new test facility to investigate the behaviour of fuel rods in loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Research into structural materials focuses on ageing processes. In the NORA project at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), platinum is injected into the cooling system with a view to reducing corrosion. Projects conducted under the auspices of the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and relating to internal events and damage encourage the international exchange of information on incidents, accidents and component damage. Subject-specific databases are created on incidents involving fires or damage to passive metal components. In 2016 the OECD CODAP project prepared a report on reliability and integrity management in pressurised components. ENSI supports research projects on external events such as earthquakes, flooding, aircraft crashes and explosions. Within the OECD MECOS project, the behaviour of pipes subjected to powerful earthquakes was modelled; it showed improvements in the calculation of cyclic loading and on the limits for simulating elastic-plastic material behaviour under high loads. The impact of operator actions on incidents and accidents is the most important human factor in view of reducing uncertainty in probabilistic safety analyses, as well as the interfaces between humans and technical systems. System behaviour and accident sequences in

  7. Research and experience report 2009. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-04-01

    In terms of research into regulatory safety, ENSI awards and coordinates research projects designed to develop current scientific knowledge and expertise and to make the results available to the regulatory process. ENSI currently supports research in four different areas: Reactor Safety; Radiological Protection; Transport and Waste Management; and Human Influence, Organisation and Safety Culture. Research in reactor safety focuses on materials research of relevance to the monitoring of ageing mechanisms such as fatigue, corrosion, embrittlement and the development of cracks, together with research into incidents and accidents and their relevance to improvements in safety analyses. It investigates issues such as the interaction between core meltdown and water and concrete, as well as the development of methodologies and software. In addition, ENSI is a partner in a range of international database projects giving it access to information on the causes, frequency and characteristics of individual incidents. The aim of radiological protection is to protect personnel, local people and the environment in the vicinity of nuclear facilities from ionising radiation. ENSI supports research into dosimetry and radio analysis. Another area of particular importance is research designed to improve the methodologies used to monitor the release of radioactive materials into the environment. In the area of transport and waste management, ENSI investigates the suitability of geological strata for the deep storage of radioactive waste. Experiments are being conducted at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory into the geological, hydro-geological, geochemical and rock-mechanical properties of the Opalinus clay. ENSI is supporting an experiment designed to characterise the fracture generation in the excavation damage zone of a gallery triggered by stress changes in the surrounding rock. The research is also looking at the chemical reactions occurring in a deep repository, together with the

  8. Research and experience report 2015 - Developments in the technical and legal basis for nuclear oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-04-01

    Projects in the research programme of the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) contribute to the clarification of outstanding issues, establish fundamentals and develop the tools required for its regulatory activities. International projects deliver results that Switzerland could not achieve on its own and encourage international networking. The research on fuels and materials covers the reactor core and the multiple barriers for the retainment of radioactive materials. In 2015 the OECD Halden Reactor Project developed new methods for measuring the thermal conductivity of fuel and the creep of cladding materials during irradiation in the reactor and ageing processes. The PISA project of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) focused on the deterministic and probabilistic assessment of the integrity of reactor pressure vessels. Under the auspices of the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency, specific databases are being created on damage to passive metal components and electrical cables. The OECD FIRE project completed its report into the combination of fires with other events; half of these events are linked to electric arcing. ENSI research projects address external events such as earthquakes, flooding, aircraft crashes and explosions. A project of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers is investigating pre-stressed reinforced concrete slabs under explosive loads. Other OECD projects consider the effects of severe earthquakes on reinforced concrete walls and pipelines. The ROES PSI project is expanding the application of methods for assessing operator errors that can negatively influence the course of an accident. System behaviour and accident sequences in nuclear power plants are analysed in conditions ranging from normal operations through to accidents involving core meltdown. The results of computer models are used for the quantitative identification of plant risk in probabilistic safety analyses. The STARS PSI project improves the basic principles for

  9. Research and experience report 2008. Developments in the technical and legal basis of nuclear oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-04-01

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (ENSI) reviews research into regulatory safety and the work done during 2008. In the area of reactor safety, research - in addition to research into materials - was concentrated primarily on safety and reliability analyses. ENSI supports projects looking at ageing mechanisms such as fatigue, corrosion, embrittlement and the development of cracks under a range of environmental conditions. Topics such as the interaction between core meltdown and water and concrete as well as the development of methods and computer codes are covered. In the area of transport and waste management, ENSI is focussing its efforts on research into the geological strata suitable for the final storage of highly radioactive, long-lived waste. Human and organisational factors and safety culture now account for an increasing part of the work of this regulatory body. Appendices present an overview of work done, international activities, publications and the basic principles of the new ENSI guidelines

  10. Regulatory oversight of maintenance activities at nuclear power plants in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouton, J.P.; Lallement, J.

    1997-01-01

    In France the nuclear safety authority sets out the main safety objectives but the operator remains the first responsible for the NPP safety. During the operation, operators have to demonstrate that the safety level remains the same as defined in the design studies. Maintenance contributes to meet this objective. The French regulation insists on the quality of the safety related components maintenance, especially in the 1984 order. All gap between results and requirements have to be analyzed by operator who provide feedback measures to avoid similar failure to occur. This gap have to be mentioned to regulators. The use of probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) and reliability centered maintenance (RCM) methods is not well developed in France to optimize maintenance. For the French regulatory, the major difficulties in the use of PSA are: The impossibility to detect unanticipated failure mode; the validity of the input data; the validity of model use, based on ''engineering judgement''. For the specific case of passive components inspection, such as the vessel of the primary circuit, the French regulator has already indicated to the operator that the optimization of maintenance by use of PSA cannot be used, for the following reasons: The safety analysis does not take into account the failure of the vessel; unanticipated failure modes have already damaged part of the primary circuit; the use of defense in depth concept requires a systematic detection of any defect on the vessel. (author)

  11. Regulatory oversight report 2012 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations; Aufsichtsbericht 2012 zur nuklearen Sicherheit in den schweizerischen Kernanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-04-15

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland. These include the five nuclear power plants, the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) and the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), at the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL) and at the University of Basel. Using a combination of inspections, regulatory meetings, examinations and analyses together with reports from the licensees of individual facilities, ENSI obtains the required overview of nuclear safety in the relevant facilities. It ensures that the facilities comply with the regulations and operate as required by law. Its regulatory responsibilities also include the transport of radioactive materials from and to nuclear facilities and the preparations for a deep geological repository for nuclear waste. ENSI maintains its own emergency organisation. It formulates and updates its own guidelines which stipulate the criteria for evaluating the current activities and future plans of the operators of nuclear facilities. ENSI produces regular reports on its regulatory activities and nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear facilities. It fulfils its statutory obligation to provide the public with information on particular events and findings in nuclear facilities. In 2012, the five nuclear power plants in Switzerland were all operated safely. 34 events were reported; on the international INES scale of 0 to 7, ENSI rated 33 events as Level 0 and 1 as Level 1. ENSI evaluates the safety of each nuclear power plant as part of a systematic safety evaluation taking account of both reportable events and other findings, in particular the results of more than 400 inspections conducted by ENSI during 2012. ZWILAG consists of several interim storage halls, a conditioning plant and an incineration/melting plant. At the end of 2012, the cask storage hall contained 40 transport/storage casks

  12. Regulatory oversight report 2016 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations; Aufsichtsbericht 2016 zur nuklearen Sicherheit in den schweizerischen Kernanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-06-15

    ENSI, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, assesses and monitors safety in the Swiss nuclear facilities. These include the five nuclear power plants: Beznau Units 1 and 2 (KKB1 and KKB2), Muehleberg (KKM), Goesgen (KKG) and Leibstadt (KKL), the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (Zwilag) in Wuerenlingen together with the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the University of Basel (UniB) and the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL). Using a combination of inspections, regulatory meetings, checks, analyses and the reporting of the operators of individual facilities, ENSI obtains the required overview of nuclear safety in these facilities. It ensures that they operate as required by law. ENSI's regulatory responsibilities also include the transport of radioactive materials from and to nuclear facilities and preparations for a deep geological repository for radioactive waste. ENSI maintains its own emergency organisation, which is an integral part of the national emergency structure that would be activated in the event of a serious incident at a nuclear facility in Switzerland. ENSI reports periodically on its supervisory activities. It informs the public about special events and findings in the nuclear installations. All five nuclear power plants in Switzerland operated safely during the past year. Nuclear safety at all plants in operation was rated as good or satisfactory. In 2016, there were 31 reportable events at the nuclear power plants. 30 events were rated Level 0 (event of no or low safety significance) on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES) and one was rated Level 1 (anomaly) at KKL. Zwilag consists of several interim storage buildings, a conditioning plant and a plasma plant (incineration/melting plant). At the end of 2016, the cask storage hall contained 56 transport/storage casks with spent fuel assemblies and vitrified residue

  13. Regulatory oversight report 2010 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations; Aufsichtsbericht 2010 zur nuklearen Sicherheit in den schweizerischen Kernanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-06-15

    Acting as the regulatory body of the Swiss Confederation, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, ENSI, assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland. This includes the five nuclear power plants (NPPs), the plant-based interim storage facilities, the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) at Wuerenlingen, the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the two universities of Basel and Lausanne, the transport of radioactive materials from and to nuclear facilities and the preparation for a deep geologic repository for radioactive waste. Using inspections, surveillance meetings, reviews and analyses as well as reports from plant licensees, ENSI obtains the required overview of the safety of the nuclear facilities. It maintains its own emergency organisation, which is an integral part of the national emergency structure. The legislative framework at the basis of the activity of ENSI specifies the criteria by which it evaluates the activities and plans of the operators of nuclear facilities. ENSI provides the public with information on particular events and observations relating to nuclear facilities. The five nuclear power plants in Switzerland (Beznau Units 1 und 2, Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt) were all operated safely in 2010. Last year, there were 39 notifiable events in Switzerland: 4 events affected both Beznau Units, 10 events the Goesgen NPP, 6 the Leibstadt NPP and 13 the Muehleberg NPP and 6 in other facilities. Based on the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) of 0-7, ENSI rated 38 events as Level 0, and as INES Level 2 the event on 31 August 2010 during maintenance work at the Leibstadt NPP, where a diver was exposed to radiation in excess of the maximum annual exposure rate of 20 mSv. The ZWILAG at Wuerenlingen consists of several interim storage halls, a conditioning plant and the plasma plant (incineration/melting plant). At the end of 2010, the cask storage hall contained 34 transport/storage casks with spent

  14. Regulatory oversight report 2011 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations; Aufsichtsbericht 2011 zur nuklearen Sicherheit in den schweizerischen Kernanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate ENSI, acting as the regulatory body of the Swiss Confederation, assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland. These include five nuclear power plants, the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) at Wuerenlingen together with the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the two universities of Basel and Lausanne. ENSI ensures that the facilities comply with regulations and operate according to the law. Its regulatory responsibilities also include the transport of radioactive materials to and from nuclear facilities and the preparations for a deep geologic repository for nuclear waste. It maintains its own emergency organisation, which is an integral part of a national emergency structure. Building on the legislative framework, ENSI also formulates and updates its own guidelines. It provides the public with information on particular events and findings in nuclear facilities. In 2011, all five nuclear power reactors in Switzerland (Beznau Units 1 and 2, Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt) were operated safely and ENSI concluded that they had complied with their approved operating conditions. There were 27 reportable events in the nuclear power plants in Switzerland: 7 at Beznau, 5 at Goesgen, 11 at Leibstadt und 4 at Muehleberg. On the international INES scale of 0 to 7, ENSI rated 26 events as Level 0. One event, at the Muehleberg nuclear power plant, was rated as INES Level 1. This related to a potential blockage of the emergency water intake system in the event of extreme flooding. The operator BKW shut down the Muehleberg plant ahead of the scheduled maintenance date and upgraded the system. ZWILAG consists of several interim storage halls, a conditioning plant and a plasma plant (incineration/melting plant). At the end of 2011, the cask storage hall contained 34 transport/storage casks with fuel assemblies and vitrified residue packages

  15. Regulatory oversight report 2015 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations; Aufsichtsbericht 2015 zur nuklearen Sicherheit in den schweizerischen Kernanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland. These include the five nuclear power plants (Beznau Units 1 and 2, Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt), the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (Zwilag) at Wuerenlingen together with the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the University of Basel and the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL), as well as the transport of radioactive materials and the preparatory work for a deep geological repository for nuclear waste. Using a combination of inspections, regulatory meetings, examinations and analyses together with reports from the licensees of individual facilities, ENSI obtains the required overview of nuclear safety in these facilities. ENSI maintains its own emergency organization. It provides the public with information on particular events and findings in nuclear facilities. ENSI publishes an annual Radiological Protection Report and a Research and Experience Report. Chapters 1 to 4 of this Surveillance Report deal with operational experience, systems technology, radiological protection and management of the 5 Swiss nuclear power plants. Chapter 5 deals with Zwilag. Chapters 6 and 7 are devoted to the nuclear facilities at PSI and the research reactor at EPFL as well as the decommissioned University of Basel’s research reactor. Chapter 8 covers the transport of radioactive materials. The subject of Chapter 9 is the deep geological storage of radioactive waste including work within the framework of the Sectoral Plan. Finally, Chapter 10 deals with generic issues relevant to all facilities such as probabilistic safety analyses. In 2015, all five nuclear power plants in Switzerland were safely operated and ENSI concluded that each had adhered to its approved operating conditions. There were 34 reportable events at the nuclear power plants; 32 events were rated at Level 0 on

  16. Information exchange - DOE oversight programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubbs, D.C.; Field, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    Oversight programs are conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy to review activities carried out by field and contractor organizations. Two of these oversight programs focus on safeguards and security and on safety and health activities. These two programs are independent, but share many common objectives and review techniques. The mutual potential benefit was recognized from an exchange of information on review techniques. The first step in this exchange was the participation by an Office of Security Evaluations (OSE) staff member with the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) during their planning, conduct and reporting of a Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA). This paper briefly describes the OSE and ONS programs. It also identifies and analyzes the similarities and differences of the two programs. The purpose of this paper is to provide perspectives on the approach taken, the techniques used and the differences between two oversight programs conducted by the Department of Energy

  17. Oversight framework over oocyte procurement for somatic cell nuclear transfer: comparative analysis of the Hwang Woo Suk case under South Korean bioethics law and U.S. guidelines for human embryonic stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Kyung

    2009-01-01

    We examine whether the current regulatory regime instituted in South Korea and the United States would have prevented Hwang's potential transgressions in oocyte procurement for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we compare the general aspects and oversight framework of the Bioethics and Biosafety Act in South Korea and the US National Academies' Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, and apply the relevant provisions and recommendations to each transgression. We conclude that the Act would institute centralized oversight under governmental auspices while the Guidelines recommend politically-independent, decentralized oversight bodies including a special review body for human embryonic stem cell research at an institutional level and that the Guidelines would have provided more vigorous protection for the women who had undergone oocyte procurement for Hwang's research than the Act. We also suggest additional regulations to protect those who provide oocytes for research in South Korea.

  18. Nuclear-fuel-cycle policy and the future of nuclear power. Oversight hearing before the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session, October 23, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Edward Teller, Ralph Nader, and a panel from Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner, and Smith were among the 12 witnesses at this hearing on the Reagan administration's decision to eliminate the ban on plutonium reprocessing and its effect on the nuclear industry's future. Subcommittee Chairman Edward J. Markey asked for comments on safety question, recent plant cancellations, contributions that nuclear power can make in relieving oil dependence in the transportation sector, proliferation, and the inconsistency of subsidizing nuclear while imposing a free-market philosophy on solar, coal, and conservation. The testimony if followed by an appendix of additional material submitted for the record

  19. Regulation and construction of nuclear powerplants: South Texas Nuclear Project. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-sixth Congress, Second Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    On September 23, 1980, the Subcommittee of Oversight and Investigation held a congressional hearing to discuss the regulation and construction of the South Texas Nuclear Power Plant project. Discussion included recommendations to prevent problems, like the problem encountered at Three Mile Island, from occurring during construction and operation. The chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission discussed the procedure for inspection and regulation process. One power plant at the South Texas project experienced significant problems because of an inadequate quality assurance and quality control program. These difficulties caused delay in construction, increased cost, and raised questions of safety. The problems encountered at Three Mile Island and at the first plant of the South Texas project provided the reasons for this congressional hearing

  20. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture — Korea’s Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, S.J.; Choi, Y.S.; Kim, J.T.

    2016-01-01

    In Korea, a regulatory oversight program of safety culture was launched in 2012 to establish regulatory measures against several events caused by weak safety culture in the nuclear industry. This paper is intended to introduce the preliminary regulatory oversight framework, development and validation of safety culture components, pilot safety culture inspection results and lessons learned. The safety culture model should be based on a sound understanding of the national culture and industry characteristics where the model will be applied. The nuclear safety culture oversight model is being developed and built on the Korean regulatory system to independently assess the nuclear power operating organizations’ safety culture.

  1. Regulatory oversight report 2008 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations; Aufsichtsbericht 2008 ueber die nukleare Sicherheit in den schweizerischen Kernanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-04-15

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (ENSI) reports on the work carried out by the Inspectorate in 2008. This report reviews the regulatory activities in the four Swiss nuclear power stations and in four further nuclear installations in various Swiss research facilities. It deals with topics such as operational details, technologies in use, radiation protection, radioactive wastes, emergency dispositions, personnel and provides an assessment of operations from the safety point of view. Also, the transportation of nuclear materials - both nuclear fuels and nuclear wastes - is reported on. General topics discussed include probabilistic safety analyses and accident management, earthquake damage analysis and agreements on nuclear safety. The underground disposal of highly-radioactive nuclear wastes and work done in the rock laboratories are discussed, as are proposals for additional nuclear power stations.

  2. Regulatory oversight report 2007 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations; Aufsichtsbericht 2007 ueber die nukleare Sicherheit in den schweizerischen Kernanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-04-15

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (HSK) reports on the work carried out by the Inspectorate in 2007. This report reviews the regulatory activities in the four Swiss nuclear power stations and in four further nuclear installations in various Swiss research facilities. It deals with topics such as operational details, technologies in use, radiation protection, radioactive wastes, emergency dispositions and personnel and provides an assessment of operations from the point of view of safety. Also, the transportation of nuclear materials - both nuclear fuels and nuclear wastes - is reported on. General topics discussed include probabilistic safety analyses and accident management. Finally, the disposal of nuclear wastes and work done in the rock laboratories in Switzerland is commented on.

  3. As (contra reformas educacionais e o depauperamento da experiência (Erfahrung na escola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir Henrique Manfre

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available O presente ensaio discorre sobre os estudos realizados no primeiro semestre de 2017 junto à disciplina de “Currículo e Escola” por mim ministrada em um curso de formação de professores. Essa investigação teve como objetivo discutir a temática das (contra reformas educacionais e o processo de depauperamento da experiência (Erfahrung na educação escolar. O delineamento metodológico dessa análise se sustentou na reflexão e problematização de textos indicados pela disciplina, os quais serviram de sustentação teórico-metodológica para o debate proposto. Conceitos-chave da Teoria Crítica da Escola de Frankfurt – sociedade administrada, Indústria Cultural, semiformação, emancipação – apoiaram a nossa investigação no sentido de evidenciar o modo como a escola da contemporaneidade necessita pensar uma formação que impeça o conformismo exacerbado. Desse modo, esse ensaio traz uma reflexão sobre o papel da escola, analisando as propostas de (contra reformas educacionais na atualidade.

  4. Oversight and enforcement at DOE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fergus, I.E., Christopher, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses recent changes to the independent oversight and enforcement programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and applications to criticality safety. DOE's Office of Oversight (Oversight hereafter), in the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH), independently evaluates whether management systems ensure adequate protection of the worker, public, and environment. Oversight has adopted a new approach to performing evaluations based on the guiding principles for safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy. The principles Oversight evaluates are line management responsibility for safety and health, comprehensive requirements, and competence commensurate with responsibilities. Recently, the DOE codified the implementation of integrated safety management, further expounding on these basic guiding principles and Oversight's role. The Office of Enforcement and Investigations in EH (Enforcement hereafter) is responsible for enforcement, and relevant documents describe its role. This paper briefly discusses criticality safety aspects of the twin initiatives of Oversight and Enforcement

  5. ENSI Approach to Oversight of Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbel Haag, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Claudia Humbel Haag presented developments in ENSI approach to safety culture oversight. ENSI has developed a definition/understanding of Safety Culture and a concept of how to perform oversight of Safety Culture. ENSI defines safety culture in the following way: Safety Culture comprises the behaviour, world views (in the sense of conceptualisations of reality and explanation models), values (in the sense of aims and evaluation scales), and features of the physical environment (specifically, the nuclear power plant and the documents used) which are shared by many members of an organization, in as much as these are of significance to nuclear safety. A model of the accessibility of safety culture was presented ranging from the observable (external aspects of safety culture), to aspects that are accessible by asking questions, through to aspects that are not accessible (internal part of safety culture). ENSI considers observable aspects through the existing systematic safety assessment compliance program. Aspects that are observable by asking questions will be addressed by additional oversight activities outside the systematic assessment program. Aspects that are not accessible are addressed by helping the licensee to re-think its safety culture through proactive discussions on safety culture. Reports are issued to the licensee on assumptions and observations identified through the discussions. The conclusions of the presentation emphasised the importance of basing any interventions in this area on a solid understanding of the concept of safety culture. ENSI safety culture oversight principles were also described. These include licensee responsibility for safety, and the need for the regulator to critically review their own activities to ensure a positive influence on the licensee

  6. Improving regulatory oversight of maintenance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, S.

    2008-01-01

    Safe nuclear power plant operation requires that risks due to failure or unavailability of Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs) be minimized. Implementation of an effective maintenance program is a key means for achieving this goal. In its regulatory framework, the important relationship between maintenance and safety is acknowledged by the CNSC. A high level maintenance program requirement is included in the Class I Facilities Regulations. In addition, the operating licence contains a condition based on the principle that the design function and performance of SSCs needs to remain consistent with the plant's design and analysis documents. Nuclear power plant licensees have the primary responsibility for safe operation of their facilities and consequently for implementation of a successful maintenance program. The oversight role of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is to ensure that the licensee carries out that responsibility. The challenge for the CNSC is how to do this consistently and efficiently. Three opportunities for improvement to regulatory maintenance oversight are being pursued. These are related to the regulatory framework, compliance verification inspection activities and monitoring of self-reporting. The regulatory framework has been improved by clarifying expectations through the issuance of S-210 'Maintenance Programs for Nuclear Power Plants'. Inspection activities have been improved by introducing new maintenance inspections into the baseline program. Monitoring is being improved by making better use of self-reported and industry produced maintenance related performance indicators. As with any type of program change, the challenge is to ensure the consistent and optimal application of regulatory activities and resources. This paper is a summary of the CNSC's approach to improving its maintenance oversight strategy. (author)

  7. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993 - March 3, 1997. Volume 2: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 2 contains copies of the documents which established the relationship between NRC, DOE, USEC, and DOL (Dept of Labor) required to facilitate regulatory oversight transition

  8. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 2 contains copies of the documents which established the relationship between NRC, DOE, USEC, and DOL (Dept of Labor) required to facilitate regulatory oversight transition.

  9. Regulatory oversight report 2009 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations; Aufsichtsbericht 2009 zur nuklearen Sicherheit in den schweizerischen Kernanlagen/Rapport de surveillance 2009 sur la securite nucleaire dans les installations nucleaires en Suisse/Regulatory oversight report 2009 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-04-15

    ENSI, the regulatory body of the Swiss Confederation, assesses and monitors the nuclear safety of nuclear facilities in Switzerland. These include the five nuclear power plants (NPPs), the plant-based interim storage facilities, the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) at Wuerenlingen, as well as the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the two universities of Basel and Lausanne (EPFL). Its regulatory obligations also include the transport of radioactive materials from and to nuclear facilities and the preparation of a deep geological repository for radioactive waste. ENSI maintains its own emergency organisation that would be activated in case of a serious incident at a nuclear facility in Switzerland. The legislative framework for ENSI's regulatory functions are the Nuclear Energy Act (KEG), the Nuclear Energy Ordinance (KEV), the Radiological Protection Act (StSG), the Radiological Protection Ordinance (StSV), as well as other ordinances and regulations related to reactor safety, the training of operating personnel, the organisation of the emergency response to increases in radioactivity, the transport of radioactive materials, and the deep geological repository. ENSI formulates and updates guidelines that stipulate the criteria by which it evaluates the activities and plans put forward by the operators of nuclear facilities. It regularly publishes reports and provides the public with information on events and findings at nuclear facilities. Chapters 1 to 4 of this Surveillance Report are devoted to the five Swiss NPPs. For each plant, the ENSI evaluation concludes with a safety ranking: high, good, satisfactory and unsatisfactory. Chapter 5 deals with ZWILAG for the processing and interim storage of radioactive waste from Swiss nuclear facilities. Chapters 6 and 7 deal with the nuclear facilities at PSI and with the research reactors at Basel and at EPFL. Chapter 8 deals with the transport of radioactive materials from and to

  10. Investing today in energy for tomorrow. U.S. civilian nuclear industry: high-level oversight. Oil prices: getting close to the psychological threshold. The future of biofuels in question

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    This issue of Alternatives newsletter features 4 main articles dealing with: 1 - Investing today in energy for tomorrow: Whether to increase or to replace generating capacity, the amount of investment needed in energy infrastructure to meet rising demand has been identified, but many obstacles must be overcome before they become a reality. A status report and personal perspective from Pierre Gadonneix, CEO of EDF, in the 'Expert opinion' section. 2 - U.S. civilian nuclear industry - high-level oversight: The approaches are clearly different, but the licensing processes for nuclear reactor development and operation in France and the United States are both strictly regulated. Alternatives delves further. 3 - Oil prices - getting close to the psychological threshold: Are we going to stop using oil sooner rather than later if crude prices keep going up? European commodities expert Philippe Chalmin shares his opinion. 4 - The future of biofuels in question In many countries, biofuels are seen as an alternative to oil. Still, farmland is not expandable forever and the economics of biofuels deserve some scrutiny

  11. Communication of 7 August 2007 from the Permanent Mission of Pakistan to the IAEA concerning the establishment of the oversight Board to monitor the implementation of Pakistan's export control on goods, technologies, materials and equipment related to nuclear and biological weapons and their Delivery Systems Act (Act No.V) 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a Note Verbale dated 7 August 2007 from the Permanent Mission of Pakistan enclosing a copy of the Gazette of Pakistan S.R.O. No.693(I)/2007, dated 11 July 2007, regarding the establishment of the Oversight Board to monitor the implementation of Pakistan's Export Control on Goods, Technologies, Materials and Equipment related to Nuclear and Biological Weapons and their Delivery Systems Act (Act No.V) 2004, including the formation and functioning of Strategic Export Control Division. As requested in the Note Verbale, the Note Verbale and the enclosure thereto are circulated for the information of Member States

  12. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 3 contains copies of two reports that document the DOE/ORO regulatory oversight inspection and enforcement history for each gaseous diffusion plant site. Each report provides a formal mechanism by which DOE/ORO could communicate the inspection and enforcement history to NRC. The reports encompass the inspection activities that occurred during July 1, 1993 through March 2, 1997.

  13. Improving MC and A Oversight in Russia by Implementing Measurement and Training Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokov, Dmitry; Byers, Kenneth R.

    2004-01-01

    As the Russian State regulatory agency responsible for oversight of nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A), Gosatomnadzor of Russia (GAN) determines the status of the MC and A programs at Russian facilities. Last year, GAN developed and implemented their Nuclear Material Measurement Program Plan which documents current non-destructive assay (NDA) measurement capability in all regions of GAN; provides justification for upgrades to equipment, procedures and training; and defines the inspector-facility operator interface as it relates to NDA measurement equipment use. This Program Plan has helped to give the GAN inspection measurements more legal and official status as an oversight tool, and has also helped to improve other GAN MC and A oversight activities. These improvements include developing a tamper-indicating device program, conducting NDA workshops at specific Russian nuclear facilities to better train MC and A inspectors, and developing training evaluation programs. The Program is an important tool to address the GAN role in oversight of the Russian Federal Information System nuclear material database. This paper describes the feedback received from the GAN regional offices on the implementation of the Program Plan during its first year in operation and how the Program Plan has affected other GAN inspection activities to improve MC and A oversight.

  14. Oversight Institutions Within the United Nations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Caroline Aggestam

    2015-01-01

    This article will give a description of the role of internal audit and governance functions within the United Nations system. The United Nations has, during the last 10 years, worked to establish effective oversight services. Oversight, governance and hereunder the internal audit function has been...

  15. 5 CFR 330.611 - Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oversight. 330.611 Section 330.611 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, AND... Employees § 330.611 Oversight. OPM provides advice and assistance to agencies in implementing their Career...

  16. 12 CFR 370.10 - Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... LIQUIDITY GUARANTEE PROGRAM § 370.10 Oversight. (a) Participating entities are subject to the FDIC's oversight regarding compliance with the terms of the temporary liquidity guarantee program. (b) A..., for the duration of the temporary liquidity guarantee program, to be subject to the FDIC's authority...

  17. Brief introduction of USA new reactor oversight process and suggestions for our country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiaofeng; Chen Rui; Zhou Limin; Wang Xiuqing

    2002-01-01

    The NRC New Reactor Oversight Process focuses the nuclear safety supervision on the 3 areas: Reactor Safety, Radiation safety and Plant Security. Within the 3 areas, 7 cornerstones are detailed for the purpose. They are Initiating Events, Mitigating Systems, Barrier Integrity, Emergency Preparedness, Occupational Radiation Protection, Public Radiation Safety and Physical Protection. On cooperating with the inspections, the new process ensures a more effective, objective and timely evaluation of the safety level of the operating nuclear power plants. On considering the practices and the status in China nuclear safety supervision, the authors have to learn something from the NRC New Reactor Oversight Process. The authors must make an optimization on Chinese limited resources and put the emphasis on the issues with high risk in order to prevent the occurrence of the accidents. Properly inducing some ideas and methodology from the NRC New Reactor Oversight Process will benefit the development and perfection of the supervision mode of the NNSA

  18. Erfahrung ohne Erfahrenden

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kouba, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2009), s. 89-106 ISSN 0342-8117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90090514 Keywords : Asubjective Existence * Facticity without Individuality * Birth of Time Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  19. 13 CFR 120.1005 - Bureau of PCLP Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bureau of PCLP Oversight. 120.1005 Section 120.1005 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1005 Bureau of PCLP Oversight. SBA's Bureau of PCLP Oversight within...

  20. 12 CFR 985.4 - Finance Board oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finance Board oversight. 985.4 Section 985.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD OFFICE OF FINANCE THE OFFICE OF FINANCE § 985.4 Finance Board oversight. (a) Oversight and enforcement actions. The Finance Board shall have the same regulatory oversight authority and enforcement powers...

  1. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture in Finland: A Systemic Approach to Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oedewald, P.; Väisäsvaara, J.

    2016-01-01

    In Finland the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority STUK specifies detailed regulatory requirements for good safety culture. Both the requirements and the practical safety culture oversight activities reflect a systemic approach to safety: the interconnections between the technical, human and organizational factors receive special attention. The conference paper aims to show how the oversight of safety culture can be integrated into everyday oversight activities. The paper also emphasises that the scope of the safety culture oversight is not specific safety culture activities of the licencees, but rather the overall functioning of the licence holder or the new build project organization from safety point of view. The regulatory approach towards human and organizational factors and safety culture has evolved throughout the years of nuclear energy production in Finland. Especially the recent new build projects have highlighted the need to systematically pay attention to the non-technical aspects of safety as it has become obvious how the HOF issues can affect the design processes and quality of construction work. Current regulatory guides include a set of safety culture related requirements. The requirements are binding to the licence holders and they set both generic and specific demands on the licencee to understand, monitor and to develop safety culture of their own organization but also that of their supplier network. The requirements set for the licence holders has facilitated the need to develop the regulator’s safety culture oversight practices towards a proactive and systemic approach.

  2. Nuclear weapons facilities. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, March 6, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    A hearing to review evidence that security at DOE weapons facilities is not adequate to protect against a potential terrorist attack focused on incidents in which security personnel performances reveal weaknesses in the Inspection and Evaluation (I and E) program. Criticism of the program cited DOE credibility, personnel training and possible drug use by plant personnel, poor coordination, and inadequate protection for physical plants and classified information. Reduced budgeting for security contributed to the problem. The hearing record includes an exchange of correspondence between the Oversight Committee and government officials, the testimony of DOE officials responsible for defense programs, and other material submitted for the record

  3. Biological Select Agents and Toxins: Risk-Based Assessment Management and Oversight.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, LouAnn Crawford; Brodsky, Benjamin H.

    2016-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories' International Biological and Chemical Threat Reduction (SNL/IBCTR) conducted, on behalf of the Federal Select Agent Program (FSAP), a review of risk assessment in modern select agent laboratories. This review and analysis consisted of literature review, interviews of FSAP staff, entities regulated by FSAP, and deliberations of an expert panel. Additionally, SNL/IBCTR reviewed oversight mechanisms used by industries, US agencies, and other countries for high-consequence risks (e.g, nuclear, chemical, or biological materials, aviation, off-shore drilling, etc.) to determine if alternate oversight mechanisms existed that might be applicable to FSAP oversight of biological select agents and toxins. This report contains five findings, based on these reviews and analyses, with recommendations and suggested actions for FSAP to consider.

  4. Designing oversight for nanomedicine research in human subjects: systematic analysis of exceptional oversight for emerging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Susan M.; Jones, Cortney M.

    2011-01-01

    The basic procedures and rules for oversight of U.S. human subjects research have been in place since 1981. Certain types of human subjects research, however, have provoked creation of additional mechanisms and rules beyond the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Common Rule and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) equivalent. Now another emerging domain of human subjects research—nanomedicine—is prompting calls for extra oversight. However, in 30 years of overseeing research on human beings, we have yet to specify what makes a domain of scientific research warrant extra oversight. This failure to systematically evaluate the need for extra measures, the type of extra measures appropriate for different challenges, and the usefulness of those measures hampers efforts to respond appropriately to emerging science such as nanomedicine. This article evaluates the history of extra oversight, extracting lessons for oversight of nanomedicine research in human beings. We argue that a confluence of factors supports the need for extra oversight, including heightened uncertainty regarding risks, fast-evolving science yielding complex and increasingly active materials, likelihood of research on vulnerable participants including cancer patients, and potential risks to others beyond the research participant. We suggest the essential elements of the extra oversight needed.

  5. Designing oversight for nanomedicine research in human subjects: systematic analysis of exceptional oversight for emerging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Susan M.; Jones, Cortney M.

    2011-04-01

    The basic procedures and rules for oversight of U.S. human subjects research have been in place since 1981. Certain types of human subjects research, however, have provoked creation of additional mechanisms and rules beyond the Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS) Common Rule and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) equivalent. Now another emerging domain of human subjects research—nanomedicine—is prompting calls for extra oversight. However, in 30 years of overseeing research on human beings, we have yet to specify what makes a domain of scientific research warrant extra oversight. This failure to systematically evaluate the need for extra measures, the type of extra measures appropriate for different challenges, and the usefulness of those measures hampers efforts to respond appropriately to emerging science such as nanomedicine. This article evaluates the history of extra oversight, extracting lessons for oversight of nanomedicine research in human beings. We argue that a confluence of factors supports the need for extra oversight, including heightened uncertainty regarding risks, fast-evolving science yielding complex and increasingly active materials, likelihood of research on vulnerable participants including cancer patients, and potential risks to others beyond the research participant. We suggest the essential elements of the extra oversight needed.

  6. Environment, safety, and health. Status of DOE's reorganization of its safety oversight function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannerman, Carl J.; Cannon, Doris E.; Jones, Gary L.; Ulrich, Timothy W.

    1990-01-01

    Several major events that preceded the Secretary's decision to restructure DOE's management of its nuclear facilities were identified. The proposed restructuring plan, in concept, is designed to set in place an oversight framework, which will provide confidence in DOE's ability to operate its nuclear facilities in a safe manner. Further, on the basis of the previous work in this area as well as other independent studies, several issues were identified that may affect the success of the proposed restructuring plan

  7. Integrating GIS and GPS in environmental remediation oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaletsky, K.; Earle, J.R.; Schneider, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents findings on Ohio EPA Office of Federal Facilities Oversight's (OFFO) use of GIS and GPS for environmental remediation oversight at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Fernald Site. The Fernald site is a former uranium metal production facility within DOE's nuclear weapons complex. Significant uranium contamination of soil and groundwater is being remediated under state and federal regulations. OFFO uses GIS/GPS to enhance environmental monitoring and remediation oversight. These technologies are utilized within OFFO's environmental monitoring program for sample location and parameter selection, data interpretation and presentation. GPS is used to integrate sample data into OFFO's GIS and for permanently linking precise and accurate geographic data to samples and waste units. It is important to identify contamination geographically as all visual references (e.g., buildings, infrastructure) will be removed during remediation. Availability of the GIS allows OFFO to perform independent analysis and review of DOE contractor generated data, models, maps, and designs. This ability helps alleviate concerns associated with open-quotes black boxclose quotes models and data interpretation. OFFO's independent analysis has increased regulatory confidence and the efficiency of design reviews. GIS/GPS technology allows OFFO to record and present complex data in a visual format aiding in stakeholder education and awareness. Presented are OFFO's achievements within the aforementioned activities and some reasons learned in implementing the GIS/GPS program. OFFO's two years of GIS/GPS development have resulted in numerous lessons learned and ideas for increasing effectiveness through the use of GIS/GPS

  8. 32 CFR 2103.51 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2103... BE DECLASSIFIED Implementation and Review § 2103.51 Information Security Oversight Committee. The NCS Information Security Oversight Committee shall be chaired by the Staff Counsel of the National Security...

  9. 32 CFR 2700.51 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2700... MICRONESIAN STATUS NEGOTIATIONS SECURITY INFORMATION REGULATIONS Implementation and Review § 2700.51 Information Security Oversight Committee. The OMSN Information Security Oversight Committee shall be chaired...

  10. 13 CFR 120.1000 - Risk-Based Lender Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Risk-Based Lender Oversight. 120.1000 Section 120.1000 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1000 Risk-Based Lender Oversight. (a) Risk-Based Lender...

  11. 76 FR 71081 - Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will convene a Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum which will begin at 9 a... ``Public Aircraft Oversight Forum: Ensuring Safety for Critical Missions'', are to (1) raise awareness of...

