WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear mass surface

  1. Extending and refining the nuclear mass surface with ISOLTRAP and MISTRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Lunney, M D

    2000-01-01

    Through the nuclear binding energy the atomic mass gives us important information about nuclear structure. Viewing the ensemble of mass data over the nuclear chart, we can examine the hills and valleys that form this surface and make hypotheses about the effects of certain nuclear configurations. To unveil these effects, mass measurements of very high precision (10$^{-6}$) are required. Two experiments at ISOLDE pursue this effort of nuclear cartography the tandem Penning trap spectrometer ISOLTRAP and the radiofrequency transmission spectrometer MISTRAL. Between them, the masses of almost 150 nuclides have been measured from stable isotopes to those with half-lives as short as 30 ms. Both experiments rely on good optical properties of a low energy ion beam and are thus well suited to the ISOLDE facility. (30 refs).

  2. Volumes, Masses, and Surface Areas for Shippingport LWBR Spent Nuclear Fuel in a DOE SNF Canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.W. Davis

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate volumes, masses, and surface areas associated with (a) an empty Department of Energy (DOE) 18-inch diameter, 15-ft long spent nuclear fuel (SNF) canister, (b) an empty DOE 24-inch diameter, 15-ft long SNF canister, (c) Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) SNF, and (d) the internal basket structure for the 18-in. canister that has been designed specifically to accommodate Seed fuel from the Shippingport LWBR. Estimates of volumes, masses, and surface areas are needed as input to structural, thermal, geochemical, nuclear criticality, and radiation shielding calculations to ensure the viability of the proposed disposal configuration

  3. Average nuclear surface properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groote, H. von.

    1979-01-01

    The definition of the nuclear surface energy is discussed for semi-infinite matter. This definition is extended also for the case that there is a neutron gas instead of vacuum on the one side of the plane surface. The calculations were performed with the Thomas-Fermi Model of Syler and Blanchard. The parameters of the interaction of this model were determined by a least squares fit to experimental masses. The quality of this fit is discussed with respect to nuclear masses and density distributions. The average surface properties were calculated for different particle asymmetry of the nucleon-matter ranging from symmetry beyond the neutron-drip line until the system no longer can maintain the surface boundary and becomes homogeneous. The results of the calculations are incorporated in the nuclear Droplet Model which then was fitted to experimental masses. (orig.)

  4. Analytical mass formula and nuclear surface properties in the ETF approximation. Part II: asymmetric nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymard, François; Gulminelli, Francesca; Margueron, Jérôme

    2016-08-01

    We have recently addressed the problem of the determination of the nuclear surface energy for symmetric nuclei in the framework of the extended Thomas-Fermi (ETF) approximation using Skyrme functionals. We presently extend this formalism to the case of asymmetric nuclei and the question of the surface symmetry energy. We propose an approximate expression for the diffuseness and the surface energy. These quantities are analytically related to the parameters of the energy functional. In particular, the influence of the different equation of state parameters can be explicitly quantified. Detailed analyses of the different energy components (local/non-local, isoscalar/isovector, surface/curvature and higher order) are also performed. Our analytical solution of the ETF integral improves previous models and leads to a precision of better than 200 keV per nucleon in the determination of the nuclear binding energy for dripline nuclei.

  5. Analytical mass formula and nuclear surface properties in the ETF approximation. Part I: symmetric nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymard, François; Gulminelli, Francesca; Margueron, Jérôme

    2016-08-01

    The problem of determination of nuclear surface energy is addressed within the framework of the extended Thomas Fermi (ETF) approximation using Skyrme functionals. We propose an analytical model for the density profiles with variationally determined diffuseness parameters. In this first paper, we consider the case of symmetric nuclei. In this situation, the ETF functional can be exactly integrated, leading to an analytical formula expressing the surface energy as a function of the couplings of the energy functional. The importance of non-local terms is stressed and it is shown that they cannot be deduced simply from the local part of the functional, as it was suggested in previous works.

  6. Symmetry energy in nuclear surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielewicz, P.; Lee, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    Interplay between the dependence of symmetry energy on density and the variation of nucleonic densities across nuclear surface is discussed. That interplay gives rise to the mass dependence of the symmetry coefficient in an energy formula. Charge symmetry of the nuclear interactions allows to introduce isoscalar and isovector densities that are approximately independent of the magnitude of neutron-proton asymmetry. (author)

  7. Nuclear mass formula with a neutron skin degree of freedom and finite-range model for the surface energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.; Myers, W.D.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of extending the model used by Moeller and Nix in 1980 to calculate nuclear masses and fission barriers for nuclei throughout the periodic system to include provision for the existence of a neutron skin is studied. The model gives excellent fit to masses and fission barriers and improves predictions of isotopic trends in charge radii

  8. Nuclear mass formula with a neutron skin degree of freedom and finite-range model for the surface energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.; Myers, W.D.

    1984-03-01

    We study the possibility of extending the model used by Moeller and Nix in 1980 to calculate nuclear masses and fission barriers for nuclei throughout the periodic system, to describe compressibility effects and the existence of a neutron skin. 9 references

  9. Nuclear mass formula with a neutron skin degree of freedom and finite-range model for the surface energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, P.; Myers, W.D.

    1984-03-01

    We study the possibility of extending the model used by Moeller and Nix in 1980 to calculate nuclear masses and fission barriers for nuclei throughout the periodic system, to describe compressibility effects and the existence of a neutron skin. 9 references. (WHK)

  10. Temperature dependence of nuclear surface properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campi, X.; Stringari, S.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal properties of nuclear surface are investigated in a semi-infinite medium. Explicit analytical expression are given for the temperature dependence of surface thickness, surface energy and surface free energy. In this model the temperature effects depend critically on the nuclear incompressibility and on the shape of the effective mass at the surface. To illustrate the relevance of these effects we made an estimate of the temperature dependence of the fission barrier height. (orig.)

  11. Critical assessment of nuclear mass models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Some of the physical assumptions underlying various nuclear mass models are discussed. The ability of different mass models to predict new masses that were not taken into account when the models were formulated and their parameters determined is analyzed. The models are also compared with respect to their ability to describe nuclear-structure properties in general. The analysis suggests future directions for mass-model development

  12. Nuclear masses, deformations and shell effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, Jorge G; Barbero, César A; Mariano, Alejandro E

    2011-01-01

    We show that the Liquid Drop Model is best suited to describe the masses of prolate deformed nuclei than of spherical nuclei. To this end three Liquid Drop Mass formulas are employed to describe nuclear masses of eight sets of nuclei with similar quadrupole deformations. It is shown that they are able to fit the measured masses of prolate deformed nuclei with an RMS smaller than 750 keV, while for the spherical nuclei the RMS is, in the three cases, larger than 2000 keV. The RMS of the best fit of the masses of semi-magic nuclei is also larger than 2000 keV. The parameters of the three models are studied, showing that the surface symmetry term is the one which varies the most from one group of nuclei to another. In one model, isospin dependent terms are also found to exhibit strong changes. The inclusion of shell effects allows for better fits, which continue to be better in the prolate deformed nuclei region.

  13. The art of predicting nuclear masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.G.; Morales, I.; Mendoza-Temis, J.; Frank, A.; Lopez-Vieyra, J.C.; Barea, J.; Pittel, S.; Van Isacker, P.; Velazquez, V.

    2008-01-01

    A review of recent advances in the theoretical analysis of nuclear mass models and their predictive power is presented. After introducing two tests which probe the ability of nuclear mass models to extrapolate, three models are analyzed in detail: the liquid drop model (LDM), the liquid drop model plus empirical shell corrections (LDMM) and the Duflo–Zuker mass formula (DZ). The DZ model is exhibited as the most predictive model. The Garvey–Kelson mass relations are also discussed. It is shown that their fulfillment probes the consistency of the most commonly used mass formulae, and that they can be used in an iterative process to predict nuclear masses in the neighborhood of nuclei with measured masses, offering a simple and reproducible procedure for short range mass predictions. (author)

  14. Quantum chaos and nuclear mass systematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, Jorge G.; Velazquez, Victor; Frank, Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    The presence of quantum chaos in nuclear mass systematics is analyzed by considering the differences between measured and calculated nuclear masses as a time series described by the power law 1fα. While for the liquid droplet model plus shell corrections a quantum chaotic behavior α∼1 is found, errors in the microscopic mass formula have α∼0.5, closer to white noise. The chaotic behavior seems to arise from many body effects not included in the mass formula

  15. Plasma Mass Filters For Nuclear Waste Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Practical disposal of nuclear waste requires high-throughput separation techniques. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which contains the most active and mobile radioisotopes and produces most of the heat. We suggest that the fission products could be separated as a group from nuclear waste using plasma mass filters. Plasmabased processes are well suited to separating nuclear waste, because mass rather than chemical properties are used for separation. A single plasma stage can replace several stages of chemical separation, producing separate streams of bulk elements, fission products, and actinoids. The plasma mass filters may have lower cost and produce less auxiliary waste than chemical processing plants. Three rotating plasma configurations are considered that act as mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, the Ohkawa filter, and the asymmetric centrifugal trap.

  16. Effective masses and the nuclear mean field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaux, C.; Sartor, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effective mass characterizes the energy dependence of the empirical average nuclear potential. This energy dependence has two different sources, namely the nonlocality in space of the microscopic mean field on the one hand, and its true energy dependence on the other hand. Correspondingly it is convenient to divide the effective mass into two components, the k-mass and the ω-mass. The latter is responsible for the existence of a peak in the energy dependence of the effective mass. This peak is located near the Fermi energy in nuclear matter and in nuclei, as well as in the electron gas, the hard sphere Fermi gas and liquid helium 3. A related phenomenon is the existence of a low energy anomaly in the energy dependence of the optical model potential between two heavy ions. (orig.)

  17. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry in nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaobo; Hu Jinjun; Wang Huijuan; Guan Yongjing; Wang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a promising method to provide extreme sensitivity measurements of the production yields of long-lived radioisotopes, which cannot be detected by other methods. AMS technique plays an important role in the research of nuclear physics, as well as the application field of AMS covered nuclear science and technology, life science, earth science, environmental science, archaeology etc. The newest AMS field is that of actinide, particularly U and Pu, isotopic assay with expanding applications in nuclear safeguards and monitoring, and as a modern bomb-fallout tracer for atmospheric transport and surface sediment movement. This paper reviews the applications of AMS in the research of nuclear energy and nuclear security including the research of half life of radionuclides, cross section of nuclear reaction. (authors)

  18. Mass Spectrometric Analysis for Nuclear Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulyga, S.

    2013-01-01

    The release of man-made radionuclides into the environment results in contamination that carries specific isotopic signatures according to the release scenarios and the previous usage of materials and facilities. In order to trace the origin of such contamination and/or to assess the potential impact on the public and environmental health, it is necessary to determine the isotopic composition and activity concentrations of radionuclides in environmental samples in an accurate and timely fashion. Mass spectrometric techniques, such as thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) belong to the most powerful methods for analysis of nuclear and related samples in nuclear safeguards, forensics, and environmental monitoring. This presentation will address the potential of mass spectrometric analysis of actinides at ultra-trace concentration levels, isotopic analysis of micro-samples, age determination of nuclear materials as well as identification and quantification of elemental and isotopic signatures of nuclear samples in general. (author)

  19. Mass spectrometry in nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Takuji

    1985-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely used and playing a very important role in the field of nuclear science and technology. A major reason for this is that not only the types of element but also its isotopes have to be identified and measured in this field. Thus, some applications of this analytical method are reviewed and discussed in this article. Its application to analytical chemistry is described in the second section following an introductory section, which includes subsections for isotropic dilution mass spectrometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry and isotopic correlation technique. The isotopic ratio measurement for hydrogen, uranium and plutonium as well as nuclear material control and safeguards are also reviewed in this section. In the third section, mass spectrometry is discussed in relation to nuclear reactors, with subsections on natural uranium reactor and neutron flux observation. Some techniques for measuring the burnup fraction, including the heavy isotopic ratio method and fission product monitoring, are also described. In the fourth section, application of mass spectrometry to measurement of nuclear constants, such as ratio of effective cross-sectional area for 235 U, half-life and fission yield is reviewed. (Nogami, K.)

  20. Mass spectrometric analysis for nuclear safeguards

    OpenAIRE

    BOULYGA S.; KONEGGER-KAPPEL S.; RICHTER Stephan; SANGELY L.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is currently being implemented in a wide spectrum of research and industrial areas, such as material sciences, cosmo- and geochemistry, biology and medicine, to name just a few. Research and development in nuclear safeguards is closely related to the general field of “Peace Research”; representing a specific application area for analytical sciences in general and for mass spectrometry in particular. According to Albert Einstein “peace cannot be kept by force. It only can be ...

  1. Mass-spectrometric measurements for nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.A.; Smith, D.H.; Walker, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The need of an on-site inspection device to provide isotopic ratio measurements led to the development of a quadrupole mass spectrometer mounted in a van. This mobile laboratory has the ability, through the use of the resin bead technique, to acquire, prepare, and analyze samples of interest to nuclear safeguards. Precision of the measurements is about 1 to 2%

  2. Empirical information on nuclear matter fourth-order symmetry energy from an extended nuclear mass formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We establish a relation between the equation of state of nuclear matter and the fourth-order symmetry energy asym,4(A of finite nuclei in a semi-empirical nuclear mass formula by self-consistently considering the bulk, surface and Coulomb contributions to the nuclear mass. Such a relation allows us to extract information on nuclear matter fourth-order symmetry energy Esym,4(ρ0 at normal nuclear density ρ0 from analyzing nuclear mass data. Based on the recent precise extraction of asym,4(A via the double difference of the “experimental” symmetry energy extracted from nuclear masses, for the first time, we estimate a value of Esym,4(ρ0=20.0±4.6 MeV. Such a value of Esym,4(ρ0 is significantly larger than the predictions from mean-field models and thus suggests the importance of considering the effects of beyond the mean-field approximation in nuclear matter calculations.

  3. R7T7 nuclear waste glass behavior in moist clay: role of the clay mass/glass surface area ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godon, N.; Vernaz, E.

    1989-01-01

    R7T7 glass alteration was investigated in the presence of various moist clays. In contact with smectite 4a, selected in France as a potential engineered barrier material, the glass was significantly corroded: after 6 months the glass corrosion rate was practically the same as the initial alteration rate in double-distilled water. Substantially lower alteration was observed in contact with bentonite 6 activated by sodium carbonate. Smectite 4a consumes silicon released by glass corrosion, and thus retards the rise to high silicon concentrations in solution at which the glass corrosion rate diminishes. Glass can therefore in some cases be altered as much in moist clay as in water with high renewal rates. Other experiments with smaller quantities of smectite 4a showed that the phenomenon becomes less important in time: its duration is proportional to the ratio between the clay mass (C) and the glass surface area (SA). Comparing the results of studies at different C/SA ratios indicates that low glass corrosion rates are obtained more slowly at higher C/SA ratios. Tests with 239 Pu-doped R7T7 glass also showed that the radionuclide retention factor in the alteration film at the glass surface is only 6, compared with a factor of nearly 50 in double-distilled water

  4. Nuclear molecular structure in heavy mass systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arctaedius, T.; Bargholtz, C.

    1989-04-01

    A study is made of nuclear molecular configurations involving one heavy mass partner. The stability of these configurations to mass flow and to fission is investigated as well as their population in fusion reactions. It is concluded that shell effects in combination with the effects of angular momentum may be important in stabilizing certain configurations. A possible relation of these configurations to the so called superdeformed states is pointed out. The spectrum of rotational and vibrational trasitions within molecular configurations is investigated. For sufficiently mass-asymmetric systems the engergies of vibrational transitions are comparable to the neutron separation energy. Gamma radiation from such transitions may then be observable above the background of statistical transitions. The gamma spectrum and the directional distribution of the radioation following fusion reactions with 12 C and 16 O are calculated. (authors)

  5. Nuclear industry will soon surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum has carried out the annual survey of nuclear industry from the very inception of the development of nuclear power in Japan. The aim is to research and analyze nuclear-related expenditures, sales and manpower, as well as the future prospect of mining and manufacturing industries, electric utilities, trading companies and other related industries. The 19th fact-finding survey investigated into the actual conditions of the nuclear industry from April, 1977, to March, 1978. The number of companies surveyed increased by 75 from the previous year to 1,244, of which 883 or 71% responded to the questions. 501 companies did the business in the field of nuclear power. The first thing to be pointed out about the economic conditions of the nuclear industry is that the nuclear related expenditures increased in electric utilities, mining and manufacturing industries and trading companies, and exceeded 1 trillion yen mark for the first time in the private sector. It is likely that the current nuclear-related activities of mining and manufacturing industries will soon increase, but it will not be easy to wipe off the cumulative deficit of the industries. The employees increased by more than 7% in the nuclear-related sectors of electric utilities and mining and manufacturing industries. The facilities of nuclear supply industry were operated at the average rate of 50%. (Kako, I.)

  6. Surface ionization mass spectrometry of opiates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmanov, D.T.

    2009-07-01

    Key words: surface ionization, adsorption, heterogeneous reactions, surface ionization mass spectrometry, thermodesorption surface ionization spectroscopy, thermoemitter, opiates, extracts of biosamples. Subjects of study. The mass - spectrometric study of thermal - ion emission: surface ionization of opiates by on the surface of oxidized refractory metals. Purpose of work is to establish the regularities of surface ionization (SI) of multi-atomic molecule opiates and their mixtures develop the scientific base of SI methods for high sensitive and selective detection and analysis of these substances in the different objects, including biosamples. Methods of study: surface ionization mass spectrometry, thermodesorption surface ionization spectroscopy. The results obtained and their novelty. For the first time, SI of molecule opiates on the oxidized tungsten surface has been studied and their SI mass-spectra and temperature dependences of ion currents have been obtained, the characteristic heterogeneous reactions of an adsorbed molecules and the channels of monomolecular decays vibrationally-excited ions on their way in mass-spectrometry have been revealed, sublimation energy has been defined, the activation energy of E act , of these decays has been estimated for given period of time. Additivity of the SI mass-spectra of opiate mixtures of has been established under conditions of joint opiate adsorption. High selectivity of SI allows the extracts of biosamples to be analyzed without their preliminary chromatographic separation. The opiates are ionized by SI with high efficiency (from 34 C/mol to 112 C/mol), which provides high sensitivity of opiate detection by SI/MS and APTDSIS methods from - 10 -11 g in the samples under analysis. Practical value. The results of these studies create the scientific base for novel SI methods of high sensitive detection and analysis of the trace amounts of opiates in complicated mixtures, including biosamples without their preliminary

  7. Recent status of the studies of nuclear masses and {beta}-decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Masami [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Advanced Research Center for Science and Engineering

    1996-05-01

    The recent status of the above studies was explained, especially, nuclear masses were described from the aspect of probability theory and that of {beta}-decay suggested that the first forbidden transition was hindered between the ground states. We have to study various systematics in order to know the mass surface, Way-Yamada-Matumoto type systematics is better to check the experimental nuclear masses. The gross theory is very useful to understand the general aspect of {beta}-decay. The understanding method of mass surface, systematic check of mass and hindrance of the first forbidden transition at rank 1 were explained. (S.Y.)

