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Sample records for nuclear medicine experimental

  1. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive ... NIBIB-funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that ...

  2. Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  5. General Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of ... limitations of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a ... of your child's body. top of page How is the procedure performed? Nuclear medicine imaging is usually ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine ... physicians diagnose and evaluate medical conditions. These imaging scans use radioactive materials called radiopharmaceuticals or radiotracers . Depending ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate response to therapeutic interventions. Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine ... leaving the nuclear medicine facility. Through the natural process of radioactive decay, the small amount of radiotracer ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tell your doctor about your child’s recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications and allergies. Depending on the type ... Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed ... the thyroid gland. top of page How does the nuclear medicine procedure work? With ordinary x-ray ...

  16. Nuclear medicine physics

    CERN Document Server

    De Lima, Joao Jose

    2011-01-01

    Edited by a renowned international expert in the field, Nuclear Medicine Physics offers an up-to-date, state-of-the-art account of the physics behind the theoretical foundation and applications of nuclear medicine. It covers important physical aspects of the methods and instruments involved in modern nuclear medicine, along with related biological topics. The book first discusses the physics of and machines for producing radioisotopes suitable for use in conventional nuclear medicine and PET. After focusing on positron physics and the applications of positrons in medicine and biology, it descr

  17. Technologists for Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Huey D.

    1974-01-01

    Physicians need support personnel for work with radioisotopes in diagnosing dangerous diseases. The Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT) Program at Hillsborough Community College in Tampa, Florida, is described. (MW)

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scan being performed, you will receive specific preparation instructions for what your child may eat and drink before the exam, especially ... Epilepsy Images related to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine ... Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo. ...

  19. Nuclear tele medicine; Telemedicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, L.; Hernandez, F.; Fernandez, R. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Imagenologia Diagnostica, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The great majority of the digital images of nuclear medicine are susceptible of being sent through internet. This has allowed that the work in diagnosis cabinets by image it can benefit of this modern technology. We have presented in previous congresses works related with tele medicine, however, due to the speed in the evolution of the computer programs and the internet, becomes necessary to make a current position in this modality of work. (Author)

  20. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify ...

  1. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify ...

  2. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ... d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease ...

  3. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease in its earliest stage, often before symptoms ... benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. To learn more about nuclear medicine, visit Radiology ...

  4. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease ...

  5. Practical nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Gemmell, Howard G; Sharp, Peter F

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear medicine plays a crucial role in patient care, and this book is an essential guide for all practitioners to the many techniques that inform clinical management. The first part covers the scientific basis of nuclear medicine, the rest of the book deals with clinical applications. Diagnostic imaging has an increasingly important role in patient management and, despite advances in other modalities (functional MRI and spiral CT), nuclear medicine continues to make its unique contribution by its ability to demonstrate physiological function. This book is also expanded by covering areas of d

  6. Nuclear Medicine Annual, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, L.M.; Weissmann, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Among the highlights of Nuclear Medicine Annual, 1989 are a status report on the thyroid scan in clinical practice, a review of functional and structural brain imaging in dementia, an update on radionuclide renal imaging in children, and an article outlining a quality assurance program for SPECT instrumentation. Also included are discussions on current concepts in osseous sports and stress injury scintigraphy and on correlative magnetic resonance and radionuclide imaging of bone. Other contributors assess the role of nuclear medicine in clinical decision making and examine medicolegal and regulatory aspects of nuclear medicine.

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... beforehand, especially if sedation is to be used. Most nuclear medicine exams will involve an injection in ... PET/CT, SPECT/CT and PET/MR) are most often used in children with cancer, epilepsy and ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of radioactive materials called radiotracers, a special camera and a computer ... medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine the severity of or ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed ... the thyroid gland. top of page How does the procedure work? With ordinary x-ray examinations, an ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... necessitate sedation for your child. You will receive instructions prior to the exam if your child will ... child has been sedated, you will receive specific instructions to be followed after leaving the nuclear medicine ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page How does the nuclear medicine procedure work? With ordinary x-ray examinations, an image is ... placed over the patient's body. SPECT involves the rotation of the gamma camera heads around the patient's ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bladder. bones. liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically used ... gas via a mask, such as with a lung scan. Bladder: some exams require a catheter to ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the procedure. top of page Who interprets the results and how do we get them? A radiologist ... radiotracer administered are small, diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures result in low radiation exposure, acceptable for diagnostic exams. ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to be followed after leaving the nuclear medicine facility. Through the natural process of radioactive decay, the ... Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical questions ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. jaundice in newborns and older children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. top ... to be followed after leaving the nuclear medicine facility. Through the natural process of radioactive decay, the ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... used. Most nuclear medicine exams will involve an injection in a vein in your child’s arm or ... are noninvasive and, with the exception of intravenous injections, are usually painless medical tests that help physicians ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits The information provided by nuclear medicine examinations ... diagnosis or to determine appropriate treatment, if any. Risks Because the doses of radiotracer administered are small, ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically used to help ... children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. top of page How does the procedure ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... jaundice in newborns and older children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. top of ... full size with caption Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Epilepsy ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... organs and tissues in your body. Hybrid imaging techniques (PET/CT, SPECT/CT and PET/MR) are ... equipment look like? The special camera and imaging techniques used in nuclear medicine include the gamma camera ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures result in low radiation exposure, acceptable for diagnostic exams. Thus, the radiation risk ... long-term adverse effects from such low-dose exposure. For more information about safety in pediatric radiology ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... molecular information. In many centers, nuclear medicine images can be superimposed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic ... small hand-held device resembling a microphone that can detect and measure the amount of the radiotracer ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... painless medical tests that help physicians diagnose and evaluate medical conditions. These imaging scans use radioactive materials called radiopharmaceuticals or radiotracers . Depending on the type of nuclear medicine exam, the radiotracer is either ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other abnormalities within the body. Because nuclear medicine procedures are able to pinpoint molecular activity within ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... variety of diseases, including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other abnormalities ... and bladder. bones. liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will be inhaled as a gas via a mask, such as with a lung scan. Bladder: some ... A radiologist or other physician who has specialized training in nuclear medicine will interpret the images and ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... determine appropriate treatment, if any. Risks Because the doses of radiotracer administered are small, diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures result in low radiation exposure, acceptable for diagnostic exams. Thus, the radiation ...

  8. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  9. Physics in nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Cherry, Simon R; Phelps, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Physics in Nuclear Medicine - by Drs. Simon R. Cherry, James A. Sorenson, and Michael E. Phelps - provides current, comprehensive guidance on the physics underlying modern nuclear medicine and imaging using radioactively labeled tracers. This revised and updated fourth edition features a new full-color layout, as well as the latest information on instrumentation and technology. Stay current on crucial developments in hybrid imaging (PET/CT and SPECT/CT), and small animal imaging, and benefit from the new section on tracer kinetic modeling in neuroreceptor imaging.

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... like? Special camera or imaging devices used in nuclear medicine include the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT). The gamma camera, also called a scintillation camera, detects radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnoses. In addition, manufacturers are now making single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) and ... nuclear medicine include the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT). The gamma camera, also ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exams at the same time. An emerging imaging technology, but not readily available at this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help diagnose childhood disorders ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Most nuclear medicine exams will involve an injection in a vein in your child’s arm or hand. Your child should ... body, they offer the potential to identify disease in its earliest stages as well as a patient’s ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pictures and provides molecular information. In many centers, nuclear medicine images can be superimposed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to produce special views, a practice known as image fusion or co-registration. These views allow the information ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The special camera and imaging techniques used in nuclear medicine include the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT). The gamma camera, also called a scintillation camera, detects radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and ...

  16. Traceability in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, B.E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Ionizing Radiation Div., Gaithersburg MD (United States); Judge, St. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    Accurate, reproducible measurement of radioactivity in nuclear medicine applications is vital to ensure the safety and effectiveness of disease diagnosis and treatment using unsealed radioactive sources. The need to maintain a high degree of confidence in those measurements requires that they be carried out so as to be traceable to national and international standards. In addition, measurement traceability for radioactivity in medicine helps ensure international consistency in measurement at all levels of practice (national measurement laboratories, research institutions, isotope producers, radiopharmaceutical manufacturers and clinics). This paper explores the importance of radioactivity measurement in nuclear medicine and demonstrates how traceability can be extended from international standards to the quantity of the drug administered to the patient. (authors)

  17. Traceability in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Brian E.; Judge, Steven

    2007-08-01

    Accurate, reproducible measurement of radioactivity in nuclear medicine applications is vital to ensure the safety and effectiveness of disease diagnosis and treatment using unsealed radioactive sources. The need to maintain a high degree of confidence in those measurements requires that they be carried out so as to be traceable to national and international standards. In addition, measurement traceability for radioactivity in medicine helps ensure international consistency in measurement at all levels of practice (national measurement laboratories, research institutions, isotope producers, radiopharmaceutical manufacturers and clinics). This paper explores the importance of radioactivity measurement in nuclear medicine and demonstrates how traceability can be extended from international standards to the quantity of the drug administered to the patient.

  18. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... I-131 Therapy Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript ... an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. To learn more about nuclear medicine, visit Radiology Info dot ...

  19. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stage, often before symptoms occur or before abnormalities can be detected with other diagnostic tests. Nuclear medicine ... nuclear medicine exam, there are several things you can do to prepare. First, you may be asked ...

  20. Nuclear medicine technology study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Dee

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine Technology Study Guide presents a comprehensive review of nuclear medicine principles and concepts necessary for technologists to pass board examinations. The practice questions and content follow the guidelines of the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) and American Registry of Radiological Technologists (ARRT), allowing test takers to maximize their success in passing the examinations. The book is organized by sections of increasing difficulty, with over 600 multiple-choice questions covering all areas of nuclear medicine, including radiation safety; radi

  1. Imaging in nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    This volume addresses a wide range of issues in the field of nuclear medicine imaging, with an emphasis on the latest research findings. Initial chapters set the scene by considering the role of imaging in nuclear medicine from the medical perspective and discussing the implications of novel agents and applications for imaging. The physics at the basis of the most modern imaging systems is described, and the reader is introduced to the latest advances in image reconstruction and noise correction. Various novel concepts are then discussed, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA research project on the optimization of imaging procedures in order to permit a reduction in the radiation dose to healthy tissues. Advances in quality control and quality assurance are covered, and the book concludes by listing rules of thumb for imaging that will be of use to both beginners and experienced researchers.

  2. Nuclear medicine therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Eary, Janet F

    2013-01-01

    One in three of the 30 million Americans who are hospitalized are diagnosed or treated with nuclear medicine techniques. This text provides a succinct overview and detailed set of procedures and considerations for patient therapy with unsealed radioactivity sources.  Serving as a complete literature reference for therapy with radiopharmaceuticals currently utilized in practice, this source covers the role of the physician in radionuclide therapy, and essential procedures and protocols required by health care personnel.

  3. Imaging in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giussani, Augusto [BfS - Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Protection and Health; Hoeschen, Christoph (eds.) [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg (Germany). Research Unit Medical Raditation Physics and Diagnostics

    2013-08-01

    Presents the most recent developments in nuclear medicine imaging, with emphasis on the latest research findings. Considers the latest advances in imaging systems, image reconstruction, noise correction, and quality assurance. Discusses novel concepts, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA project. Lists rules of thumb for imaging of use to both beginners and experienced researchers. This volume addresses a wide range of issues in the field of nuclear medicine imaging, with an emphasis on the latest research findings. Initial chapters set the scene by considering the role of imaging in nuclear medicine from the medical perspective and discussing the implications of novel agents and applications for imaging. The physics at the basis of the most modern imaging systems is described, and the reader is introduced to the latest advances in image reconstruction and noise correction. Various novel concepts are then discussed, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA research project on the optimization of imaging procedures in order to permit a reduction in the radiation dose to healthy tissues. Advances in quality control and quality assurance are covered, and the book concludes by listing rules of thumb for imaging that will be of use to both beginners and experienced researchers.

  4. Frontiers in nuclear medicine symposium: Nuclear medicine & molecular biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document contains the abstracts from the American College of Nuclear Physicians 1993 Fall Meeting entitled, `Frontiers in Nuclear Medicine Symposium: Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Biology`. This meeting was sponsored by the US DOE, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. The program chairman was Richard C. Reba, M.D.

  5. Nuclear medicine therapy principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Aktolun, Cumali

    2012-01-01

    This book reviews nuclear medicine techniques and technology for therapy of malignant and benign diseases, covering scientific principles and clinical applications, and trials of experimental agents for treating tumors involving virtually every organ system.

  6. Nuclear medicine radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    Complexities of the requirements for accurate radiation dosimetry evaluation in both diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine (including PET) have grown over the past decade. This is due primarily to four factors: growing consideration of accurate patient-specific treatment planning for radionuclide therapy as a means of improving the therapeutic benefit, development of more realistic anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in estimating radiation transport and dosimetry in patients, design and use of advanced Monte Carlo algorithms in calculating the above-mentioned radiation transport and

  7. [Nuclear medicine in Europe: education].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellwig, D.; Freudenberg, L.S.; Mottaghy, F.M.; Franzius, C.; Krause, T.; Garai, I.; Biermann, M.; Gruning, T.; Leitha, T.; Gotthardt, M.

    2012-01-01

    The technical developments that have taken place in the preceding years (PET, hybrid imaging) have changed nuclear medicine. The future cooperation with radiologists will be challenging as well as positioning nuclear medicine in an European context. It can also be expected that education in nuclear

  8. Nuclear medicine and AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Doherty, M.J. (Saint Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom) Kent and Canterbury Hospital, Canterbury (United Kingdom). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Nunan, T.O. (Saint Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1993-10-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and its associated illnesses in a relatively young population of patients provides an expanding role for nuclear medicine. The disease enforces a review of each department's infection control procedures. It has also resulted in an increase in the number of patients presenting with diseases such as Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, Kaposi's sarcoma etc. which prior to the HIV epidemic were extremely rare. Thus in high risk patients the interpretation of abnormalities in nuclear medicine scans needs to include the spectrum of opportunistic infections and unusual tumours. The presence of opportunistic infections in the severely immunocompromised patient has led to the development of techniques not normally used, i.e. lung [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) transfer/clearance, donor leukocyte scanning to allow rapid diagnosis of an abnormality. Radionuclide techniques are also used to monitor the effect of therapy directed at the HIV itself or against opportunistic infections. This review covers aspects of infection control as well as the use of radionuclides to investigate specific problems related to HIV infection and therapy of the associated disease processes. (author).

  9. [Nuclear medicine and radiopharmaceuticals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopena Novales, P; Plancha Mansanet, M C; Martinez Carsi, C; Sopena Monforte, R

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a medical specialty that allows modern diagnostics and treatments using radiopharmaceuticals original radiotracers (drugs linked to a radioactive isotope). In Europe, radiopharmaceuticals are considered a special group of drugs and thus their preparation and use are regulated by a set of policies that have been adopted by individual member countries. The radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic examinations are administered in very small doses. So, in general, they have no pharmacological action, side effects or serious adverse reactions. The biggest problem associated with their use are the alterations in their biodistribution that may cause diagnostic errors. Nuclear Medicine is growing considerably influenced by the appearance and development of new radiopharmaceuticals in both the diagnostic and therapeutic fields and primarily to the impact of new multimodality imaging techniques (SPECT-CT, PET-CT, PET-MRI, etc.). It's mandatory to know the limitations of these techniques, distribution and eventual physiological alterations of radiopharmaceuticals, contraindications and adverse reactions of radiological contrasts, and the possible interference of both.

  10. Nuclear medicine in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothfeld, B. (ed.)

    1974-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the following main headings: crystal scintillation counting; liquid scintillation counting; activation analysis; the in vitro nuclear medicine laboratory; blood volume in clinical practice B/sub 12/ and folate deficiency; radionuclide studies associated with abnormalities of iron; basic principles of competitive radioassay; plasma cortisol; radioimmunoassays for T/sub 3/ and T/sub 4/; radioimmunoassay of estrogens; determination of androgens in biological fluids; radioimmunoassay of digitalis glycosides; growth hormone; thyrotropin; gonadotropins; radioimmunoassay of gastrin; glucagon; radioisotopic measurements of insulin; radioimmunoassay of the calcium-regulating hormones; the renin-angiotensin system and aldosterone; tumor antigens; fat absorption; protein-losing enteropathy; Australia antigen; bacteriologic cultures and sensitivities; and future pathways. (ERB)

  11. Nuclear medicine at a crossroads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelbert, Heinrich R

    2011-12-01

    The growth of molecular imaging heightens the promise of clinical nuclear medicine as a tool for individualization of patient care and for improvement of health-care outcomes. Together with greater use of integrated structure-function imaging, clinical nuclear medicine reaches beyond traditional specialty borders into diagnostic radiology and oncology. Yet, there are concerns about the future of nuclear medicine, including progressively declining reimbursement, the competitive advantages of diagnostic radiology, limited translation of research accomplishments to clinical diagnostic imaging and patient care, and an insufficient pool of incoming highly qualified nuclear medicine clinicians. Thus, nuclear medicine views itself as being at a critical crossroads. What will be important is for nuclear medicine to be positioned as the quintessential molecular imaging modality more centrally within medical imaging and for the integration of nuclear medicine with primary care specialties to be driven more by patient needs than by specialty needs. In this way, the full potential of nuclear medicine as an effective and efficient tool for improving patient outcomes can be realized.

  12. Essentials of nuclear medicine imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Mettler, Fred A. Jr

    2012-01-01

    Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging, by Drs. Fred A Mettler and Milton J Guiberteau, provides the practical and comprehensive guidance you need to master key nuclear imaging techniques. From physics, instrumentation, quality control, and legal requirements to hot topics such as sodium fluoride, radiopharmaceuticals, and recommended pediatric administered doses and guidelines, this sixth edition covers the fundamentals and recent developments in the practice of nuclear medicine.

  13. Nuclear Medicine National Headquarter System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Nuclear Medicine National HQ System database is a series of MS Excel spreadsheets and Access Database Tables by fiscal year. They consist of information from all...

  14. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT Angiography Video: Myelography Video: CT of the Heart Video: Radioiodine I-131 Therapy Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicine exams will involve an injection in a vein in your child’s arm or hand. Your child should wear loose, comfortable clothing and ... medicine exams will involve an injection into a vein in your child's arm or hand. Children should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing to ...

  16. Basic sciences of nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Magdy M. (ed.) [Imperial College London (United Kingdom). Biological Imaging Centre

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear medicine has become an ever-changing and expanding diagnostic and therapeutic medical profession. The day-to-day innovations seen in the field are, in great part, due to the integration of many scientific bases with complex technologic advances. The aim of this reference book, Basic Sciences of Nuclear Medicine, is to provide the reader with a comprehensive and detailed discussion of the scientific bases of nuclear medicine, covering the different topics and concepts that underlie many of the investigations and procedures performed in the field. Topics include radiation and nuclear physics, Tc-99m chemistry, single-photon radiopharmaceuticals and PET chemistry, radiobiology and radiation dosimetry, image processing, image reconstruction, quantitative SPECT imaging, quantitative cardiac SPECT, small animal imaging (including multimodality hybrid imaging, e.g., PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and PET/MRI), compartmental modeling, and tracer kinetics. (orig.)

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the bladder, such as with a vesicoureteral reflux study. It can take several seconds to a few ... until the nuclear physician checks the images in case additional images are needed. top of page What ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help diagnose childhood disorders that are present at birth or that develop during childhood. It provides unique ... diagnose childhood disorders that are congenital (present at birth) or that develop during childhood. Physicians use nuclear ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... placed over the patient's body. SPECT involves the rotation of the gamma camera heads around the patient's ... the child has been sedated, you will receive specific instructions to be followed after leaving the nuclear ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... used in children with cancer, epilepsy and back pain. top of page What does the equipment look ... being recorded. Though nuclear imaging itself causes no pain, children may experience some discomfort from having to ...

  1. Radiation physics for nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeschen, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The field of nuclear medicine is expanding rapidly, with the development of exciting new diagnostic methods and treatments. This growth is closely associated with significant advances in radiation physics. In this book, acknowledged experts explain the basic principles of radiation physics in relation to nuclear medicine and examine important novel approaches in the field. The first section is devoted to what might be termed the "building blocks" of nuclear medicine, including the mechanisms of interaction between radiation and matter and Monte Carlo codes. In subsequent sections, radiation sources for medical applications, radiopharmaceutical development and production, and radiation detectors are discussed in detail. New frontiers are then explored, including improved algorithms for image reconstruction, biokinetic models, and voxel phantoms for internal dosimetry. Both trainees and experienced practitioners and researchers will find this book to be an invaluable source of up-to-date information.

  2. Historic images in nuclear medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    In 1976, 2 major molecular imaging events coincidentally took place: Clinical Nuclear Medicine was first published in June, and in August researchers at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania created the first images in humans with F-FDG. FDG was initially developed as part of an evolution...... set in motion by fundamental research studies with positron-emitting tracers in the 1950s by Michel Ter-Pegossian and coworkers at the Washington University. Today, Clinical Nuclear Medicine is a valued scientific contributor to the molecular imaging community, and FDG PET is considered the backbone...

  3. Nuclear medicine; La medecine nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibille, L. [Hopital Lapeyronie CHU Montpellier, Medecine Nucleaire, 34 - Montpellier (France); Nalda, E.; Collombier, L.; Kotzki, P.O.; Boudousq, V. [CHU de Nimes, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et de biophysique, 30 - Nimes (France)

    2011-05-15

    Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty using the properties of radioactivity. Radioactive markers associated with vectors are used as a tracer or radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic purposes and/or therapy. Since its birth more than half a century ago, it has become essential in the care of many patients, particularly in oncology. After some definitions, this paper presents the main nuclear techniques - imaging for diagnostic, radiopharmaceuticals as therapeutic agents, intra-operative detection, technique of radioimmunoassay - and the future of this field. (authors)

  4. Radiation safety in nuclear medicine procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Geon; Kim, Ja Hae; Song, Ho Chun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Radiation Safety Research Center, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Since the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011, radiation safety has become an important issue in nuclear medicine. Many structured guidelines or recommendations of various academic societies or international campaigns demonstrate important issues of radiation safety in nuclear medicine procedures. There are ongoing efforts to fulfill the basic principles of radiation protection in daily nuclear medicine practice. This article reviews important principles of radiation protection in nuclear medicine procedures. Useful references, important issues, future perspectives of the optimization of nuclear medicine procedures, and diagnostic reference level are also discussed.

  5. Radiation Safety in Nuclear Medicine Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho-Chun

    2017-03-01

    Since the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011, radiation safety has become an important issue in nuclear medicine. Many structured guidelines or recommendations of various academic societies or international campaigns demonstrate important issues of radiation safety in nuclear medicine procedures. There are ongoing efforts to fulfill the basic principles of radiation protection in daily nuclear medicine practice. This article reviews important principles of radiation protection in nuclear medicine procedures. Useful references, important issues, future perspectives of the optimization of nuclear medicine procedures, and diagnostic reference level are also discussed.

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Therapy November 8 is the International Day of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! I’m Dr. Ramji ...

  7. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... before abnormalities can be detected with other diagnostic tests. Nuclear medicine imaging procedures use small amounts of ...

  8. Nuclear medicine at the crossroads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, H.W. [Stanford Univ. Hospital, Div. of Nuclear Medicine, CA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Many nuclear medicine procedures, originally developed more than 20 years ago, are now performed with new radiopharmaceuticals or instruments; it is therefore apposite to reappraise what we are doing and why we are doing it. The clinical utility of nuclear medicine is discussed with reference, by way of example, to gated blood pools scans and myocardial perfusion imaging; the importance of the referred population for the outcome of studies is stressed. Attention is drawn to the likelohood that the detection of ischemia would be enhanced by the administration of nitroglycerin prior to rest thallium injection. Emphasis is also placed on the increasing acceptance of dual-tracer studies. The significance of expression of p-glycoprotein by some tumors for sestamibi imaging is discussed, and advances in respect of fluorodeoxyglucose imaging are reviewed. The final section covers issues relating to the development of new procedures, such as the value of nuclear medicine in the detection and characterization of tissue oxygen levels and the possible future role of nuclear medicine in the management of sleeping and eating disorders. (orig.)

  9. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through the area being examined and gives off energy in the form of gamma rays which are detected by a special camera and computer to create images of the inside of your body. If you’re scheduled for a nuclear medicine exam, there are several things you can ...

  10. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... before abnormalities can be detected with other diagnostic tests. Nuclear medicine imaging procedures use small amounts of ...

  11. Nuclear medicine physics the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    For decades this classic reference has been the book to review to master the complexities of nuclear-medicine physics. Part of the renowned The Basics series of medical physics books, Nuclear Medicine Physics has become an essential resource for radiology residents and practitioners, nuclear cardiologists, medical physicists, and radiologic technologists. This thoroughly revised Seventh Edition retains all the features that have made The Basics series a reliable and trusted partner for board review and reference. This handy manual contains key points at the end of each chapter that help to underscore principal concepts. You'll also find review questions at the end of each chapter—with detailed answers at the end of the book—to help you master the material. This edition includes useful appendices that elaborate on specific topics, such as physical characteristics of radionuclides and CGS and SI Units.

  12. Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Gopal B

    2013-01-01

    The Fourth Edition of Dr. Gopal B. Saha’s Physics and Radiobiology of Nuclear Medicine was prompted by the need to provide up-to-date information to keep pace with the perpetual growth and improvement in the instrumentation and techniques employed in nuclear medicine since the last edition published in 2006. Like previous editions, the book is intended for radiology and nuclear medicine residents to prepare for the American Board of Nuclear Medicine, American Board of Radiology, and American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine examinations, all of which require a strong physics background. Additionally, the book will serve as a textbook on nuclear medicine physics for nuclear medicine technologists taking the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board examination.

  13. A concise guide to nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is an important component of modern medicine. This easy-to-use book is designed to acquaint readers with the basic principles of nuclear medicine, the instrumentation used, the gamut of procedures available, and the basis for selecting specific diagnostic or therapeutic procedures and interpreting results. After an introductory chapter on the history, technical basis, and scope of nuclear medicine, a series of chapters are devoted to the application of nuclear medicine techniques in the different body systems. In addition, the use of nuclear medicine methods within oncology is

  14. Essentials of nuclear medicine physics and instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Powsner, Rachel A; Powsner, Edward R

    2013-01-01

    An excellent introduction to the basic concepts of nuclear medicine physics This Third Edition of Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Physics and Instrumentation expands the finely developed illustrated review and introductory guide to nuclear medicine physics and instrumentation. Along with simple, progressive, highly illustrated topics, the authors present nuclear medicine-related physics and engineering concepts clearly and concisely. Included in the text are introductory chapters on relevant atomic structure, methods of radionuclide production, and the interaction of radiation with matter. Fu

  15. Nuclear Medicine in Pediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Ornella; Stellin, Giovanni; Zucchetta, Pietro

    2017-03-01

    Accurate cardiovascular imaging is essential for the successful management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Echocardiography and angiography have been for long time the most important imaging modalities in pediatric cardiology, but nuclear medicine has contributed in many situations to the comprehension of physiological consequences of CHD, quantifying pulmonary blood flow symmetry or right-to-left shunting. In recent times, remarkable improvements in imaging equipments, particularly in multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have led to the progressive integration of high resolution modalities in the clinical workup of children affected by CHD, reducing the role of diagnostic angiography. Technology has seen a parallel evolution in the field of nuclear medicine, with the advent of hybrid machines, as SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners. Improved detectors, hugely increased computing power, and new reconstruction algorithms allow for a significant reduction of the injected dose, with a parallel relevant decrease in radiation exposure. Nuclear medicine retains its distinctive capability of exploring at the tissue level many functional aspects of CHD in a safe and reproducible way. The lack of invasiveness, the limited need for sedation, the low radiation burden, and the insensitivity to body habitus variations make nuclear medicine an ideal complement of echocardiography. This is particularly true during the follow-up of patients with CHD, whose increasing survival represent a great medical success and a challenge for the health system in the next decades. Metabolic imaging using (18)FDG PET/CT has expanded its role in the management of infection and inflammation in adult patients, particularly in cardiology. The same expansion is observed in pediatric cardiology, with an increasing rate of studies on the use of FDG PET for the evaluation of children with vasculitis, suspected valvular infection or infected prosthetic devices. The

  16. Topics of nuclear medicine research in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inubushi, Masayuki; Kaneta, Tomohiro; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Okizaki, Atsutaka; Oku, Naohiko

    2017-07-25

    Last year in the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, we introduced some recent nuclear medicine research conducted in Japan. This was favorably received by European readers in the main. This year we wish to focus on the Annals of Nuclear Medicine on some of the fine nuclear medicine research work executed in Europe recently. In the current review article, we take up five topics: prostate-specific membrane antigen imaging, recent advances in radionuclide therapy, [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (PET) for dementia, quantitative PET assessment of myocardial perfusion, and iodine-124 ((124)I). Just at the most recent annual meeting of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine 2016, Kyoto was selected as the host city for the 2022 Congress of the World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology. We hope that our continuous efforts to strengthen scientific cooperation between Europe and Japan will bring many European friends and a great success to the Kyoto meeting.

  17. Diagnostic interventions in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrall, J.H.; Swanson, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnostic interventions in nuclear medicine may be defined as the coadministration of a nonradioactive drug or application of a physical stimulus or physiologic maneuver to enhance the diagnostic utility of a nuclear medicine test. The rationale for each interventional maneuver follows from the physiology or metabolism of the particular organ or organ system under evaluation. Diagnostic inference is drawn from the pattern of change in the biodistribution of the tracer in response to the intervention-induced change in metabolism or function. In current practice, the most commonly performed interventional maneuvers are aimed at studies of the heart, genitourinary system, hepatobiliary system, and gastrointestinal tract. The single most commonly performed interventional study in the United States is the stress Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scan aimed at the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The stress portion of the study is accomplished with dynamic leg exercise on a treadmill and is aimed at increasing myocardial oxygen demands. Areas of myocardium distal to hemodynamically significant lesions in the coronary arteries become ischemic at peak stress due to the inability of the stenotic vessel to respond to the oxygen demand/blood flow needs of the myocardium. Ischemic areas are readily recognized as photopenic defects on scans obtained immediately after exercise, with normalization upon delayed imaging. Diuresis renography is aimed at the differential diagnosis of hydroureteronephrosis. By challenging the urinary tract collecting structures with an augmented urine flow, dilated, unobstructed systems can be differentiated from systems with significant mechanical obstruction. 137 references.

  18. Nuclear medicine applications for the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartshorne, M.F.; Peters, V.

    1987-04-01

    Although not frequently described in the podiatric literature, nuclear medicine imaging may be of great assistance to the clinical podiatrist. This report reviews in detail the use of modern nuclear medicine approaches to the diagnosis and management of the diabetic foot. Nuclear medicine techniques are helpful in evaluating possible osteomyelitis, in determining appropriate amputation levels, and in predicting response to conservative ulcer management. Specific indications for bone, gallium, and perfusion imaging are described.

  19. Nuclear Medicine Technology: A Suggested Postsecondary Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Education Research Center, Cambridge, MA.

    The purpose of this curriculum guide is to assist administrators and instructors in establishing nuclear medicine technician programs that will meet the accreditation standards of the American Medical Association (AMA) Council on Medical Education. The guide has been developed to prepare nuclear medicine technicians (NMT's) in two-year…

  20. Experience with Nuclear Medicine Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Volkan-Salanci

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Radiology information system (RIS is basically evolved for the need of radiologists and ignores the vital steps needed for a proper work flow of Nuclear Medicine Department. Moreover, CT/MRI oriented classical PACS systems are far from satisfying Nuclear Physicians like storing dynamic data for reprocessing and quantitative analysis of colored images. Our purpose was to develop a workflow based Nuclear Medicine Information System (NMIS that fulfills the needs of Nuclear Medicine Department and its integration to hospital PACS system. Material and Methods: Workflow in NMIS uses HL7 (health level seven and steps include, patient scheduling and retrieving information from HIS (hospital information system, radiopharmacy, acquisition, digital reporting and approval of the reports using Nuclear Medicine specific diagnostic codes. Images and dynamic data from cameras of are sent to and retrieved from PACS system (Corttex© for reprocessing and quantitative analysis. Results: NMIS has additional functions to the RIS such as radiopharmaceutical management program which includes stock recording of both radioactive and non-radioactive substances, calculation of the radiopharmaceutical dose for individual patient according to body weight and maximum permissible activity, and calculation of radioactivity left per unit volume for each radionuclide according their half lives. Patient scheduling and gamma camera patient work list settings were arranged according to specific Nuclear Medicine procedures. Nuclear Medicine images and reports can be retrieved and viewed from HIS. Conclusion: NMIS provides functionality to standard RIS and PACS system according to the needs of Nuclear Medicine. (MIRT 2012;21:97-102

  1. Experimental medicine 1000 years ago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabie E Abdel-Halim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the state of experimentation in the field of medicine during the Medieval Islamic era. With few exceptions, most of the contemporary sources on history of medicine propagate the idea that the roots of experimental medicine in its modern form, including clinical trials and drug-potency studies, first started during the European Renaissance in the 16 th to the 18 th centuries. This study is part of an ongoing multidisciplinary primary-source investigation of the original Arabic works of 11 Islamic medical scholars who lived and practiced between the 9 th and the 13 th centuries. The study critically evaluated and documented their contributions to the development of the scientific method and experimental medicine during that medieval Islamic era in several areas including critical appraisal of previous knowledge, clinical observations and case reports, clinical therapeutic trials, drug potency trials, experimentation on animals, dissection and dissection experiments as well as postmortem examinations. In each of the above-mentioned areas, significant contributions were made during the Medieval Islamic era from as early as the ninth century AD.

  2. [Experimental nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    An earlier study of unusual electromagnetic decays in {sup 86}Zr was extended in order to make comparisons with its isotone {sup 84}Sr and with {sup 84}Zr. The K=14 (t {sub {1/2}} = 70 ns) high-spin isomer in {sup 176}W was found to have a 13% branch directly to the K=O ground-state band, one of the strongest violations of K-selection rules known. A new program to search for a predicted region of oblate deformation involving neutron deficient isotopes in the Rn/Fr/Ra region was begun. In the area of nuclear astrophysics, as part of a study of the onset of the rp-Process, a set of measurements searching for possible new resonances for {sup 14}O+{alpha} and {sup 17}F+p reactions was completed and a coincidence experiment measuring the {sup 19}F({sup 3}He,t){sup 19}Ne({alpha}){sup 15}O and {sup 19}F({sup 3}He,t){sup 19}Ne(p){sup 18}F reactions in order to determine the rates of the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O and {sup 18}F(p,{gamma}){sup 19}Ne reactions was begun. Experimental measurements of {beta}n{alpha} coincidences from the {sup 15}N(d,p){sup 16}N({beta}{sup {minus}}{nu}){sup 16}O({alpha}){sup 12}C reaction have also been completed and are currently being analyzed to determine the rate of the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}) reaction. In the APEX collaboration, we have completed the assembly and testing of two position-sensitive Na barrels which surround the axial silicon detector arrays and serve as the e{sup +} triggers by detecting their back-to-back annihilation quanta were completed. The HI@AGS and RHIC collaborations, construction and implementation activities associated with the space-time-tracker detector and in the design of the central detector for the PHENIX experiment were carried out. Operation of the ESTU tandem accelerator has been reliable, delivering beam on target at terminal voltages as high as 19.3 MV and running for as long as 143 days between tank openings. Fabrication and bench testing of a new negative ion source system have been completed.

  3. Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Gopal B

    2010-01-01

    From a distinguished author comes this new edition for technologists, practitioners, residents, and students in radiology and nuclear medicine. Encompassing major topics in nuclear medicine from the basic physics of radioactive decay to instrumentation and radiobiology, it is an ideal review for Board and Registry examinations. The material is well organized and written with clarity. The book is supplemented with tables and illustrations throughout. It provides a quick reference book that is concise but comprehensive, and offers a complete discussion of topics for the nuclear medicine and radi

  4. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Rosário; Costa, Gracinda

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear medicine in Portugal has been an autonomous speciality since 1984. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, 5 years of training are necessary. The curriculum is very similar to the one approved under the auspices of the European Union of Medical Specialists, namely concerning the minimum recommended number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. There is a final assessment, and during the training the resident is in an approved continuing education programme. Departments are accredited by the Medical College in order to verify their capacity to host nuclear medicine residencies.

  5. Integrating cardiology for nuclear medicine physicians. A guide to nuclear medicine physicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Movahed, Assad [East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States). Section of Cardiology; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath [Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Buscombe, John R.; Hall, Margaret [Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear cardiology is no longer a medical discipline residing solely in nuclear medicine. This is the first book to recognize this fact by integrating in-depth information from both the clinical cardiology and nuclear cardiology literature, and acknowledging cardiovascular medicine as the fundamental knowledge base needed for the practice of nuclear cardiology. The book is designed to increase the practitioner's knowledge of cardiovascular medicine, thereby enhancing the quality of interpretations through improved accuracy and clinical relevance.The text is divided into four sections covering all major topics in cardiology and nuclear cardiology: -Basic Sciences and Cardiovascular Diseases; -Conventional Diagnostic Modalities; -Nuclear Cardiology; -Management of Cardiovascular Diseases. (orig.)

  6. Rare earth elements in nuclear medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Kodina G.E.; Kulakov V.N.; Sheino I.N.

    2014-01-01

    The review focuses on the key applications of stable and radioactive isotopes of rare earth elements in the technology of nuclear medicine, radionuclide diagnostics and therapy, as well as magnetic resonance imaging and binary radiotherapy technologies.

  7. Rare earth elements in nuclear medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodina G.E.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The review focuses on the key applications of stable and radioactive isotopes of rare earth elements in the technology of nuclear medicine, radionuclide diagnostics and therapy, as well as magnetic resonance imaging and binary radiotherapy technologies.

  8. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Zehra [Ege University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Izmir (Turkey); Bozkurt, M. Fani; Erbas, Belkis [Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Durak, Hatice [Dokuz Eyluel University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Izmir (Turkey)

    2017-05-15

    Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years. This article describes past and present facts in this field and attempts to provide insights into the future which hopefully will be brighter than before. (orig.)

  9. An overview of nuclear medicine imaging procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Peter; Lawson, Richard

    2015-11-25

    Nuclear medicine imaging is not generally well understood by nurses who work outside this area. Consequently, nurses can find themselves unable to answer patients' questions about nuclear medicine imaging procedures or give them proper information before they attend for a test. This article aims to explain what is involved in some common diagnostic nuclear medicine imaging procedures so that nurses are able to discuss this with patients. It also addresses some common issues about radiation protection that nurses might encounter in their usual working routine. The article includes links to videos showing some typical nuclear medicine imaging procedures from a patient's point of view and links to an e-Learning for Healthcare online resource that provides detailed information for nurses.

  10. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Zehra; Bozkurt, M Fani; Erbas, Belkıs; Durak, Hatice

    2017-01-31

    Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years. This article describes past and present facts in this field and attempts to provide insights into the future which hopefully will be brighter than before.

  11. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which ac...

  12. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which ac...

  13. Nuclear test experimental science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Bucciarelli, G.; Carter, J.; Cherniak, J.; Donohue, M.L.; Kirvel, R.D.; MacGregor, P.; Reid, S. (eds.)

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory under the following topics: prompt diagnostics; experimental modeling, design, and analysis; detector development; streak-camera data systems; weapons supporting research.

  14. Trends in nuclear medicine in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Kashyap, Ravi; Paez, Diana; Pascual, Thomas; Zaknun, John; Bastos, Fernando Mut; Pynda, Yaroslav

    2011-12-01

    This article describes trends in nuclear medicine in the developing world as noted by nuclear medicine professionals at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The trends identified are based on data gathered from several sources, including information gathered through a database maintained by the IAEA; evaluation of country program frameworks of various IAEA Member States; personal interactions with representatives in the nuclear medicine field from different regions of the world; official proceedings and meeting reports of the IAEA; participation in numerous national, regional, and international conferences; discussions with the leadership of major professional societies; and relevant literature. The information presented in this article relied on both objective and subjective observations. The aims of this article were to reflect on recent developments in the specialty of nuclear medicine and to envision the directions in which it is progressing. These issues are examined in terms of dimensions of practice, growth, and educational and training needs in the field of nuclear medicine. This article will enable readers to gain perspective on the status of nuclear medicine practice, with a specific focus on the developing world, and to examine needs and trends arising from the observations.

  15. Nuclear medicine consensus; Consenso sobre medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, Edwaldo E.; Marin Neto, Jose Antonio; Naccarato, Alberto F.P.; Ramires, Jose Antonio F.; Castro, Iran de; Paiva, Eleuses Vieira; Thom, Anneliese F.; Barroso, Adelanir; Blum, Bernardo; Hollanda, Ricardo; Mansur, Antonio de Padua

    1995-04-01

    The use of nuclear methods in cardiovascular diseases is studied concerning diagnosis, risk, prognosis, indications and accuracy. Aspects concerning chronic coronary artery disease, myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction, viable myocardium, valvular heart disease, ventricular dysfunction, heart transplant, congenital heart diseases in adults, are discussed.

  16. A Training Manual for Nuclear Medicine Technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Guy H.; Alexander, George W.

    This manual was prepared for a training program in Nuclear Medicine Technology at the University of Cincinnati. Instructional materials for students enrolled in these courses in the training program include: Nuclear Physics and Instrumentation, Radionuclide Measurements, Radiation Protection, and Tracer Methodology and Radiopharmaceuticals. (CS)

  17. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medicine offers the potential to identify disease in its earliest stage, often before symptoms occur or before ... from taking certain medications before the exam. Also, it’s best to leave any jewelry at home and ...

  18. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medicine offers the potential to identify disease in its earliest stage, often before symptoms occur or before ... from taking certain medications before the exam. Also, it’s best to leave any jewelry at home and ...

  19. Radionuclides for nuclear medicine: a nuclear physicists' view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantone, M.; Haddad, F.; Harissopoulos, S.

    2013-01-01

    NuPECC (the Nuclear Physics European Collaboration Committee, an expert committee of the European Science Foundation) has the mission to strengthen European Collaboration in nuclear science through the promotion of nuclear physics and its trans-disciplinary use and application. NuPECC is currently...... working on a report on “Nuclear Physics for Medicine” and has set up a working group to review the present status and prospects of radionuclides for nuclear medicine. An interim report will be presented to seek comments and constructive input from EANM members. In particular it is investigated how nuclear...... physics Methods and nuclear physics facilities are supporting the development and supply of medical radionuclides and how this support could be further strengthened in future. Aspects that will be addressed: •In recent years, the reactor-based supply chain of 99Mo/99mTc generators was repeatedly...

  20. Festschrift. The Institute of Nuclear Medicine. 50 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Medicine, founded in 1961, celebrates with this Festschrift, its Golden Jubilee. It has been a remarkable 50 years of progress of the radionuclide tracer methodology. From initial, physiology based experimentation, a full independent medical discipline evolved, and with it, a comprehensive clinical service. Diagnosis and Treatment with radiotracers have established the basis for Nuclear Medicine. Technological advances have permeated the field like none other, its multidisciplinary character and its translational research are embedded in the history of the Institute and its success. Recent and latest advances in the field promise a future as bright as has been witnessed and documented in the last 50 years.

  1. Introduction of nuclear medicine research in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inubushi, Masayuki; Higashi, Tatsuya; Kuji, Ichiei; Sakamoto, Setsu; Tashiro, Manabu; Momose, Mitsuru

    2016-12-01

    There were many interesting presentations of unique studies at the Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine, although there were fewer attendees from Europe than expected. These presentations included research on diseases that are more frequent in Japan and Asia than in Europe, synthesis of original radiopharmaceuticals, and development of imaging devices and methods with novel ideas especially by Japanese manufacturers. In this review, we introduce recent nuclear medicine research conducted in Japan in the five categories of Oncology, Neurology, Cardiology, Radiopharmaceuticals and Technology. It is our hope that this article will encourage the participation of researchers from all over the world, in particular from Europe, in scientific meetings on nuclear medicine held in Japan.

  2. Role of nuclear medicine in melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefnagel, C.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1998-11-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumour of the melanocytes presenting characteristic metabolic and biological features, which remains a difficult and important issue in oncology. As a functional modality, nuclear medicine offers a variety of possibilities to assist in the clinical management of this disease. A brief survey of currently available techniques is presented for the diagnosis, staging and follow up, either by organ imaging or by using a great spectrum of tumour-seeking radiopharmaceuticals. The role of lymphoscintigraphy in melanoma is emphasized, as well as the supportive role of nuclear medicine in the surgical theater, enabling selective lymph node dissection by the sentinel node procedure and high dose regional chemotherapy by isolated limb perfusion. Although hardly used for metastatic melanoma so far, with all its tumour-seeking approaches nuclear medicine holds a therapeutic potential for this disease as well. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 47 refs.

  3. Applications of nuclear medicine in genitourinary imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaufox, M.D.; Kalika, V.; Scharf, S.; Milstein, D.

    1982-01-01

    Major advances in nuclear medicine instrumentation and radiopharmaceuticals for renal studies have occurred during the last decade. Current nuclear medicine methodology can be applied for accurate evaluation of renal function and for renal imaging in a wide variety of clinical situations. Total renal function can be estimated from the plasma clearance of agents excreted by glomerular filtration or tubular secretion, and individual function can be estimated by imaging combined with renography. A major area of radionuclide application is in the evaluation of obstructive uropathy. The introduction of diuretic renography and the use of computer-generated regions of interest offer the clinician added useful data which may aid in diagnosis and management. Imaging is of proven value also in trauma, renovascular hypertension, and acute and chronic renal failure. Methods for the evaluation of residual urine, vesicoureteral reflux, and testicular torsion have achieved increasing clinical use. These many procedures assure a meaningful and useful role for the application of nuclear medicine in genitourinary imaging.

  4. Introduction of nuclear medicine research in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inubushi, Masayuki [Kawasaki Medical School, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Higashi, Tatsuya [National Institutes of Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Chiba (Japan); Kuji, Ichiei [Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hidaka-shi, Saitama (Japan); Sakamoto, Setsu [Dokkyo University School of Medicine, PET Center, Mibu, Tochigi (Japan); Tashiro, Manabu [Tohoku University, Division of Cyclotron Nuclear Medicine, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Momose, Mitsuru [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    There were many interesting presentations of unique studies at the Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine, although there were fewer attendees from Europe than expected. These presentations included research on diseases that are more frequent in Japan and Asia than in Europe, synthesis of original radiopharmaceuticals, and development of imaging devices and methods with novel ideas especially by Japanese manufacturers. In this review, we introduce recent nuclear medicine research conducted in Japan in the five categories of Oncology, Neurology, Cardiology, Radiopharmaceuticals and Technology. It is our hope that this article will encourage the participation of researchers from all over the world, in particular from Europe, in scientific meetings on nuclear medicine held in Japan. (orig.)

  5. Dose Estimation in Pediatric Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Frederic H; Goodkind, Alison B; Plyku, Donika; Khamwan, Kitiwat; O'Reilly, Shannon E; Cao, Xinhua; Frey, Eric C; Li, Ye; Bolch, Wesley E; Sgouros, George; Treves, S Ted

    2017-03-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in children is well established for imaging practically all physiologic systems but particularly in the fields of oncology, neurology, urology, and orthopedics. Pediatric nuclear medicine yields images of physiologic and molecular processes that can provide essential diagnostic information to the clinician. However, nuclear medicine involves the administration of radiopharmaceuticals that expose the patient to ionizing radiation and children are thought to be at a higher risk for adverse effects from radiation exposure than adults. Therefore it may be considered prudent to take extra care to optimize the radiation dose associated with pediatric nuclear medicine. This requires a solid understanding of the dosimetry associated with the administration of radiopharmaceuticals in children. Models for estimating the internal radiation dose from radiopharmaceuticals have been developed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging and other groups. But to use these models accurately in children, better pharmacokinetic data for the radiopharmaceuticals and anatomical models specifically for children need to be developed. The use of CT in the context of hybrid imaging has also increased significantly in the past 15 years, and thus CT dosimetry as it applies to children needs to be better understood. The concept of effective dose has been used to compare different practices involving radiation on a dosimetric level, but this approach may not be appropriate when applied to a population of children of different ages as the radiosensitivity weights utilized in the calculation of effective dose are not specific to children and may vary as a function of age on an organ-by-organ bias. As these gaps in knowledge of dosimetry and radiation risk as they apply to children are filled, more accurate models can be developed that allow for better approaches to dose optimization. In turn, this

  6. Traumatic Brain Injury: Nuclear Medicine Neuroimaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Catasús, Carlos A; Vállez Garcia, David; Le Riverend Morales, Eloísa; Galvizu Sánchez, Reinaldo; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; de Vries, Erik FJ; van Waarde, Aren; Leenders, Klaus L

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an up-to-date review of nuclear medicine neuroimaging in traumatic brain injury (TBI). 18F-FDG PET will remain a valuable tool in researching complex mechanisms associated with early metabolic dysfunction in TBI. Although evidence-based imaging studies are needed, 18F-FDG PET i

  7. Neuroimaging in nuclear medicine: drug addicted brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong-An; Kim, Dae-Jin [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Addiction to illicit drugs in one of today's most important social issues. Most addictive drugs lead to irreversible parenchymal changes in the human brain. Neuroimaging data bring to light the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the abused drugs, and demonstrate that addiction is a disease of the brain. Continuous researches better illustrate the neurochemical alterations in brain function, and attempt to discover the links to consequent behavioral changes. Newer hypotheses and theories follow the numerous results, and more rational methods of approaching therapy are being developed. Substance abuse is on the rise in Korea, and social interest in the matter as well. On the other hand, diagnosis and treatment of drug addiction is still very difficult, because how the abused substance acts in the brain, or how it leads to behavioral problems in not widely known. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of drug addiction can improve the process of diagnosing addict patients, planning therapy, and predicting the prognosis . Neuroimaging approaches by nuclear medicine methods are expected to objectively judge behavioral and neurochemical changes, and response to treatment. In addition, as genes associated with addictive behavior are discovered, functional nuclear medicine images will aid in the assessment of individuals. Reviewing published literature on neuroimaging regarding nuclear medicine is expected to be of assistance to the management of drug addict patients. What's more, means of applying nuclear medicine to the care of drug addict patients should be investigated further.

  8. Collaborative environment for nuclear medicine training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambilla, Claudia Regio; Dalpiaz, Gabriel Goulart; Giraffa, Lucia Maria, E-mail: claudinharb@gmail.co [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Silva, Ana Maria Marques da [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Silva Junior, Neivo da [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (HSL-PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Hospital Sao Lucas; Ferreto, Tiago Coelho; Rose, Cesar Augusto Fonticielha de [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Informatica; Silva, Vinicius Duval da [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (FAMED/PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Escola de Medicina. Dept. de Patologia e Radiacoes

    2011-05-15

    Objective: To validate the proposal for development of a virtual collaborative environment for training of nuclear medicine personnel. Materials and Methods: Organizational assumptions, constraints and functionalities that should be offered to the professionals in this field were raised early in the development of the environment. The prototype was developed in the Moodle environment, including data storage and interaction functionalities. A pilot interaction study was developed with a sample of specialists in nuclear medicine. Users' opinions collected by means of semi-structured questionnaire were submitted to quantitative and content analysis. Results: The proposal of a collaborative environment was validated by a learning courses of nuclear medicine professionals and considered as an aid in the training in this field. Suggestions for improvements and new functionalities were made. There is a need to establish a program for education of moderators specifically for this environment, considering the different interaction characteristics as the online and conventional teaching methods are compared. Conclusion: The collaborative environment will allow the exchange of experiences and case discussions among professionals from institutions located in different regions all over the country, enhancing the collaboration among them. Thus, the environment can contribute in the early and continued education of nuclear medicine professionals. (author)

  9. A nuclear chocolate box: the periodic table of nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Philip J

    2015-03-21

    Radioisotopes of elements from all parts of the periodic table find both clinical and research applications in radionuclide molecular imaging and therapy (nuclear medicine). This article provides an overview of these applications in relation to both the radiological properties of the radionuclides and the chemical properties of the elements, indicating past successes, current applications and future opportunities and challenges for inorganic chemistry.