  12. Transparency and Oversight in Local Wellness Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chriqui, Jamie F.; Chaloupka, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Advocates have called for increased wellness policy transparency and oversight through the use of health advisory councils. This study examines (1) wellness policy transparency, (2) advisory council requirements, (3) factors associated with each, and (4) whether transparency or advisory council requirements are indicative of a stronger…

  13. Recommendations for oversight of nanobiotechnology: dynamic oversight for complex and convergent technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Wolf, Susan M.; Paradise, Jordan; Kuzma, Jennifer; Hall, Ralph; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Fatehi, Leili

    2011-01-01

    Federal oversight of nanobiotechnology in the U.S. has been fragmented and incremental. The prevailing approach has been to use existing laws and other administrative mechanisms for oversight. However, this “stay-the-course” approach will be inadequate for such a complex and convergent technology and may indeed undermine its promise. The technology demands a new, more dynamic approach to oversight. The authors are proposing a new oversight framework with three essential features: (a) the oversight trajectory needs to be able to move dynamically between “soft” and “hard” approaches as information and nano-products evolve; (b) it needs to integrate inputs from all stakeholders, with strong public engagement in decision-making to assure adequate analysis and transparency; and (c) it should include an overarching coordinating entity to assure strong inter-agency coordination and communication that can meet the challenge posed by the convergent nature of nanobiotechnology. The proposed framework arises from a detailed case analysis of several key oversight regimes relevant to nanobiotechnology and is informed by inputs from experts in academia, industry, NGOs, and government.

  14. Corporate social responsibility for nanotechnology oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya

    2011-11-01

    Growing public concern and uncertainties surrounding emerging technologies suggest the need for socially-responsible behavior of companies in the development and implementation of oversight systems for them. In this paper, we argue that corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an important aspect of nanotechnology oversight given the role of trust in shaping public attitudes about nanotechnology and the lack of data about the health and environmental risks of nanoproducts. We argue that CSR is strengthened by the adoption of stakeholder-driven models and attention to moral principles in policies and programs. In this context, we examine drivers of CSR, contextual and leadership factors that influence CSR, and strategies for CSR. To illustrate these concepts, we discuss existing cases of CSR-like behavior in nanotechnology companies, and then provide examples of how companies producing nanomedicines can exhibit morally-driven CSR behavior.

  15. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993 - March 3, 1997. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    On July 1, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the RO program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These activities were performed under the authority of the lease agreement between DOE and USEC until NRC issued a Certificate of Compliance or approved a Compliance Plan pursuant to Section 1701 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and assumed regulatory responsibility. This report chronicles the formal development, operation and key activities of the RO organization from its beginning in July 1993, until the turnover of the regulatory oversight responsibility to the NRC on March 3, 1997. Through its evolution to closure, the RO program was a formal, proceduralized effort designed to provide consistent regulation and to facilitate transition to NRC. The RO Program was also a first-of-a-kind program for DOE. The process, experience, and lessons learned summarized herein should be useful as a model for transition of other DOE facilities to privatization or external regulation

  16. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    On July 1, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the RO program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These activities were performed under the authority of the lease agreement between DOE and USEC until NRC issued a Certificate of Compliance or approved a Compliance Plan pursuant to Section 1701 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and assumed regulatory responsibility. This report chronicles the formal development, operation and key activities of the RO organization from its beginning in July 1993, until the turnover of the regulatory oversight responsibility to the NRC on March 3, 1997. Through its evolution to closure, the RO program was a formal, proceduralized effort designed to provide consistent regulation and to facilitate transition to NRC. The RO Program was also a first-of-a-kind program for DOE. The process, experience, and lessons learned summarized herein should be useful as a model for transition of other DOE facilities to privatization or external regulation.

  17. Accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Powerplant. Part 1. Oversight hearings before a task force of the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs conducted an informal review of the accident beginning on March 28, 1979 at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant. Officials of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, plant operating personnel employed by General Public Utilities, and representatives of the reactor manufacturer, Babcock and Wilcox Company, related their activities during the accident and their analyses of the sequence of events

  18. Safety at DOE Nuclear Weapons Facilities. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, October 22, 1987 and May 11, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The hearings address the adequacy of health and safety programs at the Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear weapons facilities. All the facilities are owned by the government and operated by contractors. Statements and documents are provided by officials from the DOE and its operating contractors

  19. Environmental crimes at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Facility. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight of the Committee on Science, Space and Technology, US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Documented here are the executive session: September 10, 11, 17, 18, 23 [11:00 a.m.], 24, 25, 30, 1992 and the public session: September 23 [2:15 p.m.]; October 2, 5, 1992 of the hearings on the Environmental Crimes at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Facility. This document is Volume I of the hearings

  20. Licensing process at Grand Gulf Nuclear Powerplant. Oversight hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, July 24, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    A panel of Commissioners from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) headed by Nunzio Palladino and a panel of witnesses from the Jacksonians United for Livable Energy Policies and the Union of Concerned Scientists testified at a hearing on licensing of the Grand Gulf nuclear plant for low-power operation and the reasons for delaying its application for full-power licensing. At issue were a number of irregularities during the design and construction stages and the integrity of the regulatory systems. Panelists were asked to limit their comments to licensing procedures, and not to debate safety issues. Witnesses were critical of NRC's handling of the licensing in view of the large number of errors, unqualified personnel, mishaps, and other problems which have plagued the plant. An appendix with additional material from the witnesses and others follows the testimony

  1. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Budget request for fiscal years 1986 and 1987. Oversight hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First and Second Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Two days of hearings on the fiscal year 1986-1987 budget request for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) heard testimony from NRC Chairman Nunzio Palladino and four commissioners. Areas of concern were the NRC's failure to develop public confidence in nuclear power and the Commission's ability to regulate. Palladino noted that the total budget request of $429 million is $20 million less than the 1985 budget, which will limit the funding for research that would improve licensing procedures and safe plant operation. There was concern that efforts to reduce the federal deficit could lower the level of protection and affect the NRC's mission. Two appendices with correspondence and statements submitted for the record follow the testimony

  2. 12 CFR 4.66 - Oversight and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oversight and monitoring. 4.66 Section 4.66 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS...; Contracting for Goods and Services § 4.66 Oversight and monitoring. The Deputy Comptroller for Resource...

  3. 41 CFR 105-53.133 - Information Security Oversight Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information Security... FUNCTIONS Central Offices § 105-53.133 Information Security Oversight Office. (a) Creation and authority. The Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO), headed by the Director of ISOO, who is appointed by...

  4. 10 CFR 440.23 - Oversight, training, and technical assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oversight, training, and technical assistance. 440.23... PERSONS § 440.23 Oversight, training, and technical assistance. (a) The Secretary and the appropriate..., directly or indirectly, training and technical assistance to any grantee or subgrantee. Such training and...

  5. 10 Standards for Oversight and Transparency of National Intelligence Services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskens, S.; van Daalen, O.; van Eijk, N.

    2016-01-01

    This report aims to enhance the policy debate on surveillance by intelligence services by focusing on two key components: oversight and transparency. Both oversight and transparency are essential to devising checks and balances in a way that respects human rights. By offering this concise list of

  6. 27 | Page OVERSIGHT FUNCTIONS OF THE LEGISLATURE: AN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    2004-09-06

    Sep 6, 2004 ... its oversight functions remains weak because legislative role and ... ministers of his government and other officers in the public service of the Federation9, while .... 22 “Parliamentary Oversight of Finance and the Budgetary Process” - The ... Association of First Nations National, Chief Matthew Coon29 ...

  7. Navy Acquisition Executive's Management Oversight and Procurement Authority Category I and II Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    .... This report discusses the management oversight and procurement authority within the Navy. Two other reports discussed the management oversight and procurement authority within the Army and Air Force...

  8. Experience gained in enhancing operational safety at ComEd`s nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, D [Commonwealth Edison Co. (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The following aspects of experience gained in enhancing operational safety at Comed`s nuclear power plants are discussed: nuclear safety policy; centralization/decentralization; typical nuclear operating organization; safety review boards; human performance enhancement; elements of effective nuclear oversight.

  9. Experience gained in enhancing operational safety at ComEd's nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, D.

    1997-01-01

    The following aspects of experience gained in enhancing operational safety at Comed's nuclear power plants are discussed: nuclear safety policy; centralization/decentralization; typical nuclear operating organization; safety review boards; human performance enhancement; elements of effective nuclear oversight

  10. Regulatory Oversight for New Projects - Challenges and Improvement in Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lall, F.

    2016-01-01

    From inception, there has been rise in number of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) even though very few accidents / events led to intermittent setbacks. However these accidents / events have posed challenges towards enhancement of safety and scope of regulation in all phases of NPP such as siting, design, construction, commissioning and decommissioning. It is essential to ensure compliance to these enhanced safety requirements during all phases of NPP. New and evolutionary reactors are under threshold for regulatory consideration world over. The variety of technologies and genres by themselves pose challenges to regulatory bodies. These challenges are to be addressed through systematic enhancement of the regulation including updating of regulatory documents. The paper touches upon some key elements to be considered towards such enhancement of regulation during all stages of NPP. These being; ensuring quality assurance, regulatory oversight especially over supply chain and contractors, counterfeit material specifically in case of international dealings, emergency handling in case of multi-unit site, feedback and associated enhancements from international events, construction experience database and feedback for safety enhancement, qualification and acceptance of first of a kind systems, regulatory enforcement specifically in case of imported reactors and maintaining interface between safety and security. Regulation in present context has become dynamic and Regulatory bodies need to continue enhancement of its current regulation taking into account the technological developments, feedback from construction, operation and accidents in the current fleet of plants. The paper touches upon some of these elements and highlights the challenges and improvements in regulation. (author)

  11. Aviation Safety: FAA Oversight of Repair Stations Needs Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-24

    This report by the General Accounting Office examines the Federal Aviation : Administration's (FAA) oversight of the aviation repair station industry. : Specifically, this report addresses the following questions: (1) What is the : nature and scope o...

  12. 22 CFR 96.32 - Internal structure and oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Accreditation and Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.32 Internal structure and oversight. (a) The... number of such other provider; and (3) The name, address, and phone number of any entity it uses or...

  13. Regulatory Oversight of the Legacy Gunner Uranium Mine and Mill Site in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada - 13434

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenson, Ron; Howard, Don [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, P.O. Box 1046, Station B, 280 Slater Street, Ottawa ON K1P 5S9 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    As Canada's nuclear regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is responsible for licensing all aspects of uranium mining, including remediation activities at legacy sites. Since these sites already existed when the current legislation came into force in 2000, and the previous legislation did not apply, they present a special case. The Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA), was written with cradle-to- grave oversight in mind. Applying the NSCA at the end of a 'facilities' life-cycle poses some challenges to both the regulator and the proponent. When the proponent is the public sector, even more challenges can present themselves. Although the licensing process for legacy sites is no different than for any other CNSC license, assuring regulatory compliance can be more complicated. To demonstrate how the CNSC has approached the oversight of legacy sites the history of the Commission's involvement with the Gunnar uranium mine and mill site provides a good case study. The lessons learned from the CNSC's experience regulating the Gunnar site will benefit those in the future who will need to regulate legacy sites under existing or new legislation. (authors)

  14. Review of the OSHA framework for oversight of occupational environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Young; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2009-01-01

    The OSHA system for oversight of chemicals in the workplace was evaluated to derive lessons for oversight of nanotechnology. Criteria relating to the development, attributes, evolution, and outcomes of the system were used for evaluation that was based upon quantitative expert elicitation and historical literature analysis. The oversight system had inadequate resources in terms of finances, expertise, and personnel, and insufficient incentive for compliance. The system showed a lack of flexibility in novel situations. There were minimal requirements on companies for data on health and safety of their products. These factors have a strong influence on public confidence and health and safety. The oversight system also scored low on attributes such as public input, transparency, empirical basis, conflict of interest, and informed consent. The experts in our sample tend to believe that the current oversight system for chemicals in the workplace is neither adequate nor effective. It is very likely that the performance of the OSHA oversight system for nanomaterials will be equally inadequate.

  15. Dynamic oversight: implementation gaps and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John

    2011-04-01

    Nanotechnology is touted as a transformative technology in that it is predicted to improve many aspects of human life. There are hundreds of products in the market that utilize nanostructures in their design, such as composite materials made out of carbon or metal oxides. Potential risks to consumers, to the environment, and to workers from the most common passive nanomaterial—carbon nanotubes—are emerging through scientific research. Newer more active nanostructures—such as cancer therapies and targeted drug systems—are also increasing in use and are raising similar risk concerns. Governing the risks to workers is the subject of this commentary. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 grants the Occupational Safety and Health Administration the legal authority to set occupational health standards to insure that no worker suffers material impairment of health from work. However, setting a standard to protect workers from nanotechnology risks may occur some time in the future because the risks to workers have not been well characterized scientifically. Alternative risk governances—such as dynamic oversight through stakeholder partnerships, "soft law" approaches, and national adoption of international consensus standards—are evaluated in this article.

  16. Dynamic oversight: implementation gaps and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, John

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is touted as a transformative technology in that it is predicted to improve many aspects of human life. There are hundreds of products in the market that utilize nanostructures in their design, such as composite materials made out of carbon or metal oxides. Potential risks to consumers, to the environment, and to workers from the most common passive nanomaterial—carbon nanotubes—are emerging through scientific research. Newer more active nanostructures—such as cancer therapies and targeted drug systems—are also increasing in use and are raising similar risk concerns. Governing the risks to workers is the subject of this commentary. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 grants the Occupational Safety and Health Administration the legal authority to set occupational health standards to insure that no worker suffers material impairment of health from work. However, setting a standard to protect workers from nanotechnology risks may occur some time in the future because the risks to workers have not been well characterized scientifically. Alternative risk governances—such as dynamic oversight through stakeholder partnerships, “soft law” approaches, and national adoption of international consensus standards—are evaluated in this article.

  17. Nuclear health and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    Numerous environmental, safety, and health problems found at other Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities precipitated a review of these conditions at DOE's contractor-operated Pantex Plant, where our nation's nuclear weapons are assembled. This book focuses the review on examining key safety and health problems at Pantex and determining the need for external safety oversight of the plant

  18. Use of the Management Oversight and Risk Tree (MORT) methodology in health-physics program appraisals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essig, T.H.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1981-06-01

    In January 1980, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) assumed a major role in helping the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) conduct comprehensive health physics appraisals at 47 operating nuclear power plants. These appraisals required the development of an analytical technique that permitted a deductive analysis of a health-physics program on an element-by-element basis. The technique employed was a modification of the Management Oversight and risk Tree (MORT) analytical logic methodology used in probabilistic assessments. This paper includes the method used in establishing the appraisal guidelines and assigning the proper level of importance within the analytical tree structure. The system for ensuring the proper subdivision necessary for an adequate assessment of each area (e.g., exposure controls and radioactive waste management) will also be discussed. In addition to these major subjects, the generation of specific review questions that correspond to the analytical trees is addressed

  19. 75 FR 10507 - Information Security Oversight Office; National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office; National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... individuals planning to attend must be submitted to the Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) no later...

  20. 12 CFR 1700.1 - Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. 1700.1 Section 1700.1 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF... of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. (a) Scope and authority. The Office of Federal Housing...

  1. 49 CFR 659.29 - Oversight agency safety and security reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oversight agency safety and security reviews. 659... Role of the State Oversight Agency § 659.29 Oversight agency safety and security reviews. At least... safety program plan and system security plan. Alternatively, the on-site review may be conducted in an on...

  2. 13 CFR 120.1070 - Lender oversight fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lender oversight fees. 120.1070 Section 120.1070 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based... Lender” means a Small Business Lending Company or a Non-Federally Regulated Lender. (2) On-site reviews...

  3. Oversight of Department of Defense Reconstruction Projects in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    had to reschedule some of our site visits multiple times due to security conditions. As an alternative means for conducting oversight, due to a limited...employed less than 20 percent of the staff it was expected to employ. According to the doctors and nurses on site during our inspection, the limited

  4. 15 CFR 2008.18 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2008.18 Section 2008.18 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12065; OFFICE OF...

  5. Notification: Oversight of Clean Water State Revolving Loan Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY15-0153, April 6, 2015. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is beginning preliminary research on the EPA oversight of the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF).

  6. 40 CFR 51.362 - Motorist compliance enforcement program oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... deviate from established requirements, or in the case of non-government entities that process... registrations; and (10) The prevention of fraudulent procurement or use of inspection documents by controlling... measurements. (c) SIP requirements. The SIP shall include a description of enforcement program oversight and...

  7. Strategic planning of an integrated program for state oversight agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walzer, A.E.; Cothron, T.K.

    1991-01-01

    Among the barrage of agreements faced by federal facilities are the State Oversight Agreements (known as Agreements in Principle in many states). These agreements between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the states fund the states to conduct independent environmental monitoring and oversight which requires plans, studies, inventories, models, and reports from DOE and its management and operating contractors. Many states have signed such agreements, including Tennessee, Kentucky, Washington, Idaho, Colorado, California, and Florida. This type of oversight agreement originated in Colorado as a result of environmental concerns at the Rocky Flats Plant. The 5-year State Oversight Agreements for Tennessee and Kentucky became effective on May 13, 1991, and fund these states nearly $21 million and $7 million, respectively. Implementation of these open-quotes comprehensive and integratedclose quotes agreements is particularly complex in Tennessee where the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation houses three installations with distinctly different missions. The program development and strategic planning required for coordinating and integrating a program of this magnitude is discussed. Included are the organizational structure and interfaces required to define and coordinate program elements across plants and to also effectively negotiate scope and schedules with the state. The planned Program Management Plan, which will contain implementation and procedural guidelines, and the management control system for detailed tracking of activities and costs are outlined. Additionally, issues inherent in the nature of the agreements and implementation of a program of this magnitude are discussed. Finally, a comparison of the agreements for Tennessee, Kentucky, Colorado, and Idaho is made to gain a better understanding of the similarities and differences in State Oversight Agreements to aid in implementation of these agreements

  8. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities, Security and Safeguards Division, Safeguards and Security Program Office, Protective Force Oversight Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify and describe the duties and responsibilities of Facility Security and Safeguards (FSS) Safeguards and Security (SS) organizations (groups/offices) with oversight functions over the Protection Force (PF) subcontractor. Responsible organizations will continue their present PF oversight functions under the Cost Plus Award Fee (CPAF) assessment, but now will be required to also coordinate, integrate, and interface with other FSS S and S organizations and with the PF subcontractor to measure performance, assess Department of Energy (DOE) compliance, reduce costs, and minimize duplication of effort. The role of the PF subcontractor is to provide the Laboratory with effective and efficient protective force services. PF services include providing protection for the special nuclear material, government property and classified or sensitive information developed and/or consigned to the Laboratory, as well as protection for personnel who work or participate in laboratory activities. FSS S and S oversight of both performance and compliance standards/metrics is essential for these PF objectives to be met

  9. PARTICULARITIES OF PARLIAMENTARY OVERSIGHT IN DIFFERENT POLITICAL REGIMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia-Claudia CĂLIN-MIHALCEA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The quality and intensity of the parliamentary oversight performed over the Government are shaped by several major criteria: political regime, electoral system, structure of the Parliament (unicameral/bicameral, parliamentary culture and tradition. This paper emphasizes some distinctive elements and particular mechanisms of the control exercised over the activities of the executive power, from the point of view of the political regime established in states with modern democracies.

  10. Technical oversight for installation of TNX piezometers, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pidcoe, W.W. Jr. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1997-06-05

    Science Applications International Corporation was tasked under subcontract C002025P to provide technical oversight for the drilling of one pilot borehole, and the drilling and installation of five piezometers in the TNX Area Swamp. The work was performed in accordance with the Statement of Work in Task Order Proposal No. ER39-129 dated August 6, 1996. This report describes the activities associated with the performance of the task.

  11. Oil and gas site contamination risks : improved oversight needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-02-01

    British Columbia has seen record levels of activities in the oil and gas sector. Upstream petroleum processes include exploration, well completion and production. Site contamination can occur during all of these activities, resulting in potential environmental and human health impacts. Although well operators are responsible by law for site restoration, there is a potential risk that some operators will not fulfill their responsibilities, thereby leaving the province liable for the site restoration costs. In British Columbia, the BC Oil and Gas Commission (OGC) is responsible for managing these risks through oversight activities designed to ensure that industry meets its obligations. The OGC also manages the orphan sites reclamation fund. This report presented an audit of the OGC in order to determine if it is providing adequate oversight of upstream oil and gas site contamination risks. The audit examined whether the agency responsibilities are clear and whether the OGC is fully aware of the environmental and financial risks associated with upstream oil and gas site contamination. The audit also examined if the OGC has established appropriate procedures to oversee the risks and to inform the public of how effectively site contamination risks are being managed. The report presented the audit background, audit expectations, findings, conclusions and recommendations. It was concluded that the OGC's oversight of the environmental and financial risks associated with oil and gas site contamination needs improving. tabs., figs.

  12. Contemporary Approaches to Safety Culture: Lessons from Developing a Regulatory Oversight Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, V.; Heppell-Masys, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulates the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect health, safety, security and the environment, and to implement Canada’s international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy; and to disseminate objective scientific, technical and regulatory information to the public. In the late 1990s, the CNSC conducted research into an Organization and Management (O&M) assessment method. Based on this research the CNSC conducted O&M assessments at all Canadian nuclear power plants and conducted additional assessments of nuclear research and uranium mine and mill operations. The results of these assessments were presented to licencees and used to inform their ongoing actions related to safety culture. Additional safety culture outreach and oversight activities provided licencees with opportunities to develop effective safety culture assessment methods, to share best practices across industry, and to strive for continual improvement of their organizations. Recent changes to the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) management system standard have resulted in the inclusion of requirements associated to safety culture and human performance. Representatives from several sectors of Canada’s nuclear industry, as well as participation from regulators such as the CNSC took part to the development of this consensus standard. Specifically, these requirements focus on monitoring and understanding safety culture, integrating safety into all of the requirements of the management system, committing workers to adhere to the management system and supporting excellence in workers’ performance. The CNSC is currently developing a regulatory document on safety culture which includes key concepts applicable to all licencees and specific requirements related to self-assessment, and additional guidance for nuclear power plants. Developing a regulatory document on safety culture requires consultation and fact finding initiatives at

  13. Nuclear health and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This paper is a review of environmental and safety programs at facilities in the Naval Reactors Program which shows no basis for allegations that unsafe conditions exist there or that the environment is being harmed by activities conducted there. The prototype reactor design provides safety measures that are consistent with commercial nuclear power plants. Minor incidents affecting safety and the environment have occurred, however, and dents affecting safety and the environment have occurred, however, and as with other nuclear facilities, past activities have caused environmental problems that require ongoing monitoring and vigilance. While the program has historically been exempt from most oversight, some federal and state environmental oversight agencies have recently been permitted access to Naval Reactors facilities for oversight purposes. The program voluntarily cooperates with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regarding reactor modifications, safety improvements, and component reliability. In addition, the program and its contractors have established an extensive internal oversight program that is geared toward reporting the slightest deviations from requirements or procedures. Given the program's classification policies and requirements, it does not appear that the program routinely overclassifies information to prevent its release to the public or to avoid embarrassment. However, GAO did not some instances in which documents were improperly classified

  14. Evaluating oversight systems for emerging technologies: a case study of genetically engineered organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Najmaie, Pouya; Larson, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. oversight system for genetically engineered organisms (GEOs) was evaluated to develop hypotheses and derive lessons for oversight of other emerging technologies, such as nanotechnology. Evaluation was based upon quantitative expert elicitation, semi-standardized interviews, and historical literature analysis. Through an interdisciplinary policy analysis approach, blending legal, ethical, risk analysis, and policy sciences viewpoints, criteria were used to identify strengths and weaknesses of GEOs oversight and explore correlations among its attributes and outcomes. From the three sources of data, hypotheses and broader conclusions for oversight were developed. Our analysis suggests several lessons for oversight of emerging technologies: the importance of reducing complexity and uncertainty in oversight for minimizing financial burdens on small product developers; consolidating multi-agency jurisdictions to avoid gaps and redundancies in safety reviews; consumer benefits for advancing acceptance of GEO products; rigorous and independent pre- and post-market assessment for environmental safety; early public input and transparency for ensuring public confidence; and the positive role of public input in system development, informed consent, capacity, compliance, incentives, and data requirements and stringency in promoting health and environmental safety outcomes, as well as the equitable distribution of health impacts. Our integrated approach is instructive for more comprehensive analyses of oversight systems, developing hypotheses for how features of oversight systems affect outcomes, and formulating policy options for oversight of future technological products, especially nanotechnology products.

  15. MEDICAID FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT: Better Oversight of State Claims for Federal Reimbursement Needed

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calbom, Linda

    2002-01-01

    .... Developing baseline information on Medicaid issues at greatest risk for improper payments and measuring improvements in program management against that baseline is key to achieving effective financial oversight...

  16. Political and Budgetary Oversight of the Ukrainian Intelligence Community: Processes, Problems and Prospects for Reform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petrov, Oleksii

    2007-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of providing policy and budget oversight of Ukrainian intelligence organizations in accordance with norms and practices developed in contemporary Western democracies...

  17. Disposal facility building also is mining engineering. Germany can tap into this expertise and planning potential; Endlagerbergbau ist auch Bergbau. Erfahrungs- und Planungspotential in Deutschland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hucke, Andreas; Kohl, Nadine; Scior, Carsten; Gutberlet, Daniela [DMT GmbH und Co.KG, Essen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The conventional mining industry has a rich tradition and as mining is practised all over the world under a whole range of different conditions the industry has witnessed all kinds of technical developments aimed at controlling strata behaviour and winning the target mineral as efficiently as possible. The proposed use of deep geological deposits as disposal facilities for nuclear waste has transformed the role of the mining Industry and instead of extracting material from the ground mining engineers are now focussing more on how to store waste material safely deep below the earth's surface. Nevertheless, this new remit retains many of the key aspects of conventional mining and the experience that the industry has built up over the years Is still of vital importance when it comes to selecting a suitable disposal site and planning a final waste disposal facility in deep geological formations. These processes benefit from the support of specialists with a mining engineering background, as this can help to avoid unnecessary delays, additional costs and potential damage to public image. The following paper describes some of the expertises and methods developed by the conventional extraction industry that are also of relevance for the construction of disposal facilities.

  18. State safety oversight program : audit of the tri-state oversight committee and the Washington metropolitan area transit authority, final audit report, March 4, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) conducted an on-site audit of the safety program implemented by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and overseen by the Tri-State Oversight Committee (TOC) between December 14 and 17, 20...

  19. Real-time Responsiveness for Ethics Oversight During Disaster Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenwiler, Lisa; Pringle, John; Boulanger, Renaud; Hunt, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Disaster research has grown in scope and frequency. Research in the wake of disasters and during humanitarian crises--particularly in resource-poor settings--is likely to raise profound and unique ethical challenges for local communities, crisis responders, researchers, and research ethics committees (RECs). Given the ethical challenges, many have questioned how best to provide research ethics review and oversight. We contribute to the conversation concerning how best to ensure appropriate ethical oversight in disaster research and argue that ethical disaster research requires of researchers and RECs a particular sort of ongoing, critical engagement which may not be warranted in less exceptional research. We present two cases that typify the concerns disaster researchers and RECs may confront, and elaborate upon what this ongoing engagement might look like--how it might be conceptualized and utilized--using the concept of real-time responsiveness (RTR). The central aim of RTR, understood here as both an ethical ideal and practice, is to lessen the potential for research conducted in the wake of disasters to create, perpetuate, or exacerbate vulnerabilities and contribute to injustices suffered by disaster-affected populations. Well cultivated and deployed, we believe that RTR may enhance the moral capacities of researchers and REC members, and RECs as institutions where moral agency is nurtured and sustained. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. 17 CFR 201.440 - Appeal of determinations by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Commission Review § 201.440 Appeal of determinations by the Public Company Accounting Oversight... for registration of a public accounting firm, may file an application for review. (b) Procedure. An... the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board. 201.440 Section 201.440 Commodity and Securities...

  1. 32 CFR 2400.19 - Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Information Security Oversight Office. 2400.19 Section 2400.19 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to... SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Declassification and Downgrading § 2400.19 Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office. If the Director of the Information...

  2. 75 FR 39954 - Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests; Public Meeting; Change of Meeting Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ...] Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests; Public Meeting; Change of Meeting Location AGENCY: Food and Drug... location for the upcoming public meeting entitled ``Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests.'' A new... the public meeting, FDA is announcing in this notice a new location for the public meeting. II. New...

  3. Creating a Learning Organization in Law Enforcement: Maturity Levels for Police Oversight Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filstad, Cathrine; Gottschalk, Petter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a stage model for maturity levels for police oversight agencies. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a literature review covering police oversight organizations and stages of growth models. Findings: As a conceptual paper, the main findings are related to the appropriateness of…

  4. 48 CFR 52.236-24 - Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Architect-Engineer Contracts. 52.236-24 Section 52.236-24 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.236-24 Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts. As prescribed in 36.609-3, insert the following clause: Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts (APR 1984) The extent and...

  5. Whistleblower Protection: DOD Needs to Enhance Oversight of Military Whistleblower Reprisal Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION DOD Needs to Enhance Oversight of Military Whistleblower Reprisal Investigations Report...00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Whistleblower Protection: DOD Needs to Enhance Oversight of Military Whistleblower Reprisal...Government Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-15-477, a report to congressional requesters May 2015 WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION DOD

  6. Defense Forensics: Additional Planning and Oversight Needed to Establish an Enduring Expeditionary Forensic Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    forensic pathology, forensic anthropology, and forensic toxicology . 13DOD’s forensic directive defines DOD components as the Office of the...DEFENSE FORENSICS Additional Planning and Oversight Needed to Establish an Enduring Expeditionary Forensic ...COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defense Forensics : Additional Planning and Oversight Needed to Establish an Enduring

  7. 76 FR 31416 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Oversight of Contractor Ethics Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ...-AL92 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Oversight of Contractor Ethics Programs AGENCY: Department of... that contractors have implemented the mandatory contractor business ethics program requirements. DATES... to Improve DoD's Oversight of Contractor Ethics Programs. The ethics program requirement flows from...

  8. 76 FR 52997 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Board Funding Final Rules for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Board Funding Final Rules for Allocation of the Board's... August 18, 2011. I. Introduction On June 21, 2011, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the... public accounting firm, in amounts that are sufficient to cover the costs of processing and reviewing...

  9. 17 CFR 202.11 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board budget approval process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public Company Accounting Oversight Board budget approval process. 202.11 Section 202.11 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION INFORMAL AND OTHER PROCEDURES § 202.11 Public Company Accounting Oversight...

  10. Parliamentary Oversight of European Security and Defence Policy: A Matter of Formal Competences or the Will of Parliamentarians?

    OpenAIRE

    Maatsch, A.; Galella, P.

    2016-01-01

    Are parliaments with strong formal powers for the deployment of troops likely to conduct more intensive oversight than their counterparts with weak or no powers? The literature suggests that strong formal powers delineate boundaries of parliamentary oversight. However, this article demonstrates that strong formal powers are not necessary for parliaments in order to conduct oversight. If parliaments with weak formal powers had strong incentives to carry out oversight of the EU NAVFOR Operation...

  11. A qualitative phenomenological study: Enhanced, risk-based FAA oversight on part 145 maintenance practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Bryan G.

    The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to examine the phenomenon of enhanced, risk-based Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) oversight of Part 145 repair stations that performed aircraft maintenance for Part 121 air carriers between 2007 and 2014 in Oklahoma. Specifically, this research was utilized to explore what operational changes have occurred in the domestic Part 145 repair station industry such as variations in management or hiring practices, training, recordkeeping and technical data, inventory and aircraft parts supply-chain logistics, equipment, and facilities. After interviewing 12 managers from Part 145 repair stations in Oklahoma, six major theme codes emerged from the data: quality of oversight before 2007, quality of oversight after 2007, advantages of oversight, disadvantages of oversight, status quo of oversight, and process improvement . Of those six major theme codes, 17 subthemes appeared from the data that were used to explain the phenomenon of enhanced oversight in the Part 145 repair station industry. Forty-two percent of the participants indicated a weak FAA oversight system that has hindered the continuous process improvement program in their repair stations. Some of them were financially burdened after hiring additional full-time quality assurance inspectors to specifically manage enhanced FAA oversight. Notwithstanding, the participants of the study indicated that the FAA must apply its surveillance on a more standardized and consistent basis. They want to see this standardization in how FAA inspectors interpret regulations and practice the same quality of oversight for all repair stations, particularly those that are repeat violators and fail to comply with federal aviation regulations. They believed that when the FAA enforces standardization on a consistent basis, repair stations can become more efficient and safer in the performance of their scope of work for the U.S. commercial air transportation industry.

  12. Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This document proposes a presentation and discussion of the main notions, issues, principles, or characteristics related to nuclear energy: radioactivity (presence in the environment, explanation, measurement, periods and activities, low doses, applications), fuel cycle (front end, mining and ore concentration, refining and conversion, fuel fabrication, in the reactor, back end with reprocessing and recycling, transport), the future of the thorium-based fuel cycle (motivations, benefits and drawbacks), nuclear reactors (principles of fission reactors, reactor types, PWR reactors, BWR, heavy-water reactor, high temperature reactor of HTR, future reactors), nuclear wastes (classification, packaging and storage, legal aspects, vitrification, choice of a deep storage option, quantities and costs, foreign practices), radioactive releases of nuclear installations (main released radio-elements, radioactive releases by nuclear reactors and by La Hague plant, gaseous and liquid effluents, impact of releases, regulation), the OSPAR Convention, management and safety of nuclear activities (from control to quality insurance, to quality management and to sustainable development), national safety bodies (mission, means, organisation and activities of ASN, IRSN, HCTISN), international bodies, nuclear and medicine (applications of radioactivity, medical imagery, radiotherapy, doses in nuclear medicine, implementation, the accident in Epinal), nuclear and R and D (past R and D programmes and expenses, main actors in France and present funding, main R and D axis, international cooperation)

  13. Nuclear Security: Action May Be Needed to Reassess the Security of NRC-Licensed Research Reactors. Report to the Ranking Member, Subcommittee on National Security and Foreign Affairs, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, House of Representatives. GAO-08-403

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloise, Gene

    2008-01-01

    There are 37 research reactors in the United States, mostly located on college campuses. Of these, 33 reactors are licensed and regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Four are operated by the Department of Energy (DOE) and are located at three national laboratories. Although less powerful than commercial nuclear power reactors,…

  14. Clinical oversight and the avoidance of repeat induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacovetty, Erica L; Clare, Camille A; Squire, Mary-Beatrice; Kubal, Keshar P; Liou, Sherry; Inchiosa, Mario A

    2018-06-03

    To evaluate the impact of patient counseling, demographics, and contraceptive methods on repeat induced abortion in women attending family planning clinics. A retrospective chart review of repeat induced abortions was performed. The analysis included patients with an initial induced abortion obtained between January 1, 2001, and March 31, 2014, at New York City Health + Hospitals/Metropolitan. The duration of involvement in the family planning program, the use of contraceptive interventions, and 18 patient factors were analyzed for their correlation with the incidence of repeat induced abortions per year of follow-up. A decreased rate of repeat induced abortions was associated with a longer duration of clinical oversight (r 2 =0.449, Pabortions. By determining the patient characteristics that most influence repeat induced abortion rates, providers can best choose the most efficacious method of contraception available. © 2018 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  15. External Police Oversight in Mexico: Experiences, Challenges, and Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Guzmán Sánchez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available After nearly 20 years of ‘reformist’ measures, the police in Mexico continues to be an ineffective, unreliable, and ‘far from citizen’ institution. The efforts made so far have faded amongst political interests and agendas; multidimensional frameworks out-dated at both conceptual and interagency levels; short-sighted competition for resources; evaluation and performance monitors that are handicapped by bureaucratic inaction; and weak transparency and accountability that perpetuate the opacity in which the police operate. In this context, the agenda of external police oversight is still at a rudimentary stage. However, there are several initiatives that have managed to push the issue to the frontier of new knowledge and promising practices. This paper outlines the experiences and challenges of—as well as the lessons learned by—the Institute for Security and Democracy (Insyde A.C., one of the most recognised think tanks in Mexico.

  16. Tennessee Oversight Agreement combined annual reports, May 13, 1991--May 12, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Tennessee Oversight Agreement provides independent oversight and monitoring of the Department of Energy's activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation by the State. The agreement obligates the state to provide an annual report to DOE and for public distribution of the results of the DOE Oversight Division's monitoring and analysis activities and its findings of the quality and effectiveness of the Department of Energy's environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. The DOE Oversight Division's first report will discuss the status of the entire oversight agreement for the first two years of its existence. The 1991--1993 combined annual reports include a short history of the Division, a list of the Tennessee Oversight Agreement commitments and a status report on each of DOE Oversight Division's programs. Each Division program includes a descriptive status of its findings and recommendations. These findings and recommendations were also consolidated into a separate segment of the report (Chapter 7). Findings indicate there have been genuine successes in the areas of site access and data availability. More effort, however, is required in both of these areas before the state can verify that DOE and its contractors are meeting its obligations. Ambient surveillance monitoring by DOE is extensive. The DOE Oversight Division reviews this data to assure the state and its citizens that all areas of the environment are adequately protected by DOE operations. There is a noticeable lack of research and development in the technology for environmental remediation and radiological and mixed waste treatment, storage and disposal. The DOE Oversight Division's recommendations for improvement are provided with each of the findings listed in this report

  17. Improving nuclear regulatory effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Ensuring that nuclear installations are operated and maintained in such a way that their impact on public health and safety is as low as reasonably practicable has been and will continue to be the cornerstone of nuclear regulation. In the past, nuclear incidents provided the main impetus for regulatory change. Today, economic factors, deregulation, technological advancements, government oversight and the general requirements for openness and accountability are leading regulatory bodies to review their effectiveness. In addition, seeking to enhance the present level of nuclear safety by continuously improving the effectiveness of regulatory bodies is seen as one of the ways to strengthen public confidence in the regulatory systems. This report covers the basic concepts underlying nuclear regulatory effectiveness, advances being made and future requirements. The intended audience is primarily nuclear safety regulators, but government authorities, nuclear power plant operators and the general public may also be interested. (author)

  18. Authorization of appropriations for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for fiscal years 1982 and 1983 (implementation of Section 110, Public Law 96-295). Oversight hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session, February 27, 1981. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Part II of the budget authorization hearings covers the testimony of two panels, one with representatives of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and one with members of the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS). Their testimony focused on section 10 of the authorization law which deals with requirements of systematic safety evaluation of operating reactors. NRC revisions to section 10 have quieted some industry criticisms that the plan will drain manpower and resources without accomplishing anything significant. UCS panelists challenged the NRC to provide objective scientific evidence that nuclear power plants are operating safely. They urged an augmented budget for further safety research. An appendix with additional statements and material follows the testimony

  19. Political and Budgetary Oversight of the Ukrainian Intelligence Community: Processes, Problems and Prospects for Reform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petrov, Oleksii

    2007-01-01

    .... Official government documents, news reports and other literature on the intelligence system in Ukraine, as well as studies of intelligence oversight within democracies are the primary sources of data...

  20. 76 FR 10135 - Public Housing Evaluation and Oversight: Changes to the Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... Vol. 76 Wednesday, No. 36 February 23, 2011 Part III Department of Housing and Urban Development 24 CFR Parts 901, 902, and 907 Public Housing Evaluation and Oversight: Changes to the Public Housing...