  8. Recent status of the studies of nuclear masses and β-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masami

    1996-01-01

    The recent status of the above studies was explained, especially, nuclear masses were described from the aspect of probability theory and that of β-decay suggested that the first forbidden transition was hindered between the ground states. We have to study various systematics in order to know the mass surface, Way-Yamada-Matumoto type systematics is better to check the experimental nuclear masses. The gross theory is very useful to understand the general aspect of β-decay. The understanding method of mass surface, systematic check of mass and hindrance of the first forbidden transition at rank 1 were explained. (S.Y.)

  9. Mass and Inertia Parameters for Nuclear Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damgaard, J.; Pauli, H.C.; Strutinsky, V.M.; Wong, C.Y.; Brack, M.; Stenholm-Jensen, A.

    1969-01-01

    The effective mass parameter and the moments of inertia for a deformed nucleus are evaluated using the cranking-model formalism. Special attention is paid to the dependence of these quantities on the intrinsic structure, which may arise due to shells in deformed nuclei. It is found that these inertial parameters are very much influenced by the shells present. The effective-mass parameter, which appears in an important way in the theory of spontaneous fission, fluctuates in the same manner as the shell-energy corrections. Its values at the fission barrier are up to two or three times larger than those at the equilibrium minima. This correlation comes about because for the effective mass the change in the local density of single-particle states is very important, much more so than the change in the pairing correlation. The moments of inertia which enter in the theory of angular anisotropy of fission fragments, also fluctuate as a function of the deformation. At low temperatures, the fluctuation is large and shows a distinct but more complicated correlation with the shells. At high temperatures, the moments of inertia fluctuate with a smaller amplitude about the rigid-body value in correlation with the energy-shell corrections. For the first-and second barriers, the rigid-body values are essentially reached at a nuclear temperature of 0.8 to 1.0 MeV. (author)

  10. Nonlinear mean field theory for nuclear matter and surface properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boguta, J.; Moszkowski, S.A.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear matter properties are studied in a nonlinear relativistic mean field theory. We determine the parameters of the model from bulk properties of symmetric nuclear matter and a reasonable value of the effective mass. In this work, we stress the nonrelativistic limit of the theory which is essentially equivalent to a Skyrme hamiltonian, and we show that most of the results can be obtained, to a good approximation, analytically. The strength of the required parameters is determined from the binding energy and density of nuclear matter and the effective nucleon mass. For realistic values of the parameters, the nonrelativistic approximation turns out to be quite satisfactory. Using reasonable values of the parameters, we can account for other key properties of nuclei, such as the spin-orbit coupling, surface energy, and diffuseness of the nuclear surface. Also the energy dependence of the nucleon-nucleus optical model is accounted for reasonably well except near the Fermi surface. It is found, in agreement with empirical results, that the Landau parameter F 0 is quite small in normal nuclear matter. Both density dependence and momentum dependence of the NN interaction, but especially the former, are important for nuclear saturation. The required scalar and vector coupling constants agree fairly well with those obtained from analyses of NN scattering phase shifts with one-boson-exchange models. The mean field theory provides a semiquantitative justification for the weak Skyrme interaction in odd states. The strength of the required nonlinear term is roughly consistent with that derived using a new version of the chiral mean field theory in which the vector mass as well as the nucleon mass is generated by the sigma-field. (orig.)

  11. The breathing mode and the nuclear surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaizot, J.P.; Grammaticos, B.

    1981-01-01

    The role of nuclear surface in the breathing mode of nuclei is analyzed. We discuss a simple model in which the density varies according to a scaling of the coordinates. We show that this model reproduces accurately the results of microscopic calculations in heavy nuclei, and we use it to estimate the contribution of the surface to the effective compression modulus of semi-infinite nuclear matter. The calculation is performed in the framework of an extended Thomas-Fermi approximation and using several effective interactions. It is shown that the surface energy is maximum with respect to variations of the density around saturation density. The reduction of the effective compression modulus due to the surface turns to be proportional to the bulk compression modulus. The magnitude of the effect is compared with results of RPA calculations. Other contributions to the effective compressions modulus of finite nuclei are also discussed. (orig.)

  12. Surface effects of underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B.M.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Townsend, M.J.

    1997-06-01

    The effects of nuclear explosions have been observed and studied since the first nuclear test (code named Trinity) on July 16, 1945. Since that first detonation, 1,053 nuclear tests have been conducted by the US, most of which were sited underground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The effects of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) on their surroundings have long been the object of much interest and study, especially for containment, engineering, and treaty verification purposes. One aspect of these explosion-induced phenomena is the disruption or alteration of the near-surface environment, also known as surface effects. This report was prepared at the request of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to bring together, correlate, and preserve information and techniques used in the recognition and documentation of surface effects of UNEs. This report has several main sections, including pertinent background information (Section 2.0), descriptions of the different types of surface effects (Section 3.0), discussion of their application and limitations (Section 4.0), an extensive bibliography and glossary (Section 6.0 and Appendix A), and procedures used to document geologic surface effects at the NTS (Appendix C). Because a majority of US surface-effects experience is from the NTS, an overview of pertinent NTS-specific information also is provided in Appendix B. It is not within the scope of this report to explore new relationships among test parameters, physiographic setting, and the types or degree of manifestation of surface effects, but rather to compile, summarize, and capture surface-effects observations and interpretations, as well as documentation procedures and the rationale behind them.

  13. Particle desorption mass spectrometric surface characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing 252 Cf-Particle Desorption Mass Spectrometry (PDMS) to characterize the surface region of solid samples has been evaluated. The PDMS experiment was adapted to an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment and was configured so as to allow the analysis of thick as well as thin samples. This apparatus included an in situ sputter cleaning/depth profiling facility. The mass resolution was variable from 300 to 200 at 133 daltons by changing the drift length from 27 cm to 20 cm. Desorbed ions were focused by using either a dual grid assembly or an einzel lens. The overall instrumental transmission efficiency with the einzel lens operative was approximately 50%. The applicability of 252 Cf-PDMS to samples that were thick and insulating was demonstrated in the analysis of geological specimens. Pollucite, Microcline, Amblygonite, and Lepidolite were analyzed without complications associated with sample thickness or charge accumulation. Substitution occurring between the alkali metals in the environment was observed by PDMS and was corroborated by SIMS, XPS, and EMP analyses. The analysis of NBM SRM glasses addressed the suitability of combining the PDMS technique was sputter etching. This application demonstrated the ability of this technique to sense changes in the chemical environment brought about by sputter cleaning. The analysis of these samples also allowed the estimation of detection limits for lithium, rubidium, and cesium in a glass matrix as 300 ppm, 400 ppm, and 400 ppm, respectively. Sputter depth profiling combined with 252 Cf-PDMS analysis of an aluminum layer on a silicon substrate established the utility of the PDMS technique in surface characterization

  14. $J/\\Psi$ mass shift in nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastao Krein, Anthony Thomas, Kazuo Tsushima

    2011-02-01

    The $J/\\Psi$ mass shift in cold nuclear matter is computed using an effective Lagrangian approach. The mass shift is computed by evaluating $D$ and $D^*$ meson loop contributions to the $J/\\Psi$ self-energy employing medium-modified meson masses. The modification of the $D$ and $D^*$ masses in nuclear matter is obtained using the quark-meson coupling model. The loop integrals are regularized with dipole form factors and the sensitivity of the results to the values of form-factor cutoff masses is investigated. The $J/\\Psi$ mass shift arising from the modification of the $D$ and $D^*$ loops at normal nuclear matter density is found to range from $-16$~MeV to $-24$~MeV under a wide variation of values of the cutoff masses. Experimental perspectives for the formation of a bound state of $J/\\Psi$ to a nucleus are investigated.

  15. Testing the predictive power of nuclear mass models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza-Temis, J.; Morales, I.; Barea, J.; Frank, A.; Hirsch, J.G.; Vieyra, J.C. Lopez; Van Isacker, P.; Velazquez, V.

    2008-01-01

    A number of tests are introduced which probe the ability of nuclear mass models to extrapolate. Three models are analyzed in detail: the liquid drop model, the liquid drop model plus empirical shell corrections and the Duflo-Zuker mass formula. If predicted nuclei are close to the fitted ones, average errors in predicted and fitted masses are similar. However, the challenge of predicting nuclear masses in a region stabilized by shell effects (e.g., the lead region) is far more difficult. The Duflo-Zuker mass formula emerges as a powerful predictive tool

  16. Impact of Precision Mass Measurements on Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kreim, Susanne; Dilling, Jens; Litvinov, Yuri A

    2013-01-01

    Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of neutron and proton number, N and Z, respectively. The data obtained through mass measurements provide details of the nuclear interaction and thus apply to a variety of physics topics. Some of the most crucial questions to be addressed by mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides are, on the one hand, nuclear forces and structure, describing phenomena such as the so-called neutron-halos or the evolution of magic numbers when moving towards the borders of nuclear existence. On the other hand, the understanding of the processes of element formation in the Universe poses a challenge and requires an accurate knowledge of nuclear astrophysics. Here, precision atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis processes are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations.

  17. Heat and mass transfer and hydrodynamics in two-phase flows in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styrikovich, M.A.; Polonskii, V.S.; Tsiklauri, G.V.

    1986-01-01

    This book examines nuclear power plant equipment from the point of view of heat and mass transfer and the behavior of impurities contained in water and in steam, with reference to real water regimes of nuclear power plants. The transfer processes of equipment are considered. Heat and mass transfer are analyzed in the pre-crisis regions of steam-generating passages with non-permeable surfaces, and in capillary-porous structures. Attention is given to forced convection boiling crises and top post-DNB heat transfer. Data on two-phase hydrodynamics in straight and curved channels are correlated and safety aspects of nuclear power plants are discussed

  18. Burnup determination of mass spectrometry for nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunhua.

    1987-01-01

    The various methods currently being used in burnup determination of nuclear fuels are studied and reviewed. The mass spectrometry method of destructive testing is discussed emphatically. The burnup determination of mass spectrometry includes heavy isotopic abundance ratio method and isotope dilution mass spectrometry used as burnup indicator for the fission products. The former is applied to high burnup level, but the later to various burnup level. According to experiences, some problems which should be noticed in burnup determination of mass spectrometry are presented

  19. Determination of B and Li in nuclear materials by secondary-ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eby, R.E.; Christie, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to perform mass and isotopic analysis for B and Li in samples that are not readily amenable to more conventional mass spectrometric techniques (e.g., surface ionization, electron impact, etc.). In this paper three specific applications of SIMS analysis to nuclear materials are discussed: first, the quantitative determination of B and its isotopic composition in borosilicate glasses; second, the determination of the isotopic composition of B and Li in irradiated nuclear-grade aluminum oxide/boron carbide composite pellets, and, lastly, the quantitative and isotopic determination of B and Li in highly radioactive solutions of unknown composition

  20. Evaporation rates and surface profiles on heterogeneous surfaces with mass transfer and surface reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M; Schmidt, L D

    1979-01-01

    Simple models incorporating surface reaction and diffusion of volatile products through a boundary layer are developed to calculate effective rates of evaporation and local surface profiles on surfaces having active and inactive regions. The coupling between surface heterogeneities with respect to a particular reaction and external mass transfer may provide a mechanism for the surface rearrangement and metal loss encountered in several catalytic systems of practical interest. Calculated transport rates for the volatilization of platinum in oxidizing environments and the rearrangement of this metal during the ammonia oxidation reaction agree well with published experimental data.

  1. The Gogny-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov nuclear-mass model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goriely, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, CP-226, Brussels (Belgium); Hilaire, S.; Girod, M.; Peru, S. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France)

    2016-07-15

    We present the Gogny-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model which reproduces nuclear masses with an accuracy comparable with the best mass formulas. In contrast to the Skyrme-HFB nuclear-mass models, an explicit and self-consistent account of all the quadrupole correlation energies is included within the 5D collective Hamiltonian approach. The final rms deviation with respect to the 2353 measured masses is 789 keV in the 2012 atomic mass evaluation. In addition, the D1M Gogny force is shown to predict nuclear and neutron matter properties in agreement with microscopic calculations based on realistic two- and three-body forces. The D1M properties and its predictions of various observables are compared with those of D1S and D1N. (orig.)

  2. Applications of accelerator mass spectrometry to nuclear physics and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhiyu; Zhang Chuan

    2002-01-01

    As an ultra high sensitive analyzing method, accelerator mass spectrometry is playing an important role in the studies of nuclear physics and astrophysics. The accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) applications in searching for violation of Pauli exclusion principle and study on supernovae are discussed as examples

  3. Surface analysis by imaging mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vidová, Veronika; Volný, Michael; Lemr, Karel; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 74, 7-8 (2009), s. 1101-1116 ISSN 0010-0765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : secondary ion mass spectrometry * matrix assisted laser desorption ionization * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.856, year: 2009

  4. Mass media and nuclear energy - IAEA's role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyd, D.R.

    1993-11-01

    The presentation covers the following areas: the wide spectrum of media outlets that the IAEA seeks to serve and their differing needs; the resources available to the IAEA for that purpose; the way in which IAEA endeavours to disseminate authoritative, reliable nuclear-related information to media; the exceptional role the IAEA may be called on to play in emergency situations

  5. Mass Producing Targets for Nuclear Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Kendall, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Metal-encapsulating technique advances prospects of controlling nuclear fusion. Prefilled fusion targets form at nozzle as molten metal such as tin flows through outer channel and pressurized deuterium/tritium gas flows through inner channel. Molten metal completely encloses gas charge as it drops off nozzle.

  6. Systematics of nuclear mass and level density formulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hisashi [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    The phenomenological models of the nuclear mass and level density are close related to each other, the nuclear ground and excited state properties are described by using the parameter systematics on the mass and level density formulas. The main aim of this work is to provide in an analytical framework the improved energy dependent shell, pairing and deformation corrections generalized to the collective enhancement factors, which offer a systematic prescription over a great number of nuclear reaction cross sections. The new formulas are shown to be in close agreement with not only the empirical nuclear mass data but the measured slow neutron resonance spacings, and experimental systematics observed in the excitation energy dependent properties. (author)

  7. Hartree-Fock calculations of nuclear masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quentin, P.

    1976-01-01

    Hartree-Fock calculations pertaining to the determination of nuclear binding energies throughout the whole chart of nuclides are reviewed. Such an approach is compared with other methods. Main techniques in use are shortly presented. Advantages and drawbacks of these calculations are also discussed with a special emphasis on the extrapolation towards nuclei far from the stability valley. Finally, a discussion of some selected results from light to superheavy nuclei, is given [fr

  8. Transport and transformation of surface water masses across the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transport and transformation of surface water masses across the Mascarene Plateau during the Northeast Monsoon season. ... Mixing occurs in the central gap between intermediate water masses (Red Sea Water [RSW] and Antarctic Intermediate Water [AAIW]) as well as in the upper waters (Subtropical Surface Water ...

  9. Human Mars Surface Mission Nuclear Power Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2018-01-01

    A key decision facing Mars mission designers is how to power a crewed surface field station. Unlike the solar-powered Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) that could retreat to a very low power state during a Martian dust storm, human Mars surface missions are estimated to need at least 15 kilowatts of electrical (kWe) power simply to maintain critical life support and spacecraft functions. 'Hotel' loads alone for a pressurized crew rover approach two kWe; driving requires another five kWe-well beyond what the Curiosity rover’s Radioisotope Power System (RPS) was designed to deliver. Full operation of a four-crew Mars field station is estimated at about 40 kWe. Clearly, a crewed Mars field station will require a substantial and reliable power source, beyond the scale of robotic mission experience. This paper explores the applications for both fission and RPS nuclear options for Mars.

  10. Surface-MALDI mass spectrometry in biomaterials research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griesser, H.J.; Kingshott, P.; McArthur, S.L.

    2004-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has been used for over a decade for the determination of purity and accurate molecular masses of macromolecular analytes, such as proteins, in solution. In the last few years the technique has been adapted to become a new...... surfaces and detecting their molecular ions with high mass resolution and at levels much below monolayer coverage. Thus, Surface-MALDI-MS offers unique means of addressing biomaterial surface analysis needs, such as identification of the proteins and lipids that adsorb from multicomponent biological...... solutions in vitro and in vivo, the study of interactions between biomaterial surfaces and biomolecules, and identification of surface-enriched additives and contaminants. Surface-MALDI-MS is rapid, experimentally convenient, overcomes limitations in mass resolution and sensitivity of established...

  11. Surface sensitivity of nuclear-knock-out form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fratamico, G.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical calculation has been performed to investigate the sensitivity of nuclear-knock-out form factors to nuclear-surface behaviour of bound-state wave functions. The result of our investigation suggests that one can extract the bound-state behaviour at the surface from experimental information on nuclear-knock-out form factors

  12. Infinite nuclear matter model and mass formulae for nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satpathy, L.