  10. Quantitative Analysis in Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a review of image analysis techniques as they are applied in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Driven in part by the remarkable increase in computing power and its ready and inexpensive availability, this is a relatively new yet rapidly expanding field. Likewise, although the use of radionuclides for diagnosis and therapy has origins dating back almost to the discovery of natural radioactivity itself, radionuclide therapy and, in particular, targeted radionuclide therapy has only recently emerged as a promising approach for therapy of cancer and, to a lesser extent, other diseases. As effort has, therefore, been made to place the reviews provided in this book in a broader context. The effort to do this is reflected by the inclusion of introductory chapters that address basic principles of nuclear medicine imaging, followed by overview of issues that are closely related to quantitative nuclear imaging and its potential role in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. ...

  11. The importance of HIFAR to nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, N.R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Since its official opening on 26 January 1960, the HIFAR research reactor operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) at Lucas Heights near Sydney has been used to support an expanding nuclear medicine market. HIFAR has characteristics which make it very suitable for this role and the effect has been to make ANSTO the dominant supplier of reactor-based radiopharmaceuticals in Australia and a significant exporter. While HIFAR has capacity to support limited increased production, its future requires government decisions. The author concluded that the absence of an operational research reactor in Australia and the lack of another local source of neutrons could directly affect the practice of nuclear medicine in the country and the level of presently increasing exports. 1 fig.

  12. A new experimental procedure for determination of photoelectric efficiency of a NaI(Tl) detector used for nuclear medicine liquid waste monitoring with traceability to a reference standard radionuclide calibrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccatelli, A; Campanella, F; Ciofetta, G; Marracino, F M; Cannatà, V

    2010-02-01

    To determine photopeak efficiency for (99m)Tc of the NaI(Tl) detector used for liquid waste monitoring at the Nuclear Medicine Unit of IRCCS Paediatric Hospital Bambino Gesù in Rome, a specific experimental procedure, with traceability to primary standards, was developed. Working with the Italian National Institute for Occupational Prevention and Safety, two different calibration source geometries were employed and the detector response dependence on geometry was investigated. The large percentage difference (almost 40%) between the two efficiency values obtained showed that geometrical effects cannot be neglected.

  13. Coded-aperture imaging in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Warren E.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Aarsvold, John N.

    1989-01-01

    Coded-aperture imaging is a technique for imaging sources that emit high-energy radiation. This type of imaging involves shadow casting and not reflection or refraction. High-energy sources exist in x ray and gamma-ray astronomy, nuclear reactor fuel-rod imaging, and nuclear medicine. Of these three areas nuclear medicine is perhaps the most challenging because of the limited amount of radiation available and because a three-dimensional source distribution is to be determined. In nuclear medicine a radioactive pharmaceutical is administered to a patient. The pharmaceutical is designed to be taken up by a particular organ of interest, and its distribution provides clinical information about the function of the organ, or the presence of lesions within the organ. This distribution is determined from spatial measurements of the radiation emitted by the radiopharmaceutical. The principles of imaging radiopharmaceutical distributions with coded apertures are reviewed. Included is a discussion of linear shift-variant projection operators and the associated inverse problem. A system developed at the University of Arizona in Tucson consisting of small modular gamma-ray cameras fitted with coded apertures is described.

  14. Converting energy to medical progress [nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-04-01

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases.

  15. Converting Energy to Medical Progress [Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases.

  16. Directory of computer users in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, J.J.; Gurney, J.; McClain, W.J. (eds.)

    1979-09-01

    The Directory of Computer Users in Nuclear Medicine consists primarily of detailed descriptions and indexes to these descriptions. A typical Installation Description contains the name, address, type, and size of the institution and the names of persons within the institution who can be contacted for further information. If the department has access to a central computer facility for data analysis or timesharing, the type of equipment available and the method of access to that central computer is included. The dedicated data processing equipment used by the department in its nuclear medicine studies is described, including the peripherals, languages used, modes of data collection, and other pertinent information. Following the hardware descriptions are listed the types of studies for which the data processing equipment is used, including the language(s) used, the method of output, and an estimate of the frequency of the particular study. An Installation Index and an Organ Studies Index are also included. (PCS)

  17. Basic science of nuclear medicine the bare bone essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Kai H

    2015-01-01

    Through concise, straightforward explanations and supporting graphics that bring abstract concepts to life, the new Basic Science of Nuclear Medicine—the Bare Bone Essentials is an ideal tool for nuclear medicine technologist students and nuclear cardiology fellows looking for an introduction to the fundamentals of the physics and technologies of modern day nuclear medicine.

  18. Development of Scintillators in Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Babak

    2015-01-01

    High-quality image is necessary for accurate diagnosis in nuclear medicine. There are many factors in creating a good image and detector is the most important one. In recent years, several detectors are studied to get a better picture. The aim of this paper is comparison of some type of these detectors such as thallium activated sodium iodide bismuth germinate cesium activated yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG: Ce) YAP: Ce "lutetium aluminum garnet activated by cerium" CRY018 "CRY019" lanthanum bromide and cadmium zinc telluride. We studied different properties of these crystals including density, energy resolution and decay times that are more important factors affecting the image quality.

  19. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresinska, Anna [Institute of Cardiology, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Birkenfeld, Bozena [Pomeranian Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Szczecin (Poland); Krolicki, Leszek [Warsaw Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Dziuk, Miroslaw [Military Institute of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-10-15

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes

  20. Nuclear medicine applications and their mathematical basis

    CERN Document Server

    Goris, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This book reviews some principal applications of nuclear medicine, specifically from the viewpoint of the mathematical and physical analyses that support the interpretation. In contradistinction to other approaches, the mathematics does not precede the applications in introductory chapters, but is presented in the application chapters with various degrees of granularity. More details on mathematical derivations are illustrated in the last chapter for interested readers. A more detailed review of Bayes theorem can be found (in Chapter 7) explaining how the literature results were retabulated

  1. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-10-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes regular

  2. Nuclear Medicine at Charles Sturt University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swan, H. [Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW (Australia); Sinclair, P. [Charles Sturt University, Dubbo, NSW (Australia); Scollard, D. [Michener Institute, Toronto (Canada)

    1998-06-01

    Full text: A distance educational programme for upgrading of Certificate, Associate Diploma and Diploma to a Bachelor of Applied Science degree commenced in second semester of 1997 with approximately 15 Australian students and 15 Canadian students. The first graduation will occur in 1998. Formal links with the Michener Institute in Toronto have allowed Canadian students access to study resources during the course. All students entering the course are accredited or registered with their respective professional societies. The short conversion programme for those with three year diplomas includes Nuclear Medicine Physics and Instrumentation, Imaging Pathology, Clinical Neuroscience and Research Method subjects. An inaugural undergraduate degree programme in Nuclear Medicine Technology commences in first semester of 1998 on the Riverina Campus at Wagga Wagga. An intake of 15 students is anticipated. This small group of rural based students will have the benefits of international expertise. The programme has a strong clinical practice component including time on campus to supplement the practicum in departments. Physiology studies continue through to third year to complement the professional subjects. Active participation is solicited from those departments involved with aspects of the practicum well before students are placed. A fully functional teaching laboratory has been constructed containing a well equipped radiopharmacy, gamma camera room and computer laboratory using modern applications software to provide the students with a solid background in their chosen field

  3. Display of nuclear medicine imaging studies

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, B; Samuel, A M

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging studies involve evaluation of a large amount of image data. Digital signal processing techniques have introduced processing algorithms that increase the information content of the display. Nuclear medicine imaging studies require interactive selection of suitable form of display and pre-display processing. Static imaging study requires pre-display processing to detect focal defects. Point operations (histogram modification) along with zoom and capability to display more than one image in one screen is essential. This album mode of display is also applicable to dynamic, MUGA and SPECT data. Isometric display or 3-D graph of the image data is helpful in some cases e.g. point spread function, flood field data. Cine display is used on a sequence of images e.g. dynamic, MUGA and SPECT imaging studies -to assess the spatial movement of tracer with time. Following methods are used at the investigator's discretion for inspection of the 3-D object. 1) Display of orthogonal projections, 2) Disp...

  4. Nuclear Medicine Physics: The Basics. 7th ed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailidis, Dimitris

    2012-10-01

    Nuclear Medicine Physics: The Basics. 7th ed. Ramesh Chandra, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, a Wolters Kluwer Business. Philadelphia, 2012. Softbound, 224 pp. Price: $69.99. ISBN: 9781451109412. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. Special monitoring in nuclear medicine; Monitoreo especial en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, C.C.; Puerta, J.A.; Morales, J. [Asociacion Colombiana de Proteccion Radiologica (Colombia)]. e-mail: ccbeltra@gmail.com

    2006-07-01

    Colombia counts with around 56 centers of Nuclear Medicine, 70 Nuclear Doctors and more of 100 Technologists in this area. The radioisotopes more used are the {sup 131} I and the {sup 99m} Tc. The radiological surveillance singular in the country is carried out for external dosimetry, being the surveillance by incorporation of radioactive materials very sporadic in our media. Given the necessity to implement monitoring programs in the incorporation of radionuclides of the occupationally exposed personnel, in the routine practice them routine of Nuclear Medicine, it was implemented a pilot program of Special Monitoring with two centers of importance in the city of Medellin. This program it was carried out with the purpose of educating, to stimulate and to establish a program of reference monitoring with base in the National Program of Monitoring in the radionuclides Incorporation that serves like base for its application at level of all the services of Nuclear Medicine in the country. This monitoring type was carried out with the purpose of obtaining information on the work routine in these centers, form of manipulation and dosage of the radionuclides, as well as the administration to the patient. The application of the program was carried out to define the frequency of Monitoring and analysis technique for the implementation of a program of routine monitoring, following the recommendations of the International Commission of Radiological Protection. For their application methods of activity evaluation were used in urine and in 7 workers thyroid, of those which only two deserve an analysis because they presented important activities. The measures were carried out during one month, every day by means in urine samples and to the most critic case is practiced two thyroid measures, one in the middle of the period and another when concluding the monitoring. To the other guy is practiced an activity count in thyroid when concluding the monitoring period. The obtained

  6. The role of general nuclear medicine in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Lacey R, E-mail: lgreene@csu.edu.au [Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales (Australia); Wilkinson, Deborah [Faculty of Health, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    The rising incidence of breast cancer worldwide has prompted many improvements to current care. Routine nuclear medicine is a major contributor to a full gamut of clinical studies such as early lesion detection and stratification; guiding, monitoring, and predicting response to therapy; and monitoring progression, recurrence or metastases. Developments in instrumentation such as the high-resolution dedicated breast device coupled with the diagnostic versatility of conventional cameras have reinserted nuclear medicine as a valuable tool in the broader clinical setting. This review outlines the role of general nuclear medicine, concluding that targeted radiopharmaceuticals and versatile instrumentation position nuclear medicine as a powerful modality for patients with breast cancer.

  7. History and Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sombut Boonyaprapa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In 1955, the first nuclear medicine division was established in Thailand by Professor Romsai Suwannik in the Department of Radiology, Siriraj Hospil, Mahidol University in Bangkok. In 1959 four years later, the second nuclear medicine division was established in the Department of Radiology, Chulalongkorn Hospital in Bangkok. The third nuclear medicine division was started in Rajvithi Hospital in Bangkok in 1961. The fourth nuclear medicine division was installed in Chiang Mai University which is the first University located outside of Bangkok in 1965 by Professor Dusadee Prabhasavat and Professor Sanan Simarak, ten years after the first nuclear medicine division in Siriraj Hospital. At the present in Thailand, there are twenty-five organizations providing clinical nuclear medicine services. Five medical faculties provide three years nuclear medicine residency training. There are eight companies which supply radiopharmaceuticals and/or nuclear medicine instruments one of these belongs to governmental office of atomic for peace (OAP of Thailand. In conclusion: Nuclear medicine researches and clinical practices in Thailand had been progressed from the past to the present time and will more progress in the near future, which certainly is the part of Asian countries and ARCCNM.

  8. Nuclear symmetry energy: An experimental overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D V Shetty; S J Yennello

    2010-08-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy is a fundamental quantity important for studying the structure of systems as diverse as the atomic nucleus and the neutron star. Considerable efforts are being made to experimentally extract the symmetry energy and its dependence on nuclear density and temperature. In this article, the experimental studies carried out up-to-date and their current status are reviewed.

  9. The impact of nuclear science on medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Kraft, G

    1999-01-01

    From the very beginning, i.e. from the discovery of the natural radioactivity by H. Becquerel and the production of radium by M. Curie, nuclear physics had a strong impact on medicine: Radioactive sources were immediately made use of in tumor therapy long before the action mechanisms of ionizing radiation were understood. The invention of the tracer technique by G. Hevesy opened a new field for the study of chemokinetics as well as for the in-vivo measurement of various organ functions. In the percutane tumor therapy hadrons like neutrons, pions, protons and heavier ions were tested. Presently, proton therapy is a great success and is spreading all over the world. The new techniques of target-conform treatment using heavy ions for an improved tumor targeting and control represent the latest great improvement of radiation tumor therapy.

  10. Pediatric nuclear medicine: A practical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pintelon, H.; Piepsz, A. [Academic Hospital VUB, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Meidicine; Dejonckheere, M. [Erasme Hospital ULB, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Anesthesiology

    1997-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the practical aspects of pediatric nuclear medicine, particularly the controversy about drug sedation. The authors conclude that drug sedation should be exceptionally used. There is an alternative way, consisting in an adequate approach of the patient: good information to the parents and the child; taking care of the child`s environment, starting from the first contacts in the waiting room; specific education of technologists: this includes injections and blood sampling, but also proper handling of the child during the procedure and adequate psychological attitudes toward child and parents. Taking these factors into account, it is exceptional that a test has to be postponed because of the lack of collaboration of the patient; good quality images, using the recommended paediatric amounts of radioactivity can be achieved even for procedures of prolonged duration.

  11. Directory of computer users in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henne, R.L.; Erickson, J.J.; McClain, W.J.; Kirch, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    The directory is composed of two major divisions, a Users' section and a Vendors' section. The Users' section consists of detailed installation descriptions and indexes to these descriptions. A typical description contains the name, address, type, and size of the institution as well as names of persons to contact. Following the hardware descriptions are listed the type of studies for which the computers are utilized, including the languages used, the method of output and an estimate of how often the study is performed. The Vendors' section contains short descriptions of current commercially available nuclear medicine systems as supplied by the vendors themselves. In order to reduce the amount of obsolete data and to include new institutions in future updates of the directory, a user questionnaire is included. (HLW)

  12. Nuclear medicine and radiopharmacy; Medicina nuclear y radiofarmacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon A, M. C. [Sociedad Mexicana de Seguridad Radiologica A. C., Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2008-12-15

    In the areas of Nuclear Medicine and Radiopharmacy frequently happens that the personnel that is incorporated as a candidate to serve as personnel occupationally exposed have varied skills, not necessarily have an ingrained culture of safety and radiation protection, some are resistant to adoption a work discipline and have very limited notions of normalization, including the safety basic standards. In fact, referring to the safety basic standards, concepts such as practice justification, protection optimization and dose limitation, can be very abstract concepts for such personnel. In regard to training strategies, it was noted that training in the work is an effective tool although it is very demanding for the learner but mainly for the teaches. The experts number that can occur in this manner is limited because it is an individualized system; however those from the process usually acquire a good preparation, which certainly includes theoretical aspects. For greater efficiency it is necessary that hospitals account facilities, procedures and personnel that might have an exclusive dedication to education and training of human resources. This would create a safety culture, alleviating the burdens of the already existing expertise and improves the training conditions. The Mexican Society of Radiological Safety (SMSR) can help in these efforts through the publication of guides aimed at work training, coordination and articulation of the possible courses already on the market and own the courses organization, workshops and conferences with more frequency. It would also serves that the SMSR acts as speaker with political actors, advocating for the courses validation offered by higher learning institutions, coordinating and promoting postgraduates in Nuclear Medicine and Radiopharmacy. (Author)

  13. Nuclear medicine training and practice in the Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel [University Hospital Olomouc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15

    Nuclear medicine in the Czech Republic is a full specialty with an exclusive practice. Since the training program was organized and structured in recent years, residents have had access to the specialty of nuclear medicine, starting with a two-year general internship (in internal medicine or radiology). At present, nuclear medicine services are provided in 45 departments. In total, 119 nuclear medicine specialists are currently registered. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, five years of training are necessary; the first two years consist of a general internship in internal medicine or radiology. The remaining three years consist of training in the nuclear medicine specialty itself, but includes three months of practice in radiology. Twenty-one physicians are currently in nuclear medicine training and a mean of three specialists pass the final exam per year. The syllabus is very similar to that of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), namely concerning the minimum recommended numbers for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In principle, the Czech law requires continuous medical education for all practicing doctors. The Czech Medical Chamber has provided a continuing medical education (CME) system. Other national CMEs are not accepted in Czech Republic. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear medicine training and practice in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamínek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear medicine in the Czech Republic is a full specialty with an exclusive practice. Since the training program was organized and structured in recent years, residents have had access to the specialty of nuclear medicine, starting with a two-year general internship (in internal medicine or radiology). At present, nuclear medicine services are provided in 45 departments. In total, 119 nuclear medicine specialists are currently registered. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, five years of training are necessary; the first two years consist of a general internship in internal medicine or radiology. The remaining three years consist of training in the nuclear medicine specialty itself, but includes three months of practice in radiology. Twenty-one physicians are currently in nuclear medicine training and a mean of three specialists pass the final exam per year. The syllabus is very similar to that of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), namely concerning the minimum recommended numbers for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In principle, the Czech law requires continuous medical education for all practicing doctors. The Czech Medical Chamber has provided a continuing medical education (CME) system. Other national CMEs are not accepted in Czech Republic.

  15. Career prospects for graduating nuclear medicine residents: survey of nuclear medicine program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A; Guiberteau, Milton J; Metter, Darlene F; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    There has been much consternation in the nuclear medicine (NM) community in recent years regarding the difficulty many NM graduates experience in securing initial employment. A survey designed to determine the extent and root causes behind the paucity of career opportunities was sent to all 2010-2011 NM residency program directors. The results of that survey and its implications for NM trainees and the profession are presented and discussed in this article.

  16. Source Book of Educational Materials for Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijar, Mary Lou, Comp.; Lewis, Jeannine T., Comp.

    The contents of this sourcebook of educational materials are divided into the following sections: Anatomy and Physiology; Medical Terminology; Medical Ethics and Department Management; Patient Care and Medical Decision-Making; Basic Nuclear Medicine; Diagnostic in Vivo; Diagnostic in Vitro; Pediatric Nuclear Medicine; Radiation Detection and…

  17. Estimated dose from diagnostic nuclear medicine patients to people outside the Nuclear Medicine department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Marissa L

    2013-11-01

    Patients undergoing nuclear medicine scans can be a source of radiation exposure for staff, family and the public. In this paper, 12 common nuclear medicine scans are considered. Doses are estimated for a range of scenarios, to hospital staff, to the public and to the patients' co-workers and family. Estimates are based on dose rates measured as patients left the Nuclear Medicine department. Radiopharmaceutical clearance is calculated from biokinetic models described in International Commission on Radiological Protection publications 53, 80 and 106. For all scan types, and all scenarios, doses are estimated to be substantially less than the trigger level of 300 µSv. Within the hospital, Intensive Care Unit staff receive the highest dose (up to 80 µSv) from patients who have had a myocardial scan or a positron emission tomography scan. For out-patients, the highest doses (up to 100 µSv) are associated with travel on public transport (for 4 h) on the same day as the scan.

  18. Distribution of nuclear medicine service in Brazil; Distribuicao do servico de medicina nuclear no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Ana Carolina Costa da; Duarte, Alessandro; Santos, Bianca Maciel dos [Faculdade Metodo de Sao Paulo (FAMESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    The Brazil does not posses a good distribution of nuclear medicine service por all his territory. This paper shows the difference among country regions as far the number of clinics of nuclear medicine as is concerning, and also doctors licensed in the area and radioprotection supervisors, both licensed by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN)

  19. Minimizing and communicating radiation risk in pediatric nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Frederic H; Treves, S Ted; Adelstein, S James

    2012-03-01

    The value of pediatric nuclear medicine is well established. Pediatric patients are referred to nuclear medicine from nearly all pediatric specialties including urology, oncology, cardiology, gastroenterology, and orthopedics. Radiation exposure is associated with a potential, small, risk of inducing cancer in the patient later in life and is higher in younger patients. Recently, there has been enhanced interest in exposure to radiation from medical imaging. Thus, it is incumbent on practitioners of pediatric nuclear medicine to have an understanding of dosimetry and radiation risk to communicate effectively with their patients and their families. This article reviews radiation dosimetry for radiopharmaceuticals and also CT given the recent proliferation of PET/CT and SPECT/CT. It also describes the scientific basis for radiation risk estimation in the context of pediatric nuclear medicine. Approaches for effective communication of risk to patients' families are discussed. Lastly, radiation dose reduction in pediatric nuclear medicine is explicated.

  20. Japanese consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. Part 1: Pediatric radiopharmaceutical administered doses (JSNM pediatric dosage card). Part 2: Technical considerations for pediatric nuclear medicine imaging procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Masaki, Hidekazu; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Okuno, Mitsuo; Oguma, Eiji; Onuma, Hiroshi; Kanegawa, Kimio; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Kensuke; Kitamura, Masayuki; Kida, Tetsuo; Kono, Tatsuo; Kondo, Chisato; Sasaki, Masayuki; Terada, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Teisuke; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Hirono, Keishi; Fujita, Yukihiko; Hoshino, Ken; Yano, Masayuki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2014-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine has recently published the consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. This article is the English version of the guidelines. Part 1 proposes the dose optimization in pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Part 2 comprehensively discusses imaging techniques for the appropriate conduct of pediatric nuclear medicine procedures, considering the characteristics of imaging in children.

  1. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  4. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  5. Experimental techniques in nuclear and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tavernier, Stefaan

    2009-01-01

    The book is based on a course in nuclear and particle physics that the author has taught over many years to physics students, students in nuclear engineering and students in biomedical engineering. It provides the basic understanding that any student or researcher using such instruments and techniques should have about the subject. After an introduction to the structure of matter at the subatomic scale, it covers the experimental aspects of nuclear and particle physics. Ideally complementing a theoretically-oriented textbook on nuclear physics and/or particle physics, it introduces the reader to the different techniques used in nuclear and particle physics to accelerate particles and to measurement techniques (detectors) in nuclear and particle physics. The main subjects treated are: interactions of subatomic particles in matter; particle accelerators; basics of different types of detectors; and nuclear electronics. The book will be of interest to undergraduates, graduates and researchers in both particle and...

  6. Metabolic radiopharmaceutical therapy in nuclear medicine; Terapia metabolica mediante radiofarmacos en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reguera, L.; Lozano, M. L.; Alonso, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    In 1986 the National Board of Medical Specialties defined the specialty of nuclear medicine as a medical specialty that uses radioisotopes for prevention, diagnosis, therapy and medical research. Nowadays, treatment with radiopharmaceuticals has reached a major importance within of nuclear medicine. The ability to treat tumors with radiopharmaceutical, Radiation selective therapy has become a first line alternative. In this paper, the current situation of the different therapies that are sued in nuclear medicine, is reviewed. (Author)

  7. What You Should Know About Pediatric Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    What You Should Know About Pediatric Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Safety www.imagegently.org What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine uses radioactive isotopes to create pictures of the human body. ...

  8. Nuclear oncology, a fast growing field of nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Pierre

    2004-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine in oncology has been for a long time synonymous with bone scintigraphy, the first ever whole body imaging modality, and with treatment of thyroid cancer with iodine-131. More recently, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) using peptides such as 111In-labelled octreotide became a reference imaging method in the detection and staging of neuroendocrine tumors while 131I- and 123I-MIBG remain the tracers of reference for pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. Lymphoscintigraphic imaging based on peritumoral injection of 99mTc-labelled colloids supports, in combination with per operative detection, the procedure of sentinel node identification in breast cancers and melanomas. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is currently experiencing a considerable growth in oncology based on the use of 18F-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), a very sensitive, although non-specific, tumor tracer. Development of instrumentation is crucial in this expansion of PET imaging with new crystals being more sensitive and hybrid imagers that permit to reduce the acquisition time and offer fused PET-CT images. Current developments in therapy can be classified into three categories. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) based on monoclonal antibodies (or fragments) labelled with beta-emitters. This technique has recently made its entrance in clinical practice with a 90Y-labelled anti-CD20 antibody ( 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin ®)) approved in US for the treatment of some subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Radionuclide-bone pain palliation has experienced developments with 153Sm-EDTMP, 186Re-HEDP or 89Sr, efficient in patients with widespread disease. Last, the same peptides, as those used in SRS, are being developed for therapy, labelled with 90Y, 111In or 177Lu in patients who failed to respond to other treatments. Overall, nuclear oncology is currently a fast growing field thanks to the combined developments of radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation.

  9. Current status of respiratory nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-01-01

    aerosolized, therapeutic drugs. Newly developed radiotracers include L-3-{sup 123}I-{alpha}-methyl-tyrosine for evaluating amino acid metabolism of lung cancer on SPECT scanner, {sup 99m}Tc-labeled surfactant B for evaluating pulmonary surfactant system, Cu-DTS for imaging hypoxic tumor cells, and {sup 18}F-fluorocaptopril for evaluating the lung distribution of pulmonary angiotension converting enzyme. These will contribute to the further advancement and development of expiratory nuclear medicine. (author)

  10. Nuclear medicine imaging and therapy: gender biases in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncayo, Valeria M; Aarsvold, John N; Alazraki, Naomi P

    2014-01-01

    Gender-based medicine is medical research and care conducted with conscious consideration of the sex and gender differences of subjects and patients. This issue of Seminars is focused on diseases for which nuclear medicine is part of routine management and for which the diseases have sex- or gender-based differences that affect incidence or pathophysiology and that thus have differences that can potentially affect the results of the relevant nuclear medicine studies. In this first article, we discuss neurologic diseases, certain gastrointestinal conditions, and thyroid conditions. The discussion is in the context of those sex- or gender-based aspects of these diseases that should be considered in the performance, interpretation, and reporting of the relevant nuclear medicine studies. Cardiovascular diseases, gynecologic diseases, bone conditions such as osteoporosis, pediatric occurrences of some diseases, human immunodeficiency virus-related conditions, and the radiation dose considerations of nuclear medicine studies are discussed in the other articles in this issue.

  11. Specific filters applied in nuclear medicine services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Vitor S.; Crispim, Verginia R., E-mail: verginia@con.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Brandao, Luis E.B. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ) Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In Nuclear Medicine, radioiodine, in various chemical forms, is a key tracer used in diagnostic practices and/or therapy. Due to its high volatility, medical professionals may incorporate radioactive iodine during the preparation of the dose to be administered to the patient. In radioactive iodine therapy doses ranging from 3.7 to 7.4 GBq per patient are employed. Thus, aiming at reducing the risk of occupational contamination, we developed a low cost filter to be installed at the exit of the exhaust system where doses of radioactive iodine are fractionated, using domestic technology. The effectiveness of radioactive iodine retention by silver impregnated silica [10%] crystals and natural activated carbon was verified using radiotracer techniques. The results showed that natural activated carbon is effective for I{sub 2} capture for a large or small amount of substrate but its use is restricted due to its low flash point (150 deg C). Besides, when poisoned by organic solvents, this flash point may become lower, causing explosions if absorbing large amounts of nitrates. To hold the CH{sub 3}I gas, it was necessary to increase the volume of natural activated carbon since it was not absorbed by SiO{sub 2} + Ag crystals. We concluded that, for an exhaust flow range of (306 {+-} 4) m{sup 3}/h, a double stage filter using SiO{sub 2} + Ag in the first stage and natural activated carbon in the second is sufficient to meet radiological safety requirements. (author)

  12. Computer Generated Cardiac Model For Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, John F.; Miller, Tom R.

    1981-07-01

    A computer generated mathematical model of a thallium-201 myocardial image is described which is based on realistic geometric and physiological assumptions. The left ventricle is represented by an ellipsoid truncated by aortic and mitral valve planes. Initially, an image of a motionless left ventricle is calculated with the location, size, and relative activity of perfusion defects selected by the designer. The calculation includes corrections for photon attenuation by overlying structures and the relative distribution of activity within the tissues. Motion of the ventricular walls is simulated either by a weighted sum of images at different stages in the cardiac cycle or by a blurring function whose width varies with position. Camera and collimator blurring are estimated by the MTF of the system measured at a representative depth in a phantom. Statistical noise is added using a Poisson random number generator. The usefulness of this model is due to two factors: the a priori characterization of location and extent of perfusion defects and the strong visual similarity of the images to actual clinical studies. These properties should permit systematic evaluation of image processing algorithms using this model. The principles employed in developing this cardiac image model can readily be applied to the simulation of other nuclear medicine studies and to other medical imaging modalities including computed tomography, ultrasound, and digital radiography.

  13. Nuclear medicine and the nursing mother

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, A.J.; Mountford, P.J. (Kent and Canterbury Hospital (UK))

    1985-07-20

    Many radiopharmaceuticals may be detected in breast milk, but differ from other drugs in that for diagnostic purposes they are used in tracer quantities and do not produce demonstrable pharmacological changes in mother or infant. Patients may also be given non-radioactive drugs to induce changes in the distribution of the radiopharmaceuticals and some of these, too, appear in milk (e.g. frusemide, potassium perchlorate, iodides, and cholecystokinin). Iodides are selectively concentrated in breast milk, and some consider them contra-indicated during lactation. A period of interruption of breast feeding, expression of milk, and reduction of close contact with the infant is usually recommended for mothers who have a nuclear medicine investigation. The inconvenience and disadvantages of interrupting breast feeding have to be balanced against the potential risk to the infant: the prolonged interruption of feeding advocated for some agents is often impracticable. Interruption for 24 hours for sup(99m)Tc compounds is excessive for doses used in Britain. Twelve hours leaves a wide range of safety for pertechnetate. No interruption is needed for sup(99m)Tc-macroaggregated albumin and sup(99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine-penta-acetic acid in order to remain below one tenth of the annual limit of intake.

  14. Annual congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. EANM'14. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-10-15

    The proceedings of the annual congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine EANM'14 contain abstracts on the following issues: nuclear cardiology practices, PET in lymphoma, advances in nuclear cardiology, dosimetry for intra-arterial treatment in the liver, pediatric nuclear medicine, therapeutic nuclear medicine, SPECT/CT, prostate cancer, extended competencies for nuclear medicine technologists, neurosciences - neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, radionuclide therapy and dosimetry - preclinical studies, physics and instrumentation, clinical molecular imaging, conventional and specialized nuclear medicine.

  15. Nuclear medicine imaging in the evaluation of endocrine hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punit Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine hypertension forms a small (< 5% but curable subset of patients with hypertension. Common endocrine causes of hypertension include pheochromocytoma, Cushing′s syndrome, primary hyperaldosteronism, and thyroid disorders. Nuclear medicine imaging plays an important role in evaluation of patients with endocrine hypertension. It has established role in patients of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma, Cushing′s syndrome, aldosteronism, and thyroid disorders. We present a brief overview of role of nuclear medicine imaging in endocrine hypertension. Development of newer radiotracers might further broaden the role of nuclear medicine in these patients.

  16. Recommendations on Strengthening the Development of Nuclear Medicine in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shih-chen Wang

    2009-01-01

    @@ This paper outlines briefly the role of nuclear medicine in life sciences and health care. Molecular imaging by using isotopic tracers can noninvasively visualize the chemistry or hidden process in the cells and tissues inside the body, obtaining "functional" images to provide early information of any disease and revealing the secrets of life. The vitality of nuclear medicine is its ability to translate bench into new clinical application that can benefits the patients. Although nuclear medicine community in China has made significant achievement with a great effort since 1950s, there are many obstacles to future development. Recommended measures are proposed here in an attempt to solve our existing problems.

  17. Structure and Activities of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H; Owunwanne, Azuwuike; Alenezi, Saud

    2016-07-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in Kuwait began in 1965 as a clinic for treating thyroid diseases. The practice developed gradually and until 1981 when the Faculty of Medicine established the Division of Nuclear Medicine in the Department of Radiology, which later became a separate department responsible for establishing and managing the practice in all hospitals of Kuwait. In 1987, a nuclear medicine residency program was begun and it is administered by Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations originally as a 4-year but currently as a 5-year program. Currently there are 11 departments in the ministry of health hospitals staffed by 49 qualified attending physicians, mostly the diplomats of the Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations nuclear medicine residency program, 4 academic physicians, 2 radiopharmacists, 2 physicists, and 130 technologists. These departments are equipped with 33 dual-head gamma cameras, 10 SPET/CT, 5 PET/CT, 2 cyclotrons, 1 breast-specific gamma imaging, 1 positron-emitting mammography, 10 thyroid uptake units, 8 technegas machines, 7 PET infusion systems, and 8 treadmills. Activities of nuclear medicine in Kuwait include education and training, clinical service, and research. Education includes nuclear medicine technology program in the Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, the 5-year residency program, medical school teaching distributed among different modules of the integrated curriculum with 14 didactic lecture, and other teaching sessions in nuclear medicine MSc program, which run concurrently with the first part of the residency program. The team of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait has been active in research and has published more than 300 paper, 11 review articles, 12 book chapters, and 17 books in addition to 36 grants and 2 patents. A PhD program approved by Kuwait University Council would begin in 2016.

  18. Oncological nuclear medicine: from antibody to PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuneo, Saga; Takako, Furukawa [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Molecular Imaging Center, Inage-ku, Chiba (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    Department of Diagnostic Imaging has recently established in the Molecular Imaging Center of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. The major aim of the department is to develop novel molecular imaging probes and to establish functional imaging methods of various cancers. The department consists of three sections; 1) biomolecule section (find out optimal biomolecule as the target of cancer imaging), 2) molecular diagnosis section (develop imaging method using specific molecular probe), and 3) clinical diagnosis section (applying molecular imaging modalities to cancer patients). In the present lecture, I would like to review my experiences in various aspects of cancer imaging using nuclear medicine procedures, which might be important in the research in the new department. The talk includes; 1) characteristics and limitations of cancer targeting with radiolabeled anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies and the attempts to overcome the limitations including pre-targeting strategy, 2 ) application of a newly synthesized polyamine (dendrimer) to the delivery and imaging of oligo-DNA and cancer treatment, 3) transfection of Na '/I - sym-porter gene to add iodide uptake mechanism to non-thyroid cancer cells for the wider application of radioiodine therapy, which is now also used as a promising reporter gene in gene therapy, and 4) basic and clinical study of PET metabolic imaging with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and fluoro-thymidine (FLT) to evaluate the characteristics of various cancers. Although these modalities can not directly visualize molecular processes occurring in cancer cells, we can evaluate the imaging results with the insight of molecular biology, and the experiences of these modalities can be the bases for the future development of molecular imaging of malignant tumors. (author)

  19. Nuclear medicine in oncology 2: Breast, prostate, and cervical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nuclear medicine approaches to cancer detection, staging and treatment. T Kotze, MB BCh, FCNP .... treatment response after chemo-radiation; and (iv) documenting recurrent cervical cancer, .... Small-cell lung cancer. Currently, the use of ...

  20. 19. Brazilian congress on biology and nuclear medicine; 19. Congresso brasileiro de biologia e medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The issue contain 97 abstracts of 19 Brazilian congress on biology and nuclear medicine held in Pernambuco, Brazil, from November 4 to 8, 1998. The subjects addressed are diagnostic and therapy nuclear medicine techniques, especially scintiscanning, SPECT and PET and their uses. The main topics were as follows: cardiology, neuro-psychiatry, oncology, endocrinology, radiopharmacy, infectious diseases, radiobiology and others.

  1. Nuclear medicine in the first year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves, S Ted; Baker, Amanda; Fahey, Frederic H; Cao, Xinhua; Davis, Royal T; Drubach, Laura A; Grant, Frederick D; Zukotynski, Katherine

    2011-06-01

    Nuclear medicine has an important role in the care of newborns and children less than 1 y old. Patients in this age group present with a spectrum of diseases different from those of older children or adults. These patients can benefit from the full range of nuclear medicine studies. In these young children, nuclear medicine studies are more likely to be used to evaluate a wide range of congenital conditions but also can be helpful for evaluating acquired conditions such as infection, cancer, and trauma. This review first will cover the general aspects of nuclear medicine practice with these patients, including the special considerations that can help achieve successful diagnostic imaging. These topics will include clinical indications, imaging technology, instrumentation, software, positioning and immobilization, sedation, local and general anesthesia, radiopharmaceutical doses, radiation risk, and dose reduction. The review then will discuss the specific nuclear medicine studies that typically are obtained in patients in this age group. With extra care and attention to the special needs of this population, nuclear medicine departments can successfully study patients less than 1 y old.

  2. History and Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Raihan

    2016-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of the smaller states in Asia. But it has a long and rich history of nuclear medicine for over sixty years. The progress in science and technology is always challenging in a developing country. In 1958, work for the first Nuclear Medicine facility was commenced in Dhaka in a tin-shed known as 'Radioisotope Centre' and was officially inaugurated in 1962. Since the late 50s of the last century nuclear medicine in Bangladesh has significantly progressed through the years in its course of development, but still the facilities are inadequate. At present there are 20 nuclear medicine establishments with 3 PET-CTs, 42 gamma camera/SPECTs with 95 physicians, 20 physicists, 10 radiochemists and 150 technologists. The Society of Nuclear Medicine, Bangladesh (SNMB) was formed in 1993 and publishing its official journal since 1997. Bangladesh also has close relationships with many international organizations like IAEA, ARCCNM, AOFNMB, ASNM, WFNMB and WARMTH. The history and the present scenario of the status of nuclear medicine in Bangladesh are being described here.

  3. Epigenetic stochasticity, nuclear structure and cancer: the implications for medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, A P

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize an evolution of thinking about the epigenetic basis of human cancer, from the earliest studies of altered DNA methylation in cancer to the modern comprehensive epigenomic era. Converging data from epigenetic studies of primary cancers and from experimental studies of chromatin in development and epithelial-mesenchymal transition suggest a role for epigenetic stochasticity as a driving force of cancer, with Darwinian selection of tumour cells at the expense of the host. This increased epigenetic stochasticity appears to be mediated by large-scale changes in DNA methylation and chromatin in domains associated with the nuclear lamina. The implications for diagnosis include the potential to identify stochastically disrupted progenitor cells years before cancer develops, and to target drugs to epigenetic drivers of gene expression instability rather than to mean effects per se. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  4. Nuclear medicine in dentistry revisited: New avenues to explore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Boloor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear medicine and radioactive tracers have considerable application in dental research, because they provide one of the few practical methods for studying the limited metabolic activities of bones and teeth. The ease with which minute amounts of these radioactive materials may be accurately measured and distinguished from the mass of inert element in the tooth is particularly valuable. They are useful in studying many problems of calcification and mineral exchange. There are also opportunities of their use in investigating fluorosis, caries protection, periodontal disease, micro leakage studies of dental materials, root resorption, nutritional, and endocrine effects, as well as numerous other dental problems. Other usages of nuclear medicine in dentistry are listed below: Age written in teeth by nuclear tests, scintigraphic evaluation of osteoblastic activity, and evaluation of osteoblastic activity around dental implants using bone scintigraphy. Nuclear medicine can be an indicator of "active" alveolar bone loss. Nuclear medicine techniques are used as an adjunct for the diagnosis of oral diseases (benign tumors and carcinomas and temporomandibular joint disease. This review article discusses these indications of nuclear medicine.

  5. IAEA support to medical physics in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Sgouros, George

    2013-05-01

    Through its programmatic efforts and its publications, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has helped define the role and responsibilities of the nuclear medicine physicist in the practice of nuclear medicine. This paper describes the initiatives that the IAEA has undertaken to support medical physics in nuclear medicine. In 1984, the IAEA provided guidance on how to ensure that the equipment used for detecting, imaging, and quantifying radioactivity is functioning properly (Technical Document [TECDOC]-137, "Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine Instruments"). An updated version of IAEA-TECDOC-137 was issued in 1991 as IAEA-TECDOC-602, and this included new chapters on scanner-computer systems and single-photon emission computed tomography systems. Nuclear medicine physics was introduced as a part of a project on radiation imaging and radioactivity measurements in the 2002-2003 IAEA biennium program in Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics. Ten years later, IAEA activities in this field have expanded to cover quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of nuclear medicine equipment, education and clinical training, professional recognition of the role of medical physicists in nuclear medicine physics, and finally, the coordination of research and development activities in internal dosimetry. As a result of these activities, the IAEA has received numerous requests to support the development and implementation of QA or QC programs for radioactivity measurements in nuclear medicine in many Member States. During the last 5 years, support was provided to 20 Member States through the IAEA's technical cooperation programme. The IAEA has also supported education and clinical training of medical physicists. This type of support has been essential for the development and expansion of the Medical Physics profession, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The need for basic as well as specialized clinical training in medical physics was identified as a

  6. Computers in Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine Imaging - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Kapoor

    1989-07-01

    Full Text Available Digital computers are becoming increasingly popular for a variety of purposes in nuclear medicine. They are particuiarly useful in the areas of nuclear imaging and gamma camera image processing,radionuclide inventory and patient record keeping. By far the most important use of the digital computer is in array processors which are commonly available with emission computed systems for fast reconstruction of images in transverse, coronal and sagittal views, particularly when the data to be handled is enormous and involves filtration and correction processes. The addition of array processors to computer systems has helped the clinicians in improving diagnostic nuclear medicine imaging capability. This paper reviews briefly therole of computers in the field of nuclear medicine imaging.

  7. Experimental Seminar on Nuclear Energy for Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    `Experimental Seminar on Nuclear Energy for Teachers` was conducted and sponsored by the Science and Technology Agency. And in order to understand nuclear energy properly through lectures and experiments with good results inclass, the seminar carried out for teachers of high schools and junior high schools by the Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in 1990 FY to 1997 FY. In this report, details of the seminars in the above period are described and No.1 to 17 of Communication Letters of Experimental Seminar on Nuclear Energy` started at 1992 FY are described also. These letters were prepared for attendant follow-up program. And programs of recent seminars, future`s seminars, impressions and comments from attendants, reports from actual classes and others are described in these letters and they are very useful for educational classes on nuclear energy by other teachers. Therefore contents of the letters are listed and easy to refer. A part of this educational task was transferred to the Radiation Application Development Association in 1997 FY and other parts were transferred in 1998 FY. (author)

  8. Comparative analysis of dosimetry parameters for nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toohey, R.E.; Stabin, M.G. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1999-01-01

    For years many have employed the concept of ``total-body dose`` or ``whole-body dose,`` i.e., the total energy deposited in the body divided by the mass of the body, when evaluating the risks of different nuclear medicine procedures. The effective dose equivalent (H{sub E}), first described in ICRP Publication 26, has been accepted by some as a better quantity to use in evaluating the total risk of a procedure, but its use has been criticized by others primarily because the tissue weighting factors were intended for use in the radiation worker, rather than the nuclear medicine patient population. Nevertheless, in ICRP Publication 52, the ICRP has suggested that the H{sub E} may be used in nuclear medicine. The ICRP also has published a compendium of dose estimates, including H{sub E} values, for various nuclear medicine procedures at various ages in ICRP Publication 53. The effective dose (E) of ICRP Publication 60 is perhaps more suitable for use in nuclear medicine, with tissue weighting factors based on the entire population. Other comparisons of H{sub E} and E have been published. The authors have used the program MIRDOSE 3.1 to compute total-body dose, H{sub E}, and E for 62 radiopharmaceutical procedures, based on the best current biokinetic data available.

  9. [Legal implications of information to the patient in nuclear medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Sánchez, J

    2004-01-01

    Every patient has the right to be informed about a medical procedure. The nuclear medicine physician has the duty to inform the patients and, if necessary, to obtain a reasonable written consent before some radioisotopic examinations. The following must be considered in every informed consent of a nuclear medicine procedure: the need for the patient information ("why"), the type of information given ("how"), the person who performs it ("who"), the moment in the time ("when") and the place ("where") where the consent is performed. It must always be kept in mind that, although the informed consent has a protection function from the medicolegal point of view, this function may be lost if the consent is not performed correctly. In this paper the importance and the medicolegal implications of the patient information in Nuclear Medicine are evaluated and discussed.

  10. Training requirements for chemists in radiotracer development for nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, R.; Fowler, J.

    1988-01-01

    This panel was organized to address the current and anticipated future shortage of chemists with advanced training to fill positions in the nuclear medicine field. Although hard data and statistics are difficult to acquire, we will attempt to highlight the impact of chemistry on nuclear medicine and to describe the growth of the field which has led to an increasing need for chemists resulting in the current manpower shortage. We also will make recommendations for attracting Ph.D. chemists to careers in nuclear medicine research and possible mechanisms for postgraduate training. Solving this problem and establishing a long term committment and mechanism for advanced training is critically important to meet the current needs of the profession and to assure future growth and innovation. 3 tabs.

  11. Internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine procedures; Dosimetria interna por procedimientos en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera Magarino, F.; Salgado Garcia, C.; Ruiz Manzano, P.; Rivas Ballarin, M. A.; Jimenez Hefernan, A.; Sanchez Segovia, J.

    2011-07-01

    The Department of Radio Physics and Radiation Protection, University Hospital Lozano Blesa Zaragoza presented a calculus textbook to estimate patient doses in diagnostic nuclear medicine. In this paper present an updated version referred Book of calculation.

  12. Application of nuclear physics in medical physics and nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehr, Cornelia

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear physics has a long history of influencing and advancing medical fields. At TRIUMF we use the applications of nuclear physics to diagnose several diseases via medical isotopes and treat cancer by using proton beams. The Life Science division has a long history of producing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) isotopes but we are also investigating the production of SPECT and PET isotopes with a potential shortage for clinical operation or otherwise limited access to chemists, biologists and medical researchers. New targets are being developed, aided by a simulation platform investigating the processes inside a target under proton irradiation - nuclear, thermodynamic, and chemical. Simulations also aid in the development of new beam-shaping devices for TRIUMF's Proton Therapy facility, Canada's only proton therapy facility, as well as new treatment testing systems. Both promise improved treatment delivery for cancer patients.

  13. Pioneers of nuclear medicine, Madame Curie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammaticos, Philip C

    2004-01-01

    Among those who have made important discoveries in the field of radioactivity and thus helped in the development of nuclear medicine as an identical entity are: Heinrich Hertz who in 1886 demonstrated the existence of radiowaves. In 1895 Wilhelm Röntgen discovered the X-rays. In 1896 H. Becquerel described the phenomenon of radioactivity. He showed that a radioactive uranium salt was emitting radioactivity which passing through a metal foil darkened a photographic plate. An analogous experiment performed by S.Thomson in London was announced to the president of the Royal Society of London before the time H.Becquerel announced his discovery but Thomson never claimed priority for his discovery. Muarie Sklodowska Curie (1867-1934) was undoubtedly the most important person to attribute to the discovery of radioactivity. In 1898 she discovered radium as a natural radioactive element. This is how she describes the hard time she had, working with her husband Pierre Curie (1859-1906) for the discovery of radium and polonium: "During the first year we did not go to the theater or to a concert or visited friends. I miss my relatives, my father and my daughter that I see every morning and only for a little while. But I do not complain...". In presenting her discovery of radium, Madame Curie said: " ...in the hands of a criminal, radium is very dangerous. So we must often ask ourselves: will humanity earn or lose from this discovery? I, myself belong to those who believe the former...". The notebooks that Madame Curie had when she was working with radium and other radioactive elements like polonium, thorium and uranium are now kept in Paris. They are contaminated with radioactive materials having very long half-lives and for this reason anyone who wishes to have access to these notes should sign that he takes full responsibility. There are some more interesting points in Madame Curie's life which may not be widely known like: Although her full name is Maria Sklodowska

  14. Radionuclides for nuclear medicine: a nuclear physicists' view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantone, M.; Haddad, F.; Harissopoulos, S.

    2013-01-01

    transport of individual doses lead to a renewed interest in radionuclide generators such as 68Ge/68Ga, 82Sr/82Rb or even 44Ti/44Sc. For long time such generator nuclides were mainly produced at non-European accelerators (BNL, LANL, TRIUMF, iThemba Labs) that are mainly devoted to support nuclear physics...... challenged by unforeseen outages. This triggered the proposition and development of complementary accelerator-based production Methods of 99mTc. Long-term prospects for 99mTc supply in Europe will be discussed. •The emergence of new applications as well as rising costs and regulations for radioactive...... facilities. The recent addition of ARRONAX, a dedicated production facility in Nantes, France, and the upcoming inauguration of a 70 MeV cyclotron at the nuclear physics facility SPES at Legnaro, Italy will greatly improve Europe’s production capabilities of these nuclides. •Ongoing accelerator R&D for new...

  15. Historic images in nuclear medicine: 1976: the first issue of clinical nuclear medicine and the first human FDG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Søren; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Alavi, Abass

    2014-08-01

    In 1976, 2 major molecular imaging events coincidentally took place: Clinical Nuclear Medicine was first published in June, and in August researchers at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania created the first images in humans with F-FDG. FDG was initially developed as part of an evolution set in motion by fundamental research studies with positron-emitting tracers in the 1950s by Michel Ter-Pegossian and coworkers at the Washington University. Today, Clinical Nuclear Medicine is a valued scientific contributor to the molecular imaging community, and FDG PET is considered the backbone of this evolving and exciting discipline.

  16. Is there a place for music in nuclear medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannouli, Vaitsa; Lytras, Nikolaos; Syrmos, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Music, since the time of ancient Greek Asclepieia is well-known for its influence on men's behavior. Nuclear Medicine can study the effect of music in humans' brain. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown brain areas to be activated after colored hearing vs after hearing to words. Furthermore, PET studies gave evidence that visual imagery of a musical stave is used by some musically untrained subjects in a pitch discrimination task. Listening to music combines intellect and emotion by intimate anatomical and functional connexions between temporal lobe, hippocampus and limbic system. Mozart's music is considered the best for bringing favorable music effects to men. This is called "the Mozart's effect" and by some is attributed to the fact that this kind of music's sequences tend to repeat regularly every 20-30sec, which is about the same length of time as brain-wave patterns. It may be useful to suggest that a certain kind of music played in the waiting room and/or in the examining room of a Nuclear Medicine Department may support patients ' cooperation with their physicians, especially in cardiac nuclear medicine. Furthermore, patients should be calm and not afraid of radioactivity. A long DVD program to be played during working hours can be decided between a music therapist and the Nuclear Medicine physician.

  17. Nuclear Medicine | RadTown USA | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    >Nuclear medicine procedures can help detect and treat disease by using a small amount of radioactive material, called a radiopharmaceutical. Some radiopharmaceuticals are used with imaging equipment to detect diseases. Others are placed in or near a cancerous tumor to shrink or kill it.

  18. Nuclear Medicine Technology: A Suggested Two-Year Curriculum Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, David

    This curriculum guide prescribes an educational program for training nuclear medicine technologists. Following a brief section on program development, the curriculum is both outlined and presented in detail. For each of the 44 courses, the following information is given: (1) sequential placement of the course in the curriculum; (2) course…

  19. Australian per caput dose from diagnostic imaging and nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayton, A; Wallace, A; Marks, P; Edmonds, K; Tingey, D; Johnston, P

    2013-10-01

    The largest man-made contributor to the ionising radiation dose to the Australian population is from diagnostic imaging and nuclear medicine. The last estimation of this dose was made in 2004 (1.3 mSv), this paper describes a recent re-evaluation of this dose to reflect the changes in imaging trends and technology. The estimation was calculated by summing the dose from five modalities, computed tomography (CT), general radiography/fluoroscopy, interventional procedures, mammography and nuclear medicine. Estimates were made using Australian frequency data and dose data from a range of Australian and international sources of average effective dose values. The ionising radiation dose to the Australian population in 2010 from diagnostic imaging and nuclear medicine is estimated to be 1.7 mSv (1.11 mSv CT, 0.30 mSv general radiography/fluoroscopy, 0.17 mSv interventional procedures, 0.03 mSv mammography and 0.10 mSv nuclear medicine). This exceeds the estimate of 1.5 mSv per person from natural background and cosmic radiation.