  1. Does nanobiotechnology oversight present a uniquely complex challenge to interagency cooperation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karkkainen, Bradley C.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous regulatory and oversight challenges exist in the field of nanobiotechnology. Although these challenges may appear novel and complex, similar issues have plagued environmental regulation since the 1970 s. This article argues that complexity, uncertainty, and regulatory gaps are common problems in environmental regulation, and that the lessons learned and progress made during more than 40 years of environmental regulation can serve as a guidepost for addressing nanobiotechnology regulation and oversight issues.

  2. Poor Government Oversight of Anham and Its Subcontracting Procedures Allowed Questionable Costs To Go Undetected

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-30

    contractor purchasing system review of Anham. Management Comments and Audit Response The Defense Contract Mangement Agency and the U.S. Central... Introduction 1  Background 1  Government Agency Roles and Oversight Responsibilities 4  Objectives 7  Weak Government Oversight Resulted in Significant...Subcontracting Procedures Allowed Questionable Costs To Go Undetected SIGIR 11-022 July 30, 2011 Introduction Since 2003, the United States Government

  3. Ideal Police Oversight and Review: The Next Piece of the Community Policing Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    oversight. Included in that malpractice are instances of perceived physical and verbal abuse , perceived harassment, failure to take appropriate action...a kid from south Stockton. 1 I. INTRODUCTION A. PROBLEM STATEMENT—BACKGROUND Independent oversight boards are asked to make the complaint...communities with inclusion and investigative transparency when filing complaints of police misconduct and abuse of police powers. In his article “Race

  4. Reinventing oversight in the twenty-first century: the question of capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosso, Christopher; DeLeo, Rob A.; Kay, W. D.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses a key question emerging from this project based at the University of Minnesota: the fundamental capacity of government to engage in “dynamic oversight” of emergent technologies. This conception of oversight requires additional or new types of capacity for government agencies that must arbitrate conflicts and endow any outcomes with necessary democratic legitimacy. Rethinking oversight thus also requires consideration of the fundamental design and organizational capacity of the regulatory regime in the democratic state.

  5. 75 FR 59158 - Earth Day Commitment/Friends of the Coast, Beyond Nuclear, Seacoast Anti-Pollution League, C-10...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... the health, safety and general well-being of the New Hampshire Seacoast community from nuclear... staff turnover, changes in oversight, licensee staff changes, and ownership (licensee) changes, greater...

  6. A Study of Construction Reactor Oversight Process in US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, I.; Kim, S. Y.; Jeong, G. Y.; Kim, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    This process provides a risk-informed approach such as construction significance determination process (SDP) and construction program performance index analogous to those used in the Reactor Oversight Process (ROP). The cROP has been applied to Vogtle units 3, 4 and V.C. Summer units 2, 3 under construction for the regulatory inspection. In this paper, the cROP is dissected to present its major contents and characteristics. The main features of the cROP can be summarized as followings: 1) The cROP which adopts the concept of the ROP used for operating NPPs assesses NPP under construction periodically to determine the appropriate level of regulatory response. 2) The cROP consists of three parts: the CIP, the CAP and the CEP. 3) The inspections for NPPs under construction can be categorized into three parts: vendor inspection, baseline inspection and supplemental and plant specific inspections. USNRC's regulatory resources can be used effectively based on baseline inspection, which is using ITAAC inspections. The construction SDP is used to assign the color scheme to categorize the significance of inspection findings. Regulatory actions are taken from CAM to which the significance of inspection findings input. In this paper, major contents and characteristics of USNRC's cROP have been presented

  7. Restart oversight assessment of Hanford 242-A evaporator: Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes a January 17--28, 1994, oversight assessment of restart activities for the 242-A Evaporator at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site about 25 miles northeast of Hanford, Washington. The assessment was conducted by qualified staff and consultants from the DOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). Its focus was the readiness of the facility for the resumption of safe operations, in particular those operations involved in the treatment and disposal of condensate from the evaporation of liquid radioactive waste, a key element of the tank waste remediation project administered by the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). Overall, the assessment yielded eight programmatic concerns, supported by 38 individual findings. Of the concerns, four have already been closed, and the other four have been resolved. Results pointed up strengths in management and engineering design, as well as effective support of facility training programs by the management and operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Weaknesses were evident, however, in conduct of operations, maintenance, and radiological practices. Furthermore, problems in the submittal and approval of Compliance Schedule Approvals--that is, WHC documentation of the status of compliance with DOE orders--were indicative of a programmatic breakdown in the DOE Order compliance process. According to the results of this assessment, there are no safety and health issues that would preclude or delay restart of the evaporator

  8. Moving forward responsibly: Oversight for the nanotechnology-biology interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzma, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Challenges and opportunities for appropriate oversight of nanotechnology applied to or derived from biological systems (nano-bio interface) were discussed in a public workshop and dialog hosted by the Center for Science, Technology, and Public Policy of the University of Minnesota on September 15, 2005. This paper discusses the themes that emerged from the workshop, including the importance of analyzing potential gaps in current regulatory systems; deciding upon the general approach taken toward regulation; employing non-regulatory mechanisms for governance; making risk and other studies transparent and available to the public; bolstering mechanisms for public participation in risk analysis; creating more opportunities for meaningful discussion of the social and ethical dimensions of the nano-bio interface; increasing funds for implications and problem-solving research in this area; and having independent and reliable sources for communication. The workshop was successful in identifying ways of moving forward responsibly so that ultimately nanotechnology and its products can succeed in developers', researchers', regulators', and the public's eyes

  9. Bonneville Power Administration: financial fallout from termination of WPPSS nuclear projects 4 and 5. Oversight hearings before the Subcommittee on Mining, Forest Management, and Bonneville Power Administration of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, February 14 and 15, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Peter T. Johnson, Administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration, and a representative of the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS) described the financial situation resulting from the cancellations and cost overruns of WPPSS nuclear projects that have left the area with an unacceptable debt. Four panels representing area utilities and electric cooperatives described their financial positions on the second day of hearings. Two appendices with additional material from Bonneville, WPPSS, the Department of the Interior, and others follow the testimony

  10. Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    The first text deals with a new circular concerning the collect of the medicine radioactive wastes, containing radium. This campaign wants to incite people to let go their radioactive wastes (needles, tubes) in order to suppress any danger. The second text presents a decree of the 31 december 1999, relative to the limitations of noise and external risks resulting from the nuclear facilities exploitation: noise, atmospheric pollution, water pollution, wastes management and fire prevention. (A.L.B.)

  11. Proceedings of the CSNI/IAEA workshop on maintaining oversight of licensee safety culture - methods and approaches. Held from 21 to 23 May 2007 in Chester, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Weaknesses in safety culture have contributed to a number of high profile events in the nuclear and other high hazard sectors. The nuclear industry also faces challenges such as deregulation, out-sourcing, phase-out, upgrading and new builds which, if not properly planned and implemented, have the potential to make a negative impact on safety culture. These factors have fostered an increasing awareness of the need for licensees to develop a strong safety culture to support successful and sustainable nuclear safety performance. Regulatory bodies are taking a growing interest in this issue, and several are actively working to develop and implement approaches to maintaining oversight of licensee safety culture. However, these approaches are not yet well-established, and it was considered prudent to share experiences and developing methodologies in order to disseminate good practices and avoid potential pitfalls. An NEA/CSNI/IAEA workshop was therefore held in Chester, UK, in May 2007 in order to explore and discuss the approaches that different regulatory bodies are taking to maintain oversight of licensee safety culture. It was organised by the UK Nuclear Installations Inspectorate on behalf of the CSNI's Working Group on Human and Organisational Factors. This report sets out the findings of the Chester workshop. The workshop was attended by 50 representatives of nuclear regulatory bodies in 20 countries plus IAEA, WANO, EU and NEA. It included both specialists in safety culture and site/resident inspectors, whose attendance was facilitated by the CNRA's Working Group on Inspection Practices. The workshop comprised structured discussion sessions, in which a set of issues were explored by small discussion groups and then discussed in plenary, complemented by short presentations on national regulatory positions. The workshop revealed a broad consensus that nuclear regulators should have processes in place to maintain oversight of licensee safety culture. The approaches

  12. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC`s program results.

  13. Nuclear safety in perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, K.; Sjöberg, B.M.D.; Lauridsen, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the NKS/SOS-1 project has been to enhance common understanding about requirements for nuclear safety by finding improved means of communicat-ing on the subject in society. The project, which has been built around a number of seminars, wassupported by limited research in three sub......-projects: Risk assessment Safety analysis Strategies for safety management The report describes an industry in change due to societal factors. The concepts of risk and safety, safety management and systems forregulatory oversight are de-scribed in the nuclear area and also, to widen the perspective, for other...

  14. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H.

    1993-01-01

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC's program results

  15. Recommendations for Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research Oversight: An Evolutionary Approach for an Emerging Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, Leili; Wolf, Susan M.; McCullough, Jeffrey; Hall, Ralph; Lawrenz, Frances; Kahn, Jeffrey P.; Jones, Cortney; Campbell, Stephen A.; Dresser, Rebecca S.; Erdman, Arthur G.; Haynes, Christy L.; Hoerr, Robert A.; Hogle, Linda F.; Keane, Moira A.; Khushf, George; King, Nancy M.P.; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Marchant, Gary; Maynard, Andrew D.; Philbert, Martin; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Siegel, Ronald A.; Wickline, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The nanomedicine field is fast evolving toward complex, “active,” and interactive formulations. Like many emerging technologies, nanomedicine raises questions of how human subjects research (HSR) should be conducted and the adequacy of current oversight, as well as how to integrate concerns over occupational, bystander, and environmental exposures. The history of oversight for HSR investigating emerging technologies is a patchwork quilt without systematic justification of when ordinary oversight for HSR is enough versus when added oversight is warranted. Nanomedicine HSR provides an occasion to think systematically about appropriate oversight, especially early in the evolution of a technology, when hazard and risk information may remain incomplete. This paper presents the consensus recommendations of a multidisciplinary, NIH-funded project group, to ensure a science-based and ethically informed approach to HSR issues in nanomedicine, and integrate HSR analysis with analysis of occupational, bystander, and environmental concerns. We recommend creating two bodies, an interagency Human Subjects Research in Nanomedicine (HSR/N) Working Group and a Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Nanomedicine (SAC/N). HSR/N and SAC/N should perform 3 primary functions: (1) analysis of the attributes and subsets of nanomedicine interventions that raise HSR challenges and current gaps in oversight; (2) providing advice to relevant agencies and institutional bodies on the HSR issues, as well as federal and federal-institutional coordination; and (3) gathering and analyzing information on HSR issues as they emerge in nanomedicine. HSR/N and SAC/N will create a home for HSR analysis and coordination in DHHS (the key agency for relevant HSR oversight), optimize federal and institutional approaches, and allow HSR review to evolve with greater knowledge about nanomedicine interventions and greater clarity about attributes of concern. PMID:23289677

  16. Institutional Oversight of Occupational Health and Safety for Research Programs Involving Biohazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Melissa C; Carpenter, Calvin B; Colby, Lesley A

    2017-06-01

    Research with hazardous biologic materials (biohazards) is essential to the progress of medicine and science. The field of microbiology has rapidly advanced over the years, partially due to the development of new scientific methods such as recombinant DNA technology, synthetic biology, viral vectors, and the use of genetically modified animals. This research poses a potential risk to personnel as well as the public and the environment. Institutions must have appropriate oversight and take appropriate steps to mitigate the risks of working with these biologic hazards. This article will review responsibilities for institutional oversight of occupational health and safety for research involving biologic hazards.

  17. A Grey Area: Congressional Oversight of the Middle Ground Between Title 10 and Title 50

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    1950’s, just a few short years after the Agency’s creation.1 With Watergate fresh on the country’s mind having just witnessed President Nixon’s...3 Congressional Oversight Legislative Overview Congressional oversight is not a result of modern scandals as one might think; it is as old as the...President Reagan’s tenure, however, members of Congress believed that he had overstepped his authority in the so-called “Iran-Contra affair.” The scandal

  18. 78 FR 12369 - United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of Concern AGENCY: Office of Science and Technology Policy... comments on the proposed United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual... requirements for certain categories of life sciences research at institutions that accept Federal funding for...

  19. Oversight of the Air Force - What is the Audit Component and How Can Air Force Managers Deal with It Effectively?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    This report discusses authority, mission, and responsibilities of the audit organizations that perform oversight of Air Force operations. A...the discussion of the major audit organizations. The audit oversight function is here to stay. Auditors and audit organizations can be beneficial to Air

  20. Regulatory control of nuclear safety in Finland. Annual report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainulainen, E.

    2009-06-01

    This report covers the regulatory control of nuclear safety in 2008, including the design, construction and operation of nuclear facilities, as well as nuclear waste management and nuclear materials. The control of nuclear facilities and nuclear waste management, as well as nuclear non-proliferation, concern two STUK departments: Nuclear Reactor Regulation and Nuclear Waste and Material Regulation. It constitutes the report on regulatory control in the field of nuclear energy, which the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is required to submit to the Ministry of Employment and the Economy pursuant to section 121 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Decree. The first parts of the report explain the basics of the nuclear safety regulation included as part of STUK's responsibilities, as well as the objectives of the operations, and briefly introduce the objects of regulation. The chapter concerning the development and implementation of legislation and regulations describes changes in nuclear legislation, as well as the progress of STUK's YVL Guide revision. The chapter also includes a summary of the application of the updated YVL Guides to nuclear facilities. The section concerning the regulation of nuclear facilities contains a complete safety assessment of the nuclear facilities currently in operation or under construction. For the nuclear facilities in operation, the section describes plant operation, events during operation, annual maintenance, development of the plants and their safety, and observations made during monitoring. Data and observations gained during regulatory activities are reviewed with a focus on ensuring the safety functions of nuclear facilities and the integrity of structures and components. The report also includes a description of the oversight of the operations and quality management of organisations, oversight of operational experience feedback activities, and the results of these oversight activities. The radiation safety of nuclear

  1. Nuclear fuels accounting interface: River Bend experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This presentation describes nuclear fuel accounting activities from the perspective of nuclear fuels management and its interfaces. Generally, Nuclear Fuels-River Bend Nuclear Group (RBNG) is involved on a day-by-day basis with nuclear fuel materials accounting in carrying out is procurement, contract administration, processing, and inventory management duties, including those associated with its special nuclear materials (SNM)-isotopics accountability oversight responsibilities as the Central Accountability Office for the River Bend Station. As much as possible, these duties are carried out in an integrated, interdependent manner. From these primary functions devolve Nuclear Fuels interfacing activities with fuel cost and tax accounting. Noting that nuclear fuel tax accounting support is of both an esoteric and intermittent nature, Nuclear Fuels-RBNG support of developments and applications associated with nuclear fuel cost accounting is stressed in this presentation

  2. 75 FR 81684 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support Fee for Calendar Year 2011 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the ``Sarbanes-Oxley Act''), established the Public Company Accounting... through registration of public accounting firms and standard setting, inspection, and disciplinary...

  3. 78 FR 11915 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support Fee for Calendar Year 2013 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the ``Sarbanes-Oxley Act''),\\1\\ established the Public Company Accounting... through registration of public accounting firms and standard setting, inspection, and disciplinary...

  4. 77 FR 2576 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ... Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support Fee for Calendar Year 2012 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the ``Sarbanes-Oxley Act''),\\1\\ established the Public Company Accounting... through registration of public accounting firms and standard setting, inspection, and disciplinary...

  5. 75 FR 3509 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Rules on Auditing Standard No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Rules on Auditing Standard No. 7, Engagement Quality... (the ``Commission'') a notice (the ``Notice'') of proposed rules (File No. PCAOB-2009-02) on Auditing... identify any significant engagement deficiencies before it issues its audit report. Auditing Standard No. 7...

  6. Beyond Measure: New Approaches to Analyzing Congressional Oversight of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    published books and peer reviewed journal articles. The Congressional Research Service being the key source on congressional procedure and theory ...Transportation Committee 1 Senate Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs Committee 15 Senate Small Business & Entrepreneurship 1 Senate Special...military contracting procedures in a war zone are not necessarily oversight of national security functions, reviews of FEMA contracting practices

  7. 75 FR 82417 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Rules on Auditing Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... Standards Board (``ASB'') of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants); and observations from... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63606; File No. PCAOB 2010-01] Public Company.... Introduction On September 15, 2010, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the ``Board'' or the ``PCAOB...

  8. 48 CFR 936.609-3 - Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... architect-engineer contracts. 936.609-3 Section 936.609-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 936.609-3 Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts. In addition to the clause at 48...

  9. 48 CFR 36.609-3 - Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... architect-engineer contracts. 36.609-3 Section 36.609-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 36.609-3 Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts. The contracting officer...

  10. 77 FR 71803 - Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' This guidance provides questions and answers that address.... 2201, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. Send one self-addressed adhesive label to assist that office in... availability of a guidance entitled ``FDA Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' In 1997...

  11. 77 FR 11553 - Draft Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' The draft guidance provides questions and answers... assist that office in processing your requests. See the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for electronic... PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' In 1997, Congress passed the Food and Drug Administration...

  12. 75 FR 78779 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Supplemental Budget Request To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ...; Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Release No. 63526/December 10, 2010] Order Approving Public Company... Company Accounting Oversight Board (the ``PCAOB'') to oversee the audits of companies and related matters..., subject to approval by the Commission, auditing and related attestation, quality control, ethics, and...

  13. A Voice Crying in the Wilderness: Legislative Oversight Agencies' Efforts to Achieve Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanLandingham, Gary R.

    2006-01-01

    While legislative oversight offices, like many evaluation and policy analysis units, face substantial challenges in promoting use of their work by policymakers, they often have not taken steps to overcome these challenges by adopting the strategies suggested by the evaluation literature. Although the offices seek utilization, they have not fully…

  14. Counterfeit Parts: DOD Needs to Improve Reporting and Oversight to Reduce Supply Chain Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    agencies and contractors we met with stated that they have encountered counterfeit parts less frequently in the DOD supply chain , in part, because...the DOD supply chain as a method to prevent further counterfeiting.22 DOD and industry officials noted that timely reporting of...COUNTERFEIT PARTS DOD Needs to Improve Reporting and Oversight to Reduce Supply Chain Risk Report to Congressional Committees

  15. More DoD Oversight Needed for Purchases Made Through the Department of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    obligations or to liquidate prior valid obligations. However, expired funds are not available for new obligations nor can they be used for new requirements...Oversight Would Enable The Department of Homeland Security To Address Risks,” September 2006 GAO Report No. GAO-05-456, “Interagency Contracting Franchise

  16. Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed a review room in its headquarters building where, in the graphical style that prevailed in the 1960's, Ames leadership could review progress against schedule, budget and performance measures. Shown, in October 1965 is Merrill Mead chief of Ames' program and resources office. (for H Julian Allen Retirement album)

  17. Inspector General, DOD, Oversight of the Audit of the FY 2000 Military Retirement Fund Financial Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-28

    statements and to report on the adequacy of internal controls and compliance with laws and regulations. We contracted the audit of the FY 2000 Military...performed on the oversight of the audit of the FY 2000 Military Retirement Fund Financial Statements.

  18. 20 CFR 411.595 - What oversight procedures are planned for the EN payment systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EN payment systems? 411.595 Section 411.595 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Network Payment Systems § 411.595 What oversight procedures are planned for the EN payment systems? We use audits, reviews, studies and observation of daily...

  19. 78 FR 49257 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Management and Oversight of the National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... award. Each reserve compiles an ecological characterization or site profile to describe the biological... Collection; Comment Request; Management and Oversight of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System... estuarine research reserves representative of various regions and estuarine types in the United States to...

  20. AGB Statement on Board Responsibility for the Oversight of Educational Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Statement on Board Responsibility for the Oversight of Educational Quality," approved by the Board of Directors of the Association of Governing Boards (AGB) in March 2011, urges institutional administrators and governing boards to engage fully in this area of board responsibility. The seven principles in this statement offer suggestions to…

  1. 76 FR 52996 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Temporary Rule for an Interim...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Temporary Rule for an Interim Program of Inspection Related to Audits of Brokers and Dealers August 18, 2011. I. Introduction On June 21, 2011, the Public... that would be imposed on different categories of registered public accounting firms and classes of...

  2. Approaches to the mathematical description of NPP operational safety management and oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilej, D.V.; Berzhanskij, S.V.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents analysis of features related to NPP operational safety management and oversight. According to analysis results, approaches are proposed to perform mathematical description of specific processes and to develop a scale for management to the current safety level as regards NPP power generation. Proposed approaches are making experimental equations and process approach of ISO-9001 quality system

  3. 77 FR 6411 - Training, Qualification, and Oversight for Safety-Related Railroad Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... Oversight for Safety-Related Railroad Employees AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of... establishing minimum training standards for each category and subcategory of safety-related railroad employee... or contractor that employs one or more safety-related railroad employee to develop and submit a...

  4. Policy, Practice, and Research Agenda for Emergency Medical Services Oversight: A Systematic Review and Environmental Scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taymour, Rekar K; Abir, Mahshid; Chamberlin, Margaret; Dunne, Robert B; Lowell, Mark; Wahl, Kathy; Scott, Jacqueline

    2018-02-01

    Introduction In a 2015 report, the Institute of Medicine (IOM; Washington, DC USA), now the National Academy of Medicine (NAM; Washington, DC USA), stated that the field of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) exhibits signs of fragmentation; an absence of system-wide coordination and planning; and a lack of federal, state, and local accountability. The NAM recommended clarifying what roles the federal government, state governments, and local communities play in the oversight and evaluation of EMS system performance, and how they may better work together to improve care. This systematic literature review and environmental scan addresses NAM's recommendations by answering two research questions: (1) what aspects of EMS systems are most measured in the peer-reviewed and grey literatures, and (2) what do these measures and studies suggest for high-quality EMS oversight? To answer these questions, a systematic literature review was conducted in the PubMed (National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Institutes of Health; Bethesda, Maryland USA), Web of Science (Thomson Reuters; New York, New York USA), SCOPUS (Elsevier; Amsterdam, Netherlands), and EMBASE (Elsevier; Amsterdam, Netherlands) databases for peer-reviewed literature and for grey literature; targeted web searches of 10 EMS-related government agencies and professional organizations were performed. Inclusion criteria required peer-reviewed literature to be published between 1966-2016 and grey literature to be published between 1996-2016. A total of 1,476 peer-reviewed titles were reviewed, 76 were retrieved for full-text review, and 58 were retained and coded in the qualitative software Dedoose (Manhattan Beach, California USA) using a codebook of themes. Categorizations of measure type and level of application were assigned to the extracted data. Targeted websites were systematically reviewed and 115 relevant grey literature documents were retrieved. A total of 58 peer-reviewed articles met inclusion

  5. Historic low-level radioactive waste federal policies, programs and oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchette, M.; Kenney, J.; Zelmer, B.

    2011-01-01

    'Full text:' The management of radioactive waste is one of the most serious environmental problems facing Canadians. From the early industrial uses of radioactive material in the 1930s to the development of nuclear power reactors and the medical and experimental use of radio-isotopes today, there has been a steady accumulation of waste products. Historic waste is low-level radioactive waste for which the federal government has accepted responsibility for long-term management. This paper will outline the policy framework used to govern institutional and financial arrangements for the disposal of radioactive waste by waste producers and owners and the major radioactive projects in which the Government of Canada is currently involved. It will provide an overview of the organizations established for the management of historic radioactive waste and NRCan's oversight role. Finally, an overview of the historic waste program activities managed on behalf of the federal government through these organizations in the Port Hope area, the Greater Toronto Area, in Fort McMurray, Alberta and along the Northern Transportation Route is provided. Canada's Policy Framework for Radioactive Waste, sets out principles that govern the institutional and financial arrangements for disposal of radioactive waste by waste producers and owners. According to the Policy Framework: The federal government will ensure that radioactive waste disposal is carried out in a safe, environmentally sound, comprehensive, cost-effective and integrated manner; The federal government has the responsibility to develop policy, to regulate, and to oversee producers and owners; and, The waste producers and owners are responsible, in accordance with the principle of 'polluter pays', for the funding, organization, management and operation of disposal and other facilities required for their wastes. Arrangements may be different for nuclear fuel waste, low-level radioactive waste and

  6. Independent oversight review of the Department of Energy Quality Assurance Program for suspect/counterfeit parts. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    To address the potential threat that suspect/counterfeit parts could pose to DOE workers and the public, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight initiated a number of activities beginning in mid-1995. Oversight placed increased emphasis on the field's quality assurance-suspect/counterfeit parts programs during safety management evaluations, in keeping with the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) oversight responsibilities, which include oversight of the Department's quality assurance (QA) programs. In addition, Oversight reviewed relevant policy documents and occurrence reports to determine the nature and magnitude of the problem within the Department. The results of that review, contained in an Office of Oversight report, Independent Oversight Analysis of Suspect/Counterfeit Parts Within the Department of Energy (November 1995), indicate a lack of consistency and comprehensiveness in the Department's QA-suspect/counterfeit parts program. A detailed analysis of the causes and impacts of the problem was recommended. In response, this review was initiated to determine the effectiveness of the Department's QA program for suspect/counterfeit parts. This study goes beyond merely assessing and reporting the status of the program, however. It is the authors intention to highlight the complex issues associated with suspect/counterfeit parts in the Department today and to present approaches that DOE managers might consider to address these issues

  7. Independent oversight review of the Department of Energy Quality Assurance Program for suspect/counterfeit parts. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    To address the potential threat that suspect/counterfeit parts could pose to DOE workers and the public, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight initiated a number of activities beginning in mid-1995. Oversight placed increased emphasis on the field`s quality assurance-suspect/counterfeit parts programs during safety management evaluations, in keeping with the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) oversight responsibilities, which include oversight of the Department`s quality assurance (QA) programs. In addition, Oversight reviewed relevant policy documents and occurrence reports to determine the nature and magnitude of the problem within the Department. The results of that review, contained in an Office of Oversight report, Independent Oversight Analysis of Suspect/Counterfeit Parts Within the Department of Energy (November 1995), indicate a lack of consistency and comprehensiveness in the Department`s QA-suspect/counterfeit parts program. A detailed analysis of the causes and impacts of the problem was recommended. In response, this review was initiated to determine the effectiveness of the Department`s QA program for suspect/counterfeit parts. This study goes beyond merely assessing and reporting the status of the program, however. It is the authors intention to highlight the complex issues associated with suspect/counterfeit parts in the Department today and to present approaches that DOE managers might consider to address these issues.

  8. Better Oversight Needed for Safety and Health Activities at DOE’s Nuclear Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-04

    States Acca !3ion Tor Kl. ; BRA&I DTIC TAi \\ • inounced Jusl Lfii I "• ’ DiStril on/ r\\ D i Avai3 i - ’•ity Coi a j...m*d——I—^1 I —* Even DOE’s audit report tracking system failed to adequately document corrective actions taken or planned. This system was...designed by DOE to ensure that corrective actions on audit report recommendations are responsive, timely and complete. Audit re- ports, such as ours

  9. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project independent direction and oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazek, M.L.; Power, M.

    1991-01-01

    Hanford was selected in 1942 as one of the sites for the Manhattan Project. It produced plutonium for one of the world's first nuclear weapons. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors continued to make plutonium for nuclear weapons at Hanford for more than four decades. In the early days of Hanford operations, radioactive materials routinely were released to the environment by many processes. The DOE disclosed documents about these releases in 1986. In 1987, Washington, Oregon, and regional Indian tribes gathered an independent panel of experts. This group recommended dose reconstruction and health effects feasibility studies. Later that year, DOE hired Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to reconstruct potential public radiation doses from Hanford's past releases of radioactive material. The DOE agreed with the states and tribes that project direction would come from an independent technical steering panel (TSP). This approach was critical to gain public credibility for the project and the science. The TSP directs the project and makes policy. That is now clear - but, it was hard-earned. Conducting science in an open public process is new, challenging, and clearly worthwhile. The panel's product is good science that is believed and accepted by the public - our client

  10. Nuclear Energy: Compendium of relevant GAO products on regulation, health, and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This report presents findings, conclusions, and recommendations in the areas of (1) protecting worker health and safety, (2) planning for nuclear emergencies and coordinating response mechanisms in the event of a serious nuclear accident, (3) ensuring the safe design of facilities, and (4) monitoring the environment. GAO points out that impaired organizational independence of the oversight function, a lack of headquarters authority, and the decentralized nature of the oversight activities may constitute serious problems over the long term. More recent GAO work indicates that organizational independence of the oversight function may still be a problem area and is likely to receive increased scrutiny in the aftermath of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union

  11. Nuclear catastrophes and their consequences. 30 years after Chernobyl, 5 years after Fukushima; Nukleare Katastrophen und ihre Folgen. 30 Jahre nach Tschernobyl, 5 Jahre nach Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebert, Wolfgang; Gepp, Christian; Reinberger, David (eds.)

    2016-07-01

    The book on nuclear catastrophes covers the following issues: A historical oversight on nuclear power; two catastrophic reactor accidents: Chernobyl and Fukushima; presentation of important experiences on the radiological consequences of the severe accidents; regulatory reactions in Europe as a consequence of Fukushima; beyond Chernobyl and Fukushima: fundamental problems with nuclear energy.

  12. Notification: Audit of EPA's Adherence to Policies, Procedures and Oversight Controls Pertaining to the Administrator’s Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY17-0382, August 28, 2017. The EPA OIG plans to begin preliminary research on the EPA’s adherence to policies, procedures and oversight controls pertaining to the Administrator’s travel to Oklahoma.

  13. Investigation and consideration on the framework of oversight-based safety regulation. U.S. NRC 'Risk-Informed, Performance-Based' Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, Gen

    2001-01-01

    Regulation on safety, environment and health in Japan has before today been intended to correspond with an accident at forms of reinforcement of national standards and monitoring, if any. However, as it was thought that such regulation reinforcement was afraid to bring some social rigidity, and to weaken independent responsibility, as a result, because of anxiety of losing peoples' merits inversely, some fundamental directivity such as respect of self-responsibility principle' and 'necessary and least limit of regulation' were selected as a part of political innovation. On the other hand, at a background of wide improvements on various indexing values showing operation results of nuclear power stations in U.S.A., private independent effort on upgrading of safety is told to largely affect at beginning of INPO (Institute of Nuclear Power Operations), without regulation reinforcement of NRC side. This is a proof of concrete effect of transfer to oversight-based safety regulation. Here were introduced on nuclear safety in U.S.A. at a base of some references obtained on entering the 'MIT summer specialist program. Nuclear system safety', on focussing at new safety regulation of NRC and its effect and so on, and adding some considerations based on some knowledge thereafter. (G.K.)

  14. Oversight and management of a cell therapy clinical trial network: experience and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyé, Lemuel A; Sayre, Shelly L; Westbrook, Lynette; Jorgenson, Beth C; Handberg, Eileen; Anwaruddin, Saif; Wagner, Kristi A; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2011-09-01

    The Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), was established to develop, coordinate, and conduct multiple collaborative protocols testing the effects of cell therapy on cardiovascular diseases. The Network was born into a difficult political and ethical climate created by the recent removal of a dozen drugs from the US formulary and the temporary halting of 27 gene therapy trials due to safety concerns. This article describes the Network's challenges as it initiated three protocols in a polarized cultural atmosphere at a time when oversight bodies were positioning themselves for the tightest vigilance of promising new therapies. Effective strategies involving ongoing education, open communication, and relationship building with the oversight community are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Public not convinced on nuclear comeback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear industry itself may be the biggest obstacle to the revival of nuclear power. The author explains that the issue is one of credibility. Citizens perceive the industry to have consistently underestimated nuclear powers complexity, risks, and costs. Numerous studies have disclosed past instances of deception - coverups concerning radiation hazards, suppression of accident reports and accident probabilities, and misleading economic claims. At best cohn says, pro-nuclear experts failed to acknowledge the uncertainties that accompanied the commercialization of a new and complex technology. As a result, the public turned to nuclear critics for information. It is unlikely that public skepticism can be reversed. Cohn says the industry may be repeating its previous mistakes by its current claims for the expected economy and performance of advanced design, passively safe reactors. In efforts to rebuild its credibility, he says, the nuclear industry must seek to include nuclear skeptics in the planning and oversight of new nuclear initiatives

  16. Improvements Needed in Managing Scope Changes and Oversight of Construction Projects at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    efficiency; advises the Secretary of Defense and Congress; and informs the public. Vision Our vision is to be a model oversight organization in the...Bachelor Enlisted Quarters and P220, Ammunition Supply Point, with combined estimated costs of $65.2 million, for audit . This is one in a series of...The Director stated that maintaining contract files was secondary to construction completion. As a result, there is an increased risk that

  17. Contract Audits: Role in Helping Ensure Effective Oversight and Reducing Improper Payments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    the risk of improper paymen Department of Energy (DOE). DOE’s internal controls over payments to its Waste Treatment Plant ( WTP ) contractor did not...provide reasonab assurance against the risk of improper payments, particularly given the WTP project’s substantial inherent risks. 18 Several factors...DCAA and the contractor, with little oversight of its own, exposed the hundreds of millions of dolla spent annually on the WTP project to an

  18. Maintaining Oversight of Licensee Safety Culture. CSNI/WGHOF Survey Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for this workshop, a survey was sent to members of the WGHOF in Autumn 2006. Purpose of the Survey was to explore and share the methods and approaches used to maintain oversight of licensee safety culture. 13 countries responded to the survey. The responses were used in the development of discussion topics and themes for this workshop. This presentation (slides) summarizes the results of the survey

  19. Institutional Oversight of Occupational Health and Safety for Research Programs Involving Biohazards

    OpenAIRE

    Dyson, Melissa C; Carpenter, Calvin B; Colby, Lesley A

    2017-01-01

    Research with hazardous biologic materials (biohazards) is essential to the progress of medicine and science. The field of microbiology has rapidly advanced over the years, partially due to the development of new scientific methods such as recombinant DNA technology, synthetic biology, viral vectors, and the use of genetically modified animals. This research poses a potential risk to personnel as well as the public and the environment. Institutions must have appropriate oversight and take app...

  20. Tennessee Oversight Agreement annual report, May 31, 1994--June 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation's DOE Oversight Division (TDEC/DOE-O) is responsible for assuring the citizens of Tennessee that their health, safety and environment on the Oak Ridge Reservation are protected and that appropriate remedial action is taken to provide this protection. TDEC/DOE-O has five program sections that reflect the organizational structure of the TDEC Bureau of Environment Divisions, as well as DOE's Environmental Safety and Health, Waste Management, and Environmental Restoration Programs

  1. Financial Management: DOD Needs to Clarify Its General Gift Fund Policies to Provide for Effective Oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-27

    Representatives Subject: Financial Management: DOD Needs to Clarify Its General Gift Fund Policies to Provide for Effective Oversight From fiscal...year 2005 through fiscal year 2008, the military services received about $295 million in monetary and nonmonetary gifts from individuals and...organizations wishing to donate gifts to the Department of Defense (DOD).1 Section 2601(a) of Title 10, U.S. Code is a long-standing authority under which

  2. Auditing the Auditors: Has the Establishment of the Audit Oversight Board Affected Audit Quality?

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Hashanah; Theng, Ung Chui

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a research into the relationship between audit quality during the years before and after the incorporation of the Audit Oversight Board (AOB) in Malaysia in 2010. As the AOB only audits auditors of listed companies this study is based on 50 companies’ audited financial statements 2 years before and after AOB was established. A total of 200 firm years were observed. Using reported companies’ earnings to proxy for earnings and audit quality the data collecte...

  3. Torture, Impunity, and the Need for Independent Prosecutorial Oversight of the Executive Branch

    OpenAIRE

    Quigley, Fran

    2017-01-01

    Fran Quigley, Torture, Impunity, and the Need for Independent Prosecutorial Oversight of the Executive Branch, 20 Cornell J. L. & Pub. Pol'y 271 (2010) Allegations of Executive Branch misconduct present an inherent conflict of interest because prosecutorial discretion is invested in a U.S. Attorney General appointed by – and serving at the pleasure of – the President. Various commentators, including Justice Antonin Scalia, Professor Stephen Carter, and the many critics of the former indep...

  4. Hospital board oversight of quality and safety: a stakeholder analysis exploring the role of trust and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Ross; Freeman, Tim; Mannion, Russell

    2015-06-16

    Hospital boards, those executive members charged with developing appropriate organisational strategies and cultures, have an important role to play in safeguarding the care provided by their organisation. However, recent concerns have been raised over boards' ability to enact their duty to ensure the quality and safety of care. This paper offers critical reflection on the relationship between hospital board oversight and patient safety. In doing so it highlights new perspectives and suggestions for developing this area of study. The article draws on 10 interviews with key informants and policy actors who form part of the 'issue network' interested in the promotion of patient safety in the English National Health Service. The interviews surfaced a series of narratives regarding hospital board oversight of patient safety. These elaborated on the role of trust and intelligence in highlighting the potential dangers and limitations of approaches to hospital board oversight which have been narrowly focused on a risk-based view of organisational performance. In response, a need to engage with the development of trust based organisational relationships is identified, in which effective board oversight is built on 'trust' characterised by styles of leadership and behaviours that are attentive to the needs and concerns of both staff and patients. Effective board oversight also requires the gathering and triangulating of 'intelligence' generated from both national and local information sources. We call for a re-imagination of hospital board oversight in the light of these different perspectives and articulate an emerging research agenda in this area.

  5. A survey of front-line paramedics examining the professional relationship between paramedics and physician medical oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Christopher R; Tavares, Walter; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Kämäräinen, Antti

    2018-03-01

    Paramedicine is often dependent on physician medical directors and their associated programs for direction and oversight. A positive relationship between paramedics and their oversight physicians promotes safety and quality care while a strained or ineffective one may threaten these goals. The objective of this study was to explore and understand the professional relationship between paramedics and physician medical oversight as viewed by front-line paramedics. All active front-line paramedics from four municipal paramedic services involving three medical oversight groups in Ontario were invited to complete an online survey. Five hundred and four paramedics were invited to participate in the study, with 242 completing the survey (48% response rate); 66% male, 76% primary care paramedics with an average of 13 (SD=9) years of experience. Paramedics had neutral or positive perceptions regarding their autonomy, opportunities to interact with their medical director, and medical director understanding of the prehospital setting. Paramedics perceived medical directives as rigid and ambiguous. A significant amount of respondents reported a perception of having provided suboptimal patient care due to fear of legal or disciplinary consequences. Issues of a lack of support for critical thinking and a lack of trust between paramedics and medical oversight groups were often raised. Paramedic perceptions of physician medical oversight were mixed. Concerning areas identified were perceptions of ambiguous written directives and concerns related to the level of trust and support for critical thinking. These perceptions may have implications for the system of care and should be explored further.

  6. Institutional Oversight of Faculty-Industry Consulting Relationships in U.S. Medical Schools: A Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morain, Stephanie R; Joffe, Steven; Campbell, Eric G; Mello, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    The conflicts of interest that may arise in relationships between academic researchers and industry continue to prompt controversy. The bulk of attention has focused on financial aspects of these relationships, but conflicts may also arise in the legal obligations that faculty acquire through consulting contracts. However, oversight of faculty members' consulting agreements is far less vigorous than for financial conflicts, creating the potential for faculty to knowingly or unwittingly contract away important rights and freedoms. Increased regulation could prevent this, but it is unclear what forms of oversight universities view as feasible and effective. In this article, we report on a Delphi study to evaluate several approaches for oversight of consulting agreements by medical schools. The panel was comprised of 11 senior administrators with responsibility for oversight of faculty consulting relationships. We found broad agreement among panelists regarding the importance of institutional oversight to protect universities' interests. There was strong support for two specific approaches: providing educational resources to faculty and submitting consulting agreements for institutional review. Notwithstanding the complexities of asserting authority to regulate private consulting agreements between faculty members and companies, medical school administrators reached consensus that several approaches to improving institutional oversight are feasible and useful. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  7. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project dose management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsman, K.H.