    2016-01-01

    The matter composed of the nucleus is a quantum-mechanical interacting many-fermionic system. However, the shell and classical liquid drop have been taken as the two main features of nuclear dynamics, which have guided the evolution of nuclear physics. These two features can be considered as the macroscopic manifestation of the microscopic dynamics of the nucleons at fundamental level. Various mass formulae have been developed based on either of these features over the years, resulting in many ambiguities and uncertainties posing many challenges in this field. Keeping this in view, Infinite Nuclear Matter (INM) model has been developed during last couple of decades with a many-body theoretical foundation employing the celebrated Hugenholtz-Van Hove theorem, quite appropriate for the interacting quantum-mechanical nuclear system. A mass formula called INM mass formula based on this model yields rms deviation of 342 keV being the lowest in literature. Some of the highlights of its result includes its determination of INM density in agreement with the electron scattering data leading to the resolution of the long standing 'r 0 -paradox' it predicts new magic numbers giving rise to new island of stability in the drip-line regions. This is the manifestation of a new phenomenon where shell-effect over comes the repulsive component of nucleon-nucleon force resulting in the broadening of the stability peninsula. Shell quenching in N= 82,and N= 126 shells, and several islands of inversion have been predicted. The model determines the empirical value of the nuclear compression modulus, using high precission 4500 data comprising nuclear masses, neutron and proton separation energies. The talk will give a critical review of the field of mass formula and our understanding of nuclear dynamics as a whole

  13. Validating neural-network refinements of nuclear mass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utama, R.; Piekarewicz, J.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Nuclear astrophysics centers on the role of nuclear physics in the cosmos. In particular, nuclear masses at the limits of stability are critical in the development of stellar structure and the origin of the elements. Purpose: We aim to test and validate the predictions of recently refined nuclear mass models against the newly published AME2016 compilation. Methods: The basic paradigm underlining the recently refined nuclear mass models is based on existing state-of-the-art models that are subsequently refined through the training of an artificial neural network. Bayesian inference is used to determine the parameters of the neural network so that statistical uncertainties are provided for all model predictions. Results: We observe a significant improvement in the Bayesian neural network (BNN) predictions relative to the corresponding "bare" models when compared to the nearly 50 new masses reported in the AME2016 compilation. Further, AME2016 estimates for the handful of impactful isotopes in the determination of r -process abundances are found to be in fairly good agreement with our theoretical predictions. Indeed, the BNN-improved Duflo-Zuker model predicts a root-mean-square deviation relative to experiment of σrms≃400 keV. Conclusions: Given the excellent performance of the BNN refinement in confronting the recently published AME2016 compilation, we are confident of its critical role in our quest for mass models of the highest quality. Moreover, as uncertainty quantification is at the core of the BNN approach, the improved mass models are in a unique position to identify those nuclei that will have the strongest impact in resolving some of the outstanding questions in nuclear astrophysics.

  14. Estimation of unknown nuclear masses by means of the generalized mass relations. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of the estimations of the unknown nuclear masses by means of the generalized mass relations is presented. One discusses the new hypotheses supplementing the original general Garvey-Kelson scheme, reviewing the generalized mass relations and formulae, according to the present status of this new formalism. A critical discussions is given of the reliability of these new Garvey-Kelson type extrapolation procedures. (author)

  15. Facing the challenge of nuclear mass tort processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelzer, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    A great majority of states do not issue any specific legislation on nuclear mass tort litigations. They apparently build on general traditional practice as most probably already tried and tested in other areas. Some states defer the decision on the way to deal with mass tort claims to the time of the nuclear incident. They insert into their nuclear liability laws respective 'reminders' that contain an invitation or a demand to the legislator to take appropriate steps if and when necessary. Finally, there are a number of states that enacted elaborate regimes on how to react to, and organise, compensation of mass damages after a catastrophic nuclear incident. Among those states are in particular major nuclear states like Canada, India, Japan and the US. They developed compensation schemes where claims for compensation of nuclear damage shall be dealt with by fora that are not regular courts. In some of those states, the fora are exclusively competent without a right to appeal their decisions, while in other states the fora act in parallel or in complement to courts. So the international scenario appears to be somewhat confusing. Of course, sovereign states are free to organise claims processing, including nuclear mass claims processing, as they deem fit. The discretion of states is, however, limited by obligations under public international law. With regard to the victims of nuclear incidents, states are particularly bound by obligations under the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other relevant instruments they may be a party to. National nuclear mass claim processing has in particular to comply with the obligation to guarantee 'a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal'. With regard to possible international obligations vis-a-vis other states, it has to be taken into account that major nuclear incidents, as a rule, have transboundary detrimental effects. There is always a potential impact on territories

  16. Masses of exotic calcium isotopes pin down nuclear forces

    CERN Document Server

    Wienholtz, F; Blaum, K; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; George, S; Herfurth, F; Holt, J D; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Menéndez, J; Neidherr, D; Rosenbusch, M; Schweikhard, L; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Stanja, J; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K

    2013-01-01

    The properties of exotic nuclei on the verge of existence play a fundamental part in our understanding of nuclear interactions. Exceedingly neutron-rich nuclei become sensitive to new aspects of nuclear forces. Calcium, with its doubly magic isotopes $^{40}$Ca and $^{48}$Ca, is an ideal test for nuclear shell evolution, from the valley of stability to the limits of existence. With a closed proton shell, the calcium isotopes mark the frontier for calculations with three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory. Whereas predictions for the masses of $^{51}$Ca and $^{52}$Ca have been validated by direct measurements$^4$, it is an open question as to how nuclear masses evolve for heavier calcium isotopes. Here we report the mass determination of the exotic calcium isotopes $^{53}$Ca and $^{54}$Ca, using the multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer of ISOLTRAP at CERN. The measured masses unambiguously establish a prominent shell closure at neutron number N = 32, in excellent agreement with our t...

  17. Dependence of X-Ray Burst Models on Nuclear Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz, H.; Ong, W.-J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    X-ray burst model predictions of light curves and the final composition of the nuclear ashes are affected by uncertain nuclear masses. However, not all of these masses are determined experimentally with sufficient accuracy. Here we identify the remaining nuclear mass uncertainties in X-ray burst models using a one-zone model that takes into account the changes in temperature and density evolution caused by changes in the nuclear physics. Two types of bursts are investigated—a typical mixed H/He burst with a limited rapid proton capture process (rp-process) and an extreme mixed H/He burst with an extended rp-process. When allowing for a 3 σ variation, only three remaining nuclear mass uncertainties affect the light-curve predictions of a typical H/He burst ({sup 27}P, {sup 61}Ga, and {sup 65}As), and only three additional masses affect the composition strongly ({sup 80}Zr, {sup 81}Zr, and {sup 82}Nb). A larger number of mass uncertainties remain to be addressed for the extreme H/He burst, with the most important being {sup 58}Zn, {sup 61}Ga, {sup 62}Ge, {sup 65}As, {sup 66}Se, {sup 78}Y, {sup 79}Y, {sup 79}Zr, {sup 80}Zr, {sup 81}Zr, {sup 82}Zr, {sup 82}Nb, {sup 83}Nb, {sup 86}Tc, {sup 91}Rh, {sup 95}Ag, {sup 98}Cd, {sup 99}In, {sup 100}In, and {sup 101}In. The smallest mass uncertainty that still impacts composition significantly when varied by 3 σ is {sup 85}Mo with 16 keV uncertainty. For one of the identified masses, {sup 27}P, we use the isobaric mass multiplet equation to improve the mass uncertainty, obtaining an atomic mass excess of −716(7) keV. The results provide a roadmap for future experiments at advanced rare isotope beam facilities, where all the identified nuclides are expected to be within reach for precision mass measurements.

  18. Theories of Variable Mass Particles and Low Energy Nuclear Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Mark

    2014-02-01

    Variable particle masses have sometimes been invoked to explain observed anomalies in low energy nuclear reactions (LENR). Such behavior has never been observed directly, and is not considered possible in theoretical nuclear physics. Nevertheless, there are covariant off-mass-shell theories of relativistic particle dynamics, based on works by Fock, Stueckelberg, Feynman, Greenberger, Horwitz, and others. We review some of these and we also consider virtual particles that arise in conventional Feynman diagrams in relativistic field theories. Effective Lagrangian models incorporating variable mass particle theories might be useful in describing anomalous nuclear reactions by combining mass shifts together with resonant tunneling and other effects. A detailed model for resonant fusion in a deuterium molecule with off-shell deuterons and electrons is presented as an example. Experimental means of observing such off-shell behavior directly, if it exists, is proposed and described. Brief explanations for elemental transmutation and formation of micro-craters are also given, and an alternative mechanism for the mass shift in the Widom-Larsen theory is presented. If variable mass theories were to find experimental support from LENR, then they would undoubtedly have important implications for the foundations of quantum mechanics, and practical applications may arise.

  19. Low Energy Nuclear Reaction Products at Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, David J.

    2008-03-01

    This paper examines the evidence for LENR occurring on or very near to the surface of materials. Several types of experimental indications for LENR surface reactions have been reported and will be reviewed. LENR result in two types of products, energy and the appearance of new elements. The level of instantaneous power production can be written as the product of four factors: (1) the total area of the surface on which the reactions can occur, (2) the fraction of the area that is active at any time, (3) the reaction rate, that is, the number of reactions per unit active area per second, and (4) the energy produced per reaction. Each of these factors, and their limits, are reviewed. A graphical means of relating these four factors over their wide variations has been devised. The instantaneous generation of atoms of new elements can also be written as the product of the first three factors and the new elemental mass produced per reaction. Again, a graphical means of presenting the factors and their results over many orders of magnitude has been developed.

  20. Hyperthermal surface ionization mass spectrometry of organic molecules: monoterpenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Hiroshi; Fujii, Toshihiro.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study on the influence of kinetic energy of fast monoterpene molecules on the surface ionization efficiency and on the mass spectral patterns, using rhenium oxide (ReO 2 ) surface. Molecular kinetic energy, given to the molecules through the acceleration in the seeded supersonic molecular beam, ranged from 1 to 10 eV. Hyperthermal surface ionization mass spectra (HSIMS) were taken for various incident kinetic energies and surface temperatures. The observed mass spectra were interpreted in a purely empirical way, by means of evidence from the previous investigations, and they were compared with conventional EI techniques and with the thermal energy surface ionization technique (SIOMS; Surface Ionization Organic Mass Spectrometry). Ionization efficiency (β) was also studied. Under hyperthermal surface ionization (HSI) conditions, many kinds of fragment ions, including quite abundant odd electron ions (OE +· ) are observed. HSIMS patterns of monoterpenes are different among 6-isomers, contrary to those of SIOMS and EIMS, where very similar patterns for isomers are observed. HSIMS patterns are strongly dependent on the molecular kinetic energies. The surface temperature does not affect much the spectral patterns, but it controls the total amount of ion formation. We conclude from these mass spectral findings, HSI-mechanism contains an impulsive process of ion formation, followed by the fragmentation process as a results of the internal energies acquired through the collision processes. (author)

  1. Equidistant structure and effective nucleon mass in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezuka, Hirokazu.

    1981-11-01

    The effective nucleon mass of the Equidistant Multi-Layer Structure (EMULS) is discussed self-consistently. In the density region where the Fermi gas state in nuclear matter is unstable against the density fluctuation, the EMULS gives lower binding energy. It is, however, shown that such a structure with an ordinary nucleon mass collapses due to too strong attraction. We point out that such a collapse can be avoided by taking account of an effective nucleon mass affected by the localization of nucleons. (author)

  2. Nuclear reactions of high energy deuterons with medium mass targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numajiri, Masaharu; Miura, Taichi; Oki, Yuichi

    1994-01-01

    Formation cross sections of product nuclides in the nuclear reactions of medium mass targets by 10 GeV deuterons were measured with a gamma-ray spectroscopy. The measured data were compared with the cross sections of 12 GeV protons. (author)

  3. Role of mass spectrometry in nuclear forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, M.; Sivaraman, N.

    2016-01-01

    The present talk will focus on the role of mass spectrometry in NFS in general; besides that, the various chromatographic methods developed towards separation of actinides and lanthanide fission products and characterization of dissolver solutions of nuclear reactor fuels using TIMS and some applications of using ICP-MS as well

  4. Extrapolations of nuclear binding energies from new linear mass relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, D.; Jensen, A. S.; Riisager, K.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to extrapolate nuclear binding energies from known values for neighboring nuclei. We select four specific mass relations constructed to eliminate smooth variation of the binding energy as function nucleon numbers. The fast odd-even variations are avoided by comparing nuclei...

  5. The nuclear waste issue in Swedish mass media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedberg, P.

    1991-04-01

    This is an investigation of the representation given in the Swedish mass media of questions concerning the nuclear waste. The investigation covers the period from 1979 to 1989 of 8 newspapers of different political colours and the Swedish radio and television. (KAE)

  6. Surface mass balance contributions to acceleration of Antarctic ice mass loss during 2003-2013

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Ki-Weon; Wilson, Clark R.; Scambos, Ted; Kim, Baek-Min; Waliser, Duane E.; Tian, Baijun; Kim, Byeong-Hoon; Eom, Jooyoung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent observations from satellite gravimetry (the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission) suggest an acceleration of ice mass loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS). The contribution of surface mass balance changes (due to variable precipitation) is compared with GRACE?derived mass loss acceleration by assessing the estimated contribution of snow mass from meteorological reanalysis data. We find that over much of the continent, the acceleration can be explained by ...

  7. Nuclear surface diffuseness revealed in nucleon-nucleus diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, S.; Horiuchi, W.; Kohama, A.

    2018-05-01

    The nuclear surface provides useful information on nuclear radius, nuclear structure, as well as properties of nuclear matter. We discuss the relationship between the nuclear surface diffuseness and elastic scattering differential cross section at the first diffraction peak of high-energy nucleon-nucleus scattering as an efficient tool in order to extract the nuclear surface information from limited experimental data involving short-lived unstable nuclei. The high-energy reaction is described by a reliable microscopic reaction theory, the Glauber model. Extending the idea of the black sphere model, we find one-to-one correspondence between the nuclear bulk structure information and proton-nucleus elastic scattering diffraction peak. This implies that we can extract both the nuclear radius and diffuseness simultaneously, using the position of the first diffraction peak and its magnitude of the elastic scattering differential cross section. We confirm the reliability of this approach by using realistic density distributions obtained by a mean-field model.

  8. Improved Nuclear Reactor and Shield Mass Model for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    New technologies are being developed to explore the distant reaches of the solar system. Beyond Mars, solar energy is inadequate to power advanced scientific instruments. One technology that can meet the energy requirements is the space nuclear reactor. The nuclear reactor is used as a heat source for which a heat-to-electricity conversion system is needed. Examples of such conversion systems are the Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling cycles. Since launch cost is proportional to the amount of mass to lift, mass is always a concern in designing spacecraft. Estimations of system masses are an important part in determining the feasibility of a design. I worked under Michael Barrett in the Thermal Energy Conversion Branch of the Power & Electric Propulsion Division. An in-house Closed Cycle Engine Program (CCEP) is used for the design and performance analysis of closed-Brayton-cycle energy conversion systems for space applications. This program also calculates the system mass including the heat source. CCEP uses the subroutine RSMASS, which has been updated to RSMASS-D, to estimate the mass of the reactor. RSMASS was developed in 1986 at Sandia National Laboratories to quickly estimate the mass of multi-megawatt nuclear reactors for space applications. In response to an emphasis for lower power reactors, RSMASS-D was developed in 1997 and is based off of the SP-100 liquid metal cooled reactor. The subroutine calculates the mass of reactor components such as the safety systems, instrumentation and control, radiation shield, structure, reflector, and core. The major improvements in RSMASS-D are that it uses higher fidelity calculations, is easier to use, and automatically optimizes the systems mass. RSMASS-D is accurate within 15% of actual data while RSMASS is only accurate within 50%. My goal this summer was to learn FORTRAN 77 programming language and update the CCEP program with the RSMASS-D model.

  9. Chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The standard covers analytical procedures to determine compliance of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to specifications. The following methods are described in detail: uranium by ferrous sulfate reduction-potassium dichromate titrimetry and by ignition gravimetry; specific gravity by pycnometry; free acid by oxalate complexation; thorium by the Arsenazo(III) (photometric) method; chromium by the diphenylcarbazide (photometric) method; molybdenum by the thiocyanate (photometric) method; halogens separation by steam distillation; fluorine by specific ion electrode; halogen distillate analysis: chloride, bromide and iodide by amperometric microtitrimetry; bromine by the fluorescein (photometric) method; sulfate sulfur by (photometric) turbidimetry; phosphorus by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; silicon by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; carbon by persulfate oxidation-acid titrimetry; nonvolatile impurities by spectrography; volatile impurities by rotating-disk spark spectrography; boron by emission spectrography; impurity elements by spark source mass spectrography; isotopic composition by multiple filament surface-ionization mass spectrometry; uranium-232 by alpha spectrometry; total alpha activity by direct alpha counting; fission product activity by beta and gamma counting; entrained organic matter by infrared spectrophotometry

  10. Properties of nuclear matter from macroscopic–microscopic mass formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the standard Skyrme energy density functionals together with the extended Thomas–Fermi approach, the properties of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter represented in two macroscopic–microscopic mass formulas: Lublin–Strasbourg nuclear drop energy (LSD formula and Weizsäcker–Skyrme (WS* formula, are extracted through matching the energy per particle of finite nuclei. For LSD and WS*, the obtained incompressibility coefficients of symmetric nuclear matter are K∞=230±11 MeV and 235±11 MeV, respectively. The slope parameter of symmetry energy at saturation density is L=41.6±7.6 MeV for LSD and 51.5±9.6 MeV for WS*, respectively, which is compatible with the liquid-drop analysis of Lattimer and Lim [4]. The density dependence of the mean-field isoscalar and isovector effective mass, and the neutron–proton effective masses splitting for neutron matter are simultaneously investigated. The results are generally consistent with those from the Skyrme Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov calculations and nucleon optical potentials, and the standard deviations are large and increase rapidly with density. A better constraint for the effective mass is helpful to reduce uncertainties of the depth of the mean-field potential.

  11. Infinite nuclear matter based for mass of atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satpathy, L.

    1987-01-01

    The ground-state energy of an atomic nucleus with asymmetry β is considered to be equivalent to the energy of a perfect sphere made up of infinite nuclear matter of the same asymmetry plus a residual energy eta, called the local energy. Eta represents the energy due to shell, deformation, diffuseness and exchange Coulomb effects, etc. Using this picture and the generalised Hugenholtz-Van Hove theorem of many-body theory, the previously proposed mass relation is derived in a transport way in which eta drops away in a very natural manner. The validity of this mass relation is studied globally using the latest mass table. The model is suitable for the extraction of the saturation properties of nuclear matter. The binding energy per nucleon and the saturation Fermi momentum of nuclear matter obtained through this model are 18.33 MeV and 1.48 fm -1 respectively. It is shown in several representative cases in the Periodic Table that the masses of nuclei in the far unknown region can be reliably predicted. (author)

  12. Quantum Nuclear Extension of Electron Nuclear Dynamics on Folded Effective-Potential Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, B.; Deumens, E.; Ohrn, Y.

    2014-01-01

    A perennial problem in quantum scattering calculations is accurate theoretical treatment of low energy collisions. We propose a method of extracting a folded, nonadiabatic, effective potential energy surface from electron nuclear dynamics (END) trajectories; we then perform nuclear wave packet...