  20. Experimental energy-dependent nuclear spin distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidy, Till von [Physik-Department, T.U. Muenchen (Germany); Bucurescu, Dorel [National Inst. Phys. and Nucl. Eng., Bucharest (Romania)

    2010-07-01

    A new method is proposed to determine the energy dependent spin distribution in experimental nuclear level schemes. This method compares various experimental and calculated moments in the energy-spin plane in order to obtain the spin-cutoff parameter {sigma} as a function of mass A and excitation energy using a total of 7202 levels with spin assignment in 227 nuclei between F and Cf. A simple formula, {sigma}{sup 2}=0.391 . A{sup 0.675}(E-0.5 .Pa'){sup 0.312}, is proposed up to about 10 MeV which is in very good agreement with experimental {sigma} values and is applied to improve the systematics of level density parameters.

  1. American College of Nuclear Physics 1991 DOE day symposium: Aids and nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    Since first described in 1981, the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has become the medical dilemma of the century. AIDS retrovirus, and the economic consequences of this exposure are staggering. AIDS has been the topic of conferences and symposia worldwide. This symposium, to be held on January 25, 1991, at the 17th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the American College of Nuclear Physicians, will expose the Nuclear Medicine Physicians/Radiologists to their role in the diagnosis of AIDS, and will educate them on the socio-economic and ethical issues related to this problem. In addition, the Nuclear Medicine Physicians/Radiologists must be aware of their role in the management of their departments in order to adequately protect the health care professionals working in their laboratories. Strategies are currently being developed to control the spread of bloodborne diseases within the health care setting, and it is incumbent upon the Nuclear Medicine community to be aware of such strategies.

  2. Nuclear data for medicine and electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomp, S.; Blomgren, J.; Bergenwall, B.; Hildebrand, A.; Johansson, C.; Klug, J.; Mermod, P.; Nilsson, L.; Oesterlund, M. [Dept. of Neutron Research, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden); Dangtip, S.; Tippawan, U. [Dept. of Neutron Research, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden)]|[Fast Neutron Research Facility, Chiang Mai Univ. (Thailand); Olsson, N. [Dept. of Neutron Research, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden)]|[Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden); Prokofiev, A.V.; Renberg, P.U. [The Svedberg Lab., Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    Fast-neutron cancer therapy is now routinely performed at about a dozen facilities worldwide. Typical neutron energies for treatment are up to 70 MeV. Lately, it has been recognized that cosmic-ray neutrons, with energies up to many GeV, give significant dose contributions to airplane personnel. In fact, airplane personnel are the category, which receives the largest doses in civil work. These cosmic-ray neutrons also create a reliability problem in modern electronics. A neutron can cause a nuclear reaction inside or near a chip, thus releasing free charge, which in turn could, e.g., flip the memory content or change the result of a logical operation. For all these applications, improved knowledge of the underlying nuclear physics is of major importance. The MEDLEY setup, which has been extensively used for ADS related work, has been used for measurements of cross sections related to biomedicine and electronics reliability. Simulations of single-event upsets are described as well as accelerated device testing activities at neutron beams. (orig.)

  3. High Performance Organ-Specific Nuclear Medicine Imagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stan

    2006-04-01

    One of the exciting applications of nuclear science is nuclear medicine. Well-known diagnostic imaging tools such as PET and SPECT (as well as MRI) were developed as spin-offs of basic scientific research in atomic and nuclear physics. Development of modern instrumentation for applications in particle physics experiments offers an opportunity to contribute to development of improved nuclear medicine (gamma and positron) imagers, complementing the present set of standard imaging tools (PET, SPECT, MRI, ultrasound, fMRI, MEG, etc). Several examples of new high performance imagers developed in national laboratories in collaboration with academia will be given to demonstrate this spin-off activity. These imagers are designed to specifically image organs such as breast, heart, head (brain), or prostate. The remaining and potentially most important challenging application field for dedicated nuclear medicine imagers is to assist with cancer radiation treatments. Better control of radiation dose delivery requires development of new compact in-situ imagers becoming integral parts of the radiation delivery systems using either external beams or based on radiation delivery by inserting or injecting radioactive sources (gamma, beta or alpha emitters) into tumors.

  4. Nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging in sports injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaudermans, Andor W.J.M. [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Gielen, Jan L.M.A. [Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Sports Medicine; Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Medicine; Zwerver, Johannes (ed.) [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Center for Sports Medicine

    2015-10-01

    This comprehensive book describes in detail how nuclear medicine and radiology can meet the needs of the sports medicine physician by assisting in precise diagnosis, clarification of pathophysiology, imaging of treatment outcome and monitoring of rehabilitation. Individual sections focus on nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging of injuries to the head and face, spine, chest, shoulder, elbow and forearm, wrist and hand, pelvic region, knee, lower leg, ankle and foot. The pathophysiology of sports injuries frequently encountered in different regions of the body is described from the perspective of each specialty, and the potential diagnostic and management benefits offered by the new hybrid imaging modalities - SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and PET/MRI - are explained. In addition, a range of basic and general issues are addressed, including imaging of the injuries characteristic of specific sports. It is hoped that this book will promote interdisciplinary awareness and communication and improve the management of injured recreational or elite athletes.

  5. Therapeutic Applications of Monte Carlo Calculations in Nuclear Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Sgouros, George

    2003-01-01

    This book examines the applications of Monte Carlo (MC) calculations in therapeutic nuclear medicine, from basic principles to computer implementations of software packages and their applications in radiation dosimetry and treatment planning. It is written for nuclear medicine physicists and physicians as well as radiation oncologists, and can serve as a supplementary text for medical imaging, radiation dosimetry and nuclear engineering graduate courses in science, medical and engineering faculties. With chapters is written by recognised authorities in that particular field, the book covers the entire range of MC applications in therapeutic medical and health physics, from its use in imaging prior to therapy to dose distribution modelling targeted radiotherapy. The contributions discuss the fundamental concepts of radiation dosimetry, radiobiological aspects of targeted radionuclide therapy and the various components and steps required for implementing a dose calculation and treatment planning methodology in ...

  6. Application of Technetium and Rhenium in Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto, Roger

    2012-06-01

    Technetium and Rhenium are the two lower elements in the manganese triad. Whereas rhenium is known as an important part of high resistance alloys, technetium is mostly known as a cumbersome product of nuclear fission. It is less known that its metastable isotope 99mTc is of utmost importance in nuclear medicine diagnosis. The technical application of elemental rhenium is currently complemented by investigations of its isotope 188Re, which could play a central role in the future for internal, targeted radiotherapy. This article will briefly describe the basic principles behind diagnostic methods with radionuclides for molecular imaging, review the 99mTc-based radiopharmaceuticals currently in clinical routine and focus on the chemical challenges and current developments towards improved, radiolabeled compounds for diagnosis and therapy in nuclear medicine.

  7. 42 CFR 482.53 - Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine... HOSPITALS Optional Hospital Services § 482.53 Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine services. If the hospital provides nuclear medicine services, those services must meet the needs of the patients...

  8. Compartmental analysis of dynamic nuclear medicine data: models and identifiability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbary, Fabrice; Garbarino, Sara; Vivaldi, Valentina

    2016-12-01

    Compartmental models based on tracer mass balance are extensively used in clinical and pre-clinical nuclear medicine in order to obtain quantitative information on tracer metabolism in the biological tissue. This paper is the first of a series of two that deal with the problem of tracer coefficient estimation via compartmental modelling in an inverse problem framework. Specifically, here we discuss the identifiability problem for a general n-dimension compartmental system and provide uniqueness results in the case of two-compartment and three-compartment compartmental models. The second paper will utilize this framework in order to show how nonlinear regularization schemes can be applied to obtain numerical estimates of the tracer coefficients in the case of nuclear medicine data corresponding to brain, liver and kidney physiology.

  9. Role of nuclear medicine in ischemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashida, Kohei; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshiisa; Naito, Hiroaki; Omine, Hiromi; Kozuka, Takahiro (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan))

    1982-08-01

    With the progress in gamma camera and computer system, nuclear medicine has been applied for diagnostic tool in ischemic heart disease. There are two devices for cardiac images; (1) Radionuclide angiocardiography (RNA) by in vivo sup(99m)Tc-RBC labeling (2) Myocardial imaging by /sup 201/Tlcl. RNA can evaluate the kinesis of wall motion of left ventricle with gated pool scan and also detect reserve of cardiac function with exercise study. Myocardial imaging at rest can identify myocardial necrosis and the imaging in exercise can detect myocardial ischemia. The elaborateness and reproducibility of cardiac image in nuclear medicine will play the great role to evaluate clinical stage of ischemic heart disease by not only imaging but also functional diagnosis.

  10. Search of new scintillation materials for nuclear medicine application

    CERN Document Server

    Korzhik, M V

    2000-01-01

    Oxide crystals have a great potential to develop new advanced scintillation materials which are dense, fast, and bright. This combination of parameters, when combined to affordable price, gives a prospect for materials to be applied in nuclear medicine devices. Some of them have been developed for the last two decades along the line of rear-earth (RE) garnet (RE/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/) oxiorthosilicate (RE/sub 2/SiO/sub 5/) and perovskite (REAlO/sub 3/) crystals doped with Ce ions. Among recently developed oxide materials the lead tungstate scintillator (PWO) becomes the most used scintillation material in high energy physics experiments due to its application in CMS and ALICE experiments at LHC. In this paper we discuss scintillation properties of some new heavy compounds doped with Ce as well as light yield improvement of PWO crystals to apply them in low energy physics and nuclear medicine. (18 refs).

  11. Forensic Medicine: Age Written in Teeth by Nuclear Bomb Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2005-05-04

    Establishing the age of individuals is an important step in identification and a frequent challenge in forensic medicine. This can be done with high precision up to adolescence by analysis of dentition, but establishing the age of adults has remained difficult. Here we show that measuring {sup 14}C from nuclear bomb tests in tooth enamel provides a sensitive way to establish when a person was born.

  12. Basic principles in the radiation dosimetry of nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabin, Michael; Xu, Xie George

    2014-05-01

    The basic principles of the use of radiation dosimetry in nuclear medicine are reviewed. The basic structure of the main mathematical equations are given and formal dosimetry systems are discussed. An extensive overview of the history and current status of anthropomorphic models (phantoms) is given. The sources and magnitudes of uncertainties in calculated internal dose estimates are reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Initial experience with a nuclear medicine viewing workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Robert M.; Burt, Robert W.

    1992-07-01

    Graphical User Interfaced (GUI) workstations are now available from commercial vendors. We recently installed a GUI workstation in our nuclear medicine reading room for exclusive use of staff and resident physicians. The system is built upon a Macintosh platform and has been available as a DELTAmanager from MedImage and more recently as an ICON V from Siemens Medical Systems. The workstation provides only display functions and connects to our existing nuclear medicine imaging system via ethernet. The system has some processing capabilities to create oblique, sagittal and coronal views from transverse tomographic views. Hard copy output is via a screen save device and a thermal color printer. The DELTAmanager replaced a MicroDELTA workstation which had both process and view functions. The mouse activated GUI has made remarkable changes to physicians'' use of the nuclear medicine viewing system. Training time to view and review studies has been reduced from hours to about 30-minutes. Generation of oblique views and display of brain and heart tomographic studies has been reduced from about 30-minutes of technician''s time to about 5-minutes of physician''s time. Overall operator functionality has been increased so that resident physicians with little prior computer experience can access all images on the image server and display pertinent patient images when consulting with other staff.

  14. Recent applications of nuclear medicine in diagnostics: II part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Treglia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Positron-emission tomography (PET and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT are effective diagnostic imaging tools in several clinical settings. The aim of this article (the second of a 2-part series is to examine some of the more recent applications of nuclear medicine imaging techniques, particularly in the fields of neurology, cardiology, and infection/inflammation. Discussion: A review of the literature reveals that in the field of neurology nuclear medicine techniques are most widely used to investigate cognitive deficits and dementia (particularly those associated with Alzheimer disease, epilepsy, and movement disorders. In cardiology, SPECT and PET also play important roles in the work-up of patients with coronary artery disease, providing accurate information on the state of the myocardium (perfusion, metabolism, and innervation. White blood cell scintigraphy and FDG-PET are widely used to investigate many infectious/inflammatory processes. In each of these areas, the review discusses the use of recently developed radiopharmaceuticals, the growth of tomographic nuclear medicine techniques, and the ways in which these advances are improving molecular imaging of biologic processes at the cellular level.

  15. Recent applications of nuclear medicine in diagnostics (I part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Treglia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aim of this review is to describe the recent applications of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnostics, particularly in oncology. Materials and methods: We reviewed scientific literature data searching for the current role of tomographic nuclear medicine techniques (SPECTand PET in oncology and summarized the main applications of these techniques. Results: Nuclear medicine techniques have a key role in oncology allowing early diagnosis of many tumours, an accurate staging of disease and evalutation of treatment response. Hybrid SPECT/CT and PET/CT imaging systems now provide metabolic and functional information from SPECTor PETcombined with the high spatial resolution and anatomic information of CT. The most frequent applications of SPECT/CT in oncology concern thyroid tumours, neuroendocrine tumours, bone metastases and lymph node mapping. Furthermore the evaluation of many tumours may benefit from PET/CT imaging. Discussion: The recent development of new radiopharmaceuticals and the growth of hybrid tomographic devices, such as SPECT/CT and PET/CT, now permits molecular imaging of biologic processes at the cellular level to improve both the diagnosis and treatment of many tumours.

  16. Functional genomics and proteomics - the role of nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberkorn, U. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Nuklearmedizin; German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Altmann, A. [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Eisenhut, M. [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiopharmacy

    2002-01-01

    Now that the sequencing of the human genome has been completed, the basic challenges are finding the genes, locating their coding regions and predicting their functions. This will result in a new understanding of human biology as well as in the design of new molecular structures as potential novel diagnostic or drug discovery targets. The assessment of gene function may be performed using the tools of the genome program. These tools represent high-throughput methods used to evaluate changes in the expression of many or all genes of an organism at the same time in order to investigate genetic pathways for normal development and disease. This will lead to a shift in the scientific paradigm: In the pre-proteomics era, functional assignments were derived from hypothesis-driven experiments designed to understand specific cellular processes. The new tools describe proteins on a proteome-wide scale, thereby creating a new way of doing cell research which results in the determination of three-dimensional protein structures and the description of protein networks. These descriptions may then be used for the design of new hypotheses and experiments in the traditional physiological, biochemical and pharmacological sense. The evaluation of genetically manipulated animals or newly designed biomolecules will require a thorough understanding of physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology and the experimental approaches will involve many new technologies, including in vivo imaging with single-photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography. Nuclear medicine procedures may be applied for the determination of gene function and regulation using established and new tracers or using in vivo reporter genes such as enzymes, receptors, antigens or transporters. Pharmacogenomics will identify new surrogate markers for therapy monitoring which may represent potential new tracers for imaging. Also, drug distribution studies for new therapeutic biomolecules are needed, at least

  17. Experimental test of nuclear magnetization distribution and nuclear structure models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beirsdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lopez-Urrutia, J Crespo R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Utter, S. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1999-02-26

    Models exist that ascribe the nuclear magnetic fields to the presence of a single nucleon whose spin is not neutralized by pairing it up with that of another nucleon; other models assume that the generation of the magnetic field is shared among some or all nucleons throughout the nucleus. All models predict the same magnetic field external to the nucleus since this is an anchor provided by experiments. The models differ, however, in their predictions of the magnetic field arrangement within the nucleus for which no data exist. The only way to distinguish which model gives the correct description of the nucleus would be to use a probe inserted into the nucleus. The goal of our project was to develop exactly such a probe and to use it to measure fundamental nuclear quantities that have eluded experimental scrutiny. The need for accurately knowing such quantities extends far beyond nuclear physics and has ramifications in parity violation experiments on atomic traps and the testing of the standard model in elementary particle physics. Unlike scattering experiments that employ streams of free particles, our technique to probe the internal magnetic field distribution of the nucleus rests on using a single bound electron. Quantum mechanics shows that an electron in the innermost orbital surrounding the nucleus constantly dives into the nucleus and thus samples the fields that exist inside. This sampling of the nucleus usually results in only minute shifts in the electron' s average orbital, which would be difficult to detect. By studying two particular energy states of the electron, we can, however, dramatically enhance the effects of the distribution of the magnetic fields in the nucleus. In fact about 2% of the energy difference between the two states, dubbed the hyperfine splitting, is determined by the effects related to the distribution of magnetic fields in the nucleus, A precise measurement of this energy difference (better than 0.01%) would then allow us to

  18. Nuclear Criticality Experimental Research Center (NCERC) Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goda, Joetta Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grove, Travis Justin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hayes, David Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, William L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sanchez, Rene Gerardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-03

    The mission of the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) is to conduct experiments and training with critical assemblies and fissionable material at or near criticality in order to explore reactivity phenomena, and to operate the assemblies in the regions from subcritical through delayed critical. One critical assembly, Godiva-IV, is designed to operate above prompt critical. The Nuclear Criticality Experimental Research Center (NCERC) is our nation’s only general-purpose critical experiments facility and is only one of a few that remain operational throughout the world. This presentation discusses the history of NCERC, the general activities that makeup work at NCERC, and the various government programs and missions that NCERC supports. Recent activities at NCERC will be reviewed, with a focus on demonstrating how NCERC meets national security mission goals using engineering fundamentals. In particular, there will be a focus on engineering theory and design and applications of engineering fundamentals at NCERC. NCERC activities that relate to engineering education will also be examined.

  19. Advancing Precision Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging for Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Chadwick L; Maly, Joseph J; Zhang, Jun; Knopp, Michael V

    2017-01-01

    PET with fluorodeoxyglucose F 18 ((18)F FDG-PET) is a meaningful biomarker for the detection, targeted biopsy, and treatment of lymphoma. This article reviews the evolution of (18)F FDG-PET as a putative biomarker for lymphoma and addresses the current capabilities, challenges, and opportunities to enable precision medicine practices for lymphoma. Precision nuclear medicine is driven by new imaging technologies and methodologies to more accurately detect malignant disease. Although quantitative assessment of response is limited, such technologies will enable a more precise metabolic mapping with much higher definition image detail and thus may make it a robust and valid quantitative response assessment methodology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiation exposure analysis of female nuclear medicine radiation workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Young [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering Graduate School, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hoon Hee [Dept. of Radiological Technologist, Shingu College, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In this study, radiation workers who work in nuclear medicine department were analyzed to find the cause of differences of radiation exposure from General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition and Conduct, especially females working on nuclear medicine radiation, in order to pave the way for positive defense against radiation exposure. The subjects were 106 radiation workers who were divided into two groups of sixty-four males and forty-two females answered questions about their General Characteristic, Knowledge, Recognition, Conduct, and radiation exposure dose which was measured by TLD (Thermo Luminescence Dosimeter). The results of the analysis revealed that as the higher score of knowledge and conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in female groups, and as the higher score of conduct was shown, the radiation exposure decreased in male groups. In the correlation analysis of female groups, the non-experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of knowledge and conduct was higher and the experienced in pregnancy showed decreasing amount of radiation exposure as the score of recognition and conduct was higher. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of nuclear medicine radiation workers, the gender caused the meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of female groups compared to male groups. In the regression analysis on related factors of radiation exposure dose of female groups, the factor of conduct showed a meaningful result and the amount of radiation exposure of the experienced in pregnancy was lower compared to the non-experienced. The conclusion of this study revealed that radiation exposure of female groups was lower than that of male groups. Therefore, male groups need to more actively defend themselves against radiation exposure. Among the female groups, the experienced in pregnancy who have an active defense tendency showed a lower radiation exposure. Thus

  1. Characterization of iodinated adrenomedullin derivatives suitable for lung nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Yan; Letourneau, Myriam; Chatenet, David [Laboratoire d' etudes moleculaires et pharmacologiques des peptides, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Ville de Laval, Qc, H7V 1B7 (Canada); Dupuis, Jocelyn [Research Center, Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Qc (Canada); Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Qc (Canada); Fournier, Alain, E-mail: alain.fournier@iaf.inrs.ca [Laboratoire d' etudes moleculaires et pharmacologiques des peptides, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Ville de Laval, Qc, H7V 1B7 (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    Introduction: We have recently demonstrated the effectiveness of 99m-technetium adrenomedullin (AM) as a new molecular lung imaging agent that could provide significant advantages for the diagnosis and follow-up of disorders affecting the pulmonary circulation such as pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension. Having the possibility to conjugate the targeting molecule with different radionuclides would offer more flexibility and potential advantages depending on clinical situations. Since various iodine isotopes are currently used in nuclear medicine and in pharmacological studies, we have evaluated which iodination method should be privileged in order to produce a good iodinated AM-derived nuclear medicine agent. Methods: Synthetic AM was labeled with iodine through chemical and lactoperoxidase oxidation methods. Position of the iodine atom on the peptide was determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis following cyanogen bromide cleavage and carboxypeptidase Y digestion. Binding affinity of iodinated AM analogues was evaluated by competition and saturation binding experiments on dog lung preparations. Results: In this study, we demonstrated that, upon lactoperoxidase oxidation, iodination occurred at Tyr{sup 1} and that this radioligand retained higher binding affinity and specificity over preparations obtained through chemical oxidation. Conclusions: These results emphasize the fact that even a small chemical modification, i.e. iodination, might deeply modify the pharmacological profile of a compound and support observations that the C-terminal tail of human AM plays an important role in the AM receptor binding process. Consequently, incorporation of a radionuclide to produce an AM-based nuclear medicine agent should privilege the N-terminus of the molecule.

  2. Absorbed Doses to Patients in Nuclear Medicine; Doskatalogen foer nukleaermedicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Mattsson, Soeren; Nosslin, Bertil [Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmoe (Sweden). Avd. foer radiofysik; Johansson, Lennart [Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeaa (Sweden). Avd. foer radiofysik

    2004-09-01

    The work with a Swedish catalogue of radiation absorbed doses to patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations has continued. After the previous report in 1999, biokinetic data and dose estimates (mean absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and effective dose) have been produced for a number of substances: {sup 11}C- acetate, {sup 11}C- methionine, {sup 18}F-DOPA, whole antibody labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I, fragment of antibody, F(ab'){sub 2} labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I and fragment of antibody, Fab' labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I. The absorbed dose estimates for these substances have been made from published biokinetic information. For other substances of interest, e.g. {sup 14}C-urea (children age 3-6 years), {sup 14}C-glycocholic acid, {sup 14}C-xylose and {sup 14}C-triolein, sufficient literature data have not been available. Therefore, a large number of measurements on patients and volunteers have been carried out, in order to determine the biokinetics and dosimetry for these substances. Samples of breast milk from 50 mothers, who had been subject to nuclear medicine investigations, have been collected at various times after administration of the radiopharmaceutical to the mother. The activity concentration in the breast milk samples has been measured. The absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to the child who ingests the milk have been determined for 17 different radiopharmaceuticals. Based on these results revised recommendations for interruption of breast-feeding after nuclear medicine investigations are suggested.

  3. Management of radioactive waste generated in nuclear medicine; Gestion de los residuos radiactivos generados en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz Perez, P.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear medicine is a clinical specialty in which radioactive material is used in non-encapsulated form, for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Nuclear medicine involves administering to a patient a radioactive substance, usually liquid, both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. This process generates solid radioactive waste (syringes, vials, gloves) and liquid (mainly the patient's urine). (Author)

  4. Image Reconstruction for Prostate Specific Nuclear Medicine imagers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Smith

    2007-01-11

    There is increasing interest in the design and construction of nuclear medicine detectors for dedicated prostate imaging. These include detectors designed for imaging the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with single gamma as well as positron-emitting radionuclides. New detectors and acquisition geometries present challenges and opportunities for image reconstruction. In this contribution various strategies for image reconstruction for these special purpose imagers are reviewed. Iterative statistical algorithms provide a framework for reconstructing prostate images from a wide variety of detectors and acquisition geometries for PET and SPECT. The key to their success is modeling the physics of photon transport and data acquisition and the Poisson statistics of nuclear decay. Analytic image reconstruction methods can be fast and are useful for favorable acquisition geometries. Future perspectives on algorithm development and data analysis for prostate imaging are presented.

  5. Modelling study on production cross sections of {sup 111}In radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kara, Ayhan; Korkut, Turgay [Sinop Univ. (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering; Yigit, Mustafa [Aksaray Univ. (Turkey). Faculty of Science and Arts; Tel, Eyyup [Osmaniye Korkut Ata Univ. (Turkey). Faculty of Science and Arts

    2015-07-15

    Radiopharmaceuticals are radioactive drugs used for diagnosis or treatment in a tracer quantity with no pharmacological action. The production of radiopharmaceuticals is carried out in the special research centers generally using by the cyclotron systems. Indium-111 is one of the most useful radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine. In this paper, we calculated the production cross sections of {sup 111}In radioisotope via {sup 111-114}Cd(p,xn) nuclear reactions up to 60 MeV energy. In the model calculations, ALICE/ASH, TALYS 1.6 and EMPIRE 3.2 Malta nuclear reaction code systems were used. The model calculation results were compared to the experimental literature data and TENDL-2014 (TALYS-based) data.

  6. Necessity of Internal Monitoring for Nuclear Medicine Staff in a Large Specialized Chinese Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Qing-Zhao; Zhang, Zhen; Hou, Chang-Song; Li, Wen-Liang; Yang, Hui; Sun, Quan-Fu

    2016-04-12

    This work intends to quantify the risk of internal contaminations in the nuclear medicine staff of one hospital in Henan province, China. For this purpose, the criteria proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to determine whether it is necessary to conduct internal individual monitoring was applied to all of the 18 nuclear medicine staff members who handled radionuclides. The activity of different radionuclides used during a whole calendar year and the protection measures adopted were collected for each staff member, and the decision as to whether nuclear medicine staff in the hospital should be subjected to internal monitoring was made on the basis of the criteria proposed by IAEA. It is concluded that for all 18 members of the nuclear medicine staff in the hospital, internal monitoring is required. Internal exposure received by nuclear medicine staff should not be ignored, and it is necessary to implement internal monitoring for nuclear medicine staff routinely.

  7. Avoidable challenges of a nuclear medicine facility in a developing nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedapo, Kayode Solomon; Onimode, Yetunde Ajoke; Ejeh, John Enyi; Adepoju, Adewale Oluwaseun

    2013-10-01

    The role of nuclear medicine in disease management in a developing nation is as impactful as it is in other regions of the world. However, in the developing world, the practice of nuclear medicine is faced with a myriad of challenges, which can be easily avoided. In this review, we examine the many avoidable challenges to the practice of nuclear medicine in a developing nation. The review is largely based on personal experiences of the authors who are the pioneers and current practitioners of nuclear medicine in a typical developing nation. If the challenges examined in this review are avoided, the practice of nuclear medicine in such a nation will be more effective and practitioners will be more efficient in service delivery. Hence, the huge benefits of nuclear medicine will be made available to patients in such a developing nation.

  8. Nuclear medicine and multimodality imaging of pediatric neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Wolfgang Peter; Pfluger, Thomas [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Coppenrath, Eva [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonic tumor of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system and is metastatic or high risk for relapse in nearly 50% of cases. Therefore, exact staging with radiological and nuclear medicine imaging methods is crucial for defining the adequate therapeutic choice. Tumor cells express the norepinephrine transporter, which makes metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analogue of norepinephrine, an ideal tumor specific agent for imaging. MIBG imaging has several disadvantages, such as limited spatial resolution, limited sensitivity in small lesions and the need for two or even more acquisition sessions. Most of these limitations can be overcome with positron emission tomography (PET) using [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose [FDG]. Furthermore, new tracers, such as fluorodopa or somatostatin receptor agonists, have been tested for imaging neuroblastoma recently. However, MIBG scintigraphy and PET alone are not sufficient for operative or biopsy planning. In this regard, a combination with morphological imaging is indispensable. This article will discuss strategies for primary and follow-up diagnosis in neuroblastoma using different nuclear medicine and radiological imaging methods as well as multimodality imaging. (orig.)

  9. Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Musso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades cardiovascular disease management has been substantially improved by the increasing introduction of medical devices as prosthetic valves. The yearly rate of infective endocarditis (IE in patient with a prosthetic valve is approximately 3 cases per 1,000 patients. The fatality rate of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE remains stable over the years, in part due to the aging of the population. The diagnostic value of echocardiography in diagnosis is operator-dependent and its sensitivity can decrease in presence of intracardiac devices and valvular prosthesis. The modified Duke criteria are considered the gold standard for diagnosing IE; their sensibility is 80%, but in clinical practice their diagnostic accuracy in PVE is lower, resulting inconclusively in nearly 30% of cases. In the last years, these new imaging modalities have gained an increasing attention because they make it possible to diagnose an IE earlier than the structural alterations occurring. Several studies have been conducted in order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of various nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis of PVE. We performed a review of the literature to assess the available evidence on the role of nuclear medicine techniques in the diagnosis of PVE.

  10. Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Maria; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades cardiovascular disease management has been substantially improved by the increasing introduction of medical devices as prosthetic valves. The yearly rate of infective endocarditis (IE) in patient with a prosthetic valve is approximately 3 cases per 1,000 patients. The fatality rate of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) remains stable over the years, in part due to the aging of the population. The diagnostic value of echocardiography in diagnosis is operator-dependent and its sensitivity can decrease in presence of intracardiac devices and valvular prosthesis. The modified Duke criteria are considered the gold standard for diagnosing IE; their sensibility is 80%, but in clinical practice their diagnostic accuracy in PVE is lower, resulting inconclusively in nearly 30% of cases. In the last years, these new imaging modalities have gained an increasing attention because they make it possible to diagnose an IE earlier than the structural alterations occurring. Several studies have been conducted in order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of various nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis of PVE. We performed a review of the literature to assess the available evidence on the role of nuclear medicine techniques in the diagnosis of PVE. PMID:25695043

  11. Children in nuclear medicine; Kinder in der Nuklearmedizin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, S. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    With each study in paediatric nuclear medicine one must try to reach a high quality standard with a minimum of radiation exposure to the child. This is true for the indication for the study and the interpretation of the results as well as the preparation, the image acquisition, the processing and the documentation. A continuous evaluation of all aspects is necessary to receive optimal, clinically relevant information. In addition it is important that the child keeps nuclear medicine in a good mind, especially when it has to come back for a control study. (orig.) [German] Bei jeder paediatrischen Untersuchung in der Nuklearmedizin muss versucht werden, eine optimale Aussage bei moeglichst niedriger Strahlenexposition des Kindes zu erreichen. Dieses gilt sowohl fuer die Indikationsstellung der Untersuchung sowie die Interpretation der Untersuchungsergebnisse, als auch fuer die Vorbereitung, die Durchfuehrung, die Auswertung und die Dokumentation. Eine staendige Ueberpruefung aller dieser Aspekte ist erforderlich, um durch die nuklearmedizinische Untersuchung optimale, klinisch relevante Informationen zu erhalten. Zusaetzlich soll erreicht werden, dass das Kind - auch im Hinblick auf Folgeuntersuchungen - die Nuklearmedizin in guter Erinnerung behaelt. (orig.)

  12. Fetal dose in radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy; Dosis fetal en radiodiagnostico, medicina nuclear y radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales, F. J.; Martinez, L. C.; Candela, C.

    2015-07-01

    Sometimes irradiation of the fetus in the mother's womb is inevitable in the field of diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy, either through ignorance a priori status of this pregnancy, either because for clinical reasons it is necessary to perform the radiological study or treatment. In the first cases, know the dose at which it has exposed the fetus is essential when assessing the associated risk, while in the second it is when assessing the justification of the test. (Author)

  13. Recent Experimental Results on Nuclear Cluster Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge on nuclear cluster physics has increased considerably since the pioneering discovery of 12C+12C resonances half a century ago and nuclear clustering remains one of the most fruitful domains of nuclear physics, facing some of the greatest challenges and opportunities in the years ahead. The occurrence of "exotic" shapes and/or Bose-Einstein alpha condensates in light N-Z alpha-conjugate nuclei is investigated. Evolution of clustering from stability to the drip-lines examined with clustering aspects persisting in light neutron-rich nuclei is consistent with the extension of the "Ikeda-diagram" to non alpha-conjugate nuclei.

  14. AAPM/SNMMI Joint Task Force: report on the current state of nuclear medicine physics training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Beth A; Allison, Jerry D; Clements, Jessica B; Coffey, Charles W; Fahey, Frederic H; Gress, Dustin A; Kinahan, Paul E; Nickoloff, Edward L; Mawlawi, Osama R; MacDougall, Robert D; Pizzutiello, Robert J

    2015-09-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) recognized the need for a review of the current state of nuclear  medicine physics training and the need to explore pathways for improving nuclear medicine physics training opportunities. For these reasons, the two organizations formed a joint AAPM/SNMMI Ad Hoc Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Physics  Training. The mission of this task force was to assemble a representative group of stakeholders to:• Estimate the demand for board-certified nuclear medicine physicists in the next 5-10 years,• Identify the critical issues related to supplying an adequate number of physicists who have received the appropriate level of training in nuclear medicine physics, and• Identify approaches that may be considered to facilitate the training of nuclear medicine physicists.As a result, a task force was appointed and chaired by an active member of both organizations that included representation from the AAPM, SNMMI, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), the American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine (ABSNM), and the Commission for the Accreditation of Medical Physics Educational Programs (CAMPEP). The Task Force first met at the AAPM Annual Meeting in Charlotte in July 2012 and has met regularly face-to-face, online, and by conference calls. This manuscript reports the findings of the Task Force, as well as recommendations to achieve the stated mission.

  15. Guidance for nuclear medicine staff on radiopharmaceuticals drug interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Santos-Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous drug interactions related to radiopharmaceuticals take place every day in hospitals many of which are not reported or detected. Information concerning this kind of reaction is not abundant, and nuclear medicine staff are usually overwhelmed by this information. To better understand this type of reaction, and to help nuclear medicine staff deal with it, a review of the literature was conducted. The results show that almost all of radiopharmaceuticals marketed around the world present drug interactions with a large variety of compounds. This suggests that a logical framework to make decisions based on reviews incorporating adverse reactions must be created. The review also showed that researchers undertaking a review of literature, or even a systematic review that incorporates drug interactions, must understand the rationale for the suggested methods and be able to implement them in their review. Additionally, a global effort should be made to report as many cases of drug interaction with radiopharmaceuticals as possible. With this, a complete picture of drug interactions with radiopharmaceuticals can be drawn.Diversos casos de interações medicamentosas com radiofármacos ocorrem diariamente na rotina hospitalar, contudo muitos deles não são notificados ou mesmo percebidos. Informações a respeito desse tipo de reação não é abundante e os profissionais da medicina nuclear muitas vezes estão assoberbados por essas informações. De modo a entender esse tipo de reação e auxiliar a medicina nuclear a lidar com essa situação uma revisão da literatura foi realizada. Os resultados mostraram que a totalidade dos radiofármacos comercializados no mundo apresentam interação medicamentosa com uma enorme variedade de outros medicamentos. Dessa forma sugere-se que revisões sobre radiofármacos inclua um capítulo sobre efeitos adversos. Além disso, um esforço mundial para notificar efeitos adversos deve ser realizado, pois somente

  16. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Annual report 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-05-01

    This is the May 1988 annual report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington. It contains chapters on astrophysics, giant resonances, heavy ion induced reactions, fundamental symmetries, polarization in nuclear reactions, medium energy reactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), research by outside users, Van de Graaff and ion sources, the Laboratory`s booster linac project work, instrumentation, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, Ph.D. degrees granted in the 1987-88 academic year, and publications. Refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Current Status of Imaging Physics and Instrumentation In Nuclear Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Joung [Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Diagnostic and functional imaging device have been developed independently. The recognition that combining of these two devices can provide better diagnostic outcomes by fusing anatomical and functional images. The representative examples of combining devices would be PET/CT and SPECT/CT. Development and their applications of animal imaging and instrumentation have been very active, as new drug development with advanced imaging device has been increased. The development of advanced imaging device resulted in researching and developing for detector technology and imaging systems. It also contributed to develop a new software, reconstruction algorithm, correction methods for physical factors, image quantitation, computer simulation, kinetic modeling, dosimetry, and correction for motion artifacts. Recently, development of MRI and PET by combining them together was reported. True integration of MRI and PET has been making the progress and their results were reported. The recent status of imaging and instrumentation in nuclear medicine is reported in this paper.

  18. Breast cancer: an overview of nuclear medicine imaging and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munro, P. [QEII/Dalhousie School of Health Sciences, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this overview is to introduce the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures routinely used in the management of the patient with breast cancer and includes what some may consider being the future of nuclear medicine, positron emission tomography. Imaging the breast with {sup 99m}Tc MIBI to lymphatic mapping and the search for the sentinel lymph node for biopsy purposes, as well as bone scans used in the search for metastases will be discussed. Wall motion and ejection fraction studies are discussed as a monitoring tool for patients requiring cardiotoxic chemotherapy. The final section of the synopsis deals with the treatment of bone metastases for the purpose of palliation of this often debilitating disease. (author)

  19. Role of Nuclear Medicine in the cardiac resinchronization therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Simone Cristina Soares, E-mail: simonecordis@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Giorgi, Maria Clementina Pinto; D' Orio, Silvana Angelina; Meneghetti, Jose Claudio [Instituto do Coracao (InCor/FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) emerged as one of the most promising approaches in the treatment of cardiac dyssynchrony in heart failure patients' refractory to medical treatment. However, despite very promising clinical and functional results, individual response analyses show that a significant number of patients do not respond to treatment. The role of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in the selection of CRT candidates by the assessment of cardiac dyssynchrony, myocardial viability, myocardial perfusion and blood flow and sympathetic cardiac activity has been discussed in this review. The potential utilization of this tool to improve the comprehension of detrimental effects of dyssynchrony on cardiac function and the evaluation and monitoring of the response to CRT were also considered. Other molecular targets that characterize glucose and fatty acid metabolism, apoptosis, angiotensin converting enzyme activity and angiogenesis that can be evaluated with this technique were described. (author)

  20. The next few years: nuclear medicine and molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eil, P.J. [Middlesex Hospital Mortimer Street, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-01

    Nuclear medicine in the future will be integrated in best practice in diagnosis, staging and re-staging of disease, treatment monitoring and indeed specific new therapy. Routine multi modality imaging has clearly arrived whilst some image fusion is still required. Intra and inter modality special registration is in progress. The impact of image fusion especially PET/CT on radiotherapy planning will be major. There are major developments in therapy and especially the treatment of lymphoma with new tracers such as yttrium-90 and iodine 131 labelled anti-CD monoclonal antibodies. New registered tracers are impacting. Cancer profiling will be improved with molecular phenotype with biopsy and imaging and organ staging via imaging technology. (N.C.)

  1. Development of thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms for use in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, R. A. D.; Maia, A. F.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms to be used in control tests of medical images in scintillation cameras. The main difference among the phantoms was the neck shape: in the first, called OSCT, it was geometrically shaped, while in the second, called OSAP, it was anthropomorphically shaped. In both phantoms, thyroid gland prototypes, which were made of acrylic and anthropomorphically shaped, were constructed to allow the simulation of a healthy thyroid and of thyroids with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Images of these thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms were obtained using iodine 131 with an activity of 8.695 MBq. The iodine 131 was chosen because it is widely used in studies of thyroid scintigraphy. The images obtained proved the effectiveness of the phantoms to simulate normal or abnormal thyroids function. These phantoms can be used in medical imaging quality control programs and, also in the training of professionals involved in the analysis of images in nuclear medicine centers.

  2. Diffusion processes in tumors: A nuclear medicine approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Helman

    2016-07-01

    The number of counts used in nuclear medicine imaging techniques, only provides physical information about the desintegration of the nucleus present in the the radiotracer molecules that were uptaken in a particular anatomical region, but that information is not a real metabolic information. For this reason a mathematical method was used to find a correlation between number of counts and 18F-FDG mass concentration. This correlation allows a better interpretation of the results obtained in the study of diffusive processes in an agar phantom, and based on it, an image from the PETCETIX DICOM sample image set from OsiriX-viewer software was processed. PET-CT gradient magnitude and Laplacian images could show direct information on diffusive processes for radiopharmaceuticals that enter into the cells by simple diffusion. In the case of the radiopharmaceutical 18F-FDG is necessary to include pharmacokinetic models, to make a correct interpretation of the gradient magnitude and Laplacian of counts images.

  3. Nuclear medicine external individual occupational doses in Rio de Janeiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauricio, Claudia L.P.; Lima, Ana Luiza S.; Silva, Herica L.R. da; Santos, Denison Souza [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: claudia@ird.gov.br, e-mail: analuslima@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: herica@ird.gov.br, e-mail: santosd@ird.gov.br; Silva, Claudio Ribeiro da [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao Geral de Ciencia e Tecnologia da Informacao (CGTI)(Brazil)], e-mail: claudio@cnen.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    According to the Brazilian National Database there are about 300 Nuclear Medicine Services (NMS) in Brazil, 44 of them located in the State of Rio de Janeiro (RJ). Individual dose measurements are an important input for the evaluation of occupational exposure in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of radioprotection implementation and to keep individual doses as low as possible. In Brazil, most nuclear medicine (NM) staff is routinely monitored for external dose. The internal committed dose is estimated only in abnormal conditions. This paper makes a statistics analysis of all the RJ NMS annual external occupational doses in year 2005. A study of the evolution of monthly external individual doses higher than 4.00 mSv from 2004 to 2008 is also presented. The number of registered thorax monthly dose higher than 4.0 mSv is increasing, as its value. In this period the highest dose measured reaches 56.9 mSv, in one month, in 2008. About 50% of the annual doses are smaller than the monthly record level of 0.20 mSv. In 2005, around 100 professionals of RJ NMS received annual doses higher than 4.0 mSv, considering only external doses, but no one receives doses higher than 20.0 mSv. Extremities dosimeters are used by about 15% of the staff. In some cases, these doses are more than 10 times higher than the dose in thorax. This study shows the importance to improve radiation protection procedures in NM. (author)

  4. Special Radiation Protection Precautions in Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanoyiannis, A. P.; Gerogiannis, J.

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine concerns the administration of appropriate amounts of radioactivity of certain isotopes, in order to achieve internal localized irradiation of neoplasmatic cells. Due to the increased level and the specific isotope characteristics of administered radioactivity, special Radiation Protection precautions must be taken. This study addresses such issues, based on national as well as international legislation and guidelines. Application of the principle of optimization is of outmost importance and is based on individual dose planning. The decision about the release of Nuclear Medicine patients after therapy is determined on an individual basis, taking into account patients' pattern of contact with other people, their age and that of persons in the home environment, in addition to other factors. Estimation of the absorbed dose given to the treated organ is based on uptake measurements and other biokinetic data, as well as on the mass of the treated tissue or organ. Concerning pregnant women, the rule of thumb is that they should not be treated, unless the radionuclide therapy is required to save their lives. In that case, the potential absorbed dose and risk to the foetus should be estimated and conveyed to the patient. After radionuclide therapy, a female should be advised to avoid pregnancy for the period of time depending on the specific radionuclide. This is to ensure that the dose to a conceptus/foetus would probably not exceed 1 mGy (the member of the public dose limit). The radiation risk for relatives and caregivers is small and unlikely to exceed the legal dose constraints during the period of the patient's treatment. Solid waste from the patient's stay in hospital is a different matter, and is normally incinerated or held for a period until radioactive decay brings the activity to an acceptable level.

  5. Activities report in nuclear physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J. F. W.; Scholten, O.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies of giant resonances, nuclear structure, light mass systems, and heavy mass systems are summarized. Theoretical studies of nuclear structure, and dynamics are described. Electroweak interactions; atomic and surface physics; applied nuclear physics; and nuclear medicine are discus

  6. Nuclear Chemistry, Science (Experimental): 5316.62.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Russell R.

    This nuclear chemistry module includes topics on atomic structure, instability of the nucleus, detection strengths and the uses of radioactive particles. Laboratory work stresses proper use of equipment and safe handling of radioactive materials. Students with a strong mathematics background may consider this course as advanced work in chemistry.…

  7. Standardization of Administered Activities in Pediatric Nuclear Medicine: A Report of the First Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative Project, Part 2-Current Standards and the Path Toward Global Standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Frederic H; Bom, Henry Hee-Seung; Chiti, Arturo; Choi, Yun Young; Huang, Gang; Lassmann, Michael; Laurin, Norman; Mut, Fernando; Nuñez-Miller, Rodolfo; O'Keeffe, Darin; Pradhan, Prasanta; Scott, Andrew M; Song, Shaoli; Soni, Nischal; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Vargas, Luis

    2016-07-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative (NMGI) was formed in 2012 and consists of 13 international organizations with direct involvement in nuclear medicine. The underlying objectives of the NMGI are to promote human health by advancing the field of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, encourage global collaboration in education, and harmonize procedure guidelines and other policies that ultimately lead to improvements in quality and safety in the field throughout the world. For its first project, the NMGI decided to consider the issues involved in the standardization of administered activities in pediatric nuclear medicine. It was decided to divide the final report of this project into 2 parts. Part 1 was published in this journal in the spring of 2015. This article presents part 2 of the final report. It discusses current standards for administered activities in children and adolescents that have been developed by various professional organizations. It also presents an evaluation of the current practice of pediatric nuclear medicine specifically with regard to administered activities as determined by an international survey of 313 nuclear medicine clinics and centers from 29 countries. Lastly, it provides recommendations for a path toward global standardization of the administration of radiopharmaceuticals in children.

  8. Do we need a universal 'code of ethics' in nuclear medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Chandakacharla N; Vinjamuri, Sobhan

    2010-06-01

    Recent years have seen huge advances in medicine and the science of medicine. Nuclear medicine has been no exception and there has been rapid acceptance of new concepts, new technologies and newer ways of working. Ethical principles have been traditionally considered as generic skills applicable to wide groups of scientists and doctors, with only token refinement at specialty level. Specialist bodies across the world representing wide groups of practitioners frequently have subgroups dealing exclusively with ethical issues. It could easily be argued that the basic principles of ethical practice adopted by specialist bodies closest to nuclear medicine practice, such as radiology and oncology, will also be applicable to nuclear medicine and that time and effort need not be spent on specifying a separate code for nuclear medicine. It could also be argued that nuclear medicine is an independent specialty and some (if not most) practitioners will not be aware of the guidelines adopted by other specialist societies, and that there is a need for re-iteration of ethical principles at the specialty level and on a worldwide scale.In this article we would like to present a brief history of medical ethics, discuss some of the advances in nuclear medicine and their associated ethical aspects, as well as list a framework of principles for consideration, should a specialist body deem it suitable to establish a 'code of ethics' for nuclear medicine.

  9. Strategies for CT tissue segmentation for Monte Carlo calculations in nuclear medicine dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braad, Poul-Erik; Andersen, Thomas; Hansen, Søren Baarsgaard;

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: CT images are used for patient specific Monte Carlo treatment planning in radionuclide therapy. The authors investigated the impact of tissue classification, CT image segmentation, and CT errors on Monte Carlo calculated absorbed dose estimates in nuclear medicine. Methods: CT errors...... patient specific dosimetry in nuclear medicine. Accurate dosimetry was obtained with a 13-tissue ramp that included five different bone types....

  10. Highlights lecture EANM 2015: the search for nuclear medicine's superheroes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Andreas; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-09-01

    The EANM 2015 Annual Congress, held from October 10th to 14th in Hamburg, Germany, was outstanding in many respects. With 5550 participants, this was by far the largest European congress concerning nuclear medicine. More than 1750 scientific presentations were submitted, with more than 250 abstracts from young scientists, indicating that the future success of our discipline is fuelled by a high number of young individuals becoming involved in a multitude of scientific activities. Significant improvements have been made in molecular imaging of cancer, particularly in prostate cancer. PSMA-directed PET/CT appears to become a new gold standard for staging and restaging purposes. Novel tumour specific compounds have shown their potential for target identification also in other solid neoplasms and further our understanding of tumour biology and heterogeneity. In addition, a variety of nuclear imaging techniques guiding surgical interventions have been introduced. A particular focus of the congress was put on targeted, radionuclide based therapies. Novel theranostic concepts addressing also tumour entities with high incidence rates such as prostate cancer, melanoma, and lymphoma, have shown effective anti-tumour activity. Strategies have been presented to improve further already established therapeutic regimens such as somatostatin receptor based radio receptor therapy for treating advanced neuroendocrine tumours. Significant contributions were presented also in the neurosciences track. An increasing number of target structures of high interest in neurology and psychiatry are now available for PET and SPECT imaging, facilitating specific imaging of different subtypes of dementia and movement disorders as well as neuroinflammation. Major contributions in the cardiovascular track focused on further optimization of cardiac perfusion imaging by reducing radiation exposure, reducing scanning time, and improving motion correction. Besides coronary artery disease, many

  11. Links between nuclear medicine and radiopharmacy; Structuration des liens entre medecine nucleaire et radiopharmacie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelegrin, M. [Inserm, U896, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, institut de recherche en cancerologie de Montpellier (IRCM), universite Montpellier 1, 34 - Montpellier (France); Francois-Joubert, A. [Service de medecine nucleaire, centre hospitalier de Chambery, 73 - Chambery (France); Chassel, M.L. [Radiopharmacie, service de pharmacie, centre hospitalier de Chambery, 73 - Chambrry (France); Desruet, M.D. [Service de radiopharmacie et service pharmaceutique, clinique universitaire de medecine nucleaire, CHU de Grenoble, 38 - Grenoble (France); Bolot, C. [Service de radiopharmacie, service pharmaceutique, centre de medecine nucleaire, groupement hospitalier Est, 69 - Bron (France); Lao, S. [Service de radiopharmacie, medecine nucleaire, hopital de l' Archet, 06 - Nice (France)

    2010-11-15

    Radiopharmaceuticals are nowadays under the responsibility of the radio-pharmacist because of their medicinal product status. Radiopharmacy belongs to the hospital pharmacy department, nevertheless, interactions with nuclear medicine department are important: rooms are included or located near nuclear medicine departments in order to respect radiation protection rules, more over staff, a part of the material and some activities are shared between the two departments. Consequently, it seems essential to formalize links between the radiopharmacy and the nuclear medicine department, setting the goals to avoid conflicts and to ensure patients' security. Modalities chosen for this formalization will depend on the establishment's organization. (authors)

  12. Handbook of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Edmund E; Tateishi, Ukihide; Baum, Richard P

    2012-01-01

    This handbook will provide updated information on nuclear medicine and molecular imaging techniques as well as its clinical applications, including radionuclide therapy, to trainees and practitioners of nuclear medicine, radiology and general medicine. Updated information on nuclear medicine and molecular imaging are vitally important and useful to both trainees and existing practitioners. Imaging techniques and agents are advancing and changing so rapidly that concise and pertinent information are absolutely necessary and helpful. It is hoped that this handbook will help readers be better equipped for the utilization of new imaging methods and treatments using radiopharmaceuticals.

  13. ACR-SNM Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training: report of the task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberteau, Milton J; Graham, Michael M

    2011-06-01

    The expansion of knowledge and technological advances in nuclear medicine and radiology require physicians to have more expertise in functional and anatomic imaging. The convergence of these two specialties into the new discipline of molecular imaging has also begun to place demands on residency training programs for additional instruction in physiology and molecular biology. These changes have unmasked weaknesses in current nuclear medicine and radiology training programs. Adding to the impetus for change are the attendant realities of the job market and uncertain employment prospects for physicians trained in nuclear medicine but not also trained in diagnostic radiology. With this background, the ACR and the Society of Nuclear Medicine convened the Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training to define the issues and develop recommendations for resident training.