    1996-03-01

    This dose management plan facilitates meeting the dose management and ALARA requirements applicable to the design activities of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, and establishes consistency of information used by multiple subprojects in ALARA evaluations. The method for meeting the ALARA requirements applicable to facility designs involves two components. The first is each Spent Nuclear Fuel Project subproject incorporating ALARA principles, ALARA design optimizations, and ALARA design reviews throughout the design of facilities and equipment. The second component is the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project management providing overall dose management guidance to the subprojects and oversight of the subproject dose management efforts

  8. Non power applications of nuclear technology: The case of Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaumotte, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    The historical review and oversight of Belgium activities in applications of nuclear technologies has been presented. Especially attention have been paid on industrial applications as sterilization of surgical tools, medical supplies, drugs, food; radiation induced polymerization and composite materials production; nondestructive testing and application of sealed sources in industry. The detailed review has been done on nuclear medicine development in Belgium covering the range of therapeutic applications as well as diagnostic techniques

  9. Continued oversight of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peake, R. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed environmental standards applicable to the disposal of defence-related transuranic wastes at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). By statute, EPA also serves as the regulator and implements these standards at WIPP, which has been in operation since 1999. The general environmental standards are set forth in the Agency's 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191 Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (US NARA, 1985). These standards are implemented by site-specific compliance criteria at 40 CFR 194 (US NARA, 1996). The repository waste area is ∼650 meters below ground surface in a thick bedded salt formation that dips from west to east at ∼1 deg.. WIPP is located in the Chihuahuan Desert of south-eastern New Mexico, where the annual precipitation averages between 25 and 40 centimetres and there is high evapotranspiration. Much of the area around WIPP is federal land, managed by the Bureau of Land Management, and the area is sparsely populated. The transuranic waste disposed of at WIPP consists of materials such as radioactive sludges, soils and laboratory materials (e.g. chemical mixtures, contaminated glove boxes, paper and glass). Wastes are typically not treated unless necessary for shipping purposes (e.g. to limit hydrogen build-up). The waste is contaminated with plutonium, americium and other radionuclides, including some caesium and strontium. Transuranic waste is defined as waste with radionuclides heavier than uranium containing more than 3 700 Bq (100 nanocuries) of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste; isotopes must have half-lives greater than 20 years. The WIPP Land Withdrawal Act limits the total disposal volume to ∼177 000 cubic meters (6.2 million cubic feet) and creates two categories of waste based on operational

  10. Nuclear regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    Because of an accidental release in 1986 of low-level waste stored at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, several individuals inhaled small amounts of a radioactive substance. GAO examined the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's oversight of the Department of Defense's use, handling, and disposal of radioactive material and found that no comprehensive DOD waste disposal program exists and none of the three services knows the full extent of its low-level radioactive waste disposal problems. Throughout the 1980s, the Army and the Air Force had, on occasion, been banned from disposal sites for failing to comply with federal and state requirements. By December 1992, two of the three sites now used by DOD to disposed of waste will close, and only a limited number of new sites may be available for several years. In the interim, DID will pay substantial surcharges to dispose of waste. After January 1993, DOD will have to comply with disposal requirements for as many as 16 sites or store waste on-site pending the availability of new sites. This report discusses how GAO believes DOD needs to take full advantage of the time between now and January 1993 to establish a low-level radioactive waste disposal program. DOD also needs to work with other federal agencies, compacts, and states to determine the feasibility of dedicating a portion of one or more disposal sites for the government's use

  11. Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) provided a brief discussion on the benefits of establishing a new regulatory framework. He suggested that a new paradigm in regulatory thinking is needed and stated that the reactor oversight process (ROP) serves as the appropriate basis for starting these discussions. He suggested that the ROP cornerstones of safety be used as the starting point for developing a new set of General Design Criteria (10 CFR Part 50, Appendix A). It is suggested that new operating criteria, generic risk- informed and performance-based regulations be developed with associated design-specific and regulation-specific regulatory guides

  12. WTO oversight over bilateral agreements: from a notification to an examination process?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jens Ladefoged

    2014-01-01

    The TTIP will – like other free trade agreements (FTAs) – violate one of the cornerstones of the WTO, i.e. the Most-Favoured-Nation (MFN) principle. However, the multilateral trading system has since 1947 permitted the formation of trading blocks and preferential bilateral trading partnerships....... This contribution asks how the WTO can fulfill its task of ensuring that FTAs do not systematically undermine the multilateral trading order. It focuses on the issue of transparency in the current oversight process and discusses whether the WTO secretariat should be granted a stronger mandate to proactively...... investigate the economic effects of the notified FTAs....

  13. Educational Programme in Nuclear Security (Chinese Version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Higher education plays an essential role in nuclear security capacity building. It ensures the availability of experts able to provide the necessary competencies for the effective national nuclear security oversight of nuclear and other radioactive material and to establish and maintain an appropriate nuclear regime in a State. This guide provides both the theoretical knowledge and the practical skills necessary to meet the requirements described in the international framework for nuclear security. Emphasis is placed on the implementation of these requirements and recommendations in States. On the basis of this guide, each university should be able to develop its own academic programme tailored to suit the State's educational needs in the area of nuclear security and to meet national requirements.

  14. Nuclear fuel waste policy in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, P.A.; Letourneau, C.

    1999-01-01

    The 1996 Policy Framework for Radioactive Waste established the approach in Canada for dealing with all radioactive waste, and defined the respective roles of Government and waste producers and owners. The Policy Framework sets the stage for the development of institutional and financial arrangements to implement long-term waste management solutions in a safe, environmentally sound, comprehensive, cost-effective and integrated manner. For nuclear fuel waste, a 10-year environmental review of the concept to bury nuclear fuel waste bundles at a depth of 500 m to 1000 m in stable rock of the Canadian Shield was completed in March 1998. The Review Panel found that while the concept was technically safe, it did not have the required level of public acceptability to be adopted at this time as Canada's approach for managing its nuclear fuel waste. The Panel recommended that a Waste Management Organization be established at arm's length from the nuclear industry, entirely funded by the waste producers and owners, and that it be subject to oversight by the Government. In its December 1998 Response to the Review Panel, the Government of Canada provided policy direction for the next steps towards developing Canada's approach for the long-term management of nuclear fuel waste. The Government chose to maintain the responsibility for long-term management of nuclear fuel waste close with the producers and owners of the waste. This is consistent with its 1996 Policy Framework for Radioactive Waste. This approach is also consistent with experience in many countries. In addition, the federal government identified the need for credible federal oversight. Cabinet directed the Minister of NRCan to consult with stakeholders, including the public, and return to ministers within 12 months with recommendations on means to implement federal oversight. (author)

  15. Lessons Learned from a Five-year Evaluation of the Belgian Safety Culture Oversight Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, B.

    2016-01-01

    The Belgian Regulatory Body has implemented a Safety Culture oversight process since 2010. In a nutshell, this process is based on field observations provided by inspectors or safety analysts during any contact with a licencee (inspections, meetings, phone calls, etc). These observations are recorded within an observation (excel) sheet—aiming at describing factual and contextual issues — and are linked to IAEA Safety Culture attributes. It should be stressed that the purpose of the process is not to give a comprehensive view of a licencee safety culture but to address findings that require attention or action on the part of a licencee. In other words, gathering safety culture observations aims at identifying cultural, organizational or behavioural issues in order to feed a regulatory response to potential problems. Safety Culture Observations (SCO) are then fully integrated in routine inspection activities and must be seen as an input of the overall oversight process. As a result, the assessment of the SCO is inserted within the yearly safety evaluation report performed by Bel V and transmitted to the licencee. However, observing safety culture is not a natural approach for engineers. Guidance, training and coaching must be provided in order to open up safety dimensions to be captured. In other words, a SCO process requires a continuous support in order to promote a holistic and systemic view of safety.

  16. Nanotechnology, voluntary oversight, and corporate social performance: does company size matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya

    2011-04-01

    In this article, we examine voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology in the context of corporate social performance (CSP) in order to better understand the drivers, barriers, and forms of company participation in such programs. At the theoretical level, we use the management framework of CSP to understand the voluntary behavior of companies. At the empirical level, we investigate nanotech industry participation in the Environmental Protection Agency's Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program (NMSP) as an example of CSP, in order to examine the effects of company characteristics on CSP outcomes. The analysis demonstrates that, on the average, older and larger companies for which nanotech is one of the many business activities demonstrate greater CSP as judged by company actions, declarations, and self-evaluations. Such companies tended to submit more of the requested information to the NMSP, including specific information about health and safety, and to claim fewer of the submitted items as confidential business information. They were also more likely to have on-line statements of generic and nano-specific corporate social responsibility principles, policies, and achievements. The article suggests a need to encourage smaller and younger companies to participate in voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology and presents options for better design of these programs.

  17. Nanotechnology, voluntary oversight, and corporate social performance: does company size matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology in the context of corporate social performance (CSP) in order to better understand the drivers, barriers, and forms of company participation in such programs. At the theoretical level, we use the management framework of CSP to understand the voluntary behavior of companies. At the empirical level, we investigate nanotech industry participation in the Environmental Protection Agency’s Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program (NMSP) as an example of CSP, in order to examine the effects of company characteristics on CSP outcomes. The analysis demonstrates that, on the average, older and larger companies for which nanotech is one of the many business activities demonstrate greater CSP as judged by company actions, declarations, and self-evaluations. Such companies tended to submit more of the requested information to the NMSP, including specific information about health and safety, and to claim fewer of the submitted items as confidential business information. They were also more likely to have on-line statements of generic and nano-specific corporate social responsibility principles, policies, and achievements. The article suggests a need to encourage smaller and younger companies to participate in voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology and presents options for better design of these programs.

  18. The impact of masculinity on safety oversights, safety priority and safety violations in two male-dominated occupations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kent; Hansen, Claus D.; Bloksgaard, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    Background Although men have a higher risk of occupational injuries than women the role of masculinity for organizational safety outcomes has only rarely been the object of research. Aim The current study investigated the association between masculinity and safety oversights, safety priority......-related context factors (safety leadership, commitment of the safety representative, and safety involvement) and three safety-related outcome factors (safety violations, safety oversights and safety priority) were administered twice 12 months apart to Danish ambulance workers (n = 1157) and slaughterhouse workers...

  19. Control, oversight and related terms in the international guidance on geological disposal of radioactive waste - Review of definitions and use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This document presents the most complete analysis of the use of the words control, oversight, etc. as used in NEA, IAEA and ICRP literature connected to radioactive waste disposal. It reveals the many different ways the same word, 'control', has been used in international guidance and ambiguities than can arise, especially so for the post-closure phase of the repository. The newly introduced ICRP terminology, namely the use of the words 'oversight' and 'built-in controls', represents a step forward in terminology and resolves the ambiguity

  20. The concept of oversight, its connection to memory keeping and its relevance for the medium term: The findings of the RK and M initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotzel, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The medium term was introduced as the period of indirect oversight after repository closure, with timescales in the order of a few hundred years. While the importance of intrinsic control or 'passive' safety features in the post-closure phase of a geological repository has been recognised and stressed before, the role of oversight, by providing the capability to reduce or avoid some exposures, has come to the fore only recently. Oversight for the time being generally refers to 'watchful care' and society 'keeping an eye' on the technical system and the actual implementation of plans and decisions. In some regulatory frameworks oversight is indirectly required, for instance when mandating the creation of a land exclusion zone. In other frameworks, oversight is directly required, as illustrated, for instance, by the long-term stewardship concept of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Although sheer memory of the presence of the facility cannot be enough to constitute oversight, oversight and RK and M preservation do go hand in hand. For example, monitoring after repository closure fosters RK and M preservation, and vice versa. The presenter focused on terminology, potential oversight measures, and on roles and responsibilities of different stakeholders

  1. 17 CFR 240.19d-4 - Notice by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board of disapproval of registration or of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Accounting Oversight Board of disapproval of registration or of disciplinary action. (a) Definitions—(1... Accounting Oversight Board of disapproval of registration or of disciplinary action. 240.19d-4 Section 240.19d-4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES...

  2. Literatūros mokslas ir teologija: dialogiško santykio realijos ir krikščioniškos mistinės tradicijos laukas. Literaturwissenschaft und Theologie: Realien des dialogischen Verhältnisses und das Feld der mystischen Erfahrung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Jakaitė

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Das wichtigste Ziel des vorliegenden Artikels ist eine Bedeutung der Mystik für die Autoren des Dialogs zwischen der Literatur(wissenschaft und Theologie zu zeigen. Dabei wird die Tradition der frühchristlichen Kirche aktualisiert. Die christliche Tradition der Mystik kommt schon in der Bibel zum Vorschein, so z. B. in der Paulusrede auf dem Areopag, die mit der Literaturtheologie in Beziehung gesetzt wird. Als Untersuchungsgegenstand dienen theoretische Studien und einige Arbeiten der Literaturkritik. Die Erfahrung erscheint als ein wesentliches Problem im Bereich der Literatur und Theologie.Kuschel, als Verbindungskette zweier bedeutungsvoller Forschungsetappen des Dialogs zwischen Literatur und Theologie in Deutschland, formuliert einen sich dynamisch verändernden Netz der strukturellen Analogien, der Theopoetik und anderer Begriffe. Als eine der wichtigsten Säulen dient in seinen Arbeiten die Steiners Konzeption der Kunstmetaphysik, die auch für andere nach einem interdisziplinären Dialog suchenden Autoren aktuell ist. Braungart betont die ästhetische Richtung der Theologie, die Literaturwissenschaft wird laut Braungart in Zusammenhang mit ästhetisch und exegetisch-hermeneutisch orientierter Theologie gesetzt. Das ästhetische Kriterium für die Bewertung der Literatur wird in Arbeiten von Sölle durch ein starkes theologisches Interesse ergänzt. Diese Autorin sucht nach Unterstützung des dialogischen Denkens und bedient sich der figurischen Methode in Auffassung von Auerbach. Im Rahmen dieser Problematik wird kontraverse Betrachtung des Begriffs der Literaturtheologie deutlich, zum Verständnis dessen Mieths Ansicht von großer Bedeutung ist. Seiner Meinung nach sei die Literaturtheologie ohne Autonomie der Poesie nicht zu gerechtfertigen, Theologie sei genausoviel ideologisch gefährlich wie gefährlich eine für die Literaturwissenschaft typische leere Ideologie sei.Die Mystik der Kircheenväter und des Mittelaters weist

  3. The Global Fund's paradigm of oversight, monitoring, and results in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Ashley; Cordon, Roberto; Told, Michaela; de Savigny, Don; Kickbusch, Ilona; Tanner, Marcel

    2017-12-12

    The Global Fund is one of the largest actors in global health. In 2015 the Global Fund was credited with disbursing close to 10 % of all development assistance for health. In 2011 it began a reform process in response to internal reviews following allegations of recipients' misuse of funds. Reforms have focused on grant application processes thus far while the core structures and paradigm have remained intact. We report results of discussions with key stakeholders on the Global Fund, its paradigm of oversight, monitoring, and results in Mozambique. We conducted 38 semi-structured in-depth interviews in Maputo, Mozambique and members of the Global Fund Board and Secretariat in Switzerland. In-country stakeholders were representatives from Global Fund country structures (eg. Principle Recipient), the Ministry of Health, health or development attachés bilateral and multilateral agencies, consultants, and the NGO coordinating body. Thematic coding revealed concerns about the combination of weak country oversight with stringent and cumbersome requirements for monitoring and evaluation linked to performance-based financing. Analysis revealed that despite the changes associated with the New Funding Model, respondents in both Maputo and Geneva firmly believe challenges remain in Global Fund's structure and paradigm. The lack of a country office has many negative downstream effects including reliance on in-country partners and ineffective coordination. Due to weak managerial and absorptive capacity, more oversight is required than is afforded by country team visits. In-country partners provide much needed support for Global Fund recipients, but roles, responsibilities, and accountability must be clearly defined for a successful long-term partnership. Furthermore, decision-makers in Geneva recognize in-country coordination as vital to successful implementation, and partners welcome increased Global Fund engagement. To date, there are no institutional requirements for

  4. Between Erlebnis and Erfahrung: cinema experience with Benjamin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsaesser, T.

    2009-01-01

    The ‘turn’ to emotion and affect in film and media studies may take its distance from earlier ways of understanding spectatorial involvement (modelled on psychoanalytic notions of identification). But such approaches, whether cognitivist in intent, or inspired by phenomenology, also return to an

  5. Griechische Tragödie als Medium der Erfahrung

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kouba, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 22, 84-85 (2013), s. 235-253 ISSN 1318-3362 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP401/10/1164 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : tragedy * destiny * exteriority * event Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  6. TIPSS: 10 years of experience; TIPSS: 10 Jahre klinische Erfahrung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, G.M.; Brado, M.; Simon, C.; Radeleff, B.; Kauffmann, G.W. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Radiodiagnostik; Noeldge, G.; Scharf, J.; Hansmann, J.

    1998-04-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate and document 10 years of clinical experience gathered by us with TIPSS and to discuss achievements, problems and outlook. Results: Variceal filling was widely reduced by TIPSS, and significantly reduced portal liver perfusion as assessed morphologically and rheologically. However, there was an immediate onset of compensated liver perfusion by increased arterial inflow. Total liver perfusion did not change significantly. In TIPSS portal decompression was readily achieved, the portosystemic gradient dropping from an average of 24 mm Hg to 10.5 mm Hg. In our series we could not demonstrate an increased incidence of hepatic encephalopathy during the 30-day post-TIPSS period. Early mortality was 4% and early rebleeding rate 3%. The 12-month re-intervention rate based on an invasive portography follow-up protocol was 76%, and the 24-month re-intervention rate was 90%. The definite occlusion rate was below 5%. Beyond a follow-up time span of 24-months the necessity for re-intervention dropped significantly: Less than one-third of our patients required some sort of re-intervention. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Ziel: Darstellung der nach 10jaehriger klinischer Anwendung von TIPSS gewonnenen Erfahrungen unter Beruecksichtigung der technischen Grundlagen, der Veraenderungen in der Haemodynamik der Leber und der Langzeitergebnisse. Ergebnisse: TIPSS reduziert die Varizenfuellung und verringert morphologisch und haemodynamisch die portale Perfusion. Die Gesamtleberperfusion aendert sich nicht signifikant. Unter TIPSS kommt es zu einer unmittelbaren Zunahme der arteriellen Leberperfusion. Die portale Drucksenkung erfolgt von einem portosystemischen Mitteldruck von 24 mmHg auf 10,5 mmHg im Durchschnitt. Die spontane hepatische Enzephalopathierate von etwa 20% aendert sich durch TIPSS nicht wesentlich. Die Fruehletalitaet betraegt 4% und die Nachblutungsrate 3%. Insbesondere die Standardisierung von Indikationen und Kontraindikationen, des Punktionsbesteckes, der Stentwahl und -implantationstechnik fuehrt zu diesen im Vergleich zu frueher berichteten Ergebnissen eindeutigen Verbesserungen. Bei streng an invasiver Portographie ausgerichteter Nachsorge ergibt sich eine hohe Re-Interventionsrate: Nach einem Jahr 76% und nach zwei Jahren 90%. Darunter bleibt die Rate endgueltiger Verschluesse aber unter 5%. Nach etwa zwei Jahren scheint sich im Mittel ein `stabiler` Shunt zu entwickeln. Bei etwa 2/3 der Patienten ist dann keine Re-Intervention mehr erforderlich. (orig./AJ)

  7. The World Bank Inspection Panel and Quasi-Judicial Oversight: In Search of the 'Judicial Spirit' in Public International Law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Naudé Fourie (Andria)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis PhD dissertation conceptualizes the World Bank Inspection Panel as a mechanism of quasi-judicial review or oversight, aimed at enhancing the accountability and legitimacy of the World Bank – which is conceived as an international institution exercising public power. The author

  8. 12 CFR 361.5 - What are the FDIC's oversight and monitoring responsibilities in administering this program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the FDIC's oversight and monitoring responsibilities in administering this program? 361.5 Section 361.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY MINORITY AND WOMEN OUTREACH PROGRAM CONTRACTING § 361...

  9. Supplemental investigations in support of environmental assessments by the Idaho INEL Oversight Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on the status of supplemental investigations in support of environmental assessments by the Idaho INEL Oversight Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included is information on hydrology studies in wells open through large intervals, unsaturated zone contamination and transport processes, surface water-groundwater interactions, regional groundwater flow, and independent testing of air quality data

  10. 76 FR 40950 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Board Funding Final Rules...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ... available, the issuer's net asset value. (i)(v) Issuer Accounting Support Fee The term ``issuer accounting... Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Board Funding Final Rules for Allocation of the Board's Accounting Support Fee Among Issuers, Brokers, and Dealers, and Other Amendments to the Board's...

  11. 42 CFR 137.368 - Is the Secretary responsible for oversight and compliance of health and safety codes during...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... compliance of health and safety codes during construction projects being performed by a Self-Governance Tribe... SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Roles of the Secretary in Establishing and Implementing Construction Project Agreements § 137.368 Is the Secretary responsible for oversight and compliance of health...

  12. 76 FR 53683 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Oversight of Clinical Investigations: A Risk-Based Approach to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ... 200N, Rockville, MD 20852-1448; or the Office of Communication, Education and Radiation Programs... describes a modern, risk-based approach to monitoring that focuses on critical study parameters and relies... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Title: Draft Guidance for Industry: Oversight of...

  13. 76 FR 40961 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Temporary Rule for an...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ... of the Board Section 1. General Provisions * * * Rule 1001. Definitions of Terms Employed in Rules... Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Temporary Rule for an Interim Program of Inspection... Act of 2002 (the ``Act''), notice is hereby given that on June 21, 2011, the Public Company Accounting...

  14. Report: Enhanced EPA Oversight and Action Can Further Protect Water Resources From the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #15-P-0204, July 16, 2015. Enhanced EPA oversight of the permitting process for diesel fuel use during hydraulic fracturing can further EPA efforts to protect water resources, and establishment of a plan for determining whether to propose a chemical

  15. Governmental oversight of prescribing medications: history of the US Food and Drug Administration and prescriptive authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Linda S

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of drug regulation and awarding of prescriptive authority is a complex and sometimes convoluted process that can be confusing for health care providers. A review of the history of how drugs have been manufactured and dispensed helps explain why this process has been so laborious and complicated. Because the federal and state governments have the responsibility for protecting the public, most regulations have been passed with the intentions of ensuring consumer safety. The current system of laws and regulations is the result of many years of using the legal system to correct drug marketing that had adverse health consequences. Government oversight will continue as prescribing medications transitions to an electronic form and as health care professionals in addition to physicians seek to gain prescriptive authority. © 2011 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  16. Regulatory Oversight of Radioactive Sources through the Integrated Management of Safety and Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA) has full regulatory competence; its mission is to oversee the safety and security of all the peaceful applications of atomic energy. All the radioactive sources having activity above the exemption level is registered and licensed both from safety and security points of view. The Hungarian central register of radioactive sources contains about 7,000 radioactive sources and 450 license holders. In order to use its limited resources the HAEA has decided to introduce an integrated regulatory oversight programme. Accordingly, during the licensing process and inspection activities the HAEA intends to assess both safety and security aspects at the same time. The article describes the Hungarian the various applications of radioactive materials, and summarizes the preparation activities of the HAEA. (author)

  17. Nonverbal contention and contempt in U.K. parliamentary oversight hearings on fiscal and monetary policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonhardt-Bailey, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    In parliamentary committee oversight hearings on fiscal policy, monetary policy, and financial stability, where verbal deliberation is the focus, nonverbal communication may be crucial in the acceptance or rejection of arguments proffered by policymakers. Systematic qualitative coding of these hearings in the 2010-15 U.K. Parliament finds the following: (1) facial expressions, particularly in the form of anger and contempt, are more prevalent in fiscal policy hearings, where backbench parliamentarians hold frontbench parliamentarians to account, than in monetary policy or financial stability hearings, where the witnesses being held to account are unelected policy experts; (2) comparing committees across chambers, hearings in the House of Lords committee yield more reassuring facial expressions relative to hearings in the House of Commons committee, suggesting a more relaxed and less adversarial context in the former; and (3) central bank witnesses appearing before both the Lords and Commons committees tend toward expressions of appeasement, suggesting a willingness to defer to Parliament.

  18. Tennessee Oversight Agreement annual report, May 13, 1993 - May 12, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses the activities of the Division of DOE Oversight in the areas of coordination with other State Agencies with regard to environmental restoration, corrective action, and waste management activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation; and the Division's efforts to keep the public informed of those DOE activities that may impact their health and the environment. This report includes the status of the Division's efforts in implementing the Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA). Each Program Section provides information concerning the status of its activities. The Administrative Section has been instrumental in achieving access to the ORR without prior notification to DOE and in obtaining documents and environmental, waste management, safety, and health information in a timely manner. The Environmental Restoration Program has provided in-depth document reviews and on-site coordination and monitoring of field activities required under the Federal Facility Agreement. Most notable of the activities are the investigations and planned remediation of the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek and the Watts Bar Reservoir. The Waste Management Program has audited DOE's compliance with air, water, solid, hazardous, and mixed waste storage, treatment, and disposal regulations. Effort was focused on all three DOE Facilities on the ORR. The final portion of this report discusses the Division's findings and recommendations. Most significant of these issues is the Division's request to be an active participant in DOE's prioritization of its TOA commitments. Other issues discussed include long term storage of radioactive waste and the use of environmental restoration funds. A discussion of those findings and recommendations provided in last year's annual report and addressed by DOE are included in this report as well. All documents, logs, files, etc. supporting this report are available for review during routine business hours at the Division's office

  19. Enhancing board oversight on quality of hospital care: an agency theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H Joanna; Lockee, Carlin; Fraser, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Community hospitals in the United States are almost all governed by a governing board that is legally accountable for the quality of care provided. Increasing pressures for better quality and safety are prompting boards to strengthen their oversight function on quality. In this study, we aimed to provide an update to prior research by exploring the role and practices of governing boards in quality oversight through the lens of agency theory and comparing hospital quality performance in relation to the adoption of those practices. Data on board practices from a survey conducted by The Governance Institute in 2007 were merged with data on hospital quality drawn from two federal sources that measured processes of care and mortality. The study sample includes 445 public and private not-for-profit hospitals. We used factor analysis to explore the underlying dimensions of board practices. We further compared hospital quality performance by the adoption of each individual board practice. Consistent with the agency theory, the 13 board practices included in the survey appear to center around enhancing accountability of the board, management, and the medical staff. Reviewing the hospital's quality performance on a regular basis was the most common practice. A number of board practices, not examined in prior research, showed significant association with better performance on process of care and/or risk-adjusted mortality: requiring major new clinical programs to meet quality-related criteria, setting some quality goals at the "theoretical ideal" level, requiring both the board and the medical staff to be as involved as management in setting the agenda for discussion on quality, and requiring the hospital to report its quality/safety performance to the general public. Hospital governing boards should examine their current practices and consider adopting those that would enhance the accountability of the board itself, management, and the medical staff.

  20. Nuclear units operating improvement by using operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, I.; Bilegan, I.C.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents how the information experience can be used to improve the operation of nuclear units. This areas include the following items: conservative decision making; supervisory oversight; teamwork; control room distraction; communications; expectations and standards; operator training and fundamental knowledge, procedure quality and adherence; plant status awareness. For each of these topics, the information illustrate which are the principles, the lessons learned from operating experience and the most appropriate exemplifying documents. (authors)

  1. International co-operation and the future of nuclear power. European Nuclear Congress '98, Nice, 26 October 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the joint Opening Session of the European Nuclear Congress'98 (ENC) and RECOD in Nice, France, on 26 october 1998. The conference emphasized the importance of strengthened international co-operation in all areas relevant to the safe and peaceful use of nuclear energy, especially for power generation. As the only intergovernmental global organization dedicated to nuclear science and technology, the role of the IAEA is to serve as the international focal point for standard setting, independent analysis, technology transfer and oversight and verification

  2. GE's advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    The excess of US electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which open-quotes are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities.close quotes Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14-point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other open-quotes enabling conditions.close quotes GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the US and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safety, reliably, and economically

  3. Nuclear committee plays it straight: and draws criticism from all quarters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanouette, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Oversight Committee appointed after the 1979 accident at Three Mile Island angered everyone, but succeeded in highlighting many of the operating and regulatory problems plaguing nuclear power. The now defunct committee received mixed reviews, some calling it a waste of time and money, and others seeing it as a model for solving policy disputes. A review of the committee members and their two controversial studies describes the areas of disagreement

  4. Nuclear safety in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, K.; Sjoeberg, B.M.D.; Lauridsen, K.; Wahlstroem, B.

    2002-06-01

    The aim of the NKS/SOS-1 project has been to enhance common understanding about requirements for nuclear safety by finding improved means of communicating on the subject in society. The project, which has been built around a number of seminars, was supported by limited research in three sub-projects: 1) Risk assessment, 2) Safety analysis, and 3) Strategies for safety management. The report describes an industry in change due to societal factors. The concepts of risk and safety, safety management and systems for regulatory oversight are described in the nuclear area and also, to widen the perspective, for other industrial areas. Transparency and public participation are described as key elements in good risk communication, and case studies are given. Environmental Impact Assessment and Strategic Environmental Assessment are described as important overall processes within which risk communication can take place. Safety culture, safety indicators and quality systems are important concepts in the nuclear safety area are very useful, but also offer important challenges for the future. They have been subject to special attention in the project. (au)

  5. Oversight and Influencing of Licensee Leadership and Management for Safety, Including Safety Culture - Regulatory Approaches and Methods. Proceedings of an NEA/IAEA Workshop, Chester, United Kingdom, 26-28 September 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Both regulators and the nuclear industry recognise the need for licensees to develop a strong, positive safety culture to support successful and sustainable nuclear safety performance. A number of reports have been issued by the IAEA and the NEA on the role of the regulator in relation to oversight of safety culture (References 1 to 5). There has been less clarity on how this should be achieved - in particular, with regard to strategies and practical approaches for maintaining oversight of, and influencing, those facets of licensee leadership and management which have a profound influence on safety culture. In recognition of this, the CSNI Working Group on Human and Organisational Factors (WGHOF), together with the CNRA Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP) and the IAEA, organised a workshop in Chester, United Kingdom, in May 2007 to provide a forum for gathering and sharing international experience, including good practices and learning points. The results of the workshop are reported in Reference 6. Workshop participants agreed that, in view of the rapidly developing approaches in this area, it would be sensible to hold a further workshop ('Chester 2') in 3-5 years in order to discuss how regulatory approaches have moved on and to share lessons learned from their application. In 2010, the WGIP hosted a workshop which included regulatory approaches for the assessment of licensee safety culture as a discussion topic. The outputs of the workshop included a list of commendable practices for monitoring and evaluating licensee safety culture (Reference 7). The 'Chester 2' workshop took place in September 2011. This report sets out the findings of the workshop, organised by the UK Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR) on behalf of the CSNI/WGHOF and the IAEA. The workshop was attended by over 40 representatives of nuclear regulatory bodies and licensees from 15 countries plus IAEA and NEA. The workshop featured keynote papers on learning from major events, and from

  6. Computational intelligence in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrig, Robert E.; Hines, J. Wesley

    2005-01-01

    Approaches to several recent issues in the operation of nuclear power plants using computational intelligence are discussed. These issues include 1) noise analysis techniques, 2) on-line monitoring and sensor validation, 3) regularization of ill-posed surveillance and diagnostic measurements, 4) transient identification, 5) artificial intelligence-based core monitoring and diagnostic system, 6) continuous efficiency improvement of nuclear power plants, and 7) autonomous anticipatory control and intelligent-agents. Several Changes to the focus of Computational Intelligence in Nuclear Engineering have occurred in the past few years. With earlier activities focusing on the development of condition monitoring and diagnostic techniques for current nuclear power plants, recent activities have focused on the implementation of those methods and the development of methods for next generation plants and space reactors. These advanced techniques are expected to become increasingly important as current generation nuclear power plants have their licenses extended to 60 years and next generation reactors are being designed to operate for extended fuel cycles (up to 25 years), with less operator oversight, and especially for nuclear plants operating in severe environments such as space or ice-bound locations

  7. Notification: Audit of EPA’s Adherence to Policies, Procedures and Oversight Controls Pertaining to the Administrator’s Travel (2nd notification)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY17-0382, October 6, 2017 - The EPA OIG plans to expand the scope of preliminary research on the EPA’s adherence to policies, procedures and oversight controls pertaining to the Administrator’s travel.

  8. Improvements of the Regulatory Framework for Nuclear Installations in the Areas of Human and Organizational Factors and Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronea, M.; Ciurea, C.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the development of regulatory requirements in the area of human and organizational factors taking account of the lessons learned from major accidents in the nuclear industry and in particular of the factors that contributed to the Fukushima Daiichi accident and the improvement of the regulatory oversight of nuclear safety culture. New requirements have been elaborated by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN) on the nuclear safety policy of licencees for nuclear installations, on independent nuclear safety oversight, on safety conscious work environment and on the assessment of nuclear safety culture. The regulatory process for the oversight of nuclear safety culture within licencees’ organizations operating nuclear installations and the associated procedure and guidelines, based on the IAEA Safety Standards, have been developed in 2010-2011. CNCAN has used the 37 IAEA attributes for a strong safety culture, grouped into five areas corresponding to safety culture characteristics, as the basis for its regulatory guidelines providing support to the reviewers and inspectors, in their routine activities, for recognising and gathering information relevant to safety culture. The safety culture oversight process, procedure and guidelines are in process of being reviewed and revised to improve their effectiveness and to align with the current international practices, using lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident. Starting with July 2014, Romania has a National Strategy for Nuclear Safety and Security, which includes strategic objectives, associated directions for action and concrete actions for promoting nuclear safety culture in all the organizations in the nuclear sector. The progress with the implementation of this strategy with regard to nuclear safety culture is described in the paper. CNCAN started to define its own organizational culture model and identifying the elements that promote and support safety

  9. 1991 Annual performance report for environmental oversight and monitoring at Department of Energy Facilities in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    On October 22, 1990 an agreement was entered into between the US DOE and the State of New Mexico. The agreement was designed to assure the citizens of New Mexico that the environment is protected and that public health, as related to the environment is also protected. The Agreement reflects the understanding and commitments between the parties regarding environmental oversight, monitoring, remediation and emergency response at the following DOE facilities: the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These provision are ongoing through a vigorous program of independent monitoring and oversight; prioritization of clean-up and compliance activities; and new commitments by DOE. While the initial assessment of the quality and effectiveness of the facilities' environmental monitoring and surveillance programs is not yet complete, preliminary findings are presented regarding air quality monitoring, environmental monitoring, and groundwater monitoring

  10. 1993 Annual performance report for Environmental Oversight and Monitoring at Department of Energy facilities in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In October of 1990, the New Mexico Environment Department entered into an agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to create the Department of Energy Oversight and Monitoring Program. This program is designed to create an avenue for the State to ensure DOE facilities are in compliance with applicable environmental regulations, to allow the State oversight and monitoring independent of the DOE, to allow the State valuable input into remediation decision making, and to protect the environment and the public health and safety of New Mexicans concerning DOE facility activities. This agreement, called the Agreement in Principle (AIP), includes all four of New Mexico's DOE facilities: Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos; Sandia National Laboratories and the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute on Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque; and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad

  11. US system of oversight for genetic testing: a report from the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health and Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea; Teutsch, Steven; Williams, Marc S; Au, Sylvia M; Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Miller, Paul Steven; Fomous, Cathy

    2008-09-01

    As genetic testing technology is integrated into healthcare, increasingly detailed information about individual and population genetic variation is available to patients and providers. Health professionals use genetic testing to diagnose or assess the risk of disease in individuals, families and populations and to guide healthcare decisions. Consumers are beginning to explore personalized genomic services in an effort to learn more about their risk for common diseases. Scientific and technological advances in genetic testing, as with any newly introduced medical technology, present certain challenges to existing frameworks of oversight. In addition, the growing use of genetic testing will require a significant investment in evidence-based assessments to understand the validity and utility of these tests in clinical and personal decisionmaking. To optimize the use of genetic testing in healthcare, all sectors of the oversight system need to be strengthened and yet remain flexible in order to adapt to advances that will inevitably increase the range of genetic tests and methodologies.

  12. Further Improvements Needed in Navy’s Oversight and Management of Contracting for Facilities Construction on Diego Garcia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-23

    1981, the Navy awarded a cost reimbursable contract to a joint venture to construct facility projects for fiscal years 1981 and 1982 with an estimated...through fiscal year 1986. In July 1981, the Navy awarded a cost reimburs - able contract (cost plus award fee) to Raymond, Brown & Root, Molem, a joint...Navy’s oversight and management of the acquisition of these facilities. A COST REIMBURSABLE CONTRACT MAKES STRONG CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION VITAL Under

  13. 1992 Annual performance report for Environmental Monitoring and Oversight at Department of Energy facilities in New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    In October 1990 an Agreement-in-Principle (AIP) was entered into between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of New Mexico for the purpose of supporting State oversight activities at DOE facilities in New Mexico. The State`s lead agency for the Agreement is the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). DOE has agreed to provide the State with resources over a five year period to support State activities in environmental oversight, monitoring, access and emergency response to ensure compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI). The Agreement is designed to assure the citizens of New Mexico that public health, safety and the environment are being protected through existing programs; DOE is in compliance with applicable laws and regulations; DOE has made substantial new commitments; cleanup and compliance activities have been prioritized; and a vigorous program of independent monitoring and oversight by the State is underway. This report relates the quality and effectiveness of the facilities` environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. This report satisfies that requirement for the January--December 1992 time frame.