  13. Nuclear mass formulas and its application for astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    Some nuclear mass formulae are reviewed and applied for the calculation of the rapid neutron-capture-process (r-process) nucleosynthesis. A new mass formula composed of the gross term, the even-odd term, and the shell term is also presented. The new mass formula is a revised version of the spherical basis mass formula published in 2001, that is, the even-odd term is treated more carefully, and a considerable improvement is brought about. The root-mean-square deviation of the new formula from experimental masses is 641 keV for Z ≥ 8 and N ≥ 8. Properties on systematic of the neutron-separation energy is compared with some mass formulas. The calculated abundances of the r-process from different mass formulae are compared with use of a simple reaction model, and the relation between the calculated abundances and the corresponding masses are discussed. Furthermore, fission barriers for the superheavy and neutron-rich nuclei are also applied for the endpoint of the r-process. (author)

  14. Interplanetary and lunar surface SP-100 nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josloff, A.T.; Shepard, N.F.; Smith, M.; Stephen, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes how the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System (SRPS) can be tailored to meet the specific requirements for a lunar surface power system to meet the needs of the consolidation and utilization phases outlined in the 90-day NASA SEI study report. This same basic power system can also be configured to obtain the low specific masses needed to enable robotic interplanetary science missions employing Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). In both cases it is shown that the SP-100 SRPS can meet the specific requirements. For interplanetary NEP missions, performance upgrades currently being developed in the area of light weight radiators and improved thermoelectric material are assumed to be technology ready in the year 2000 time frame. For lunar applications, some system rearrangement and enclosure of critical components are necessary modifications to the present baseline design

  15. Consequences of the center-of-mass correction in nuclear mean-field models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.; Rutz, K.; Reinhard, P.G.; Maruhn, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    We study the influence of the scheme for the correction for spurious center-of-mass motion on the fit of effective interactions for self-consistent nuclear mean-field calculations. We find that interactions with very simple center-of-mass correction have significantly larger surface coefficients than interactions for which the center-of-mass correction was calculated for the actual many-body state during the fit. The reason for that is that the effective interaction has to counteract the wrong trends with nucleon number of all simplified schemes for center-of-mass correction which puts a wrong trend with mass number into the effective interaction itself. The effect becomes clearly visible when looking at the deformation energy of largely deformed systems, e.g. superdeformed states or fission barriers of heavy nuclei. (orig.)

  16. Detailed study of nuclear charge and mass densities. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdichevsky, D.; Mosel, U.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental densities are analyzed and compared in detail, in particular in the surface region. For this purpose nuclear size parameters are discussed and new sets of surface parameters are proposed. It is shown that the densities are very close to the error function in the external part of the surface and can be characterized there by two new parameters. For very large r the densities show an exponential behaviour which is analyzed in terms of single-particle density distributions. Furthermore, the effects of the asymmetry, spin-orbit and Coulomb forces on the density distributions are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Mass shift of σ-meson in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morones-Ibarra, J.R.; Maciel, Mónica Menchaca; Padilla, Felipe Robledo; Santos-Guevara, Ayax

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of σ-meson in nuclear matter is studied in the Walecka model, by assuming that sigma couples to a pair of nucleon-antinucleon states to particle-hole states. The in-medium effect of σ-ω mixing is also studied. For completeness, the coupling of sigma to two virtual pions was also considered. It is found that the σ-meson mass decreases with respect to its value in vacuum and that the contribution of the σ-ω mixing effect on the mass shift is relatively small. (author)

  18. Unified model of nuclear mass and level density formulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hisashi

    2001-01-01

    The objective of present work is to obtain a unified description of nuclear shell, pairing and deformation effects for both ground state masses and level densities, and to find a new set of parameter systematics for both the mass and the level density formulas on the basis of a model for new single-particle state densities. In this model, an analytical expression is adopted for the anisotropic harmonic oscillator spectra, but the shell-pairing correlation are introduced in a new way. (author)

  19. Probing Interfacial Processes on Graphene Surface by Mass Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakenov, Nurbek; Kocabas, Coskun

    2013-03-01

    In this work we studied the mass density of graphene, probed interfacial processes on graphene surface and examined the formation of graphene oxide by mass detection. The graphene layers were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition method on copper foils and transfer-printed on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The mass density of single layer graphene was measured by investigating the mechanical resonance of the QCM. Moreover, we extended the developed technique to probe the binding dynamics of proteins on the surface of graphene, were able to obtain nonspecific binding constant of BSA protein of graphene surface in aqueous solution. The time trace of resonance signal showed that the BSA molecules rapidly saturated by filling the available binding sites on graphene surface. Furthermore, we monitored oxidation of graphene surface under oxygen plasma by tracing the changes of interfacial mass of the graphene controlled by the shifts in Raman spectra. Three regimes were observed the formation of graphene oxide which increases the interfacial mass, the release of carbon dioxide and the removal of small graphene/graphene oxide flakes. Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK) grant no. 110T304, 109T209, Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant (IRG) grant no 256458, Turkish Academy of Science (TUBA-Gebip).

  20. Thomas-Fermi approach to nuclear mass formula. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, A.K.; Arcoragi, J.P.; Pearson, J.M.; Tondeur, F.

    1986-01-01

    With a view to having a more secure basis for the nuclear mass formula than is provided by the drop(let) model, we make a preliminary study of the possibilities offered by the Skyrme-ETF method. Two ways of incorporating shell effects are considered: the ''Strutinsky-integral'' method of Chu et al., and the ''expectation-value'' method of Brack et al. Each of these methods is compared with the HF method in an attempt to see how reliably they extrapolate from the known region of the nuclear chart out to the neutron-drip line. The Strutinsky-integral method is shown to perform particularly well, and to offer a promising approach to a more reliable mass formula. (orig.)

  1. Mass shift of σ-meson in nuclear matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mass shift of σ-meson in nuclear matter. J R MORONES-IBARRA1, MÓNICA MENCHACA MACIEL1,∗. ,. AYAX SANTOS-GUEVARA2 and FELIPE ROBLEDO PADILLA1. 1Facultad de Ciencias Físico-Matemáticas, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, UANL,. Av. Universidad S/N Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolás de los ...

  2. A quadrupole mass spectrometer system for nuclear safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, P.J.

    1987-12-01

    An on-line enrichment monitor for nuclear safeguards-related surveillance of a pilot-scale gas centrifuge plant is described. This monitor utilises a quadrupole mass spectrometer to measure the isotopic composition of UF 6 in the feed and product gas streams. Details of the design and construction are given, and several difficulties are identified and discussed. Finally, the performance of this system is illustrated with typical results

  3. Activities report in nuclear physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J. F. W.; Scholten, O.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies of giant resonances, nuclear structure, light mass systems, and heavy mass systems are summarized. Theoretical studies of nuclear structure, and dynamics are described. Electroweak interactions; atomic and surface physics; applied nuclear physics; and nuclear medicine are

  4. Deformation and shell effects in nuclear mass formulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbero, César; Hirsch, Jorge G.; Mariano, Alejandro E.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the ability of three different Liquid Drop Mass (LDM) formulas to describe nuclear masses for nuclei in various deformation regions. Separating the 2149 measured nuclear species into eight sets with similar quadrupole deformations, we show that the masses of prolate deformed nuclei are better described than those of spherical ones. In fact, the prolate deformed nuclei are fitted with an RMS smaller than 750 keV, while for spherical and semi-magic species the RMS is always larger than 2000 keV. These results are found to be independent of pairing. It is also shown that the macroscopic sector of the Duflo–Zuker (DZ) mass model reproduces shell effects, while most of the deformation dependence is lost and the RMS is larger than in any LDM. Adding to the LDM the microscopically motivated DZ master terms introduces the shell effects, allowing for a significant reduction in the RMS of the fit but still exhibiting a better description of prolate deformed nuclei. The inclusion of shell effects following the Interacting Boson Model's ideas produces similar results.

  5. Deformation and shell effects in nuclear mass formulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbero, Cesar [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica La Plata, CONICET, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Hirsch, Jorge G., E-mail: hirsch@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Mariano, Alejandro E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica La Plata, CONICET, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2012-01-15

    We analyze the ability of three different Liquid Drop Mass (LDM) formulas to describe nuclear masses for nuclei in various deformation regions. Separating the 2149 measured nuclear species into eight sets with similar quadrupole deformations, we show that the masses of prolate deformed nuclei are better described than those of spherical ones. In fact, the prolate deformed nuclei are fitted with an RMS smaller than 750 keV, while for spherical and semi-magic species the RMS is always larger than 2000 keV. These results are found to be independent of pairing. It is also shown that the macroscopic sector of the Duflo-Zuker (DZ) mass model reproduces shell effects, while most of the deformation dependence is lost and the RMS is larger than in any LDM. Adding to the LDM the microscopically motivated DZ master terms introduces the shell effects, allowing for a significant reduction in the RMS of the fit but still exhibiting a better description of prolate deformed nuclei. The inclusion of shell effects following the Interacting Boson Model's ideas produces similar results.

  6. Sensitivity studies for the main r process: nuclear masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aprahamian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The site of the rapid neutron capture process (r process is one of the open challenges in all of physics today. The r process is thought to be responsible for the creation of more than half of all elements beyond iron. The scientific challenges to understanding the origin of the heavy elements beyond iron lie in both the uncertainties associated with astrophysical conditions that are needed to allow an r process to occur and a vast lack of knowledge about the properties of nuclei far from stability. One way is to disentangle the nuclear and astrophysical components of the question. On the nuclear physics side, there is great global competition to access and measure the most exotic nuclei that existing facilities can reach, while simultaneously building new, more powerful accelerators to make even more exotic nuclei. On the astrophysics side, various astrophysical scenarios for the production of the heaviest elements have been proposed but open questions remain. This paper reports on a sensitivity study of the r process to determine the most crucial nuclear masses to measure using an r-process simulation code, several mass models (FRDM, Duflo-Zuker, and HFB-21, and three potential astrophysical scenarios.

  7. Surface Ionization and Soft Landing Techniques in Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futrell, Jean H.; Laskin, Julia

    2010-01-01

    The advent of soft ionization techniques, notably electrospray and laser desorption ionization methods, has extended mass spectrometric methods to large molecules and molecular complexes. This both greatly expands applications of mass spectrometry and makes the activation and dissociation of complex ions an integral part of large molecule mass spectrometry. A corollary of the much greater number of internal degrees of freedom and high density of states associated with molecular complexity is that internal energies much higher than the dissociation energies for competing fragmentation processes are required for observable fragmentation in time scales sampled by mass spectrometers. This article describes the kinetics of surface-induced dissociation (SID), a particularly efficient activation method for complex ions. Two very important characteristics of SID are very rapid, sub-picosecond activation and precise control of ion internal energy by varying ion collision energy. The nature of the surface plays an important role in SID, determining both efficiency and mechanism of ion activation. Surface composition and morphology strongly influence the relative importance of competing reactions of SID, ion capture (soft-landing), surface reaction and neutralization. The important features of SID and ion soft-landing are described briefly in this review and more fully in the recommended reading list.

  8. Analysis on one underground nuclear waste repository rock mass in USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha Qiuling; Zhang Tiantian

    2012-01-01

    When analyzing the rock mass of a underground nuclear waste repository, the current studies are all based on the loading mechanical condition, and the unloading damage of rock mass is unconsidered. According to the different mechanical condition of actual engineering rock mass of loading and unloading, this paper implements a comprehensive analysis on the rock mass deformation of underground nuclear waste repository through the combination of present loading and unloading rock mass mechanics. It is found that the results of comprehensive analysis and actual measured data on the rock mass deformation of underground nuclear waste repository are basically the same, which provide supporting data for the underground nuclear waste repository. (authors)

  9. Surface Mass Balance Contributions to Acceleration of Antarctic Ice Mass Loss during 2003- 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, K. W.; Wilson, C. R.; Scambos, T. A.; Kim, B. M.; Waliser, D. E.; Tian, B.; Kim, B.; Eom, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations from satellite gravimetry (the GRACE mission) suggest an acceleration of ice mass loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS). The contribution of surface mass balance changes (due to variable precipitation) is compared with GRACE-derived mass loss acceleration by assessing the estimated contribution of snow mass from meteorological reanalysis data. We find that over much of the continent, the acceleration can be explained by precipitation anomalies. However, on the Antarctic Peninsula and other parts of West Antarctica mass changes are not explained by precipitation and are likely associated with ice discharge rate increases. The total apparent GRACE acceleration over all of the AIS between 2003 and 2013 is -13.6±7.2 GTon/yr2. Of this total, we find that the surface mass balance component is -8.2±2.0 GTon/yr2. However, the GRACE estimate appears to contain errors arising from the atmospheric pressure fields used to remove air mass effects. The estimated acceleration error from this effect is about 9.8±5.8 GTon/yr2. Correcting for this yields an ice discharge acceleration of -15.1±6.5 GTon/yr2.

  10. New discovery: Quantization of atomic and nuclear rest mass differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F. A.; Zhidkova, I. E.

    2007-01-01

    We come to the conclusion that all atomic models based on either the Newton equation and the Kepler laws, or the Maxwell equations, or the Schrodinger and Dirac equations are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. We can only suspect that these equations are grounded on the same fundamental principle(s) which is (are) not known or these equations can be transformed into each other. We proposed a new mechanism of LENR: cooperative processes in the whole system - nuclei + atoms + condensed matter - nuclear reactions in plasma - can occur at smaller threshold energies than the corresponding ones on free constituents. We were able to quantize [1] phenomenologically the first time the differences between atomic and nuclear rest masses by the formula: ΔΔ M = n 1 /n 2 x 0.0076294 (in MeV/c 2 ), n i =1,2,3,... Note that this quantization rule is justified for atoms and nuclei with different A, N and Z and the nuclei and atoms represent a coherent synchronized open systems - a complex of coupled oscillators (resonators). The cooperative resonance synchronization mechanisms are responsible for explanation of how the electron volt world can influence on the nuclear mega electron volt world. It means that we created new possibilities for inducing and controlling nuclear reactions by atomic processes grounded on the fundamental low of physics - conservation law of energy. The results of these research fields can provide new ecologically pure mobile sources of energy independent from oil, gas and coal, new substances, and technologies. For example, this discovery gives us a simple and cheep method for utilization of nuclear waste. References [1] F.A. Gareev, I.E. Zhidkova, E-print arXiv Nucl-th/0610002 2006

  11. Evaluation of errors for mass-spectrometric analysis with surface-ionization type mass-spectrometer (statistical evaluation of mass-discrimination effect)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The surface-ionization type mass-spectrometer is widely used as an apparatus for quality assurance, accountability and safeguarding of nuclear materials, and for this analysis it has become an important factor to statistically evaluate an analytical error which consists of a random error and a systematic error. The major factor of this systematic error was the mass-discrimination effect. In this paper, various assays for evaluating the factor of variation on the mass-discrimination effect were studied and the data obtained were statistically evaluated. As a result of these analyses, it was proved that the factor of variation on the mass-discrimination effect was not attributed to the acid concentration of sample, sample size on the filament and supplied voltage for a multiplier, but mainly to the filament temperature during the mass-spectrometric analysis. The mass-discrimination effect values β which were usually calculated from the measured data of uranium, plutonium or boron isotopic standard sample were not so significant dependently of the difference of U-235, Pu-239 or B-10 isotopic abundance. Furthermore, in the case of U and Pu, measurement conditions and the mass range of these isotopes were almost similar, and these values β were not statistically significant between U and Pu. On the other hand, the value β for boron was about a third of the value β for U or Pu, but compared with the coefficient of the correction on the mass-discrimination effect for the difference of mass-number, ΔM, these coefficient values were almost the same among U, Pu, and B.As for the isotopic analysis error of U, Pu, Nd and B, it was proved that the isotopic abundance of these elements and the isotopic analysis error were in a relationship of quadratic curves on a logarithmic-logarithmic scale

  12. Surface contamination technology in decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Hideharu

    2012-01-01

    Surface contamination measurement is the most basic technology in radiation control of the nuclear and radiation facilities. Loose surface contamination causes internal exposure through airborne contamination. Surface contamination measurement is recently more important in the waste management such as confirmation of decontamination factor, contamination survey of carried-out materials from radioactive control area, and application of clearance level. This report describes the base of surface contamination standards, meaning of contamination in decommissioning, relationship between clearance level and surface contamination, and current technology of surface contamination measurement. (author)

  13. Investigation of an orbital mass - the role of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlop, R. V.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:A 35 year old male presented, suffering from night sweats, occipital and frontal headaches, blurred vision, nausea and a decrease in appetite. He underwent a CT and MRI scan, which identified a 2.2cm lesion in the left orbit in an intra-conal position. This was suspected to be a cavernous haemangioma, although other tumours, such as Schwannoma could not be ruled out. A nuclear medicine labelled red blood cell study was performed which included initial dynamic images and early statics and 120min delayed images. SPECT/CT was also performed at the later time. The characteristic blood pool mismatch of low early and high delayed concentration of red blood cells confirmed suspicions of a cavernous haemangioma, which, although comprised mainly of blood vessels, has slow flow. Hence there is considerable delay before maximum activity is reached. The lesion was surgically removed. Histology reports confirmed the nuclear medicine results. Nuclear Medicine has the potential to play a significant role in the preoperative diagnosis of an orbital mass.

  14. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O. Silva, Hector; Berti, Emanuele; Sotani, Hajime

    2016-03-01

    Compact objects such as neutron stars are ideal astrophysical laboratories to test our understanding of the fundamental interactions in the regime of supranuclear densities, unachievable by terrestrial experiments. Despite recent progress, the description of matter (i.e., the equation of state) at such densities is still debatable. This translates into uncertainties in the bulk properties of neutron stars, masses and radii for instance. Here we will consider low-mass neutron stars. Such stars are expected to carry important information on nuclear matter near the nuclear saturation point. It has recently been shown that the masses and surface redshifts of low-mass neutron stars smoothly depend on simple functions of the central density and of a characteristic parameter η associated with the choice of equation of state. Here we extend these results to slowly-rotating and tidally deformed stars and obtain empirical relations for various quantities, such as the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment and ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love numbers, and rotational apsidal constants. We discuss how these relations might be used to constrain the equation of state by future observations in the electromagnetic and gravitational-wave spectra.