  14. The production of radionuclides for nuclear medicine from a compact, low-energy accelerator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, William D; Parks, Geoffrey T; Titov, Dmitry; Beasley, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The field of nuclear medicine is reliant on radionuclides for medical imaging procedures and radioimmunotherapy (RIT). The recent shut-downs of key radionuclide producers have highlighted the fragility of the current radionuclide supply network, however. To ensure that nuclear medicine can continue to grow, adding new diagnostic and therapy options to healthcare, novel and reliable production methods are required. Siemens are developing a low-energy, high-current - up to 10 MeV and 1 mA respectively - accelerator. The capability of this low-cost, compact system for radionuclide production, for use in nuclear medicine procedures, has been considered. The production of three medically important radionuclides - (89)Zr, (64)Cu, and (103)Pd - has been considered, via the (89)Y(p,n), (64)Ni(p,n) and (103)Rh(p,n) reactions, respectively. Theoretical cross-sections were generated using TALYS and compared to experimental data available from EXFOR. Stopping power values generated by SRIM have been used, with the TALYS-generated excitation functions, to calculate potential yields and isotopic purity in different irradiation regimes. The TALYS excitation functions were found to have a good agreement with the experimental data available from the EXFOR database. It was found that both (89)Zr and (64)Cu could be produced with high isotopic purity (over 99%), with activity yields suitable for medical diagnostics and therapy, at a proton energy of 10MeV. At 10MeV, the irradiation of (103)Rh produced appreciable quantities of (102)Pd, reducing the isotopic purity. A reduction in beam energy to 9.5MeV increased the radioisotopic purity to 99% with only a small reduction in activity yield. This work demonstrates that the low-energy, compact accelerator system under development by Siemens would be capable of providing sufficient quantities of (89)Zr, (64)Cu, and (103)Pd for use in medical diagnostics and therapy. It is suggested that the system could be used to produce many other

  15. Chinese medicines in the treatment of experimental diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Yi; Chen, Xiao-Xin; Tang, Sydney Chi-Wai; Sze, Stephen Cho-Wing; Feng, Yi-Bin; Lee, Kai-Fai; Zhang, Kalin Yan-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a severe micro vascular complication accompanying diabetes mellitus that affects millions of people worldwide. End-stage renal disease occurs in nearly half of all DN patients, resulting in large medical costs and lost productivity. The course of DN progression is complicated, and effective and safe therapeutic strategies are desired. While the complex nature of DN renders medicines with a single therapeutic target less efficacious, Chinese medicine, with its holistic view targeting the whole system of the patient, has exhibited efficacy for DN management. This review aims to describe the experimental evidence for Chinese medicines in DN management, with an emphasis on the underlying mechanisms, and to discuss the combined use of herbs and drugs in DN treatment.

  16. Nuclear Test-Experimental Science: Annual report, fiscal year 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G.L.; Donohue, M.L.; Bucciarelli, G.; Hymer, J.D.; Kirvel, R.D.; Middleton, C.; Prono, J.; Reid, S.; Strack, B. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    Fiscal year 1988 has been a significant, rewarding, and exciting period for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's nuclear testing program. It was significant in that the Laboratory's new director chose to focus strongly on the program's activities and to commit to a revitalized emphasis on testing and the experimental science that underlies it. It was rewarding in that revolutionary new measurement techniques were fielded on recent important and highly complicated underground nuclear tests with truly incredible results. And it was exciting in that the sophisticated and fundamental problems of weapons science that are now being addressed experimentally are yielding new challenges and understanding in ways that stimulate and reward the brightest and best of scientists. During FY88 the program was reorganized to emphasize our commitment to experimental science. The name of the program was changed to reflect this commitment, becoming the Nuclear Test-Experimental Science (NTES) Program.

  17. Curriculum for education and training of Medical Physicists in Nuclear Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Guerra, Alberto; Bardies, Manuel; Belcari, Nicola;

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide a guideline curriculum covering theoretical and practical aspects of education and training for Medical Physicists in Nuclear Medicine within Europe. MATERIAL AND METHODS: National training programmes of Medical Physics, Radiation Physics and Nuclear Medicine physics from...... experience required to practice as a Medical Physicist in Nuclear Medicine in Europe. It is assumed that the precondition for the beginning of the training is a good initial degree in Medical Physics at master level (or equivalent). The Learning Outcomes are categorised using the Knowledge, Skill...... Medicine. CONCLUSIONS: This new joint EANM/EFOMP European guideline curriculum is a further step to harmonise specialist training of Medical Physicists in Nuclear Medicine within Europe. It provides a common framework for national Medical Physics societies to develop or benchmark their own curricula...

  18. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., App. F Appendix F to Part 75—Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2. Licenses... radiography, nuclear medicine technology, or radiation therapy technology. 2. Special eligibility to take...

  19. Therapeutic radionuclides in nuclear medicine: current and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeong, Chai-Hong; Cheng, Mu-hua; Ng, Kwan-Hoong

    2014-10-01

    The potential use of radionuclides in therapy has been recognized for many decades. A number of radionuclides, such as iodine-131 ((131)I), phosphorous-32 ((32)P), strontium-90 ((90)Sr), and yttrium-90 ((90)Y), have been used successfully for the treatment of many benign and malignant disorders. Recently, the rapid growth of this branch of nuclear medicine has been stimulated by the introduction of a number of new radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of metastatic bone pain and neuroendocrine and other malignant or non-malignant tumours. Today, the field of radionuclide therapy is enjoying an exciting phase and is poised for greater growth and development in the coming years. For example, in Asia, the high prevalence of thyroid and liver diseases has prompted many novel developments and clinical trials using targeted radionuclide therapy. This paper reviews the characteristics and clinical applications of the commonly available therapeutic radionuclides, as well as the problems and issues involved in translating novel radionuclides into clinical therapies.

  20. Diffusion processes in tumors: A nuclear medicine approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya, Helman, E-mail: haamayae@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Universidad Nacional de Colombia (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    The number of counts used in nuclear medicine imaging techniques, only provides physical information about the desintegration of the nucleus present in the the radiotracer molecules that were uptaken in a particular anatomical region, but that information is not a real metabolic information. For this reason a mathematical method was used to find a correlation between number of counts and {sup 18}F-FDG mass concentration. This correlation allows a better interpretation of the results obtained in the study of diffusive processes in an agar phantom, and based on it, an image from the PETCETIX DICOM sample image set from OsiriX-viewer software was processed. PET-CT gradient magnitude and Laplacian images could show direct information on diffusive processes for radiopharmaceuticals that enter into the cells by simple diffusion. In the case of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 18}F-FDG is necessary to include pharmacokinetic models, to make a correct interpretation of the gradient magnitude and Laplacian of counts images.

  1. Applying activity-based costing to the nuclear medicine unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthummanon, Sakesun; Omachonu, Vincent K; Akcin, Mehmet

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies have shown the feasibility of using activity-based costing (ABC) in hospital environments. However, many of these studies discuss the general applications of ABC in health-care organizations. This research explores the potential application of ABC to the nuclear medicine unit (NMU) at a teaching hospital. The finding indicates that the current cost averages 236.11 US dollars for all procedures, which is quite different from the costs computed by using ABC. The difference is most significant with positron emission tomography scan, 463 US dollars (an increase of 96%), as well as bone scan and thyroid scan, 114 US dollars (a decrease of 52%). The result of ABC analysis demonstrates that the operational time (machine time and direct labour time) and the cost of drugs have the most influence on cost per procedure. Clearly, to reduce the cost per procedure for the NMU, the reduction in operational time and cost of drugs should be analysed. The result also indicates that ABC can be used to improve resource allocation and management. It can be an important aid in making management decisions, particularly for improving pricing practices by making costing more accurate. It also facilitates the identification of underutilized resources and related costs, leading to cost reduction. The ABC system will also help hospitals control costs, improve the quality and efficiency of the care they provide, and manage their resources better.

  2. The role of nuclear medicine in acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, P. (Saint James' s Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-10-01

    In most patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, endoscopy will locate the site and cause of bleeding, and also provide an opportunity for local therapy. The cause of lower GI bleeding is often difficult to attribute, even when pathology is found by colonoscopy or barium enema. Nuclear medicine techniques can be used to identify the site of bleeding in those patients in whom the initial diagnostic procedures are negative or inconclusive. Methods using transient labelling of blood (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-sulphur colloid) produce a high target-to-background ratio in positive cases, give quick results and localize bleeding sites accurately, but depend upon bleeding being active at the time of injection. Techniques using stable blood labelling (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-labelled red blood cells) may be positive even with intermittent bleeding but may take several hours to produce a result and are less precise in localization. The most useful application is in patients with recurrent or prolonged bleeding, those with inconclusive endoscopy or barium studies, and those who are high-risk surgical candidates. (author).

  3. Importance of Bladder Radioactivity for Radiation Safety in Nuclear Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Sinan Gültekin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Most of the radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine are excreted via the urinary system. This study evaluated the importance of a reduction in bladder radioactivity for radiation safety. Methods: The study group of 135 patients underwent several organ scintigraphies [40/135; thyroid scintigraphy (TS, 30/135; whole body bone scintigraphy (WBS, 35/135; myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS and 30/135; renal scintigraphy (RS] by a technologist within 1 month. In full and empty conditions, static bladder images and external dose rate measurements at 0.25, 0.50, 1, 1.5 and 2 m distances were obtained and decline ratios were calculated from these two data sets. Results: External radiation dose rates were highest in patients undergoing MPS. External dose rates at 0.25 m distance for TS, TKS, MPS and BS were measured to be 56, 106, 191 and 72 μSv h-1 for full bladder and 29, 55, 103 and 37 μSv h-1 for empty bladder, respectively. For TS, WBS, MPS and RS, respectively, average decline ratios were calculated to be 52%, 55%, 53% and 54% in the scintigraphic assessment and 49%, 51%, 49%, 50% and 50% in the assessment with Geiger counter. Conclusion: Decline in bladder radioactivity is important in terms of radiation safety. Patients should be encouraged for micturition after each scintigraphic test. Spending time together with radioactive patients at distances less than 1 m should be kept to a minimum where possible.

  4. On the safety of persons accompanying nuclear medicine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Barreto, Marlenin; López Bejerano, Gladys M; Varela Corona, Consuelo; Fleitas Estévez, Ileana

    2012-12-01

    The presence of caretakers/comforters during nuclear medicine examinations is relatively common. These caretakers receive higher doses than the general public, who receive only environmental/background exposure. The aim of this research was to know about the doses received by two significant groups of caretakers: comforters of cancer patients (Group I) and mothers of small children (Group II). The patients were scheduled to undergo two different diagnostic studies: Inmuno-Scintigraphy using a monoclonal antibody bound to (99m)Tc (for adults) and Renal Scintigraphy using (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (for children). The average effective doses were 0.27 and 0.29 mSv for Groups I and II, respectively. Additionally, environmental monitoring was performed in the waiting room for injected patients (Room I) and inside the procedure room (Room II). Equivalent environmental doses of 0.28 and 0.24 mSv for Rooms 1 and II, respectively, were found, which are similar to values reported by other authors.

  5. Absorbed Doses to Patients in Nuclear Medicine; Doskatalogen foer nukleaermedicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Mattsson, Soeren; Johansson, Lennart; Fernlund, Per; Nosslin, Bertil

    2007-04-15

    The Swedish radiation protection authority, (SSI), has supported work on estimates of radiation doses to patients from nuclear medicine examinations since more than 20 years. A number of projects have been reported. The results are put together and published under the name 'Doskatalogen' which contains data on doses to different organs and tissues from radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostics and research. This new report contains data on: {sup 11}C-labelled substances (realistic maximum model), amino acids labelled with {sup 11}C, {sup 18}F or {sup 75}Se, {sup 99m}Tc-apcitide, {sup 123}I-labelled fatty acids ({sup 123}I- BMIPP and {sup 123}I-IPPA) and revised models for previously reported {sup 15}O-labelled water, {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin (rest as well as exercise) and {sup 201}Tl-ion Data for almost 200 substances and radionuclides are included in the 'Doskatalogen' today. Since the year 2001 the 'Doskatalogen' is available on the authority's home page (www.ssi.se)

  6. Nuclear medicine in problems of fertility and impotence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckier, L S; Strober, M D

    1992-04-01

    Nuclear medicine techniques may be used to test fallopian tube patency and penile vascular inflow and outflow. Radionuclide hysterosalpingography (HSP) is a readily performed method of evaluating fallopian tube patency, and is believed to be more physiologic and functionally informative than the accepted radiologic method of contrast HSP. The test is simple to perform and interpret and offers an accurate alternative to the contrast examination. For scintigraphic evaluation of impotence, blood pool studies are most useful in assessing the integrity of arterial inflow, but may also be used to generate indices of venous leak. Washout of xenon after subcutaneous injection, in the flaccid state, has been used as a measure of baseline penile perfusion, as has intracavernosal injections in the flaccid penis. Intracavernosal xenon washout during erection seems the most useful method of testing venous integrity. Washout using technetium-99m (99mTc)-labeled red blood cells (99mTc-RBC) may emerge as a convenient alternative to the more technically difficult xenon examinations.

  7. Examining Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Practice as a lifelong learning process: opportunities and challenges to the nuclear medicine professional and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Thomas N B

    2016-08-01

    This essay will explore the critical issues and challenges surrounding lifelong learning for professionals, initially exploring within the profession and organizational context of nuclear medicine practice. It will critically examine how the peer-review process called Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Practice (QUANUM) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) can be considered a lifelong learning opportunity to instill a culture of quality to improve patient care and elevate the status of the nuclear medicine profession and practice within the demands of social changes, policy, and globalization. This will be explored initially by providing contextual background to the identity of the IAEA as an organization responsible for nuclear medicine professionals, followed by the benefits that QUANUM can offer. Further key debates surrounding lifelong learning, such as compulsification of lifelong learning and impact on professional change, will then be weaved through the discussion using theoretical grounding through a qualitative review of the literature. Keeping in mind that there is very limited literature focusing on the implications of QUANUM as a lifelong learning process for nuclear medicine professionals, this essay uses select narratives and observations of QUANUM as a lifelong learning process from an auditor's perspective and will further provide a comparative perspective of QUANUM on the basis of other lifelong learning opportunities such as continuing professional development activities and observe parallelisms on its benefits and challenges that it will offer to other professionals in other medical speciality fields and in the teaching profession.

  8. IAEA programs in empowering the nuclear medicine profession through online educational resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Thomas Nb; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana; Kashyap, Ravi; Nunez-Miller, Rodolfo

    2013-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) programme in human health aims to enhance the capabilities in Member States to address needs related to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases through the application of nuclear techniques. It has the specific mission of fostering the application of nuclear medicine techniques as part of the clinical management of certain types of diseases. Attuned to the continuous evolution of this specialty as well as to the advancement and diversity of methods in delivering capacity building efforts in this digital age, the section of nuclear medicine of the IAEA has enhanced its program by incorporating online educational resources for nuclear medicine professionals into its repertoire of projects to further its commitment in addressing the needs of its Member States in the field of nuclear medicine. Through online educational resources such as the Human Health Campus website, e-learning modules, and scheduled interactive webinars, a validation of the commitment by the IAEA in addressing the needs of its Member States in the field of nuclear medicine is strengthened while utilizing the advanced internet and communications technology which is progressively becoming available worldwide. The Human Health Campus (www.humanhealth.iaea.org) is the online educational resources initiative of the Division of Human Health of the IAEA geared toward enhancing professional knowledge of health professionals in radiation medicine (nuclear medicine and diagnostic imaging, radiation oncology, and medical radiation physics), and nutrition. E-learning modules provide an interactive learning environment to its users while providing immediate feedback for each task accomplished. Webinars, unlike webcasts, offer the opportunity of enhanced interaction with the learners facilitated through slide shows where the presenter guides and engages the audience using video and live streaming. This paper explores the IAEA's available online

  9. Progress of experimental research on nuclear safety in NPIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Houjun; Zan, Yuanfeng; Peng, Chuanxin; Xi, Zhao; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Ying; He, Yanqiu; Huang, Yanping [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu (China)

    2016-05-15

    Two kinds of Generation III commercial nuclear power plants have been developed in CNNC (China National Nuclear Corporation), one is a small modular reactor ACP100 having an equivalent electric power 100 MW, and the other is HPR1000 (once named ACP1000) having an equivalent electric power 1 000 MW. Both NPPs widely adopted the design philosophy of advanced passive safety systems and considered the lessons from Fukushima Daichi nuclear accident. As the backbone of the R and D of ACP100 and HPR1000, NPIC (Nuclear power Institute of China) has finished the engineering verification test of main safety systems, including passive residual heat removal experiments, reactor cavity injection experiments, hydrogen combustion experiments, and passive autocatalytic recombiner experiments. Above experimental work conducted in NPIC and further research plan of nuclear safety are introduced in this paper.

  10. Nuclear medicine technology. Review questions for the board examinations. 3. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramer, Karen [CNMT, Marianka (Slovakia); Alavi, Abass [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Hospital

    2008-07-01

    This book prepares students and technologists for registry examinations in nuclear medicine technology by providing practice questions and answers with detailed explanations, as well as a mock registry exam. The questions are designed to test the basic knowledge required of nuclear medicine technologists, as well as the practical application of that knowledge. The topics covered closely follow the content specifications for the exam given by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologist and the components of preparedness published by the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board. This third edition includes a new chapter on positron emission tomography. (orig.)

  11. Up-to-date review of nuclear medicine applications in pediatric thoracic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwatra, Neha S; Grant, Frederick D; Lim, Ruth; Lee, Edward Y

    2017-10-01

    Nuclear medicine has an important role in the evaluation of various congenital and acquired pediatric chest diseases. Although the radiopharmaceuticals and nuclear medicine examinations used in children are broadly the same as in adults, there are some key differences in clinical indications and underlying disorders. This article provides the reader with an up-to-date review of practice of nuclear medicine as it relates to the pediatric chest, including its current role and future applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. VI European Summer School on Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The European Summer School on Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics has reached the sixth edition, marking the tenth year's anniversary. The spirit of the school is to provide a very important occasion for a deep education of young researchers about the main topics of experimental nuclear astrophysics. Moreover, it should be regarded as a forum for the discussion of the last-decade research activity. Lectures are focused on various aspects of primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis, including novel experimental approaches and detectors, indirect methods and radioactive ion beams. Moreover, in order to give a wide educational offer, some lectures cover complementary subjects of nuclear astrophysics such as gamma ray astronomy, neutron-induced reactions, short-lived radionuclides, weak interaction and cutting-edge facilities used to investigate nuclear reactions of interest for astrophysics. Large room is also given to young researcher oral contributions. Traditionally, particular attention is devoted to the participation of students from less-favoured countries, especially from the southern coast of the Mediterranean Sea. The school is organised by the Catania Nuclear Astrophysics research group with the collaboration of Dipartimento di Fisica e Astromomia - Università di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare.

  13. Evaluations of Molecular Nuclear Medicine in pediatric urgencies; Evaluaciones de Medicina Nuclear Molecular en urgencias pediatricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Duncker R, C. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear Molecular, Hospital Infantil de Mexico, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    Several diagnostic procedures of Molecular Nuclear Medicine are considered in first choice in clinical evaluation of patients with different illnesses. So, the gammagraphy is the diagnostic form more sensitive to detect alterations of the perfusion on organs and systems such as bones, heart, brain, lungs or kidneys. Also is possible to identify, localize, evaluate the activity of inflammatory processes such as cellulitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, the abscesses and several primary or metastatic tumours before each other diagnostic technique. In this work is treated about the importance of treatments with radioactive materials have been an important reappearance in last years since with the present capacity to localize specifically intracellular processes (for example, synthesis of DNA) new gateways are opened to research which in coming years would be of great utility. (Author)

  14. Radiation exposure in nuclear medicine: real-time measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Sylvain

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available French regulations have introduced the use of electronic dosimeters for personal monitoring of workers. In order to evaluate the exposure from diagnostic procedures to nuclear medicine staff, individual whole-body doses were measured daily with electronic (digital personal dosimeters during 20 consecutive weeks and correlated with the work load of each day. Personal doses remained always below 20 µSv/d under normal working conditions. Radiation exposure levels were highest to tech staff, nurses and stretcher-bearers. The extrapolated annual cumulative doses for all staff remained less than 10 % of the maximum legal limit for exposed workers (2 mSv/yr. Electronic dosimeters are not technically justified for routine survey of staff. The high sensitivity and immediate reading of electronic semiconductor dosimeters may become very useful for exposure control under risky working conditions. It may become an important help for optimising radiation protection.A legislação francesa introduziu o uso de dosímetros eletrônicos para monitoração da exposição do trabalhador. Afim de avaliar a exposição do trabalhador proveniente de exames diagnósticos em medicina nuclear, doses individuais do corpo inteiro foram medidas diariamente com dosímetros eletrônicos (digitais durante 20 semanas consecutivas e correlatas com as atividades de trabalho de cada dia. As doses foram sempre inferiores à 20 µSv por dia em condições normais de trabalho. Os níveis de exposição de radiação mais elevados foram para os enfermeiros, manipuladores e maqueiros. A extrapolação da dose anual para todos os trabalhadores foi menos que 10 % do limite máximo legal para os trabalhadores expostos (2 mSv/ano. Dosímetros eletrônicos não são tecnicamente justificados para a o controle de rotina da exposição dos trabalhadores, mas a alta sensibilidade e a leitura imediata desses dosímetros podem vir a serem muito úteis para o controle da exposição em condi

  15. Learning gestures and ethical issues in oncology and nuclear medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboubakr Matrane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to show the importance of learning gestures in three medical procedures (chemotherapy, brachytherapy, and bone scan. It allows us to assess complications, lack of benefit, and ethical questions to which resident physicians are confronted in their training. Materials and Methods: The study is based on a questionnaire divided into two parts distributed to 70 resident physicians and 90 patients: 60 physicians radiation oncologists and 10 nuclear physicians completed the first part of 24 items. It concerned the learning of medical practices. The second part of 18 items was completed by 90 patients (30 patients in the chemotherapy unit, 30 patients in the brachytherapy unit, and 30 patients in the nuclear medicine department; it was related to patients′ information prior to the completion (performance of the gesture. Results: The training of medical residents physicians took place mainly during the first year on conscious and well-informed patients, with the exception of brachytherapy taught later in the second year. It was preceded by a theoretical education in 56.7%, 43.3%, and 100%, respectively, in case of chemotherapy, brachytherapy, and bone scan unit, but the previous observation by a senior had failed in 16.7% in case of chemotherapy and in 36.7% in case of brachytherapy unit. Despite the almost constant presence of a senior, four incidents were associated with the first acts of chemotherapy and brachytherapy unit and one incident with the bone scan unit. These incidents had been generated, respectively, from 23.4%, 26.7%, and 20% of resident physicians surveyed (in chemotherapy, in brachytherapy, and in bone scan and had a consequence of a loss of opportunity for patient, in 20%, 13.3%, and 40%, respectively. Most patients were informed before the completion of the medical procedure, and cause ethical problems. Alternative ways of learning were known by most of the resident physicians in training

  16. Comprehensive Auditing in Nuclear Medicine Through the International Atomic Energy Agency Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM) Program. Part 1: the QUANUM Program and Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Torres, Leonel; Marengo, Mario; Massardo, Teresa; Mishani, Eyal; Van Zyl Ellmann, Annare; Solanki, Kishor; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Lobato, Enrique Estrada; Miller, Rodolfo Nunez; Paez, Diana; Pascual, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    An effective management system that integrates quality management is essential for a modern nuclear medicine practice. The Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the mission of supporting nuclear medicine practice in low- and middle-income countries and of helping them introduce it in their health-care system, when not yet present. The experience gathered over several years has shown diversified levels of development and varying degrees of quality of practice, among others because of limited professional networking and limited or no opportunities for exchange of experiences. Those findings triggered the development of a program named Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM), aimed at improving the standards of NM practice in low- and middle-income countries to internationally accepted standards through the introduction of a culture of quality management and systematic auditing programs. QUANUM takes into account the diversity of nuclear medicine services around the world and multidisciplinary contributions to the practice. Those contributions include clinical, technical, radiopharmaceutical, and medical physics procedures. Aspects of radiation safety and patient protection are also integral to the process. Such an approach ensures consistency in providing safe services of superior quality to patients. The level of conformance is assessed using standards based on publications of the IAEA and the International Commission on Radiological Protection, and guidelines from scientific societies such as Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) and European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). Following QUANUM guidelines and by means of a specific assessment tool developed by the IAEA, auditors, both internal and external, will be able to evaluate the level of conformance. Nonconformances will then be prioritized and recommendations will be provided during an exit briefing. The

  17. Radiation dose study in nuclear medicine using GATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguwa, Kasarachi

    Dose as a result of radiation exposure is the notion generally used to disclose the imparted energy in a volume of tissue to a potential biological effect. The basic unit defined by the international system of units (SI system) is the radiation absorbed dose, which is expressed as the mean imparted energy in a mass element of the tissue known as "gray" (Gy) or J/kg. The procedure for ascertaining the absorbed dose is complicated since it involves the radiation transport of numerous types of charged particles and coupled photon interactions. The most precise method is to perform a full 3D Monte Carlo simulation of the radiation transport. There are various Monte Carlo toolkits that have tool compartments for dose calculations and measurements. The dose studies in this thesis were performed using the GEANT4 Application for Emission Tomography (GATE) software (Jan et al., 2011) GATE simulation toolkit has been used extensively in the medical imaging community, due to the fact that it uses the full capabilities of GEANT4. It also utilizes an easy to-learn GATE macro language, which is more accessible than learning the GEANT4/C++ programming language. This work combines GATE with digital phantoms generated using the NCAT (NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom) toolkit (Segars et al., 2004) to allow efficient and effective estimation of 3D radiation dose maps. The GATE simulation tool has developed into a beneficial tool for Monte Carlo simulations involving both radiotherapy and imaging experiments. This work will present an overview of absorbed dose of common radionuclides used in nuclear medicine and serve as a guide to a user who is setting up a GATE simulation for a PET and SPECT study.

  18. Intercomparison and calibration of dose calibrators used in nuclear medicine facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, A M D

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish a working standard for intercomparison and calibration of dose calibrators used in most of nuclear medicine facilities for the determination of the activity of radionuclides administered to patients in specific examinations or therapeutic procedures. A commercial dose calibrator, a set of standard radioactive sources, and syringes, vials and ampoules with radionuclide solutions used in nuclear medicine were utilized in this work. The commercial dose calibrator was calibrated for radionuclide solutions used in nuclear medicine. Simple instrument tests, such as linearity response and variation response with the source volume at a constant source activity concentration were performed. This instrument may be used as a reference system for intercomparison and calibration of other activity meters, as a method of quality control of dose calibrators utilized in nuclear medicine facilities.

  19. The 2011 nuclear medicine technology job analysis project of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dan; Hubble, William; Press, Bret A; Hall, Scott K; Michels, Ann D; Koenen, Roxanne; Vespie, Alan W

    2010-12-01

    The American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) conducts periodic job analysis projects to update the content and eligibility requirements for all certification examinations. In 2009, the ARRT conducted a comprehensive job analysis project to update the content specifications and clinical competency requirements for the nuclear medicine technology examination. ARRT staff and a committee of volunteer nuclear medicine technologists designed a job analysis survey that was sent to a random sample of 1,000 entry-level staff nuclear medicine technologists. Through analysis of the survey data and judgments of the committee, the project resulted in changes to the nuclear medicine technology examination task list, content specifications, and clinical competency requirements. The primary changes inspired by the project were the introduction of CT content to the examination and the expansion of the content covering cardiac procedures.

  20. The molecular imaging approach to image infections and inflammation by nuclear medicine techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signore, Alberto; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory and infectious diseases are a heterogeneous class of diseases that may be divided into infections, acute inflammation and chronic inflammation. Radiological imaging techniques have, with the exception of functional MRI, high sensitivity but lack in specificity. Nuclear medicine techniqu

  1. Current research in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging: highlights of the 23rd Annual EANM Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrió, Ignasi

    2011-02-01

    The most recent research developments in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging were presented at the 2010 Annual Congress of the EANM. This review summarizes some of the most relevant contributions made in the fields of oncology, cardiovascular science, neurology and psychiatry, technological innovation and novel tracers. Presentations covered basic and clinical research in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, and diagnostic and therapeutic applications of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals on a global scale. The results reported demonstrate that investigative strategies using nuclear medicine techniques facilitate effective diagnosis and management of patients with most prevalent disease states. At the same time novel tracers and technologies are being explored, which hold promise for future new applications of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in research and clinical practice.

  2. The molecular imaging approach to image infections and inflammation by nuclear medicine techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signore, Alberto; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory and infectious diseases are a heterogeneous class of diseases that may be divided into infections, acute inflammation and chronic inflammation. Radiological imaging techniques have, with the exception of functional MRI, high sensitivity but lack in specificity. Nuclear medicine

  3. NCRP report 160 and what it means for medical imaging and nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolus, Norman E

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to briefly explain report 160 of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement and the significance of the report to medical imaging as a whole and nuclear medicine specifically. The implications of the findings of report 160 have had repercussions and will continue to affect all of ionizing radiation medical imaging. The nuclear medicine community should have an understanding of why and how report 160 is important. After reading this article, the nuclear medicine technologist will be familiar with the main focus of report 160, the significant change that has occurred since the 1980s in the ionizing radiation exposure of people in the United States, the primary background source of ionizing radiation in the United States, the primary medical exposure to ionizing radiation in the United States, trends in nuclear medicine procedures and patient exposure, and a comparison of population doses between 2006 and the early 1980s as outlined in report 160.

  4. The role of nuclear medicine in the diagnosis of cancer of unknown origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demir, H; Berk, F; Raderer, M;

    2004-01-01

    is directed at the identification of treatable subset. Accurate diagnostic workup is crucial because both prognosis and survival rates depend mainly on detection of the primary tumor site. Although these patients undergo extensive imaging procedures, nuclear medicine techniques are under-utilized despite...... their ability of providing molecular information. Positron emission tomography has an emerging role in this clinical challenge along with other nuclear medicine methods including, bone scan, thyroid scintigraphy....

  5. Assessment of radiation exposure of nuclear medicine staff using personal TLD dosimeters and charcoal detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, F.; Garcia-Talavera, M.; Pardo, R.; Deban, L. [Valladolid Univ., Dept. de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias (Spain); Garcia-Talavera, P.; Singi, G.M.; Martin, E. [Hospital Clinico Univ., Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Salamanca (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Although the main concern regarding exposure to ionizing radiation for nuclear medicine workers is external radiation, inhalation of radionuclides can significantly contribute to the imparted doses. We propose a new approach to assess exposure to inhalation of {sup 131}I based on passive monitoring using activated charcoal detectors. We compared the inhalation doses to the staff of a nuclear medicine department, based on the measurements derived from charcoal detectors placed at various locations, and the external doses monitored using personal TLD dosimeters. (authors)

  6. Nuclear medicine methods in the assessment of acupuncture effects: a short review

    OpenAIRE

    Deise Elisabete Souza; Bernardo Machado Rebello; Reginaldo de Carvalho Silva Filho; Raquel Terra Agostinho; Bastos,Sohaku R. C.; Mario Bernardo-Filho

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of acupuncture are poorly understood. In consequence, numerous investigators have conducted clinical trials to test the efficacy of acupuncture in various conditions. We have used PubMed database system to evaluate the number of publications in acupuncture and nuclear medicine procedures in the period from 1964 to 2007, using the keywords: "nuclear medicine and acupuncture", "SPECT and acupuncture", "PET and acupuncture", "scintigraphy and acupuncture", "radionuclide and acupun...

  7. Quality management in nuclear medicine for better patient care: the IAEA program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Kashyap, Ravi; Pascual, Thomas; Paez, Diana; Nunez-Miller, Rodolfo

    2013-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency promotes the practice of nuclear medicine among its Member States with a focus on quality and safety. It considers quality culture as a part of the educational process and as a tool to reduce heterogeneity in the practice of nuclear medicine, and in turn, patient care. Sensitization about quality is incorporated in all its delivery mechanisms. The Agency has developed a structured peer-review process called quality management (QM) audits in nuclear medicine practices to help nuclear medicine facilities improve their quality through this voluntary comprehensive audit process. The process is multidisciplinary, covering all aspects of nuclear medicine practice with a focus on the patient. It complements other QM and accreditation approaches developed by professional societies or accreditation agencies. The Agency is committed to propagate its utility and assist in the implementation process. Similar auditing programs for practice in diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy, called QUADRIL and QUATRO, respectively, are also in place. Necessary amendments in the auditing process and content are incorporated based on technological and practice changes with time. The reader will become familiar with the approach of the Agency on QM in nuclear medicine and its implementation process to improve patient care.

  8. Compartmental analysis of dynamic nuclear medicine data: regularization procedure and application to physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Fabrice, Delbary

    2016-01-01

    Compartmental models based on tracer mass balance are extensively used in clinical and pre-clinical nuclear medicine in order to obtain quantitative information on tracer metabolism in the biological tissue. This paper is the second of a series of two that deal with the problem of tracer coefficient estimation via compartmental modelling in an inverse problem framework. While the previous work was devoted to the discussion of identifiability issues for 2, 3 and n-dimension compartmental systems, here we discuss the problem of numerically determining the tracer coefficients by means of a general regularized Multivariate Gauss Newton scheme. In this paper, applications concerning cerebral, hepatic and renal functions are considered, involving experimental measurements on FDG-PET data on different set of murine models.

  9. Current research in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in Italy: highlights of the 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuocolo, A

    2011-06-01

    The 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (AIMN) took place in Rimini on March 18-21, 2011 under the chairmanship of Professor Stefano Fanti. The program was of excellent quality and put a further step for the settlement of the standardized AIMN congress structure. A large industrial exhibition demonstrated the latest technological innovations and developments within the field. The congress was a great success with more than 1100 total participants and more than 360 abstracts received. Of these, 40 abstracts were accepted for oral and 285 for poster presentations. The original investigations presented were related to different areas of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, with particular focus on advances in instrumentation and data processing, progress in radiochemistry and pharmacy, novel diagnostics and therapeutics, and new insights in well established areas of clinical application, such as oncology, cardiology, neurology, psychiatry, endocrinology, paediatrics, and infection and inflammation. Noteworthy, several presentations at this congress, focusing on quantitative interpretation of the imaging data and on pragmatic endpoints, such as adverse outcomes, identified when nuclear medicine procedures achieved clinical effectiveness for patient care and patient management and further demonstrated that nuclear medicine plays a crucial role in the contemporary medical scenario. This highlights lecture is only a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress abstract book, published as volume 55, supplement 1 of the Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging in April 2011.

  10. Current Status of Nuclear Medicine Practice in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Diana; Becic, Tarik; Bhonsle, Uday; Jalilian, Amir R; Nuñez-Miller, Rodolfo; Osso, Joao Alberto

    2016-07-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine (NM) in the Middle East region has experienced an important growth in the last 2 decades and has become crucial in providing healthcare to the region's population of about 395 million people. Even though there are some countries in which the services provided are limited to basic coverage of studies with (99m)Tc and (131)I, most have well-established practices covering most of the available studies in this medical specialty; this is the case in for example, Iran, Israel, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey. According to data provided by the NM professionals in the 17 countries included in the present publication, which was collected by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 2015, the total number of gamma cameras in the region is 910 with an average of 2.3 gamma cameras per million inhabitants. Out of these, 107 cameras, or 12%, are SPECT/CT cameras. There are 194 operating PET/CT scanners, translating to one PET/CT scanner for 2.04 million people on average. The availability of PET/CT scanners in relation to population is the highest in Lebanon and Kuwait, with 2.2 and 1.7 scanners per million people, respectively. There is a total of 628 NM centers in the 17 countries, whereas most NM centers belong to the public healthcare system and in most of the countries are widely spread and not confined exclusively to capital cities. As for the radionuclide therapies, (131)I is used regularly in diagnostic workup as well as in therapeutic applications in all the countries included in this analysis. Only five countries have the capability of assembling (99)Mo-(99m)Tc generators (Egypt, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Israel, and Turkey), and cold kits are produced in several countries. Although there are no capabilities in the region to produce (99)Mo from nuclear reactors, a total of 46 cyclotrons are operated for production of PET radionuclides. The most widely used PET tracer in the region is (18)F-FDG followed by (18)F-NaF; concomitantly, the

  11. Acupuncture in clinical and experimental reproductive medicine: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franconi, G; Manni, L; Aloe, L; Mazzilli, F; Giambalvo Dal Ben, G; Lenzi, A; Fabbri, A

    2011-04-01

    Acupuncture has been used as treatment for infertility for hundreds of years, and recently it has been studied in male and female infertility and in assisted reproductive technologies, although its role in reproductive medicine is still debated. To review studies on acupuncture in reproductive medicine, in experimental and clinical settings. Papers were retrieved on PubMed and Google Scholar and were included in the review if at least the abstract was in English. There is evidence of benefit mainly when acupuncture is performed on the day of embryo transfer (ET) in the live birth rate. Benefit is also evident when acupuncture is performed for female infertility due to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). There is some evidence of sperm quality improvement when acupuncture is performed on males affected by idiopathic infertility. Experimental studies suggest that acupuncture effects are mediated by changes in activity of the autonomic nervous system and stimulation of neuropeptides/neurotransmitters which may be involved in the pathogenesis of infertility. Acupuncture seems to have beneficial effects on live birth rate when performed on the day of ET, and to be useful also in PCOS as well as in male idiopathic infertility, with very low incidence of side effects. However, further studies are necessary to confirm the clinical results and to expand our knowledge of the mechanisms involved.

  12. Radiation doses for pediatric nuclear medicine studies: comparing the North American consensus guidelines and the pediatric dosage card of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Frederick D.; Drubach, Laura A.; Treves, S. Ted; Fahey, Frederic H. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Joint Program in Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gelfand, Michael J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Section of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Estimated radiation dose is important for assessing and communicating the risks and benefits of pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Radiation dose depends on the radiopharmaceutical, the administered activity, and patient factors such as age and size. Most radiation dose estimates for pediatric nuclear medicine have not been based on administered activities of radiopharmaceuticals recommended by established practice guidelines. The dosage card of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the North American consensus guidelines each provide recommendations of administered activities of radiopharmaceuticals in children, but there are substantial differences between these two guidelines. For 12 commonly performed pediatric nuclear medicine studies, two established pediatric radiopharmaceutical administration guidelines were used to calculate updated radiation dose estimates and to compare the radiation exposure resulting from the recommendations of each of the guidelines. Estimated radiation doses were calculated for 12 common procedures in pediatric nuclear medicine using administered activities recommended by the dosage card of the EANM (version 1.5.2008) and the 2010 North American consensus guidelines for radiopharmaceutical administered activities in pediatrics. Based on standard models and nominal age-based weights, radiation dose was estimated for typical patients at ages 1, 5, 10 and 15 years and adult. The resulting effective doses were compared, with differences greater than 20% considered significant. Following either the EANM dosage card or the 2010 North American guidelines, the highest effective doses occur with radiopharmaceuticals labeled with fluorine-18 and iodine-123. In 24% of cases, following the North American consensus guidelines would result in a substantially higher radiation dose. The guidelines of the EANM dosage card would lead to a substantially higher radiation dose in 39% of all cases, and in 62% of cases in which patients

  13. Experimental study of water flow in nuclear fuel elements; Estudo experimental do escoamento de agua em elementos combustiveis nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Lorena Escriche, E-mail: ler@cdtn.br [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rezende, Hugo Cesar; Mattos, Joao Roberto Loureiro de; Barros Filho, Jose Afonso; Santos, Andre Augusto Campagnole dos, E-mail: hcr@cdtn.br, E-mail: jrmattos@cdtn.br, E-mail: jabf@cdtn.br, E-mail: aacs@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This work aims to develop an experimental methodology for investigating the water flow through rod bundles after spacer grids of nuclear fuel elements of PWR type reactors. Speed profiles, with the device LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), and the pressure drop between two sockets located before and after the spacer grid, using pressure transducers were measured.

  14. Radiological Justification for and Optimization of Nuclear Medicine Practices in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Il

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear medicine is a rapidly growing discipline that employs advanced novel hybrid techniques that provide unique anatomical and functional information, as well as targets for molecular therapy. Concomitantly, there has been an increase in the attention paid to medical radiation exposure. A radiological justification for the practice of nuclear medicine has been implemented mainly through referral guidelines based on research results such as prospective randomized clinical trials. The International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends diagnostic reference levels as a practical mechanism to optimize medical radiation exposure in order to be commensurate with the medical purpose. The Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine has been implementing radiological optimization through a survey of the protocols on how each hospital determines the dose of administration of each radiopharmaceutical. In the case of nuclear medicine, radiation exposure of caregivers and comforters of patients discharged after administration of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals can occur; therefore, optimization has been implemented through written instructions for patients, based on international recommendations. The development of patient-radiation-dose monitoring software, and a national registry and management system of patient-radiation-dose is needed to implement radiological optimization through diagnostic reference levels. This management system must work in agreement with the "Institute for Quality Management of Nuclear Medicine", and must take into account the medical reality of Korea, such as low medicine fee, in order to implement reasonable radiological justification and optimization.

  15. 20. Brazilian congress on biology and nuclear medicine. Abstracts; 20. Congresso brasileiro de biologia e medicina nuclear. Resumos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    Several aspects concerning the use of nuclear medicine in cardiology, oncology, neurology, endocrinology among other areas are studied. Various topics related to diagnosis and treatment of diseases are presented, e.g. radiotracers use, radiopharmaceuticals (mainly associated with technetium 99), development and standardization of radionuclides, structural chemical analysis, metabolism, biological functions. The scintiscanning is the most reported diagnostic technique.

  16. Nuclear medicine comes of age: its present and future roles in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, J G; Kopecky, R T; Frymoyer, P A

    1990-03-01

    The current role of nuclear medicine in clinical diagnosis was surveyed in a retrospective review of medical records by two internists. About one radiologic imaging study in 20 was a radionuclide procedure, and a somewhat larger fraction was performed in outpatients. The internists found that diagnostic screening procedures in nuclear medicine influenced patient management in 63% of hospital inpatients, and quantitative/monitoring types of tests influenced management in 56%. Of the projected health care costs in the United States of $490 billion, all imaging procedures will account for only $12 billion, and nuclear medicine procedures will account for about $1 billion. Nuclear medicine research continues to blossom. The National Institutes of Health budget for diagnostic imaging research in fiscal year 1988 totaled $86.6 million; nuclear medicine projects represented 43% of this total, all other projects in radiology represented 30%, and projects outside radiology represented 30%. Research with positron emitters and positron emission tomography totaled $20.5 million, and research with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies totaled $6.2 million. Two major problems may hinder the future practice of nuclear medicine in the United States compared with that in other developed countries: (a) the serious time lag in the approval process for new radiopharmaceuticals by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other agencies and (b) the lack of a facility dedicated to the continuous production of radionuclides for biomedical research. Now, there is sporadic production permitted only during high-energy physics experiments. The recent developments which will probably induce the greatest changes in clinical nuclear medicine in the near future are the improvements in design and utilization of single photon emission computed tomographic devices and prolific generation of new radiopharmaceuticals, especially technetium-99m agents for cerebral and myocardial imaging and tumor agents.

  17. [Occupational medicine in nuclear industry and power engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kova, A K

    2004-01-01

    The author analysed results of medical service in atomic industry and power engineering over 50 years. Those results are beneficial for management in occupational medicine for any new complicated and potentially dangerous technology and activity.

  18. The radiological protection in the nuclear medicine practice; La proteccion radiologica en la practica de medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado M, H., E-mail: hmaldonado@cnsns.gob.m [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan No. 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    The nuclear medicine practice dates of the 1950 years, in this work the achievements reached as regards radiological protection are shown, although even lack a lot to make, the doses for the occupationally exposed personnel have decreased with lapsing of the years, thanks to the perception of the nuclear physicians to improve the administration techniques of the radioactive material, the decrease of administered activity and the unit doses use among the most remarkable advances. The changes in the equipment s technology to quantify the activity to administer, detection systems and image formation have demanded the development of the new professionals of the nuclear medicine that allows give protection to the patient. This improvement needs to consolidate with the appropriate normative development, the involved personnel qualification and the methods and procedures actualization to improve the protection of the occupationally exposed personnel, the public, the environment and the patient. (Author)

  19. Evaluation of various energy windows at different radionuclides for scatter and attenuation correction in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Afrouz; Ashoor, Mansour; Sohrabpour, Mostafa; Shokrani, Parvaneh; Rezaei, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Improving signal to noise ratio (SNR) and qualified images by the various methods is very important for detecting the abnormalities at the body organs. Scatter and attenuation of photons by the organs lead to errors in radiopharmaceutical estimation as well as degradation of images. The choice of suitable energy window and the radionuclide have a key role in nuclear medicine which appearing the lowest scatter fraction as well as having a nearly constant linear attenuation coefficient as a function of phantom thickness. The energy windows of symmetrical window (SW), asymmetric window (ASW), high window (WH) and low window (WL) using Tc-99m and Sm-153 radionuclide with solid water slab phantom (RW3) and Teflon bone phantoms have been compared, and Matlab software and Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP4C) code were modified to simulate these methods and obtaining the amounts of FWHM and full width at tenth maximum (FWTM) using line spread functions (LSFs). The experimental data were obtained from the Orbiter Scintron gamma camera. Based on the results of the simulation as well as experimental work, the performance of WH and ASW display of the results, lowest scatter fraction as well as constant linear attenuation coefficient as a function of phantom thickness. WH and ASW were optimal windows in nuclear medicine imaging for Tc-99m in RW3 phantom and Sm-153 in Teflon bone phantom. Attenuation correction was done for WH and ASW optimal windows and for these radionuclides using filtered back projection algorithm. Results of simulation and experimental show that very good agreement between the set of experimental with simulation as well as theoretical values with simulation data were obtained which was nominally less than 7.07 % for Tc-99m and less than 8.00 % for Sm-153. Corrected counts were not affected by the thickness of scattering material. The Simulated results of Line Spread Function (LSF) for Sm-153 and Tc-99m in phantom based on four windows and TEW method were

  20. [Survey questionnaire of pediatric nuclear medicine examinations in 14 Japanese institutes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Kensuke; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Teisuke; Koizumi, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Under the auspices of the Japanese Society of Pediatric Nuclear Medicine, an annual aggregate from a 5-year period, 2007 to 2011, of a survey questionnaire of pediatric nuclear medicine examinations performed at 14 institutes in the Kanto region was conducted. The subjects were pediatric patients 15 years old or younger. The survey questions included the determination method for administered dose of radiopharmaceuticals, the items examined and number of examinations. Of 14 institutes, 11 determined administered doses using the formula: adult dose X (age +1) / (age+7), while the remaining 3 used the adult dose as the maximum dose and used a conversion formula based on age and physical condition. In 2011, in a total of 3,884 pediatric patients, renoscintigraphy accounted for 41.5%, brain 14.4%, pulmonary scintigraphy 12.9%, oncology 9.0%, hepatobiliary scintigraphy 6.3%, gastrointestinal scintigraphy 4.8%, musculoskeletal scintigraphy 4.3%, cardiology 2.5%, and other 4.9% of all nuclear medicine examinations. Pediatric nuclear medicine examinations in general hospitals accounted for only 3.4% of all examinations. A similar trend was observed in previous years. Since pediatric patients have a longer reproductive term and higher sensitivity to radiation exposure, pediatric nuclear medicine requires a strict selection of appropriate studies and administered dose. These results show the current practice and would warrant further consideration.

  1. Quality Assessment of Research Articles in Nuclear Medicine Using STARD and QUADAS-2 Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roysri, Krisana; Chotipanich, Chanisa; Laopaiboon, Vallop; Khiewyoo, Jiraporn

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic nuclear medicine is being increasingly employed in clinical practice with the advent of new technologies and radiopharmaceuticals. The report of the prevalence of a certain disease is important for assessing the quality of that article. Therefore, this study was performed to evaluate the quality of published nuclear medicine articles and determine the frequency of reporting the prevalence of studied diseases. We used Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) and Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) checklists for evaluating the quality of articles published in five nuclear medicine journals with the highest impact factors in 2012. The articles were retrieved from Scopus database and were selected and assessed independently by two nuclear medicine physicians. Decision concerning equivocal data was made by consensus between the reviewers. The average STARD score was approximately 17 points, and the highest score was 17.19±2.38 obtained by the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine. QUADAS-2 tool showed that all journals had low bias regarding study population. The Journal of Nuclear Medicine had the highest score in terms of index test, reference standard, and time interval. Lack of clarity regarding the index test, reference standard, and time interval was frequently observed in all journals including Clinical Nuclear Medicine, in which 64% of the studies were unclear regarding the index test. Journal of Nuclear Cardiology had the highest number of articles with appropriate reference standard (83.3%), though it had the lowest frequency of reporting disease prevalence (zero reports). All five journals had the same STARD score, while index test, reference standard, and time interval were very unclear according to QUADAS-2 tool. Unfortunately, data were too limited to determine which journal had the lowest risk of bias. In fact, it is the author's responsibility to provide details of research methodology so that the reader

  2. Quality Assessment of Research Articles in Nuclear Medicine Using STARD and QUADAS-2 Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisana Roysri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Diagnostic nuclear medicine is being increasingly employed in clinical practice with the advent of new technologies and radiopharmaceuticals. The report of the prevalence of a certain disease is important for assessing the quality of that article. Therefore, this study was performed to evaluate the quality of published nuclear medicine articles and determine the frequency of reporting the prevalence of studied diseases. Methods: We used Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD and Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2 checklists for evaluating the quality of articles published in five nuclear medicine journals with the highest impact factors in 2012. The articles were retrieved from Scopus database and were selected and assessed independently by two nuclear medicine physicians. Decision concerning equivocal data was made by consensus between the reviewers. Results: The average STARD score was approximately 17 points, and the highest score was 17.19±2.38 obtained by the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine. QUADAS-2 tool showed that all journals had low bias regarding study population. The Journal of Nuclear Medicine had the highest score in terms of index test, reference standard, and time interval. Lack of clarity regarding the index test, reference standard, and time interval was frequently observed in all journals including Clinical Nuclear Medicine, in which 64% of the studies were unclear regarding the index test. Journal of Nuclear Cardiology had the highest number of articles with appropriate reference standard (83.3%, though it had the lowest frequency of reporting disease prevalence (zero reports. All five journals had the same STARD score, while index test, reference standard, and time interval were very unclear according to QUADAS-2 tool. Unfortunately, data were too limited to determine which journal had the lowest risk of bias. In fact, it is the author’s responsibility to provide

  3. Radioactive waste management of the nuclear medicine services; Gestao de rejeitos radioativos em servicos de medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, Alex

    2009-07-01

    Radioisotope applications in nuclear medicine services, for diagnosis and therapy, generate radioactive wastes. The general characteristics and the amount of wastes that are generated in each facility are function of the number of patients treated, the procedures adopted, and the radioisotopes used. The management of these wastes embraces every technical and administrative activity necessary to handle the wastes, from the moment of their generation, till their final disposal, must be planned before the nuclear medicine facility is commissioned, and aims at assuring people safety and environmental protection. The regulatory framework was established in 1985, when the National Commission on Nuclear Energy issued the regulation CNEN-NE-6.05 'Radioactive waste management in radioactive facilities'. Although the objective of that regulation was to set up the rules for the operation of a radioactive waste management system, many requirements were broadly or vaguely defined making it difficult to ascertain compliance in specific facilities. The objective of the present dissertation is to describe the radioactive waste management system in a nuclear medicine facility and provide guidance on how to comply with regulatory requirements. (author)

  4. Production of gel {sup 99m}Tc generators for Nuclear Medicine at the Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, R.E

    1996-07-01

    The development and testing of the gel-type {sup 99m}Tc generator technology has been going on for several years at the Nuclear Power Institute of China. This generator type has already been licensed by the Ministry of Health. With the co-operation of the IAEA, under Model Project CPR/2/006,it is intended to upgrade and optimise the existing facility for large scale production and continue to improve the generator performance in terms of quality and reliability of its use in nuclear medicine. The expert mission objective was to carry out final laboratory tests to assess the performance of the gel- type {sup 99m}Tc, locally produced, as well as to assess the suitability of the corresponding {sup 99m}Tc eluate for nuclear medicine studies. In particular, the expert tested the suitability of the {sup 99m}Tc for the labelling of sensitive biomolecules and its general performance in a nuclear medicine service

  5. Nuclear medicine technology. Review questions for the board examinations. 4. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramer, Karen [Ochotnicky Partners s.r.o., Marianka (Slovakia); Mantel, Eleanor [Pennsylvania Univ., Hammonton, NJ (United States). Nuclear Medicine/Molecular Imaging; Reddin, Janet S.; Alavi, Abass [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Radiology/Nuclear Medicine; Cheng, Gang [Philadelphia VA Medical Center, PA (United States). Radiology

    2013-07-01

    The only comprehensive exam preparation guide on the market. Includes a mock registry exam. Provides expanded coverage of positron emission tomography and other new procedures and practices. This book prepares students and technologists for registry examinations in nuclear medicine technology by providing practice questions and answers with detailed explanations, as well as a mock registry exam. The questions are designed to test the basic knowledge required of nuclear medicine technologists, as well as the practical application of that knowledge. The topics covered closely follow the content specifications and the components of preparedness as published by the certification boards. This 4th edition includes expanded coverage of positron emission tomography and other new procedures and practices in the field of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging.