  14. 1992 Annual performance report for Environmental Monitoring and Oversight at Department of Energy facilities in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In October 1990 an Agreement-in-Principle (AIP) was entered into between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of New Mexico for the purpose of supporting State oversight activities at DOE facilities in New Mexico. The State's lead agency for the Agreement is the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). DOE has agreed to provide the State with resources over a five year period to support State activities in environmental oversight, monitoring, access and emergency response to ensure compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI). The Agreement is designed to assure the citizens of New Mexico that public health, safety and the environment are being protected through existing programs; DOE is in compliance with applicable laws and regulations; DOE has made substantial new commitments; cleanup and compliance activities have been prioritized; and a vigorous program of independent monitoring and oversight by the State is underway. This report relates the quality and effectiveness of the facilities' environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. This report satisfies that requirement for the January--December 1992 time frame

  15. Addressing conflicts of interest in nanotechnology oversight: lessons learned from drug and pesticide safety testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Kevin C., E-mail: ke@sc.edu [University of South Carolina, Department of Philosophy, USC NanoCenter (United States); Volz, David C. [University of South Carolina, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Financial conflicts of interest raise significant challenges for those working to develop an effective, transparent, and trustworthy oversight system for assessing and managing the potential human health and ecological hazards of nanotechnology. A recent paper in this journal by Ramachandran et al., J Nanopart Res, 13:1345-1371 (2011) proposed a two-pronged approach for addressing conflicts of interest: (1) developing standardized protocols and procedures to guide safety testing; and (2) vetting safety data under a coordinating agency. Based on past experiences with standardized test guidelines developed by the international Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and implemented by national regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA), we argue that this approach still runs the risk of allowing conflicts of interest to influence toxicity tests, and it has the potential to commit regulatory agencies to outdated procedures. We suggest an alternative approach that further distances the design and interpretation of safety studies from those funding the research. In case the two-pronged approach is regarded as a more politically feasible solution, we also suggest three lessons for implementing this strategy in a more dynamic and effective manner.

  16. Addressing conflicts of interest in nanotechnology oversight: lessons learned from drug and pesticide safety testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, Kevin C.; Volz, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Financial conflicts of interest raise significant challenges for those working to develop an effective, transparent, and trustworthy oversight system for assessing and managing the potential human health and ecological hazards of nanotechnology. A recent paper in this journal by Ramachandran et al., J Nanopart Res, 13:1345–1371 (2011) proposed a two-pronged approach for addressing conflicts of interest: (1) developing standardized protocols and procedures to guide safety testing; and (2) vetting safety data under a coordinating agency. Based on past experiences with standardized test guidelines developed by the international Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and implemented by national regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA), we argue that this approach still runs the risk of allowing conflicts of interest to influence toxicity tests, and it has the potential to commit regulatory agencies to outdated procedures. We suggest an alternative approach that further distances the design and interpretation of safety studies from those funding the research. In case the two-pronged approach is regarded as a more politically feasible solution, we also suggest three lessons for implementing this strategy in a more dynamic and effective manner.

  17. Comparison of Management Oversight and Risk Tree and Tripod-Beta in Excavation Accident Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadfam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Accident investigation programs are a necessary part in identification of risks and management of the business process. Objectives One of the most important features of such programs is the analysis technique for identifying the root causes of accidents in order to prevent their recurrences. Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP was used to compare management oversight and risk tree (MORT with Tripod-Beta in order to determine the superior technique for analysis of fatal excavation accidents in construction industries. Materials and Methods MORT and Tripod-Beta techniques were used for analyzing two major accidents with three main steps. First, these techniques were applied to find out the causal factors of the accidents. Second, a number of criteria were developed for the comparison of the techniques and third, using AHP, the techniques were prioritized in terms of the criteria for choosing the superior one. Results The Tripod-Beta investigation showed 41 preconditions and 81 latent causes involved in the accidents. Additionally, 27 root causes of accidents were identified by the MORT analysis. Analytical hierarchy process (AHP investigation revealed that MORT had higher priorities only in two criteria than Tripod-Beta. Conclusions Our findings indicate that Tripod-Beta with a total priority of 0.664 is superior to MORT with the total priority of 0.33. It is recommended for future research to compare the available accident analysis techniques based on proper criteria to select the best for accident analysis.

  18. The roles of antitrust law and regulatory oversight in the restructured electricity industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glazer, C.A.; Little, M.B.

    1999-05-01

    The introduction of retail wheeling is changing the roles of regulators and the courts. When states unbundle the vertically integrated investor-owned utility (IOU) into generation companies, transmission companies, and distribution companies, antitrust enforcement and policy setting by the state public utility/service commissions (PUCs) will be paramount. As was seen in the deregulation of the airline industry, vigorous enforcement of antitrust laws by the courts and proper policy setting by the regulators are the keys to a successful competitive market. Many of the problems raised in the airline deregulation movement came about due to laxity in correcting clear antitrust violations and anti-competitive conditions before they caused damage to the market. As retail wheeling rolls out, it is critical for state PUCs to become attuned to these issues and, most of all, to have staff trained in these disciplines. The advent of retail wheeling changes the application of the State Action Doctrine and, in turn, may dramatically alter the role of the state PUC--meaning antitrust law and regulatory oversight must step in to protect competitors and consumers from monopolistic abuse.

  19. Addressing conflicts of interest in nanotechnology oversight: lessons learned from drug and pesticide safety testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kevin C.; Volz, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Financial conflicts of interest raise significant challenges for those working to develop an effective, transparent, and trustworthy oversight system for assessing and managing the potential human health and ecological hazards of nanotechnology. A recent paper in this journal by Ramachandran et al., J Nanopart Res, 13:1345-1371 (2011) proposed a two-pronged approach for addressing conflicts of interest: (1) developing standardized protocols and procedures to guide safety testing; and (2) vetting safety data under a coordinating agency. Based on past experiences with standardized test guidelines developed by the international Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and implemented by national regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA), we argue that this approach still runs the risk of allowing conflicts of interest to influence toxicity tests, and it has the potential to commit regulatory agencies to outdated procedures. We suggest an alternative approach that further distances the design and interpretation of safety studies from those funding the research. In case the two-pronged approach is regarded as a more politically feasible solution, we also suggest three lessons for implementing this strategy in a more dynamic and effective manner.

  20. Preserving the nuclear option: The AIAA position paper on space nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, D.M.; Bennett, G.L.; El-Genk, M.S.; Newhouse, A.R.; Rose, M.F.; Rovang, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    In response to published reports about the decline in funding for space nuclear power, the Board of Directors of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) approved a position paper in March 1995 that recommends (1) development and support of an integrated space nuclear power program by DOE, NASA and DoD; (2) Congressional support for the program; (3) advocacy of the program by government and industry leaders; and (4) continuation of cooperation between the U.S. and other countries to advance nuclear power source technology and to promote safety. This position paper has been distributed to various people having oversight of the U.S. space nuclear power program. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  1. Improving nuclear regulation. NEA regulatory guidance booklets volumes 1-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    A common theme throughout the series of NEA regulatory guidance reports, or 'green booklets', is the premise that the fundamental objective of all nuclear safety regulatory bodies is to ensure that nuclear facilities are continuously maintained and operated in an acceptably safe manner. In meeting this objective the regulator must bear in mind that it is the operator that has responsibility for safely operating the nuclear facility; the role of the regulator is to assess and to provide assurance regarding the operator's activities in terms of assuming that responsibility. The full series of these reports was brought together in one edition for the first time in 2009 and was widely found to be a useful resource. This second edition comprises 14 volumes, including the latest on The Nuclear Regulator's Role in Assessing Licensee Oversight of Vendor and Other Contracted Services. The reports address various challenges that could apply throughout the lifetime of a nuclear facility, including design, siting, manufacturing, construction, commissioning, operation, maintenance and decommissioning. The compilation is intended to serve as a knowledge management tool both for current regulators and the new nuclear professionals and organisations entering the regulatory field. Contents: Executive Summary; Regulatory Challenges: 1. The Role of the Nuclear Regulator in Promoting and Evaluating Safety Culture; 2. Regulatory Response Strategies for Safety Culture Problems; 3. Nuclear Regulatory Challenges Related to Human Performance; 4. Regulatory Challenges in Using Nuclear Operating Experience; 5. Nuclear Regulatory Review of Licensee Self-assessment (LSA); 6. Nuclear Regulatory Challenges Arising from Competition in Electricity Markets; 7. The Nuclear Regulatory Challenge of Judging Safety Back-fits; 8. The Regulatory Challenges of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors; 9. The Nuclear Regulator's Role in Assessing Licensee Oversight of Vendor and Other Contracted Services

  2. Nuclear law - Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontier, Jean-Marie; Roux, Emmanuel; Leger, Marc; Deguergue, Maryse; Vallar, Christian; Pissaloux, Jean-Luc; Bernie-Boissard, Catherine; Thireau, Veronique; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Spencer, Mary; Zhang, Li; Park, Kyun Sung; Artus, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    This book contains the contributions presented during a one-day seminar. The authors propose a framework for a legal approach to nuclear safety, a discussion of the 2009/71/EURATOM directive which establishes a European framework for nuclear safety in nuclear installations, a comment on nuclear safety and environmental governance, a discussion of the relationship between citizenship and nuclear, some thoughts about the Nuclear Safety Authority, an overview of the situation regarding the safety in nuclear waste burying, a comment on the Nome law with respect to electricity price and nuclear safety, a comment on the legal consequences of the Fukushima accident on nuclear safety in the Japanese law, a presentation of the USA nuclear regulation, an overview of nuclear safety in China, and a discussion of nuclear safety in the medical sector

  3. Compact, self-regulating nuclear power source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Otis G.; Kimpland, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    An inherently safe nuclear power source has been designed, that is self-stabilizing and requires no moving mechanical components. Unlike conventional designs, the proposed reactor is self-regulating through the inherent properties of uranium hydride, which serves as a combination fuel and moderator. The temperature driven mobility of the hydrogen contained in the hydride will control the nuclear activity. If the core temperature increases over the set point, the hydrogen is driven out of the core, the moderation drops and the power production decreases. If the temperature drops, the hydrogen returns and the process is reversed. Thus the design is inherently fail-safe and requires only minimal human oversight. The compact nature and inherent safety opens the possibility for low-cost mass production and operation of the reactors. This design has the capability to dramatically alter the manner in which nuclear energy is harnessed for commercial use. (author)

  4. A Citation Tracking System to Facilitate Sponsoring Institution Oversight of ACGME-Accredited Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Timothy R; Poe, John D; Zimmerman, Richard S; Rose, Steven H

    2012-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires the graduate medical education committee and the designated institutional official to ensure that citations for noncompliance with the accreditation standards and institutional trends in citations are reviewed and corrected. To describe a citation tracking system (CTS) that uses Microsoft Office Access to efficiently catalogue, monitor, and document resolution of citations. The CTS was implemented in a sponsoring institution with oversight of 133 ACGME-accredited programs. The designated institutional official and the graduate medical education committee review all program letters of notification and enter citations into the CTS. A program-correction plan is required for each citation and is entered into the database. Open citations and action plans are reviewed by the graduate medical education committee and the designated institutional official on a quarterly basis, with decisions ranging from "closing" the citation to approving the action plan in process to requiring a new or modified action plan. Citation categories and subcategories are accessed on the ACGME website and entered into the CTS to identify trends. All 236 citations received since the 2006 Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education institutional site visit were entered into the CTS. On November 22, 2011, 26 of 236 citations (11%) were in active status with ongoing action plans, and 210 (89%) citations had been resolved and were closed. The CTS uses commercially available software to ensure citations are monitored and addressed and to simplify analysis of citation trends. The approach requires minimal staff time for data input and updates and can be performed without institutional information technology assistance.

  5. Surrogate receptivity to participation in critical illness genetic research: aligning research oversight and stakeholder concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Bradley D; Butler, Kevin; Bolcic-Jankovic, Dragana; Clarridge, Brian R; Kennedy, Carie R; LeBlanc, Jessica; Chandros Hull, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Collection of genetic biospecimens as part of critical illness investigations is increasingly commonplace. Oversight bodies vary in restrictions imposed on genetic research, introducing inconsistencies in study design, potential for sampling bias, and the possibility of being overly prohibitive of this type of research altogether. We undertook this study to better understand whether restrictions on genetic data collection beyond those governing research on cognitively intact subjects reflect the concerns of surrogates for critically ill patients. We analyzed survey data collected from 1,176 patients in nonurgent settings and 437 surrogates representing critically ill adults. Attitudes pertaining to genetic data (familiarity, perceptions, interest in participation, concerns) and demographic information were examined using univariate and multivariate techniques. We explored differences among respondents who were receptive (1,333) and nonreceptive (280) to genetic sample collection. Whereas factors positively associated with receptivity to research participation were "complete trust" in health-care providers (OR, 2.091; 95% CI, 1.544-2.833), upper income strata (OR, 2.319; 95% CI, 1.308-4.114), viewing genetic research "very positively" (OR, 3.524; 95% CI, 2.122-5.852), and expressing "no worry at all" regarding disclosure of results (OR, 2.505; 95% CI, 1.436-4.369), black race was negatively associated with research participation (OR, 0.410; 95% CI, 0.288-0.585). We could detect no difference in receptivity to genetic sample collection comparing ambulatory patients and surrogates (OR, 0.738; 95% CI, 0.511-1.066). Expressing trust in health-care providers and viewing genetic research favorably were associated with increased willingness for study enrollment, while concern regarding breach of confidentiality and black race had the opposite effect. Study setting had no bearing on willingness to participate.

  6. Blueprint for nuclear safety - a nonregulatory strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Department of Energy operates a nuclear complex that now numbers over 250 facilities nationwide, many of which date back to the 1940s and 1950s. In 1985, Secretary Herrington moved to establish the Office of Environment, Safety and Health, give it needed resources and authorities, and begin extensive environmental protection and safety evaluations of all major DOE sites and facilities. On the nuclear safety side this necessitates an integrated program that not only strengthens oversight but also builds DOE-wide technical capabilities and promotes safety performance. This has led up to focus our attention on three areas: (1) the DOE safety oversight system -- its resources, technical capabilities, and effectiveness; (2) the safety policy development and review; and (3) the Department's capabilities to foster technical inquisitiveness and overall excellence in safety performance. The essence of this approach is found in this last term -- performance. Performance that is results-oriented; founded on realized safety enhancements and risk reduction, not merely regulation for its own sake. Performance not merely in terms of hardware fixes, but also focusing on the human part of the safety equation

  7. Nuclear plant life cycle costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durante, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    Life cycle costs of nuclear power plants in the United States are discussed. The author argues that these costs have been mishandled or neglected. Decommissioning costs have escalated, e.g. from $328 per unit in 1991 to $370 in 1993 for the Sacramento Municipal Utility District, though they still only amount to less than 0.1 cent per kWh. Waste management has been complicated in the U.S. by the decision to abandon civilian reprocessing; by the year 2000, roughly 30 U.S. nuclear power units will have filled their storage pools; dry storage has been delayed, and will be an expense not originally envisaged. Some examples of costs of major component replacement are provided. No single component has caused as much operational disruption and financial penalties as the steam generator. Operation and maintenance costs have increased steadily, and now amount to more than 70% of production costs. A strategic plan by the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (of U.S. utilities) will ensure that the ability to correctly operate and maintain a nuclear power plant is built into the original design. 6 figs

  8. Teamwork for Oversight of Processes and Systems (TOPS). Implementation guide for TOPS version 2.0, 10 August 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Albert A.; Jackson, Darryl J.

    1992-01-01

    As the nation redefines priorities to deal with a rapidly changing world order, both government and industry require new approaches for oversight of management systems, particularly for high technology products. Declining defense budgets will lead to significant reductions in government contract management personnel. Concurrently, defense contractors are reducing administrative and overhead staffing to control costs. These combined pressures require bold approaches for the oversight of management systems. In the Spring of 1991, the DPRO and TRW created a Process Action Team (PAT) to jointly prepare a Performance Based Management (PBM) system titled Teamwork for Oversight of Processes and Systems (TOPS). The primary goal is implementation of a performance based management system based on objective data to review critical TRW processes with an emphasis on continuous improvement. The processes are: Finance and Business Systems, Engineering and Manufacturing Systems, Quality Assurance, and Software Systems. The team established a number of goals: delivery of quality products to contractual terms and conditions; ensure that TRW management systems meet government guidance and good business practices; use of objective data to measure critical processes; elimination of wasteful/duplicative reviews and audits; emphasis on teamwork--all efforts must be perceived to add value by both sides and decisions are made by consensus; and synergy and the creation of a strong working trust between TRW and the DPRO. TOPS permits the adjustment of oversight resources when conditions change or when TRW systems performance indicate either an increase or decrease in surveillance is appropriate. Monthly Contractor Performance Assessments (CPA) are derived from a summary of supporting system level and process-level ratings obtained from objective process-level data. Tiered, objective, data-driven metrics are highly successful in achieving a cooperative and effective method of measuring

  9. Teamwork for Oversight of Processes and Systems (TOPS). Implementation guide for TOPS version 2.0, 10 August 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Albert A.; Jackson, Darryl J.

    As the nation redefines priorities to deal with a rapidly changing world order, both government and industry require new approaches for oversight of management systems, particularly for high technology products. Declining defense budgets will lead to significant reductions in government contract management personnel. Concurrently, defense contractors are reducing administrative and overhead staffing to control costs. These combined pressures require bold approaches for the oversight of management systems. In the Spring of 1991, the DPRO and TRW created a Process Action Team (PAT) to jointly prepare a Performance Based Management (PBM) system titled Teamwork for Oversight of Processes and Systems (TOPS). The primary goal is implementation of a performance based management system based on objective data to review critical TRW processes with an emphasis on continuous improvement. The processes are: Finance and Business Systems, Engineering and Manufacturing Systems, Quality Assurance, and Software Systems. The team established a number of goals: delivery of quality products to contractual terms and conditions; ensure that TRW management systems meet government guidance and good business practices; use of objective data to measure critical processes; elimination of wasteful/duplicative reviews and audits; emphasis on teamwork--all efforts must be perceived to add value by both sides and decisions are made by consensus; and synergy and the creation of a strong working trust between TRW and the DPRO. TOPS permits the adjustment of oversight resources when conditions change or when TRW systems performance indicate either an increase or decrease in surveillance is appropriate. Monthly Contractor Performance Assessments (CPA) are derived from a summary of supporting system level and process-level ratings obtained from objective process-level data. Tiered, objective, data-driven metrics are highly successful in achieving a cooperative and effective method of measuring

  10. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY: Views on Proposed Civil Penalties, Security Oversight, and External Safety Regulation Legislation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Gary

    2000-01-01

    This report provides the General Accounting Office's views on three bills designed to improve worker and nuclear facility safety and health as well as to enhance security for the Department of Energy (DOE...

  11. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY: Views on Proposed Civil Penalties, Security Oversight, and External Safety Regulation Legislation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Gary

    2000-01-01

    .... 3383 would amend the Atomic Energy Act by eliminating the exemption that currently allows certain nonprofit contractors to avoid paying civil penalties if they violate DOE's nuclear safety rules...

  12. How WANO is tackling the realities of a new nuclear era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraev, Kamen [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-07-15

    Rapid new build initiatives and post-Fukushima safety concerns mean the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) is dealing with the prospect of a considerable increase in the demand for its services. Chief executive officer Peter Prozesky spoke to NucNet about the critical work the organisation is facing. Ten of the 12 projects established by WANO following the Fukushima-Daiichi accident have already progressed to the point where WANO was comfortable with closing them down. Two projects concerning design safety fundamentals and emergency support to remain open. WANO is an independent nuclear oversight organisation and has no remit to promote nuclear power.

  13. Overseeing oversight: governance of quality and safety by hospital boards in the English NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Russell; Davies, Huw; Freeman, Tim; Millar, Ross; Jacobs, Rowena; Kasteridis, Panos

    2015-01-01

    To contribute towards an understanding of hospital board composition and to explore board oversight of patient safety and health care quality in the English NHS. We reviewed the theory related to hospital board governance and undertook two national surveys about board management in NHS acute and specialist hospital trusts in England. The first survey was issued to 150 trusts in 2011/2012 and was completed online via a dedicated web tool. A total 145 replies were received (97% response rate). The second online survey was undertaken in 2012/2013 and targeted individual board members, using a previously validated standard instrument on board members' attitudes and competencies (the Board Self-Assessment Questionnaire). A total of 334 responses were received from 165 executive and 169 non-executive board members, providing at least one response from 95 of the 144 NHS trusts then in existence (66% response rate). Over 90% of the English NHS trust boards had 10-15 members. We found no significant difference in board size between trusts of different types (e.g. Foundation Trusts versus non-Foundation Trusts and Teaching Hospital Trusts versus non-Teaching Hospital Trusts). Clinical representation on boards was limited: around 62% had three or fewer members with clinical backgrounds. For about two-thirds of the trusts (63%), board members with a clinical background comprised less than 30% of the members. Boards were using a wide range and mix of quantitative performance metrics and soft intelligence (e.g. walk-arounds, patient stories) to monitor their organisations with regard to patient safety. The Board Self-Assessment Questionnaire data showed generally high or very high levels of agreement with desirable statements of practice in each of its six dimensions. Aggregate levels of agreement within each dimension ranged from 73% (for the dimension addressing interpersonal issues) to 85% (on the political). English NHS boards largely hold a wide range of attitudes and

  14. Some recent human performance issues at U.S. nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, John V.

    1998-01-01

    Some recent events at U.S. operating nuclear power plants revealed interesting human performance issues. Events discussed in this paper are: (1) a September 1996 event at Clinton, (2) a February 1997 event at Zion 1, and (3) March 1997 operator failures of 'in-house' examinations at LaSalle. The specific human performance weaknesses exhibited in these events, some underlying organizational or institutional issues and factors which influenced operators and their management, and implications regarding regulatory oversight are discussed. (author)

  15. Political Influence on Japanese Nuclear and Security Policy: New Forces Face Large Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    supported and sometimes even led by a strong bureaucracy, with oversight by but also much deference from the broader LDP majority in the Diet . During the...Research Council (PARC), a “shadow Diet committee” system in which DPJ legislators could engage in bureaucrat-led “study sessions,” something...303- 328. 62 Katsuhisa Furukawa, “Japan’s Policy and Views on Nuclear Weapons: A Historical Perspective,” Jebat: Malaysian Journal of History

  16. Current practice and perspectives in CRO oversight based on a survey performed among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Michael; Hundt, Ferdinand; Busta, Susanne; Mikus, Stefan; Sanden, Per-Holger; Sörgel, Andrea; Ruppert, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the number and scope of outsourced activities in the pharmaceutical industry have increased heavily. In addition, also the type of outsourcing has changed significantly in that time. This raises the question of whether and how sponsors retain the capability to select and to control the contract research organizations (CROs) involved and what expertise still has to be present in the development department as well as other relevant departments to ensure adequate oversight, also in line with the expectations of regulators and health authorities. In order to answer these questions, a survey was conducted among the German vfa member companies. The survey describes the latest developments and experiences in outsourcing by 18 German vfa member companies. It concentrates on measures how to implement Quality Assurance (QA) when performing outsourced clinical studies. This study shows that the majority of companies apply a full-outsourcing, preferred-provider model of clinical trial services, with the clinical research department playing the major role in this process. A large amount of guiding documents, processes and tools are used to ensure an adequate oversight of the services performed by the CRO(s). Finally the guiding principles for all oversight processes should be transparent communication, a clearly established expectation for quality, a precise definition of accountability and responsibility while avoiding silo mentality, and a comprehensive documentation of the oversight's evidence. For globally acting and outsourcing sponsors, oversight processes need to be aligned with regards to local and global perspectives. This survey shows that the current implementation of oversight processes in the participating companies covers all relevant areas to ensure highest quality and integrity of the data produced by the outsourced clinical trial.

  17. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  18. A Critical Review of the Oversight Role of the Office of the Auditor-General in Financial Accountability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogochukwu Nzewi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Accountability is the very essence of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (Act No. 108 of 1996. In this regard, the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA as the supreme audit institution of the Republic of South Africa plays an important oversight role of promoting financial accountability in government. The purpose of this article is to examine the challenges facing the office of the Auditor-General in executing its oversight role of promoting financial accountability in the sphere of provincial government. Information and sources for this article was gathered through literature review. The article gives some background on the establishment and rationale of Supreme Audit Institutions (SAI. It explores some policy framework that informs public finance management in the Republic of South Africa, establishing the role of the AGSA within this purview. Based on the data gathered through literature review, the key challenges facing the office of the Auditor-General are discussed. Finally, possible solutions are recommended to the challenges that were identified.

  19. Why budget accountability fails? The elusive links between parliaments and audit agencies in the oversight of the budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS SANTISO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTParliaments and audit agencies have critical and complementary roles in the oversight of the budget and the enforcement of government accountability. Yet, the nexus between parliaments and audit agencies is one of the weakest links in the accountability chain, generating an accountability gap in the budget process. This articles analyses the interactions between parliaments and audit agencies in the oversight of government finances during the latter stages of the budget process. Using proxies to evaluate the quality of those linkages, such as the follow-up to audit findings and the discharge of government, it shows important dysfunctions in the interactions between parliaments and audit agencies due to a combination of technical capacity constraints and political economy disincentives. It suggests that the effective functioning of the system of checks and balances in public budgeting critically hinges on the agility of the linkages between accountability institutions. As such, the failure of budget accountability is due to systemic dysfunctions in the systems of accountability, rather than the failure of an individual accountability institution acting in isolation. In addition, the effectiveness of the horizontal accountability architecture depends on the political economy incentives shaping the budget process, which are generated by the interactions between the choice of institutional design and budget rules, with the degree of political competition and electoral rules.

  20. Post-approval monitoring and oversight of U.S.-initiated human subjects research in resource-constrained countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Brandon; Kinsler, Janni; Folayan, Morenike O; Allen, Karen; Cáceres, Carlos F

    2014-06-01

    The history of human subjects research and controversial procedures in relation to it has helped form the field of bioethics. Ethically questionable elements may be identified during research design, research implementation, management at the study site, or actions by a study's investigator or other staff. Post-approval monitoring (PAM) may prevent violations from occurring or enable their identification at an early stage. In U.S.-initiated human subjects research taking place in resource-constrained countries with limited development of research regulatory structures, arranging a site visit from a U.S. research ethics committee (REC) becomes difficult, thus creating a potential barrier to regulatory oversight by the parent REC. However, this barrier may be overcome through the use of digital technologies, since much of the world has at least remote access to the Internet. Empirical research is needed to pilot test the use of these technologies for research oversight to ensure the protection of human subjects taking part in research worldwide.

  1. Nuclear safety. Seguranca nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aveline, A [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1981-01-01

    What is nuclear safety Is there any technical way to reduce risks Is it possible to put them at reasonable levels Are there competitiveness and economic reliability to employ the nuclear energy by means of safety technics Looking for answers to these questions the author describes the sources of potential risks to nuclear reactors and tries to apply the answers to the Brazilian Nuclear Programme. (author).

  2. Preliminary regulatory assessment of nuclear power plants vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, V.; Petelin, S.

    2004-01-01

    Preliminary attempts to develop models for nuclear regulatory vulnerability assessment of nuclear power plants are presented. Development of the philosophy and computer tools could be new and important insight for management of nuclear operators and nuclear regulatory bodies who face difficult questions about how to assess the vulnerability of nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities to external and internal threats. In the situation where different and hidden threat sources are dispersed throughout the world, the assessment of security and safe operation of nuclear power plants is very important. Capability to evaluate plant vulnerability to different kinds of threats, like human and natural occurrences and terrorist attacks and preparation of emergency response plans and estimation of costs are of vital importance for assurance of national security. On the basis of such vital insights, nuclear operators and nuclear regulatory bodies could plan and optimise changes in oversight procedures, organisations, equipment, hardware and software to reduce risks taking into account security and safety of nuclear power plants operation, budget, manpower, and other limitations. Initial qualitative estimations of adapted assessments for nuclear applications are shortly presented. (author)

  3. Invisible nuclear; converting nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jongmoon

    1993-03-01

    This book consists of 14 chapters which are CNN era and big science, from East and West to North and South, illusory nuclear strategy, UN and nuclear arms reduction, management of armaments, advent of petroleum period, the track of nuclear power generation, view of energy, internationalization of environment, the war over water in the Middle East, influence of radiation and an isotope technology transfer and transfer armament into civilian industry, the end of nuclear period and the nuclear Nonproliferation, national scientific and technological power and political organ and executive organ.

  4. INEL oversight program. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1993--December 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Idaho's successful lawsuit over shipments of spent nuclear fuel is a major milestone for 1993. The challenge forced the U.S. Department of Energy to cease all shipments of spent nuclear fuel to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory until a site-wide environmental impact statement is completed. This agreement is a significant victory in Idaho's battle to hold the federal government responsible for its actions and force compliance with applicable laws. Much of the State's INEL-related activity in 1993 focused on ensuring that INEL operations are conducted in a manner that protects public health and the environment

  5. Management Oversight and Risk Tree (MORT): a new system safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.L.

    Experiences of Aerojet Nuclear Company (ANC), in the development and implementation of a system safety program for ANC and for the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) are discussed. Aerojet Nuclear is the prime operating contractor for ERDA, formerly AEC, at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The ERDA sponsored ''MORT'' system safety program is described along with the process whereby formal system safety methods are incorporated into a stable organization. Specifically, a discussion is given of initial development of MORT; pilot program trials conducted at ANC; implementation methodology; and reaction of the ANC organization. (auth)

  6. Regulating Nuclear Reactor Construction and Commissioning, and Preparation for Operation – Challenges for a New Regulatory Body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktorsson, C.

    2016-01-01

    Following an introduction with a description of the peaceful nuclear energy program in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and an overview of the regulatory framework for safety, security and safeguards, this paper describes the regulatory approach for oversight of construction and the granting of an Operating Licence for the first nuclear power plant in the UAE. The paper describes the inspection programme set up by the Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation (FANR) to verify construction and preoperational testing by the licensee. Moreover, it outlines the content of the operating licence application and focus areas for the regulatory review and assessment. Also, the paper describes the basic elements required by FANR for the decision-making regarding the issuance of the Operating Licence including integration of the results of review and assessment and the implementation of a systematic inspection programme to ensure operational readiness to operate and maintain the plant in accordance with FANR regulations. Finally, the paper addresses the preparation for regulatory oversight and the skill-set needed at FANR to ensure an effective and efficient oversight of safety, security of the nuclear energy power in the UAE. (author)

  7. State of Nevada, Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office narrative report, January 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) is the State of Nevada agency designated by State law to monitor and oversee US Department of Energy (DOE) activities relative to the possible siting, construction, operation and closure of a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain and to carry out the State of Nevada's responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. During the reporting period the NWPO continued to work toward the five objectives designed to implement the Agency's oversight responsibilities: (1) Assure that the health and safety of Nevada's citizens are adequately protected with regard to any federal high-level radioactive waste program within the State; (2) Take the responsibilities and perform the duties of the State of Nevada as described in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987; (3) Advise the Governor, the State Commission on Nuclear Projects and the Nevada State Legislature on matters concerning the potential disposal of high-level radioactive waste in the State; (4) Work closely and consult with affected local governments and State agencies; (5) Monitor and evaluate federal planning and activities regarding high-level radioactive waste disposal. Plan and conduct independent State studies regarding the proposed repository

  8. Mort User's Manual: For use with the Management Oversight and Risk Tree analytical logic diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, N.W.; Eicher, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains the User's Manual for MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree), a logic diagram in the form of a work sheet'' that illustrates a long series of interrelated questions. MORT is a comprehensive analytical procedure that provides a disciplined method for determining the causes and contributing factors of major accidents. Alternatively, it serves as a tool to evaluate the quality of an existing system. While similar in many respects to fault tree analysis, MORT is more generalized and presents over 1500 specific elements of an ideal universal'' management program for optimizing environment, safety and health, and other programs. This User's Manual is intended to be used with the MORT diagram dated February 1992.

  9. Development of nuclear power plant simulators for Soviet-designed nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, P.; Tutu, N.K.; Cleary, E.J.; Erickson, K.G.; Yoder, J.; Kroshilin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (US DOE), under the US government's International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP), is implementing a program of developing and providing simulators for many of the Russian and Ukrainian Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) manage and provide technical oversight of the various INSP simulator projects for DOE. The program also includes a simulator technology transfer process to simulator design organizations in Russia and Ukraine. Training programs, installation of new simulators, and enhancements in existing simulators, are viewed as providing a relatively fast and cost-effective technology transfer that will result in measurable improvement in the safety culture and operation of NPPs. A review of this program, its present status, and its accomplishments are provided in this paper

  10. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission nuclear safety assistance to the CEE and NIS countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaha, J.

    2001-01-01

    NRC participates in bilateral and multilateral efforts to strengthen the regulatory authorities of countries in which Soviet design NPPs are operated. Countries involved are the New Independent States of the Soviet Union (Armenia, Kazakhstan, Russia and Ukraine) and of Central and Eastern Europe (Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania and Slovak Republic). NRC's goal is to see that its counterparts receive the basic tools, knowledge and understanding needed to exercise effective regulatory oversight, consistent with internationally accepted norms and standards. The bilateral assistance started in 1991. $44 mill. are provided to the countries. The multilateral activities NRC participates in include: H-7 Nuclear Safety Working Group, EBRD - Administered Nuclear Safety Account and Chernobyl Sarcophagus Fund and IAEA

  11. Strategic Missile Defense & Nuclear Deterrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grego, Laura

    The United States has pursued defenses against nuclear-armed long-range ballistic missiles since at least the 1950s. At the same time, concerns that missile defenses could undermine nuclear deterrence and potentially spark an arms race led the United States and Soviet Union to negotiate limits on these systems. The 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty constrained strategic missile defenses for thirty years. After abandoning the treaty in 2002, President George W. Bush began fielding the Ground-based Midcourse Defense (GMD) homeland missile defense system on an extremely aggressive schedule, nominally to respond to threats from North Korea and Iran. Today, nearly fifteen years after its initial deployment, the potential and the limits of this homeland missile defense are apparent. Its test record is poor and it has no demonstrated ability to stop an incoming missile under real-world conditions. No credible strategy is in place to solve the issue of discriminating countermeasures. Insufficient oversight has not only exacerbated the GMD system's problems, but has obscured their full extent, which could encourage politicians and military leaders to make decisions that actually increase the risk of a missile attack against the United States. These are not the only costs. Both Russia and China have repeatedly expressed concerns that U.S. missile defenses adversely affect their own strategic capabilities and interests, particularly taken in light of the substantial US nuclear forces. This in turn affects these countries' nuclear modernization priorities. This talk will provide a technical overview of the US strategic missile defense system, and how it relates to deterrence against non-peer adversaries as well as how it affects deterrence with Russia and China and the long-term prospects for nuclear reductions

  12. Current practice and perspectives in CRO oversight based on a survey performed among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennig, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the number and scope of outsourced activities in the pharmaceutical industry have increased heavily. In addition, also the type of outsourcing has changed significantly in that time. This raises the question of whether and how sponsors retain the capability to select and to control the contract research organizations (CROs involved and what expertise still has to be present in the development department as well as other relevant departments to ensure adequate oversight, also in line with the expectations of regulators and health authorities. In order to answer these questions, a survey was conducted among the German vfa member companies. The survey describes the latest developments and experiences in outsourcing by 18 German vfa member companies. It concentrates on measures how to implement Quality Assurance (QA when performing outsourced clinical studies.This study shows that the majority of companies apply a full-outsourcing, preferred-provider model of clinical trial services, with the clinical research department playing the major role in this process. A large amount of guiding documents, processes and tools are used to ensure an adequate oversight of the services performed by the CRO(s.Finally the guiding principles for all oversight processes should be transparent communication, a clearly established expectation for quality, a precise definition of accountability and responsibility while avoiding silo mentality, and a comprehensive documentation of the oversight’s evidence. For globally acting and outsourcing sponsors, oversight processes need to be aligned with regards to local and global perspectives. This survey shows that the current implementation of oversight processes in the participating companies covers all relevant areas to ensure highest quality and integrity of the data produced by the outsourced clinical trial.

  13. [Nuclear theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion

  14. Laying the Foundations for a Knowledge Management Strategy in the Context of a Nuclear New-Build Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright, C.; Schifflers, J.-F.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: This paper outlines NuGen’s strategic framework for Knowledge Management that is currently being defined in support of the Moorside nuclear new build project in the United Kingdom. The strategic context is described along with an underpinning KM model, five step knowledge process, and oversight and governance arrangements that in combination seek to deliver integrated and sustainable management of critical knowledge assets throughout the plant’s lifecycle. (author

  15. Nuclear topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukner, C.

    1982-07-01

    The pamphlet touches on all aspects of nuclear energy, from the world energy demands and consumption, the energy program of the Federal Government, nuclear power plants in the world, nuclear fusion, nuclear liability up to the nuclear fuel cycle and the shutdown of nuclear power plants. (HSCH) [de

  16. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described

  17. Public distrust and hazard management success at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohenemser, C.

    1987-01-01

    Based on experience gained while serving a public oversight commission appointed by the governor of Colorado, hazard management at the Department of Energy's Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant is reviewed. Specific reference is made to the plant's history of controversy, its defense-in-depth strategy of hazard control, occupational health issues, public exposure to plutonium, and the assessment of low-probability, high-consequence risks. This leads to the conclusion that Rocky flats is, by any objective standard, a hazard management success. It follows that public distrust of Rocky Flats arises as much from fear and loathing of nuclear weapons themselves as from the manufacturing process by which they are made

  18. A perfect match: Nuclear energy and the National Energy Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    In the course of developing the National Energy Strategy, the Department of Energy held 15 public hearings, heard from more than 375 witnesses and received more than 1000 written comments. In April 1990, the Department published an Interim Report on the National Energy Strategy, which compiles those public comments. The National Energy Strategy must be based on actual experience and factual analysis of our energy, economic and environmental situation. This report by the Nuclear Power Oversight committee, which represents electric utilities and other organizations involved in supplying electricity from nuclear energy to the American people, provides such an analysis. The conclusions here are based on hard facts and actual worldwide experience. This analysis of all the available data supports -- indeed, dictates -- expanded reliance on nuclear energy in this nation's energy supply to achieve the President's goals. 33 figs

  19. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  20. Nuclear moments

    CERN Document Server

    Kopferman, H; Massey, H S W

    1958-01-01

    Nuclear Moments focuses on the processes, methodologies, reactions, and transformations of molecules and atoms, including magnetic resonance and nuclear moments. The book first offers information on nuclear moments in free atoms and molecules, including theoretical foundations of hyperfine structure, isotope shift, spectra of diatomic molecules, and vector model of molecules. The manuscript then takes a look at nuclear moments in liquids and crystals. Discussions focus on nuclear paramagnetic and magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance. The text discusses nuclear moments and nucl

  1. Nuclear security. Improving correction of security deficiencies at DOE's weapons facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, James E.; Cannon, Doris E.; Fenzel, William F.; Lightner, Kenneth E. Jr.; Curtis, Lois J.; DuBois, Julia A.; Brown, Gail W.; Trujillo, Charles S.; Tumler, Pamela K.