  15. A Simple Correlation for Neutron Capture Rates from Nuclear Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, Aaron Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-30

    Recent studies of neutron capture performed at LANL have revealed a previously unrecognized connection between nuclear masses and the average neutron capture cross section. A team of three scientists from Los Alamos (P-27), Yale Univ., and Istanbul Univ. (Turkey) recently discovered this connection and have published their results as a Rapid Communication in Physical Review C. Neutron capture is a reaction in which a free neutron is absorbed by the nucleus, keeping the element unchanged, but changing isotopes. This reaction is typically exothermic. As a result, the reaction can proceed even when many other reaction channels are closed. In an astrophysical environment, this means that neutron capture is the primary mechanism by which all of the elements with atomic number greater than nickel are produced is neutron capture.

  16. Prediction of heat and mass transfer in innovative nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, W.; Forgione, N.; Manfredini, A.; Oriolo, F.

    2000-01-01

    This paper proposes a short review of the different forms adopted to express the analogy between heat and mass transfer for application in correlating data from condensation and evaporation experiments. In particular, the assumptions at the basis of the various forms presented by classical textbooks as well as recent research work are qualitatively discussed, proposing a unified treatment of the different models. On this background, the results of the application of one of the considered forms of the analogy to a problem having relevance for nuclear reactor safety are then discussed. The work performed in this frame is related to condensation on finned tube heat exchangers, proposed as key components in passive containment cooling systems adopted in some innovative reactor concepts. The application of the model to the experimental dana also allowed to obtain interesting information about the effect of different parameters on the cooling capabilities of this compact heat exchangers. (author)

  17. Nuclear techniques for bulk and surface analysis of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agostino, M.D.; Kamykowski, E.A.; Kuehne, F.J.; Padawer, G.M.; Schneid, E.J.; Schulte, R.L.; Stauber, M.C.; Swanson, F.R.

    1978-01-01

    A review is presented summarizing several nondestructive bulk and surface analysis nuclear techniques developed in the Grumman Research Laboratories. Bulk analysis techniques include 14-MeV-neutron activation analysis and accelerator-based neutron radiography. The surface analysis techniques include resonant and non-resonant nuclear microprobes for the depth profile analysis of light elements (H, He, Li, Be, C, N, O and F) in the surface of materials. Emphasis is placed on the description and discussion of the unique nuclear microprobe analytical capacibilities of immediate importance to a number of current problems facing materials specialists. The resolution and contrast of neutron radiography was illustrated with an operating heat pipe system. The figure shows that the neutron radiograph has a resolution of better than 0.04 cm with sufficient contrast to indicate Freon 21 on the inner capillaries of the heat pipe and pooling of the liquid at the bottom. (T.G.)

  18. Nuclear technology: katulong sa pag-unlad ng masa [support for the progress of the masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The topics discussed during the convention is the usefulness of nuclear science and technology in national development and to promote the beneficial uses of nuclear science and technology to support for the progress of the masses

  19. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry with 15 UD pelletron at the Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    The 15 UD Pelletron machine is widely used to carry on investigations in a variety of disciplines like nuclear physics, materials science, radiobiology etc. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry studies with 15 UD pelletron machine at Nuclear Science Centre are elaborated

  20. Radiocarbon mass balance for a Magnox nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, M.P.; Mills, R.W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • First comprehensive assessment of C-14 arisings in a Magnox nuclear power station. • C-14 production in graphite and coolant gas quantified by activation modelling. • Principal C-14 production pathway is via C-13 with a small contribution from N-14. • C-14 mass balance model provides a basis for analyses on other reactors. - Abstract: Nuclear power generation in the United Kingdom is based principally on graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors. The mass of irradiated graphite associated with these reactors, including material from associated experimental, prototype and plutonium production reactors, exceeds 96,000 tonnes. One of the principal long-lived radionuclides produced during graphite irradiation is radiocarbon (C-14). Its potential as a hazard must be taken into account in decommissioning and graphite waste management strategies. While C-14 production processes are well-understood, radionuclide distributions and concentrations need to be characterised. A common misconception is that generic statements can be made about C-14 precursors and their location. In fact, the composition of the original manufactured material, the chemical environment of the graphite during service and its irradiation history will all influence C-14 levels. The analysis presented here provides the first assessment of the principal C-14 activation pathways for a UK Magnox reactor. Activation modelling has been used to predict C-14 production rates in both the graphite core and the carbon dioxide coolant over a selected period of operation and the results compared with monitored site C-14 discharges. Principal activation routes have been identified, which should inform future graphite waste management strategies relating to radiocarbon

  1. Nuclear stimulated desorption as a potential tool for surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nir, Dror.

    1993-03-01

    The described research work constitutes a base for an experimental method to be implemented in the study of solid surfaces. Nuclear Stimulated Desorption (NSD) is a new mode of experimentation in thin film and surface physics. It Is based on the interplay between nuclear phenomena (reactions and spontaneous decays), and atomic - scale induced effects on surfaces and very thin films. One may distinguish between two generically different relationships between the two. First, the dynamics of the nuclear reaction -primarily the recoil of the nucleus - may effect the position of the atom or molecule containing it. Second, the nuclear reaction (or decay) may serve as an analytical indicator of the whereabouts of the atom, or molecule, in question. In nuclear stimulated desorption, both thee aspects combine in an essential way. Namely, one employs a series of two consecutive decays (normally weak decays or isomeric transition) . The first of these decays causes the nucleus to desorb from a surface onto which it had been placed; the second serves to determine the position of the daughter and thereby the characteristics of the primary desorption . The essential feature in NSD is that it occurs almost exclusively from the outermost surface layer. This is because we choose to work with nuclei whose recoil energy Is of the same order of magnitude of the binding energy of the atom to the surface . Furthermore, the desorption probability and its angular (and temporal) characteristics, depend on the features (topology, morphology) of its immediate neighborhood. This work describes experiments which were designed to give relevant, phenomenological information about the outgoing flux of the radioactive daughters (for specifically chosen nuclear species) , and in particular the magnitude of the flux, its time dependence and its charged state. In addition. the basic phenomena itself is being distinguished from competing processes (thermal desorption, in particular). We will now

  2. Surface analytical methods in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgaertner, F.

    1985-06-01

    Application of SEM-EDX, AES, XPS are exemplarily demonstrated for highly radioactive materials with ionizing dose rates of about 1 Sv near the surface. The samples studied are aerosols from the high level waste vitrification process, postprecipitation in a pretreated fuel solution and emulsifying sludge from a solvent extraction process. The results of the chemical composition differentiated down to microscopic level reveal much more information about the history of a sample than those available from the integral macro-methods analysing. Elucidication of chemical composition and body structure in micrometer level may give insight into the origin and generation processes of samples under investigation. (orig.)

  3. Detection of high mass cluster ions sputtered from Bi surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, A; Hewitt, R W; Slusser, G J; Baitinger, W E; Cooks, R G; Winograd, N [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, Ind. (USA). Dept. of Chemistry; Delgass, W N [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, Ind. (USA); Varon, A; Devant, G [Societe RIBER, 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1976-12-01

    The technique of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been employed to detect Bi/sup 3 +/ ions and associated oxides Bi/sub 3/Osub(x)sup(+)(x=1 to 4) from a Bi foil. Using a 3 keV Ar/sup +/ ion primary beam of 5x10/sup -7/ A/cm/sup 2/, mass resolution to nearly 700 with the requisite sensitivity has been achieved. The Bi surface was also monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA). The presence of a weak O 1s peak at 532.7 eV and a strong SIMS Bi/sup 3 +/ peak is interpreted to mean that the oxygen is weakly incorporated into the Bi lattice without disrupting metal-metal bonds.

  4. Analysis of hydrogen isotopes in materials by secondary ion mass spectrometry and nuclear microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, G.G.

    1994-01-01

    Only two techniques are really appropriate for the depth profiling of hydrogen isotopes: nuclear microanalysis (NMA) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The intent of this paper is to give an up to date review of both techniques and to show how they can be used in conjunction. Both techniques (SIMS and NMA) will be described briefly. NMA will divided into two different categories: nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and elastic recoil detection (ERD). Both techniques (SIMS and NMA) will be discussed in terms of sensitivity, resolution, probing depth, quantitative measurement, generality and selectivity, beam induced effects and surface roughness effects. The principal advantages and disadvantages of each of these techniques will be specified, supporting the contention that SIMS and NMA are complementary and should be used in conjunction. Finally, some examples of, and perspectives for, the complementary use of both techniques will be presented. (Author)

  5. Radiocarbon Mass Balance for a Magnox Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, M.P.; Mills, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear power generation in the United Kingdom is based principally on graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors. The mass of irradiated graphite associated with these reactors, including material from associated experimental, prototype and production reactors, exceeds 96,000 tonnes. One of the principal long-lived radionuclides produced during graphite irradiation is radiocarbon (C-14), which has a half-life of 5730 ± 40 years. Decommissioning and graphite waste management strategies must take account of this radionuclide. In order to identify appropriate options for addressing the potential hazard of C-14, it is important that the production processes are understood and the distributions and concentrations of C-14 are characterised. In fact, C-14 precursors and their activation processes are well-known. However, there is ongoing debate over the relative importance of different C-14 precursors, which will determine the location of C-14 within graphite components and hence its mobility/response to treatment. A generally held misconception concerning C-14 in irradiated graphite is that generic statements can be made about its precursors and their location. C-14 location and activities will depend upon the composition of the original manufactured graphite (raw materials, impurities), the chemical environment of the graphite during service and the irradiation history of the graphite. So, while there may be some similarities across, for example, carbon dioxide cooled graphite moderated designs (Magnox, AGR, UNGG), any informed assessment of a core’s C-14 inventory would require more-precise characterisation. The analysis presented here focuses on a UK Magnox reactor core, Reactor 1 at Wylfa Nuclear Power Station. The objective of the analysis is to present a full C-14 mass balance over a selected period of operation for which there are accurate C-14 discharge records. The analysis presented here provides the first assessment of the principal C-14 activation pathways

  6. Evolution of massive stars with mass loss: surface abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greggio, L.

    1984-01-01

    The location of theoretical stellar models in the upper part of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram depends on a variety of poorly understood physical processes which may occur during the evolution of massive stars. The comparison between theoretical predictions and observations of the surface chemical composition of these objects can help in understanding their evolution and to set more stringent limits to the mentioned parameters. To this end, evolutionary sequences corresponding to 20, 40 and 60 solar masses have been computed up to core He exhaustion, following in detail the abundance variations of CNO, Ne and Mg isotopes. (Auth.)

  7. Nuclear surface vibrations in bag models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomio, L.

    1984-01-01

    The main difficulties found in the hadron bag models are reviewed from the original version of the MIT bag model. Following, with the aim to answer two of the main difficulties in bag models, viz., the parity and the divergence illness, a dynamical model is presented. In the model, the confinement surface of the quarks (bag) is treated like a real physical object which interacts with the quarks and is exposed to vibrations. The model is applied to the nucleon, being observed that his spectrum, in the first excited levels, can be reproduced with resonable precision and obeying to the correct parity order. In the same way that in a similar work of Brown et al., it is observed to be instrumental the inclusion of the effect due to pions. (L.C.) [pt

  8. Precision Mass Measurements of Cr-6358 : Nuclear Collectivity Towards the N =40 Island of Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougeot, M.; Atanasov, D.; Blaum, K.; Chrysalidis, K.; Goodacre, T. Day; Fedorov, D.; Fedosseev, V.; George, S.; Herfurth, F.; Holt, J. D.; Lunney, D.; Manea, V.; Marsh, B.; Neidherr, D.; Rosenbusch, M.; Rothe, S.; Schweikhard, L.; Schwenk, A.; Seiffert, C.; Simonis, J.; Stroberg, S. R.; Welker, A.; Wienholtz, F.; Wolf, R. N.; Zuber, K.

    2018-06-01

    The neutron-rich isotopes Cr 58 - 63 were produced for the first time at the ISOLDE facility and their masses were measured with the ISOLTRAP spectrometer. The new values are up to 300 times more precise than those in the literature and indicate significantly different nuclear structure from the new mass-surface trend. A gradual onset of deformation is found in this proton and neutron midshell region, which is a gateway to the second island of inversion around N =40 . In addition to comparisons with density-functional theory and large-scale shell-model calculations, we present predictions from the valence-space formulation of the ab initio in-medium similarity renormalization group, the first such results for open-shell chromium isotopes.

  9. Surface-ionization field mass-spectrometry studies of nonequilibrium surface ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blashenkov, Nikolai M; Lavrent'ev, Gennadii Ya

    2007-01-01

    The ionization of polyatomic molecules on tungsten and tungsten oxide surfaces is considered for quasiequilibrium or essentially nonequilibrium conditions (in the latter case, the term nonequilibrium surface ionization is used for adsorbate ionization). Heterogeneous reactions are supposed to proceed through monomolecular decay of polyatomic molecules or fragments of multimolecular complexes. The nonequilibrium nature of these reactions is established. The dependences of the current density of disordered ions on the surface temperature, electric field strength, and ionized particle energy distribution are obtained in analytical form. Heterogeneous dissociation energies, the ionization potentials of radicals, and the magnitude of reaction departure from equilibrium are determined from experimental data, as are energy exchange times between reaction products and surfaces, the number of molecules in molecular complexes, and the number of effective degrees of freedom in molecules and complexes. In collecting the data a new technique relying on surface-ionization field mass-spectrometry was applied. (instruments and methods of investigation)

  10. Effect of zero-point oscillations of nuclear surface on observable properties of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masterov, V.S.; Rabotnov, N.S.

    1982-01-01

    Possible effect of zero-point oscillations of nuclear surface on such observable nucleus characteristics as the mass of ground state, edge diffusion and height of fission barrier is considered. Within the framework of a drop model the calculation of binding energy per nucleon for even-even nuclei with a mass number 8 <= A <= 60 depending on A is given. It is shown that consideration of even quadrupole and octupole oscillations results in marked effects which are necessary to consider when comparing results of model calculations with experiment

  11. Low energy quasi free scattering on nuclear surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiyuan, S.

    1983-05-01

    The result of RGM calculation of low energy /sup 3/He(n, n)/sup 3/ He total elastic cross section does not agree well with experimental data for E/sub n/<1 MeV. This discrepancy can be improved by assuming lwo energy quasi-free scattering of particles beyond the nuclear surface.

  12. Surface acoustic wave nebulization facilitating lipid mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung Hwan; Huang, Yue; Edgar, J Scott; Ting, Ying S; Heron, Scott R; Kao, Yuchieh; Li, Yanyan; Masselon, Christophe D; Ernst, Robert K; Goodlett, David R

    2012-08-07

    Surface acoustic wave nebulization (SAWN) is a novel method to transfer nonvolatile analytes directly from the aqueous phase to the gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. The lower ion energetics of SAWN and its planar nature make it appealing for analytically challenging lipid samples. This challenge is a result of their amphipathic nature, labile nature, and tendency to form aggregates, which readily precipitate clogging capillaries used for electrospray ionization (ESI). Here, we report the use of SAWN to characterize the complex glycolipid, lipid A, which serves as the membrane anchor component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and has a pronounced tendency to clog nano-ESI capillaries. We also show that unlike ESI SAWN is capable of ionizing labile phospholipids without fragmentation. Lastly, we compare the ease of use of SAWN to the more conventional infusion-based ESI methods and demonstrate the ability to generate higher order tandem mass spectral data of lipid A for automated structure assignment using our previously reported hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. The ease of generating SAWN-MS(n) data combined with HiTMS interpretation offers the potential for high throughput lipid A structure analysis.

  13. Rock mass modification around a nuclear waste repository in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, M.G.; Brandshaug, T.; Brady, B.H.

    1989-08-01

    This report presents the results of numerical analyses to estimate the extent of rock mass modification resulting from the presence of a High Level Waste (HLW) repository. Changes in rock mass considered are stresses and joint deformations resulting from disposal room excavation and thermal efffects induced by the heat generated by nuclear waste. rock properties and site conditions are taken from the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design Report for the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Analyses were conducted using boundary element and distinct element methods. Room-scale models and repository-scale models were investigated for up to 500 years after waste emplacement. Results of room-scale analyses based on the thermoelastic boundary element model indicate that a zone of modified rock develops around the disposal rooms for both vertical and horizontal waste emplacement. This zone is estimated to extend a distance of roughly two room diameters from the room surface. Results from the repository-scale model, which are based on the thermoelastic boundary element model and the distinct element model, indicate a zone with modified rock mass properties starting approximately 100 m above and below the repository, with a thickness of approximately 200 m above and 150 m below the repository. Slip-prone subhorizontal features are shown to have a substantial effect on rock mass response. The estimates of rock mass modification reflect uncertainties and simplifying assumptions in the models. 32 refs., 57 figs., 1 tab

  14. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the Nuclear Science Laboratory: Applications to Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collon, P.; Bauder, W.; Bowers, M.; Lu, W.; Ostdiek, K.; Robertson, D.

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) program at the Nuclear Science Laboratory of the University of Notre Dame is focused on measurements related to galactic radioactivity and to nucleosynthesis of main stellar burning as well as the production of so called Short-Lived Radionuclides (SLRs) in the Early Solar System (ESS). The research program is based around the 11MV FN tandem accelerator and the use of the gas-filled magnet technique for isobar separation. Using a technique that evolved from radiocarbon dating, this paper presents a number of research programs that rely on the use of an 11MV tandem accelerator at the center of the AMS program.

  15. Radial distributions of surface mass density and mass-to-luminosity ratio in spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2018-03-01

    We present radial profiles of the surface mass density (SMD) in spiral galaxies directly calculated using rotation curves of two approximations of flat-disk (SMD-F) and spherical mass distribution (SMD-S). The SMDs are combined with surface brightness using photometric data to derive radial variations of the mass-to-luminosity ratio (ML). It is found that the ML generally has a central peak or a plateau, and decreases to a local minimum at R ˜ 0.1-0.2 h, where R is the radius and h is the scale radius of optical disk. The ML, then, increases rapidly until ˜0.5 h, and is followed by gradual rise till ˜2 h, remaining at around ˜2 [M_{⊙} L^{-1}_{⊙}] in the w1 band (infrared λ3.4 μm) and ˜ 10 [M_⊙ L_⊙ ^{-1}] in the r band (λ6200-7500 Å). Beyond this radius, the ML increases steeply with approaching the observed edges at R ˜ 5 h, attaining to as high values as ˜20 in w1 and ˜ 10^2 [M_⊙ L_⊙ ^{-1}] in the r band, which are indicative of dominant dark matter. The general properties of the ML distributions will be useful for constraining cosmological formation models of spiral galaxies.