  6. Report: dosimetry of diagnostic exams in nuclear medicine; Rapport: dosimetrie des explorations diagnostiques en medecine nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touzery, C. [Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer de Bourgogne, Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, 21 - Dijon (France); Aubert, B. [Institut Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Caselles, O. [Centre Claudius-Regaud, 31 - Toulouse (France); Gardin, I. [Centre Henri Becquerel, 76 - Rouen (France); Guilhem, M.Th. [Centre Hospitalier Regional de la Source, 45 - Orleans (France); Laffont, S. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, 35 - Rennes (France); Lisbona, A. [Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes (France)

    2002-07-01

    A compilation about dosimetry of diagnosis explorations in nuclear medicine is presented in this issue. Dosimetry tables of the different radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine give indications on absorbed and efficient doses according the patients age from one year to adult age. The doses received by a fetus during a lung scintigraphy realized for the pregnant woman susceptible to suffer of pulmonary emboli is presented. A table of efficient doses for the infants until the age of six months for the principal scintigraphy explorations realized in nuclear medicine are given. A chapter of theoretical headlines is devoted to dosimetry and the calculations methods of absorbed and efficient doses in function of patients age. A short chapter concerns the recommendations to explore nursing mothers by scintigraphy. A last chapter treats the efficient doses received during explorations using ionizing radiations in radiology and their place in annual natural irradiation scale. (N.C.)

  7. Comparative study on storage and disposal of liquid waste in nuclear medicine diagnostic; Estudio comparativo sobre almacenamiento y eliminacion de residuos liquidos para diagnostico en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez Vazquez, R.; Sanchez Garcia, M.; Santamarina Vazquez, F.; Soto Bua, M.; Montoya Pastor, A.; Luna Vega, V.; Mosquera Suueiro, J.; Otero Martinez, C.; Lobato Busto, R.; Pombar Camean, M.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this paper presents a comparative study on the total activity of material discharge to public sewers and the activity concentration in the final point of discharge, for a typical installation of Nuclear Medicine, in the case of having no deposit or storage of liquid radioactive waste from diagnostic techniques, based on actual data from the Nuclear Medicine Department of our hospital.

  8. Assessment of radiation safety awareness among nuclear medicine nurses: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, N. A.; Abdullah, M. H. R. O.; Said, M. A.; Ch'ng, P. E.

    2014-11-01

    All nuclear medicine nurses need to have some knowledge and awareness on radiation safety. At present, there is no study to address this issue in Malaysia. The aims of this study were (1) to determine the level of knowledge and awareness on radiation safety among nuclear medicine nurses at Putrajaya Hospital in Malaysia and (2) to assess the effectiveness of a training program provided by the hospital to increase the knowledge and awareness of the nuclear medicine nurses. A total of 27 respondents attending a training program on radiation safety were asked to complete a questionnaire. The questionnaire consists 16 items and were categorized into two main areas, namely general radiation knowledge and radiation safety. Survey data were collected before and after the training and were analyzed using descriptive statistics and paired sample t-test. Respondents were scored out of a total of 16 marks with 8 marks for each area. The findings showed that the range of total scores obtained by the nuclear medicine nurses before and after the training were 6-14 (with a mean score of 11.19) and 13-16 marks (with a mean score of 14.85), respectively. Findings also revealed that the mean score for the area of general radiation knowledge (7.59) was higher than that of the radiation safety (7.26). Currently, the knowledge and awareness on radiation safety among the nuclear medicine nurses are at the moderate level. It is recommended that a national study be conducted to assess and increase the level of knowledge and awareness among all nuclear medicine nurses in Malaysia.

  9. Nuclear medicine in the acute clinical setting: indications, imaging findings, and potential pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uliel, Livnat; Mellnick, Vincent M; Menias, Christine O; Holz, Andrew L; McConathy, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging provides valuable functional information that complements information obtained with anatomic imaging techniques in the evaluation of patients with specific acute clinical manifestations. Nuclear medicine studies are most often used in conjunction with other imaging modalities and as a problem-solving tool. Under certain circumstances a nuclear medicine study may be indicated as the first-line imaging modality, as in the case of renal scintigraphy for transplant dysfunction in the early postoperative period. Nuclear imaging may be preferred when a conventional first-line study is contraindicated or when it is important to minimize radiation exposure. The portability of nuclear imaging offers particular advantages for the evaluation of critically ill patients whose clinical condition is unstable and who cannot be safely transported out of the intensive care unit. The ability to visualize physiologic and pathophysiologic processes over relatively long time periods without adding to the patient's radiation exposure contributes to the high diagnostic sensitivity of several types of nuclear medicine studies. Viewing the acquired images in the cine mode adds to the value of these studies for diagnosing and characterizing dynamic abnormalities such as intermittent internal bleeding and bile or urine leakage. In this pictorial review, the spectrum of nuclear medicine studies commonly performed in the acute care setting is reviewed according to body systems and organs, with detailed descriptions of the indications, technical considerations, findings, and potential pitfalls of each type of study. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.332125098/-/DC1.

  10. Nuclear medicine technology. Review questions for the board examinations. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramer, K. [CNMT, Marianka (Slovakia); Alavi, A. [Pennsylvania Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2005-07-01

    This book prepares students and technologists for registry examinations in nuclear medicine technology by providing practice questions and answers and a mock registry exam. The questions test both subject comprehension of material and practical applications. The topics covered closely follow the content specifications for the exam given by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologist and the components of preparedness published by the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board. Figure-related questions, similar to those on current registry examinations, are provided. Also included are up-to-date questions and answers regarding NRC regulations. (orig.)

  11. The Role of Nuclear Medicine in The Diagnosis and Management of Solitary Pulmonary Nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Shariati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available   Solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN is a frequent finding on the chest x-ray and computed tomography. Nuclear medicine techniques play an important role in the diagnosis and management of SPN. In the current review, we briefly will explain the different nuclear medicine modalities in this regard including positron emission tomography (PET using 18-F-FDG, and 11-C-Methionine, and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT using somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, 201-Thallium, and 99m-Tc-MIBI.  

  12. Economic issue in pediatric nuclear medicine: Cortical scanning of acute pyelonephritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandell, G. A. [Pont Hospital for Children, Wilmington (United States). Dept. of Medical Imaging

    1997-12-01

    Pediatric nuclear medicine must be innovative in finding ways of competing with other pediatric imagining subspecialties for the health care dollars. Newer radiopharmaceuticals and imagining methods that are time-effective in answering clinical problems and cost-effective in attracting the health care providers are ways of accomplishing this difficult task. Renal cortical scanning for the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis is presented as an example of an existing nuclear medicine study that is accurate and cost-effective, but has not yet taken a major place in the imaging `armamentarium`. In this discussion, the cortical scan is endorsed as the primary imaging tool for children presenting with acute urinary infection.

  13. Tracking patient radiation exposure: challenges to integrating nuclear medicine with other modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, Mathew; Rehani, Madan M.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The cumulative radiation exposure to the patient from multiple radiological procedures can place some individuals at significantly increased risk for stochastic effects and tissue reactions. Approaches, such as those in the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Smart Card program, have been developed to track cumulative radiation exposures to individuals. These strategies often rely on the availability of structured dose reports, typically found in the DICOM header. Dosimetry information is currently readily available for many individual x-ray based procedures. Nuclear medicine, of which nuclear cardiology constitutes the majority of the radiation burden in the U.S., currently lags behind x-ray based procedures with respect to reporting of radiation dosimetric information. This paper discusses qualitative differences between nuclear medicine and x-ray based procedures, including differences in the radiation source and measurement of its strength, the impact of biokinetics on dosimetry, and the capability of current scanners to record dosimetry information. These differences create challenges in applying monitoring and reporting strategies used in x-ray based procedures to nuclear medicine, and integrating dosimetry information across modalities. A concerted effort by the medical imaging community, dosimetry specialists and manufacturers of imaging equipment is required to develop strategies to improve the reporting of radiation dosimetry data in nuclear medicine. Some ideas on how to address this issue are suggested. PMID:22695788

  14. Nanoparticles in medicine: selected observations and experimental caveats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Sharon; Pearce, John A.; Giustini, Andrew; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-02-01

    Medically useful nanoparticles measure 1-100 nm in at least one dimension and are engineered and manufactured for specific diagnostic and treatment applications. Most nanoparticles used currently used in medicine are engineered and manufactured for specific purposes. Medically significant nanoparticles are composed of a 1) central core that is usually the medically active component, 2) one or more layers of organic or inorganic materials that forms a capsule (corona) covering the core and 3) an outer surface layer that interacts with the environment and/or targeted cells and tissues. Effective nanoparticle function in the living, intact animal or human requires electrochemical stability necessary to bypass the reticuloendothelial system (RES) and avoid filtration through the renal glomerulus into the urine. Nanoparticles are present in " natural" as well as the manufacturing and clinical environments thus could pose as significant toxins because of their small sizes, their chemical and drug content and potential effect of causing long term disease including allergies, chronic inflammation and cancer. Currently published studies have focused on the effects of nanoparticles on cells in the extremely artificial environments of cell cultures. More clinical and preclinical studies documenting the short term and long term effects nanoparticle in the intact experimental animal and human are needed.

  15. The IAEA technical cooperation programme and nuclear medicine in the developing world: objectives, trends, and contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas-Zamora, Juan Antonio; Kashyap, Ridhi

    2013-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's technical cooperation (TC) programme helps Member States in the developing world with limited infrastructure and human resource capacity to harness the potential of nuclear technologies in meeting socioeconomic development challenges. As a part of its human health TC initiatives, the Agency, through the TC mechanism, has the unique role of promoting nuclear medicine applications of fellowships, scientific visits, and training courses, via technology procurement, and in the past decade has contributed nearly $54 million through 180 projects in supporting technology procurement and human resource capacity development among Member States from the developing world (low- and middle-income countries). There has been a growing demand in nuclear medicine TC, particularly in Africa and ex-Soviet Union States where limited infrastructure presently exists, based on cancer and cardiovascular disease management projects. African Member States received the greatest allocation of TC funds in the past 10 years dedicated to building new or rehabilitating obsolete nuclear medicine infrastructure through procurement support of single-photon emission computed tomography machines. Agency support in Asia and Latin America has emphasized human resource capacity building, as Member States in these regions have already acquired positron emission tomography and hybrid modalities (positron emission tomography/computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography) in their health systems. The strengthening of national nuclear medicine capacities among Member States across different regions has enabled stronger regional cooperation among developing countries who through the Agency's support and within the framework of regional cooperative agreements are sharing expertise and fostering the sustainability and productive integration of nuclear medicine within their health systems.

  16. Comparison of the activity measurements in nuclear medicine services in the Brazilian northeast region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Farias Fragoso, Maria da Conceição; de Albuquerque, Antônio Morais; de Oliveira, Mércia L; de Lima, Fabiana Farias; Barreto, Flávio Chiappetta Paes; de Andrade Lima, Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    The Northeastern Regional Centre for Nuclear Sciences (CRCN-NE), National Nuclear Energy Commission, has organized for the first time in nuclear medicine services (NMSs) in the Brazilian northeast region a comparison of activity measurements for (99m)Tc, (131)I, (67)Ga, (201)Tl and (57)Co. This tool is widely utilized to evaluate not only the accuracy of radionuclide calibrators, but also the competence of NMSs to measure the activity of the radiopharmaceuticals and the performance of the personnel involved in these measurements. The comparison results showed that 90% of the results received from participants are within the ±10% limit established by the Brazilian Norm.

  17. Development of the Experimental Photo-Nuclear Reaction Database in Hokkaido University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinaga, A.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear databases are important tools to apply nuclear phenomena to various fields of nuclear engineering. It is now recognized that the databases must be further developed for photo-nuclear reaction data for nuclear security, safety and nonproliferation applications. Hokkaido University Nuclear Reaction Data Centre (JCPRG) has contributed to the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Library (EXFOR) which is developed by the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres under coordination by IAEA. We report here on the recent compilation of the nuclear data files for the photonuclear reaction.

  18. Proceedings of seventh symposium on sharing of computer programs and technology in nuclear medicine, computer assisted data processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, B.Y.; McClain, W.J.; Landay, M. (comps.)

    1977-01-01

    The Council on Computers (CC) of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) annually publishes the Proceedings of its Symposium on the Sharing of Computer Programs and Technology in Nuclear Medicine. This is the seventh such volume and has been organized by topic, with the exception of the invited papers and the discussion following them. An index arranged by author and by subject is included.

  19. Contamination, a Major Problem in Nuclear Medicine Imaging: How to Investigate, Handle, and Avoid It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narvesh; Verma, Shashwat; Singh, Rani Kunti R; Datta, Deepanksha; Kheruka, Subhash Chandra; Gambhir, Sanjay

    2017-09-01

    We present a case study in which artifacts from collimator contamination and patient motion were seen on a bone scan. Any identified artifact must be further investigated and documented so as to detect its source and thus prevent its future occurrence. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  20. Impact of waiting on the perception of service quality in nuclear medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Man, S; Vlerick, P; Gemmel, P; De Bondt, P; Matthys, D; Dierckx, RA

    2005-01-01

    Background This is the first study examining the link between waiting and various dimensions of perceived service quality in nuclear medicine. Methods We tested the impact of selected waiting experience variables on the evaluation of service quality, measured using the Servqual tool, of 406 patients

  1. Development of RadRob15, A Robot for Detecting Radioactive Contamination in Nuclear Medicine Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafe A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Accidental or intentional release of radioactive materials into the living or working environment may cause radioactive contamination. In nuclear medicine departments, radioactive contamination is usually due to radionuclides which emit high energy gamma photons and particles. These radionuclides have a broad range of energies and penetration capabilities. Rapid detection of radioactive contamination is very important for efficient removing of the contamination without spreading the radionuclides. A quick scan of the contaminated area helps health physicists locate the contaminated area and assess the level of activity. Studies performed in IR Iran shows that in some nuclear medicine departments, areas with relatively high levels of activity can be found. The highest contamination level was detected in corridors which are usually used by patients. To monitor radioactive contamination in nuclear medicine departments, RadRob15, a contamination detecting robot was developed in the Ionizing and Non-ionizing Radiation Protection Research Center (INIRPRC. The motor vehicle scanner and the gas radiation detector are the main components of this robot. The detection limit of this robot has enabled it to detect low levels of radioactive contamination. Our preliminary tests show that RadRob15 can be easily used in nuclear medicine departments as a device for quick surveys which identifies the presence or absence of radioactive contamination.

  2. Development of RadRob15, A Robot for Detecting Radioactive Contamination in Nuclear Medicine Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafe, A; Mortazavi, S M J; Joharnia, A; Safaeyan, Gh H

    2016-09-01

    Accidental or intentional release of radioactive materials into the living or working environment may cause radioactive contamination. In nuclear medicine departments, radioactive contamination is usually due to radionuclides which emit high energy gamma photons and particles. These radionuclides have a broad range of energies and penetration capabilities. Rapid detection of radioactive contamination is very important for efficient removing of the contamination without spreading the radionuclides. A quick scan of the contaminated area helps health physicists locate the contaminated area and assess the level of activity. Studies performed in IR Iran shows that in some nuclear medicine departments, areas with relatively high levels of activity can be found. The highest contamination level was detected in corridors which are usually used by patients. To monitor radioactive contamination in nuclear medicine departments, RadRob15, a contamination detecting robot was developed in the Ionizing and Non-ionizing Radiation Protection Research Center (INIRPRC). The motor vehicle scanner and the gas radiation detector are the main components of this robot. The detection limit of this robot has enabled it to detect low levels of radioactive contamination. Our preliminary tests show that RadRob15 can be easily used in nuclear medicine departments as a device for quick surveys which identifies the presence or absence of radioactive contamination.

  3. Radiation exposure and dosimetry in transplant patients due to Nuclear Medicine studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Maghraby, T. A. F. [Leiden Univ., Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology, Div. of Nuclear Medicine; Cairo Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Faculty of Medicine, Dept. of Oncology and Nuclear Medicine; Camps, J. A. J.; Geleyns, J.; Pauwels, E. K. J. [Leiden Univ., Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology, Div. of Nuclear Medicine

    2000-12-01

    Organ transplantation is now an accepted method of therapy for treating patients with end stage failure of kidneys, liver, heart or lung. Nuclear Medicine may provide functional data and semi-quantitative parameters. However, one serious factor that hampers the use of nuclear medicine procedures in transplant patients is the general clinical concern about radiation exposure to the patient. This lead the researcher to discuss the effective doses and radiation dosimetry associated with radionuclide procedures used in the management and follow-up of transplant patients. A simple way to place the risk associated with Nuclear Medicine studies in an appropriate context is to compare the dose with that received from more familiar source of exposure such as from a diagnostic X-ray procedure. The radiation dose for the different radiopharmaceuticals used to study transplant organ function ranges between 0.1 and 5.3 mSv which is comparable to X-ray procedures with the exception of {sup 201}Tl and {sup 111}In-antimyosin. Thus Nuclear Medicine studies do not bear a higher radiation risk than the often used X-ray studies in transplant patients.

  4. Nuclear medicine methods in the assessment of acupuncture effects: a short review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Deise Elisabete; Rebello, Bernardo Machado; Agostinho, Raquel Terra [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Lab. de Radiofarmacia Experimental; Academia Brasileira de Arte e Ciencia Oriental, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); E-mail: deise_desouza@yahoo.com.br; Silva Filho, Reginaldo de Carvalho [Escola Brasileira de Medicina Chinesa, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro Avancado de Pesquisas em Ciencias Orientais; Bastos, Sohaku R.C. [Academia Brasileira de Arte e Ciencia Oriental, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa Basica

    2007-09-15

    The mechanisms of acupuncture are poorly understood. In consequence, numerous investigators have conducted clinical trials to test the efficacy of acupuncture in various conditions. We have used PubMed database system to evaluate the number of publications in acupuncture and nuclear medicine procedures in the period from 1964 to 2007, using the keywords: 'nuclear medicine and acupuncture', 'SPECT and acupuncture, 'PET and acupuncture', 'scintigraphy and acupuncture, 'radionuclide and acupuncture', 'radiopharmaceutical and acupuncture', 'radioisotope and acupuncture' and {sup 99m}Tc and acupuncture'. Some papers published in English language were selected and a short review is presented The analysis of the number of publications shows that when a method is well accepted by the scientific community, as the methods used in nuclear medicine, the interest in the development of research increases. Moreover, important findings are presented when the nuclear medicine image is used to evaluate the effect of the acupuncture. (author)

  5. A survey of incidents in radiology and nuclear medicine in the West of Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C J

    2005-10-01

    Data on 606 incidents in radiology and nuclear medicine departments reported to a central health physics service have been analysed and causes reviewed. 85% of incidents in radiology departments and 37% in nuclear medicine were overexposures of patients. 80% of these resulted from human error or procedural failure, and of these 32% were mistakes by the referrer. Other incidents in nuclear medicine were contamination events (49%) and failure in management of radioactive materials (10%). Effective doses for patient overexposures covered a broad range with those for CT being 1 mSv and above, while those for other radiology examinations were mostly less than 2 mSv. Reporting of patient overexposure incidents in radiology has increased by four-fold in recent years. The average numbers reported during the last 3 years were 91 per year in radiology and 12 per year in nuclear medicine, for hospitals with a population base of 2.8 million. Incident investigations demonstrated the importance of robust procedures and defences to identify mistakes that could lead to incidents. The central incident reporting and investigation system has raised the awareness of staff about the type of mistakes which could lead to incidents and promoted the introduction of recommended actions to reduce these risks.

  6. Development of Career Opportunities for Technicians in the Nuclear Medicine Field. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Education Research Center, Cambridge, MA.

    This report describes a nationally coordinated program development project whose purpose was to catalyze the implementation of needed postsecondary educational programs in the field of nuclear medicine technology (NMT). The NMT project was carried out during the six year period 1968-74 in cooperation with more than 36 community/junior colleges and…

  7. Regulation and quality in nuclear medicine 2 october 1998; Reglementation et qualite en medecine nucleaire 2 octobre 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouchner, B. [Secretariat d' Etat a la Sante, 75 - Paris (France); Huriet, C. [Commission des Affaires Sociales du Senat, 75 - Paris (France); Le Deaut, J.Y. [Office Parlementaire d' Evaluation des Choix Scientifiques et Technologiques du Senat, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this meeting is to examine how the regulations are liable to decrease the patient taking charge. The problem of the public information and opinion in the nuclear medicine domain is also presented. The nineteen presentations are proposed in 2 sessions. The first one deals with the state of the art of the nuclear medicine in France (techniques and regulations). The second one deals with the environment of the nuclear medicine (irradiation limits, public opinion, doctors and medicine quality). (A.L.B.)

  8. Cyclotron Production of Radionuclides for Nuclear Medicine at Academic Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    The increase in use of radioisotopes for medical imaging has led to the development of new accelerator targetry and separation techniques for isotope production. For example, the development of longer-lived position emitting radionuclides has been explored to allow for nuclear imaging agents based on peptides, antibodies and nanoparticles. These isotopes (64Cu, 89Zr, 86Y) are typically produced via irradiation of solid targets on smaller cyclotrons (10-25 MeV) at academic or hospital based facilities. Recent research has further expanded the toolbox of PET tracers to include additional isotopes such as 52Mn, 55Co, 76Br and others. The smaller scale of these types of facilities can enable the straightforward involvement of students, thus adding to the next generation of nuclear science leaders. Research pertaining to development of robust and larger scale production technologies including solid target systems and remote systems for transport and purification of these isotopes has enabled both preclinical and clinical imaging research for many diseases. In particular, our group has focused on the use of radiolabeled antibodies for imaging of receptor expression in preclinical models and in a clinical trial of metastatic breast cancer patients.

  9. Nuclear medicine in the 1990s: a quantitative physiological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, R J

    1989-05-01

    This paper describes the potential advantages to medical diagnosis and treatment that might be obtained from the wider application of positron emission tomography as a clinical tool. Developments along the lines suggested here will require a radical change in thinking from both clinicians and the medically related scientific community in the UK and some enlightened and resourceful funding from a mixture of charitable, industrial and government sources. If these ideas are to be pursued successfully, then the work must start now on a much wider scale than is presently perceived in the UK, and close collaboration between physicists, engineers, chemists, biochemists, clinicians and industrialists is needed. Furthermore, it is imperative that the scientific developments now underway in silicon technology, parallel data processors, biochemical and pharmacological processes and even high-temperature superconductors be kept under close and constant review by those associated with the technological advancements of medicine, so that the value of such developments is rapidly transferred to applications to medicine. This must include closer relationships between academic medicine and science than is the general rule in the UK at present. In conclusion, the scenario presented here includes the installation of regional cyclotron facilities to provide a large number of institutions in the UK with positron-emitter labelled radiopharmaceuticals. Additionally, agents labelled with radionuclides from in-house generators and other already existing higher-energy cyclotrons will provide a versatile and valuable range of radiopharmaceuticals for the study of human disease. These developments must be supported by the manufacture of lower-cost positron camera systems, as suggested here, connected to high-data-rate parallel processors to provide images of body function and to determine the effects brought about by disease. These images may then be processed using algorithms based on kinetic

  10. Current global and Korean issues in radiation safety of nuclear medicine procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H C

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the management of patient doses in medical imaging has evolved as concern about radiation exposure has increased. Efforts and techniques to reduce radiation doses are focussed not only on the basis of patient safety, but also on the fundamentals of justification and optimisation in cooperation with international organisations such as the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the World Health Organization. The Image Gently campaign in children and Image Wisely campaign in adults to lower radiation doses have been initiated in the USA. The European Association of Nuclear Medicine paediatric dosage card, North American consensus guidelines, and Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative have recommended the activities of radiopharmaceuticals that should be administered in children. Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), developed predominantly in Europe, may be an important tool to manage patient doses. In Korea, overexposure to radiation, even from the use of medical imaging, has become a public issue, particularly since the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. As a result, the Korean Nuclear Safety and Security Commission revised the technical standards for radiation safety management in medical fields. In parallel, DRLs for nuclear medicine procedures have been collected on a nationwide scale. Notice of total effective dose from positron emission tomography-computed tomography for cancer screening has been mandatory since mid-November 2014.

  11. Evaluation of radiation shielding rate of lead aprons in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Hyun; Han, Beom Heui; Lee, Sang Ho [Dept. of Radiological Science, Seonam University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Dong Heui [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gi Jin [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Konyang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Considering that the X-ray apron used in the department of radiology is also used in the department of nuclear medicine, the study aimed to analyze the shielding rate of the apron according to types of radioisotopes, thus γ ray energy, to investigate the protective effects. The radioisotopes used in the experiment were the top 5 nuclides in usage statistics {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F, {sup 131}I, {sup 123}I, and {sup 201}Tl, and the aprons were lead equivalent 0.35 mmPb aprons currently under use in the department of nuclear medicine. As a result of experiments, average shielding rates of aprons were {sup 99m}Tc 31.59%, {sup 201}Tl 68.42%, and {sup 123}I 76.63%. When using an apron, the shielding rate of {sup 13}'1I actually resulted in average dose rate increase of 33.72%, and {sup 18}F showed an average shielding rate of –0.315%, showing there was almost no shielding effect. As a result, the radioisotopes with higher shielding rate of apron was in the descending order of {sup 123}I, {sup 201}Tl, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F, {sup 131}I. Currently, aprons used in the nuclear medicine laboratory are general X-ray aprons, and it is thought that it is not appropriate for nuclear medicine environment that utilizes γ rays. Therefore, development of nuclear medicine exclusive aprons suitable for the characteristics of radioisotopes is required in consideration of effective radiation protection and work efficiency of radiation workers.

  12. Building and Querying RDF/OWL Database of Semantically Annotated Nuclear Medicine Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Haejun; Koh, Geon; Willrett, Debra; Rubin, Daniel L

    2017-02-01

    As the use of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has increased rapidly, there is a need to retrieve relevant medical images that can assist image interpretation. However, the images themselves lack the explicit information needed for query. We constructed a semantically structured database of nuclear medicine images using the Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) format and evaluated the ability the AIM annotations to improve image search. We created AIM annotation templates specific to the nuclear medicine domain and used them to annotate 100 nuclear medicine PET-CT studies in AIM format using controlled vocabulary. We evaluated image retrieval from 20 specific clinical queries. As the gold standard, two nuclear medicine physicians manually retrieved the relevant images from the image database using free text search of radiology reports for the same queries. We compared query results with the manually retrieved results obtained by the physicians. The query performance indicated a 98 % recall for simple queries and a 89 % recall for complex queries. In total, the queries provided 95 % (75 of 79 images) recall, 100 % precision, and an F1 score of 0.97 for the 20 clinical queries. Three of the four images missed by the queries required reasoning for successful retrieval. Nuclear medicine images augmented using semantic annotations in AIM enabled high recall and precision for simple queries, helping physicians to retrieve the relevant images. Further study using a larger data set and the implementation of an inference engine may improve query results for more complex queries.

  13. Lanthanides in Nuclear Medicine. The Production of Terbium-149 by Heavy Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, S N; Zaitseva, N G; Maslov, O D; Molokanova, L G; Starodub, G Ya; Shishkin, S V; Shishkina, T V

    2001-01-01

    Among radioactive isotopes of lanthanide series elements, finding the increasing using in nuclear medicine, alpha-emitter {149}Tb (T_{1/2} = 4.118 h; EC 76.2 %; beta^+ 7.1 %; alpha 16.7 %) is considered as a perspective radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy. The aim of the present work is to study experimental conditions of the {149}Tb production in reactions Nd({12}C, xn){149}Dy (4.23 min; beta^+, EC)\\to {149}Tb when the Nd targets have been irradiated by heavy ions of carbon. On the basis of results of formation and decay of {149}Dy\\to{149}Tb evaluation of the {149}Tb activity, is made which can be received under optimum conditions (enriched {142}Nd target, {12}C ions with the energy 120 MeV and up to current 100 mu A, time of irradiating 8-10 hours). Under these conditions {149}Tb can be obtained up to 30 GBq (up to 0.8 Ci).

  14. Observation Leads to Improved Operations in Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Religioso, Deo G

    2016-01-01

    The concept of observation--going out and seeing what is happening in daily operations---would seem like a normal management activity, but the reality in practice of the philosophy and technique is often underutilized. Once an observation has been determined, the next steps are to test and validate any discoveries on paper. For process change to be implemented, numerical data is needed to back-up observations in order to be heard and taken seriously by the executive team. Boca Raton Regional Hospital saw an opportunity to improve the process for radiopharmaceutical standing orders within its nuclear imaging department. As a result of this observation, the facility realized improved savings and an increase in employee motivation.

  15. Nuclear medicine in urological cancers: what is new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Cristina; Zanoni, Lucia; Fanti, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    The diffusion of PET/computed tomography has opened up a new role for nuclear imaging in urological oncology. Prostate cancer is evaluated with choline ((11)C or (18)F) PET due to a lack of sensitivity of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). However, many new tracers, such as (18)F-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid and (68)Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen, are under investigation, offering promising results in the particular setting of radically treated patients with biochemical relapse. The performance of (18)F-FDG depends on the histological type; indeed, renal cell cancer may present variable metabolic uptake. In this field, mainly antibodies labeled with positron emitters are under clinical evaluation. Finally, (18)F-FDG PET/computed tomography has been proven to show good accuracy in detecting metastatic testicular and bladder cancers, despite not having valid results in detecting local disease. The urological cancer diagnostic process is currently under continuous development.

  16. Rationale for the combination of nuclear medicine with magnetic resonance for pre-clinical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J; Kapusta, Maciej; Li, Junqiang; Patt, Bradley E

    2006-08-01

    Multi-modality combinations of SPECT/CT and PET/CT have proven to be highly successful in the clinic and small animal SPECT/CT and PET/CT are becoming the norm in the research and drug development setting. However, the use of ionizing radiation from a high-resolution CT scanner is undesirable in any setting and particularly in small animal imaging (SAI), in laboratory experiments where it can result in radiation doses of sufficient magnitude that the experimental results can be influenced by the organism's response to radiation. The alternative use of magnetic resonance (MR) would offer a high-resolution, non-ionizing method for anatomical imaging of laboratory animals. MR brings considerably more than its 3D anatomical capability, especially regarding the imaging of laboratory animals. Dynamic MR imaging techniques can facilitate studies of perfusion, oxygenation, and diffusion amongst others. Further, MR spectroscopy can provide images that can be related to the concentration of endogenous molecules in vivo. MR imaging of injected contrast agents extends MR into the domain of molecular imaging. In combination with nuclear medicine (NM) SPECT and PET modalities in small animal imaging, MR would facilitate studies of dynamic processes such as biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. However, the detectors for nearly all PET and SPECT systems are still based on vacuum tube technology, namely: photomultiplier tubes (PMT's) in which the signal is generated by transporting electrons over a substantial distance within an evacuated glass tube, making them inoperable in even small magnetic fields. Thus the combination of SPECT or PET with MR has not been practical until the recent availability of semiconductor detectors such as silicon avalanche photodiodes (APD's) for PET and CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for SPECT coupled with the availability of high-density low noise ASIC electronics to read out the semiconductor detectors. The strong advantage of these

  17. Nuclear Medicine Therapy : Current Status and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Sharma

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available Radioisotope therapy began in 1942 with the use of /sup 131/I for Graves disease and /sup 32/P for polycythemia vera. Local therapy with radioisotopes includes radiocolloids for malignant pleural and peritoneal effusions, intra-articular radiocolloids for chronic synovitis, intra-arterial radioactive microsphere for liver metastases, and intralymphatic administration for malignancies of the lymphatic system. The most widely practised use of radioisotopes for therapy is for the management of hyperthyroidism by /sup 131/I. Each school has developed its own treatment schedule for controlling the disease without producing too unacceptable an incidence of late hypothyroidism. /sup 131/I is also being used effectively for thyroid cancer, particularly at the Radiation Medicine Centre, BARC. There is hope that a new generation of radiolabelled compounds is round the corner for therapy. As in the case of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis, the shift has been from simple inorganic compounds to tailored organic ones. Radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies aimed against specific tumour antigens have already shown great promise. Another area of interest is the use of minute lipid spheroids (vesicles enclosing the radioactive drug which can be targeted to the tumour.

  18. What can be expected from nuclear medicine tomorrow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet, Jacques; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Chatal, Jean-François

    2008-08-01

    Imaging can take advantage of developments in "omics" approaches and go from routine individual biomarkers to multiple-scale biomarker profiles. Imaging structural, functional, metabolic, cellular, and molecular changes will be made possible by multimodality hybrid techniques, such as positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging should predict treatment response, look at stratification for specific treatment modalities, and look at the "omic" characterization of an individual patient or a specific tumor. This should lead to the development of "personalized" medicine. In cancer radiotherapy, patient responses should be accurately predicted. In specific cases, proton and hadrontherapy will be further enhanced by the irradiation dose delivered to the tumors. For disseminated or metastatic disease, targeted radionuclide therapy is an effective addition to the arsenal against cancer. The clinical efficacy of radiolabeled antibodies has been clearly demonstrated in lymphoma as well as that of radiolabeled peptides derived from somatostatin in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. Preliminary studies now show interesting results in solid tumors, too. Even if the number of objective clinical responses based on tumor shrinkage is small, targeted radionuclide therapy increases progression-free survival or overall survival in some specific cases where tumor burden is small. Avenues for further improvement are multiple and include combination with other therapeutic modalities, development of new approaches (e.g., small molecules, pretargeting, and antibody alternatives). Using alpha-emitting radionuclides is another possibility for specific diseases, such as leukemias, multiple myeloma, or brain tumor remnants.

  19. Control flow of radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine by means of an E-service; Control flujo de radiofarmacos en medicine nuclear por medio de un E-servicio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez Martin, L.; Gonzalez de Mingo, M. A.; Fragua Redondo, J. A.; Martinez Ortega, J.; Gutierrez Camunas, S.; Redondo Miguel, A. B.

    2013-07-01

    The almost generalized use of single-dose Nuclear Medicine for performing diagnostic tests or treatments, and the consequent complexity that accompanies its management, has resulted in the need to control the flow of material radioisotopic tools. An e-service is designed to manage the flow of radiopharmaceuticals and control its use and spending. This control does not only affect the efficiency in the use and cost of material, but in the radioactive waste associated with the non-use and waste reduction and a more effective organization of the Department. (Author)

  20. Standardization of administered activities in pediatric nuclear medicine: a report of the first nuclear medicine global initiative project, part 1-statement of the issue and a review of available resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Frederic H; Bom, Henry Hee-Seong; Chiti, Arturo; Choi, Yun Young; Huang, Gang; Lassmann, Michael; Laurin, Norman; Mut, Fernando; Nuñez-Miller, Rodolfo; O'Keeffe, Darin; Pradhan, Prasanta; Scott, Andrew M; Song, Shaoli; Soni, Nischal; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Vargas, Luis

    2015-04-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative (NMGI) was formed in 2012 and consists of 13 international organizations with direct involvement in nuclear medicine. The underlying objectives of the NMGI were to promote human health by advancing the field of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, encourage global collaboration in education, and harmonize procedure guidelines and other policies that ultimately lead to improvements in quality and safety in the field throughout the world. For its first project, the NMGI decided to consider the issues involved in the standardization of administered activities in pediatric nuclear medicine. This article presents part 1 of the final report of this initial project of the NMGI. It provides a review of the value of pediatric nuclear medicine, the current understanding of the carcinogenic risk of radiation as it pertains to the administration of radiopharmaceuticals in children, and the application of dosimetric models in children. A listing of pertinent educational and reference resources available in print and online is also provided. The forthcoming part 2 report will discuss current standards for administered activities in children and adolescents that have been developed by various organizations and an evaluation of the current practice of pediatric nuclear medicine specifically with regard to administered activities as determined by an international survey of nuclear medicine clinics and centers. Lastly, the part 2 report will recommend a path forward toward global standardization of the administration of radiopharmaceuticals in children.

  1. Nuclear Physics meets Medicine and Biology: Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    F. Ballarini, F; S. Bortolussi, S; P. Bruschi, P; A.M. Clerici, A M; A. De Bari, A; P. Dionigi, P; C. Ferrari, C; M.A. Gadan, M A; N. Protti, N; S. Stella, S; C. Zonta, C; A. Zonta, A; S. Altieri, S

    2010-01-01

    BNCT is a tumour treatment based on thermal-neutron irradiation of tissues enriched with 10B, which according to the 10B(n, )7Li reaction produces particles with high Linear Energy Transfer and short range. Since this treatment can deliver a therapeutic tumour dose sparing normal tissues, BNCT represents an alternative for diffuse tumours and metastases, which show poor response to surgery and photontherapy. In 2001 and 2003, in Pavia BNCT was applied to an isolated liver, which was infused with boron, explanted, irradiated and re-implanted. A new project was then initiated for lung tumours, developing a protocol for Boron concentration measurements and performing organ-dose Monte Carlo calculations; in parallel, radiobiology studies are ongoing to characterize the BNCT effects down to cellular level. After a brief introduction, herein we will present the main activities ongoing in Pavia including the radiobiological ones, which are under investigation not only experimentally but also theoretically, basing on...

  2. Radiation risk and nuclear medicine: An interview with a Nobel Prize winner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yalow, R.S.

    1995-12-01

    In a speech given years ago at the Veterans Administration Medical Center, Bronx, NY, Rosalyn S. Yalow, 1977 Nobel Prize recipient for her invention of radioimmunoassay, made several salient points on the perception of fear or hazards from exposure to low-level radiation and low-level radioactive wastes. For the past three years, Yalow has been concerned with the general fear of radiation. In this interview, Newsline solicited Yalow`s views on public perceptions on radiation risk and what the nuclear medicine community can do to emphasize the fact that, if properly managed, the use of isotopes in medicine and other cases is not dangerous.

  3. Metrological aspects in the estimate of the administered activity in nuclear medicine patients; Aspectos metrologicos na estimativa da atividade administrada em pacientes de medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzzarin, A.; Iwahara, A.; Tahuata, L., E-mail: anelise@bolsista.ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil), Lab. Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes; Xavier, A.M. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (ESPOA/CNEN-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Escritorio de Porto Alegre

    2014-07-01

    In order to investigate the performance quality of routine measurements of Nuclear Medicine Services (NMS), the National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation/Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (LNMRI/IRD) has been conducting, since 1998, a program of comparison for activity measurements of radiopharmaceuticals administered to patients in nuclear medicine. Correction factors are determined from the result of performance analysis in order to determine with better accuracy the activity to be administered to the patients. (author)

  4. Study of metrologic characteristics in activimeters used in Nuclear Medicine Centers in Colombia; Estudio de caracteristicas metrologicas en activimetros utilizados en centros de Medicina Nuclear de Colombia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila, Hernan Olaya; Flores, Guillermo, E-mail: holayadavila@gmail.com [Instituto Colombiano de Geologia y Mineria (INGEOMINAS), Bogota, D.C. (Colombia). Laboratorio de Metrologia de las Radiaciones del Servicio Geologico Colombiano; Cantillo, Juliana I.P., E-mail: julianacantillo5@gmail.com [Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Boyaca (Colombia)

    2013-07-01

    In our country currently there is a legislation that regulated de Nuclear Medicine practice, that establish the criteria about quality assurance in Nuclear Medicine and the justification to imparted to medical exposures. In this work includes some tests to the clinical approval in this type of instruments before to be used. The type of tests are linearity, geometric dependence and the energetic response and moreover to evaluate the total uncertainty during the work the physician using this equipment with radioactive sources. (author)

  5. Nuclear medicine methods in the assessment of acupuncture effects: a short review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deise Elisabete Souza

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of acupuncture are poorly understood. In consequence, numerous investigators have conducted clinical trials to test the efficacy of acupuncture in various conditions. We have used PubMed database system to evaluate the number of publications in acupuncture and nuclear medicine procedures in the period from 1964 to 2007, using the keywords: "nuclear medicine and acupuncture", "SPECT and acupuncture", "PET and acupuncture", "scintigraphy and acupuncture", "radionuclide and acupuncture", "radiopharmaceutical and acupuncture", "radioisotope and acupuncture" and "99mTc and acupuncture". Some papers published in English language were selected and a short review is presented The analysis of the number of publications shows that when a method is well accepted by the scientific community, as the methods used in nuclear medicine, the interest in the development of research increases. Moreover, important findings are presented when the nuclear medicine image is used to evaluate the effect of the acupuncture.Os mecanismos de ação da acupuntura ainda não são completamente esclarecidos. Em conseqüência, diversos pesquisadores têm conduzido testes clínicos para verificar a eficiência da acupuntura em condições diversas. Nós utilizamos o sistema de base de dados PubMed para avaliar o número de publicações em acupuntura e procedimentos em medicina nuclear no período de 1964 até 2007, usando as palavras-chaves: "medicina nuclear e acupuntura", "SPECT e acupuntura", "PET e acupuntura", "cintilografia e acupuntura", "radionuclídeo e acupuntura", "radiofármaco e acupuntura", "radioisótopo e acupuntura" e "99mTc e acupuntura". Alguns artigos publicados em inglês foram selecionados e uma pequena revisão é apresentada. A análise do número de publicações mostra que quando um método é bem aceito pela comunidade científica, como os métodos utilizados em medicina nuclear, o interesse em desenvolver novos estudos aumenta. Al

  6. Communication of radiation risk in nuclear medicine: Are we saying the right thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Manish; Vinjamuri, Sobhan

    2014-07-01

    The radiation risk arising from nuclear medicine investigations represents a small but manageable risk to patients and it needs to be effectively communicated to them. Frequently in the culture of "doctor knows best," patients trust their doctors to do whatever is right and appropriate and leave it to them to worry about any attendant risks associated with any tests involving the use of radiation. The benefit to the patient of having a speedier diagnosis and a further guide to management may not be effectively communicated in a comprehensive, timely and professional manner. In this article, we address the issue of communication of radiation risk and benefits to patients and the basis for such information. While there are different ways of communicating radiation risk, we recognize that certain basic parameters are absolutely essential for patients to enable them to make an informed choice about undergoing a nuclear medicine investigation under the direction of a well-trained and qualified individual.

  7. Optimizing bioimpedance measurement configuration for dual-gated nuclear medicine imaging: a sensitivity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivumäki, Tuomas; Vauhkonen, Marko; Kuikka, Jyrki T; Hakulinen, Mikko A

    2011-07-01

    Motion artefacts due to respiration and cardiac contractions may deteriorate the quality of nuclear medicine imaging leading to incorrect diagnosis and inadequate treatment. Motion artefacts can be minimized by simultaneous respiratory and cardiac gating, dual-gating. Currently, only cardiac gating is often performed. In this study, an optimized bioimpedance measurement configuration was determined for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac gating signal acquisition. The optimized configuration was located on anterolateral upper thorax based on sensitivity simulations utilizing a simplified thorax model. The validity of the optimized configuration was studied with six healthy volunteers. In the peak-to-peak and frequency content analyses the optimized configuration showed consistently higher peak-to-peak values and frequency content than other studied measurement configurations. This study indicates that the bioimpedance method has potential for the dual-gating in nuclear medicine imaging. The method would minimize the need of additional equipment, is easy for the technologists to use and comfortable for the patients.

  8. Some results of a simulated test for administration of activity in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oropesa, P. [Centro de Isotopos (CENTIS), San Jose de las Lajas, Habana (Cuba)]. E-mail: poropesa@centis.edu.cu; Hernandez, A.T. [Centro de Isotopos (CENTIS), San Jose de las Lajas, Habana (Cuba); Serra, R.A. [Centro de Isotopos (CENTIS), San Jose de las Lajas, Habana (Cuba); Varela, C. [Centro de Control Estatal de Equipos Medicos (CCEEM). Havana (Cuba); Woods, M.J. [Ionising Radiation Metrology Consultants Ltd, Teddington (United Kingdom)

    2006-04-15

    This paper describes the results obtained using a simulated test for administration of activity in nuclear medicine between 2002 and 2004. Measurements in the radionuclide calibrator are made during the different stages of the procedure. The test attempts to obtain supplementary information on the quality of the measurement, with the aim of evaluating in a more complete way the accuracy of the administered activity value compared with the prescribed one. The participants' performance has been assessed by means of a statistical analysis of the reported data. Dependences between several attributes of the simulated administration tests results are discussed. Specifically, the proportion of satisfactory results in the 2003-2004 period was found to be higher than in 2002. It reveals an improvement of the activity administration in the Cuban nuclear medicine departments since 2003.

  9. Therapeutic strategy of papillary microcarcinoma of the thyroid gland: a nuclear medicine perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, B; Schober, O

    2009-03-01

    According to the literature, the prevalence of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) is increasing. To date, PMTC account for up to 30% of all differentiated thyroid cancers. Patients with PTMC have an excellent prognosis with a normal life expectancy. Because of the differential definitions of the PTMC, the therapeutic approaches of the national Scien-tific Societies have not been standardized. The therapeutic algorithms have to be adjusted with regard to thyroid surgery, radioiodine ablation and thyrotropin-suppressive therapy as well as follow-up. Recently, the Therapy Committee of the European Society of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) has recommended a risk-adapted therapy and follow-up. Risk factors which require a more aggressive therapeutic approach are multifocality, thyroid capsule infiltration, evidence of locoregional or distant metastasis and unfavourable histology. It was the aim of this review to evaluate the current therapeutic concepts in patients with PTMC from a nuclear medicine perspective.

  10. Collective effective dose in Europe from X-ray and nuclear medicine procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bly, R; Jahnen, A; Järvinen, H; Olerud, H; Vassileva, J; Vogiatzi, S

    2015-07-01

    Population doses from radiodiagnostic (X-ray and nuclear medicine) procedures in Europe were estimated based on data collected from 36 European countries. For X-ray procedures in EU and EFTA countries (except Liechtenstein) the collective effective dose is 547,500 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 1.06 mSv per caput. For all European countries included in the survey the collective effective dose is 605,000 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 1.05 mSv per caput. For nuclear medicine procedures in EU countries and EFTA (except Liechtenstein) countries the collective effective dose is 30,700 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 0.06 mSv per caput. For all European countries included in the survey the collective effective dose is 31,100 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 0.05 mSv per caput.

  11. Effects of the variation of samples geometry on radionuclide calibrator response for radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, Antonio Morais de Sa; Fragoso, Maria Conceicao de Farias; Oliveira, Mercia L. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In the nuclear medicine practice, the accurate knowledge of the activity of radiopharmaceuticals which will be administered to the subjects is an important factor to ensure the success of diagnosis or therapy. The instrument used for this purpose is the radionuclide calibrator. The radiopharmaceuticals are usually contained on glass vials or syringes. However, the radionuclide calibrators response is sensitive to the measurement geometry. In addition, the calibration factors supplied by manufactures are valid only for single sample geometry. To minimize the uncertainty associated with the activity measurements, it is important to use the appropriate corrections factors for the each radionuclide in the specific geometry in which the measurement is to be made. The aims of this work were to evaluate the behavior of radionuclide calibrators varying the geometry of radioactive sources and to determine experimentally the correction factors for different volumes and containers types commonly used in nuclear medicine practice. The measurements were made in two ionization chambers of different manufacturers (Capintec and Biodex), using four radionuclides with different photon energies: {sup 18}F, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I and {sup 201}Tl. The results confirm the significant dependence of radionuclide calibrators reading on the sample geometry, showing the need of use correction factors in order to minimize the errors which affect the activity measurements. (author)

  12. The development and use of radionuclide generators in nuclear medicine -- recent advances and future perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1998-03-01

    Although the trend in radionuclide generator research has declined, radionuclide generator systems continue to play an important role in nuclear medicine. Technetium-99m obtained from the molybdenum-99/technetium-99m generator system is used in over 80% of all diagnostic clinical studies and there is increasing interest and use of therapeutic radioisotopes obtained from generator systems. This paper focuses on a discussion of the major current areas of radionuclide generator research, and the expected areas of future research and applications.

  13. Nuclear medicine in pediatric neurology and neurosurgery: epilepsy and brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shekhar; Biassoni, Lorenzo; Borgwardt, Lise

    2007-09-01

    In pediatric drug-resistant epilepsy, nuclear medicine can provide important additional information in the presurgical localization of the epileptogenic focus. The main modalities used are interictal (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and ictal regional cerebral perfusion study with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Nuclear medicine techniques have a sensitivity of approximately 85% to 90% in the localization of an epileptogenic focus in temporal lobe epilepsy; however, in this clinical setting, they are not always clinically indicated because other techniques (eg, icterictal and ictal electroencephalogram, video telemetry, magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) may be successful in the identification of the epileptogenic focus. Nuclear medicine is very useful when MRI is negative and/or when electroencephalogram and MRI are discordant. A good technique to identify the epileptogenic focus is especially needed in the setting of extra-temporal lobe epilepsy; however, in this context, identification of the epileptogenic focus is more difficult for all techniques and the sensitivity of the isotope techniques is only 50% to 60%. This review article discusses the clinical value of the different techniques in the clinical context; it also gives practical suggestions on how to acquire good ictal SPECT and interictal FDG-PET scans. Nuclear medicine in pediatric brain tumors can help in differentiating tumor recurrence from post-treatment sequelae, in assessing the response to treatment, in directing biopsy, and in planning therapy. Both PET and SPECT tracers can be used. In this review, we discuss the use of the different tracers available in this still very new, but promising, application of radioisotope techniques.