    1992-11-01

    The US nuclear weapons research, development, and production are conducted at 10 DOE nuclear weapons facilities by contractors under the guidance and oversight of 9 DOE field offices. Because these facilities house special nuclear materials used in making nuclear weapons and nuclear weapons components, DOE administers a security program to protect (1) against theft, sabotage, espionage, terrorism, or other risks to national security and (2) the safety and health of DOE employees and the public. DOE spends almost $1 billion a year on this security program. DOE administers the security program through periodic inspections that evaluate and monitor the effectiveness of facilities' safeguards and security. Security inspections identify deficiencies, instances of noncompliance with safeguards and security requirements or poor performance of the systems being evaluated, that must be corrected to maintain adequate security. The contractors and DOE share responsibility for correcting deficiencies. Contractors, in correcting deficiencies, must comply with several DOE orders. The contractors' performances were not adequate in conducting four of the eight procedures considered necessary in meeting DOE's deficiency correction requirements. For 19 of the 20 deficiency cases we reviewed, contractors could not demonstrate that they had conducted three critical deficiency analyses (root cause, risk assessment, and cost-benefit) required by DOE. Additionally, the contractors did not always adequately verify that corrective actions taken were appropriate, effective, and complete. The contractors performed the remaining four procedures (reviewing deficiencies for duplication, entering deficiencies into a data base, tracking the status of deficiencies, and preparing and implementing a corrective action plan) adequately in all 20 cases. DOE's oversight of the corrective action process could be improved in three areas. The computerized systems used to track the status of security

  2. History, organization, and oversight of the accredited dosimetry calibration laboratories by the AAPM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenfeld, M.

    1993-01-01

    For more than 20 years, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) has operated an accreditation program for secondary standards laboratories that calibrate radiation measuring instruments. Except for one short period, that program has been able to provide the facilities to satisfy the national need for accurate calibrations of such instruments. That exception, in 1981, due to the combination of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requiring instrument calibrations by users of cobalt-60 teletherapy units and the withdrawal of one of the three laboratories accredited at that time. However, after successful operation as a Task Group of the Radiation Therapy Committee (RTC) of the AAPM for two decades, a reorganization of this structure is now under serious consideration by the administration of the AAPM

  3. History, organization, and oversight of the accredited dosimetry calibration laboratories by the AAPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozenfeld, M. [St. James Hospital and Health Centers, Chicago Heights, IL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    For more than 20 years, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) has operated an accreditation program for secondary standards laboratories that calibrate radiation measuring instruments. Except for one short period, that program has been able to provide the facilities to satisfy the national need for accurate calibrations of such instruments. That exception, in 1981, due to the combination of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requiring instrument calibrations by users of cobalt-60 teletherapy units and the withdrawal of one of the three laboratories accredited at that time. However, after successful operation as a Task Group of the Radiation Therapy Committee (RTC) of the AAPM for two decades, a reorganization of this structure is now under serious consideration by the administration of the AAPM.

  4. The Security of Russia's Nuclear Arsenal: The Human Factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, D.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Assertions by the Russian military that all of their nuclear weapons are secure against theft and that nuclear units within the military are somehow insulated from the problems plaguing the Russian military should not be accepted uncritically. Accordingly, we should not give unwarranted credence to the pronouncements of military figures like Cal.-Gen. Igor Valynkin, Chief of the Defense Ministry's 12th Main Directorate, which oversees the country's nuclear arsenal. He contends that ''Russian nuclear weapons are under reliable supervision'' and that ''talk about the unreliability of our control over nuclear weapons has only one pragmatic goal--to convince international society that the country is incapable of maintaining nuclear safety and to introduce international oversight over those weapons, as it is done, for example, in Iraq.'' While the comparison to Iraq is preposterous, many analysts might agree with Valynkin's sanguine appraisal of the security of Russia's nuclear weapons. In contrast, I argue that the numerous difficulties confronting the military as a whole should cause concern in the West over the security of the Russian nuclear arsenal

  5. Nuclear Protections and Safety Act of 1987. Report of the Committee on Governmental Affairs, United States Senate together with Additional Views to Accompany S. 1085, One Hundredth Congress, First Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The Senate report on S. 1085 suggests several amendments to the recommended bill which would make oversight of nuclear facility safety an independent board. The legislation responds to concerns that there is no justification for DOE facilities to be exempt from this kind of oversight, and that health and safety standards are as important at nuclear weapons and materials facilities as elsewhere. The report traces the emergence of the nuclear age and the different treatment of government and commercial facilities. There is evidence of a lack of concern for employee health and safety at some government installations. The report summarizes the four titles of the bill, reviews the four days of public hearings, and analyzes the bill by section. It notes changes that will result in the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, and the Department of Energy Organization Act

  6. EEI/UWASTE oversight of the DOE Repository Program by the Repository Information Exchange Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkel, C.J.; Supko, E.M.; Schwartz, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    The Utility Nuclear Waste and Transportation Program of the Edison Electric Institute (EEI/UWASTE) has conducted reviews of the US DOE's repository program through its Repository Information Exchange Team (RIET or Team). Eight such reviews have been conducted since 1985 covering topics that include repository program management and control; repository schedule; repository budget; quality assurance; site characterization; repository licensing; environmental issues; and institutional and public information activities. The utility industry has used these repository program reviews as a forum for providing DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with comments on the direction of the repository program, advice for future actions regarding quality assurance activities and repository licensing, and suggestions for management and control of the Repository Program. The most significant recommendations made by the utility industry through the RIET are discussed along with any subsequent action by OCRWM in response to or subsequent to utility industry recommendations. The process used by the RIET to develop its recommendations to OCRWM regarding the repository program is also discussed

  7. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2005-01-01

    This chapter discussed the following topics related to the nuclear power: nuclear reactions, nuclear reactors and its components - reactor fuel, fuel assembly, moderator, control system, coolants. The topics titled nuclear fuel cycle following subtopics are covered: , mining and milling, tailings, enrichment, fuel fabrication, reactor operations, radioactive waste and fuel reprocessing. Special topic on types of nuclear reactor highlighted the reactors for research, training, production, material testing and quite detail on reactors for electricity generation. Other related topics are also discussed: sustainability of nuclear power, renewable nuclear fuel, human capital, environmental friendly, emission free, impacts on global warming and air pollution, conservation and preservation, and future prospect of nuclear power

  8. Implementation of Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP) guidelines within the External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Christopher A; Sanchez, Ana M; Garcia, Ambrosia; Denny, Thomas N; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella

    2014-07-01

    The EQAPOL contract was awarded to Duke University to develop and manage global proficiency testing programs for flow cytometry-, ELISpot-, and Luminex bead-based assays (cytokine analytes), as well as create a genetically diverse panel of HIV-1 viral cultures to be made available to National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers. As a part of this contract, EQAPOL was required to operate under Good Clinical Laboratory Practices (GCLP) that are traditionally used for laboratories conducting endpoint assays for human clinical trials. EQAPOL adapted these guidelines to the management of proficiency testing programs while simultaneously incorporating aspects of ISO/IEC 17043 which are specifically designed for external proficiency management. Over the first two years of the contract, the EQAPOL Oversight Laboratories received training, developed standard operating procedures and quality management practices, implemented strict quality control procedures for equipment, reagents, and documentation, and received audits from the EQAPOL Central Quality Assurance Unit. GCLP programs, such as EQAPOL, strengthen a laboratory's ability to perform critical assays and provide quality assessments of future potential vaccines. © 2013.

  9. How can nanobiotechnology oversight advance science and industry: examples from environmental, health, and safety studies of nanoparticles (nano-EHS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jing; Asbach, Christof; Fissan, Heinz; Hülser, Tim; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A. J.; Thompson, Drew; Pui, David Y. H.

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology has great potential to transform science and industry in the fields of energy, material, environment, and medicine. At the same time, more concerns are being raised about the occupational health and safety of nanomaterials in the workplace and the implications of nanotechnology on the environment and living systems. Studies on environmental, health, and safety (EHS) issues of nanomaterials have a strong influence on public acceptance of nanotechnology and, eventually, affect its sustainability. Oversight and regulation by government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) play significant roles in ensuring responsible and environmentally friendly development of nanotechnology. The EHS studies of nanomaterials can provide data and information to help the development of regulations and guidelines. We present research results on three aspects of EHS studies: physico-chemical characterization and measurement of nanomaterials; emission, exposure, and toxicity of nanomaterials; and control and abatement of nanomaterial releases using filtration technology. Measurement of nanoparticle agglomerates using a newly developed instrument, the Universal NanoParticle Analyzer (UNPA), is discussed. Exposure measurement results for silicon nanoparticles in a pilot scale production plant are presented, as well as exposure measurement and toxicity study of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Filtration studies of nanoparticle agglomerates are also presented as an example of emission control methods.

  10. Animal Research, the 3Rs, and the "Internet of Things": Opportunities and Oversight in International Pharmaceutical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Steven M; Davies, Gail F

    2016-12-01

    Stages of drug (and vaccine) discovery and evaluation that involve laboratory animals increasingly occur via scientific collaborations across national borders and continents. Many of these research collaborations are between asset-rich institutions and others in less wealthy parts of the world. The care and use of laboratory animals in geographically disparate locations introduces new complexities, such as different oversight requirements and available resources, as well as diverse organizational and cultural milieus. These complexities can hamper the effectiveness of local animal welfare committees and regulatory compliance, as well as compromise good science and animal welfare. At the same time, new technologies are becoming available that offer greater transparency in how these collaborations and their animal subjects are faring in real time that, in turn, can enable progress towards the 3 Rs. The focus of this essay is to identify potential rewards and risks stemming from new techniques for producing and connecting data in preclinical pharmaceutical development and consider how further social scientific investigations have the potential to enhance the benefits of international research collaborations for both human health and animal welfare. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Promoting Healthy Growth or Feeding Obesity? The Need for Evidence-Based Oversight of Infant Nutritional Supplement Claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Lampl

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD model recognizes growth in infancy and childhood as a fundamental determinant of lifespan health. Evidence of long-term health risks among small neonates who subsequently grow rapidly poses a challenge for interventions aiming to support healthy growth, not merely drive weight gain. Defining healthy growth beyond “getting bigger” is essential as infant and young child feeding industries expand. Liquid-based nutritional supplements, originally formulated for undernourished children, are increasingly marketed for and consumed by children generally. Clarifying the nature of the evidentiary base on which structure/function claims promoting “healthy growth” are constructed is important to curb invalid generalizations. Evidence points to changing social beliefs and cultural practices surrounding supplementary feeding, raising specific concerns about the long-term health consequences of an associated altered feeding culture, including reduced dietary variety and weight gain. Reassessing the evidence for and relevance of dietary supplements’ “promoting healthy growth” claims for otherwise healthy children is both needed in a time of global obesity and an opportunity to refine intervention approaches among small children for whom rapid subsequent growth in early life augments risk for chronic disease. Scientific and health care partnerships are needed to consider current governmental oversight shortfalls in protecting vulnerable populations from overconsumption. This is important because we may be doing more harm than good.

  12. Nuclear Safety Review for the Year 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-07-01

    , including an independent regulatory body, must also be established and sustained. The development of a national safety infrastructure and relevant capacity building are complex undertakings that take significant time and resources. Safety infrastructure is particularly important for nuclear power programmes. From site selection through to eventual decommissioning, the lifetime of a nuclear power plant can exceed 100 years. A growing number of Member States are considering a nuclear power programme for the first time. These new entrants may have an adequate safety infrastructure for their current nuclear applications, but do not yet have an adequate infrastructure for the implementation of a nuclear power programme. The nuclear industry is becoming increasingly multinational in nature. In the nuclear power sector, there are a large number of nuclear power plant component suppliers and service providers. To provide assurances that these suppliers, particularly those that supply major components, are meeting the high standards of quality required, oversight audits are conducted. Through careful coordination of effort, there is an opportunity for suppliers, utilities and regulatory bodies to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of this oversight. There is general international understanding that suppliers of nuclear technology have to assist new entrant countries in the development of the appropriate national safety infrastructure. In the area of incident and emergency preparedness and response, there continues to be a need to establish clear communication procedures in response to any type of radiation incident or emergency to ensure that the public is well informed. There is also a need to increase the number of drills and exercises in incident and emergency response at all levels, as well as expanding their scope to include both safety and security aspects and initiators. By the end of 2008, 14 Member States had registered a number of expert capabilities with the Agency

  13. Reply to ''Comment on enhancement of forbidden nuclear beta decay by high-intensity radio-frequency fields''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    The negative conclusion in the Comment of Becker, Schlicher, and Scully about electromagnetic enhancement of beta decay is shown to be faulty. They have found an algebraic oversight in my paper, but correction of that oversight yields results strongly resembling the original. Becker, Schlicher, and Scully fail to find this. They then conduct an analysis which is highly implicit and incomplete. In attempting to analyze their very complicated expressions they claim not to find significant electromagnetic effects. Yet they also lose completely the electron retardation term of conventional forbidden beta decay. When they attempt to explain the difference between their results and mine, they misconstrue the momentum-translation technique and end up in a logical contradiction. They attempt also to apply a ''no-go'' theorem applicable only to plane-wave particles to my theory, which is built around the use of bound-state nuclear wave functions. This makes the no-go theorem inapplicable

  14. 'We all want to succeed, but we've also got to be realistic about what is happening': an ethnographic study of relationships in trial oversight and their impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daykin, Anne; Selman, Lucy E; Cramer, Helen; McCann, Sharon; Shorter, Gillian W; Sydes, Matthew R; Gamble, Carrol; Macefield, Rhiannon; Lane, J Athene; Shaw, Alison

    2017-12-22

    The oversight and conduct of a randomised controlled trial involves several stakeholders, including a Trial Steering Committee (TSC), Trial Management Group (TMG), Data Monitoring Committee (DMC), funder and sponsor. We aimed to examine how the relationships between these stakeholders affect the trial oversight process and its rigour, to inform future revision of Good Clinical Practice guidelines. Using an ethnographic study design, we observed the oversight processes of eight trials and conducted semi-structured interviews with members of the trials' TSCs and TMGs, plus other relevant informants, including sponsors and funders of trials. Data were analysed thematically, and findings triangulated and integrated to give a multi-perspective account of current oversight practices in the UK. Eight TSC and six TMG meetings from eight trials were observed and audio-recorded, and 66 semi-structured interviews conducted with 52 purposively sampled key informants. Five themes are presented: (1) Collaboration within the TMG and role of the CTU; (2) Collaboration and conflict between oversight committees; (3) Priorities; (4) Communication between trial oversight groups and (5) Power and accountability. There was evidence of collaborative relationships, based on mutual respect, between CTUs, TMGs and TSCs, but also evidence of conflict. Relationships between trial oversight committees were influenced by stakeholders' priorities, both organisational and individual. Good communication following specific, recognised routes played a central role in ensuring that relationships were productive and trial oversight efficient. Participants described the possession of power over trials as a shifting political landscape, and there was lack of clarity regarding the roles and accountability of each committee, the sponsor and funder. Stakeholders' perceptions of their own power over a trial, and the power of others, influenced relationships between those involved in trial oversight. Recent

  15. Nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This fact sheet answers specific questions about the Department of Energy's possible acquisition and conversion of a partially completed commercial nuclear power plant to a nuclear materials production facility. The nuclear power plant is the Washington Nuclear Plant number sign 1 owned by the Washington Public Power Supply System and is located on DOE's Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington

  16. Nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    This report answers questions about the Department of Energy's possible acquisition and conversion of a partially completed commercial nuclear power plant to a nuclear materials production facility. The nuclear power plant is the Washington Nuclear Plant No.1 owned by the Washington Public Power Supply System and is located on DOE's Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington

  17. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    Several growth areas for nuclear medicine were defined. Among them were: cardiac nuclear medicine, neuro-psychiatric nuclear medicine, and cancer diagnosis through direct tumor imaging. A powerful new tool, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was lauded as the impetus for new developments in nuclear medicine. The political environment (funding, degree of autonomy) was discussed, as were the economic and scientific environments

  18. Nuclear option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemm, K R

    1978-05-01

    The global outlook is that nuclear reactors are here to stay and South Africa has already entered the nuclear power stakes. This article discusses the rocketing oil prices, and the alternatives that can be used in power generation, the good safety record of the nuclear industry and the effect that South Africa's first nuclear power station should have on the environment.

  19. Nuclear resisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The booklet contains six papers by different authors, under the headings: dangers along the nuclear fuel cycle; the nuclear profiteers; the nuclear state is a police state; a non-disposable future (renewable energy sources, energy conservation); nuclear weapons - out of control; man made madness. (U.K.)

  20. Nuclear engineering R ampersand D at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, D.R.; Ferrara, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is the prime operating contractor for the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. One division of WSRC, the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), has the primary responsibility for research and development, which includes supporting the safe and efficient operation of the SRS production reactors. Several Sections of SRL, as well as other organization in WSRC, pursue R ampersand D and oversight activities related to nuclear engineering. The Sections listed below are described in more detail in this document: (SRL) nuclear reactor technology and scientific computations department; (SRL) safety analysis and risk management department; (WSRC) new production reactor program; and (WSRC) environment, safety, health, and quality assurance division

  1. Safeguards and an internationalized nuclear fuel cycle for East Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, John

    2005-01-01

    Concerns about nuclear proliferation by means of illicit enrichment of uranium or reprocessing of plutonium suggest limiting those technologies to a few, large facilities. In turn, countries that renounce acquiring those capabilities would be guaranteed fuel cycle services. Interdependence might lead to an Internationalized Nuclear Fuel Cycle (IFC), which could be formalized in voluntary regional compacts to share management of certain facilities. An IFC could add managerial oversight to strengthen the nonproliferation culture in the region and offer cost and efficiency benefits to participating countries, as well. An East Asian IFC would present opportunities to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of international safeguards by consolidating inspection requirements into relatively few facilities. This may be an opportune time to consider an IFC before the growing national industries each invest in separate facilities. An East Asian IFC regime could minimize international safeguards burdens, strengthen regional non-proliferation cooperation, and help manage future energy costs. (author)

  2. Nuclear links

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The subject is dealt with in sections: introduction; energy and the third world; world energy consumption 1978; oil -the energy dilemma; nuclear chains - introduction; uranium; Namibia; enrichment and reprocessing; countries with enrichment and reprocessing facilities; waste; conclusion; why take the nuclear option; third world countries with nuclear reactors; the arms connection; government spending and human resources 1977 (by countries); nuclear power - the final solution; the fascists; world bank; campaigns; community action in Plogoff; Australian labour movement; NUM against nuclear power; Scottish campaign; students against nuclear energy; anti-nuclear campaign; partizans; 3W1 disarmament and development; campaign ATOM; CANUC; 3W1; SANE. (U.K.)

  3. SWOT of nuclear power plant sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbaspour, M.; Ghazi, S.

    2008-01-01

    SWOT Analysis is a Useful tool that can he applied to most projects or business ventures. In this article we are going to examine major strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of nuclear power plants in view of sustainable development. Nuclear power plants have already attained widespread recognition for its benefits in fossil pollution abatement, near-zero green house gas emission, price stability and security of energy supply. The impressive new development is that these virtues are now a cost -free bonus, because, in long run, nuclear energy has become an inexpensive way to generate electricity. Nuclear energy's pre-eminence economically and environmentally has two implications for government policy. First, governments should ensure that nuclear licensing and safety oversight arc not only rigorous but also efficient in facilitating timely development of advanced power plants. Second, governments should be bold incentivizing the transformation to clean energy economics, recognizing that such short-term stimulus will, in the case of nuclear plants, simply accelerate desirable changes that now have their own long-term momentum. The increased competitiveness of nuclear power plant is the result of cost reductions in all aspects of nuclear economics: Construction, financing, operations, waste management and decommissioning. Among the cost-lowering factors are the evolution to standardized reactor designs, shorter construction periods, new financing techniques, more efficient generation technologies, higher rates of reactor utilization, and longer plant lifetimes. U.S World Nuclear Association report shows that total electricity costs for power plant construction and operation were calculated at two interest rates. At 10%, midrange generating costs per kilowatt-hour are nuclear at 4 cents, coal at 4.7 cents and natural gas at 5.1 cent. At a 5% interest rate, mid-range costs per KWh fall to nuclear at 2.6 cents, coal at 3.7 cents and natural gas at 4.3 cents

  4. Federal Research: Opportunities Exist to Improve the Management and Oversight of Federally Funded Research and Development Centers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woods, William; Mittal, Anu; Neumann, John; Williams, Cheryl; Candon, Sharron; Sterling, Suzanne; Wade, Jacqueline; Zwanzig, Peter

    2008-01-01

    .... FFRDCs -- including laboratories, studies and analyses centers, and systems engineering centers -- conduct research in military space programs, nanotechnology, microelectronics, nuclear warfare...

  5. High technology and the courts: nuclear power and the need for institutional reform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellin, J.

    1981-01-01

    In this article Professor Yellin analyzes the performance of the courts when confronted with the important and complex issues attending the commercial development of nuclear power. He draws three general conclusions from the analysis: (1) the failure of nuclear regulation indicates that substantive review of agency decision making is necessary; (2) the limitations of the courts' ability to understand the scientific and technological arguments inherent in the nuclear power cases suggest the need for hybrid legal and scientific oversight of technological decisions; and (3) procedural requirements of the adversary system tend to impede full presentation of the issues in nuclear power cases, again pointing to the need for new systems of review. Professor Yellin proposes creation of a permanent review board composed of masters trained in both science and law to which technological and scientific issues falling outside the special competence of the judiciary would be referred by the federal appellate courts

  6. A Comparison of the Audit and Accreditation Tools Used By The Health Care Financing Administration, The Texas Department of Insurance, and The National Committee on Quality Assurance: The Cost of Multi-Agency Oversight on Medicare+Choice Plans in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-12

    Comparison of Oversight Models in Managed Care 1 Running Head: Comparison of Oversight Models in Managed Care A Comparison of the Audit and...TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Comparison of the Audit and Accreditation Tools Used By The Health Care Financing Administration, The Texas Department of...Comparison of Oversight Models in Managed Care 5 A Comparison of the Audit and Accreditation Tools Used By The Health Care Financing

  7. Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office final progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) was formally established by Executive Policy in 1983 following passage of the federal Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Act). That Act provides for the systematic siting, construction, operation, and closure of high-level radioactive defense and research by-products and other forms of high-level radioactive waste from around the country which will be stored at such repositories. In 1985 the Nevada legislature formally established the NWPO as a distinct and statutorily authorized agency to provide support to the Governor and State Legislature on matters concerning the high-level nuclear waste programs. The NWPO utilized a small, central staff supplemented by contractual services for needed technical and specialized expertise in order to provide high quality oversight and monitoring of federal activities, to conduct necessary independent studies, and to avoid unnecessary duplication of efforts. This report summarizes the results of this ongoing program to ensure that risks to the environment and to human safety are minimized. It includes findings in the areas of hydrogeology, geology, quality assurance activities, repository engineering, legislature participation, socioeconomic affects, risk assessments, monitoring programs, public information dissemination, and transportation activities. The bulk of the reporting deals with the Yucca Mountain facility

  8. International status and prospects of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-12-01

    Nuclear power plants are primarily used for electricity production. Currently, 439 reactors are operating in 30 countries and are contributing approximately 14% to global electricity generation. The share of nuclear in global electricity generation has declined slightly in recent years. However, the total amount of nuclear electricity generation is increasing as plant availability, power uprating, and new plants offset the loss from older plants that are being shut down. Due to the economic benefits of continuing operation of a plant after the capital cost has been repaid, and with careful plant life management assessments, a number of reactors have had their operating licences extended for an additional 20 years. Light water reactors (LWRs) are by far the most prevalent reactors in use today, followed by pressurized heavy water reactors, gas cooled reactors and, currently, two fast reactors. The safety and reliability of nuclear facilities have been steadily improving. Strong networks among countries with operating nuclear power plants have enabled operators to learn from each other and to address common issues. Ongoing efforts have continuously strengthened safety culture and regulatory oversight. The current available supply of uranium meets the demand. Current enrichment and fuel fabrication capacities are adequate to meet the expected demand for the next decade. There is also substantial experience in the storage and reprocessing of spent fuel and the treatment of high level waste. Existing reprocessing capacity is adequate to meet present demand. Most spent fuel continues, however, to be stored awaiting a decision on future policy, i.e. whether to reprocess and recycle it or to dispose of it as waste. To date, no ultimate disposal facilities are available. Only a few countries currently use civil nuclear energy for purposes other than electricity production - mainly for seawater desalination and district heating - and even then only to a limited extent

  9. Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas-Hamilton, J.; Home Robertson, J.; Beith, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this debate the Government's policy on nuclear power is discussed. Government policy is that nuclear power is the safest and cleanest way of generating electricity and is cheap. Other political parties who do not endorse a nuclear energy policy are considered not to be acting in the people's best interests. The debate ranged over the risks from nuclear power, the UK safety record, safety regulations, and the environmental effects of nuclear power. The Torness nuclear power plant was mentioned specifically. The energy policy of the opposition parties is strongly criticised. The debate lasted just over an hour and is reported verbatim. (UK)

  10. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1991-01-01

    Partial Contents: Medium Range Missiles, Rocket Engine, Nuclear Submarine, Nuclear Reactor, Nuclear Inspection, Nuclear Weapons, Transfer Technology, Scud, Safety, Nuclear Power, Chernobyl Trial, ,CHemical Weapons...

  11. Nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal, V.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear forensics is the analysis of nuclear materials recovered from either the capture of unused materials, or from the radioactive debris following a nuclear explosion and can contribute significantly to the identification of the sources of the materials and the industrial processes used to obtain them. In the case of an explosion, nuclear forensics can also reconstruct key features of the nuclear device. Nuclear forensic analysis works best in conjunction with other law enforcement, radiological protection dosimetry, traditional forensics, and intelligence work to provide the basis for attributing the materials and/or nuclear device to its originators. Nuclear forensics is a piece of the overall attribution process, not a stand-alone activity

  12. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    ''Nuclear Power'' describes how a reactor works and examines the different designs including Magnox, AGR, RBMK and PWR. It charts the growth of nuclear generation in the world and its contributions to world energy resources. (author)

  13. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  14. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, W.

    1986-01-01

    This loose-leaf collection is made up of five didactically prepared units covering the following subjects: basic knowledge on nuclear energy, nuclear energy in relation to energy economy, site issues, environmental compatibility of nuclear energy, and nuclear energy in the focus of political and social action. To this was added a comprehensive collection of material: specific scientific background material, a multitude of tables, diagrams, charts etc. for copying, as well as 44 transparent charts, mostly in four colours. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, D.A.; Joy, T.

    1986-01-01

    The paper on 'nuclear structure' is the Appendix to the Daresbury (United Kingdom) Annual Report 1985/86, and contains the research work carried out at the Nuclear Structure Facility, Daresbury, within that period. During the year a total of 74 experiments were scheduled covering the main areas of activity including: nuclear collective motion, nuclei far from stability, and nuclear collisions. The Appendix contains brief reports on these experiments and associated theory. (U.K.)

  16. Nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Recent reports of alleged terrorist plans to build a 'dirty bomb' have heightened longstanding concerns about nuclear terrorism. This briefing outlines possible forms of attack, such as: detonation of a nuclear weapon; attacks involving radioactive materials; attacks on nuclear facilities. Legislation addressing these risks and the UK's strategy for coping with them are also considered

  17. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    d'Easum, Lille.

    1976-03-01

    An environmentalist's criticism of nuclear energy is given, on a layman's level. Such subjects as conflict of interest in controlling bodies, low-level radiation, reactor safety, liability insurance, thermal pollution, economics, heavy water production, export of nuclear technology, and the history of the anti-nuclear movement are discussed in a sensationalistic tone. (E.C.B.)

  18. Nuclear alerts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Anti-nuclear demonstrations against the deployment of new US missiles were held in Nato Europe. As no agreement has yet been reached at the US-Soviet Intermediate Nuclear Forces talks in Geneva, the deployment of nuclear missiles in Europe has started

  19. Nuclear questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Civilian and military nuclear questions fill a multitude of publications these days, especially after the Japanese tsunami and the Fukushima disaster. The author analyses some of them and highlights the links between civil and military nuclear industries, the realities of the nuclear cycle and related industrial questions before concluding on the controversial issue of weapons and their proliferation potential

  20. Nuclear decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The paper on nuclear decommissioning was presented by Dr H. Lawton to a meeting of the British Nuclear Energy Society and Institution of Nuclear Engineers, 1986. The decommissioning work currently being undertaken on the Windscale advanced gas cooled reactor (WAGR) is briefly described, along with projects in other countries, development work associated with the WAGR operation and costs. (U.K.)

  1. Nuclear electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friese, T.

    1981-09-01

    A short survey is given on nuclear radiation detectors and nuclear electronics. It is written for newcomers and those, who are not very familiar with this technique. Some additional information is given on typical failures in nuclear measurement systems. (orig.) [de

  2. Principal Areas of Activity to Improve the Monitoring of Nuclear Material Security and Accounting in the Russian Federation Ministry of Atomic Energy, within the Framework of the Program of Cooperation with the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erastov, Victor V.; Cunningham, Mitchel E.

    2004-01-01

    One of the major elements of the Russian Federation state system of accounting and control of nuclear materials (SSAC NM) is a 'universal' oversight system for nuclear materials security covering MPC and A at the federal, agency and enterprise levels. Oversight of SSAC NM has always been considered important by the State. In 1951 an Order of the USSR Council of Ministers created a department responsible for the accounting and storing of nuclear materials at the enterprises. The accounting and storing of NM was assigned to the First Central administrative board of the Council of Ministers of the USSR (the former name of the Ministry of Atomic Energy of Russia). Originally this activity included, in general, oversight of the maintenance of secrecy and security during the performance of various kinds of work connected with special production (classified products and materials). Since 1995, beginning with the enactment of the Federal law 'On the use of atomic energy,' this activity has received additional development beyond organizational-methodological activities. Technical equipment and new technologies have been introduced into work on the control of nuclear materials security (for example, means of controlling access to nuclear material, equipment for detecting radiation from nuclear material, etc.). The questions connected to development and perfection of oversight activity are laid out in the 6th section of the Federal targeted program 'Nuclear and radiation safety of Russia' in which the overall working plan for the creation and perfection of the state system accounting and the control of nuclear material in Russia are described. Russian-American collaboration on MPC and A began nearly simultaneously with the enactment of the Law 'On the use of atomic energy.' The purpose of this collaborative program is the introduction of modern technologies in the area of nuclear materials security to the Russian installations using nuclear materials for industrial and

  3. Comparison of the Canadian and US Laws, Regulations, Policies, and Systems of Oversight for Animals in Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Gilly; Locke, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The Canadian and United States' approaches to oversight of animals in research are both based on the "3Rs" principles outlined in Russell and Burch's classic text, The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique. Each country seeks to protect the welfare of animals, while permitting the legitimate goals of scientific research to be attained according to the legal principles, cultures, and strengths and constraints of their jurisprudential and societal traditions. Canada is one of the most decentralized federations in the world, and regulation of activities is based to a great extent on custom and practice. The United States is more hierarchical and, at least with respect to laws governing animal research, more centralized. Accordingly, the Canadian approach is rooted in the concepts of social contracts, with a greater emphasis on guidance and policy and less reliance on legislation. No federal (national) direct legislation of laboratory animal welfare exists, although the federal government uses its criminal and spending authorities to shape behavior. The central feature of the Canadian system is the Canadian Council on Animal Care, which was formed to support universities and government departments involved in animal-based science. Animal care committees play a central role in implementing the guidelines and policies in facilities that carry out animal research. The United States has enacted two federal (national) laws applicable to animals in research. The Animal Welfare Act is a more traditional, command-and-control law that gives authority to the US Department of Agriculture to promulgate regulations, inspect facilities, and enforce violations. The Health Research Extension Act, which amended the US Public Health Services (PHS) Act, applies to any activity conducted or supported by the PHS, including research efforts supported by the US National Institutes of Health. It is largely nonregulatory and establishes a system of assurances and policies that covered

  4. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This digest document was written by members of the union of associations of ex-members and retired people of the Areva group (UARGA). It gives a comprehensive overview of the nuclear industry world, starting from radioactivity and its applications, and going on with the fuel cycle (front-end, back-end, fuel reprocessing, transports), the nuclear reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu, HTR, generation 4 systems), the effluents from nuclear facilities, the nuclear wastes (processing, disposal), and the management and safety of nuclear activities. (J.S.)

  5. Nuclear orientation and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krane, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    The present generation of on-line nuclear orientation facilities promises to revolutionize the gathering of nuclear structure information, especially for the hitherto poorly known and understood nuclei far from stability. Following a brief review of the technological developments that have facilitated these experiments, the nuclear spectroscopic information that can be obtained is summarized. Applications to understanding nuclear structure are reviewed, and challenges for future studies are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The committee concludes that the nature of the proliferation problem is such that even stopping nuclear power completely could not stop proliferation completely. Countries can acquire nuclear weapons by means independent of commercial nuclear power. It is reasonable to suppose if a country is strongly motivated to acquire nuclear weapons, it will have them by 2010, or soon thereafter, no matter how nuclear power is managed in the meantime. Unilateral and international diplomatic measures to reduce the motivations that lead to proliferation should be high on the foreign policy agenda of the United States. A mimimum antiproliferation prescription for the management of nuclear power is to try to raise the political barriers against proliferation through misuse of nuclear power by strengthening the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and to seek to raise the technological barriers by placing fuel-cycle operations involving weapons-usable material under international control. Any such measures should be considered tactics to slow the spread of nuclear weapons and thus earn time for the exercise of statesmanship. The committee concludes the following about technical factors that should be considered in formulating nuclear policy: (1) rate of growth of electricity use is a primary factor; (2) growth of conventional nuclear power will be limited by producibility of domestic uranium sources; (3) greater contribution of nuclear power beyond 400 GWe past the year 2000 can only be supported by advanced reactor systems; and (4) several different breeder reactors could serve in principle as candidates for an indefinitely sustainable source of energy

  7. Nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, Anwar

    2014-01-01

    Explains the concepts in detail and in depth. Provides step-by-step derivations. Contains numerous tables and diagrams. Supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Sketches also the historical development of the subject. This textbook explains the experimental basics, effects and theory of nuclear physics. It supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Numerous tables and diagrams help to better understand the explanations. A better feeling to the subject of the book is given with sketches about the historical development of nuclear physics. The main topics of this book include the phenomena associated with passage of charged particles and radiation through matter which are related to nuclear resonance fluorescence and the Moessbauer effect., Gamov's theory of alpha decay, Fermi theory of beta decay, electron capture and gamma decay. The discussion of general properties of nuclei covers nuclear sizes and nuclear force, nuclear spin, magnetic dipole moment and electric quadrupole moment. Nuclear instability against various modes of decay and Yukawa theory are explained. Nuclear models such as Fermi Gas Model, Shell Model, Liquid Drop Model, Collective Model and Optical Model are outlined to explain various experimental facts related to nuclear structure. Heavy ion reactions, including nuclear fusion, are explained. Nuclear fission and fusion power production is treated elaborately.

  8. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors

  9. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors. (Auth.)

  10. Nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadeniz, O.; Guenalp, G.

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses the methodology of nuclear forensics and illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. Nuclear forensics is relatively new scientific branch whose aim it is to read out material inherent from nuclear material. Nuclear forensics investigations have to be considered as part of a comprehensive set of measures for detection,interception, categorization and characterization of illicitly trafficking nuclear material. Prevention, detection and response are the main elements in combating illicit trafficking. Forensics is a key element in the response process. Forensic science is defined as the application of a broad spectrum of sciences to answer questions of interest to the legal system. Besides, in this study we will explain age determination of nuclear materials.

  11. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangwani, Saloni; Chakrabortty, Sumita

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fuel is a material that can be consumed to derive nuclear energy, by analogy to chemical fuel that is burned for energy. Nuclear fuels are the most dense sources of energy available. Nuclear fuel in a nuclear fuel cycle can refer to the fuel itself, or to physical objects (for example bundles composed of fuel rods) composed of the fuel material, mixed with structural, neutron moderating, or neutron reflecting materials. Long-lived radioactive waste from the back end of the fuel cycle is especially relevant when designing a complete waste management plan for SNF. When looking at long-term radioactive decay, the actinides in the SNF have a significant influence due to their characteristically long half-lives. Depending on what a nuclear reactor is fueled with, the actinide composition in the SNF will be different. The following paper will also include the uses. advancements, advantages, disadvantages, various processes and behavior of nuclear fuels

  12. Nuclear networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Burke, Brian

    2017-07-04

    Nuclear lamins are intermediate filament proteins that represent important structural components of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs). By combining proteomics and superresolution microscopy, we recently reported that both A- and B-type nuclear lamins form spatially distinct filament networks at the nuclear periphery of mouse fibroblasts. In particular, A-type lamins exhibit differential association with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our studies reveal that the nuclear lamina network in mammalian somatic cells is less ordered and more complex than that of amphibian oocytes, the only other system in which the lamina has been visualized at high resolution. In addition, the NPC component Tpr likely links NPCs to the A-type lamin network, an association that appears to be regulated by C-terminal modification of various A-type lamin isoforms. Many questions remain, however, concerning the structure and assembly of lamin filaments, as well as with their mode of association with other nuclear components such as peripheral chromatin.

  13. Building Nuclear Safety and Security Culture Within Regulatory Body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, K.