  16. Direct mass spectrometric screening of antibiotics from bacterial surfaces using liquid extraction surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Marco; González, Ignacio; Genilloud, Olga; Singh, Sheo B; Svatoš, Aleš

    2012-10-30

    There is a need to find new antibiotic agents to fight resistant pathogenic bacteria. To search successfully for novel antibiotics from bacteria cultivated under diverse conditions, we need a fast and cost-effective screening method. A combination of Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis (LESA), automated chip-based nanoelectrospray ionization, and high-resolution mass or tandem mass spectrometry using an Orbitrap XL was tested as the screening platform. Actinobacteria, known to produce well-recognized thiazolyl peptide antibiotics, were cultivated on a plate of solid medium and the antibiotics were extracted by organic solvent mixtures from the surface of colonies grown on the plate and analyzed using mass spectrometry (MS). LESA combined with high-resolution MS is a powerful tool with which to extract and detect thiazolyl peptide antibiotics from different Actinobacteria. Known antibiotics were correctly detected with high mass accuracy (antibiotics in particular and natural products in general. The method described in this paper is suitable for (1) screening the natural products produced by bacterial colonies on cultivation plates within the first 2 min following extraction and (2) detecting antibiotics at high mass accuracy; the cost is around 2 Euro per sample. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Rock mass characterization for storage of nuclear waste in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherspoon, P.A.; Nelson, P.; Doe, T.; Thorpe, R.; Paulsson, B.; Gale, J.; Forster, C.

    1979-02-01

    The rock mass characterization in granite adjacent to an iron mine at Stripa, Sweden is being carried out by four different methods. The mechanical characterization includes monitoring the responses to thermal loading of jointed rock in situ, and mechanical tests on cores from 25 mm to 1 m in diameter. Geological characterization includes detailed surface mapping, subsurface mapping, and core mapping. Geophysical characterization uses a variety of borehole techniques, with emphasis on sonic methods. The hydrologic characterization is done through injection tests, pump tests, water pressure measurements, and controlled inflow tests to tunnels. Since the data are not yet complete, only tentative conclusions can be drawn regarding the best combinations of techniques for rock-mass characterization. Mapping studies are useful in defining continuity and fracture-system geometry. They do not give aperture, a factor significant in terms of both water flow and the displacements due to heating. Of the geophysical techniques, sonic methods appear most effective in fracture definition; other methods, gamma and neutron particularly, give data on radionuclide and water content and need further analysis with geologic and hydrologic data to determine their significance. Hydrologic work yields primarily aperture data, which with fracture geometry can be used to calculate directional permeabilities. Pressure measurements may provide one means of assessing fracture continuity. Finally, laboratory tests on large cores suggest considerable refinement in testing techniques may be needed before stress-aperture data can be extrapolated from laboratory to field

  18. Characteristic relation for the mass and energy distribution of the nuclear fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandru, G.

    1977-01-01

    The dispersion relation for nuclear fission is written in the two part fragmentation approach which allows to obtain the characteristic relation for the mass and energy distribution of the nuclear fission products. One explains the resonance approximation in the mass distribution of the fission products taking into account the high order resonances too. (author)

  19. Nuclear fuel, mass balances, conversion ratio, doubling time, and uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1976-11-01

    Information on the performance aspects of nuclear power plants is presented concerning conversion ratio, criticality, primitive economic analysis, stable breeder-converter industry, doubling time, breeder industry economic benefit, defining nuclear fuel, recommendations, and uncertainty

  20. Theme day: corrosion and surface treatments in nuclear facilities. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-02-01

    This document brings together the available presentations given at the theme day organized by the Bourgogne Nuclear Pole on the topic of corrosion and surface treatments in nuclear facilities. Eleven presentations (slides) are compiled in this document: 1 - Introduction - PNB centre of competitiveness and R and D activities (A. Mantovan, PNB); 2 - Corrosion damage (M. Foucault, Areva NP - Centre Technique Le Creusot); 3 - Corrosion mechanisms (R. Oltra, UB-ICB); 4 - Examples of expertise management (C. Duret-Thual, Institut de la corrosion/Corrosion Institute); 5 - General framework of surface treatments (C. Nouveau, ENSAM Cluny Paris Tech); 6 - Surfaces et interfaces characterisation - Part A (C. Langlade, Y. Gachon, UTBM and HEF); 7 - Surfaces et interfaces characterisation - Part B (C. Langlade, Y. Gachon, UTBM and HEF); 8 - Ion beam surface treatment (Y. Le Guellec, Quertech Ingenierie); 9 - Impact surface treatment (G. Saout, Sonats); 10 - Metal oxides Characterisation by US laser (R. Oltra, UB-ICB); 11 - Detection and Characterisation of intergranular corrosion (Y. Kernin, Stephane Bourgois, Areva Intercontrole)

  1. Secondary-ion mass spectrometry: some applications in the analysis of nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, W.H.; Eby, R.E.; Warmack, R.J.; Landau, L.

    1981-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been shown to offer some significant advantages over conventional mass spectrometry for the analysis of radioactive samples. We have used SIMS for the rapid, accurate analysis of B, Li, Cs, U and Pu in various nuclear materials. In many instances, SIMS allows one to perform mass and isotopic analysis on samples that are not amenable to other mass spectrometric techniques (e.g., surface ionization, electron impact, etc.). The significant advantage that accrues from the use of SIMS for isotopic analysis of these materials is the cmplete elimination of any chemical sample preparation steps, and only sample dissolution is necessary for the application of isotope dilution methods for quantitative analysis. The high sensitivity of SIMS for B, Li, U and Pu makes it possible to analyze sufficiently small radioactive samples so that radiation is reduced to acceptable levels for safe handling. The precision of SIMS isotopic analysis for natural B samples is about 0.5% and is about 1% for natural Li samples

  2. Optimization in the nuclear fuel cycle II: Surface contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, W.S.; Silva, A.X.; Lopes, J.M.; Carmo, A.S.; Fernandes, T.S.; Mello, C.R.; Kelecom, A.

    2017-01-01

    Optimization is one of the bases of radioprotection and aims to move doses away from the dose limit that is the borderline of acceptable radiological risk. This work aims to use the monitoring of surface contamination as a tool of the optimization process. 53 surface contamination points were analyzed at a nuclear fuel cycle facility. Three sampling points were identified with monthly mean values of contamination higher than 1 Bq ∙ cm -2 , points 28, 42 and 47. These points were indicated for the beginning of the optimization process

  3. Linearised collective Schroedinger equation for nuclear quadrupole surface vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, M.; Heumann, D.; Scheid, W.

    1990-11-01

    The linearisation of the Schroedinger equation for nuclear quadrupole surface vibrations yields a new spin degree of freedom, which is called collective spin and has a value of 3/2. With the introduction of collective spin dependent potentials, this linearised Schroedinger equation is then used for the description of low energy spectra and electromagnetic transition probabilities of some even-odd Xe, Ir and Au nuclei which have a spin 3/2 in their groundstate. (orig.)

  4. SURFACE SYMMETRY ENERGY OF NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, N; Schunck, N; Nazarewicz, W; Bender, M; Pei, J

    2010-12-20

    We study the bulk deformation properties of the Skyrme nuclear energy density functionals. Following simple arguments based on the leptodermous expansion and liquid drop model, we apply the nuclear density functional theory to assess the role of the surface symmetry energy in nuclei. To this end, we validate the commonly used functional parametrizations against the data on excitation energies of superdeformed band-heads in Hg and Pb isotopes, and fission isomers in actinide nuclei. After subtracting shell effects, the results of our self-consistent calculations are consistent with macroscopic arguments and indicate that experimental data on strongly deformed configurations in neutron-rich nuclei are essential for optimizing future nuclear energy density functionals. The resulting survey provides a useful benchmark for further theoretical improvements. Unlike in nuclei close to the stability valley, whose macroscopic deformability hangs on the balance of surface and Coulomb terms, the deformability of neutron-rich nuclei strongly depends on the surface-symmetry energy; hence, its proper determination is crucial for the stability of deformed phases of the neutron-rich matter and description of fission rates for r-process nucleosynthesis.

  5. The mass media and nuclear energy in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, C.

    1994-01-01

    The role of the US media in informing the public about benefits of nuclear industry is discussed. Usually the media in USA is biased against nuclear energy and works on the side of anti-nuclear groups. The tendency of reporters to mistrust government and industry experts, and to trust 'environmental groups' poses a particular problem for the US nuclear industry. One of the challenges of nuclear industry is to convince the media that anti-nuclear groups are not acting in the public interest, but in self-interest too. The scientists who communicate with the media must help reporters to understand technology, but to do that, they must understand reporter's needs. Those include a quick response to requests for information, spokespersons who speak clearly and understandably, in human terms, and candor and honesty in all of the information they provide. (I.P.)

  6. Particulate matter mass concentrations produced from pavement surface abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fullova Dasa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the latest findings particulate matter belong to the most significant pollutants in Europe together with ground-level ozone O3 and nitrogen dioxide NO2. Road traffic is one of the main sources of particulate matter. Traffic volume has unpleasant impact on longevity of the pavements and also on the environment. Vehicle motions cause mechanical wearing of the asphalt pavement surface - wearing course by vehicle tyres. The paper deals with abrasion of bituminous wearing courses of pavements. The asphalt mixtures are compared in terms of mechanically separated particulate matter. The samples of asphalt mixtures were rutted in wheel tracking machine. The particulate matter measurements were performed in laboratory conditions. The experimental laboratory measurements make it possible to sample particulates without contamination from exhaust emissions, abraded particles from vehicles, resuspension of road dust and climate affects. The paper offers partial results of measurements on six trial samples of asphalt mixtures with different composition. It presents particulate matter morphology and the comparison of rutted asphalt samples in terms of PM mass concentrations and chemical composition.

  7. Surface treatments for material protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, P.K.; Gadiyar, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    The paper highlights some of the surface treatment methods used in nuclear power plants to improve their performance. The corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys results from the formation of an adherent and protective film of ZrO 2 . Graphite coating of zircaloy-2 cladding minimizes the susceptibility to environmental induced cracking. Magnetite formation during the hot conditioning operation improves the corrosion resistance of carbon steel as well as controls the spread of radioactivity. It has been illustrated how the surface treatment is helpful for redistributing residual stress to facilitate conversion of tensile stress to compressive stress to mitigate failures due to stress corrosion and fatigue corrosion. Inhibitors and passivators can modify the surface conditions (in situ) of condenser tubes and cooling water systems. These aspects have been dealt in the text of the paper. (author). 8 refs., 3 figures

  8. Floor surface decontaminating device for use in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomiji; Ue, Tatsuyuki; Omori, Nobuya; Okuzawa, Tsutomu.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a device for decontaminating the floor surfaces contaminated with radioactive materials in nuclear power plants or the likes, mechanically, automatically and effectively. Constitution: During running of the device by means of running wheels and castors, a decontaminating head is always applied with vibrations by a vibrator. In this state, wiping members are sent from a delivery roll, applied with vibrations at the decontaminating head. The members wipe off contamination products while in frictional contact with the floor surface and are then taken up to a winding roll with the contamination products deposited thereto. In this case, since the vibrations from the decontaminating head are transmitted by way of a resilient portion thereof to the wiping members, the vibrations transmitted from the wiping members to the floor surface are somewhat buffered. (Kawakami, Y.)

  9. A surface structural model for ferrihydrite I: Sites related to primary charge, molar mass, and mass density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Tjisse; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H.

    2009-08-01

    A multisite surface complexation (MUSIC) model for ferrihydrite (Fh) has been developed. The surface structure and composition of Fh nanoparticles are described in relation to ion binding and surface charge development. The site densities of the various reactive surface groups, the molar mass, the mass density, the specific surface area, and the particle size are quantified. As derived theoretically, molecular mass and mass density of nanoparticles will depend on the types of surface groups and the corresponding site densities and will vary with particle size and surface area because of a relatively large contribution of the surface groups in comparison to the mineral core of nanoparticles. The nano-sized (˜2.6 nm) particles of freshly prepared 2-line Fh as a whole have an increased molar mass of M ˜ 101 ± 2 g/mol Fe, a reduced mass density of ˜3.5 ± 0.1 g/cm 3, both relatively to the mineral core. The specific surface area is ˜650 m 2/g. Six-line Fh (5-6 nm) has a molar mass of M ˜ 94 ± 2 g/mol, a mass density of ˜3.9 ± 0.1 g/cm 3, and a surface area of ˜280 ± 30 m 2/g. Data analysis shows that the mineral core of Fh has an average chemical composition very close to FeOOH with M ˜ 89 g/mol. The mineral core has a mass density around ˜4.15 ± 0.1 g/cm 3, which is between that of feroxyhyte, goethite, and lepidocrocite. These results can be used to constrain structural models for Fh. Singly-coordinated surface groups dominate the surface of ferrihydrite (˜6.0 ± 0.5 nm -2). These groups can be present in two structural configurations. In pairs, the groups either form the edge of a single Fe-octahedron (˜2.5 nm -2) or are present at a single corner (˜3.5 nm -2) of two adjacent Fe octahedra. These configurations can form bidentate surface complexes by edge- and double-corner sharing, respectively, and may therefore respond differently to the binding of ions such as uranyl, carbonate, arsenite, phosphate, and others. The relatively low PZC of

  10. The odd-proton effects on the potential energy surfaces of odd mass Tl, Au, Ir and Re isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    De Wieclawik, W; Larsson, S E; Leander, G; Vieu, C; Dionisio, J S

    1976-01-01

    The total potential energy surfaces of thallium, gold, iridium and rhenium odd mass isotopes are calculated microscopically as functions of the quadrupole deformation, epsilon /sub 2/, when the odd protons occupy definite orbitals. The nuclear shapes and the static equilibrium deformations of these nuclei are deduced from the results of these calculations for the proton orbitals nearest to the Fermi level. The influence of the hexadecapole deformation, epsilon /sub 4/, on these results is investigated too. Finally, a few experimental data available for these odd mass nuclei are correlated to the corresponding theoretical results. (16 refs).

  11. A simple method for improving predictions of nuclear masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masami; Tsuchiya, Susumu; Tachibana, Takahiro

    1991-01-01

    The formula for atomic masses which exactly conforms to all nuclides does not exist in reality and cannot be anticipated for the time being hereafter. At present the masses of many nuclides are known experimentally with good accuracy, but the values of whichever mass formulas are more or less different from those experimental values except small number of accidental coincidence. Under such situation, for forecasting the mass of an unknown nuclide, how is it cleverly done ? Generally speaking, to take the value itself of a mass formula seems not the best means. It may be better to take the difference of the values of a mass formula and experiment for the nuclide close to that to be forecast in consideration and to correct the forecast value of the mass formula. In this report, the simple method for this correction is proposed. The formula which connects between two extreme cases, the difference between a true mass and the value of a mass formula is the sum of proton part and neutron part, and the difference distributes randomly around zero, was proposed. The procedure for its concrete application is explained. This method can be applied to other physical quantities than mass, for example the half life of beta decay. (K.I.)

  12. UPDATED MASS SCALING RELATIONS FOR NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTERS AND A COMPARISON TO SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Nicholas; Graham, Alister W.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate whether or not nuclear star clusters and supermassive black holes (SMBHs) follow a common set of mass scaling relations with their host galaxy's properties, and hence can be considered to form a single class of central massive object (CMO). We have compiled a large sample of galaxies with measured nuclear star cluster masses and host galaxy properties from the literature and fit log-linear scaling relations. We find that nuclear star cluster mass, M NC , correlates most tightly with the host galaxy's velocity dispersion: log M NC = (2.11 ± 0.31)log (σ/54) + (6.63 ± 0.09), but has a slope dramatically shallower than the relation defined by SMBHs. We find that the nuclear star cluster mass relations involving host galaxy (and spheroid) luminosity and stellar and dynamical mass, intercept with but are in general shallower than the corresponding black hole scaling relations. In particular, M NC ∝M 0.55±0.15 Gal,dyn ; the nuclear cluster mass is not a constant fraction of its host galaxy or spheroid mass. We conclude that nuclear stellar clusters and SMBHs do not form a single family of CMOs.

  13. Investigation of the proton-neutron interaction by high-precision nuclear mass measurements

    CERN Multimedia

    Savreux, R P; Akkus, B

    2007-01-01

    We propose to measure the atomic masses of a series of short-lived nuclides, including $^{70}$Ni, $^{122-130}$Cd, $^{134}$Sn, $^{138,140}$Xe, $^{207-210}$Hg, and $^{223-225}$Rn, that contribute to the investigation of the proton-neutron interaction and its role in nuclear structure. The high-precision mass measurements are planned for the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP that reaches the required precision of 10 keV in the nuclear mass determination.

  14. Quality control for total evaporation technique by surface/thermal ionization mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Seikou; Inoue, Sinichi; Yamaguchi, Katsuyuki; Tsutaki, Yasuhiro

    2007-01-01

    For the measurement of uranium and plutonium isotopic composition, the surface/thermal ionization mass spectrometry is widely used at the both nuclear facilities and safeguards verification laboratories. The progress of instrument specification makes higher sensitivity. The total evaporation technique is one of the latest measurement techniques by using this progress, in which all of uranium or plutonium on the filament would be evaporated by increasing the filament current. The accuracy and precision of this technique is normally checked by using the certified isotope reference materials measurement. But the fluctuation of ion beam is very different by each filament, depending on the chemical form of evaporation. So, it should be considered how to check the measurement quality of unknown samples which has no certified values. This presentation is focused on the monitoring of ion yields and pattern of isotope ratio fluctuation to attain the traceability between reference material and unknown sample as quality control approach of total evaporation technique. (author)

  15. Surface coating Zr or Zr alloy nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaghy, R.E.; Sherman, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    A method is disclosed for preventing stress corrosion cracking or metal embrittlement of a zirconium or zirconium alloy container that is to be coated on the inside surface with a layer of a metal such as copper, a copper alloy, nickel, or iron and used for holding nuclear fuel material as a nuclear fuel element. The zirconium material is etched in an etchant solution, desmutted mechanically or ultrasonically, oxidized to form an oxide coating on the zirconium, cleaned in an aqueous alkaline cleaning solution, activated for electroless deposition of a metal layer and contacted with an electroless metal plating solution. This method provides a boundary layer of zirconium oxide between the zirconium container and the metal layer. (author)

  16. Software in windows for staple compounding system of microcomputer nuclear mass scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yanting; Zhang Yongming; Wang Yu; Jin Dongping

    1998-01-01

    The software exploited in windows for staple compounding system of microcomputer nuclear mass scale is described. The staple compounding system is briefly narrated. The software structure and its realizing method are given

  17. The mass media and nuclear energy in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, C.

    1994-01-01

    The author discusses some problems of mass media of the United States connected with covering issues of nuclear power development, and makes some recommendations to improve the situation in this field

  18. Multiple nucleon transfer in damped nuclear collisions. [Lectures, mass charge, and linear and angular momentum transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randrup, J.