  14. Level of occupational exposure during daily work in a Nuclear Medicine Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarcke, Marcelo, E-mail: mschwarcke@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica e Matematica; Ferreira, Nadya [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Cardoso, Domingos [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Workers of the Nuclear Medicine Department have a very complex geometric exposition. The source of irradiation is not collimated and irradiated for all direction, the interaction with many structural tissue is inside the body before could be detected outside. The professional who works in a Nuclear Medicine Department is exposed to this condition and different energies. This work proposes a good approach to estimate the mensal dose level according to the dose rate during their daily routine. To measure the dose rate, a Babyline 81 ionization chamber was used, and the most frequent exams using {sup 99m}Tc were chosen. A previous study was conducted to determine the most frequent exams made in the Nuclear Medicine Department at the Central Army Hospital in Rio de Janeiro, and previous environment monitoring determine the places with higher exposure that could interfere in the measurement of this paper. The Renal scintigraphy with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) had an average dose rate of (2.50{+-}0.25) {mu}Sv/h; for the Renal scintigraphy with dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), it was of (1.20{+-}0.25) {mu}Sv/h; for Bone scintigraphy using two different protocols, it was (2.63{+-}0.30) {mu}Sv/h and (3.09{+-}0.30) {mu}Sv/h. Exposition during elution, dose preparing and clinical procedure was considered a critical moment in the daily routine of the employee. The dose rate obtained in this study demonstrated that the professional cannot exceed the public dose limit in one day of his work routine. Therefore, for the Radioprotection Department, this is a good approach to make a radioprotection plan in the Nuclear Medicine Department. (author)

  15. Swiss Society of Nuclear Medicine (SGNM/SSMN) 8th annual congress. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Program chart and compiled abstracts of the 8th annual congress of the Swiss Society of Nuclear Medicine (SGNM/SSMN). Session headers are: The role of imaging in primary prevention (screening); new technology, SPECT/CT; imaging in secondary prevention (patients at risk); oncology, new tracers; instrumentation/methodology; imaging in tertiary prevention (tumor staging); rTSH in managemnet of differentiated thyroid cancer moderation; cardiology, new perspectives; oncology, PET/CT. (uke)

  16. Delayed luminescence: an experimental protocol for Chinese herbal medicines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, M.; Wijk, R. van; Wijk, E. van; Wang, M.; Wietmarschen, H. van; Hankemeier, T.; Greef, J. van der

    2016-01-01

    In Chinese medicine, raw herbal materials are used in processed and unprocessed forms aiming to meet the different requirements of clinical practice. To assure the chemical quality and therapeutic properties of the herbs, fast and integrated systematic assays are required. So far, such assays have

  17. Delayed luminescence: an experimental protocol for Chinese herbal medicines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, M.; Wijk, R. van; Wijk, E. van; Wang, M.; Wietmarschen, H. van; Hankemeier, T.; Greef, J. van der

    2016-01-01

    In Chinese medicine, raw herbal materials are used in processed and unprocessed forms aiming to meet the different requirements of clinical practice. To assure the chemical quality and therapeutic properties of the herbs, fast and integrated systematic assays are required. So far, such assays have n

  18. The medical physicist in a nuclear medicine department; El fisico medico en un departamento de medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo Z, F.E.; Gomez A, E. [Instituto nacional de Cancerologia, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The diagnostic studies and therapeutic treatments carried out in a Nuclear Medicine department make use of radioactive material. For such a reason it becomes necessary to take a strict control in the reception, use and waste that are generated of the typical works inside the department. Also, work related with the quality control of the equipment dedicated to produce images and of those not image formers, need to carry out to guarantee its maximum performance; as well as quality of the diagnostic and of the therapy imparted in patients. Additionally its are needed to make originated works of the individual procedures to patient and of the acquisition of radioactive materials and removal of the waste or radioactive contaminations. Presently work the recommendations of the American College of Radiology (ACR), the European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics (EFOMP) and of the Mexican Official Standards relating to the functions that should be observed in a Nuclear Medicine Department are exposed. The ACR and the EFOMP, conclude in their recommendations that the medical physicist fulfills with the suitable profile and likewise they describe in detail the actions and functions that he should supervise, to carry out, to document and to inform. (Author)

  19. Implementation of Nuclear Medicine Methods for Assessment of Child Abuse and Neglec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eser Kaya

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Child abuse and neglect are detrimental to a child’s health, physical and psychosocial development and result from inappropriate behavior or inattention on the part of those responsible for the child’s care and protection. Child abuse/neglect is a serious public problem encompassing medical, ethical and legal aspects. Imaging methods play an important role in investigating and documenting child abuse and neglect. Radiological imaging methods have particular priority. X-rays of the whole skeletal system are obtained for evaluation of the bone structure. Computerized tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and ultrasonography (US are used for the detection of cranial and internal organ damage. Due to the rapid developments in technology, diagnostic methods using nuclear medicine have also been initiated for use in identifying abuse and neglect. Detection of abuse and neglect carries ethical, judicial and moral liabilities as well as a responsibility for accurate diagnosis and treatment. Implementation of diagnostic methods of nuclear medicine in determining child abuse and neglect might contribute significantly in resolving court cases by providing objective evidence in medicolegal cases for realization of fair trials and in facilitating substantial conclusions. It is hoped that nuclear medicine methods will be helpful in terms of providing objective evidence for the experts. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2010; 8: 30-5

  20. [Fetus radiation doses from nuclear medicine and radiology diagnostic procedures. Potential risks and radiation protection instructions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markou, Pavlos

    2007-01-01

    Although in pregnancy it is strongly recommended to avoid diagnostic nuclear medicine and radiology procedures, in cases of clinical necessity or when pregnancy is not known to the physician, these diagnostic procedures are to be applied. In such cases, counseling based on accurate information and comprehensive discussion about the risks of radiation exposure to the fetus should follow. In this article, estimations of the absorbed radiation doses due to nuclear medicine and radiology diagnostic procedures during the pregnancy and their possible risk effects to the fetus are examined and then discussed. Stochastic and detrimental effects are evaluated with respect to other risk factors and related to the fetus absorbed radiation dose and to the post-conception age. The possible termination of a pregnancy, due to radiation exposure is discussed. Special radiation protection instructions are given for radiation exposures in cases of possible, confirmed or unknown pregnancies. It is concluded that nuclear medicine and radiology diagnostic procedures, if not repeated during the pregnancy, are rarely an indication for the termination of pregnancy, because the dose received by the fetus is expected to be less than 100 mSv, which indicates the threshold dose for having deterministic effects. Therefore, the risk for the fetus due to these diagnostic procedures is low. However, stochastic effects are still possible but will be minimized if the radiation absorbed dose to the fetus is kept as low as possible.

  1. A new era for Nuclear Medicine neuroimaging in Spain: Where do we start from in Spain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa, M A; Camacho, V; Garrastachu, P; García-Solís, D; Gómez-Río, M; Rubí, S; Setoain, X; Arbizu, J

    To determine the status of neuroimaging studies of Nuclear Medicine in Spain during 2013 and first quarter of 2014, in order to define the activities of the neuroimaging group of the Spanish Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SEMNIM). A questionnaire of 14 questions was designed, divided into 3 parts: characteristics of the departments (equipment and professionals involved); type of scans and clinical indications; and evaluation methods. The questionnaire was sent to 166 Nuclear Medicine departments. A total of 54 departments distributed among all regions completed the questionnaire. Most departments performed between 300 and 800 neuroimaging examinations per year, representing more than 25 scans per month. The average pieces of equipment were three; half of the departments had a PET/CT scanner and SPECT/CT equipment. Scans performed more frequently were brain SPECT with (123)I-FP-CIT, followed by brain perfusion SPECT and PET with (18)F-FDG. The most frequent clinical indications were cognitive impairment followed by movement disorders. For evaluation of the images most sites used only visual assessment, and for the quantitative assessment the most used was quantification by region of interest. These results reflect the clinical activity of 2013 and first quarter of 2014. The main indications of the studies were cognitive impairment and movement disorders. Variability in the evaluation of the studies is among the challenges that will be faced in the coming years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  2. Application for internal dosimetry using biokinetic distribution of photons based on nuclear medicine images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal Neto, Viriato; Vieira, José Wilson; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a way to obtain estimates of dose in patients submitted to radiotherapy with basis on the analysis of regions of interest on nuclear medicine images. A software called DoRadIo (Dosimetria das Radiações Ionizantes [Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry]) was developed to receive information about source organs and target organs, generating graphical and numerical results. The nuclear medicine images utilized in the present study were obtained from catalogs provided by medical physicists. The simulations were performed with computational exposure models consisting of voxel phantoms coupled with the Monte Carlo EGSnrc code. The software was developed with the Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack and the project template Windows Presentation Foundation for C# programming language. With the mentioned tools, the authors obtained the file for optimization of Monte Carlo simulations using the EGSnrc; organization and compaction of dosimetry results with all radioactive sources; selection of regions of interest; evaluation of grayscale intensity in regions of interest; the file of weighted sources; and, finally, all the charts and numerical results. The user interface may be adapted for use in clinical nuclear medicine as a computer-aided tool to estimate the administered activity.

  3. [E-learning in nuclear medicine - a nationwide survey in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberg, L S; Nattland, A; Jonas, G; Beyer, T; Bockisch, A

    2010-01-01

    To assess available e-learning concepts and programmes for nuclear medicine at university hospitals in Germany. All (34) departments of nuclear medicine at German university hospitals were asked to participate in an anonymized online survey. Questions were categorized into four topics: 1.) clinic and education; 2.) on-site strategies for e-learning; 3.) available e-learning offers and 4.) free text comments on experiences and expectations. All input was reviewed descriptively; free text was analyzed analytically. The response rate was 56% (19/34). 13/19 responses indicated well-defined e-learning strategies, mainly to support frontal teaching courses. Future e-learning perspectives focus on clinical case studies with sufficient imaging materials. Only 7/19 university hospitals operate a centralized e-learning platform (e. g. Moodle). The acceptance of the available e-learning options by the students is considered relatively poor. Today e-learning concepts for nuclear medicine are available at selected university hospitals only. All responders wish to expand on e-learning but many report the lack of administrative support to do so. These data could be regarded as a basis for discussions of inter-university teaching scenarios.

  4. Extremity exposure in nuclear medicine: preliminary results of a European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sans Merce, M; Ruiz, N; Barth, I; Carnicer, A; Donadille, L; Ferrari, P; Fulop, M; Ginjaume, M; Gualdrini, G; Krim, S; Mariotti, F; Ortega, X; Rimpler, A; Vanhavere, F; Baechler, S

    2011-03-01

    The Work Package 4 of the ORAMED project, a collaborative project (2008-11) supported by the European Commission within its seventh Framework Programme, is concerned with the optimisation of the extremity dosimetry of medical staff in nuclear medicine. To evaluate the extremity doses and dose distributions across the hands of medical staff working in nuclear medicine departments, an extensive measurement programme has been started in 32 nuclear medicine departments in Europe. This was done using a standard protocol recording all relevant information for radiation exposure, i.e. radiation protection devices and tools. This study shows the preliminary results obtained for this measurement campaign. For diagnostic purposes, the two most-used radionuclides were considered: (99m)Tc and (18)F. For therapeutic treatments, Zevalin(®) and DOTATOC (both labelled with (90)Y) were chosen. Large variations of doses were observed across the hands depending on different parameters. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of the positioning of the extremity dosemeter for a correct estimate of the maximum skin doses.

  5. Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Beets, A.L.; Boll, R.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.

    1997-03-20

    In this report the authors describe the use of an effective method for concentration of the rhenium-188 bolus and the results of the first Phase 1 clinical studies for bone pain palliation with rhenium-188 obtained from the tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator. Initial studies with therapeutic levels of Re-188-HEDP at the Clinic for Nuclear Medicine at the University of Bonn, Germany, have demonstrated the expected good metastatic uptake of Re-188-HEDP in four patients who presented with skeletal metastases from disseminated prostatic cancer with good pain palliation and minimal marrow suppression. In addition, skeletal metastatic targeting of tracer doses of Re-188(V)-DMSA has been evaluated in several patients with metastases from prostatic cancer at the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Canterbury and Kent Hospital in Canterbury, England. In this report the authors also describe further studies with the E-(R,R)-IQNP ligand developed in the ORNL Nuclear Medicine Program as a potential imaging agent for detection of changes which may occur in the cerebral muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) in Alzheimer`s and other diseases.

  6. Application for internal dosimetry using biokinetic distribution of photons based on nuclear medicine images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal Neto, Viriato, E-mail: viriatoleal@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: this article presents a way to obtain estimates of dose in patients submitted to radiotherapy with basis on the analysis of regions of interest on nuclear medicine images. Materials and methods: a software called DoRadIo (Dosimetria das Radiacoes Ionizantes [Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry]) was developed to receive information about source organs and target organs, generating graphical and numerical results. The nuclear medicine images utilized in the present study were obtained from catalogs provided by medical physicists. The simulations were performed with computational exposure models consisting of voxel phantoms coupled with the Monte Carlo EGSnrc code. The software was developed with the Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack and the project template Windows Presentation Foundation for C ⧣ programming language. Results: with the mentioned tools, the authors obtained the file for optimization of Monte Carlo simulations using the EGSnrc; organization and compaction of dosimetry results with all radioactive sources; selection of regions of interest; evaluation of grayscale intensity in regions of interest; the file of weighted sources; and, finally, all the charts and numerical results. Conclusion: the user interface may be adapted for use in clinical nuclear medicine as a computer-aided tool to estimate the administered activity. (author)

  7. A Poisson resampling method for simulating reduced counts in nuclear medicine images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Duncan; Lawson, Richard S

    2015-05-07

    Nuclear medicine computers now commonly offer resolution recovery and other software techniques which have been developed to improve image quality for images with low counts. These techniques potentially mean that these images can give equivalent clinical information to a full-count image. Reducing the number of counts in nuclear medicine images has the benefits of either allowing reduced activity to be administered or reducing acquisition times. However, because acquisition and processing parameters vary, each user should ideally evaluate the use of images with reduced counts within their own department, and this is best done by simulating reduced-count images from the original data. Reducing the counts in an image by division and rounding off to the nearest integer value, even if additional Poisson noise is added, is inadequate because it gives incorrect counting statistics. This technical note describes how, by applying Poisson resampling to the original raw data, simulated reduced-count images can be obtained while maintaining appropriate counting statistics. The authors have developed manufacturer independent software that can retrospectively generate simulated data with reduced counts from any acquired nuclear medicine image.

  8. Use of radiopharmaceuticals in diagnostic nuclear medicine in the United States: 1960-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Brill, Aaron B; Callahan, Ronald J; Clanton, Jeffrey A; DePietro, Allegra; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Greenspan, Bennett S; Gross, Milton D; Hays, Marguerite T; Moore, Stephen C; Ponto, James A; Shreeve, Walton W; Melo, Dunstana R; Linet, Martha S; Simon, Steven L

    2015-05-01

    To reconstruct reliable nuclear medicine-related occupational radiation doses or doses received as patients from radiopharmaceuticals over the last five decades, the authors assessed which radiopharmaceuticals were used in different time periods, their relative frequency of use, and typical values of the administered activity. This paper presents data on the changing patterns of clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals and documents the range of activity administered to adult patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in the U.S. between 1960 and 2010. Data are presented for 15 diagnostic imaging procedures that include thyroid scan and thyroid uptake; brain scan; brain blood flow; lung perfusion and ventilation; bone, liver, hepatobiliary, bone marrow, pancreas, and kidney scans; cardiac imaging procedures; tumor localization studies; localization of gastrointestinal bleeding; and non-imaging studies of blood volume and iron metabolism. Data on the relative use of radiopharmaceuticals were collected using key informant interviews and comprehensive literature reviews of typical administered activities of these diagnostic nuclear medicine studies. Responses of key informants on relative use of radiopharmaceuticals are in agreement with published literature. Results of this study will be used for retrospective reconstruction of occupational and personal medical radiation doses from diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals to members of the U.S. radiologic technologists' cohort and in reconstructing radiation doses from occupational or patient radiation exposures to other U.S. workers or patient populations.

  9. Assessment of OEP health's risk in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Manzano, C.; Melendrez, R.; Castaneda, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.; Pedroza-Montero, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico and Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados CIMAV, A.C. Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Centro de Diagnostico Integral del Noroeste, Luis Donaldo Colosio 23 83000 Centro Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    The use of ionizing radiation has been increased in recent years within medical applications. Nuclear Medicine Department offers both treatment and diagnosis of diseases using radioisotopes to controlled doses. Despite the great benefits to the patient, there is an inherent risk to workers which remains in contact with radiation sources for long periods. These personnel must be monitored to avoid deterministic effects. In this work, we retrospectively evaluated occupationally exposed personnel (OEP) to ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine during the last five years. We assessed both area and personal dosimetry of this department in a known Clinic in Sonora. Our results show an annual equivalent dose average of 4.49 {+-} 0.70 mSv in OEP without showing alarming changes in clinical parameters analyzed. These results allow us to conclude that health of OEP in nuclear medicine of this clinic has not been at risk during the evaluated period. However, we may suggest the use of individual profiles based on specific radiosensitivity markers.

  10. Nuclear medicine procedures to diagnose renal disorders; Nuklearmedizinische Diagnostik der Niere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bares, R.; Mueller-Schauenburg, W. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2000-10-01

    Background. Renal studies have a long tradition in nuclear medicine and are available for routine use for more than 30 years. Their high clinical acceptance is mainly based up-on the fact that they allow for quantitative evaluation of different functional parameters such as glomerular filtration, effective renal plasma flow, or postrenal transport. The used methods are validated by experimental as well as numerous clinical studies and are performed throughout the world in a highly standardized way. Indications. Indications are verification/exclusion of a disturbed renal function, detection or evaluation of renal artery stenosis, and differential diagnosis of urinary tract obstruction. Further diagnostic improvement might be achieved by use of positron emission tomography which has the potential for absolute quantification of physiological parameters such as renal blood flow in ml x min{sup -1} x 100 g{sup -1} tissue. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund. Untersuchungen der Nieren zaehlen zu den aeltesten und am besten etablierten diagnostischen Anwendungen der Nuklearmedizin. Begruendet ist dies durch die Verfuegbarkeit nierenspezifischer Radiopharmaka, die eine Quantifizierung physiologischer Funktionsparameter (glomerulaere Filtrationsrate, effektiver renaler Plasmafluss) und luminaler Transportvorgaenge (Harnabfluss zur Blase) zulassen. Die hierzu eingesetzten Methoden sind in Jahrzehnten klinischer Anwendung validiert und stehen weltweit in standardisierter Form zur Verfuegung. Indikationen. Als wichtigste Indikationen sind derzeit der Nachweis/Ausschluss von Nierenschaedigungen, die Differenzierung postrenaler Harnabflussstoerungen und die funktionelle Bewertung von Nierenarterienstenosen anzusehen. Aktuelle Entwicklungen unter Einbeziehung der Positronenemissionstomographie deuten eine weitere Verbesserung der Quantifizierungsmoeglichkeiten an (z.B. renaler Blutfluss in ml x min{sup -1} x 100 g{sup -1}), die vorerst allerdings wissenschaftlichen Fragestellungen

  11. SUS in nuclear medicine in Brazil: analysis and comparison of data provided by Datasus and CNEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzo, Lorena; Coura Filho, George; Osso Júnior, João Alberto; Squair, Peterson Lima

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the outpatient access to nuclear medicine procedures by means of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS), analyzing the correspondence between data provided by this system and those from Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN) (National Commission of Nuclear Energy). Data provided by Datasus regarding number of scintillation chambers, outpatient procedures performed from 2008 to 2012, administrative responsibility for such procedures, type of service providers and outsourced services were retrieved and evaluated. Also, such data were compared with those from institutions certified by CNEN. The present study demonstrated that the system still lacks maturity in terms of correct data input, particularly regarding equipment available. It was possible to list the most common procedures and check the growth of the specialty along the study period. Private centers are responsible for most of the procedures covered and reimbursed by SUS. However, many healthcare facilities are not certified by CNEN. Datasus provides relevant data for analysis as done in the present study, although some issues still require attention. The present study has quantitatively depicted the Brazilian reality regarding access to nuclear medicine procedures offered by/for SUS.

  12. Experimental facility for testing nuclear instruments for planetary landing missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Dmitry; Mitrofanov, Igor; Litvak, Maxim; Kozyrev, Alexander; Sanin, Anton; Vostrukhin, Andrey

    2017-04-01

    The experimental facility for testing and calibration of nuclear planetology instruments has been built in the frame of JINR and Space Research Institute (Moscow) cooperation. The Martian soil model from silicate glass with dimensions 3.82 x 3.21 m and total weight near 30 tons has been assembled in the facility. The glass material was chosen for imitation of dry Martian regolith. The heterogeneous model has been proposed and developed to achieve the most possible similarity with Martian soil in part of the average elemental composition by adding layers of necessary materials, such as iron, aluminum, and chlorine. The presence of subsurface water ice is simulated by adding layers of polyethylene at different depths inside glass model assembly. Neutron generator was used as a neutron source to induce characteristic gamma rays for testing active neutron and gamma spectrometers to define elements composition of the model. The instrumentation was able to detect gamma lines attributed to H, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Cl, K, Ca and Fe. The identified elements compose up to 95 wt % of total mass of the planetary soil model. This results will be used for designing scientific instruments to performing experiments of active neutron and gamma ray spectroscopy on the surface of the planets during Russian and international missions Luna-Glob, Luna-Resource and ExoMars-2020.

  13. Energetic electron processes fluorescence effects for structured nanoparticles X-ray analysis and nuclear medicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taborda, A.; Desbrée, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, BP-17, 31, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Carvalho, A. [IEQUALTECS, Lda, Rua Dr. Francisco Sá Carneiro, 36, 2500-065 S. Gregório CLD (Portugal); Chaves, P.C. [C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km 139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Reis, M.A., E-mail: mareis@ctn.tecnico.ulisboa.pt [IEQUALTECS, Lda, Rua Dr. Francisco Sá Carneiro, 36, 2500-065 S. Gregório CLD (Portugal); C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km 139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2016-08-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are widely used as contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and can be modified for improved imaging or to become tissue-specific or even protein-specific. The knowledge of their detailed elemental composition characterisation and potential use in nuclear medicine applications, is, therefore, an important issue. X-ray fluorescence techniques such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), can be used for elemental characterisation even in problematic situations where very little sample volume is available. Still, the fluorescence coefficient of Fe is such that, during the decay of the inner-shell ionised atomic structure, keV Auger electrons are produced in excess to X-rays. Since cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons, for low atomic number atoms, are of the order of 10{sup 3} barn, care should be taken to account for possible fluorescence effects caused by Auger electrons, which may lead to the wrong quantification of elements having atomic number lower than the atomic number of Fe. Furthermore, the same electron processes will occur in iron oxide nanoparticles containing {sup 57}Co, which may be used for nuclear medicine therapy purposes. In the present work, simple approximation algorithms are proposed for the quantitative description of radiative and non-radiative processes associated with Auger electrons cascades. The effects on analytical processes and nuclear medicine applications are quantified for the case of iron oxide nanoparticles, by calculating both electron fluorescence emissions and energy deposition on cell tissues where the nanoparticles may be embedded.

  14. Energetic electron processes fluorescence effects for structured nanoparticles X-ray analysis and nuclear medicine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborda, A.; Desbrée, A.; Carvalho, A.; Chaves, P. C.; Reis, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are widely used as contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and can be modified for improved imaging or to become tissue-specific or even protein-specific. The knowledge of their detailed elemental composition characterisation and potential use in nuclear medicine applications, is, therefore, an important issue. X-ray fluorescence techniques such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), can be used for elemental characterisation even in problematic situations where very little sample volume is available. Still, the fluorescence coefficient of Fe is such that, during the decay of the inner-shell ionised atomic structure, keV Auger electrons are produced in excess to X-rays. Since cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons, for low atomic number atoms, are of the order of 103 barn, care should be taken to account for possible fluorescence effects caused by Auger electrons, which may lead to the wrong quantification of elements having atomic number lower than the atomic number of Fe. Furthermore, the same electron processes will occur in iron oxide nanoparticles containing 57Co, which may be used for nuclear medicine therapy purposes. In the present work, simple approximation algorithms are proposed for the quantitative description of radiative and non-radiative processes associated with Auger electrons cascades. The effects on analytical processes and nuclear medicine applications are quantified for the case of iron oxide nanoparticles, by calculating both electron fluorescence emissions and energy deposition on cell tissues where the nanoparticles may be embedded.

  15. Ensuring safe and quality medication use in nuclear medicine: a collaborative team achieves compliance with medication management standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Trent A; Griffith, Karen; Dam, Hung Q; Manzone, Timothy A

    2012-03-01

    As hospital nuclear medicine departments were established in the 1960s and 1970s, each department developed detailed policies and procedures to meet the specialized and specific handling requirements of radiopharmaceuticals. In many health systems, radiopharmaceuticals are still unique as the only drugs not under the control of the health system pharmacy; however, the clear trend--and now an accreditation requirement--is to merge radiopharmaceutical management with the overall health system medication management system. Accomplishing this can be a challenge for both nuclear medicine and pharmacy because each lacks knowledge of the specifics and needs of the other field. In this paper we will first describe medication management standards, what they cover, and how they are enforced. We will describe how we created a nuclear medicine and pharmacy team to achieve compliance, and we will present the results of their work. We will examine several specific issues raised by incorporating radiopharmaceuticals in the medication management process and describe how our team addressed those issues. Finally, we will look at how the medication management process helps ensure ongoing quality and safety to patients through multiple periodic reviews. The reader will gain an understanding of medication management standards and how they apply to nuclear medicine, learn how a nuclear medicine and pharmacy team can effectively merge nuclear medicine and pharmacy processes, and gain the ability to achieve compliance at the reader's own institution.

  16. Identifying Understudied Nuclear Reactions by Text-mining the EXFOR Experimental Nuclear Reaction Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirdt, J. A.; Brown, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    The EXFOR library contains the largest collection of experimental nuclear reaction data available as well as the data's bibliographic information and experimental details. We text-mined the REACTION and MONITOR fields of the ENTRYs in the EXFOR library in order to identify understudied reactions and quantities. Using the results of the text-mining, we created an undirected graph from the EXFOR datasets with each graph node representing a single reaction and quantity and graph links representing the various types of connections between these reactions and quantities. This graph is an abstract representation of the connections in EXFOR, similar to graphs of social networks, authorship networks, etc. We use various graph theoretical tools to identify important yet understudied reactions and quantities in EXFOR. Although we identified a few cross sections relevant for shielding applications and isotope production, mostly we identified charged particle fluence monitor cross sections. As a side effect of this work, we learn that our abstract graph is typical of other real-world graphs.

  17. Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeflinski, Z.; Kirejczyk, M.; Popkiewicz, M. [eds.

    1998-08-01

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Institute of Experimental Physics (Warsaw University) in year 1997 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure, Experimental Methods and Instrumentation and the third one contain the lists of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ``Preface`` written by NDP director prof. K. Siwek-Wilczynska

  18. Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University Annual Report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeflinski, Z.; Popkiewicz, M. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Institute of Experimental Physics (Warsaw University) in year 1996 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction mechanisms and nuclear structure; Experimental methods and instrumentation and the third part contains the list of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ``Preface`` by NPD director prof. Ch. Droste.

  19. Nuclear Physics Division - Inst. of Experimental Physics - Warsaw University - Annual Report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirejczyk, M.; Szeflinski, Z. [eds.

    1999-08-01

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Warsaw University Institute of Experimental Physics in year of 1998 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure, Experimental Methods and Instrumentation and the third one contains the lists of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and list of published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ``Preface`` written by NDP director prof. K. Siwek-Wilczynska

  20. Survey of the use of nuclear medicine in New Zealand in 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, V.G.; Laban, J.A. [National Radiation Laboratory, Christchurch, (New Zealand)

    1997-09-01

    Full text: The National Radiation Laboratory (NRL) has surveyed the use of radioactive materials in medicine each decade since 1966. The purpose of this is to monitor trends and estimate the radiation dose to the population from this modality. Each of the nuclear medicine facilities in New Zealand was surveyed. The data provided consisted of total numbers of each type of procedure has increased by nearly 10 per cent in 10 years. Bone scans have nearly doubled in frequency, and form just under half of all diagnostic procedures, compared to 30 per cent in 1983. There has been an eightfold increase in the number of cardiac studies. Renal and lung studies are up, but liver tests and brain scans are down.The 1983 survey noted that the activities administered in New Zealand were high compared to those in other countries. Since then, a reasonable international consensus has formed over `reference doses` for each standard procedure. There are incorporated in the NRL Code of Safe Practice and compliance is good. While in some countries there is a considerably greater frequency of nuclear medicine procedures, this survey indicates that overall practice in New Zealand is similar to many industrialized countries.

  1. Experimental observables on nuclear liquid gas phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Y G

    2006-01-01

    Progress on nuclear liquid gas phase transition (LGPT) or critical behavior has been simply reviewed and some signals of LGPT in heavy ion collisions, especially in NIMROD data, are focused. These signals include the power-law charge distribution, the largest fluctuation of the fragment observables, the nuclear Zipf law, caloric curve and critical exponent analysis etc.

  2. Physical aspects of quality assurance in nuclear medicine and radiotherapy, regulatory approach of the National Nuclear Safety Center; Aspectos fisicos de garantia de calidad en medicina nuclear y radioterapia. Enfoque regulatorio del centro Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez C, D.; Fuente P, A. de la; Quevedo G, J.R.; Lopez F, Y. [CNSN, Calle 28 No. 504 e/5 y 7, Ave. Miramar, La Habana (Cuba); Varela C, C. [CCEEM, Calle 4 No. 455 e/19 y 21, Ave. Vedado, La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: cruz@orasen.co.cu

    2006-07-01

    The physical aspects of the quality guarantee in Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy its are of cardinal importance to guarantee the quality of the diagnoses and treatments that are carried out to the patients in this type of services. The OIEA, the OMS and other scientific and professional organizations have contributed significantly to the elaboration of recommendations, Protocols, etc. applicable in the quality control programs and safety of the Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy departments. In spite of the great effort developed in this sense the Installation of the programs of quality control and safety of the Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy departments can fail if the same ones are not based in three decisive elements that are: the existence of national regulations, the existence of the infrastructure required for it and the existence of enough qualified personnel to develop this programs. The present work shows the regulatory focus that on this topic, it has followed the National Center of Nuclear Safety of Cuba (CNSN). The same left of strengthen all the existent Synergies in the different organizations of the country and it went in two fundamental directions: installation of the regulatory requirements that govern this activity and the Authorization of a Cuban Entity, specialized in carrying out audits to the quality control and safety programs of the Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy departments. After 4 work years in this direction, the results confirm the validity of the experience developed by the CNSN, at the moment all the services of Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy of Cuba possess quality control and safety programs, these programs are annually Auditing by an Authorized entity by the CNSN and the Inspectors of the Regulatory Authority, control, during the inspections, the one execution of the established requirements in the national regulations. The work developed so far can serve, modestly, of reference to others countries of Latin America that

  3. Influence of quark energy loss on extracting nuclear sea quark distribution from nuclear Drell-Yan experimental data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Chun-Gui; LIU Na

    2009-01-01

    By means of two typical kinds of quark energy loss parametrization and the nuclear parton distribu-tions determined only with lepton-nuclear deep inelastic scattering experimental data, a leading order analysis is performed on the proton-induced Drell-Yau differential cross section ratios of tungsten versus deuterium as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and target nuclei. It is found that the theoretical results with quark energy loss are in good agreement with the experimental data. The quark energy loss effect produces approximately 3% to 11% suppression on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios RW/D in the range 0.05 ≤ x2≤ 0.3. The application of nuclear Drell-Yan data with heavy targets is remarkably subject to difficulty in the constraint of the nuclear sea quark distribution.

  4. PREFACE: International Conference on Image Optimisation in Nuclear Medicine (OptiNM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofides, Stelios; Parpottas, Yiannis

    2011-09-01

    Conference logo The International Conference on Image Optimisation in Nuclear Medicine was held at the Atlantica Aeneas Resort in Ayia Napa, Cyprus between 23-26 March 2011. It was organised in the framework of the research project "Optimising Diagnostic Value in SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging" (YΓΕΙΑ/ΔYΓΕΙΑ/0308/11), funded by the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation and the European Regional Development Fund, to present the highlights of the project, discuss the progress and results, and define future related goals. The aim of this International Conference was to concentrate on image optimization approaches in Nuclear Medicine. Experts in the field of nuclear medicine presented their latest research results, exchanged experiences and set future goals for image optimisation while balancing patient dose and diagnostic value. The conference was jointly organized by the Frederick Research Centre in Cyprus, the Department of Medical and Public Health Services of the Cyprus Ministry of Health, the Biomedical Research Foundation in Cyprus and the AGH University of Science and Technology in Poland. It was supported by the Cyprus Association of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, and the Cyprus Society of Nuclear Medicine. The conference was held under the auspices of the European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. The conference scientific programme covered several important topics such as functional imaging; image optimization; quantification for diagnosis; justification; simulations; patient dosimetry, staff exposures and radiation risks; quality assurance and clinical audit; education, training and radiation protection culture; hybrid systems and image registration; and new and competing technologies. The programme consisted of 13 invited and keynote presentations as well as workshops, round table discussions and a number of scientific sessions. A total of 51 speakers presented their

  5. Nuclear medicine. Basic knowledge and clinical applications. 7. rev. and enl. ed.; Nuklearmedizin. Basiswissen und klinische Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicha, Harald [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany). Medizinisches Versorgungszentrum II; Schober, Otmar [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-11-01

    The book on basic knowledge and clinical applications of nuclear medicine covers the following issues: The first general part: principles of nuclear medicine; physical fundamentals; radiopharmaceutical chemistry; measuring techniques: gamma detectors, gamma spectrometry, gamma camera, SPECT, PET, PET/CT, PET/NMR, image processing and communication; nuclear medical examinations: metabolic and pharmacological kinetics, scintigraphic methods, criteria for the use; quality assurance; dosimetry and radiation protection, radiation risks and patients exposure, benefit-risk considerations. The second part covers endocrine organs, carcinomas, skeleton and bone joints, inflammations, lymph system, cardiovascular system, lungs, central nervous system, kidneys and urinary system, gastrointestinal tract, other scintigraphic examinations.

  6. Radiation dose produced by patients during radiopharmaceutical incorporation in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán, V; Prieto, E; García-García, B; Barbés, B; Ribelles, M J; Richter, J Á; Martí-Climent, J M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the dose received by members of the public due to close contact with patients undergoing nuclear medicine procedures during radiopharmaceutical incorporation, and comparing it with the emitted radiation dose when the test was complete, in order to establish recommendations. A prospective study was conducted on 194 patients. H*(10) dose rates were measured at 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0m after the radiopharmaceutical administration, before the image acquisition, and at the end of the nuclear medicine procedure. Effective dose for different close contact scenarios were calculated, according to 95th percentile value (bone scans) and the maximum value (remaining tests). During the radiopharmaceutical incorporation, a person who stays with another injected patient in the same waiting room may receive up to 0.59 mSv. If the patient had a medical appointment, or went to a restaurant or a coffee shop, members of the public could receive 23, 43, and 22 μSv, respectively. After finishing the procedure, these doses are reduced by a factor 3. In most of the studies, the use of private instead of public transport may reduce the dose by more than a factor 6. It is recommended to increase the distance between the patients during the radiopharmaceutical incorporation and to distribute them according to the diagnostic procedure. Patients should be encouraged to use private instead of public transport. Depending on the number of nuclear medicine outpatients per year attended by a physician, it could be necessary to apply restrictions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  7. The Mexican Nuclear Medicine Society and the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards; La Sociedad Mexicana de Medicina Nuclear y la Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado M, H.I. [CNSNS, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    This presentation contains an analysis of the work make by the medical and radiological personnel and its recommendations inside the nuclear medicine installations as well as the appropriate safety measures for the patients and its families protection as well as the environment. (Author)

  8. Safety assessment of nuclear medicine practice using the Risk Matrix Method; Evaluaciones de seguridad de la practica de medicina nuclear utilizando el metodo de Matrices de Riesgo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Dumenigo; Cruz, Yoanis; Soler, Karen, E-mail: cruz@orasen.co.cu [Centro Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear (CNSN), La Habana (Cuba); Guerrero, Mayka, E-mail: mayka@infomed.sld.cu [Centro de investigaciones Medico Quirurgicas (CIMEQ), La Habana (Cuba)

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents the main results from the application of the methodology of Risk Matrices in a hypothetical service / department of the Nuclear medicine that realize metabolic radiotherapy treatment and diagnostic studies with {sup 131}I and {sup 99} m Tc and {sup 18}F. We could identify major equipment failures and human errors that could potentially lead to a accident in practice. For each analyzed initiating events evaluated the frequency of occurrence, identified key existing defenses to avoid the accident and assessed the potential consequences of an accident if this comes to fruition. With this methodology we could identify which accident sequences increased risk and to propose means to reduce the risk in such cases. As a result of this work was developed the 'RMA Nuclear Medicine' computer tools that will apply this methodology in nuclear medicine services that need to do similar risk assessments.

  9. Calibration and intercomparison methods of dose calibrators used in nuclear medicine facilities; Metodos de calibracao e de intercomparacao de calibradores de dose utilizados em servicos de medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Alessandro Martins da

    1999-07-01

    Dose calibrators are used in most of the nuclear medicine facilities to determine the amount of radioactivity administered to a patient in a particular investigation or therapeutic procedure. It is therefore of vital importance that the equipment used presents good performance and is regular;y calibrated at a authorized laboratory. This occurs of adequate quality assurance procedures are carried out. Such quality control tests should be performed daily, other biannually or yearly, testing, for example, its accuracy and precision, the reproducibility and response linearity. In this work a commercial dose calibrator was calibrated with solution of radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. Simple instrument tests, such as response linearity and the response variation of the source volume increase at a constant source activity concentration, were performed. This instrument can now be used as a working standard for calibration of other dose calibrators/ An intercomparison procedure was proposed as a method of quality control of dose calibrators used in nuclear medicine facilities. (author)

  10. Improving patient access in nuclear medicine: a case study of PET scanner scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, Yariv N; Kemp, Bradley J; Huschka, Todd R; Ruter, Royce L; McConnell, Daniel M; Rohleder, Thomas R

    2013-01-01

    We used the systems engineering technique of discrete event simulation modeling to assist in increasing patient access to positron emission tomographic examinations in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at Mayo Clinic, Rochester. The model was used to determine the best universal slot length to address the specific access challenges of a destination medical center such as Mayo Clinic. On the basis of the modeling, a new schedule was implemented in April 2012 and our before and after data analysis shows an increase of 2.4 scans per day. This was achieved without requiring additional resources or negatively affecting patient waiting, staff satisfaction (as evaluated by day length), or examination quality.

  11. New Help from cellular medicine to surgery; Nuevas ayudas de la medicina nuclear a la cirugia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreras Delgado, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    New Nuclear Medicine techniques to help the surgeon in the operation room are now being introduced. They aim to get a better location of the objective or a shorter duration of the surgical process. The selective radio guided biopsy of the sentinel node included in the clinical practise guidelines for the surgery of tumours as breast cancer and malignant melanoma is the paradigm of this new techniques. Other techniques are intraoperatory detection with probes or portable gamma cameras of tumour lesions as parathyroid adenomas, metastatic neuroendocrine tumours and other tumours. (Author) 16 refs.

  12. Gap analysis survey: an aid in transitioning to standardized curricula for nuclear medicine technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bires, Angela Macci; Mason, Donna L; Gilmore, David; Pietrzyk, Carly

    2012-09-01

    This article discusses the process by which the Society of Nuclear Medicine Technology Section (SNMTS) is assisting educators as they transition to comply with the fourth edition of the Curriculum Guide for Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology. An electronic survey was sent to a list of nuclear medicine technology programs compiled by the educational division of the SNMTS. The collected data included committee member demographics, goals and objectives, conference call minutes, consultation discussions, transition examples, 4- and 2-y program curricula, and certificate program curricula. There were 56 responses to the survey. All respondents were program directors, with 3 respondents having more than one type of program, for a total of 59 programs. Of these, 19 (33.93%) were baccalaureate, 19 (28.57%) associate, and 21 (37.5%) certificate. Forty-eight respondents (85.71%) had accreditation through the Joint Review Commission on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology, 6 (10.71%) had regional accreditation, and 2 (3.57%) were accredited through other entities. Thirteen categories of required general education courses were identified, and the existing program curricula of 9 (69.2%) courses were more than 50% compliant with the fourth edition Curriculum Guide. The fact that no measurable gap could be found within the didactic professional content across programs was due to the lack of a degree requirement and content standardization within the profession. The data indicated that the participating programs offer a minimum of 1-15 contact hours in emerging technology modalities. The required clinical hours ranged from 765 to 1,920 for degree or certificate completion. The average number of clinical hours required for all programs was 1,331.69. Standardization of the number and types of courses is needed both for current baccalaureate programs and for clinical education. This standardization will guide programs in transitioning from a

  13. The Hotelling Trace Criterion Used for System Optimization and Feature Enhancement in Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiete, Robert Dean

    The Hotelling trace criterion (HTC) is a measure of class separability used in pattern recognition to find a set of linear features that optimally separate two classes of objects. In this dissertation we use the HTC not as a figure of merit for features, but as a figure of merit for characterizing imaging systems and designing filters for feature enhancement in nuclear medicine. If the HTC is to be used to optimize systems, then it must correlate with human observer performance. In our first study, a set of images, created by overlapping ellipses, was used to simulate images of livers. Two classes were created, livers with and without tumors, with noise and blur added to each image to simulate nine different imaging systems. Using the ROC parameter d_ {rm a} as our measure, we found that the HTC has a correlation of 0.988 with the ability of humans to separate these two classes of objects. A second study was performed to demonstrate the use of the HTC for system optimization in a realistic task. For this study we used a mathematical model of normal and diseased livers and of the imaging system to generate a realistic set of liver images from nuclear medicine. A method of adaptive, nonlinear filtering which enhances the features that separate two sets of images has also been developed. The method uses the HTC to find the optimal linear feature operator for the Fourier moduli of the images, and uses this operator as a filter so that the features that separate the two classes of objects are enhanced. We demonstrate the use of this filtering method to enhance texture features in simulated liver images from nuclear medicine, after using a training set of images to obtain the filter. We also demonstrate how this method of filtering can be used to reconstruct an object from a single photon-starved image of it, when the object contains a repetitive feature. When power spectrums for real liver scans from nuclear medicine are calculated, we find that the three

  14. Importance of the nutritional status for the interpretation of nuclear medicine examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Egberto Gaspar de [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Ciencias Fisiologicas; E-mail: egmoura@uerj.br; Passos, Magna Cottini Fonseca [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Nutricao. Dept. de Nutricao Aplicada

    2002-09-01

    Malnutrition is very prevalent in the Third World, but still in developing countries and is found in certain communities in developed countries. Several laboratories examinations are affected by malnutrition. Recently, gestational or neonatal malnutrition were considered to contribute to the development of chronic diseases in adulthood, this phenomena was named programming or metabolic imprinting. Similar consideration were suggested for Nuclear Medicine examinations. Here we review the literature bout this aspect and present our own data showing changes in biodistribution of a radiopharmaceutical compound in different animal models of adult malnutrition or cause by maternal malnutrition programming. (author)

  15. Highlights of the 6th world congress of nuclear medicine and biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ell, P.J. [Inst. of Nuclear Medicine, University Coll. London Medical School, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-02-01

    The article summarizes the most interesting medical aspects of the 6th World Congress of Nuclear Medicine and Biology, addressing recent developments in the fields of scintiscanning, SPET and PET, oncology, neurology, psychiatry, in the diagnostic evaluation of the cardiovascular system, and new radiopharmaceuticals. (VHE) [Deutsch] Der Artikel gibt einen Ueberblick ueber medizinische Aspekte des 6. Weltkongresses der Nuklearmedizin und -biologie. Aktuelle Entwicklungen bei Szintigraphie, SPET und PET in Onkologie, Neurologie, Psychiatrie, Herz und Kreislauf sowie weitere neue Entwicklungen bei Radiopharmazeutika werden referiert. (VHE)

  16. Detection of thoracic infections by nuclear medicine techniques in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, E.L.; Sanger, J.J. (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The challenge of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) for nuclear medicine has been the early detection of related intrathoracic opportunistic infections, inflammatory conditions, and neoplasms. Gallium-67 citrate scanning has proved a sensitive test not only for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia but for many of the other opportunistic infections and malignancies, including mycobacterial infections and lymphoma. Patterns and intensity of gallium uptake may suggest more specific diagnoses. Indium-111-labeled white blood cells may also be a valuable diagnostic tool in the AIDS patient.41 references.

  17. CdTe and CdZnTe detectors in nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Scheiber, C

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear medicine diagnostic applications are growing in search for more disease specific or more physiologically relevant imaging. The data are obtained non-invasively from large field gamma cameras or from miniaturised probes. As far as single photon emitters are concerned, often labelled with sup 9 sup 9 sup m Tc (140 keV, gamma), nuclear instrumentation deals with poor counting statistics due to the method of spatial localisation and low contrast to noise due to scatter in the body. Since the 1960s attempts have been made to replace the NaI scintillator by semiconductor detectors with better spectrometric characteristics to improve contrast and quantitative measurements. They allow direct conversion of energy and thus more compact sensors. Room-temperature semiconductor detectors such as cadmium tellure and cadmium zinc tellure have favourable physical characteristics for medical applications which have been investigated in the 1980s. During one decade, they have been used in miniaturised probes such as fo...

  18. Review of nuclear data improvement needs for nuclear radiation measurement techniques used at the CEA experimental reactor facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destouches, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The constant improvement of the neutron and gamma calculation codes used in experimental nuclear reactors goes hand in hand with that of the associated nuclear data libraries. The validation of these calculation schemes always requires the confrontation with integral experiments performed in experimental reactors to be completed. Nuclear data of interest, straight as cross sections, or elaborated ones such as reactivity, are always derived from a reaction rate measurement which is the only measurable parameter in a nuclear sensor. So, in order to derive physical parameters from the electric signal of the sensor, one needs specific nuclear data libraries. This paper presents successively the main features of the measurement techniques used in the CEA experimental reactor facilities for the on-line and offline neutron/gamma flux characterizations: reactor dosimetry, neutron flux measurements with miniature fission chambers and Self Power Neutron Detector (SPND) and gamma flux measurements with chamber ionization and TLD. For each technique, the nuclear data necessary for their interpretation will be presented, the main identified needs for improvement identified and an analysis of their impact on the quality of the measurement. Finally, a synthesis of the study will be done.

  19. Review of nuclear data improvement needs for nuclear radiation measurement techniques used at the CEA experimental reactor facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Destouches Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant improvement of the neutron and gamma calculation codes used in experimental nuclear reactors goes hand in hand with that of the associated nuclear data libraries. The validation of these calculation schemes always requires the confrontation with integral experiments performed in experimental reactors to be completed. Nuclear data of interest, straight as cross sections, or elaborated ones such as reactivity, are always derived from a reaction rate measurement which is the only measurable parameter in a nuclear sensor. So, in order to derive physical parameters from the electric signal of the sensor, one needs specific nuclear data libraries. This paper presents successively the main features of the measurement techniques used in the CEA experimental reactor facilities for the on-line and offline neutron/gamma flux characterizations: reactor dosimetry, neutron flux measurements with miniature fission chambers and Self Power Neutron Detector (SPND and gamma flux measurements with chamber ionization and TLD. For each technique, the nuclear data necessary for their interpretation will be presented, the main identified needs for improvement identified and an analysis of their impact on the quality of the measurement. Finally, a synthesis of the study will be done.

  20. Comprehensive Auditing in Nuclear Medicine Through the International Atomic Energy Agency Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Program. Part 2: Analysis of Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Torres, Leonel; Marengo, Mario; Massardo, Teresa; Mishani, Eyal; Van Zyl Ellmann, Annare; Solanki, Kishor; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Lobato, Enrique Estrada; Miller, Rodolfo Nunez; Ordonez, Felix Barajas; Paez, Diana; Pascual, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has developed a program, named Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM), to help its Member States to check the status of their nuclear medicine practices and their adherence to international reference standards, covering all aspects of nuclear medicine, including quality assurance/quality control of instrumentation, radiopharmacy (further subdivided into levels 1, 2, and 3, according to complexity of work), radiation safety, clinical applications, as well as managerial aspects. The QUANUM program is based on both internal and external audits and, with specifically developed Excel spreadsheets, it helps assess the level of conformance (LoC) to those previously defined quality standards. According to their level of implementation, the level of conformance to requested standards; 0 (absent) up to 4 (full conformance). Items scored 0, 1, and 2 are considered non-conformance; items scored 3 and 4 are considered conformance. To assess results of the audit missions performed worldwide over the last 8 years, a retrospective analysis has been run on reports from a total of 42 audit missions in 39 centers, three of which had been re-audited. The analysis of all audit reports has shown an overall LoC of 73.9 ± 8.3% (mean ± standard deviation), ranging between 56.6% and 87.9%. The highest LoC has been found in the area of clinical services (83.7% for imaging and 87.9% for therapy), whereas the lowest levels have been found for Radiopharmacy Level 2 (56.6%); Computer Systems and Data Handling (66.6%); and Evaluation of the Quality Management System (67.6%). Prioritization of non-conformances produced a total of 1687 recommendations in the final audit report. Depending on the impact on safety and daily clinical activities, they were further classified as critical (requiring immediate action; n = 276; 16% of the total); major (requiring action in relatively short time, typically from 3 to 6 months; n = 604

  1. [Presence of Nuclear Medicine in the Spanish journals of Internal Medicine and other specialties (2000-2009)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Ferreras, A; Sabaté-Díaz, J; Espigares-Jiménez, M

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to provide a quantitative and qualitative description of the publications on Nuclear Medicine (NM) in journals from other disciplines, between 2000 and 2009. A retrospective descriptive study was carried out including the years 2000-2009 in three internal medicine journals (IM) and in three related specialty journals (RS). The criteria used are that some of the authors were located professionally in a Service, Unit or Central MN and/or that the title of the article or at least its content made a reference to some specific aspect of NM. Date of publication, the magazine section, thematic, data of the authors, province and referral hospital were collected. A total of 186 articles were found, 81 in IM journals and 105 in RS. The IM journal articles came from 43 different hospitals. Vall d'Hebron (Barcelona, Spain) was the hospital with the largest volume. Twenty-four provinces were identified, Barcelona and Madrid standing out among them with 20 and 17 articles, respectively. In the RS journals, 59 hospitals/centers had participated, Vall d'Hebron standing out with 51 articles. There were 9 foreign articles. The articles were distributed into 19 provinces, Barcelona and Madrid standing out with 32 papers and 20 papers, respectively. There are at least twice as many articles in the RS Journals than in the IM ones. «Original» articles are the most frequent. The Clinical and Translational Oncology journal in RS and Medicina Clínica in IM stand out with the highest number of articles. No specific topic prevailed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  2. Procedures, activities and doses in nuclear medicine cycle in Brazil; Procedimentos, atividades e doses no ciclo da medicina nuclear no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Silvia Maria Velasques de

    2005-07-01

    With the aim of characterizing nuclear medicine procedures performed in Brazil, activities of radiopharmaceuticals used and effective doses to patients, data was collected from nuclear medicine institutions in three regions of the country, namely the Southeast, the Northeast and the South regions, representing public hospitals, university hospitals, private and philanthropic institutions with low, medium and high levels of consumption of radiopharmaceuticals. The three chosen regions are responsible for 92% of radiopharmaceutical consumption and imaging equipment in the country. Accordingly, it was requested of some participating institutions to fulfill manually from individual patients data, to record gender, age, weight, height and activities used, for each type of exam as well as the equipment used. In others, the researcher collected data personally. Per institution, nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures ranged from 700 to 13,000 per year, most of which are myocardial and bone imaging procedures, and imaging equipment ranged, from 1 to 8 machines, one or two head SPECT's (hybrid or not). 26.782 patients protocols were analysed, 24.371 adults and 2.411 children and teenagers. For adult patients, differences were observed in the amount of activities used in diagnostic procedures between public and private institutions, with lower average activities used in public institutions. Activities administered to children and their effective doses were difficult to evaluate due to the incompleteness of individual records. Appropriate individual patient records could be adopted without affecting hospitals routine and contributing for a comprehensive evaluation of the radiation protection of nuclear medicine patients. Data from 8.881 workers were analysed, 346 working at nuclear medicine institutions. For monitored workers and measurably exposed workers in nuclear medicine, the values 2.3 mSv and 5.4 mSv, respectively, for effective annual doses are greater than data

  3. Delayed luminescence: an experimental protocol for Chinese herbal medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengmeng; van Wijk, Roeland; van Wijk, Eduard; Wang, Mei; van Wietmarschen, Herman; Hankemeier, Thomas; van der Greef, Jan

    2016-09-01

    In Chinese medicine, raw herbal materials are used in processed and unprocessed forms aiming to meet the different requirements of clinical practice. To assure the chemical quality and therapeutic properties of the herbs, fast and integrated systematic assays are required. So far, such assays have not been established. Delayed luminescence (DL) refers to a decaying long-term ultraweak photon emission after exposure to light. Its decay kinetics under certain conditions may be a sensitive indicator reflecting the internal structural and chemical/physiological state of a biological system. DL measurements have been used in many applications for quality control. However, relatively little research has been reported on dried plant material such as Chinese herbs. The objective of the present study is to establish a protocol for direct and rapid DL measurements of dried Chinese herbal materials, including the determination of the dependence on: (a) the optimal excitation time utilizing a white light source; (b) the optimal size of the grinded herbal particle; and (c) the humidity conditions before and during measurement. Results indicate that stable and reproducible curves of DL photon emission depend mainly on the water content of herbal materials. To investigate the application of the established DL measurement protocol, non-processed and processed Aconitum (Aconitum carmichaelii Debx.), wild and cultivated rhubarb (Rheum palmatum L.) and ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A.Mey) of different ages were measured using DL. The results suggest that DL technology is a potential tool for assessment of dried Chinese herb qualities. The results warrant a further exploration of this technique in relation to therapeutic properties of the herbs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Truly personalised medicine: self-experimentation in medical discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, William

    2008-01-01

    Biomedical research need not be carried out solely by 'Them': distant, dissociated, enormously costly institutions and companies. It can, and increasingly in the 21st century will, be carried out by 'Us', the informed non-professional. Conventional clinical trials treat humans with the same experimental model as laboratory rats - regarding them as mute, variable, unreliable material from which results must be obtained as fast as possible to maximise return on investment and patent life. The alternative is longer term, self-reported clinical studies of new treatments, based on the assumption that the experimenter is informed, intelligent and aware. A wide variety of new treatments for chronic disease are available, involving elements of diet, behaviour, environment and non-prescription medication as well as ethical pharmaceuticals, and previous experience suggests that they can be enormously effective. The key is objective, quantifiable measures of outcome. These can be achieved with over-the-counter diagnostics for a variety of parameters, as well as with self-built test systems, and careful and systematic observations of symptoms. Hypothesis generation is a key part of this process.