    2016-01-01

    To achieve a higher level of nuclear safety and security, it needs to develop the safety and security culture not only in the facility but also in the regulatory body. The regulatory body, especially needs to develop the safety and security culture within the organization, because it has a function to promote and oversee the culture in the facilities. In this sense, the regulatory body should become a role model. Development of the nuclear safety and security culture should be started by properly understanding its concept and awakening the awareness of individual and organization on the importance of nuclear safety and security. For effectiveness of the culture development in the regulatory body, the following steps are suggested to be taken: setting up of the regulatory requirements, self-assessment, independent assessment review, communication with the licensee, oversight of management system implementation, and integration with regulatory activities. The paper discusses those steps in the framework of development of nuclear safety and security culture in the regulatory body, as well as some important elements in building of the culture in the nuclear facilities. (author)

  14. Market Oversight Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, Maarten Pieter

    2011-01-01

    Big business plays cat & mouse with market regulators. Market participants try to avoid the competitive pressures that the regulators are working to keep up. Only if the latter play these games at least as cleverly as the former can we reap all the fruits of competition. A case in point is the

  15. Market oversight games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    Big business plays cat & mouse with market regulators. Market participants try to avoid the competitive pressures that the regulators are working to keep up. Only if the latter play these games at least as cleverly as the former can we reap all the fruits of competition. A case in point is the

  16. Nuclear blackmail and nuclear balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    This book raises pointed questions about nuclear saber rattling. More than a dozen cases since the bombing of Hiroshima and Magasaki in which some sort of nuclear threat was used as a sparring technique in tense confrontations are cited. Each incident is described and analyzed. Two theories offered to explain America's use of nuclear threats, the balance of interest theory and the balance of power theory, are contrasted throughout the book. This book helps to fill the gap in the understanding of nuclear weapons and their uses, while pointing out that nuclear bravado could lead to an unintended unleashing of these weapons

  17. Nuclear energy and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.L.

    1983-06-01

    We all want to prevent the use of nuclear weapons. The issue before us is how best to achieve this objective; more specifically, whether the peaceful applications of nuclear energy help or hinder, and to what extent. Many of us in the nuclear industry are working on these applications from a conviction that without peaceful nuclear energy the risk of nuclear war would be appreciably greater. Others, however, hold the opposite view. In discussing the subject, a necessary step in allaying fears is understanding some facts, and indeed facing up to some unpalatable facts. When the facts are assessed, and a balance struck, the conclusion is that peaceful nuclear energy is much more part of the solution to preventing nuclear war than it is part of the problem

  18. The contribution of nuclear energy co-operation to a new global age, OECD Headquarters, Paris, 30 September 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the Special Session to mark the Fortieth Anniversary of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), held at the OECD Headquarters in Paris, on 30 September 1998. The conference emphasizes the role of the IAEA in enlarging the contribution of nuclear energy for peace and development, and ensuring that atomic energy is used at a high level of security and exclusively for peaceful purposes. The Agency was never intended to 'promote' nuclear energy in any commercial sense. Its role is to be an objective institution that serves as a centre for international norm development, standard setting, independent analysis, expert advice, technology transfer, and impartial oversight and verification. From this perspective, the Director General offers some views on why the international nuclear co-operation, complemented by regional and national activities, is an indispensable part of way forward, highlighting the following areas: energy, safety, verification, and technology transfer

  19. Nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In 1998, Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) performed 38 inspections, 25 of them were performed in co-operation with IAEA inspectors. There is no fresh nuclear fuel at Bohunice A-1 NPP at present. Fresh fuel of Bohunice V-1 and V-2 NPPs is inspected in the fresh fuel storage.There are 327 fresh fuel assemblies in Mochovce NPP fresh fuel storage. In addition to that, are also 71 small users of nuclear materials in Slovakia. In most cases they use: covers made of depleted uranium for non-destructive works, detection of level in production plants, covers for therapeutical sources at medical facilities. In. 1995, NRA SR issued 4 new licences for nuclear material withdrawal. In the next part manipulation with nuclear materials, spent fuel stores and illegal trafficking in nuclear materials are reported

  20. Nuclear Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesbauer, Bruno

    1978-01-01

    This book is the first attempt of a comprehensive compilation of national Austrian Nuclear Law (Nuclear Liability Act; Radiation protection Act, Radiation Protection Ordinance, Security Control Act, Act on the uses of Nuclear Energy - Zwentendorf Nuclear Power Plant) and the most important international agreements to which Austria is a party. Furthermore, the book contains the most important Nuclear Liability Conventions to which Austria is not yet a party, but which are applicable in neighbouring; the Paris Convention served as a model for the national Nuclear Liability Act and may be used for its interpretation. The author has translated a number of international instruments into German, such as the Expose des Motifs of the Paris Convention. (NEA) [fr

  1. Nuclear nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubert, M.

    1992-01-01

    The following motion was put before the United Kingdom House of Commons on 3rd February 1992 and agreed; that this House, recognising the potential dangers of the rapidly changing world order, welcomes the recent proposals for substantial reductions in nuclear weaponry, the growing support for the non-proliferation treaty and progress in the implementation of the United Nations Security Council Resolutions concerning the dismantling of Iraqi nuclear, chemical and biological capabilities; urges the Government to play their full part in helping the relevant authorities in the Commonwealth of Independent States to dismantle their nuclear devices, to safeguard their nuclear components and to discourage the proliferation of nuclear expertise; and believes it is of the first importance that Britain retains an effective and credible minimum nuclear deterrent as security in a world where there remain many sources of instability. The record of arguments for and against the motion in the debate is presented. (author)

  2. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panait, A.

    1994-01-01

    This is a general report presenting the section VII entitled Nuclear Power of the National Conference on Energy (CNE '94) held in Neptun, Romania, on 13-16 June 1994. The problems addressed were those relating to electric power produced by nuclear power plant, to heat secondary generation, to quality assurance, to safety, etc. A special attention was paid to the commissioning of the first Romanian nuclear power unit, the Cernavoda-1 reactor of CANDU type. The communications were grouped in four subsections. These were: 1. Quality assurance, nuclear safety, and environmental protection; 2. Nuclear power plant, commissioning, and operation; 3. Nuclear power plant inspection, maintenance, and repairs, heavy water technology; 4. Public opinion education. There were 22 reports, altogether

  3. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, P.

    1990-01-01

    Written from the basis of neutrality, neither for nor against nuclear power this book considers whether there are special features of nuclear power which mean that its development should be either promoted or restrained by the State. The author makes it dear that there are no easy answers to the questions raised by the intervention of nuclear power but calls for openness in the nuclear decision making process. First, the need for energy is considered; most people agree that energy is the power to progress. Then the historicalzed background to the current position of nuclear power is given. Further chapters consider the fuel cycle, environmental impacts including carbon dioxide emission and the greenhouse effect, the costs, safety and risks and waste disposal. No conclusion either for or against nuclear power is made. The various shades of opinion are outlined and the arguments presented so that readers can come to their own conclusions. (UK)

  4. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, Arthur.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter of the final report of the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning in Ontario updates its interim report on nuclear power in Ontario (1978) in the light of the Three Mile Island accident and presents the commission's general conclusions and recommendations relating to nuclear power. The risks of nuclear power, reactor safety with special reference to Three Mile Island and incidents at the Bruce generating station, the environmental effects of uranium mining and milling, waste management, nuclear power economics, uranium supplies, socio-political issues, and the regulation of nuclear power are discussed. Specific recommendations are made concerning the organization and public control of Ontario Hydro, but the commission concluded that nuclear power is acceptable in Ontario as long as satisfactory progress is made in the disposal of uranium mill tailings and spent fuel wastes. (LL)

  5. Natural Disasters and Safety Risks at Nuclear Power Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutnova, T.

    2012-04-01

    industry needs advanced mechanisms of international oversight. The natural-technological disaster that happens in a particular country is a matter of concern of the global community. Hence, the urgent necessity is to develop and adopt a joint mechanism for international consultation in case of serious accident at a nuclear power plant. It is also necessary to work out the list of constraining provisions for building and operating nuclear plants in regions where potential risks of natural-technological catastrophes exist. These provisions should include risk estimate for every particular region, as well as the list of preventive measures to secure the safe operation of nuclear plants located at those sites. As it was stated before, the synergy effects of more than one potential hazard must be taken into account. The main goal of my report is to represent possible methods for mitigating nuclear safety risks associated with natural hazards and technological disasters, review the effectiveness of existing standards and oversight mechanisms, encourage a cooperative discussion of these issues.

  6. Nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized

  7. Nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    This book is a simple and direct introduction to the tools of modern nuclear physics, both experimental and mathematical. Emphasizes physical intuition and illuminating analogies, rather than formal mathematics. Topics covered include particle accelerators, radioactive series, types of nuclear reactions, detection of the neutrino, nuclear isomerism, binding energy of nuclei, fission chain reactions, and predictions of the shell model. Each chapter contains problems and illustrative examples. Pre-requisites are calculus and elementary vector analysis

  8. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesketh, Ross.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is treated under the headings: nuclear energy -what is it; fusion (principles; practice); fission (principles); reactor types and systems (fast (neutron) reactors as breeders; fast reactors; thermal reactors; graphite-moderated thermal reactors; the CANDU reactor; light water reactors - the BWR and the PWR); the nuclear fuel cycle (waste storage; fuel element manufacture; enrichment processes; uranium mining); safety and risk assessment; the nuclear power industry and the economy (regulating authorities; economics; advantages and disadvantages). (U.K.)

  9. Nuclear Asia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferguson, Joseph; Tarleton, Gael

    2004-01-01

    .... This event was an opportunity for policy makers, security analysts, nuclear scientists and engineers, regional experts, and military planners to share perspectives and identify those issues requiring...

  10. Nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, M.B.

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances in nuclear medicine instrumentation and software, including myocardial perfusion imaging, offer increased accuracy in the detection, diagnosis and prognosis of coronary artery disease. (orig.)

  11. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The area of nuclear medicine, the development of artificially produced radioactive isotopes for medical applications, is relatively recent. Among the subjects covered in a lengthy discussion are the following: history of development; impact of nuclear medicine; understanding the most effective use of radioisotopes; most significant uses of nuclear medicine radioimmunoassays; description of equipment designed for use in the field of nuclear medicine (counters, scanning system, display systems, gamma camera); description of radioisotopes used and their purposes; quality control. Numerous historical photographs are included. 52 refs

  12. Nuclear Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascal, Maurice.

    1979-01-01

    This book on nuclear law is the first of a series of analytical studies to be published by the French Energy Commission (CEA) concerning all the various nuclear activities. It describes national and international legislation applicable in France covering the following main sectors: the licensing procedure for nuclear installations, the law of the sea and nuclear law, the legal system governing radioisotopes, the transport of radioactive materials, third party liability and insurance and radiation protection. In each chapter, the overall analysis is supplemented by the relevant regulatory texts and by organisation charts in annex. (NEA) [fr

  13. Nuclear Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, E G [ed.

    1989-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  14. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bupp, I.C.

    1991-01-01

    Is a nuclear power renaissance likely to occur in the United States? This paper investigates the many driving forces that will determine the answer to that question. This analysis reveals some frequently overlooked truths about the current state of nuclear technology: An examination of the issues also produces some noteworthy insights concerning government regulations and related technologies. Public opinion will play a major role in the unfolding story of the nuclear power renaissance. Some observers are betting that psychological, sociological, and political considerations will hod sway over public attitudes. Others wager that economic and technical concerns will prevail. The implications for the nuclear power renaissance are striking

  15. Communication planning by the nuclear regulatory body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The national regulatory body, whose primary mission is to exercise regulatory control over nuclear facilities and the use of radiation sources, but not to promote their use, may be the most credible source of neutral, balanced and accurate information about issues relating to nuclear and radiation safety. It is therefore important for a regulatory body to establish and exercise an effective communication programme to acquaint the public with its oversight functions, capabilities and effectiveness. If the regulatory body is to maintain credibility and to deal promptly and effectively with nuclear or radiological accidents and any other events that may give rise to significant public concerns, and is to communicate clearly and effectively with the public, it must have adequate resources, including experts in nuclear safety. And if maintaining public confidence in the authorities and avoiding unnecessary concerns are among its principal objectives, it must be able to communicate understandably and truthfully about the known extent of any accident, the actions taken in response to it and its implications. In the past, psychological effects as a result of certain severe nuclear and radiological accidents have been compounded by a lack of candour with the public on the part of the authorities and an absence of an appropriate programme of public information. This publication describes good practices and gives practical examples of how the regulatory body can establish a systematic and structured programme for enhancing effective communication with various parties and under various circumstances. The report presupposes an adequate national infrastructure, including an independent regulatory body with sufficient authority and resources to discharge its responsibilities for the regulation of safety. This Safety Report covers the elements of a regulatory body's programme for communication with various audiences and under the different circumstances that may be encountered

  16. One Year After Fukushima: Lessons for a Safer Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flory, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The accident at Fukushima Daiichi was a wake-up call for many. It reminded that nuclear accidents can happen, they do happen. Our common goal, in the Agency as well as in the wider international community, is that nuclear accidents become less and less likely. Our goal is also that, would an accident happen, all measures for minimizing its consequences would be available, exercised, effective. Every nuclear incident carries its lessons. These allow for a continuous strengthening of nuclear safety. Unfortunately, the most profound structural or cultural changes need exceptional events to make their way into our minds, into our culture, and into everyday implementation. On 11 March 2011 a huge earthquake and tsunami left more than 20,000 people dead or missing in eastern Japan. Amidst widespread destruction, the tsunami slammed into Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, disabling cooling systems and leading to fuel meltdowns in three of the six units. The accident was a jolt to the nuclear industry, regulators and governments. It was triggered by a massive force of nature, but it was existing weaknesses regarding defence against natural hazards, regulatory oversight, accident management and emergency response that allowed it to unfold as it did. The IAEA responded to the accident by activating its Incident and Emergency Centre and by organizing specialized expert missions to Japan to gain an understanding of the accident and to provide assistance and expert advice. The Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety organised by the IAEA in Vienna in June 2011 adopted a Ministerial Declaration which requested the Director General, inter alia, to prepare a draft IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety

  17. The case for international nuclear co-operation. An IAEA perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klerk, P. de

    2001-01-01

    In the light of the diminished commitment to the promotion and development of nuclear technologies by governments, and in view of the globalization of major parts of the nuclear sector, international cooperation is becoming increasingly more important. Continued strong cooperation is expected in the areas of nuclear safety and the advanced, development of nuclear power plant projects, the decommissioning of nuclear installations, and in waste management. The broad range of activities this entails for the future also add to the duties and the scope of activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as one of the main coordinating international institutions. In addition to the Agency's basic duty, i.e. overseeing more than nine hundred nuclear facilities in the non-nuclear weapon states under the non-proliferation scheme, it is mainly coordinating activities which are becoming more and more important in the changing environment. In the research sector alone, 159 projects are currently handled internationally under the 'Coordinated Research Projects' heading. In the interest of making national safety standards compatible, a multi-level international safety system is being developed which is to lay the foundations for decisions about the engineered safeguards design of nuclear plants on the national level which continues to bear responsibility for deciding in matters of safety. This broad range of duties in technology, safety, and oversight will make IAEA an important organization for multilateral cooperation. (orig.) [de

  18. Das Werden des Kosmos. Von der Erfahrung der zeitlichen Dimension astronomischer Objekte im 18. Jahrhundert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, F.

    This paper deals with two of the initial stages through which the dimension of time, in the sense of an irreversible development, found its way into astronomical-cosmological thinking. The one resulted from the first consequential application of Newtonian principles and laws to cosmic entities outside of our solar system found in the "General Natural History or Theory of the Heavens" by Immanuel Kant. The other initial stage is found in the classification of 'nebulae' by William Herschel who introduced the historical time factor as a principle of order in addition to the outward shape, which had become common for all the different elements in natural history during the second half of the 18th century.

  19. Nuclear stress test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Persantine stress test; Thallium stress test; Stress test - nuclear; Adenosine stress test; Regadenoson stress test; CAD - nuclear stress; Coronary artery disease - nuclear stress; Angina - nuclear ...

  20. Nuclear physics for nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xingzhong; Liu Bin; Wei Qingming; Ren Xianzhe

    2004-01-01

    The D-T fusion cross-section is calculated using quantum mechanics with the model of square nuclear potential well and Coulomb potential barrier. The agreement between ENDF data and the theoretically calculated results is well in the range of 0.2-280 keV. It shows that the application of Breit-Wigner formula is not suitable for the case of the light nuclei fusion reaction. When this model is applied to the nuclear reaction between the charged particles confined in a lattice, it explains the 'abnormal phenomena'. It implies a prospect of nuclear fusion energy without strong nuclear radiations

  1. Nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 2 of the document contains some details about the existing Brazilian nuclear installations. Also, safety improvements at Angra 1 and aspects of Angra 2 and 3 are reported

  2. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This book reviews the accomplishments, operations, and problems faced by the defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. Specifically, it discusses the recommendations that the Safety Board made to improve safety and health conditions at the Department of Energy's defense nuclear facilities, problems the Safety Board has encountered in hiring technical staff, and management problems that could affect the Safety Board's independence and credibility

  3. Nuclear violence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    A great deal of attention has been paid in the past decade or so to the characteristics of terrorists and their apparent goals and objectives, capabilities, and evolving strategy and tactics with respect to nuclear terrorism. In contrast, little has been said about the procedural aspects of nuclear terrorism, and even less about the way in which such endeavors can fail. This latter omission is important because it bears directly on the ability to evaluate credibly the potential for nuclear terrorism. Here, the author addresses the requirements inherent in acquiring a nuclear explosive capability by three routes: separation of plutonium from irradiated light or heavy water reactor (LWR or HWR) fuel, processing, or use of separated fissile material, and theft of a nuclear weapon. In addition, he deals with other potential acts of nuclear terrorism: sabotage of power reactors, uranium enrichment facilities and spent nuclear fuel in transport, and dispersal of radioactive materials, in particular, plutonium. He specifically does not look at the design or production of a nuclear weapon. Finally, the discussion here assumes that the terrorist is subnational; that is, a nation is not involved. Also, the discussion of subnational participation does not address the possibility of collusion with insiders

  4. Nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 2 of the document contains some details about the existing Brazilian nuclear installations. Also, safety improvements at Angra 1 and aspects of Angra 2 and 3 are reported

  5. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2003-01-01

    This chapter discuss on nuclear power and its advantages. The concept of nucleus fission, fusion, electric generation are discussed in this chapter. Nuclear power has big potential to become alternative energy to substitute current conventional energy from coal, oil and gas

  6. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This brochure is intended as a contribution to a better and more general understanding of one of the most urgent problems of present society. Emphasis is laid on three issues that are always raised in the nuclear debate: 1) Fuel cycle, 2) environmental effects of nuclear power plants, 3) waste disposal problems. (GL) [de

  7. Nuclear pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramade, Francois

    1979-01-01

    In this chapter devoted to nuclear pollution the following topics were studied: fundamentals of radiobiology (ecological importance of the various radioisotopes, biological effects of ionizing radiations); ecological effects of radioactive fallout (contamination of atmosphere, terrestrial ecosystems, oceans). The electronuclear industry and its environmental impact. PWR type reactors, fuel reprocessing plants, contamination of trophic chains by radionuclides released in the environment from nuclear installations [fr

  8. Nuclear lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caraca, J.M.G.

    1976-01-01

    The importance of the results obtained in experiments of measurement of lifetimes for a detailed knowledge of nuclear structure is referred. Direct methods of measurement of nuclear lifetimes are described, namely, electronic methods, recoil-distance method, doppler shift atenuation method and blocking-method. A brief reference is made to indirect methods for measurement of life-times

  9. Nuclear facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The subject is discussed as follows: the case for using nuclear energy (Britain's energy needs; energy policy); safety; transport of spent fuel; radiation (natural radioactivity); environment (land use of nuclear power plants; storage and disposal of radioactive wastes). (U.K.)

  10. Operational safety enhancement of Soviet-designed nuclear reactors via development of nuclear power plant simulators and transfer of related technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, P.; Epel, L.G.; Tutu, N.K.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under the US government's International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP), is implementing a program of developing and providing simulators for many of the Russian and Ukrainian Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) manage and provide technical oversight of the various INSP simulator projects for DOE. The program also includes a simulator technology transfer process to simulator design organizations in Russia and Ukraine. Training programs, installation of new simulators, and enhancements in existing simulators are viewed as providing a relatively fast and cost-effective technology transfer that will result in measurable improvement in the safety culture and operation of NPPs. A review of this program, its present status, and its accomplishments are provided in this paper

  11. Nuclear measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenkel, R.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear measurements play a fundamental role in the development of nuclear technology and the assurance of its peaceful use. They are also required in many non-power nuclear applications such as in nuclear medicine, agriculture, environmental protection, etc. This presentation will show examples of most recent advances in measurement methodology or technology in the areas described below. The Generation IV International Forum has selected six innovative reactor systems as candidates for a next generation of sustainable, economic and safe nuclear energy systems. The choice of the best options relies heavily on the availability of accurate nuclear data that can only be obtained, in an international effort, using highly specialised facilities. Significant efforts are being directed towards the partitioning and transmutation of highly active nuclear waste. Different concepts involving fast reactors or accelerator-driven systems are being studied in view of their transmutation capabilities. State of the art equipment has been developed to assess basic properties of nuclear fuel at very high burn-up; some fine examples of this work will be shown. Physical and chemical methods play a crucial role in the detection and identification of radioisotopes used in various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle. Radiation measurement techniques are used, for example, to monitor the quantities of uranium, plutonium and other actinide elements in fuel enrichment and reprocessing facilities. Another field of application of physical and chemical methods is the characterisation of nuclear material seized from illicit trafficking. Seized material has to be analysed in order to obtain clues on its origin and intended use and to prevent diversion of nuclear material from the same source in the future. A recent highlight in basic physics relates to nuclear fission and transmutation with high intensity lasers. Ultra-fast high intensity lasers can produce high energy (tens of MeV) photons through

  12. Nuclear rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarram, M.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear energy has found many applications in space projects. This article deals with these applications. The first application is the use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity in space and the second main application is the use of nuclear energy for propulsion purposes in space flight. The main objective is to develop a 75000 pound thrust flight engine call NERVA by heating liquid hydrogen, in a nuclear reactor, from 420F to 4000 0 F. The paper describes in detail the salient features of the NERVA rocket as well as its comparison with the conventional chemical rockets. It is shown that a nuclear rocket using liquid hydrogen as medium is at least 85% more efficient as compared with the chemical rockets such as those used for the APOLLO moon flight

  13. Nuclear rockets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarram, M [Teheran Univ. (Iran). Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology

    1972-02-01

    Nuclear energy has found many applications in space projects. This article deals with these applications. The first application is the use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity in space and the second main application is the use of nuclear energy for propulsion purposes in space flight. The main objective is to develop a 75000 pound thrust flight engine called NERVA by heating liquid hydrogen in a nuclear reactor. The paper describes in detail the salient features of the NERVA rocket as well as its comparison with the conventional chemical rockets. It is shown that a nuclear rocket using liquid hydrogen as medium is at least 85% more efficient as compared with the chemical rockets such as those used for the APOLLO moon flight.

  14. Nuclear haematology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masjhur, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear techniques have been applied to study diagnose and treat various haematological disorders for more than five decades. Two scientists are regarded as pioneers in this field, i.e. John Lawrence who in 1938 used 32 P to treat chronic myeloid leukaemia and George Hevessy who used 32 P labelled erythrocytes to measure blood volume in 1939. At present, many nuclear medicine procedures are available for diagnosis and therapy of a variety of haematological disorders. Although nuclear techniques are somewhat complex, they give direct and quantitative assessment of the kinetics of blood elements as compared to other non-isotopic haematological tests. Basically, equipment required for nuclear haematology is very simple such as well scintillation counters to measure radioactivity in blood samples. More sophisticated equipment like rectilinear scanner or gamma camera is required when imaging is necessary. An overview of the basic principles and clinical applications of nuclear haematology is given

  15. Nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal, V.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing threat by terrorists for a possible nuclear attack is particularly alarming in recent years. The likelihood of such an event is highly uncertain but cannot be ruled out. The consequence of such an event would be highly disastrous and the implications could be far-reaching both socially and politically. It is feared that significant amount of nuclear weapons materials may be kept under poor security. Therefore, there is a greater demand with utmost priority to curb nuclear terrorism by adapting proper security measures. One of the most important measures is to stop illicit trafficking of nuclear materials which are the source of building nuclear explosive devices. According to the IAEA illicit trafficking database (ITDB) report, a total number of 252 incidents were reported in 2006, of which 150 occurred in 2006 and the remaining 102 had taken place prior to that year, mainly in 2005

  16. Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    In this short paper it has only been possible to deal in a rather general way with the standards of safety used in the UK nuclear industry. The record of the industry extending over at least twenty years is impressive and, indeed, unique. No other industry has been so painstaking in protection of its workers and in its avoidance of damage to the environment. Headings are: introduction; how a nuclear power station works; radiation and its effects (including reference to ICRP, the UK National Radiological Protection Board, and safety standards); typical radiation doses (natural radiation, therapy, nuclear power programme and other sources); safety of nuclear reactors - design; key questions (matters of concern which arise in the public mind); safety of operators; safety of people in the vicinity of a nuclear power station; safety of the general public; safety bodies. (U.K.)

  17. Nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, S.

    1978-01-01

    The terms and reactions to President Carter's nuclear policy, culminating in the 1978 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act, are reviewed and analyzed. The new law increases restrictions on nuclear exports, encourages continued use of light water reactors in preference to plutonium-fueled reactors, and emphasizes technical solutions to proliferation problems. Critics of the law point out that it will hurt U.S. trade unfairly, that other countries do not have as many fuel options as the U.S. has, and that nuclear sales have as many political and economic as technical solutions. Compromise areas include new international safety guidelines, the possibility of an international nuclear fuel bank, and a willingness to consider each case on its merits. 21 references

  18. Nuclear privatization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffs, E.

    1995-01-01

    The United Kingdom government announced in May 1995 plans to privatize the country's two nuclear generating companies, Nuclear Electric and Scottish Nuclear. Under the plan, the two companies will become operating divisions of a unified holding company, to be called British Electric, with headquarters in Scotland. Britain's nuclear plants were left out of the initial privatization in 1989 because the government believed the financial community would be unwilling to accept the open-ended liability of decommissioning the original nine stations based on the Magnox gas-cooled reactor. Six years later, the government has found a way around this by retaining these power stations in state ownership, leaving the new nuclear company with the eight Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) stations and the recently completed Sizewell B PWR stations. The operating Magnox stations are to be transferred to BNFL, which operates two Magnox stations of their own at Calder Hall and Chapelcross

  19. Nuclear haematology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masjhur, J S

    1993-12-31

    Nuclear techniques have been applied to study diagnose and treat various haematological disorders for more than five decades. Two scientists are regarded as pioneers in this field, i.e. John Lawrence who in 1938 used {sup 32}P to treat chronic myeloid leukaemia and George Hevessy who used {sup 32}P labelled erythrocytes to measure blood volume in 1939. At present, many nuclear medicine procedures are available for diagnosis and therapy of a variety of haematological disorders. Although nuclear techniques are somewhat complex, they give direct and quantitative assessment of the kinetics of blood elements as compared to other non-isotopic haematological tests. Basically, equipment required for nuclear haematology is very simple such as well scintillation counters to measure radioactivity in blood samples. More sophisticated equipment like rectilinear scanner or gamma camera is required when imaging is necessary. An overview of the basic principles and clinical applications of nuclear haematology is given

  20. Preventing Teen Pregnancy: Coordinating Community Efforts. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Human Resources and Intergovernmental Relations of the Committee on Government Reform and Oversight. House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, Second Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight.

    The Subcommittee on Human Resources and Intergovernmental Relations of the House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform and Oversight met to consider the causes of and solutions to teen pregnancy and the role of community organizations in prevention efforts. Opening remarks by Representative Christopher Shays were followed by statements…

  1. Oversight Hearing on Drug Abuse Education Programs. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, 101st Congress, 2nd Session (Vancouver, Washington, September 6, 1990).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    The text of an oversight hearing on Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) programs is presented in this document. Introductory statements by Representatives Jolene Unsoeld and Dale E. Kildee are presented. Testimony by these witnesses is included: (1) Roy Bondurant, student, and Roy "Skip" Bondurant, parent, Tenino, Washington; (2) Paul…

  2. Nuclear health and safety. Status of GAO's environmental, safety, and health recommendations to DOE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England-Joseph, Judy; Bannerman, Carl J.; Fenzel, William F.; Brack, David L.; Harter, Frederick A.

    1990-04-01

    DOE's operations are carried out at many contractor-operated sites around the country, including major sites within the nuclear weapons complex that are involved in the production of nuclear material for weapons and naval fuel. At these sites DOE contractors routinely use and generate large quantities of a wide range of hazardous and radioactive materials. Because these materials require special handling by workers. Also pursuant to Mar. 15, 1989, request, we provided you a report entitled Nuclear Health and Safety: Need for Improved Responsiveness to Problems at DOE Sites (GAO/RCED-90-101, Mar. 28, 1990). to prevent exposure to themselves or releases into the environment, DOE's weapons complex, considered in its entirety, is among the potentially more dangerous industrial operations in the world. Over the last decade, at the request of the Congress, we have carried out a series of assessments and evaluations of various aspects of the complex. In over 60 reports and testimonies published since 1990, we have called attention to the mounting problems facing DOE's nuclear weapons complex. This body of work includes (1) identifying serious, costly, and widespread environmental, safety, and health problems at DOE facilities, (2) calling for outside independent oversight of DOE's nuclear operations, and (3) making recommendations to DOE to strengthen its oversight, providing more detailed information and plans to the Congress, and improving its management and accounting practices. In total, our reports and testimonies have included 54 recommendations to DOE, in addition to recommendations to the Congress, concerning environmental, safety, and health matters at the complex. We consider 23 of the 54 recommendations to be still open. The open recommendations call for improvements such as tighter program controls and clearer standards and policies related to environmental, safety, and health matters

  3. One Year After Fukushima, Nuclear Safety Is Stronger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear power is safer than it was a year ago as the nuclear industry, regulators and governments act on the lessons of Fukushima, but that safety must never be taken for granted, said Yukiya Amano, Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Speaking ahead of the first anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident on 11 March, Amano said a culture of constant vigilance and improvement was vital to ensure that the benefits of nuclear power could be harnessed as safely as humanly possible. 'Nuclear safety is stronger than it was a year ago', he said. 'Fukushima Daiichi was a very serious accident, but we know what went wrong and we have a clear course of action to tackle those causes - not only in Japan, but anywhere in the world. 'Now we have to keep up the momentum. Complacency can kill'. On 11 March 2011 a huge earthquake and tsunami left more than 20 000 people dead or missing in eastern Japan. Amidst widespread destruction, the tsunami slammed into the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, disabling cooling systems and leading to fuel meltdowns in three of the six Units. The accident was a jolt to the nuclear industry, regulators and governments. It was triggered by a massive force of nature, but it was existing weaknesses of design regarding defence against natural hazards, regulatory oversight, accident management and emergency response that allowed it to unfold as it did. For example: The nuclear regulator was not sufficiently independent, allowing weak oversight of the operator, TEPCO, and regulatory requirements fell short of international best practice; Not enough attention was paid to guarding against possible extreme events at the Fukushima Daiichi site, leaving critical safety functions such as cooling systems vulnerable to the tsunami; Training to respond to serious accidents was inadequate, as were mitigation measures to prevent hydrogen explosions and protect the venting system; and Accident command lines

  4. Nuclear questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, M. [Physics World (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-01

    The future of nuclear power has returned to centre stage. Freezing weather on both sides of the Atlantic and last month's climate-change talks in Montreal have helped to put energy and the future of nuclear power right back on the political agenda. The issue is particularly pressing for those countries where existing nuclear stations are reaching the end of their lives. In the UK, prime minister Tony Blair has commissioned a review of energy, with a view to deciding later this year whether to build new nuclear power plants. The review comes just four years after the Labour government published a White Paper on energy that said the country should keep the nuclear option open but did not follow this up with any concrete action. In Germany, new chancellor and former physicist Angela Merkel is a fan of nuclear energy and had said she would extend the lifetime of its nuclear plants beyond 2020, when they are due to close. However, that commitment has had to be abandoned, at least for the time being, following negotiations with her left-wing coalition partners. The arguments in favour of nuclear power will be familiar to all physicists - it emits almost no carbon dioxide and can play a vital role in maintaining a diverse energy supply. To over-rely on imported supplies of oil and gas can leave a nation hostage to fortune. The arguments against are equally easy to list - the public is scared of nuclear power, it generates dangerous waste with potentially huge clean-up costs, and it is not necessarily cheap. Nuclear plants could also be a target for terrorist attacks. Given political will, many of these problems can be resolved, or at least tackled. China certainly sees the benefits of nuclear power, as does Finland, which is building a new 1600 MW station - the world's most powerful - that is set to open in 2009. Physicists, of course, are essential to such developments. They play a vital role in ensuring the safety of such plants and developing new types of

  5. Governance and oversight of researcher access to electronic health data: the role of the Independent Scientific Advisory Committee for MHRA database research, 2006-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, P; Cassell, J A; Saunders, M H; Stevens, R

    2017-03-01

    In order to promote understanding of UK governance and assurance relating to electronic health records research, we present and discuss the role of the Independent Scientific Advisory Committee (ISAC) for MHRA database research in evaluating protocols proposing the use of the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. We describe the development of the Committee's activities between 2006 and 2015, alongside growth in data linkage and wider national electronic health records programmes, including the application and assessment processes, and our approach to undertaking this work. Our model can provide independence, challenge and support to data providers such as the Clinical Practice Research Datalink database which has been used for well over 1,000 medical research projects. ISAC's role in scientific oversight ensures feasible and scientifically acceptable plans are in place, while having both lay and professional membership addresses governance issues in order to protect the integrity of the database and ensure that public confidence is maintained.

  6. MORT User's Manual for use with the Management Oversight and Risk Tree analytical logic diagram. [Contains a list of System Safety Development Center publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, N.W.; Eicher, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains the User's Manual for MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree), a logic diagram in the form of a work sheet'' that illustrates a long series of interrelated questions. MORT is a comprehensive analytical procedure that provides a disciplined method for determining the causes and contributing factors of major accidents. Alternatively, it serves as a tool to evaluate the quality of an existing system. While similar in many respects to fault tree analysis, MORT is more generalized and presents over 1,500 specific elements of an ideal universal'' management program for optimizing environment, safety and health, and other programs. This User's Manual is intended to be used with the MORT diagram dated February 1992.

  7. Electric utility deregulation - A nuclear opportunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMella, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    The implications of electric deregulation are and will continue to be pervasive and significant. Not only will the fundamental monopoly regulatory concepts of managing electric utilities change but deregulation will have a profound and dramatic impact on the way electric generating plants are managed and operated. In the past, under the various approaches to financial regulation, the economic benefits normally attributed to competition or that would have otherwise been derived from competitive or open market forces, were assumed to be embodied in and inherent to the various processes, methods and principles of financial oversight of utility companies by regional, state and municipal regulatory authorities. Traditionally, under the various forms of regulated monopolies, a utility company, in exchange for an exclusive franchise to produce and sell electricity in a particular region, was obligated to provide an adequate supply to all consumers wanting it, at a price that was 'just and reasonable'. The determination of adequate supply and reasonable price was a matter of interpretation by utility companies and their regulators. In essence, the ultimate economic benefits, normally attributed to price equilibrium, in balance with supply, demand and other market forces, were expected to be achieved through a complex, political process of financial regulatory oversight, in which utility companies were usually reimbursed for all annual expenses or their 'cost of service' and additionally allowed to earn a 'reasonable' rate of return on plant investments. The result was often escalating electric prices, over supplies of electric capacity, by justifying unnecessarily high reserve margins based on long planning horizons (typically 20 years or greater) with extrapolated demand requirements that were generally in excess of what actually occurred over time. Although the regulatory process varied from country or country and region-to-region, the fundamental principles, which

  8. Symposium on the development of nuclear waste policy: Siting the high-level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijawka, K.D.; Mushkatel, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) attempted to formulate a viable national policy for managing the disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. The NWPA authorized the selection of two repository sites: the first to be constructed in the West and a second site developed in the eastern United States. A detailed process for site selection was outlined in the NWPA. In addition, the NWPA authorized open-quotes the development of a waste transportation system; required the Department of Energy (DOE) to submit a proposal to construct a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) after conducting a study of the need for, and feasibility of such a facility; and required the President to evaluate the use of the repositories ... for the disposal of high-level waste resulting from defense activitiesclose quotes (DOE, 1988, p. 1). A series of provisions granting oversight participation to states and Indian tribes, as well as a compensation package for the ultimate host state were also included. Responsibility for implementing the NWPA was assigned to DOE

  9. The evolving regulation of uranium recovery operations in the United States: Inovative approaches are necessary for cost effective regulatory oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.J.; Lehrenbaum, W.U.; Lashway, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    The US domestic uranium industry is at a crossroads. Historic low prices for uranium, combined with stringent and often irrational regulatory requirements, pose a very real threat to the industry's continued viability. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has taken a number of innovative steps to reform and rationalize its regulatory program. However, if the domestic uranium recovery industry is to remain viable, additional steps toward innovation and reform are needed, and effective implementation of reforms adopted by the Commission is essential. (author)

  10. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippon, S.

    1984-01-01

    Do we need nuclear energy. Is it safe. What are the risks. Will it lead to proliferation. The questions are endless, the answers often confused. In the vigorous debates that surround the siting and operation of nuclear power plants, it is all too easy to lose sight of the central issues amid the mass of arguments and counter-arguments put forward. And there remains the doubt, who do we believe. This book presents the facts, simply, straightforwardly, and comprehensibly. It describes the different types of nuclear reactor, how they work, how energy is produced and transformed into usable power, how nuclear waste is handled, what safeguards are built in to prevent accident, contamination and misuse. More important, it does this in the context of the real world, examining the benefits as well as the dangers of a nuclear power programme, quantifying the risks, and providing an authoritative account of the nuclear industry worldwide. Technically complex and politically controversial, the contribution of nuclear energy to our future energy requirements is a crucial topic of our time. (author)

  11. Nuclear Hostages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, C.L.

    1978-01-01

    The global spread of nuclear reactors for the production of energy seems inevitable. Nuclear power plants will be supplied--if not by the United States, then by one of several other exporters. But other aspects of this development are less certain. One is the relationship between proliferation of nuclear energy plants and that of nuclear weapons. Another is the actual constraint that such vulnerable potential targets as nuclear power plants would have on would-be aggressors. In the last analysis, this would depend on the rationality of a nation's leadership. What can be said for the concept of nuclear power plants as potential hostages is that by installing a reactor on its territory, a country increases its vulnerability to grave, possibly unacceptable damage in the event of war. As a result, that nation's leaders might be inclined to raise the threshold of their sensitivity to provocation by neighbors and to restrain their own inclinations toward aggression. Admittedly this is a frail substitute for robust international agreements, but in the present order of things it is not a trivial consideration. Many incidents once regarded by the great powers as easi belli have more recently been either resolved by diplomacy or ignored altogether. The idea must not be pressed too far. The export of a nuclear power plant to a Third World country cannot be advocated simply as a means to constrain its own military adventurism. Aside from the promise of a vast increase in energy supply for developing nations, nuclear powered generating stations could actually improve relations among countries. The risk of widespread radioactive contamination by nuclear power plants hit by even conventional bombs could introduce a positive new element into the military calculations of powers outside the NATO-Warsaw Pact arena. As they balance military and diplomatic solutions to local conflicts, moderation rather than bellicosity might become the better part of valor

  12. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kand, Purushottam

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is a specialized area of radiology that uses very small amounts of radioactive materials to examine organ function and structure. Nuclear medicine is older than CT, ultrasound and MRI. It was first used in patients over 60-70 years ago. Today it is an established medical specialty and offers procedures that are essential in many medical specialities like nephrology, pediatrics, cardiology, psychiatry, endocrinology and oncology. Nuclear medicine refers to medicine (a pharmaceutical) that is attached to a small quantity of radioactive material (a radioisotope). This combination is called a radiopharmaceutical. There are many radiopharmaceuticals like DTPA, DMSA, HIDA, MIBI and MDP available to study different parts of the body like kidneys, heart and bones etc. Nuclear medicine uses radiation coming from inside a patient's body where as conventional radiology exposes patients to radiation from outside the body. Thus nuclear imaging study is a physiological imaging, whereas diagnostic radiology is anatomical imaging. It combines many different disciplines like chemistry, physics mathematics, computer technology, and medicine. It helps in diagnosis and to treat abnormalities very early in the progression of a disease. The information provides a quick and accurate diagnosis of wide range of conditions and diseases in a person of any age. These tests are painless and most scans expose patients to only minimal and safe amounts of radiation. The amount of radiation received from a nuclear medicine procedure is comparable to, or often many times less than, that of a diagnostic X-ray. Nuclear medicine provides an effective means of examining whether some tissues/organs are functioning properly. Therapy using nuclear medicine in an effective, safe and relatively inexpensive way of controlling and in some cases eliminating, conditions such as overactive thyroid, thyroid cancer and arthritis. Nuclear medicine imaging is unique because it provides doctors with

  13. Nuclear inheritance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpech, Therese

    1997-01-01

    Since the end of the East-West confronting, the nuclear weapon issue has been focused in an international debate with obvious repercussions in Europe, because it is the European continent which indicated first the significance of nuclear deterrence. This debate refers first upon the past, as the German unification allowed capturing numerous documents of Warsaw treaty which revealed the intentions and the plans of Soviet Union during the cold war, and secondly concerns the future, since the role of nuclear weapons must be re-thought in a new context. This is the subject of this book, which refers also to the problem of the nuclear proliferation in the world and evolution of different countries in a political and regional context. The extension of the non-proliferation treaty for an undefined duration, in May 1995, is a incontestable victory because this treaty rules the renouncement to nuclear weapons of 185 countries. However, it does not solve most sensible problems like the Iraq case, for which a specific inspection regime has been instituted, or the case of Iran, which is suspected to acquire the bomb, although no clear evidence has been provided up to now. This is also the case of Israel, India and Pakistan which allege plainly their willingness of keeping open, from security reasons, their nuclear option. The content is displayed in five chapters: 1. Introduction; 2. The role of the nuclear weapons after the cold war; 3. The nuclear proliferation at crossroads; 4. Undefined extension of the NPT, a striking but fragile victory; 5. Conclusions. An appendix containing the text of the Nuclear Weapon Non-Proliferation Treaty and a chronology are added

  14. Application of the DOE Nuclear Safety Policy goal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, G.A.; Hey, B.E.; Leach, D.S.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1992-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) issued their Nuclear Safety Policy for implementation on September 9, 1991. The statement noted that it was the DOE's policy that the general public should be protected such that no individual would bear significant additional risk to health and safety from operation of their nuclear facilities above the risks to which members of the general population were normally exposed. The intent is that from the nuclear safety policy will follow specific safety rules, orders, standards and other requirements. The DOE Nuclear Safety Policy provides general statements in the areas of management involvement and accountability, providing technically competent personnel, oversight and self-assessment, promoting a safety culture, and quantitative safety goals as aiming points for performance. In general, most DOE Management and Operating Contractors should have programs in place which address the general statements noted above. Thus, compliance with the general statements of the DOE Nuclear Safety Policy should present no significant difficulty. Consequently, the focus of this paper will be the two quantitative safety goals reproduced below from the DOE Nuclear Safety Policy. ''The risk to an average individual in the vicinity of a DOE facility for prompt fatalities that might result from accidents should not exceed one tenth of one percent (0.1 %) of the sum of prompt fatalities resulting from other accidents to which members of the population are generally exposed. For evaluation purposes, individuals are assumed to be located within one mile of the site boundary.'' ''The risk to the population in the area of a DOE nuclear facility for cancer fatalities that might result from operations should not exceed one tenth of one percent (0.1 %) of the sum of all cancer fatality risks resulting from all other causes. For evaluation purposes, individuals are assumed to be located within 10 miles of the site boundary.''