    1979-07-01

    This lecture discusses a theory for the transport of mass, charge, linear, and angular momentum and energy in damped nuclear collisions, as induced by multiple transfer of individual nucleons. 11 references.

  19. Nuclear mass formula with the shell energies obtained by a new method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koura, H.; Tachibana, T.; Yamada, M.; Uno, M.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear shapes and masses are estimated by a new method. The main feature of this method lies in estimating shell energies of deformed nuclei from spherical shell energies by mixing them with appropriate weights. The spherical shell energies are calculated from single-particle potentials, and, till now, two mass formulas have been constructed from two different sets of potential parameters. The standard deviation of the calculated masses from all the experimental masses of the 1995 Mass Evaluation is about 760 keV. Contrary to the mass formula by Tachibana, Uno, Yamada and Yamada in the 1987-1988 Atomic Mass Predictions, the present formulas can give nuclear shapes and predict on super-heavy elements

  20. Evolution of a 30 solar mass star: the interplay of nuclear burning and mass loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, H.J.; Mitalas, R.

    1981-01-01

    Evolutionary tracks for a 30 solar mass star with various mass loss rates (MLR) were evolved to core He exhaustion. The 'overluminosity' of mass losing (ML) stars is explained in terms of the well known mass-luminosity (M-L) law. A critical ZAMS MLR above which mass loss leads to evolution to fainter luminosities is derived. Two tracks showed reversals in their direction of evolution across the HR diagram. These have been shown to be a consequence of mass loss dominating over the effects of the shell source. An analytic criterion for this condition has been derived. (Auth.)

  1. Microanalysis of solid surfaces by nuclear reactions and elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agius, B.

    1975-01-01

    The principles involved in the use of monokinetic light ions beams, of about 1MeV, to the study of surface phenomena are presented. Two complementary techniques are described: the use of elastic scattering, which allows the analysis of impurity elements heavier than the substrate components and the use of nuclear reactions specific of light elements. Typical sensitivities are of the order of 10 11 at/cm 2 in good cases. The depth resolution varies, according to the cases, from about a hundred angstroems to a few thousand angstroems [fr

  2. Nuclear Fusion Research Understanding Plasma-Surface Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Robert E.H

    2005-01-01

    It became clear in the early days of fusion research that the effects of the containment vessel (erosion of "impurities") degrade the overall fusion plasma performance. Progress in controlled nuclear fusion research over the last decade has led to magnetically confined plasmas that, in turn, are sufficiently powerful to damage the vessel structures over its lifetime. This book reviews current understanding and concepts to deal with this remaining critical design issue for fusion reactors. It reviews both progress and open questions, largely in terms of available and sought-after plasma-surface interaction data and atomic/molecular data related to these "plasma edge" issues.

  3. Erratum to: Nuclear triaxiality in the A ∼ 160–170 mass region: the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Erratum to: Nuclear triaxiality in the A ∼ 160–170 mass region: the story so far. S MUKHOPADHYAY1,∗ and W C MA2. 1Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India. 2Department of Physics, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi 39762, USA. ∗. Corresponding ...

  4. Capacitor-based detection of nuclear magnetization: nuclear quadrupole resonance of surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorovič, Alan; Apih, Tomaž; Kvasić, Ivan; Lužnik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko; Strle, Drago; Muševič, Igor

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate excitation and detection of nuclear magnetization in a nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) experiment with a parallel plate capacitor, where the sample is located between the two capacitor plates and not in a coil as usually. While the sensitivity of this capacitor-based detection is found lower compared to an optimal coil-based detection of the same amount of sample, it becomes comparable in the case of very thin samples and even advantageous in the proximity of conducting bodies. This capacitor-based setup may find its application in acquisition of NQR signals from the surface layers on conducting bodies or in a portable tightly integrated nuclear magnetic resonance sensor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Analyzing mass perceptions of nuclear politics: Puzzling over trust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins-Smith, H.C.; Pratt, D.A.; Bassett, G.W. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The juxtaposition of public values, trust, and beliefs is at the core of policy-making in democratic political systems, and an accurate understanding of nuclear politics requires that researchers untangle and carefully think about the web of psychological and social influences that shape citizens' preferences. In this paper, we offer some tentative answers about several pieces of the trust open-quotes puzzleclose quotes. First, we reconsider what is meant by open-quotes trustclose quotes and how it is to be measured. We then use telephone survey data to explore the relationship between trust and citizens' nuclear policy preferences. The data lend support to the conclusion that trust is more mutable than previous research has shown, and besides the traditional measure of competence includes aspects of believability and fiduciary competence. The data further indicate that it is a mistake to think in terms of a single open-quotes publicclose quotes when exploring the link between trust and nuclear policies. A number of dissimilar open-quotes publicsclose quotes based on shared open-quotes worldviewsclose quotes or political cultures are apparent in the data analyzed here. These open-quotes publicsclose quotes appear to think about trust differently from one another and rely on different dimensions of trust when determining nuclear policy preferences. Policy-makers must recognize the different open-quotes publicsclose quotes coexisting within the U.S. nuclear policy arena, and the relative import that these publics place on different dimensions of trust

  6. Near-surface analysis with nuclear reactions and scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, K.L.; Hirvonen, J.K.

    1974-01-01

    Very useful information about the elemental composition of solids in the surface and near-surface regions can be obtained with small accelerators and suitable auxiliary apparatus. Two methods which produce data from which quantitative concentration depth profiles can be constructed and which have been used extensively at this laboratory are: nuclear resonance profiling and Rutherford backscattering. The first method is described in detail. Data are given on profiles of Al and Al + Na films implanted on silicon substrates. Rutherford backscattering spectra for chromium implanted into silicon dioxide are used to illustrate the improved depth sensitivity that can be obtained with a magnetic spectrometer in depth concentration profiles of heavy impurities relative to that obtainable with a conventional semiconductor detector

  7. Nuclear power debate - scientists, mass media and the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, S.; Lichter, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    A poll among the members of the American Men and Women of Science has shown that the majority of scientists are for nuclear energy. The controversial results of polls in the general public are believed to be due to the distortion effects of the press and media. The biased information role of the communication media might be the result of the prejudiced publicity behavior of antinuclear scientists. A more significant role, however, has been played by the science journalists whose scepticism toward nuclear power is reflected in the public opinion. There seems to be a lack in the communication chain connecting the layman public with the science community. (R.P.)

  8. Reactive surface organometallic complexes observed using dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Pump, Eva; Viger-Gravel, Jasmine; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Samantaray, Manoja; Hamzaoui, Bilel; Gurinov, Andrei; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Gajan, David; Lesage, Anne; Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, Anissa; Emsley, Lyndon; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy (DNP SENS) is an emerging technique that allows access to high-sensitivity NMR spectra from surfaces. However, DNP SENS usually requires the use of radicals as an exogenous source of polarization, which has so far limited applications for organometallic surface species to those that do not react with the radicals. Here we show that reactive surface species can be studied if they are immobilized inside porous materials with suitably small windows, and if bulky nitroxide bi-radicals (here TEKPol) are used as the polarization source and which cannot enter the pores. The method is demonstrated by obtaining significant DNP enhancements from highly reactive complelxes [(equivalent to Si-O-)W(Me)(5)] supported on MCM-41, and effects of pore size (6.0, 3.0 and 2.5 nm) on the performance are discussed.

  9. Reactive surface organometallic complexes observed using dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Pump, Eva

    2016-08-15

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy (DNP SENS) is an emerging technique that allows access to high-sensitivity NMR spectra from surfaces. However, DNP SENS usually requires the use of radicals as an exogenous source of polarization, which has so far limited applications for organometallic surface species to those that do not react with the radicals. Here we show that reactive surface species can be studied if they are immobilized inside porous materials with suitably small windows, and if bulky nitroxide bi-radicals (here TEKPol) are used as the polarization source and which cannot enter the pores. The method is demonstrated by obtaining significant DNP enhancements from highly reactive complelxes [(equivalent to Si-O-)W(Me)(5)] supported on MCM-41, and effects of pore size (6.0, 3.0 and 2.5 nm) on the performance are discussed.

  10. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J.; Ambers, Scott D.

    2011-01-14

    The Next Generation Safeguard Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S Department of Energy is supporting a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The following 14 NDA techniques are being studied: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Gamma, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis. Understanding and maturity of the techniques vary greatly, ranging from decades old, well-understood methods to new approaches. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that had not previously been studied for SNF assay or similar applications. Since NRF generates isotope-specific signals, the promise and appeal of the technique lies in its potential to directly measure the amount of a specific isotope in an SNF assay target. The objectives of this study were to design and model suitable NRF measurement methods, to quantify capabilities and corresponding instrumentation requirements, and to evaluate prospects and the potential of NRF for SNF assay. The main challenge of the technique is to achieve the sensitivity and precision, i.e., to accumulate sufficient counting statistics, required for quantifying the mass of Pu isotopes in SNF assemblies. Systematic errors, considered a lesser problem for a direct measurement and only briefly discussed in this report, need to be evaluated for specific instrument designs in the future. Also, since the technical capability of using NRF to measure Pu in SNF has not been established, this report does not directly address issues such as cost, size

  11. The Asteroid Threat and the Safety of Surface Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shestopalov, V.M.; Shibetskij, Yu.A.; Makarenko, A.N.

    2015-01-01

    Surface nuclear installations are much more vulnerable to impact events than it has traditionally been considered. They can be destroyed by events with energies greater than 100 Mt. According to the most unfavorable (conservative) estimates, the probability of destruction can reach 10 -7 ...10 -6 year -1 for certain areas of the Earth. In fact, any cosmic body that can reach the surface of the Earth, or an atmospheric explosion can cause a serious accident to or even completely destroy a nuclear facility. The burden of the radiological consequences of such an accident will be determined by the total activity of radioactive substances located on site and by meteorological factors. The most dangerous (probable) are low-energy events (10 0 ...10 2 Mt). They can occur during the collision of the Earth with a cosmic body with a diameter of 30...200 m. The risk of death resulting from the direct effects of the impact of the given energy is approximately two orders of magnitude lower than the risk of death due to additional radiological impacts of the destroyed facility. Within the energy range of 10 2 ...10 5 Mt, the radiological consequences of impact events (opposite to non-radiological) will be global. In our opinion, this is a strong argument for the inclusion of impact events into the list of possible external events when assessing the suitability of sites for placement of NPPs and storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel. The safety analysis of the indicated facilities should consider the complexity of the damaging factors (high temperatures, shock, seismic shock, tsunamis) and also the fact that the loads associated with the phenomena induced by the impact will depend on its energy and can greatly exceed the values of loads typical for the region of the facility location

  12. Mass Media and the Debate about Nuclear Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Thomas M.

    Many factors contribute to the difficulties the media have in dealing with science, engineering, and technology. These difficulties were pointed up in the media coverage of the March 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear plant, which reflected confusion and lack of understanding and which combined with other factors (including the movie…

  13. Role of deformed shell effects on the mass asymmetry in nuclear fission of mercury isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panebianco, Stefano; Sida, Jean-Luc; Goutte, Heloise; Lemaitre, Jean-Francois; Dubray, Noel; Hilaire, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    Until now, the mass asymmetry in the nuclear fission process has been understood in terms of the strong influence of the nuclear structure of the nascent fragments. Recently, a surprising asymmetric fission has been discovered in the light mercury region and has been interpreted as the result of the influence of the nuclear structure of the parent nucleus, totally discarding the influence of the fragments' structure. To assess the role of the fragment shell effects in the mass asymmetry in this particular region, a scission-point model, based on a full energy balance between the two nascent fragments, has been developed using one of the best theoretical descriptions of microscopic nuclear structure. As for actinides, this approach shows that the asymmetric splitting of the Hg-180 nucleus and the symmetric one of Hg-198 can be understood on the basis of only the microscopic nuclear structure of the fragments at scission. (authors)

  14. Greenland surface mass-balance observations from the ice-sheet ablation area and local glaciers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machguth, Horst; Thomsen, Henrik H.; Weidick, Anker

    2016-01-01

    Glacier surface mass-balance measurements on Greenland started more than a century ago, but no compilation exists of the observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. Such data could be used in the evaluation of modelled surface mass balance, or to document changes in g...

  15. Greenland surface mass-balance observations from the ice-sheet ablation area and local glaciers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machguth, Horst; Thomsen, Henrik H.; Weidick, Anker; Ahlstrøm, Andreas P.; Abermann, Jakob; Andersen, Morten L.; Andersen, Signe B.; Bjørk, Anders A.; Box, Jason E.; Braithwaite, Roger J.; Bøggild, Carl E.; Citterio, Michele; Clement, Poul; Colgan, William; Fausto, Robert S.; Gleie, Karin; Gubler, Stefanie; Hasholt, Bent; Hynek, Bernhard; Knudsen, Niels T.; Larsen, Signe H.; Mernild, Sebastian H.; Oerlemans, Johannes; Oerter, Hans; Olesen, Ole B.; Smeets, C. J P Paul; Steffen, Konrad; Stober, Manfred; Sugiyama, Shin; Van As, Dirk; Van Den Broeke, Michiel R.; Van De Wal, Roderik S W

    2016-01-01

    Glacier surface mass-balance measurements on Greenland started more than a century ago, but no compilation exists of the observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. Such data could be used in the evaluation of modelled surface mass balance, or to document changes in

  16. Nuclear masses and the number of valence nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza-Temis, J.; Frank, A.; Hirsch, J.G.; Lopez Vieyra, J.C.; Morales, I.; Barea, J.; Van Isacker, P.; Velazquez, V.

    2008-01-01

    An improved version of the liquid drop model is presented. The addition of two terms, linear and quadratic in the total number of valence nucleons (particles or holes), improves the description of atomic masses, which can be fitted with an r.m.s. error of 1.2 MeV. Predictions are analysed an compared with those of established models

  17. Surface Disturbances at the Punggye-ri Nuclear Test Site: Another Indicator of Nuclear Testing?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabian, Frank V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Coblentz, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-02-03

    A review of available very high-resolution commercial satellite imagery (bracketing the time of North Korea’s most recent underground nuclear test on 9 September 2016 at the Punggye-ri Underground Nuclear Test Site) has led to the detection and identification of several minor surface disturbances on the southern flank of Mt. Mantap. These surface disturbances occur in the form of small landslides, either alone or together with small zones of disturbed bare rock that appear to have been vertically lofted (“spalled”) as a result of the most recent underground explosion. Typically, spall can be uniquely attributed to underground nuclear testing and is not a result of natural processes. However, given the time gap of up to three months between images (pre- and post-event), which was coincident with a period of heavy typhoon flooding in the area1, it is not possible to determine whether the small landslides were exclusively explosion induced, the consequence of heavy rainfall erosion, or some combination of the two.

  18. Calibration of a surface mass balance model for global-scale applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesen, R. H.; Oerlemans, J.

    2012-01-01

    Global applications of surface mass balance models have large uncertainties, as a result of poor climate input data and limited availability of mass balance measurements. This study addresses several possible consequences of these limitations for the modelled mass balance. This is done by applying a

  19. Understanding the Role of Wind in Reducing the Surface Mass Balance Estimates over East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, I.; Scambos, T. A.; Koenig, L.; Creyts, T. T.; Bell, R. E.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Lenaerts, J.; Paden, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate quantification of surface snow-accumulation over Antarctica is important for mass balance estimates and climate studies based on ice core records. An improved estimate of surface mass balance must include the significant role near-surface wind plays in the sublimation and redistribution of snow across Antarctica. We have developed an empirical model based on airborne radar and lidar observations, and modeled surface mass balance and wind fields to produce a continent-wide prediction of wind-scour zones over Antarctica. These zones have zero to negative surface mass balance, are located over locally steep ice sheet areas (>0.002) and controlled by bedrock topography. The near-surface winds accelerate over these zones, eroding and sublimating the surface snow. This scouring results in numerous localized regions (≤ 200 km2) with reduced surface accumulation. Each year, tens of gigatons of snow on the Antarctic ice sheet are ablated by persistent near-surface katabatic winds over these wind-scour zones. Large uncertainties remain in the surface mass balance estimates over East Antarctica as climate models do not adequately represent the small-scale physical processes that lead to mass loss through sublimation or redistribution over the wind-scour zones. In this study, we integrate Operation IceBridge's snow radar over the Recovery Ice Stream with a series of ice core dielectric and depth-density profiles for improved surface mass balance estimates that reflect the mass loss over the wind-scour zones. Accurate surface mass balance estimates from snow radars require spatially variable depth-density profiles. Using an ensemble of firn cores, MODIS-derived surface snow grain size, modeled accumulation rates and surface temperatures from RACMO2, we assemble spatially variable depth-density profiles and use our mapping of snow density variations to estimate layer mass and net accumulation rates from snow radar layer data. Our study improves the quantification of

  20. Relativistic mean-field approximation with density-dependent screening meson masses in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Baoxi; Lu, Xiaofu; Shen, Pengnian; Zhao, Enguang

    2003-01-01

    The Debye screening masses of the σ, ω and neutral ρ mesons and the photon are calculated in the relativistic mean-field approximation. As the density of the nucleon increases, all the screening masses of mesons increase. A different result with Brown–Rho scaling is shown, which implies a reduction in the mass of all the mesons in the nuclear matter, except the pion. Replacing the masses of the mesons with their corresponding screening masses in the Walecka-1 model, five saturation properties of the nuclear matter are fixed reasonably, and then a density-dependent relativistic mean-field model is proposed without introducing the nonlinear self-coupling terms of mesons. (author)

  1. Nuclear reactor vessel surface inspecting technique applying electric resistance probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Enami, K.; Yoshioka, M.

    1975-01-01

    A new technique for inspecting the inner surface of the PWR type nuclear reactor vessel by use of an electric resistance probe is introduced, centering on a data processing system. This system is composed of a mini-computer, a system typewriter, an interface unit, a D-A converter and controller, and X-Y recorder and others. Its functions are judging flaws and making flaw detection maps. In order to judge flaws by flaw detection signals, three kinds of flaw judging methods have been developed. In case there is a flaw, its position and depth are calculated and listed on the system typewriter. The flaw detection maps are expressed in four kinds of modes and they are displayed on the X-Y recorder. (auth.)