  5. Recommended administered activities for {sup 68}Ga-labelled peptides in paediatric nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, J.S.; Beykan, S.; Lassmann, M. [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Herrmann, K. [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-10-15

    The aim of this study was to establish a method for determining administered activities for {sup 68}Ga-labelled peptides. Dose calculations were based on the weight-independent effective dose model proposed by the EANM paediatric dosage card for use in paediatric nuclear medicine. Previously published time-integrated activity coefficients for {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE, {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC and {sup 68}Ga-pentixafor were used to calculate age-independent effective doses. Consequently, the corresponding weight-dependent effective dose coefficients were rescaled according to the formalism of the EANM dosage card to determine the radiopharmaceutical class of {sup 68}Ga-labelled peptides (''multiples'') and to calculate the baseline activities based on an upper limit for administered activity (185 MBq) in an adult. All calculated normalization factors suggest that the {sup 68}Ga-labelled peptides are class ''B'' radiopharmaceuticals. The baseline activity for all compounds is 12.8 MBq. In analogy to {sup 18}F-fluoride, we recommend a minimum activity of 14 MBq. For paediatric nuclear medicine applications involving {sup 68}Ga-labelled peptides, we suggest determining administered activities based on the formalism proposed in this work. The corresponding effective doses from these procedures will remain age-independent. (orig.)

  6. [Development of the software package of the nuclear medicine data processor for education and research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hisato; Yamaki, Noriyasu; Azuma, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a personal computer-based nuclear medicine data processor for education and research in the field of nuclear medicine. We call this software package "Prominence Processor" (PP). Windows of Microsoft Corporation was used as the operating system of this PP, which have 1024 × 768 image resolution and various 63 applications classified into 6 groups. The accuracy was examined for a lot of applications of the PP. For example, in the FBP reconstruction application, there was visually no difference in the image quality as a result of comparing two SPECT images obtained from the PP and GMS-5500A (Toshiba). Moreover, Normalized MSE between both images showed 0.0003. Therefore the high processing accuracy of the FBP reconstruction application was proven as well as other applications. The PP can be used in an arbitrary place if the software package is installed in note PC. Therefore the PP is used to lecture and to practice on an educational site and used for the purpose of the research of the radiological technologist on a clinical site etc. widely now.

  7. The role of ultrasound and nuclear medicine methods in the preoperative diagnostics of primary hyperparathyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacko, Marek; Królicki, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PH) represents one of the most common endocrine diseases. In most cases, the disorder is caused by parathyroid adenomas. Bilateral neck exploration has been a widely used treatment method for adenomas since the 20's of the twentieth century. In the last decade, however, it has been increasingly replaced by a minimally invasive surgical treatment. Smaller extent, shorter duration and lower complication rate of such a procedure are emphasized. Its efficacy depends on a precise location of parathyroid tissue during the preoperative imaging. Scintigraphy and ultrasound play a major role in the diagnostic algorithms. The efficacy of both methods has been repeatedly verified and compared. The still-current guidelines of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (2009) emphasize the complementary role of scintigraphy and ultrasonography in the preoperative diagnostics in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. At the same time, attempts are made to improve both these techniques by implementing new study protocols or innovative technologies. Publications have emerged in the recent years in the field of ultrasonography, whose authors pointed out the usefulness of elastography and contrast media. Nuclear medicine studies, on the other hand, focus mainly on the assessment of new radiotracers used in the positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of this article is to present, based on literature data, the possibilities of ultrasound and scintigraphy in the preoperative diagnostics in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. Furthermore, the main directions in the development of imaging techniques in PH patients were evaluated. PMID:26807297

  8. A methodology for auto-monitoring of internal contamination by 131I in nuclear medicine workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, M V S; Dantas, A L A; Dantas, B M

    2007-01-01

    The manipulation of 131I in Nuclear Medicine involves significant risks of internal contamination of the staff. In the event of an accidental contamination, or when the Radiological Protection Program includes routine individual monitoring of internal contamination, it is necessary to implement internal dose estimation through in vivo and in vitro bioassay techniques. Due to the huge extension of the Brazilian country, this type of monitoring becomes unfeasible if all measurements have to be performed at the institutes of the CNEN. Thus, if the Nuclear Medicine Centres (NMC) become able to conduct the monitoring of their employees, this skill would be of great significance. The methodology proposed in this work consists in a simple and inexpensive protocol for auto-monitoring the internal contamination by 131I, using the resources available at the NMC. In order to verify the influence of the phantom in the calibration factor for the measurement of 131I in thyroid, it was performed a comparison among a variety of phantoms commercially available, including the Neck-Thyroid Phantom developed in IRD. A protocol for performing in vivo and in vitro measurements by the NMC was established. The applicability of the individual monitoring techniques was also evaluated by comparing the detection limits with the derived limits associated with the annual dose limits for workers.

  9. Fractal analysis in radiological and nuclear medicine perfusion imaging: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michallek, Florian; Dewey, Marc [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    To provide an overview of recent research in fractal analysis of tissue perfusion imaging, using standard radiological and nuclear medicine imaging techniques including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and to discuss implications for different fields of application. A systematic review of fractal analysis for tissue perfusion imaging was performed by searching the databases MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE (via Ovid) and ISI Web of Science. Thirty-seven eligible studies were identified. Fractal analysis was performed on perfusion imaging of tumours, lung, myocardium, kidney, skeletal muscle and cerebral diseases. Clinically, different aspects of tumour perfusion and cerebral diseases were successfully evaluated including detection and classification. In physiological settings, it was shown that perfusion under different conditions and in various organs can be properly described using fractal analysis. Fractal analysis is a suitable method for quantifying heterogeneity from radiological and nuclear medicine perfusion images under a variety of conditions and in different organs. Further research is required to exploit physiologically proven fractal behaviour in the clinical setting. (orig.)

  10. Pulmonary embolism in pregnancy: is nuclear medicine imaging still a valid option?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ezwawah, O

    2008-10-01

    In this study we demonstrate our Radiology Department\\'s experience in utilizing low dose (half the normal dose) lung perfusion radionuclide scanning for pregnant patients as the initial investigation for suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Secondly; we highlight the radiation dose reduction advantages of nuclear medicine imaging over multi-detector computed tomography in this group. We performed a retrospective study of 21 consecutive pregnant women who presented with suspected PE. These patients underwent either lung perfusion scanning or CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA), over a two-year period (May 2005 to July 2007). 19 patients of the cohort studied underwent low dose perfusion-only scintigraphy, with half the usual dose of radionuclide activity. All scans were considered of diagnostic quality. No patient in our study required a ventilation scan. No patient with a negative perfusion scan represented during the 3 month follow up period with PE. We conclude, nuclear medicine imaging is an effective initial investigation for pregnant patients with suspected PE. While scinitigraphy is associated with a greater fetal radiation dose than CTPA, it imparts a lower maternal dose and significantly lower dose to radiosensitive tissues such as breast.

  11. Dose equivalent rate constants and barrier transmission data for nuclear medicine facility dose calculations and shielding design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Maggie; Caldwell, Curtis B

    2014-07-01

    A primary goal of nuclear medicine facility design is to keep public and worker radiation doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). To estimate dose and shielding requirements, one needs to know both the dose equivalent rate constants for soft tissue and barrier transmission factors (TFs) for all radionuclides of interest. Dose equivalent rate constants are most commonly calculated using published air kerma or exposure rate constants, while transmission factors are most commonly calculated using published tenth-value layers (TVLs). Values can be calculated more accurately using the radionuclide's photon emission spectrum and the physical properties of lead, concrete, and/or tissue at these energies. These calculations may be non-trivial due to the polyenergetic nature of the radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. In this paper, the effects of dose equivalent rate constant and transmission factor on nuclear medicine dose and shielding calculations are investigated, and new values based on up-to-date nuclear data and thresholds specific to nuclear medicine are proposed. To facilitate practical use, transmission curves were fitted to the three-parameter Archer equation. Finally, the results of this work were applied to the design of a sample nuclear medicine facility and compared to doses calculated using common methods to investigate the effects of these values on dose estimates and shielding decisions. Dose equivalent rate constants generally agreed well with those derived from the literature with the exception of those from NCRP 124. Depending on the situation, Archer fit TFs could be significantly more accurate than TVL-based TFs. These results were reflected in the sample shielding problem, with unshielded dose estimates agreeing well, with the exception of those based on NCRP 124, and Archer fit TFs providing a more accurate alternative to TVL TFs and a simpler alternative to full spectral-based calculations. The data provided by this paper should assist

  12. Understanding the cause of an unreadable nuclear medicine image: a case of unexpected results with 123I whole-body scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skweres, Justin; Yang, Zhiyun; Gonzalez-Toledo, Eduardo

    2014-12-01

    When unexpected results are obtained with standard image collection, the nuclear medicine physician must consider many technical factors that may have contributed. When image quality is poor, prior radiotracer administration, among other things, should always be considered. Our case demonstrates how knowledge of patient history and basic principles of nuclear medicine physics allows recognition of the septal penetration artifact. This allows the nuclear medicine physician to tailor the exam to an individual patient and obtain the most useful diagnostic information for the clinician.

  13. Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition: Experimental Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, M.; Bruno, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Cannata, F.; Chomaz, Ph.; Casini, G.; Geraci, E.; Gramegna, F.; Moroni, A.; Vannini, G.

    2005-03-01

    The connection between the thermodynamics of charged finite nuclear systems and the asymptotically measured partitions in heavy ion collisions is discussed. Different independent signals compatible with a liquid-to-gas-like phase transition are reported. In particular abnormally large fluctuations in the measured observables are presented as a strong evidence of a first order phase transition with negative heat capacity.

  14. Nuclear liquid-gas phase transition: Experimental signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Agostino, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Bruno, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Gulminelli, F. [LPC Caen (IN2P3-CNRS/ISMRA et Universite), F-14050 Caen Cedex (France); Cannata, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Chomaz, Ph. [GANIL, DSM-CEA/IN2P3-CNRS (France); Casini, G. [INFN Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Geraci, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Gramegna, F. [INFN Laboratorio Nazionale di Legnaro (Italy); Moroni, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Milano (Italy); Vannini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Bologna (Italy)

    2005-03-07

    The connection between the thermodynamics of charged finite nuclear systems and the asymptotically measured partitions in heavy ion collisions is discussed. Different independent signals compatible with a liquid-to-gas-like phase transition are reported. In particular abnormally large fluctuations in the measured observables are presented as a strong evidence of a first order phase transition with negative heat capacity.

  15. Few-Body Problems in Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, H.O.U.

    2013-01-01

    The 3α-reaction is one of the key reactions in nuclear astrophysics. Since it is a three-body reaction direct measurement is impossible, and therefore the reaction rate must be estimated theoretically. In this contribution I will discuss uncertainties in this reaction rate both at very low...

  16. Internal dosimetry for occupationally exposed personnel in nuclear medicine; Dosimetria interna para personal ocupacionalmente expuesto en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M.T.; Alfaro, L.M.M.; Angeles, C.A., E-mail: teodoro.garcia@inin.gob.mx, E-mail: mercedes.alfaro@inin.gob.mx, E-mail: arturo.angeles@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares Carrelera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, MX (Mexico)

    2013-10-01

    Internal dosimetry plays an important role in nuclear medicine dosimetry control of personnel occupationally exposed, and that in recent years there has been a large increase in the use of radionuclides both in medical diagnosis as radiotherapy. But currently, in Mexico and in many parts of the world, this internal dosimetry control is not performed. The Instituto Nacional de lnvestigaciones Nucleares de Mexico (ININ) together with the Centro Oncologico de Toluca (ISEMMYM) have developed a simple and feasible methodology for monitoring of personnel working in these facilities. It was aimed to carry out the dosimetry of the personnel, due to the incorporation of I-131, using the spectrometric devices that the hospital has, a gamma camera. The first step in this methodology was to make a thyroid phantom to meet the specifications of the ninth ANSI. This phantom is compared under controlled conditions with RMC- II phantom used for system calibration of the ININ internal dosimetry (ACCUSCAN - Ll), and with another phantom developed in Brazil with ANSI specifications, in order to determine the variations in measurements due to the density of the material of each of the phantoms and adjust to the system ACCUSCAN, already certificate. Furthermore, necessary counts were performed with the gamma camera of the phantom developed at ININ, with a standard source of {sup 133}Ba which simulates the energy of {sup 131}I. With these data, were determined the counting efficiencies for a distance of 15 to 20 cm between the surface of the phantom and the the plate of the detectors. Another important aspect was to determine the lower limit of detection (LLD). In this paper we present the results obtained from the detectors calibration of the gamma camera of the hospital.

  17. In Vitro Evaluation Of Molecular Tumor Targets In Nuclear Medicine: Immunohistochemistry Is One Option, But Under Which Conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reubi, Jean Claude

    2017-09-14

    The identification of new molecular targets for diagnostic and therapeutic applications using in vitro methods is an important challenge in nuclear medicine. One of the methods is immunohistochemistry, increasingly popular due to its easy-to-perform procedure. This review presents the case for conducting receptor immunohistochemistry to evaluate potential molecular targets in human tumor tissue sections. The focus is on the immunohistochemistry of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), one of the largest families of cell surface proteins, representing a major class of drug targets and thus playing an important role in nuclear medicine. The review identifies common pitfalls and challenges, and provides guidelines in performing such immunohistochemical studies. An appropriate validation of target is a prerequisite for developing robust and informative new molecular probes. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  18. Radiation doses of employees of a Nuclear Medicine Department after implementation of more rigorous radiation protection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwowarska-Bilska, Hanna; Supinska, Aleksandra; Listewnik, Maria H; Zorga, Piotr; Birkenfeld, Bozena

    2013-11-01

    The appropriate radiation protection measures applied in departments of nuclear medicine should lead to a reduction in doses received by the employees. During 1991-2007, at the Department of Nuclear Medicine of Pomeranian Medical University (Szczecin, Poland), nurses received on average two-times higher (4.6 mSv) annual doses to the whole body than those received by radiopharmacy technicians. The purpose of this work was to examine whether implementation of changes in the radiation protection protocol will considerably influence the reduction in whole-body doses received by the staff that are the most exposed. A reduction in nurses' exposure by ~63 % took place in 2008-11, whereas the exposure of radiopharmacy technicians grew by no more than 22 % in comparison with that in the period 1991-2007. Proper reorganisation of the work in departments of nuclear medicine can considerably affect dose reduction and bring about equal distribution of the exposure.

  19. Use of a remote infrared thermography in experimental medicine at extreme influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datsenko A.V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study presents an analysis of published data on the use of remote infrared thermography in medicine and veterinary science and evaluated the main opportunities, methods and ways of thermovision registration in experimental medical studies on biological objects, including at extreme influences. The following resources of the bibliographic electronic databases had been used: eLibrary, PubMed, Clinical Key, Science. Now methods of infrared thermography in insufficient degree are used in experimental medicine, including when studying adverse biological effect of various harmful and dangerous extreme factors, which main manifestation, especially in the early period after exposure, are systemic microvascular disorders, determining the state of capacity of human biomodels. These dynamic remote ther-mographic studies of experimental biological objects can be used to evaluate disorders of the peripheral circulation, working capacity and an emotional condition of the biomodels exposed to extreme factors, including early after experimental studies in laboratory and field work.

  20. Diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives in nuclear medicine: radiolabelled biomolecules; Perspectivas diagnosticas y terapeuticas en medicina nuclear: biomoleculas radiomarcadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G. [Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud. ININ, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear. Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Melendez A, L. [Facultad de Medicina, UAEM, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    From their beginning, the radiopharmaceuticals chemistry has gone to the study of the molecular chemistry. The radiopharmaceuticals are only in their capacity to detect such specific biochemical places as the receivers and the enzymes. With the recent obtaining of the complete structural sequence of the genome, it doesn't fit doubt of the importance that they have acquired the molecular images for the study from the genetic information to the alterations phenotypic in the chemistry of the human body. So, the future of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, practically is based in the study of protein fragments, peptide structures and chains of DNA radiolabelled for the study of the metabolism In vivo. These investigations represent a substantial change in those paradigms of the pharmaceutical development, when using the own organic capacities as source of medications, instead of considering to the organism like a simple assay tube where molecules act, like they are most of the traditional medications. The investigation of new techniques to design complex stable of Tc-99m, Re-188, Lu-177, Y-90 and Dy-166/Ho-l66 with biomolecules that don't alter the specificity and in general the molecular properties of the same ones. it is a topic of world interest in the environment of the radiopharmaceutical chemistry. In this work some achievements and perspectives are presented on those main diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals of third generation. (Author)

  1. Normal values and standardization of parameters in nuclear cardiology: Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine working group database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Naoya; Kasai, Tokuo; Matsuo, Shinro; Kiso, Keisuke; Okuda, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    As a 2-year project of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine working group activity, normal myocardial imaging databases were accumulated and summarized. Stress-rest with gated and non-gated image sets were accumulated for myocardial perfusion imaging and could be used for perfusion defect scoring and normal left ventricular (LV) function analysis. For single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with multi-focal collimator design, databases of supine and prone positions and computed tomography (CT)-based attenuation correction were created. The CT-based correction provided similar perfusion patterns between genders. In phase analysis of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT, a new approach for analyzing dyssynchrony, normal ranges of parameters for phase bandwidth, standard deviation and entropy were determined in four software programs. Although the results were not interchangeable, dependency on gender, ejection fraction and volumes were common characteristics of these parameters. Standardization of (123)I-MIBG sympathetic imaging was performed regarding heart-to-mediastinum ratio (HMR) using a calibration phantom method. The HMRs from any collimator types could be converted to the value with medium-energy comparable collimators. Appropriate quantification based on common normal databases and standard technology could play a pivotal role for clinical practice and researches.

  2. DICOM image quantification secondary capture (DICOM IQSC) integrated with numeric results, regions, and curves: implementation and applications in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xinhua; Xu, Xiaoyin; Voss, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we describe an enhanced DICOM Secondary Capture (SC) that integrates Image Quantification (IQ) results, Regions of Interest (ROIs), and Time Activity Curves (TACs) with screen shots by embedding extra medical imaging information into a standard DICOM header. A software toolkit of DICOM IQSC has been developed to implement the SC-centered information integration of quantitative analysis for routine practice of nuclear medicine. Primary experiments show that the DICOM IQSC method is simple and easy to implement seamlessly integrating post-processing workstations with PACS for archiving and retrieving IQ information. Additional DICOM IQSC applications in routine nuclear medicine and clinic research are also discussed.

  3. Clinical trials in nuclear medicine: Present and future; Les essais cliniques en medecine nucleaire: etat et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaumet-Riffaud, P. [Medecine nucleaire, centre hospitalier de Kremlin-Bicetre, Kremlin-Bicetre, (France); Cachin, F. [EA 4231, medecine nucleaire, CRLCC Jean-Perrin, faculte de medecine, Clermont-Ferrand, (France); Couturier, O. [Inserm U646, departement de medecine nucleaire, CHU d Angers, Angers, (France); Desruet, M.D. [Pole d imagerie clinique de biophysique et medecine nucleaire, Paris, (France); Radiopharmacie, unite Inserm 877, hopital Michallon, CHU de Grenoble, BP217, 38043 Grenoble cedex 9, (France); Kraeber-Bodere, F. [Inserm UMR 601, CHU/CLCC Rene-Gauducheau, Nantes, (France); Talbot, J.N. [Medecine nucleaire, hopital Tenon, Paris, (France); Vuillez, J.P. [Radiopharmacie, unite Inserm 877, hopital Michallon, CHU de Grenoble, BP217, 38043 Grenoble cedex 9, (France)

    2009-05-15

    The particular status of radiopharmaceuticals, together with the positioning of nuclear medicine in multidisciplinary approach of oncology, lead to real difficulties for conception, validation and granting of clinical trials which are necessary for demonstrating clinical interest of new compounds, for diagnosis as well as for therapeutic use. This article is a presentation of some recent clinical trials conducted in nuclear medicine in France, showing its dynamism but also pointing out some encountered difficulties. These experiences could lead to reflexion in order to improve the clinical research performances, taking into account a scientific and regulatory context more and more constraining. (authors)

  4. EC Project 'GUIDELINES ON MPE': proposed qualification and curriculum frameworks and the MPE in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruana, C J, E-mail: carmel.j.caruana@um.edu.mt [EFOMP Representative on the EC ' Guidelines on MPE' Project and Biomedical Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Malta (Malta)

    2011-09-23

    The objectives of EC project 'Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert' are to provide for improved implementation of the provisions relating to the Medical Physics Expert within Council Directive 97/43/EURATOM and the proposed recast Basic Safety Standards directive. This includes harmonisation of the mission statement for Medical Physics Services as well as the education and training of the MPE. It also includes detailed knowledge-skills-competence inventories for the Medical Physics Expert in each of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy. This paper presents the proposed Qualification and Curriculum Frameworks and their application to the Medical Physics Expert in Nuclear Medicine.

  5. Internal dosimetry of nuclear medicine workers through the analysis of {sup 131}I in aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes C, L.; Lucena, E. A.; Da Silva S, C.; Almeida D, A. L.; Oliveira S, W.; Souza S, M.; Maranhao D, B., E-mail: carneiro@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria - CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende s/n, 22783-127 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    {sup 131}I is widely used in nuclear medicine for diagnostic and therapy of thyroid diseases. Depending of workplace safety conditions, routine handling of this radionuclide may result in a significant risk of exposure of the workers subject to chronic intake by inhalation of aerosols. A previous study including in vivo and in vitro measurements performed recently among nuclear medicine personnel in Brazil showed the occurrence of {sup 131}I incorporation by workers involved in the handling of solutions used for radioiodine therapy. The present work describes the development, optimization and application of a methodology to collect and analyze aerosol samples aiming to assess internal doses based on the activity of {sup 131}I present in a radiopharmacy laboratory. Portable samplers were positioned at one meter distant from the place where non-sealed liquid sources of {sup 131}I are handled. Samples were collected over one hour using high-efficiency filters containing activated carbon and analyzed by gamma spectrometry with a high purity germanium detection system. Results have shown that, although a fume hood is available in the laboratory, {sup 131}I in the form of vapor was detected in the workplace. The average activity concentration was found to be of 7.4 Bq /m{sup 3}. This value is about three orders of magnitude below the Derived Air Concentration (Dac) of 8.4 kBq/m{sup 3}. Assuming that the worker is exposed by inhalation of iodine vapor during one hour, {sup 131}I concentration detected corresponds to an intake of 3.6 Bq which results in a committed effective dose of 7.13 x 10{sup -5} mSv. These results show that the radiopharmacy laboratory evaluated is safe in terms of internal exposure of the workers. However it is recommended that the presence of {sup 131}I should be periodically re-assessed since it may increase individual effective doses. It should also be pointed out that the results obtained so far reflect a survey carried out in a specific

  6. A no-gold-standard technique for objective assessment of quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhinav K; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C

    2016-04-07

    The objective optimization and evaluation of nuclear-medicine quantitative imaging methods using patient data is highly desirable but often hindered by the lack of a gold standard. Previously, a regression-without-truth (RWT) approach has been proposed for evaluating quantitative imaging methods in the absence of a gold standard, but this approach implicitly assumes that bounds on the distribution of true values are known. Several quantitative imaging methods in nuclear-medicine imaging measure parameters where these bounds are not known, such as the activity concentration in an organ or the volume of a tumor. We extended upon the RWT approach to develop a no-gold-standard (NGS) technique for objectively evaluating such quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods with patient data in the absence of any ground truth. Using the parameters estimated with the NGS technique, a figure of merit, the noise-to-slope ratio (NSR), can be computed, which can rank the methods on the basis of precision. An issue with NGS evaluation techniques is the requirement of a large number of patient studies. To reduce this requirement, the proposed method explored the use of multiple quantitative measurements from the same patient, such as the activity concentration values from different organs in the same patient. The proposed technique was evaluated using rigorous numerical experiments and using data from realistic simulation studies. The numerical experiments demonstrated that the NSR was estimated accurately using the proposed NGS technique when the bounds on the distribution of true values were not precisely known, thus serving as a very reliable metric for ranking the methods on the basis of precision. In the realistic simulation study, the NGS technique was used to rank reconstruction methods for quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) based on their performance on the task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a known volume of interest

  7. Nuclear medicine and the failed joint replacement: Past, present, and future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher; J; Palestro

    2014-01-01

    Soon after the introduction of the modern prosthetic joint,it was recognized that radionuclide imaging provides useful information about these devices.The bone scan was used extensively to identify causes of prosthetic joint failure.It became apparent,however,that although sensitive,regardless of how the images were analyzed or how it was performed,the test was not specific and could not distinguish among the causes of prosthetic failure.Advances in anatomic imaging,notably cross sectional modalities,have facilitated the diagnosis of many,if not most,causes of prosthetic failure,with the important exception of infection.This has led to a shift in the diagnostic paradigm,in which nuclear medicine investigations increasingly have focused on diagnosing infection.The recognition that bone scintigraphy could not reliably diagnose infection led to the development of combined studies,first bone/gallium and subsequently leukocyte/bone and leukocyte/marrow imaging.Labeled leukocyte imaging,combined with bone marrow imaging is the most accurate(about90%)imaging test for diagnosing joint arthroplasty infection.Its value not withstanding,there are significant disadvantages to this test.In-vivo techniques for labeling leukocytes,using antigranulocyte antibodieshave been explored,but have their own limitations and the results have been inconsistent.Fluorodeoxyglucose(FDG)-positron emission tomography(FDG-PET)has been extensively investigated for more than a decade but its role in diagnosing the infected prosthesis has yet to be established.Antimicrobial peptides bind to bacterial cell membranes and are infection specific.Data suggest that these agents may be useful for diagnosing prosthetic joint infection,but large scale studies have yet to be undertaken.Although for many years nuclear medicine has focused on diagnosing prosthetic joint infection,the advent of hybrid imaging with singlephoton emission computed tomography(SPECT)/electronic computer X-ray tomography technique

  8. A no-gold-standard technique for objective assessment of quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C.

    2016-04-01

    The objective optimization and evaluation of nuclear-medicine quantitative imaging methods using patient data is highly desirable but often hindered by the lack of a gold standard. Previously, a regression-without-truth (RWT) approach has been proposed for evaluating quantitative imaging methods in the absence of a gold standard, but this approach implicitly assumes that bounds on the distribution of true values are known. Several quantitative imaging methods in nuclear-medicine imaging measure parameters where these bounds are not known, such as the activity concentration in an organ or the volume of a tumor. We extended upon the RWT approach to develop a no-gold-standard (NGS) technique for objectively evaluating such quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods with patient data in the absence of any ground truth. Using the parameters estimated with the NGS technique, a figure of merit, the noise-to-slope ratio (NSR), can be computed, which can rank the methods on the basis of precision. An issue with NGS evaluation techniques is the requirement of a large number of patient studies. To reduce this requirement, the proposed method explored the use of multiple quantitative measurements from the same patient, such as the activity concentration values from different organs in the same patient. The proposed technique was evaluated using rigorous numerical experiments and using data from realistic simulation studies. The numerical experiments demonstrated that the NSR was estimated accurately using the proposed NGS technique when the bounds on the distribution of true values were not precisely known, thus serving as a very reliable metric for ranking the methods on the basis of precision. In the realistic simulation study, the NGS technique was used to rank reconstruction methods for quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) based on their performance on the task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a known volume of interest

  9. Internal exposure in nuclear medicine: application of IAEA criteria to determine the need for internal monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Maranhão Dantas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The manipulation of unsealed sources in nuclear medicine poses significant risks of internal exposure to the staff. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency, the radiological protection program should include an evaluation of such risks and an individual monitoring plan, assuring acceptable radiological safety conditions in the workplace. The IAEA Safety Guide RS-G-1.2 recommends that occupational monitoring should be implemented whenever it is likely that committed effective doses from annual intakes of radionuclides would exceed 1 mSv. It also suggests a mathematical criterion to determine the need to implement internal monitoring. This paper presents a simulation of the IAEA criteria applied to commonly used radionuclides in nuclear medicine, taking into consideration usual manipulated activities and handling conditions. It is concluded that the manipulation of 131I for therapy presents the higher risk of internal exposure to the workers, requiring the implementation of an internal monitoring program by the Nuclear Medicine Centers.A manipulação de fontes abertas em Serviços de Medicina Nuclear envolve riscos de exposição externa e contaminação interna. O plano de proteção radiológica das Instalações licenciadas pela CNEN deve incluir a avaliação de tais riscos e propor um programa de monitoração individual de forma a controlar as exposições e garantir a manutenção das condições de segurança radiológica. As recomendações da AIEA apresentadas no Safety Guide RS-G-1.2 sugerem que seja implementado um programa de monitoração interna do trabalhador sempre que houver possibilidade da contaminação interna conduzir a valores de dose efetiva comprometida anual igual ou superior a 1 mSv. Este trabalho apresenta a simulação da aplicação de tais critérios para os radionuclídeos mais utilizados na área de Medicina Nuclear, levando-se em consideração as condições usuais de manipulação das fontes e as

  10. Influence of operation of national experimental nuclear reactor on the natural environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kaczmarek-Kacprzak

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the impact of experimental nuclear reactor operations on the national environment, based on assessment reports of the radiological protection of active nuclear technology sources. Using the analysis of measurements carried out in the last 15 years, the trends are presented in selected elements of the environment on the Świerk Nuclear Centre site and its surroundings. In addition, the impact of research results is presented from the fi fteen year period of environmental analysis on building public confi dence on the eve of the start of construction of the first Polish nuclear power plant.

  11. The American College of nuclear physicians 18th annual meeting and scientific sessions DOE day: Substance abuse and nuclear medicine abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    Despite the enormous personal and social cost Of substance abuse, there is very little knowledge with respect to the mechanisms by which these drugs produce addiction as well as to the mechanisms of toxicity. Similarly, there is a lack of effective therapeutic intervention to treat the drug abusers. In this respect, nuclear medicine could contribute significantly by helping to gather information using brain imaging techniques about mechanisms of drug addiction which, in turn, could help design better therapeutic interventions, and by helping in the evaluation and diagnosis of organ toxicity from the use of drugs of abuse. This volume contains six short descriptions of presentations made at the 18th Meeting of the American College of Nuclear Physicians -- DOE Day: Substance Abuse and Nuclear Medicine.

  12. Nuclear medicine imaging technique in the erectile dysfunction evaluation: a mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Godinho Ribeiro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Functional imaging with positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography is capable of visualizing subtle changes in physiological function in vivo. Erectile dysfunction(ED diminishes quality of life for affected men and their partners. Identification of neural substrates may provide information regarding the pathophysiology of types of sexual dysfunction originating in the brain. The aim of this work is to verify the approaches of the nuclear medicine techniques in the evaluation of the erectile function/disfunction. A search using the words ED and nuclear medicine, ED and scintigraphy, ED and spect and ED and pet was done in the PubMed. The number of citations in each subject was determined. Neuroimaging techniques offer insight into brain regions involved in sexual arousal and inhibition. To tackle problems such as hyposexual disorders or ED caused by brain disorders, it is crucial to understand how the human brain controls sexual arousal and penile erection.Imagens functionais, como o positron emission tomography e o single photon emission computed tomography são capazes de identificar súbitas alterações fisiológicas in vivo. A disfunção er��til diminui a qualidade de vida do casal. A identificação de substratos neurais pode esclarecer a fisiopatologia dos diferentes tipos de disfunções sexuais originadas no cérebro. O objetivo deste trabalho é verificar a abordagem das técnicas da medicina nuclear na avaliação da função/disfunção erétil. Uma pesquisa utilizando as palavras disfunção erétil e medicina nuclear, disfunção erétil e cintigrafia, disfunção erétil e SPECT e disfunção erétil e PET foi realizada no PubMed. O número de citações em cada palavra estudada foi determinado. Técnicas de neuroimagem permitem a avaliação das regiões cerebrais durante o estímulo ou inibição sexual. Para resolver alterações como disfunções hipossexuais ou disfunção erétil causada

  13. Claude Bernard and an introduction to the study of experimental medicine: "physical vitalism," dialectic, and epistemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normandin, Sebastian

    2007-10-01

    This article explores the profound impact of the thought of Claude Bernard (1813-78) and his philosophy of experimentalism elaborated in his masterwork An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine. I argue that Bernard's far-ranging theoretical impact on medicine and biology marks the end of conventional vitalism and the elusive notion of a "vital force" as a legitimate scientific concept. His understanding of medicine is as epistemologically significant in its time as Newton's contribution was to the physical sciences in the seventeenth century. This essay treats Bernard's philosophical ambitions seriously, exploring his important, even central, role in the mental world of nineteenth-century France. This includes his influence on Henri Bergson (1859-1941) and other late-nineteenth century thinkers. The subtext of Bernard's experimental epistemology is also contrasted with a key idealist philosopher of the period, the German Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), and placed in the context of the larger European philosophical sphere. In contrast to much of mid-nineteenth-century philosophy, Bernard, in creating the framework for experimental medicine, argued for an experimental approach in which a priori assumptions were to be strictly constrained. Bernard's thoughts on the nature of experiment put an end to "systems" in medicine, ironically by replacing all previous medical philosophies with the all-embracing "system" of experiment. And yet, while "vital forces" fade after Bernard, a form of vitalism still flourishes. Even in Bernard's own work, in the struggle with concepts like determinism, complexity, and causality, there is a realization of the unique character of living function in a kind of "physical vitalism."

  14. Targeting cytokine/chemokine receptors: a challenge for molecular nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signore, A. [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I, University ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Via del Policlinico 155, 00161 Roma (Italy); Chianelli, M. [Nuclear Medicine, ' ' Regina Apostolorum' ' Hospital, Albano (Roma) (Italy); Bei, R.; Modesti, A. [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Roma (Italy); Oyen, W. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2003-01-01

    Radiolabelled cytokines and chemokines are a group of radiopharmaceuticals that, by highlighting in vivo the binding to specific high-affinity receptors expressed on selected cell populations, allow the molecular and functional characterisation of immune-mediated processes Recently, several authors have described the use of radiolabelled cytokines and chemokines not only for imaging of inflammation and infection, but also as an approach to study in vivo the biology of primary and metastatic cancer cells. The latter avenue of research has been pursued particularly to help oncologists in therapeutic decision making and to follow up the efficacy of new immune therapies. In this paper we describe the characteristics of cytokines and chemokines, focussing on their role as radiopharmaceuticals for the imaging of cancer cells in vivo, a new challenge for molecular nuclear medicine. (orig.)

  15. [Conservative calibration of a clearance monitor system for waste material from nuclear medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanke, Carsten; Geworski, Lilli

    2014-09-01

    Clearance monitor systems are used for gross gamma measurements of waste potentially contaminated with radioactivity. These measurements are to make sure that legal requirements, e.g. clearance criteria according to the german radiation protection ordinance, are met. This means that measurement results may overestimate, but must not underestimate the true values. This paper describes a pragmatic way using a calibrated Cs-137 point source to generate a conservative calibration for the clearance monitor system used in the Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (MHH). The most important nuclides used in nuclear medicine are considered. The measurement result reliably overestimates the true value of the activity present in the waste. The calibration is compliant with the demands for conservativity and traceability to national standards.

  16. Strategies for CT tissue segmentation for Monte Carlo calculations in nuclear medicine dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braad, Poul-Erik; Andersen, Thomas; Hansen, Søren Baarsgaard;

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: CT images are used for patient specific Monte Carlo treatment planning in radionuclide therapy. The authors investigated the impact of tissue classification, CT image segmentation, and CT errors on Monte Carlo calculated absorbed dose estimates in nuclear medicine. Methods: CT errors...... as a function of patient size, CT reconstruction, and tube current modulation methods were assessed in a phantom experiment on a clinical CT system. The impact of tissue segmentation methods and CT number variations on EGSnrc Monte Carlo calculated absorbed dose distributions was assessed for 99mTc and 131I...... in the ICRP/ICRU male phantom and in a patient PET/CT-scanned with 124I prior to radioiodine therapy. Results: CT number variations types and accurate...

  17. Enhancement of Noisy Planar Nuclear Medicine Images using Mean Field Annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Falk, D L; Rubin, D M

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear medicine (NM) images inherently suffer from large amounts of noise and blur. The purpose of this research is to reduce the noise and blur while maintaining image integrity for improved diagnosis. The proposed solution is to increase image quality after the standard pre- and post-processing undertaken by a gamma camera system. Mean Field Annealing (MFA) is the image processing technique used in this research. It is a computational iterative technique that makes use of the Point Spread Function (PSF) and the noise associated with the NM image. MFA is applied to NM images with the objective of reducing noise while not compromising edge integrity. Using a sharpening filter as a post-processing technique (after MFA) yields image enhancement of planar NM images.

  18. Recently revised diagnostic reference levels in nuclear medicine in Bulgaria and in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, H; Bly, R; Vassileva, J; Ingilizova, K; Stoyanova, T; Kostadinova, I; Slavchev, A

    2010-01-01

    An EU twinning project entitled 'Strengthening of administrative structures for radiation protection and safe use of ionising radiation in diagnostics and therapy' was established between Bulgaria and Finland, lasting from June 2008 to May 2009. One component of the project was to improve the optimisation of patient protection in nuclear medicine (NM) through revising diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The revised DRLs are based on national surveys on the numbers of NM procedures and activities given to the patients in different procedures. The survey in Bulgaria was carried out in 2008 and that in Finland in 2007. National DRLs were established for the most frequent and dose-relevant examinations. The proposed DRLs in both countries are in good agreement with other national recommendations in Europe.

  19. Past and Present Scenario of Imaging Infection and Inflammation: A Nuclear Medicine Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipti Kakkar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear medicine techniques provide potential non-invasive tools for imaging infections and inflammations in the body in a precise way. These techniques are further exploited by the use of radiopharmaceuticals in conjunction with imaging tests such as scintigraphy and positron emission tomography. Improved agents for targeting infection exploit the specific accumulation of radiolabeled compounds to understand the pathophysiologic changes involved in the inflammatory process and correlate them with other chronic illnesses. In the recent past, a wide variety of radiopharmaceuticals have been developed, broadly classified as specific radiopharmaceuticals and nonspecific radiopharmaceuticals. New developments in positron emission (leveraging 18F and 18fluorodeoxyglucose and heterocyclic/peptide chemistry and radiochemistry are resulting in unique agents with high specific activity. Various approaches to visualizing infection and inflammation are presented in this review, in an integral manner, that give a clear view of the existing radiopharmaceuticals in clinical practice and those under development.

  20. Simulations of Radioactive Decays: an Application of Low-Energy Electromagnetic Packages for the Nuclear Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munkhbaatar Batmunkh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Problems of the radiobiology and the nuclear medicine require clarifying the specifi cs of radionuclides interactions with unhealthy cells. In this work we aimed to simulate emitting particles tracks of radionuclides and their radioactive decays at DNA level inside the cell nucleus. Accordingly, using the Monte Carlo-based track structure simulation technique, we estimated the radial distribution of deposited energy and kinetic energy spectra of electrons produced by primary particles resulting from radioactive decays of diff erent radionuclides within cell nucleus. To address the possibility of DNA damage, we performed the cluster analysis of track structures of emitted particles inside the volumes corresponding to the size of the native double-stranded DNA. For this purpose, G4-RadioactiveDecay and low- energy electromagnetic packages form Geant4 Monte-Carlo toolkit were combined together. Besides, a comparative analysis was performed for various low-energy electromagnetic packages as G4-DNA and G4-Livermore

  1. Use of nuclear medicine imaging: Scintigraphy in diagnosis of equine orthopedic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovač Milomir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes techniques, indications and findings of nuclear medicine imaging – scintigraphy of 42 horses with acute and chronic lameness of unknown origin. Most horses showed increased uptake of 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate in the tarsal joint (linked to the osteoarthritis and distal tarsal synovitis, the distal sesamoid bones (linked to the navicular disease, proximal attaches of the musculus interoseus medius on the palmar/plantar region of the metacarpus or metatarsus (linked to the insertations desmopathie and in the dorsal processes of thoracic vertebrae (linked to the kissing spine syndrome. The interpretation of scintigraphy appeared to be a more reliable and sensitive diagnostic method than radiography in diagnosing these equine orthopedic disease.

  2. Recombinant human TSH in differentiated thyroid cancer: a nuclear medicine perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanotti-Fregonara, P. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, SHFJ, LMNRB, Orsay (France); Rubello, D. [Osped S Maria Misericordia, IRCCS, IOV, Dept Nucl Med, PET Ctr, I-45100 Rovigo (Italy); Hindie, E. [Hop St Louis, Dept Nucl Med, Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    The use of recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is widely discussed in the literature with regard to the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the management of DTC patients. However, some controversy about the appropriate indications, advantages and potential disadvantages of the use of rhTSH may still exist within the community of nuclear medicine physicians. In our opinion, the clinical benefits of rhTSH in avoiding hypothyroidism outweigh its somewhat lesser diagnostic accuracy. However, we disagree on designating rhTSH as the 'golden standard' to obtain TSH stimulation, as suggested by some authors. Thus, the first follow-up examination after ablation, which is determinant for patients' prognostic classification, can be either done under rhTSH stimulation or after hormone withdrawal. In our practice, and for higher risk patients, we still favour performing the initial follow-up after thyroid hormone withdrawal. rhTSH also shows the ability to enhance radioiodine concentration into thyroid cells. This characteristic is obviously of great interest among the nuclear medicine community. In clinical practice, it seems preferable to perform {sup 131}I treatment for metastatic disease during hypothyroidism. rhTSH may find its utility for the treatment of specific populations of patients, i.e. those in whom hormone withdrawal is medically contraindicated or in whom adequate endogenous TSH levels cannot be obtained due to reduced pituitary reserve or continued thyroxine production by metastatic tissue. In conclusion, rhTSH has demonstrated to be a reliable alternative to hypothyroidism for the stimulation of Tg in the follow-up of thyroid cancer patients. However, its use must be more carefully chosen in the therapeutic setting. Our feeling is that rhTSH should no tbe used for remnant ablation in high-risk patients and for the treatment of metastatic disease, except for specific populations of

  3. Validation of an activity optimization method for nuclear medicine in planar studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez D, M. [Central University of Las Villas, CEETI, Camajuani Road Km 5.5, Santa Clara 54830 Villa Clara (Cuba); Diaz R, O. [Institute for Sciences and Advanced Technologies (Cuba); Farias L, F. [Federal University of Pernambuco (Brazil)]. e-mail: mperez@uclv.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    A method for optimizing the administered activity in Static Nuclear Medicine Studies is validated by comparison with ROC curve. Linear Discriminant analysis of image quality in gamma cameras was the applied statistical technique. The constructed linear discriminant function owns as dependent parameters, the differentiated levels of image quality obtained by observer's criterion. The independent parameters in the function were physical variables, as Signal-to Background ratios and Signal-to-Noise ratios. They were obtained from the selection of Regions of Interest in images obtained from a Jaszczak phantom, corresponding to lesion and background sites. The percentage of cases correctly classified by discriminant analysis was analyzed to grade the proposed discriminant method. The minimum value of the administered activity, which permits good image quality, (it means good results for the parameters selected by the discriminant function), can be proposed as an optimized value of activity for planar studies of Nuclear Medicine. The method was tested using images from a Jaszczak phantom, acquired under four activities (1088 MBq, 962 MBq, 740 MBq and 562 MBq) with a gamma camera equipped with a high resolution - low energy- parallel-hole collimator. The gamma camera was tested by a NEMA protocol. Image quality was graded by three expert observers who also developed a rated procedure which consist in analyzing the images for ROC analysis. Two of the six measured Background-to-Signal ratios were the parameters able to construct the linear discriminant function with high correlation respect to the observer criterion, from all the measured physical variables. The value of 740 MBq was the optimum after discriminant method application in this particular experiment. The results were coincident with the application of ROC-analysis. The optimal activity value obtained with the proposed discriminant procedure coincided with the activity value for which the area under the ROC

  4. MO-AB-207-00: ACR Update in MR, CT, Nuclear Medicine, and Mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program.

  5. MO-AB-207-03: ACR Update in Nuclear Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness, B. [Henry Ford Hospital System (United States)

    2015-06-15

    A goal of an imaging accreditation program is to ensure adequate image quality, verify appropriate staff qualifications, and to assure patient and personnel safety. Currently, more than 35,000 facilities in 10 modalities have been accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), making the ACR program one of the most prolific accreditation options in the U.S. In addition, ACR is one of the accepted accreditations required by some state laws, CMS/MIPPA insurance and others. Familiarity with the ACR accreditation process is therefore essential to clinical diagnostic medical physicists. Maintaining sufficient knowledge of the ACR program must include keeping up-to-date as the various modality requirements are refined to better serve the goals of the program and to accommodate newer technologies and practices. This session consists of presentations from authorities in four ACR accreditation modality programs, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, and mammography. Each speaker will discuss the general components of the modality program and address any recent changes to the requirements. Learning Objectives: To understand the requirements of the ACR MR Accreditation program. The discussion will include accreditation of whole-body general purpose magnets, dedicated extremity systems well as breast MRI accreditation. Anticipated updates to the ACR MRI Quality Control Manual will also be reviewed. To understand the requirements of the ACR CT accreditation program, including updates to the QC manual as well as updates through the FAQ process. To understand the requirements of the ACR nuclear medicine accreditation program, and the role of the physicist in annual equipment surveys and the set up and supervision of the routine QC program. To understand the current ACR MAP Accreditation requirement and present the concepts and structure of the forthcoming ACR Digital Mammography QC Manual and Program.

  6. Individual monitoring of internal exposure for nuclear medicine workers in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baechler, S; Stritt, N; Bochud, F O

    2011-03-01

    Monitoring of internal exposure for nuclear medicine workers requires frequent measurements due to the short physical half-lives of most radionuclides used in this field. The aim of this study was to develop screening measurements performed at the workplace by local staff using standard laboratory instrumentation, to detect whether potential intake has occurred. Such measurements do not enable to determine the committed effective dose, but are adequate to verify that a given threshold is not exceeded. For radioiodine, i.e. (123)I, (124)I, (125)I and (131)I, a calibrated surface contamination monitor is placed in front of the thyroid to detect whether the activity threshold has been exceeded. For radionuclides with very short physical half-lives (≤ 6 h), such as (99m)Tc and those used in positron emission tomography imaging, i.e. (11)C, (15)O, (18)F and (68)Ga, screening procedures consist in performing daily measurements of the ambient dose rate in front of the abdomen. Other gamma emitters used for imaging, i.e. (67)Ga, (111)In and (201)Tl, are measured with a scintillation detector located in front of the thorax. For pure beta emitters, i.e. (90)Y and (169)Er, as well as beta emitters with low-intensity gamma rays, i.e. (153)Sm, (177)Lu, (186)Re and (188)Re, the procedure consists in measuring hand contamination immediately after use. In Switzerland, screening procedures have been adopted by most nuclear medicine services since such measurements enable an acceptable monitoring while taking into account practical and economic considerations.

  7. Evaluation of diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine services of Pernambuco and Alagoas states - Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Ricardo Braz F. da; Hazin, Clovis A., E-mail: chazin@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Lima, Fabiana F., E-mail: fflima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The medical use of ionizing radiation contributes significantly to population exposure to radiation. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic procedures carried out in nuclear medicine (SMN) in Pernambuco and Alagoas in order to gather data to subsidize the proposal of reference levels for nuclear medicine in Brazil. Data were collected of the SMN in Pernambuco and Alagoas in the period of 2005 to 2009, according by UNSCEAR. The study used data from IBGE. The results showed that the total number of examinations in the period 2005 to 2009 was 34.828 in Pernambuco and 27.700 in Alagoas, corresponding to 6.966 and 5.540 average annual examinations in Pernambuco and Alagoas, respectively. The total number of examinations performed in both states in 2009 was twice the number carried out in 2005. Scintigraphy is the cardiovascular examination most performed in both states, followed by bone scintigraphy. Tc-99m is the radionuclide used most often, followed by I-131. The number of tests using Tc-99m in 2009 doubled when compared with the examinations performed in 2005. The results indicate that there has been a significant increase in the number of examinations in MN, and that females outnumber males, as far as the use of this diagnostic resource is concerned. The study of the activities of the radionuclides administered to patients in the states of Pernambuco and Alagoas showed that they are high when compared to the values recommended by the IAEA in its Safety Report Series Document No. 40. (author)

  8. Development of a patient-specific dosimetry estimation system in nuclear medicine examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, H. H.; Dong, S. L.; Yang, H. J. [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing-Hua Univ., Taiwan (China); Chen, S. [Dept. of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical Univ., Taiwan (China); Shih, C. T. [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing-Hua Univ., Taiwan (China); Chuang, K. S. [Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Sciences, National Tsing-Hua Univ., Taiwan (China); Lin, C. H. [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing-Hua Univ., Taiwan (China); Yao, W. J. [PET Center, National Cheng Kung Univ. Hospital, Taiwan (China); Jan, M. L. [Physics Div., Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taiwan (China)

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a patient-specific dosimetry estimation system in nuclear medicine examination using a SimSET-based Monte Carlo code. We added a dose deposition routine to store the deposited energy of the photons during their flights in SimSET and developed a user-friendly interface for reading PET and CT images. Dose calculated on ORNL phantom was used to validate the accuracy of this system. The S values for {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F and {sup 131}I obtained by the system were compared to those from the MCNP4C code and OLINDA. The ratios of S values computed by this system to those obtained with OLINDA for various organs were ranged from 0.93 to 1.18, which are comparable to that obtained from MCNP4C code (0.94 to 1.20). The average ratios of S value were 0.99{+-}0.04, 1.03{+-}0.05, and 1.00{+-}0.07 for isotopes {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, and {sup 99m}Tc, respectively. The simulation time of SimSET was two times faster than MCNP4C's for various isotopes. A 3D dose calculation was also performed on a patient data set with PET/CT examination using this system. Results from the patient data showed that the estimated S values using this system differed slightly from those of OLINDA for ORNL phantom. In conclusion, this system can generate patient-specific dose distribution and display the isodose curves on top of the anatomic structure through a friendly graphic user interface. It may also provide a useful tool to establish an appropriate dose-reduction strategy to patients in nuclear medicine environments. (authors)

  9. A method of analysing experimental data of nuclear reaction cross sections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FengJun; ShenWen-Qing

    1997-01-01

    A method of analysing experimental data of nuclear reaction cross sections σr induced by radioactive beam is described.It can be used in analysis of experimental unclear reaction cross section data obtained by Na-isopope radioactive beams on different targets.Neutron halo has not been found in these nuclei.

  10. Medical Image Processing Server applied to Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, C.; Graffigna, J. P.; Marino, E.; Omati, S.; Holleywell, P.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is framed within the area of medical image processing and aims to present the process of installation, configuration and implementation of a processing server of medical images (MIPS) in the Fundación Escuela de Medicina Nuclear located in Mendoza, Argentina (FUESMEN). It has been developed in the Gabinete de Tecnologia Médica (GA.TE.ME), Facultad de Ingeniería-Universidad Nacional de San Juan. MIPS is a software that using the DICOM standard, can receive medical imaging studies of different modalities or viewing stations, then it executes algorithms and finally returns the results to other devices. To achieve the objectives previously mentioned, preliminary tests were conducted in the laboratory. More over, tools were remotely installed in clinical enviroment. The appropiate protocols for setting up and using them in different services were established once defined those suitable algorithms. Finally, it’s important to focus on the implementation and training that is provided in FUESMEN, using nuclear medicine quality control processes. Results on implementation are exposed in this work.

  11. Investigation of recoil collection method for production of high specific activity nuclear medicine isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K Y; Kunze, J F; Ehrhardt, G J

    1999-09-01

    High specific activity radiopharmaceuticals cannot readily be produced by (n, gamma) reactions in nuclear reactors, because the great abundance of parent atoms remaining have the same chemical characteristics as the produced isotope. We have investigated the effectiveness of using recoil atom collection methods for separating the produced radioisotope. Gold-198, produced from isotopically pure (natural) gold-197, was chosen for these experiments, which were run in the high flux (approximately 10(14) n/cm2 s thermal flux) of the reflector of the University of Missouri Research Reactor. Seven separate experiments were run, with a 2 mm separation between the emitter and the collector. Collection efficiencies were only a few percent of the radioisotope atoms produced in the top atomic layer of the emitter, instead of the 30% range anticipated. Furthermore, the collected radioisotope, instead of being nearly pure, contained a large quantity of the parent. Unless the reason for the "contamination" of product with the parent can be reduced by several orders of magnitude, this "surface hot atom recoil" method appears to offer no practical application for nuclear medicine isotope production.