  15. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hladky, S.

    1985-01-01

    This booklet appeared in a series on technical history. It tries to communicate some of the scientific, technical and social stresses, which have been connected with the application of nuclear energy since its discovery. The individual sections are concerned with the following subjects: the search for the 'smallest particles'; the atomic nucleus; nuclear fission; the 'Manhattan Project'; the time after this - from the euphoria of the 1950's via disillusionment and change of opinion to the state of nuclear energy at the start of the 1980's. The booklet contains many details and is generously illustrated. (HSCH) [de

  16. Nuclear transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2003-01-01

    During january and february 2003, a unique event concerning nuclear transport was reported and rated 1 on the INES scale. This event concerns the absence of a maintenance operation on a shipping cask. This shipping cask was used for several years for nuclear transport inside La-hague site before being re-assigned to transport on public thoroughfare. The re-assignment of the cask should have been preceded and conditioned by a maintenance operation whose purpose is to check the efficiency of its radiation shield. During this period 2 on-site inspections concerning the transport of nuclear materials were performed. (A.C.)

  17. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxo, Armand.

    1977-01-01

    The reasons and conditions of utilizing nuclear power in developing countries are examined jointly with the present status and future uses already evaluated by some organizations. Some consequences are deduced in the human, financial scientific and technological fields, with provisional suggestions for preparing the nuclear industry development in these countries. As a conclusion trends are given to show how the industrialized countries having gained a long scientific and technological experience in nuclear energy can afford their assistance in this field, to developing countries [fr

  18. Nuclear questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlfeld, W.

    1977-01-01

    This brochure 'nuclear problems' deals with the attitude of the protestant church in the region around the northern Elbe towards further quantitative economic growth, esp. nuclear energy, with the following essays: preaching the Gospel in an environment in danger: the Christian occident and the problems of the third world, facing the problems of exhausted supplies, the role of the prophet, problem of environment - a problem of theology, the political dimension, against ATW, signal Brokdorf, strange effects (defense of the church from unqualified teachings by non-professionals), Christian liberty, church and nuclear energy, violence and robes. (HP) [de

  19. Rotterdam Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    In 1965 Rotterdam Nuclear received an order for the design, supply of materials, manufacture, testing, inspection and preparation for shipment of one 450MW Boiling Water Reactor pressure vessel. This was one of the first orders for a reactor pressure vessel, ever obtained by a European Manufacturer. The Company has since supplied 19 reactor pressure vessels for nuclear power stations, having a total weight of about 10,000,000kg. The nuclear power stations in which these are installed represent an electrical output of about 15,000MW and they are located in seven different countries (USA, Spain, Switzerland, Argentina, Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands). (Auth.)

  20. Nuclear law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bringuier, P.

    2009-01-01

    The object of this report is to present the evolution of the nuclear law during the period from 2006 to 2008, period that was characterized in France by a real rewriting from the implementation of a control authority. The prescriptive backing of nuclear activities has been deeply changed by numerous texts. In this first part are presented: (1) the institutional aspects, (2) openness and public information, (7) radioactive wastes and (9) liability and insurance. In a next publication will be treated: (3) safety and radiation protection; (4) nuclear matter, inspection, physical protection; (5) transports; (6) trade, non-proliferation; (8) radiological accidents. (N.C.)

  1. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D Hondt, P.

    1998-01-01

    The research and development programme on nuclear fuel at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is described. The objective of this programme is to enhance the quantitative prediction of the operational limits of nuclear fuel and to assess the behaviour of fuel under incidental and accidental conditions. Progress is described in different domains including the modelling of fission gas release in LWR fuel, thermal conductivity, basic physical phenomena, post-irradiation examination for fuel performance assessment, and conceptual studies of incidental and accidental fuel experiments

  2. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wethe, Per Ivar

    2009-01-01

    Today we know two forms of nuclear energy: fission and fusion. Fission is the decomposition of heavy nuclei, while fusion is the melting together of light nuclei. Both processes create a large surplus of energy. Technologically, we can currently only use fission to produce energy in today's nuclear power plants, but there is intense research worldwide in order to realize a controlled fusion process. In a practical context, today's nuclear energy is a sustained source of energy since the resource base is virtually unlimited. When fusion technology is realized, the resource supply will be a marginal problem. (AG)

  3. Nuclear electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucero B, E.

    1989-01-01

    The rapid technical development of Colombia over the past years, resulted among others, a considerable increase in the number of measuring instrumentation and testing laboratories, scientific research and metrology centers, in industry, agriculture, public health, education on the nuclear field, etc. IAN is a well organized institution with qualified management, trained staff and reasonably equipped laboratories to carry out tasks as: Metrology, standardization, quality control and maintenance and repair of nuclear instruments. The government of Colombia has adopted a policy to establish and operate through the country maintenance and repair facilities for nuclear instrumentation. This policy is reflected in the organization of electronic laboratories in Bogota-IAN

  4. Challenges in long-term operation of nuclear power plants - Implications for regulatory bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soda, Kunihisa; Van Wonterghem, Frederik; Khouaja, Hatem; Vilpas, Martti; Osouf, Nicolas; Harikumar, S.; Ishigaki, Hiroki; Osaki, Toru; Yamada, Tomoho; Carlsson, Lennart; Shepherd, David; Galloway, Melanie; Liszka, Ervin; Svab, Miroslav; Pereira, Ken; Huerta, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power reactors have become a major source of electricity supply in many countries in the past half a century. Based on this experience, many operators have sought and have received authorisation for long-term operation, whereby plant operation continues beyond the period considered in the design of the plant. Acceptance of a nuclear power plant for extended service should be based on assurance of the fitness of the plant and the operator for safe and reliable operation over the entire period considered for long-term operation. This assurance may be obtained by establishment of appropriate regulatory requirements, specification of goals and safety levels and regulatory assessment and oversight of the operator's programme for long-term operation. The operators and regulators should ensure that operating experience continues to be evaluated during long-term operation to ensure that any relevant lessons are effectively applied. Other considerations for assurance of safe operation are effective management of ageing, possible need for safety improvements, application of lessons learnt from operating experience, evaluation of environmental impacts, adequate staff resources and performance, review of security at the plant, action in response to emerging issues, and openness and transparency in the transition to long-term operation. Even though most of these considerations are addressed under the regulatory framework that applies to the initial operating period, additional regulatory activities in these areas may be necessary for long-term operation. Although there can be significant differences in regulatory approaches used by different countries for evaluating acceptability of long-term operation, there is general agreement on the purposes and goals of the regulatory reviews. An authorisation of long-term operation could involve a licence renewal or a periodic safety review or an approach that melds elements of both. This report presents guidance that is intended

  5. Political considerations of nuclear waste disposal policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    In order to create a program for the establishment of nuclear waste repositories several conditions must prevail. Perhaps foremost is the need to alter the public perception of risk. In short, there will need to be recognition that cigarette smoking and automobile driving, acts of volition, are potentially more dangerous to one's health than radiation leaks from nuclear power plants or waste repositories. Second, the process of repository site selection will have to include wide public participation in the process in order to obtain legitimacy. Without it Congress and the state legislatures are certain to override any proposal no matter how widely accepted by scientists and engineers. Finally, states and localities selected as sites for repositories will need to be compensated adequately in exchange for accepting the onus of serving as host. Political scientists have not been notably successful forecasters of policy outcomes. However, the evidence of American history does not provide encouragement that maximization of control at the state and local level and oversight by Congress of administrative actions, as meritorious as they might appear in terms of democracy, are harbingers of success for unpleasant policy decisions. States rights and Congressional intervention to block executive action were used to maintain second-class citizenship status for Black Americans until the judicial process was resorted to as a device to alter policy. Most likely, a major policy breakthrough will occur only after a mishap or tragedy, the final product involving either a waste disposal program in the context of continued use of nuclear power or one premised on its abandonment

  6. Nuclear power in the United States: a new strategy to build on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayne, Phillip

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the US utility industry's perspective on nuclear power, and to look ahead to what might happen during the 1990s, a time of great uncertainty. The US nuclear industry has, succeeded in taking a strategic approach to nuclear power. Two years ago, the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC) started working on a Strategic Plan for Building New Nuclear Power Plants. NPOC is a group of senior executives representing private and public electric utilities, equipment suppliers and architect-engineers. Its role is to give broad policy guidance to the entire industry. NPOC's goal was to develop a comprehensive, integrated list of all the conditions that had to be met and the issues that had to be resolved in order to create an environment in which utilities would feel comfortable considering the nuclear option. The strategic plan, which was published in November 1990, identified fourteen issues, and assigned responsibility to different organisations for managing the issues. It also set timetables and milestones against which progress could be measured. Its goal is to create the conditions under which utilities can place an order or orders for new nuclear plants by the mid-1990s, with the first new unit on line by the turn of the century. The structure and content of the plan are discussed in this paper. (author)

  7. Inspecting operating nuclear powerplants: shortcomings in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission program. Fourth report by the Committee on Government Operations together with additional views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Workers at every one of this Nation's 69 operating commercial nuclear powerplants conduct a constant vigil of great importance to this country's economy and to the health and safety of its citizens. They must constantly observe, assess and respond to the subtle and complex changes in the operating conditions of a reactor facility. They must do so skillfully enough to prevent major accidents and outages. It is for that reason that extraordinary efforts to train people to anticipate and understand unexpected events are necessary in the nuclear industry. It is for that reason that nuclear powerplant systems must be designed with unusually intricate safeguards against failure, that their maintenance must be meticulous and incessant, and that the condition of those systems must be constantly understood by nuclear plan management to prevent unanticipated degradation or breakdowns. Regrettably, facts disclosed by an oversight investigation by the Government Operations Subcommittee on Environment, Energy and Natural Resources indicate that those high standards have not yet been consistently attained by the nuclear industry or by the NRC. Significant mistakes in judgment and operational errors continue to occur at many operating nuclear powerplants, and the NRC inspection program too often fails to backstop the licensee. Utility failings are not discovered by the NRC in time to prevent costly and even dangerous mistakes from being made

  8. Nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This scientific document presents an introduction to the nuclear wastes problems, the separation process and the transmutation, the political and technical aspects of the storage, the radioprotection standards and the biological effects. (A.L.B.)

  9. Nuclear Disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher

    1982-01-01

    Material about nuclear disarmament and the arms race should be included in secondary school curricula. Teachers can present this technical, controversial, and frightening material in a balanced and comprehensible way. Resources for instructional materials are listed. (PP)

  10. Nuclear analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Basic studies in nuclear analytical techniques include the examination of underlying assumptions and the development and extention of techniques involving the use of ion beams for elemental and mass analysis. 1 ref., 1 tab

  11. Nuclear reaction

    CERN Multimedia

    Penwarden, C

    2001-01-01

    At the European Research Organization for Nuclear Research, Nobel laureates delve into the mysteries of particle physics. But when they invited artists from across the continent to visit their site in Geneva, they wanted a new kind of experiment.

  12. [Nuclear theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    This report discusses concepts in nuclear theory such as: neutrino nucleosynthesis; double beta decay; neutrino oscillations; chiral symmetry breaking; T invariance; quark propagator; cold fusion; and other related topics

  13. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 1 to 56. (A.L.B.)

  14. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  15. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is made of two tables. The first table describes the different particles (bosons and fermions) while the second one gives the nuclear constants of isotopes from the different elements with Z = 1 to 25. (J.S.)

  16. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  17. Nuclear transmutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikulaj, V.

    1992-01-01

    Two types of nuclear transmutations are outlined, namely the radioactive transmutations and nuclear reactions. The basic characteristics are given of radioactive transmutations (gamma transmutations and isomeric transitions, beta, alpha transmutations, spontaneous fission and spontaneous emission of nucleons), their kinetics and the influence of the physical and chemical state of the radionuclide on the transmutation rate. The basic characteristics are described of nuclear reactions (reactions of neutrons including fission, reactions induced by charged particles and photons), their kinetics, effective cross sections and their mechanism. Chemical reactions caused by nuclear transmutations are discussed (recoil energy, properties of hot atoms, Szilard-Chalmers effect). A brief information is given on the behavior of radionuclides in trace concentrations. (Z.S.) 2 tabs., 19 figs., 12 refs

  18. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended in 1987, directed the Secretary of Energy to, among other things, investigate Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for permanently disposing of highly radioactive wastes in an underground repository. In April 1991, the authors testified on Yucca Mountain project expenditures before your Subcommittee. Because of the significance of the authors findings regrading DOE's program management and expenditures, you asked the authors to continue reviewing program expenditures in depth. As agreed with your office, the authors reviewed the expenditures of project funds made available to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which is the lead project contractor for developing a nuclear waste package that wold be used for disposing of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain. This report discusses the laboratory's use of nuclear waste funds to support independent research projects and to manage Yucca Mountain project activities. It also discusses the laboratory's project contracting practices

  19. Nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, R.C.; Nienart, L.F.; Toelcke, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for preparing melt-processable nuclear shielding compositions from chloro-fluoro substituted ethylene polymers, particularly PCTFE and E-CTFE, containing 1 to 75 percent by weight of a gadolinium compound. 13 claims, no drawings

  20. Nuclear option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, P.S.

    1983-01-01

    The energy demand complexion of this country is always changing and promises to change in the future. The nuclear industry is responding to changing energy demands through standards writing activities. Since the oil embargo of 1973, there has been a change in the mix of fuels contributing to energy growth in this country; virtually all of the energy growth has come from coal and nuclear power. The predicted expansion of coal use by 1985, over 1977 level, is 37%, while the use of oil is expected to decline by 17%. Use of nuclear power is expected to increase 62% from the 1977 level. The feasibility of using nuclear energy to meet the needs of the USA for electric power is discussed

  1. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarride, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    The author proposes an overview of methods and concepts used in the nuclear industry, at the design level as well as at the exploitation level, to ensure an acceptable safety level, notably in the case of nuclear reactors. He first addresses the general objectives of nuclear safety and the notion of acceptable risk: definition and organisation of nuclear safety (relationships between safety authorities and operators), notion of acceptable risk, deterministic safety approach and main safety principles (safety functions and confinement barriers, concept of defence in depth). Then, the author addresses the safety approach at the design level: studies of operational situations, studies of internal and external aggressions, safety report, design principles for important-for-safety systems (failure criterion, redundancy, failure prevention, safety classification). The next part addresses safety during exploitation and general exploitation rules: definition of the operation domain and of its limits, periodic controls and tests, management in case of incidents, accidents or aggressions

  2. Nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, T.

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear fission process is pedagogically reviewed from a macroscopic-microscopic point of view. The Droplet model is considered. The fission dynamics is discussed utilizing path integrals and semiclassical methods. (L.C.) [pt

  3. Nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connell, K.A.; Warner, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    The first volume of the Annual Report for 1989/90 gives an overview of the Nuclear Structure Facility at Daresbury, its development and a selection of highlights of the year's programme. This volume is complementary, presenting brief specialist reports, submitted by the users, describing the progress and results of each individual proposal. The contents reflect the extremely successful year due in good measure to the performance of the tandem accelerator which provided a record number of hours with ''beam on target''. Reports are grouped in four sections: research into nuclear structure with contributions ordered in increasing Z numbers of the nuclei studied; investigations of nuclear reaction mechanisms; nuclear theory; accelerator operations and development plus experimental instrumentation and techniques. The appendix forms a concise summary of the work at the facility for the year. (author)

  4. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pligt, J. van der

    1989-01-01

    This chapter present a brief overview of the current situation of siting radioactive wastes. This is followed by an overview of various psychological approaches attempting to analyse public reactions to nuclear facilities. It will be argued that public reactions to nuclear waste factilities must be seen in the context of more general attitudes toward nuclear energy. The latter are not only based upon perceptions of the health and environmental risks but are built on values, and sets of attributes which need not be similar to the representations o the experts and policy-makers. The issue of siting nuclear waste facilities is also embedded in a wider moral and political domain. This is illustrated by the importance of equity issues in siting radioactive wastes. In the last section, the implications of the present line of argument for risk communication and public participation in decisions about siting radioactive wastes will be briefly discussed. (author). 49 refs

  5. Nuclear regulatory policy concept on safety, security, safeguards and emergency preparedness (3S+EP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyas, Zurias

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory Policy is formulated in regulations that stipulate the assurance of workers and public safety and environmental protection. Legislation and regulations on nuclear energy should consider nuclear safety, security and safeguards, as well as nuclear emergency preparedness (3S+EP) and liability for nuclear damage. Specific requirements stipulated in international conventions and agreements should also be taken into account. Regulatory Policy is formulated in regulations that stipulate the assurance of workers and public safety and environmental protection. Legislation and regulations on nuclear energy should consider nuclear safety, security and safeguards, as well as nuclear emergency preparedness (3S+EP) and liability for nuclear damage. Specific requirements stipulated in international conventions and agreements should also be taken into account. By undertaking proper regulatory oversight on Safety, Security and Emergency Preparedness (3S+EP) as an integrated and comprehensive system, safe and secure use of nuclear energy can be assured. Licence requirements and conditions should fulfil regulatory requirements pertaining to 3S+EP for nuclear installation as an integrated system. An effective emergency capacity that can be immediately mobilized is important. The capacity in protecting the personnel before, during and after the disaster should also be planned. Thus, proper emergency preparedness should be supported by adequate resources. The interface between safety, security, safeguards and emergency preparedness has to be set forth in nuclear regulations, such as regulatory requirements; 3S+EP; components, systems and structures of nuclear installations and human resources. Licensing regulations should stipulate, among others, DIQ, installations security system, safety analysis report, emergency preparedness requirements and necessary human resources that meet the 3S+EP requirements.

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  8. General Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of radioactive ... of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  12. Nuclear instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weill, Jacky; Fabre, Rene.

    1981-01-01

    This article sums up the Research and Development effort at present being carried out in the five following fields of applications: Health physics and Radioprospection, Control of nuclear reactors, Plant control (preparation and reprocessing of the fuel, testing of nuclear substances, etc.), Research laboratory instrumentation, Detectors. It also sets the place of French industrial activities by means of an estimate of the French market, production and flow of trading with other countries [fr

  13. Nuclear hadrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geesaman, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    The role of hadron dynamics in the nucleus is illustrated to show the importance of nuclear medium effects in hadron interactions. The low lying hadron spectrum is considered to provide the natural collective variables for nuclear systems. Recent studies of nucleon-nucleon and delta-nucleon interactions are reviewed, with emphasis on the type of experimental phenomena which signal the importance of the many-body dynamics. 28 references

  14. Seguro Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, S.C.C. de.

    1978-04-01

    A description of the constitutive elements of insurance and its features in the field of law, and special legislation about the matter are given. The relationship between the liability of the nuclear power plant operator and the international conventions about civil liability on nuclear damage is discussed. Some considerations on damage reparing in the United States, Germany, France and Spain are presented. (A.L.S.L.) [pt

  15. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, L.; Nalda, E.; Collombier, L.; Kotzki, P.O.; Boudousq, V.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty using the properties of radioactivity. Radioactive markers associated with vectors are used as a tracer or radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic purposes and/or therapy. Since its birth more than half a century ago, it has become essential in the care of many patients, particularly in oncology. After some definitions, this paper presents the main nuclear techniques - imaging for diagnostic, radiopharmaceuticals as therapeutic agents, intra-operative detection, technique of radioimmunoassay - and the future of this field. (authors)

  16. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy has proposed a draft plan for investigating the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site to determine if it suitable for a waste repository. This fact sheet provides information on the status of DOE's and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's efforts to streamline what NRC expects will be the largest and most complex nuclear-licensing proceeding in history, including the development of an electronic information management system called the Licensing Support System

  17. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, D.

    1981-01-01

    Dr Arnott, scientific consultant to PANDORA, emphasises our lack of knowledge of the behaviour of highly active radioactive wastes, particularly effluents, and their characteristics. He proposes that they should be stored, preferably in a solidified state, until our knowledge allows their safe disposal. Political aspects and government policies are discussed and human fallibility is stressed. The nuclear establishment and nuclear power programme are severely criticised. (U.K.)

  18. Nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehoucq, Roland; Klotz, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Astronomy deals with the position and observation of the objects in our Universe, from planets to galaxies. It is the oldest of the sciences. Astrophysics is the study of the physical properties of these objects. It dates from the start of the 20. century. Nuclear astrophysics is the marriage of nuclear physics, a laboratory science concerned with the infinitely small, and astrophysics, the science of what is far away and infinitely large. Its aim is to explain the origin, evolution and abundance of the elements in the Universe. It was born in 1938 with the work of Hans Bethe, an American physicist who won the Nobel Prize for physics in 1967, on the nuclear reactions that can occur at the center of stars. It explains where the incredible energy of the stars and the Sun comes from and enables us to understand how they are born, live and die. The matter all around us and from which we are made, is made up of ninety-two chemical elements that can be found in every corner of the Universe. Nuclear astrophysics explains the origin of these chemical elements by nucleosynthesis, which is the synthesis of atomic nuclei in different astrophysical environments such as stars. Nuclear astrophysics provides answers to fundamental questions: - Our Sun and the stars in general shine because nuclear reactions are taking place within them. - The stars follow a sequence of nuclear reaction cycles. Nucleosynthesis in the stars enables us to explain the origin and abundance of elements essential to life, such as carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and iron. - Star explosions, in the form of supernovae, disperse the nuclei formed by nucleosynthesis into space and explain the formation of the heaviest chemical elements such as gold, platinum and lead. Nuclear astrophysics is still a growing area of science. (authors)

  19. Nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spicer, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    Major centres of experimental nuclear physics are at Melbourne University, A.N.U., the A.A.E.C., James Cook University and the University of Western Australia. Groups working in theoretical nuclear physics exist at Melbourne, A.N.U., the A.A.E.C., Flinders and Adelaide Universities and the University of Western Australia. The activities of these groups are summarised

  20. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Several issues concerning nuclear energy in France during 1996 are presented: permission of a demand for installing underground laboratories in three sites (Marcoule, Bure and Chapelle-Baton); a report assessing the capacity of Superphenix plant to operate as a research tool; the project of merging between Framatome and Gec-Alsthom companies; the revision of a general report on nuclear energy in France; the issue of military plutonium management

  1. Nuclear Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Morgan C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  2. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanquet, Paul; Blanc, Daniel.

    1976-01-01

    The applications of radioisotopes in medical diagnostics are briefly reviewed. Each organ system is considered and the Nuclear medicine procedures pertinent to that system are discussed. This includes, the principle of the test, the detector and the radiopharmaceutical used, the procedure followed and the clinical results obtained. The various types of radiation detectors presently employed in Nuclear Medicine are surveyed, including scanners, gamma cameras, positron cameras and procedures for obtaining tomographic presentation of radionuclide distributions [fr

  3. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Despite an aggressive, competitive diagnostic radiology department, the University Hospital, London, Ontario has seen a decline of 11% total (in vivo and in the laboratory) in the nuclear medicine workload between 1982 and 1985. The decline of in vivo work alone was 24%. This trend has already been noted in the U.S.. Nuclear medicine is no longer 'a large volume prosperous specialty of wide diagnostic application'

  4. Nuclear cardiac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques

  5. Nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, S M [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiation Medicine Centre

    1967-01-01

    The article deals with the growth of nuclear medicine in India. Radiopharmaceuticals both in elemental form and radiolabelled compounds became commercially available in India in 1961. Objectives and educational efforts of the Radiation Medicine Centre setup in Bombay are mentioned. In vivo tests of nuclear medicine such as imaging procedures, dynamic studies, dilution studies, thyroid function studies, renal function studies, linear function studies, blood flow, and absorption studies are reported. Techniques of radioimmunoassay are also mentioned.

  6. Nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This report examines nuclear technology in Canada, with emphasis on Quebec, as a means of revitilizing industry. The historical, present day, and future states of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited are examined. Future research programs are discussed in greatest detail. These range from disposal of porcine wastes to new applications for electricity to nuclear medical techniques (to cite only a few examples). The executive summary is written in English. (23 fig., 16 tab.)

  7. Nuclear risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulkers, G.

    1988-01-01

    This file includes data on risks insured by the nuclear insurance pool in Belgium and on the Chernobyl accident covering injury, economic damage and compensation for the latter. Also included are the texts of the IAEA Conventions on Early Notification and on Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident as well as that of a Convention on long-distance transfrontier atmospheric pollution signed in Geneva [fr

  8. Nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    On 27 May 1986 the Norwegian government appointed an inter-ministerial committee of senior officials to prepare a report on experiences in connection with the Chernobyl accident. The present second part of the committee's report describes proposals for measures to prevent and deal with similar accidents in the future. The committee's evaluations and proposals are grouped into four main sections: Safety and risk at nuclear power plants; the Norwegian contingency organization for dealing with nuclear accidents; compensation issues; and international cooperation

  9. Nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    All scientists and technologists are agreed that the coal based fuel cycle is somewhere between 50 to 300 times more dangerous than the uranium fuel cycle. Under these circumstances it is not difficult to show that on a more quantitative basis, the nuclear industry, in all countries, has an unblemished safety record when compared with other energy sources. Various hazards and benefits of nuclear power are analyzed in this paper comparing with other energy sources. (Liu)

  10. Nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnould, M.; Takahashi, K.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding of the Universe, or at least some of its many faces, through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. It attempts to find as many nuclear physics imprints as possible in the macrocosm, and to decipher what those messages are telling us about the varied constituent objects in the Universe at present and in the past. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress made in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other subfields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Notwithstanding the accomplishment, many long-standing problems remain to be solved, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endangering old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experimental and theoretical components. On top of the fact that large varieties of nuclei have to be dealt with, these nuclei are immersed in highly unusual environments which may have a significant impact on their static properties, the diversity of their transmutation modes, and on the probabilities of these modes. In order to have a chance of solving some of the problems nuclear astrophysics is facing, the astrophysicists and nuclear physicists are obviously bound to put their competence in common, and have sometimes to benefit from the help of other fields of physics, like particle physics, plasma physics or solid-state physics. Given the highly varied and complex aspects, we pick here some specific nuclear

  11. Politics of nuclear power and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddin, R.

    2007-01-01

    those that want to start in group A or those willing to start in group B-if appropriate assurances and guarantees are provided that are addressed in this paper. Note that under the current NPT, signatories have an 'inalienable right...to develop research, production, and use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes without discrimination and in conformity with Articles I and II.' Moreover, paragraph 2 of Article IV further underscores that each NPT state-party 'undertake[s] to facilitate, and have the right to participate in, the fullest possible exchange of equipment, materials and scientific and technological information for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy.' Fuel cycle is clearly a part of the peaceful uses, and hence, it is the responsibility of those concerned about proliferation to provide adequate framework and guarantees to convince countries to join group B rather than A. Those concerned with the proliferation issue identify two major weaknesses in the NPT: 1. Ability of some signatory countries to proceed with nuclear activities hidden from IAEA oversight. 2. Concern that a country that acquires nuclear technology as a signatory can easily withdraw from the treaty and then use acquired know how for bomb making purposes. Giving due weight to both sides of the debate-proliferation concern as well as concern that too restrictive framework may limit legitimate use of peaceful use of nuclear power-full paper will examine options for global and regional frameworks to maximize safety and fruits of beneficial uses of nuclear power

  12. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Program on Nuclear Safety comprehends Radioprotection, Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Material Control. These activities are developed at the Nuclear Safety Directory. The Radioactive Waste Management Department (GRR) was formally created in 1983, to promote research and development, teaching and service activities in the field of radioactive waste. Its mission is to develop and employ technologies to manage safely the radioactive wastes generated at IPEN and at its customer’s facilities all over the country, in order to protect the health and the environment of today's and future generations. The Radioprotection Service (GRP) aims primarily to establish requirements for the protection of people, as workers, contractors, students, members of the general public and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, it also aims to establish the primary criteria for the safety of radiation sources at IPEN and planning and preparing for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies. The procedures about the management and the control of exposures to ionizing radiation are in compliance with national standards and international recommendations. Research related to the main activities is also performed. The Nuclear Material Control has been performed by the Safeguard Service team, which manages the accountability and the control of nuclear material at IPEN facilities and provides information related to these activities to ABACC and IAEA. (author)

  13. Nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, H [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1976-10-01

    It is expected that nuclear power generation will reach 49 million kW in 1985 and 129 million kW in 1995, and the nuclear fuel having to be supplied and processed will increase in proportion to these values. The technical problems concerning nuclear fuel are presented on the basis of the balance between the benefit for human beings and the burden on the human beings. Recently, especially the downstream of nuclear fuel attracts public attention. Enriched uranium as the raw material for light water reactor fuel is almost monopolized by the U.S., and the technical information has not been published for fear of the diversion to nuclear weapons. In this paper, the present situations of uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, transportation, reprocessing and waste disposal and the future problems are described according to the path of nuclear fuel cycle. The demand and supply of enriched uranium in Japan will be balanced up to about 1988, but afterwards, the supply must rely upon the early establishment of the domestic technology by centrifugal separation method. No problem remains in the fabrication of light water reactor fuel, but for the fabrication of mixed oxide fuel, the mechanization of the production facility and labor saving are necessary. The solution of the capital risk for the construction of the second reprocessing plant is the main problem. Japan must develop waste disposal techniques with all-out efforts.

  14. Nuclear safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Program on Nuclear Safety comprehends Radioprotection, Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Material Control. These activities are developed at the Nuclear Safety Directory. The Radioactive Waste Management Department (GRR) was formally created in 1983, to promote research and development, teaching and service activities in the field of radioactive waste. Its mission is to develop and employ technologies to manage safely the radioactive wastes generated at IPEN and at its customer’s facilities all over the country, in order to protect the health and the environment of today's and future generations. The Radioprotection Service (GRP) aims primarily to establish requirements for the protection of people, as workers, contractors, students, members of the general public and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, it also aims to establish the primary criteria for the safety of radiation sources at IPEN and planning and preparing for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies. The procedures about the management and the control of exposures to ionizing radiation are in compliance with national standards and international recommendations. Research related to the main activities is also performed. The Nuclear Material Control has been performed by the Safeguard Service team, which manages the accountability and the control of nuclear material at IPEN facilities and provides information related to these activities to ABACC and IAEA. (author)

  15. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, J.

    1990-01-01

    This set of questions is based on an inquiry from the years 1987 to 1989. About 250 people af all age groups - primarily, however, young people between 16 and 25 years of age - were asked to state the questions they considered particularly important on the subject of nuclear energy. The survey was carried out without handicaps according to the brain-storming principle. Although the results cannot claim to be representative, they certainly reflect the areas of interest of many citizens and also their expectations, hopes and fears in connection with nuclear energy. The greater part of the questions were aimed at three topic areas: The security of nuclear power-stations, the effects of radioactivity on people and the problem of waste disposal. The book centres around these sets of questions. The introduction gives a general survey of the significance of nuclear energy as a whole. After this follow questions to do with the function of nuclear power stations, for the problems of security and waste disposal - which are dealt with in the following chapters - are easier to explain and to understand if a few physical and technical basics are understood. In the final section of the book there are questions on the so-called rejection debate and on the possibility of replacing nuclear energy with other energy forms. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Makoto; Hamasaki, Manabu; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Hoshide, Akihiko; Katayama, Kimio; Nozawa, H.; Karigome, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    In recent days, energy security is becoming a major global concern and it has been recognized that a major reduction in greenhouse-gas emissions is required to combat climate change. Considerable expansion and new introduction of nuclear power generation are currently being planned and considered for the further in various parts of the world. Nuclear technologies of the latest 10 years in Japan were reviewed with their characteristics, advancement and future perspective. Steady efforts have been made to construct new nuclear power stations with computer-aided engineering system and modular and prefabricated structures, extend the interval of periodic inspections under the new inspection system that should improve both safety and reliability, implement advanced measures against aging and develop the next-generation light water reactors including a medium small reactor. Export of nuclear power plants has been promoted with international business alliance or cooperation. Activities to close nuclear fuel cycle to ensure sustainable nuclear energy utilization have been promoted. Decommissioning technologies for Tokai power station have been developed and accumulated know-how will be utilized in light water reactors. (T. Tanaka)

  17. Nuclear watershed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makovich, L.; Parish, T.

    1984-01-01

    In 1979 the accident at Three Mile Island brought nuclear power to the forefront of national attention. Over the last five years there have been no new orders for nuclear plants, construction costs and lead times have increased drastically, and numerous plants have been cancelled. In the coming years many new plants will come on line, and the first round of nuclear plant retirements will begin. Thus, the new set of issues faced by utilities are whether to complete plants currently under construction, how to recover the cost of abandoned plants, how to handle the potential rate shock of bringing costly plants into rate base, and how to accomplish decommissioning and retirement of nuclear plants. This paper presents and analyzes these issues. First, the history of the nuclear electric generation industry is reviewed. Next a case study illustrating the cost momentum built into nuclear power plant construction is presented. The issues involved in plant cancellation are discussed. Finally, a case study involving rate phase-in strategies is analyzed. 1 reference, 7 figures

  18. Development of System Regulating and Support for Nuclear Security in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobach, D.; Astashka, R.; Lugovskaya, O.

    2015-01-01

    A safeguards strengthening in Belarus is realized as complex for measures of legal authorities building, advance staff education and international cooperation. The main scope of complex coordinated activities is to provide the sustainable development of national regulatory system and support for current and future challenges in a more globalized world to assure relevant safeguards measures and implements, to get the sustainable international and regional cooperation. Collected and implemented information and knowledge, analytical thinking of involved specialists will improve cooperation between IAEA and States to optimize technical support and experience exchange. Some authorities are responsible in regulating and oversighting for nuclear security in Belarus. The main challenge of national system development is realization the conception of effective coordination. The nuclear regulatory authority (the Ministry for Emergency Situations/ Gosatomnadzor) has the responsibility either to build up own technical capabilities for detailed review and assessment of processes and activities of the NPP operator or to make sure that a technical support organization equipped with sufficient knowledge and structural capabilities is involved in assessment and analysis of processes at all phases of the NPP use. There is developed the conception for creation of analytical and technical support laboratory including both stationary and mobile equipment and techniques for nuclear security prevention and control measures and arrangements. It is actually the realization of conception the Joint Center for Nuclear Security Competence in Belarus for national and cooperational purposes. The implementation of strengthening plans and put-up arrangements will lead to integrated regulatory activities in order to allow practical optimization of the resources to get benefits from exchange of experience and issues from safety analysis and oversighting as synergy effect. (author)

  19. Enhancing leadership at a nuclear power plant - a systematic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jupiter, P.

    1989-01-01

    The increasing use of advanced technology, greater regulatory oversight, and critical public scrutiny create numerous pressures for leaders within nuclear power plant systems (NPPSs). These large, complex industrial installations have unusually high expectations imposed for safety and efficiency of operation - without the luxury of trial-and-error learning. Industry leaders assert that enhanced leadership and management can substantially improve the operating performance of a nuclear power plant. The need has been voiced within the nuclear industry for systematic and effective methods to address leadership and management issues. This paper presents a step-by-step model for enhancing leadership achievement within NPPS, which is defined as the combined structural, equipment, and human elements involved in a plant's operation. Within the model, key areas for which the leader is responsible build upon each other in sequential order to form a solid strategic structure; teachable actions and skills form an ongoing cycle for leadership achievement. Through the model's continued and appropriate functioning, a NPPS is likely to maintain its viability, productivity, and effectiveness for the full licensed term of a plant

  20. THE NUCLEAR MATERIAL MEASUREMENT PROGRAM PLAN FOR GOSATOMNADZOR OF RUSSIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokov, Dmitry; Byers, Kenneth R.

    2003-01-01

    As the Russian State regulatory agency responsible for oversight of nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A), Gosatomnadzor of Russia determines the status of the MC and A programs at Russian facilites by testing the nuclear material inventory for accounting record accuracy. Currently, Gosatomnadzor is developing and implementing an approach to planning and conducting MC and A inspections using non-destructive assay (NDA) instruments that will provide for consistent application of MC and A measurement inspection objectives throughtout Russia. This Gosatomnadzor NDA Program Plan documents current NDA measurement capability in all regions of Gosatomnadzor; provides justification for upgrades to equipment, procedures and training; and defines the inspector-facility operator interface as it relates to NDA measurement equipment use. This plan covers a three-year measurement program cycle, but will be reviewed and updated annually to ensure that adequate inspection resources are available to meet the demands of the inspection schedule. This paper presents the elements of this plan and describes the process by which Gosatomnadzor ensures that its NDA instruments are effectively utilized, procedures are developed and certified, and inspection personnel are properly trained to provide assurance that Russian nuclear facilities are in compliance with Russian MC and A regulations.