  12. Intercomparison program of activity measurements in nuclear medicine in Recife, PE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Flavio Chiappetta Paes; Teodosio, Alberto; Santos, Marcus Aurelio P. dos; Lima, Fabiana Farias de; Oliveira, Mercia L. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)]. E-mails: flaviochiappetta@hotmail.com; atmelo@cnen.gov.br; masantos@cnen.gov.br; fflima@cnen.gov.br; mercial@cnen.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    Intercomparison is an important tool for quality assessment, since not only the equipment performance but also the procedures are evaluated and compared. This tool is wide utilized to evaluate the ability of nuclear medicine services (NMS) to measure activities of radiopharmaceuticals. Since 1998, the Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN) has been conducting intercomparison programs at Rio de Janeiro and surroundings, and, after successive rounds of comparison, an improvement in the performance of the radionuclide calibrators have been observed in this region. Similar results were observed worldwide. The Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN) was designated by the LNMRI to establish the intercomparison program of activity measurements in NMS in the Brazilian northeast. The aim of this work is to present the results of the first round of comparison measurements of activity of {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 131}I. This round was carried out in Recife/PE. Six NMS participated in this intercomparison. Additionally to the activity measurement, some information about equipment (calibration and quality control program) and human resources was obtained. All NMS participants complied with the limit established by CNEN for the accuracy of measurement ({+-}10%) for {sup 99}mTc and {sup 131}I. Measurements will be repeated for {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 131}I, and additional rounds will be performed including different radionuclides. (author)

  13. Development of renal simulators for use in nuclear medicine; Desenvolvimento de simuladores renais para uso em medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dullius, Marcos Alexandre

    2014-09-01

    Quality control programs in nuclear medicine include verifying the efficiency of all equipment used for diagnosis and therapy, including scintillation cameras. To that end, we have developed and evaluated the performance of four phantom kidneys - two static anthropomorphic, one semi-dynamic, and one dynamic - to acquire static and dynamic renal scintigraphic images. The static anthropomorphic phantoms were used to characterize and evaluate the response of the processing system for different concentrations of radionuclides through static renal scintigraphy images ({sup 99m}Tc-DMSA), obtained with posterior, right posterior oblique, left posterior oblique, and anterior incidences. The static phantoms were made in two ways; one was made of acrylic from a mold of a pair of human kidneys preserved in formalin, and the second was built with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), in a 3D printer using the Slicer program, based on a computed tomography (CT) of the thorax, using the Slicer program. The semi-dynamic and dynamic phantoms were constructed to characterize and evaluate images of dynamic renal scintigraphy. In the semi-dynamic phantom, the injection of radiotracer was performed manually, whereas in the dynamic phantom, the radiotracer was automatically injected through an injector system. With the semi-dynamic phantom, it was possible to analyze the formation of a renogram with normal renal scintigraphic appearance using an imaging system. The simulations obtained from the dynamic phantom simulator enabled studies of normal renal scintigraphy and four other forms of renograms. The static anthropomorphic phantom kidneys proved to be efficient for use in evaluations of varying concentrations of radionuclides. The dynamic phantom kidney was useful for analysis of scintigraphic images and obtaining different pathways for elimination of the radioisotope, allowing for analysis of different renograms. Therefore, the new kidney phantoms would be useful for quality

  14. High Temperature Steam Corrosion of Cladding for Nuclear Applications: Experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, Kevin M; Garnier, John E; Sergey Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff; George W. Griffith; Shannong M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-01-01

    Stability of cladding materials under off-normal conditions is an important issue for the safe operation of light water nuclear reactors. Metals, ceramics, and metal/ceramic composites are being investigated as substitutes for traditional zirconium-based cladding. To support down-selection of these advanced materials and designs, a test apparatus was constructed to study the onset and evolution of cladding oxidation, and deformation behavior of cladding materials, under loss-of-coolant accident scenarios. Preliminary oxidation tests were conducted in dry oxygen and in saturated steam/air environments at 1000OC. Tube samples of Zr-702, Zr-702 reinforced with 1 ply of a ß-SiC CMC overbraid, and sintered a-SiC were tested. Samples were induction heated by coupling to a molybdenum susceptor inside the tubes. The deformation behavior of He-pressurized tubes of Zr-702 and SiC CMC-reinforced Zr-702, heated to rupture, was also examined.

  15. Guidelines for MIBG-scintigraphy in children; Empfehlungen zur Durchfuehrung der MIBG-Szintigraphie bei Kindern. Leitlinie uebernommen vom Paediatric Committee der European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, P. [CHU Nancy (France); Colarinha, P. [Inst. Portugues de Oncologia, Lisbon (Portugal); Fettich, J. [Univ. Medical Centre Ljubljana (Slovenia); Fischer, S.; Hahn, K.; Porn, U. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. of Munich (Germany); Froekier, J. [Aarhus Univ. Hospital - Skejby (Denmark); Giammarile, F. [Centre Leon Berard, Lyon (France); Gordon, I. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Kabasakal, L. [Cerraphasa Tipp Fakultesi, Nukleer Tipp Ana Bilim Dali, Aksaray (Turkey); Mann, M. [Red Cross Hospital Cape Town (South Africa); Mitjavila, M. [Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Piepsz, A. [AZ VUB and CHU St Pierre, Brussels (Belgium); Sixt, R. [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital Oestra, Goeteborg (Sweden); Velzen, J. van [ARPES (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    These ''Empfehlungen'' are the german translation of the Guidelines on MIBG-Scintigraphy in Children, which were published by the Paediatric Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. (orig.) [German] Bei den vorliegenden Empfehlungen handelt es sich um die deutsche Uebersetzung der vom Paediatric Committee der European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) publizierten Guidelines. (orig.)

  16. Guidelines for direct radionuclide cystography; Empfehlungen zur Durchfuehrung der direkten Radionuklid-Zystographie bei Kindern. Richtlinie uebernommen vom Paediatric Committee der European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fettich, J. [Univ. Medical Centre Ljubljana (Slovenia); Colarinha, P. [Inst. Portugues de Oncologia, Lisboa (Portugal); Fischer, S.; Hahn, K.; Porn, U. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, LMU Muenchen (Germany); Froekier, J. [Aarhus Univ. Hospital - Skejby (Denmark); Gordon, I. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Kabasakal, L. [Cerraphasa Tip Fakultesi, Nukleer Tip Ana Bilim Dali, Aksaray (Turkey); Mann, M. [Inst. of Child Health, Rondebosh, Red Cross Hospital, Capetown (South Africa); Mitjavila, M. [Hospital Universitario de Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Olivier, P. [CHU Nancy (France); Piepsz, A. [CHU St Pierre (Belgium); Roca, I. [Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Sixt, R. [The Queen Silvia Children' s Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden); Velzen, J. van [ARPES (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    These ''Empfehlungen'' are the german translation of the Guidelines on MIBG-Scintigraphy in Children, which were published by the Paediatric Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. (orig.) [German] Bei den vorliegenden Empfehlungen handelt es sich um die deutsche Uebersetzung der vom Paediatric Committee der European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) publizierten Guidelines. (orig.)

  17. Guidelines for glomerular filtration rate determination in children; Empfehlungen zur Bestimmung der glomerulaeren Filtrationsrate bei Kindern. Leitlinie uebernommen vom Paediatric Committee der European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepsz, A. [CHU St. Pierre, Brussels (Belgium); Colarinha, P. [Inst. Portuges de Oncologica, Lisbon (Portugal); Gordon, I. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Hahn, K. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Munich (Germany); Olivier, P. [CHU Nancy (France); Sixt, R. [The Queen Silvia Children' s Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden); Velzen, J. van [ARPES (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    These ''Empfehlungen'' are the german translation of the Guidelines on MIBG-Scintigraphy in Children, which were published by the Paediatric Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. (orig.) [German] Bei den vorliegenden Empfehlungen handelt es sich um die deutsche Uebersetzung der vom Paediatric Committee der European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) publizierten Guidelines. (orig.)

  18. 42 CFR Appendix D to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Nuclear Medicine Technologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... courses in the following areas: (1) Human anatomy and physiology; (2) Physics; (3) Mathematics; (4..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING STANDARDS FOR THE ACCREDITATION OF... of an integrated program in nuclear medicine technology (i.e., two to four years). E....

  19. Development of departmental standard for traceability of measured activity for I-131 therapy capsules used in nuclear medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran Ramamoorthy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available International Basic Safety Standards (International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA provide guidance levels for diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine indicating the maximum usual activity for various diagnostic tests in terms of activities of injected radioactive formulations. An accuracy of ± 10% in the activities of administered radio-pharmaceuticals is being recommended, for expected outcome in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures. It is recommended that the long-term stability of isotope calibrators used in nuclear medicine is to be checked periodically for their performance using a long-lived check source, such as Cs-137, of suitable activity. In view of the un-availability of such a radioactive source, we tried to develop methods to maintain traceability of these instruments, for certifying measured activities for human use. Two re-entrant chambers [(HDR 1000 and Selectron Source Dosimetry System (SSDS] with I-125 and Ir-192 calibration factors in the Department of Radiotherapy were used to measure Iodine-131 (I-131 therapy capsules to establish traceability to Mark V isotope calibrator of the Department of Nuclear Medicine. Special nylon jigs were fabricated to keep I-131 capsule holder in position. Measured activities in all the chambers showed good agreement. The accuracy of SSDS chamber in measuring Ir-192 activities in the last 5 years was within 0.5%, validating its role as departmental standard for measuring activity. The above method is adopted because mean energies of I-131 and Ir-192 are comparable.

  20. 48. Annual meeting of the German Society for Nuclear Medicine. Abstracts; 48. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The proceedings concerning the 48th annual meeting of the German Society for Nuclear Medicine cover 181 papers and 91 posters on the following issues: thyroid; physics and equipment; radiation biology and radiation protection; multimodal imaging, radiochemistry/radiopharmaceuticals; data processing/modeling: oncology (PET, radiotherapy, brain, neck, larynx; thorax, breast, gastrointestinal tract, urology); pediatrics - skeleton; neurology/psychiatry; endocrinology; heart/cardiovascular system.

  1. Advances in nuclear particle dosimetry for radiation protection and medicine - Ninth Symposium on Neutron Dosimetry (Editorial Material, English)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoetelief, J; Bos, A J.; Schuhmacher, H; McDonald, Joseph C.; Schultz, F W.; Pihet, P

    2004-12-15

    The Ninth Symposium on Neutron Dosimetry has been expanded to cover not only neutron radiation but heavy charged particle dosimetry as well. The applications are found in such fields as radiation protection, aircrew dosimetry, medicine, nuclear power and accelerator health physics. Scientists from many countries from around the world presented their work, and described the latest developments in techniques and instrumentation.

  2. The Swedish radiation protection institute's regulations and general advice on nuclear medicine; issued on April 28, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-01

    These regulations and general advice are applicable to nuclear medicine within human medical care. The regulations are also applicable to activities where radioactive substances are administered to individuals in connection to medical or biomedical research and medical examinations for insurance or legal purposes.

  3. Experimental spin distribution in nuclear level schemes from F to Cm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidy, Till von [Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Bucurescu, Dorel [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    The spin distribution of nuclear levels is an essential ingredient of formulas for nuclear level densities. However, experimental information is rather scarce. The distribution is usually assumed to follow the formula f(J)=exp(-J{sup 2}/2{sigma}{sup 2})-exp(-(J+1){sup 2}/2{sigma}{sup 2}) with the spin cut-off parameter {sigma} which corresponds roughly to the maximum of the spin distribution. The theory predicts that {sigma} increases with the moment of inertia, with the nuclear mass and with the nuclear temperature. But the various parameters for these dependencies are not well known. We investigated the experimental spin distribution of 310 nuclei between F and Cm below about 2 MeV in order to test various formulas for {sigma} and to determine the corresponding parameters with least squares fits. The best results will be presented and discussed.

  4. Assessment of exposure of workers to ionizing radiation from radioiodine and technetium in nuclear medicine departmental facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Krajewska

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to its use of ionising radiation, the field of nuclear medicine is a unique and significant part of medical diagnostics and patient treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the internal exposure of nuclear medicine employees to radioiodine 131I and technetium 99mTc as well as to assess the external exposure doses. Material and Methods: The radioiodine 131I and technetium 99mTc contents in the thyroid of staff members (about 100 persons dealing with these radionuclides have been measured in four departments of nuclear medicine. The measurements were conducted with a portable detection unit for in situ measurements of radioiodine and technetium. High sensitivity environmental thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD were used to measure the external exposure dose. Results: The average values and ranges of radioiodine 131I activity measured in the thyroids of all of the medical units' employees were: 83 Bq (range: 70-250 Bq, 280 Bq (range: 70-4000 Bq, 275 Bq (range: 70-1000 Bq for technical staff, nuclear medicine staff and hospital services staff, respectively. The mean value of technetium 99mTc content in the thyroids of nuclear medicine staff was approximately 1500 Bq (range: 50- -1800 Bq. External exposure dose rates were in the range of 0.5-10 μGy/h. Conclusions: The calculated average effective dose for particular person caused by the inhalation of radioiodine 131I is below 5% of 20 mSv/year (occupational exposure limit. Med Pr 2013;64(5:625–630

  5. Numerical and experimental investigations of water hammers in nuclear industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Messahel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear and petroleum industries, supply pipes are often exposed to high pressure loading which can cause to the structure high strains, plasticity and even, in the worst scenario, failure. Fast Hydraulic Transient phenomena such as Water Hammers (WHs are of this type. It generates a pressure wave that propagates in the pipe causing high stress. Such phenomena are of the order of few msecs and numerical simulation can offer a better understanding and an accurate evaluation of the dynamic complex phenomenon including fluid-structure interaction, multi-phase flow, cavitation … For the last decades, the modeling of phase change taking into account the cavitation effects has been at the centre of many industrial applications (chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, … and has a direct impact on the industry as it might cause damages to the installation (pumps, propellers, control valves, …. In this paper, numerical simulation using FSI algorithm and One-Fluid Cavitation models ("Cut-Off" and "HEM (Homogeneous Equilibrium Model Phase-Change" introduced by Saurel et al. [1] of WHs including cavitation effects is presented.

  6. A novel non-linear recursive filter design for extracting high rate pulse features in nuclear medicine imaging and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajedi, Salar; Kamal Asl, Alireza; Ay, Mohammad R; Farahani, Mohammad H; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-06-01

    Applications in imaging and spectroscopy rely on pulse processing methods for appropriate data generation. Often, the particular method utilized does not highly impact data quality, whereas in some scenarios, such as in the presence of high count rates or high frequency pulses, this issue merits extra consideration. In the present study, a new approach for pulse processing in nuclear medicine imaging and spectroscopy is introduced and evaluated. The new non-linear recursive filter (NLRF) performs nonlinear processing of the input signal and extracts the main pulse characteristics, having the powerful ability to recover pulses that would ordinarily result in pulse pile-up. The filter design defines sampling frequencies lower than the Nyquist frequency. In the literature, for systems involving NaI(Tl) detectors and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), with a signal bandwidth considered as 15 MHz, the sampling frequency should be at least 30 MHz (the Nyquist rate), whereas in the present work, a sampling rate of 3.3 MHz was shown to yield very promising results. This was obtained by exploiting the known shape feature instead of utilizing a general sampling algorithm. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed filter enhances count rates in spectroscopy. With this filter, the system behaves almost identically as a general pulse detection system with a dead time considerably reduced to the new sampling time (300 ns). Furthermore, because of its unique feature for determining exact event times, the method could prove very useful in time-of-flight PET imaging.

  7. Summary Report of the Workshop on The Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semkova, V. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Pritychenko, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-10-10

    The Workshop on the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database (EXFOR) was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 6 to 10 October 2014. The workshop was organized to discuss various aspects of the EXFOR compilation process including compilation rules, different techniques for nuclear reaction data measurements, software developments, etc. A summary of the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop is reported here.

  8. Summary Report of the Workshop on The Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semkova, V. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Pritychenko, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The Workshop on the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database (EXFOR) was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 6 to 10 October 2014. The workshop was organized to discuss various aspects of the EXFOR compilation process including compilation rules, different techniques for nuclear reaction data measurements, software developments, etc. A summary of the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop is reported here.

  9. Methods and benefits of experimental seismic evaluation of nuclear power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This study reviews experimental techniques, instrumentation requirements, safety considerations, and benefits of performing vibration tests on nuclear power plant containments and internal components. The emphasis is on testing to improve seismic structural models. Techniques for identification of resonant frequencies, damping, and mode shapes, are discussed. The benefits of testing with regard to increased damping and more accurate computer models are oulined. A test plan, schedule and budget are presented for a typical PWR nuclear power plant.

  10. EXFOR – a global experimental nuclear reaction data repository: Status and new developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semkova Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC have collaborated since the 1960s on the worldwide collection, compilation and dissemination of experimental nuclear reaction data. New publications are systematically complied, and all agreed data assembled and incorporated within the EXFOR database. Recent upgrades to achieve greater completeness of the contents are described, along with reviews and adjustments of the compilation rules for specific types of data.

  11. Advances in Experimental Studies on Treatment of Psoriasis by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洪儒; 瞿幸

    2002-01-01

    @@ Psoriasis is a chronic and recurrent dermatosis marked by excessive hyperplasia of epidermal cells. The cause and pathogenesis are unknown. In the last few years, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has manifested its strength in treating psoriasis. In order to delve into the mechanism governing the TCM treatment of psoriasis, some clinical and experimental studies were carried out. The following is a review of the advance of the studies since the 1990's.Effects on Proliferation and Differentiation of Keratinocytes (Epithelial Cells)

  12. Experimental aspects of quarkonia production and suppression in cold and hot nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    Frawley, A D

    2015-01-01

    When heavy Quarkonia are formed in collisions between between nuclei, their production cross section is modified relative to that in p+p collisions. The physical effects that cause this modification fall into two categories. Hot matter effects are due to the large energy density generated in the nuclear collision, which disrupts the formation of the quarkonium state. Cold nuclear matter effects are due to the fact that the quarkonium state is created in a nuclear target. I will review experimental aspects of quarkonia production due to both hot and cold matter effects.

  13. Nuclear Physics Division Institute of Experimental Physics Warsaw University annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osuch, S. [ed.

    1995-12-31

    In the presented Annual Report the activities of the Nuclear Physics Division of the Institute of Experimental Physics of the Warsaw University in 1994 are described. The report consist of three sections: (i) Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure (12 articles); (ii) Experimental Methods and Instrumentation (2 articles); (iii) Other Research (1 article). Additionally the list of seminars held at the NPD, personnel list and list of published papers is also given. In the first, leading article of the report written by head of NPD prof. Ch. Droste the general description of the Department activity is presented.

  14. Dose received by occupationally exposed workers at a nuclear medicine department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, O.; Sánchez-Uribe, N. A.; Rodríguez-Laguna, A.; Medina, L. A.; Estrada, E.; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E.

    2012-10-01

    Personal Dose Equivalent (PDE) values were determined for occupational exposed workers (OEW) at the Nuclear Medicine Department (NMD) of "Instituto Nacional de Cancerología" (INCan), Mexico, using TLD-100 thermoluminescent dosemeters. OEW at NMD, INCan make use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Radionuclides associated to a pharmaceutical compound used at this Department are 131I, 18F, 68Ga, 99mTc, 111In and 11C with main gamma emission energies between 140 and 511 keV. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the metrology department of "Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares" (ININ), Mexico. Every occupational worker used dark containers with three dosimeters which were replaced monthly for a total of 5 periods. Additionally, control dosemeters were also placed at a site free of radioactive sources in order to determine the background radiation. Results were adjusted to find PDE/day and estimating annual PDE values in the range between 2 mSv (background) and 9 mSv. The mean annual value is 3.51 mSv and the standard deviation SD is 0.78 mSv. Four of the 16 OEW received annual doses higher than the average +1 SD (4.29 mSv). Results depend on OEW daily activities and were consistent for each OEW for the 5 studied periods as well as with PDE values reported by the firm that performs the monthly service. All obtained values are well within the established annual OEW dose limit stated in the "Reglamento General de Seguridad Radiológica", México (50 mSv), as well as within the lower limit recommended by the "International Commission on Radiation Protection" (ICRP), report no.60 (20 mSv). These results verify the adequate compliance of the NMD at INCan, Mexico with the norms given by the national regulatory commission.

  15. Importance of the nutritional status for the interpretation of nuclear medicine examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egberto Gaspar de Moura

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition is very prevalent in the Third World, but still in developing Countries and is found in certain communities in developed Countries. Several laboratories examinations are affected by malnutrition. Recently, gestational or neonatal malnutrition were considered to contribute to the development of chronic diseases in adulthood, this phenomena was named programming or metabolic imprinting. Similar consideration were suggested for Nuclear Medicine examinations. Here we review the literature about this aspect and present our own data showing changes in biodistribution of a radiopharmaceutical compound in different animal models of adult malnutrition or caused by maternal malnutrition programming.A desnutrição é muito prevalente em países do Terceiro Mundo, mas ainda o é em países em desenvolvimento e em certas comunidades de países desenvolvidos. Diversos exames laboratoriais são afetados pela desnutrição. Recentemente, demonstrou-se que a desnutrição no período gestacional ou neonatal contribui para o surgimento de doenças crônicas na idade adulta. Este fenômeno foi denominado de programação ou impressão metabólica. Considera-se, de forma similar, que os exames de Medicina Nuclear poderiam ser afetados pela desnutrição ou programação. Neste artigo revisamos a literatura a este respeito, incluindo nossos próprios dados que mostram modificações na biodistribuição de um radiofarmaco em diferentes modelos animais de desnutrição em adultos ou causada por programação.

  16. Dose received by occupationally exposed workers at a nuclear medicine department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, O.; Sanchez-Uribe, N. A.; Rodriguez-Laguna, A.; Medina, L. A.; Estrada, E.; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico) and Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-542, 04510, DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando No.22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico) and Unidad de Investigacion Biomedica en Cancer INCan-UNAM, Av. San Fernando No.22 C.P. 4080 (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando No.22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    Personal Dose Equivalent (PDE) values were determined for occupational exposed workers (OEW) at the Nuclear Medicine Department (NMD) of 'Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia' (INCan), Mexico, using TLD-100 thermoluminescent dosemeters. OEW at NMD, INCan make use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Radionuclides associated to a pharmaceutical compound used at this Department are {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, {sup 68}Ga, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In and {sup 11}C with main gamma emission energies between 140 and 511 keV. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the metrology department of 'Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares' (ININ), Mexico. Every occupational worker used dark containers with three dosimeters which were replaced monthly for a total of 5 periods. Additionally, control dosemeters were also placed at a site free of radioactive sources in order to determine the background radiation. Results were adjusted to find PDE/day and estimating annual PDE values in the range between 2 mSv (background) and 9 mSv. The mean annual value is 3.51 mSv and the standard deviation SD is 0.78 mSv. Four of the 16 OEW received annual doses higher than the average +1 SD (4.29 mSv). Results depend on OEW daily activities and were consistent for each OEW for the 5 studied periods as well as with PDE values reported by the firm that performs the monthly service. All obtained values are well within the established annual OEW dose limit stated in the {sup R}eglamento General de Seguridad Radiologica{sup ,} Mexico (50 mSv), as well as within the lower limit recommended by the 'International Commission on Radiation Protection' (ICRP), report no.60 (20 mSv). These results verify the adequate compliance of the NMD at INCan, Mexico with the norms given by the national regulatory commission.

  17. Current Status of Nuclear Medicine Practice in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez, Diana; Orellana, Pilar; Gutiérrez, Claudia; Ramirez, Raúl; Mut, Fernando; Torres, Leonel

    2015-10-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine (NM) in the Latin American and Caribbean region has experienced important growth in the last decade. However, there is great heterogeneity among countries regarding the availability of technology and human resources. According to data collected through June 2014 by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the total number of γ cameras in the region is 1,231, with an average of 2.16 per million inhabitants. Over 90% of the equipment is SPECT cameras; 7.6% of which have hybrid technology. There are 161 operating PET or PET/CT cameras in 12 member states, representing a rate of 0.3 per million people. Most NM centers belong to the private health system and are in capitals or major cities. Only 4 countries have the capability of assembling 99Mo-99mTc generators, and 2 countries produce 99mTc from nuclear reactors. Cold kits are produced in some countries, and therapeutic agents are mostly imported from outside the region. There are 35 operative cyclotrons. In relation to human resources: there is 1 physician per γ camera, 1.6 technologists per γ camera, 0.1 medical physicist per center, and approximately 0.1 radiochemist or radiopharmacist per center. Nearly 94% of the procedures are diagnostic. PET studies represent about 4% of the total. The future of NM in the Latin American and Caribbean region is promising, with great potential and possibilities. Some of the most important factors driving the region toward greater homogeneity in the availability and application of NM, and bridging the gaps between countries, are clinician awareness of the importance of NM in managing diseases prevalent in the region, increased building of capacity, continuous and strong support from international organizations such as the IAEA through national and regional projects, and strong public-private partnerships and government commitment.

  18. Critical Behavior in Light Nuclear Systems: (I) Experimental Aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Y G; Wada, R; Hagel, K; Wang, J; Keutgen, T; Majka, Z; Murray, M; Qin, L; Smith, P; Alfaro, R; Cibor, J; Cinausero, M; Masri, Y E; Fabris, D; Fioretto, E; Keksis, A L; Lunardon, M; Makeev, A; Marie, N; Martin, E; Martínez-Davalos, A; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Nebbia, G; Prete, G; Rizzi, V; Ruangma, A; Shetty, D V; Souliotis, G A; Staszel, P; Veselsky, M; Viesti, G; Winchester, E M; Yennello, S J

    2004-01-01

    An extensive experimental survey of the features of the disassembly of a small quasi-projectile system with $A \\sim$ 36, produced in the reactions of 47 MeV/nucleon $^{40}$Ar + $^{27}$Al, $^{48}$Ti and $^{58}$Ni, has been carried out. Nuclei in the excitation energy range of 1-9 MeV/u have been investigated employing a new method to reconstruct the quasi-projectile source. At an excitation energy $\\sim$ 5.6 MeV/nucleon many observables indicate the presence of maximal fluctuations in the de-excitation processes. The fragment topological structure shows that the rank sorted fragments obey Zipf's law at the point of largest fluctuations providing another indication of a liquid gas phase transition. The caloric curve for this system shows a monotonic increase of temperature with excitation energy and no apparent plateau. The temperature at the point of maximal fluctuations is $8.3 \\pm 0.5$ MeV. Taking this temperature as the critical temperature and employing the caloric curve information we have extracted the c...

  19. Establishment of Experimental Equipment for Training of Professionals in the Nuclear Radiation Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S. K.; Seo, K. W.; Joo, Y. C.; Kim, I. C.; Woo, C. K.; Yoo, B. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    The main purpose of this project is to establish experimental equipment for training of professionals and students in the field of radiation measurement, and settle the foundation for the advanced education system and program. The priority for the experimental equipment had been deduced by reviewing of the Nuclear Training and Education Center of KAERI and other country's training courses. Equipment for training of radiation professionals are High-Purity Germanium spectroscopic systems, alpha analyzers, and hand-held gamma/neutron inspector systems. For the basic experiments, electric personal dosimeters and a reader, radiation survey meters, and various alpha, beta and gamma radiation isotopes have been equipped. Some old or disused equipment and devices were disposed and re-arranged, and a new experiment lab had been settled for gamma spectroscopy. Along with the preparation of equipment, 14 experimental modules have been selected for practical and essential experiments training to professionals from industries, universities and research organizations. Among the modules, 7 important experiment notes had been prepared in Korea and also in English. As a consequence, these advanced radiation experimental setting would be a basis to cooperate with IAEA or other countries for international training courses. These activities would be a foundation for our contribution to the international nuclear society and for improving our nuclear competitiveness. The experimental equipment and application notes developed in this study will be used also by other training institutes and educational organizations through introducing and encouraging to use them to the nuclear society.

  20. Experimental determination of nuclear parameters for RP-0 reactor core; Determinacion experimental de los parametros nucleares para el nucleo tipo MTR del reactor nuclear RP-0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cajacuri, Rafael A. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2000-07-01

    In the nuclear reactor for investigations RP-0 which is in Lima, Peru, that is a open pool class reactor with 1 to 10 watts of power and as a nuclear fuel uranium 238 enriched to 20% constituted by elements of Material Testing Reactor fuel class. This has reflectors of graphite and moderator of water demineralized. In 1996/1997 was measured in this reactor the following parameters: position of the control bar that make critic the reactor, critic height of moderator, excess of reactivity of the nucleus, parameter of reactivity for vacuum, parameter of reactivity for temperature, reactivity of its control bar, levels of doses in the reactor. (author)

  1. Nuclear Medicine in the Philippines: A Glance at the Past, a Gaze at the Present, and a Glimpse of the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Patricia A; Luis, Teofilo O L San

    2016-01-01

    While the introduction of radioactive tracers in the study of metabolic pathways has been well-documented in clinical thyroidology as early as 1924, the widespread utilization in other clinical specialties has been hampered by slow developments in radiation-detecting devices and in the production of appropriate radiopharmaceuticals, in addition to the morbid fear of radiation. In the Philippines, the first radioisotope laboratory was established in 1956. Ten years later, the Philippine Society of Nuclear Medicine was formed. Through the years, challenges were overcome, foundations were laid down, growth was encouraged, friendships with other organizations were built, adjustments were made, and rules were enforced. To date, there are approximately 58 nuclear medicine centers randomly distributed from north to south of the Philippines, 7 accredited nuclear medicine training institutions, 95 board-certified nuclear medicine physicians (a few of whom are also internationally recognized), and a regionally-indexed Philippine Journal of Nuclear Medicine. Qualifying examinations for technologists were also recently instated. International relations are constantly strengthened by sending trainees abroad and accepting foreign trainees here, as well as participating in conferences and other endeavors. While the cost of putting up nuclear medicine centers in the Philippines is still prohibitive, it should not pose too much of a constraint as there are foreign and local parties willing to help. With appropriate instrumentation, targeting radiopharmaceuticals and trained human resources, nuclear medicine can indeed contribute much to health care delivery.

  2. Modeling the nuclear magnetic resonance behavior of lung: from electrical engineering to critical care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutillo, A G; Ailion, D C

    1999-01-01

    The present article reviews the basic principles of a new approach to the characterization of pulmonary disease. This approach is based on the unique nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of the lung and combines experimental measurements (using specially developed NMR techniques) with theoretical simulations. The NMR signal from inflated lungs decays very rapidly compared with the signal from completely collapsed (airless) lungs. This phenomenon is due to the presence of internal magnetic field inhomogeneity produced by the alveolar air-tissue interface (because air and water have different magnetic susceptibilities). The air-tissue interface effects can be detected and quantified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques using temporally symmetric and asymmetric spin-echo sequences. Theoretical models developed to explain the internal (tissue-induced) magnetic field inhomogeneity in aerated lungs predict the NMR lung behavior as a function of various technical and physiological factors (e.g., the level of lung inflation) and simulate the effects of various lung disorders (in particular, pulmonary edema) on this behavior. Good agreement has been observed between the predictions obtained from the mathematical models and the results of experimental NMR measurements in normal and diseased lungs. Our theoretical and experimental data have important pathophysiological and clinical implications, especially with respect to the characterization of acute lung disease (e.g., pulmonary edema) and the management of critically ill patients.

  3. An overview of radioactive waste disposal procedures of a nuclear medicine department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, R; Binukumar, J P; Sreeram, Rajan; Arunkumar, L S

    2011-04-01

    Radioactive wastes from hospitals form one of the various types of urban wastes, which are managed in developed countries in a safe and organized way. In countries where growth of nuclear medicine services are envisaged, implementations of existing regulatory policies and guidelines in hospitals in terms of handling of radioactive materials used in the treatment of patients need a good model. To address this issue, a brief description of the methods is presented. A designed prototype waste storage trolley is found to be of great help in decaying the I-131 solid wastes from wards before releasing to waste treatment plant of the city. Two delay tanks with collection time of about 2 months and delay time of 2 months alternately result in 6 releases of urine toilet effluents to the sewage treatment plant (STP) of the hospital annually. Samples of effluents collected at releasing time documented radioactive releases of I-131 much below recommended levels of bi-monthly release. External counting of samples showed good statistical correlation with calculated values. An overview of safe procedures for radioactive waste disposal is presented.

  4. An overview of radioactive waste disposal procedures of a nuclear medicine department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, R.; Binukumar, J. P.; Sreeram, Rajan; Arunkumar, L. S.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive wastes from hospitals form one of the various types of urban wastes, which are managed in developed countries in a safe and organized way. In countries where growth of nuclear medicine services are envisaged, implementations of existing regulatory policies and guidelines in hospitals in terms of handling of radioactive materials used in the treatment of patients need a good model. To address this issue, a brief description of the methods is presented. A designed prototype waste storage trolley is found to be of great help in decaying the I-131 solid wastes from wards before releasing to waste treatment plant of the city. Two delay tanks with collection time of about 2 months and delay time of 2 months alternately result in 6 releases of urine toilet effluents to the sewage treatment plant (STP) of the hospital annually. Samples of effluents collected at releasing time documented radioactive releases of I-131 much below recommended levels of bi-monthly release. External counting of samples showed good statistical correlation with calculated values. An overview of safe procedures for radioactive waste disposal is presented. PMID:21731225

  5. Exposure of the lens of the eye in nuclear medicine; Strahlenexposition der Augenlinse in der Nuklearmedizin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szermerski, B.; Bruchmann, I.; Geworski, L. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Stabsstelle Strahlenschutz und Abt. Medizinische Physik

    2015-07-01

    The dose threshold for the lens of the eye for occupationally radiation-exposed personnel will be reduced from 150 mSv to 20 mSv per year. Publications addressing the expected eye lens doses of personnel in nuclear medicine are only barely known. In this work, dose rate constants for the quantity H{sub p}(3) were determined and corresponding dose estimations were calculated. Therefore dosimeters measuring H{sub p}(3) were exposed at the surface of an Alderson head phantom. The exposure of the dosimeters with frequently used radionuclides (F-18, Ga-68, Y-90, Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, I-131 and Ra-223+) was performed under varying source-dosimeter distances from 20 cm to 50 cm. The dose rate constants were determined to be 0.021 mSv.m{sup 2}/(GBq.h) for Tc-99m (10 ml syringe) and 2.161 mSv.m{sup 2}/(GBq.h) for Y-90-spheres (5 ml syringe). The other results take values between these ranges. Using the determined dose rate constants, prospective doses to the eye lens could be calculated.

  6. Bone metastases: assessment of therapeutic response through radiological and nuclear medicine imaging modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, V; Andreopoulos, D; Frangos, S; Tselis, N; Giannopoulou, E; Lutz, S

    2011-11-01

    Radiological and nuclear medicine imaging modalities used for assessing bone metastases treatment response include plain and digitalised radiography (XR), skeletal scintigraphy (SS), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET/CT. Here we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assessment modalities as evident through different clinical trials. Additionally, we present the more established response criteria of the International Union Against Cancer and the World Health Organization and compare them with newer MD Anderson criteria. Even though serial XR and SS have been used to assess the therapeutic response for decades, several months are required before changes are evident. Newer techniques, such as MRI or PET, may allow an earlier evaluation of response that may be quantified through monitoring changes in signal intensity and standard uptake value, respectively. Moreover, the application of PET/CT, which can follow both morphological and metabolic changes, has yielded interesting and promising results that give a new insight into the natural history of metastatic bone disease. However, only a few studies have investigated the application of these newer techniques and further clinical trials are needed to corroborate their promising results and establish the most suitable imaging parameters and evaluation time points. Last, but not least, there is an absolute need to adopt uniform response criteria for bone metastases through an international consensus in order to better assess treatment response in terms of accuracy and objectivity.

  7. Nuclear medicine in the diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism; Nuklearmedizinische Diagnostik des primaeren Hyperparathyreoidismus (pHPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luster, M. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany); Timm, S. [Chirurgische Universitaetsklinik Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2003-03-01

    Nuclear medicine recently has gained importance in the diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism. Stimulated by the introduction of minimal invasive surgery preoperative imaging is mandatory for the planning of the surgical approach. Sestamibi scintigraphy has proven its superiority in sensitivity concerning the lesion detection especially in primary hyperparathyroidism as compared to other imaging modalities. Therefore this test is not only used for the diagnosis of relapsing or persistent disease but also successfully implemented in the initial work-up. The wider use of SPECT contributed significantly to a further increase of the detection rate and is recommended as a standard procedure. (orig.) [German] Die nuklearmedizinische Nebenschilddruesendiagnostik hat in juengerer Vergangenheit zunehmende Bedeutung erlangt. Durch die Einfuehrung minimal invasiver Operationstechniken ist eine praeoperative Bildgebung fuer die Planung des Eingriffs Voraussetzung. Die Sestamibi-Szintigraphie hat in diesem Zusammenhang in zahlreichen Studien eine Ueberlegenheit gegenueber anderen Verfahren im Hinblick auf die Sensitivitaet bei der Detektion von Laesionen, insbesondere beim primaeren Hyperparathyreoidismus, gezeigt. Demzufolge wird dieses Untersuchungsverfahren nicht nur wie bisher vor Rezidiveingriffen oder bei persistierender Erkrankung, sondern auch erfolgreich vor Erstoperationen eingesetzt. Die vermehrte Nutzung der SPECT-Technik konnte in den letzten Jahren zu einer weiteren Steigerung der Detektionsrate beitragen und sollte grosszuegig Verwendung finden. (orig.)

  8. The development of new radionuclide generator systems for nuclear medicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Callahan, A.P.; Mirzadeh, S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Brihaye, C.; Guillaume, M. (Liege Univ. (Belgium). Cyclotron Research Center)

    1991-01-01

    Radioisotope generator systems have traditionally played a central role in nuclear medicine in providing radioisotopes for both research and clinical applications. In this paper, the development of several tungsten-188/rhenium-188 prototype generators which provide rhenium-188 for radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) is discussed. The authors have recently demonstrated that carrier-free iridium-194 can be obtained from the activated carbon system from decay of reactor-produced osmium-194 for potential RAIT applications. Instrumentation advances such as the new generation of high-count-rate (fast) gamma camera systems for first-pass technology require the availability of generator-produced ultra short-lived radioisotopes for radionuclide angiography (RNA). The activated carbon generator is an efficient system to obtain ultra short-lived iridium-191 m from osmium-191 for RNA. In addition, the growing number of PET centers has stimulated research in generators which provide positron-emitting radioisotopes. Copper-62, obtained from the zinc-62 generator, is currently used for PET evaluation of organ perfusion. The availability of the parent radioisotopes, the fabrication and use of these generators, and the practical factors for use of these systems in the radiopharmacy are discussed. 74 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Individual monitoring in nuclear medicine therapeutic procedures using extremity dosemeters LiF(Mg, Cu, P).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, G; Del Dottore, F; Fabbri, C; Tassinari, L; Pagan, S; Rustignoli, M; Motta, P

    2011-03-01

    Unsealed beta-gamma-emitting sources are used (15 GBq (90)Y each session) in nuclear medicine therapeutic procedures. Inside the manipulation cell and while giving the injection to the patient, the skin exposure is very high; electron radiation field is not homogeneous and thus the exposure of the extremities is not uniform. Particular individual monitoring is adopted: single thermoluminescence dosemeter, wrapped in polyethylene film and placed on an adhesive tape, is positioned on the tip of the fingers; 6-10 dosemeters are assigned to each operator per session. The energy and angle response is studied for X-ray spectra, (90)Sr/Y and (204)Tl--a unique mean calibration factor is calculated in order to estimate H(p)(0.07). Performance of dosemeter is analysed according to ISO 62387-1(2007) and the combined uncertainty (calculated using the Monte Carlo method) results lie in the order of 11 %. This method reveals the critical step of manipulation and administration and ensures that dose limits are not exceeded.

  10. An overview of radioactive waste disposal procedures of a nuclear medicine department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ravichandran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive wastes from hospitals form one of the various types of urban wastes, which are managed in developed countries in a safe and organized way. In countries where growth of nuclear medicine services are envisaged, implementations of existing regulatory policies and guidelines in hospitals in terms of handling of radioactive materials used in the treatment of patients need a good model. To address this issue, a brief description of the methods is presented. A designed prototype waste storage trolley is found to be of great help in decaying the I-131 solid wastes from wards before releasing to waste treatment plant of the city. Two delay tanks with collection time of about 2 months and delay time of 2 months alternately result in 6 releases of urine toilet effluents to the sewage treatment plant (STP of the hospital annually. Samples of effluents collected at releasing time documented radioactive releases of I-131 much below recommended levels of bi-monthly release. External counting of samples showed good statistical correlation with calculated values. An overview of safe procedures for radioactive waste disposal is presented.

  11. Exposures from nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures: the dose impact on the Aosta Valley population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimonetto, S; Arrichiello, C; Peruzzo Cornetto, A; Catuzzo, P; Zeverino, M; Poti, C; Meloni, T; Pasquino, M; Tofani, S

    2013-12-01

    The present work evaluates the per-procedure, annual collective and per-capita effective doses to the Aosta Valley region population from nuclear medicine (NM) examinations performed from 2005 to 2011 at the regional NM department. Based on its demographical and socioeconomics characteristics, this area can be considered as representative of the level I countries, as defined by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. The NM per-procedures effective doses were within the range of 0.018-35 mSv. A steady frequency per 10 000 inhabitants has been observed, together with a decrease for thyroid and whole-body bone scintigraphy. Myocardial and bone scintigraphy studies were the major contributors to the total collective effective dose. The mean annual collective and per-capita effective doses to the population were 15 man Sv y(-1) and 120 µSv y(-1), respectively. The NM contribution to the total per-capita effective dose accounts for 5.9 % of that due to the medical ionising radiation examinations overall.

  12. Activity standardisation of (18)F and ionisation chamber calibration for nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, H; Klein, R; Kossert, K

    2007-05-01

    Primary activity standardisations were performed on solutions of (18)F using 4pibeta-gamma coincidence counting and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) according to the CIEMAT/NIST method. A beta(+)-emission probability of 96.86% was used for both methods. The various standardised (18)F solutions were measured in ionisation chambers of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and compared by determining radionuclide calibration factors. Already in 2001 an (18)F solution had been standardised at the PTB and compared with the results of nine national metrology institutes (NMIs), using the ISOCAL IV secondary radionuclide calibrators of the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) as transfer instruments and a (68)Ge check source solution. These results were linked to the International Reference System (SIR) at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) by aliquots of solutions sent by the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (BNM-LNHB) and the NPL. Further on, in 2005, PTB sent an aliquot of an (18)F solution to the SIR for ionisation chamber measurements. A value of the equivalent activity was determined and included in the key comparison database (KCDB). The recent PTB value of the equivalent activity of the SIR is in good agreement with the key comparison reference value determined from five NMIs. These results confirm that the standardisation of (18)F solutions can be achieved with the accuracy required for use in nuclear medicine and, in particular, for applications in positron emission tomography (PET).

  13. The role and rationale of nuclear medicine procedures in the differential diagnosis of renovascular hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaufox, M.D. (Albert Einstein Coll. of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The use of radionuclides in the differential diagnosis of renovascular hypertension has gone through many periods of enthusiasm and of disappointment. Regardless of the problems with the routine renogram, the availability of gamma camera renal evaluation makes possible meaningful preintervention of screening. The use of the test as a follow-up procedure is an extremely important but often overlooked application of radionuclides in the evaluation of renovascular hypertension. The radionuclide technique is a sensitive and accurate method of evaluating the results of percutaneous angioplasty or surgery or renal function in the affected kidney of patients with renovascular disease. A major change in our approach to the nuclear medicine diagnosis of renovascular hypertension has been the introduction of captopril renography. Although there is still a great deal of work to be done and many investigators are actively studying captopril renography, the potential of the test is clear. Captopril renography should include a baseline renogram, followed by the administration of 25 mg of captopril and a repeat study. Specificity and sensitivity data on this test probably will not be available for several years, but preliminary results are encouraging enough to justify routine use at this time in clinics in which screening for renovascular hypertension is carried out. (author).

  14. Image fusion in open-architecture quality-oriented nuclear medicine and radiology departments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohjonen, H

    1997-12-31

    Imaging examinations of patients belong to the most widely used diagnostic procedures in hospitals. Multimodal digital imaging is becoming increasingly common in many fields of diagnosis and therapy planning. Patients are frequently examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound imaging (US) in addition to single photon (SPET) or positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of the study was to provide means for improving the quality of the whole imaging and viewing chain in nuclear medicine and radiology. The specific aims were: (1) to construct and test a model for a quality assurance system in radiology based on ISO standards, (2) to plan a Dicom based image network for fusion purposes using ATM and Ethernet technologies, (3) to test different segmentation methods in quantitative SPET, (4) to study and implement a registration and visualisation method for multimodal imaging, (5) to apply the developed method in selected clinical brain and abdominal images, and (6) to investigate the accuracy of the registration procedure for brain SPET and MRI 90 refs. The thesis includes also six previous publications by author

  15. Investigation of public exposure resulted from the radioiodine delay tank facility of nuclear medicine department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd; Ali, Abdul Muhaimin Mat; Abdullah, Reduan; Idris, Abdullah Waidi

    2016-01-01

    The study is carried out to assess the exposure rate that could contribute to public exposure in a radioiodine ward delay tank facility of Radiotherapy, Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Department, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM). The exposure rate at several locations including the delay tank room, doorway and at the public walking route was measured using Victoreen 415P-RYR survey meter. The radioactive level of the 131I waste was measured using Captus 3000 well counting system. The results showed that exposure rate and total count of the delay tank sample increased when the radioiodine ward was fully occupied with patient and reduced when the ward was vacant. Occupancy of radioiodine ward for two consecutive weeks had dramatically increased the exposure rate around the delay tank and radioactive level of 131I waste. The highest exposure rate and radioactive level was recorded when the ward was occupied for two consecutive weeks with 177.00 µR/h and 58.36 kcpm respectively. The exposure rate decreased 15.76 % when the door of the delay tank room was closed. The exposure rate at public walking route decreased between 15.58 % and 36.92 % as the distance increased between 1 and 3 m.

  16. Scene setting: criteria for acceptability and suspension levels in diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Jim; Faulkner, Keith; Christofides, Stelios; Lillicrap, Stephen; Horton, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    The EC (European Commission) Directive on radiation protection of patients requires that Criteria for Acceptability of Equipment in Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy be established throughout the member states. This paper reviews the background to this requirement and to its implementation in practice. It notes parallel requirements in the EC medical devices directive and International Electrotechnical Commission standards. It is also important to be aware and that both sets of requirements should ideally be harmonised due to the global nature of the equipment industry. The paper further reviews the type of criteria that can be well applied for the above purposes, and defines qualitative criteria and suspension levels suitable for application. Both are defined and relationships with other acceptance processes are considered (including acceptance testing at the time of purchase, commissioning and the issue of second-hand equipment). Suspension levels are divided into four types, A, B, C and D, depending on the quality of evidence and consensus on which they are based. Exceptional situations involving, for example, new or rapidly evolving technology are also considered. The publication and paper focuses on the role of the holder of the equipment and related staff, particularly the medical physics expert and the practitioner. Advice on how the criteria should be created and implemented and how this might be coordinated with the supplier is provided for these groups. Additional advice on the role of the regulator is provided.

  17. Physical aspects of scintigraphy-based dosimetry for nuclear medicine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geworski, L.; Knoop, B.O. [Dept. of Radiation Protection and Medical Physics, Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Schaefer, A.; Kirsch, C.M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland Univ. Medical Center, Homburg (Germany); Pinkert, J. [Bayer Vital GmbH, Leverkusen (Germany); Plotkin, M. [Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Charitee, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    In nuclear medicine therapy the treatment of tumours by radiation exposure from internally deposited labelled antibodies or labelled peptides is currently an active field of investigation. To permit the efficient delivery of high amounts of radiation dose to tumours while limiting the radiation dose to critical organs dosimetry calculations have to be performed. These are relying on scintigraphic data being input to the well known MIRD formalism. This paper focuses on the methods and the difficulties associated with the scintigraphic determination of organ kinetics. The physical properties of the well-known scintigraphic imaging modalities, PET, SPECT and planar scintigraphy, are discussed thereby taking into account the properties of the appropriate radionuclides currently being available for therapy and dosimetry. Several arguments are given and disputed for the limited clinical use of PET and SPECT in dosimetry and the ongoing preference of planar whole-body imaging as the method of choice. The quantitative restrictions still inherent to this method are also discussed in detail. Procedural recommendations are proposed covering all processes related to data acquisition, data correction and data analysis which finally lead to reliable estimations of organ dose. (orig.)

  18. E-learning for medical imaging specialists: introducing blended learning in a nuclear medicine specialist course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslerud, Torjan; Tulipan, Andreas Julius; Gray, Robert M; Biermann, Martin

    2017-07-01

    While e-learning has become an important tool in teaching medical students, the training of specialists in medical imaging is still dominated by lecture-based courses. To assess the potential of e-learning in specialist education in medical imaging. An existing lecture-based five-day course in Clinical Nuclear Medicine (NM) was enhanced by e-learning resources and activities, including practical exercises. An anonymized survey was conducted after participants had completed and passed the multiple choice electronic course examination. Twelve out of 15 course participants (80%) responded. Overall satisfaction with the new course format was high, but 25% of the respondents wanted more interactive elements such as discussions and practical exercises. The importance of lecture handouts and supplementary online material such as selected original articles and professional guidelines was affirmed by all the respondents (92% fully, 8% partially), while 75% fully and 25% partially agreed that the lectures had been interesting and relevant. E-learning represents a hitherto unrealized potential in the education of medical specialists. It may expedite training of medical specialists while at the same time containing costs.

  19. Bone imaging in prostate cancer: the evolving roles of nuclear medicine and radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Gary J R; Azad, Gurdip; Padhani, Anwar R

    2016-01-01

    The bone scan continues to be recommended for both the staging and therapy response assessment of skeletal metastases from prostate cancer. However, it is widely recognised that bone scans have limited sensitivity for disease detection and is both insensitive and non-specific for determining treatment response, at an early enough time point to be clinically useful. We, therefore, review the evolving roles of nuclear medicine and radiology for this application. We have reviewed the published literature reporting recent developments in imaging bone metastases in prostate cancer, and provide a balanced synopsis of the state of the art. The development of single-photon emission computed tomography combined with computed tomography has improved detection sensitivity and specificity but has not yet been shown to lead to improvements in monitoring therapy. A number of bone-specific and tumour-specific tracers for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) are now available for advanced prostate cancer that show promise in both clinical settings. At the same time, the development of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) that incorporates diffusion-weighted imaging also offers significant improvements for detection and therapy response assessment. There are emerging data showing comparative SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and WB-MRI test performance for disease detection, but no compelling data on the usefulness of these technologies in response assessment have yet emerged.

  20. Investigation of public exposure resulted from the radioiodine delay tank facility of nuclear medicine department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd, E-mail: mfahmi@usm.my; Ali, Abdul Muhaimin Mat; Abdullah, Reduan; Idris, Abdullah Waidi [School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kota Bharu, Kelantan (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    The study is carried out to assess the exposure rate that could contribute to public exposure in a radioiodine ward delay tank facility of Radiotherapy, Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Department, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM). The exposure rate at several locations including the delay tank room, doorway and at the public walking route was measured using Victoreen 415P-RYR survey meter. The radioactive level of the {sup 131}I waste was measured using Captus 3000 well counting system. The results showed that exposure rate and total count of the delay tank sample increased when the radioiodine ward was fully occupied with patient and reduced when the ward was vacant. Occupancy of radioiodine ward for two consecutive weeks had dramatically increased the exposure rate around the delay tank and radioactive level of {sup 131}I waste. The highest exposure rate and radioactive level was recorded when the ward was occupied for two consecutive weeks with 177.00 µR/h and 58.36 kcpm respectively. The exposure rate decreased 15.76 % when the door of the delay tank room was closed. The exposure rate at public walking route decreased between 15.58 % and 36.92 % as the distance increased between 1 and 3 m.