  2. Nuclear equipment to determine soil and water mass attenuation coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchi, O.L.A.D.; Nascimento Filho, V.F. do

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of substituting the monochannel gamma spectrometer, traditionally used in the gamma ray attenuation technique, for a less sophisticated and less expensive system of integral counting is studied. The proposed system can be operated by a non-specialized person. Three detection systems were used in the determination of the mass attenuation coefficients for different types of soil and for water. (M.A.C.) [pt

  3. Mass and charge distributions in chlorine-induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    Projectile-like fragments were detected and characterized in terms of A, Z, and energy for the reactions 37 Cl on 40 Ca and 209 Bi at E/A = 7.3 MeV, and 35 Cl, on 209 Bi at E/A = 15 MeV, at angles close to the grazing angle. Mass and charge distributions were generated in the N-Z plane as a function of energy loss, and have been parameterized in terms of their centroids, variances, and coefficients of correlation. Due to experimental problems, the mass resolution corresponding to the 31 Cl on 209 Bi reaction was very poor. This prompted the study and application of a deconvolution technique for peak enhancement. The drifts of the charge and mass centroids for the system 37 Cl on 40 Ca are consistent with a process of mass and charge equilibration mediated by nucleon exchange between the two partners, followed by evaporation. The asymmetric systems show a strong drift towards larger asymmetry, with the production of neutron-rich nuclei. It was concluded that this is indicative of a net transfer of protons from the light to the heavy partner, and a net flow of neutrons in the opposite direction. The variances for all systems increase with energy loss, as it would be expected from a nucleon exchange mechanism; however, the variances for the reaction 37 Cl on 40 Ca are higher than those expected from that mechanism. The coefficients of correlation indicate that the transfer of nucleons between projectile and target is correlated. The results were compared to the predictions of two current models based on a stochastic nucleon exchange mechanism. In general, the comparisons between experimental and predicted variances support this mechanism; however, the need for more realistic driving forces in the model calculations is indicated by the disagreement between predicted and experimental centroids

  4. Hazards to nuclear plants from surface traffic accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornyik, K.

    1975-01-01

    Analytic models have been developed for evaluating hazards to nuclear plants from hazardous-materials accidents in the vicinity of the plant. In particular, these models permit the evaluation of hazards from such accidents occurring on surface traffic routes near the plant. The analysis uses statistical information on accident rates, traffic frequency, and cargo-size distribution along with parameters describing properties of the hazardous cargo, plant design, and atmospheric conditions, to arrive at a conservative estimate of the annual probability of a catastrophic event. Two of the major effects associated with hazardous-materials accidents, explosion and release of toxic vapors, are treated by a common formalism which can be readily applied to any given case by means of a graphic procedure. As an example, for a typical case it is found that railroad shipments of chlorine in 55-ton tank cars constitute a greater hazard to a nearby nuclear plant than equally frequent rail shipments of explosives in amounts of 10 tons. 11 references. (U.S.)

  5. Steam Generator control in Nuclear Power Plants by water mass inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Wei [North Carolina State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695-7909 (United States); Doster, J. Michael [North Carolina State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695-7909 (United States)], E-mail: doster@eos.ncsu.edu; Mayo, Charles W. [North Carolina State University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695-7909 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Control of water mass inventory in Nuclear Steam Generators is important to insure sufficient cooling of the nuclear reactor. Since downcomer water level is measurable, and a reasonable indication of water mass inventory near steady-state, conventional feedwater control system designs attempt to maintain downcomer water level within a relatively narrow operational band. However, downcomer water level can temporarily react in a reverse manner to water mass inventory changes, commonly known as shrink and swell effects. These complications are accentuated during start-up or low power conditions. As a result, automatic or manual control of water level is difficult and can lead to high reactor trip rates. This paper introduces a new feedwater control strategy for Nuclear Steam Generators. The new method directly controls water mass inventory instead of downcomer water level, eliminating complications from shrink and swell all together. However, water mass inventory is not measurable, requiring an online estimator to provide a mass inventory signal based on measurable plant parameters. Since the thermal-hydraulic response of a Steam Generator is highly nonlinear, a linear state-observer is not feasible. In addition, difficulties in obtaining flow regime and density information within the Steam Generator make an estimator based on analytical methods impractical at this time. This work employs a water mass estimator based on feedforward neural networks. By properly choosing and training the neural network, mass signals can be obtained which are suitable for stable, closed-loop water mass inventory control. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that water mass control can significantly improve the operation and safety of Nuclear Steam Generators.

  6. Steam Generator control in Nuclear Power Plants by water mass inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Wei; Doster, J. Michael; Mayo, Charles W.

    2008-01-01

    Control of water mass inventory in Nuclear Steam Generators is important to insure sufficient cooling of the nuclear reactor. Since downcomer water level is measurable, and a reasonable indication of water mass inventory near steady-state, conventional feedwater control system designs attempt to maintain downcomer water level within a relatively narrow operational band. However, downcomer water level can temporarily react in a reverse manner to water mass inventory changes, commonly known as shrink and swell effects. These complications are accentuated during start-up or low power conditions. As a result, automatic or manual control of water level is difficult and can lead to high reactor trip rates. This paper introduces a new feedwater control strategy for Nuclear Steam Generators. The new method directly controls water mass inventory instead of downcomer water level, eliminating complications from shrink and swell all together. However, water mass inventory is not measurable, requiring an online estimator to provide a mass inventory signal based on measurable plant parameters. Since the thermal-hydraulic response of a Steam Generator is highly nonlinear, a linear state-observer is not feasible. In addition, difficulties in obtaining flow regime and density information within the Steam Generator make an estimator based on analytical methods impractical at this time. This work employs a water mass estimator based on feedforward neural networks. By properly choosing and training the neural network, mass signals can be obtained which are suitable for stable, closed-loop water mass inventory control. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that water mass control can significantly improve the operation and safety of Nuclear Steam Generators

  7. Effects of mass transfer between Martian satellites on surface geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-21

    suspected. Published by Elsevier Inc.1. Introduction Several features about the surface geology on the moons of Mars remain poorly understood. The grooves on...Deimos may have an effect on Phobos’ geology ; we shall attempt to estimate the magnitude of that effect in Section 4. For impacts with Mars, Phobos or...global surface geology , particularly in the 100+ Ma since the last Voltaire-sized impact. Therefore we believe it unlikely that the red veneer of

  8. Mass transfer from smooth alabaster surfaces in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opdyke, Bradley N.; Gust, Giselher; Ledwell, James R.

    1987-11-01

    The mass transfer velocity for alabaster plates in smooth-wall turbulent flow is found to vary with the friction velocity according to an analytic solution of the advective diffusion equation. Deployment of alabaster plates on the sea floor can perhaps be used to estimate the viscous stress, and transfer velocities for other species.

  9. The kinetic energy operator for distance-dependent effective nuclear masses: Derivation for a triatomic molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoma, Mykhaylo; Jaquet, Ralph

    2017-09-21

    The kinetic energy operator for triatomic molecules with coordinate or distance-dependent nuclear masses has been derived. By combination of the chain rule method and the analysis of infinitesimal variations of molecular coordinates, a simple and general technique for the construction of the kinetic energy operator has been proposed. The asymptotic properties of the Hamiltonian have been investigated with respect to the ratio of the electron and proton mass. We have demonstrated that an ad hoc introduction of distance (and direction) dependent nuclear masses in Cartesian coordinates preserves the total rotational invariance of the problem. With the help of Wigner rotation functions, an effective Hamiltonian for nuclear motion can be derived. In the derivation, we have focused on the effective trinuclear Hamiltonian. All necessary matrix elements are given in closed analytical form. Preliminary results for the influence of non-adiabaticity on vibrational band origins are presented for H 3 + .

  10. Proposal for the determination of nuclear masses by high-precision spectroscopy of Rydberg states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wundt, B J; Jentschura, U D

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical treatment of Rydberg states in one-electron ions is facilitated by the virtual absence of the nuclear-size correction, and fundamental constants like the Rydberg constant may be in the reach of planned high-precision spectroscopic experiments. The dominant nuclear effect that shifts transition energies among Rydberg states therefore is due to the nuclear mass. As a consequence, spectroscopic measurements of Rydberg transitions can be used in order to precisely deduce nuclear masses. A possible application of this approach to hydrogen and deuterium, and hydrogen-like lithium and carbon is explored in detail. In order to complete the analysis, numerical and analytic calculations of the quantum electrodynamic self-energy remainder function for states with principal quantum number n = 5, ..., 8 and with angular momentum l = n - 1 and l = n - 2 are described (j = l +- 1/2).

  11. Proposal for the determination of nuclear masses by high-precision spectroscopy of Rydberg states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wundt, B J; Jentschura, U D [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409-0640 (United States)

    2010-06-14

    The theoretical treatment of Rydberg states in one-electron ions is facilitated by the virtual absence of the nuclear-size correction, and fundamental constants like the Rydberg constant may be in the reach of planned high-precision spectroscopic experiments. The dominant nuclear effect that shifts transition energies among Rydberg states therefore is due to the nuclear mass. As a consequence, spectroscopic measurements of Rydberg transitions can be used in order to precisely deduce nuclear masses. A possible application of this approach to hydrogen and deuterium, and hydrogen-like lithium and carbon is explored in detail. In order to complete the analysis, numerical and analytic calculations of the quantum electrodynamic self-energy remainder function for states with principal quantum number n = 5, ..., 8 and with angular momentum l = n - 1 and l = n - 2 are described (j = l {+-} 1/2).

  12. Mass casualties of radiation injuries after nuclear weapon explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messerschmidt, O.

    1980-01-01

    Burns, mechanical lesions, radiation injuries as well as combinations of these types of injuries as a consequence of a nuclear explosion demand different basic lines of triage. The lack of a suitable physical dosimetry is a special problem for the evaluation of radiation injuries. While in cases of wounds and burns treatment, like surgery, is recommended to take place early, for example, within hours or days after those injuries, treatment of radiation victims is necessary only in the stage of severe haematologic changes including disturbances of coagulation and occurrence of high fever which appears after one or two weeks subsequent to exposure. The lack of medical personnel and medical equipment result in even a worse prognosis for the various injuries than in peace time accidents. (orig.) [de

  13. Onsets of nuclear deformation from measurements with the Isoltrap mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naimi, S.

    2010-10-01

    Mass measurements provide important information concerning nuclear structure. This work presents results from the pioneering Penning trap spectrometer Isoltrap at CERN-Isolde. High-precision mass measurements of neutron-rich manganese ( 58 - 66 Mn) and krypton isotopes ( 96, 97 Kr) are presented, of which the 66 Mn and 96, 97 Kr masses are measured for the first time. In particular, the mass of 97 Kr was measured using the preparation trap and required the definition of a new fit function. In the case of the manganese isotopes, the N=40 shell closure is addressed. The two-neutron-separation energies calculated from the new masses show no shell closure at N=40 but give an estimation of the proton-neutron interaction (around 0.5 MeV) responsible for the increase of collectivity and nuclear deformation in this mass region. The new krypton masses show behavior in sharp contrast with heavier neighbors where sudden and intense deformation is present, interpreted as the establishment of a nuclear quantum shape/phase transition critical-point boundary. The new masses confirm findings from nuclear mean-square charge-radius measurements up to N=60 but are at variance with conclusions from recent gamma-ray spectroscopy. Another part of this work was the design of new decay spectroscopy system behind the Isoltrap mass spectrometer. The beam purity achievable with Isoltrap will allow decay studies with γ and β detection coupled to a tape-station. This system has been mounted and commissioned with the radioactive beam 80 Rb. (author)

  14. Significancy in atomic mass measurements and the topography of the mass-surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audi, G.

    1991-01-01

    It is discussed how to explore new regions of the chart of the nuclides through masses, and what has to be understood under significant mass measurements. In the exploratory phase of a new region of the chart, a result with almost any accuracy is appropriate. The higher the accuracy is, the better the possibility is to see finer structures. (G.P.) 24 refs.; 10 figs

  15. Mass media differences in ''nuclear news'' reporting: implications for public opinions and acceptable safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.; Williams, J.

    1975-01-01

    The technical and political issues of diversion safeguards are at best confusing to the general public, who derive most of their information about nuclear science from the mass media. This investigation compared ''nuclear news'' of all kinds in three national mass media for thirty-three months of 1972-1974 to examine the quantity and quality of atom-related news they provide. Findings from The New York Times, U. S. News and World Report, and the ABC, CBS, and NBC evening news indicate grounds for low public familiarity with essential concepts of safeguards, and consequently, for consumer value conflicts and weak popular supports for safeguards-related policy

  16. Directional mass transport in an atmospheric pressure surface barrier discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, A; Morabit, Y; Hasan, M I; Walsh, J L

    2017-10-25

    In an atmospheric pressure surface barrier discharge the inherent physical separation between the plasma generation region and downstream point of application reduces the flux of reactive chemical species reaching the sample, potentially limiting application efficacy. This contribution explores the impact of manipulating the phase angle of the applied voltage to exert a level of control over the electrohydrodynamic forces generated by the plasma. As these forces produce a convective flow which is the primary mechanism of species transport, the technique facilitates the targeted delivery of reactive species to a downstream point without compromising the underpinning species generation mechanisms. Particle Imaging Velocimetry measurements are used to demonstrate that a phase shift between sinusoidal voltages applied to adjacent electrodes in a surface barrier discharge results in a significant deviation in the direction of the plasma induced gas flow. Using a two-dimensional numerical air plasma model, it is shown that the phase shift impacts the spatial distribution of the deposited charge on the dielectric surface between the adjacent electrodes. The modified surface charge distribution reduces the propagation length of the discharge ignited on the lagging electrode, causing an imbalance in the generated forces and consequently a variation in the direction of the resulting gas flow.

  17. Mass estimation of loose parts in nuclear power plant based on multiple regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yuanfeng; Cao, Yanlong; Yang, Jiangxin; Gan, Chunbiao

    2012-01-01

    According to the application of the Hilbert–Huang transform to the non-stationary signal and the relation between the mass of loose parts in nuclear power plant and corresponding frequency content, a new method for loose part mass estimation based on the marginal Hilbert–Huang spectrum (MHS) and multiple regression is proposed in this paper. The frequency spectrum of a loose part in a nuclear power plant can be expressed by the MHS. The multiple regression model that is constructed by the MHS feature of the impact signals for mass estimation is used to predict the unknown masses of a loose part. A simulated experiment verified that the method is feasible and the errors of the results are acceptable. (paper)

  18. Dose Prediction for surface nuclear explosions: case studies for Semipalatinsk and Lop Nur tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Dose prediction method RAPS after surface nuclear explosion has been developed by using the empirical dose function of USA nuclear test. This method which provides us external total dose, dose rate at any distant, at any time for any yield of nuclear explosion, is useful for radiation protection in case of nuclear events such as terrorism and nuclear war. The validity of RAPS has been confirmed by application to historical surface nuclear test explosions. The first test case study which was done for the first test explosion of the former USSR at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site on August 29th 1949, shows a good agreement with luminescence dosimetry on a brick. This dose prediction method was applied nuclear tests in Lop Nur. The results indicate dangerous nuclear radiation influences including fatal risk in the wide Uygur area. (author)

  19. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Free Acid by Titration in an Oxalate Solution 8 to 15 Free Acid by Iodate Precipitation-Potentiometric Titration Test Method 16 to 22 Uranium by Arsenazo I Spectrophotometric Test Method 23 to 33 Thorium by Thorin Spectrophotometric Test Method 34 to 42 Iron by 1,10-Phenanthroline Spectrophotometric Test Method 43 to 50 Impurities by ICP-AES Chloride by Thiocyanate Spectrophotometric Test Method 51 to 58 Fluoride by Distillation-Spectrophotometric Test Method 59 to 66 Sulfate by Barium Sulfate Turbidimetric Test Method 67 to 74 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrom...

  20. Ablation and deceleration of mass-driver launched projectiles for space disposal of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C.; Bowen, S.W.

    1981-01-01

    The energy cost of launching a projectile containing nuclear waste is two orders of magnitude lower with a mass driver than with a typical rocket system. A mass driver scheme will be feasible, however, only if ablation and deceleration are within certain tolerable limits. It is shown that if a hemisphere-cylinder-shaped projectile protected thermally with a graphite nose is launched vertically to attain a velocity of 17 km/sec at an altitude of 40 km, the mass loss from ablation during atmospheric flight will be less than 0.1 ton, provided the radius of the projectile is under 20 cm and the projectile's mass is of the order of 1 ton. The velocity loss from drag will vary from 0.4 to 30 km/sec, depending on the mass and radius of the projectile, the smaller velocity loss corresponding to large mass and small radius. Ablation is always within a tolerable range for schemes using a mass driver launcher to dispose of nuclear wastes outside the solar system. Deceleration can also be held in the tolerable range if the mass and diameter of the projectile are properly chosen

  1. Characterisation of nuclear fuel samples by quadrupole and multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernli, Beath; Guenther-Leopold, Ines; Kobler Waldis, Judith; Kopajtic, Zlatan

    2003-01-01

    The characterisation of nuclear fuel cycle materials for trace and minor metallic constituents is of great interest for the nuclear industry and safeguard officials. The main objective of various international programmes dealing with postirradiation examinations is to improve the knowledge of the inventories of actinides, fission and spallation products in spent nuclear fuels. The low detection limits for a large number of elements combined with the ability to analyse the isotopic composition of the elements have established inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as a powerful multi-element technique in diverse analytical applications for the characterisation of nuclear materials. Because numerous isobaric overlaps restrict the direct determination of many fission products by mass spectrometry, extensive chemical separations are required for these elements. In order to simplify this sample preparation procedure, a high performance liquid chromatography system (HPLC) was online coupled to the mass spectrometer. Since about 10 years a quadrupole based ICP-MS (Q-ICP-MS) combined with an HPLC is used within the Hot Laboratory of the Paul Scherrer Institut for different applications on nuclear fuel samples. Since May 2003 also a new multi-collector ICP-MS (MC-ICP-MS) is used for the mass spectrometric characterisation of nuclear fuel samples, especially for the precise determination of the isotopic vectors of fission products and actinides. Therefore, two complementary analytical systems are now available in the group of 'Isotope and Wet Analytical Chemistry'. A comparison of the analytical performance of both systems (with and without an online coupled HPLC system) for the determination of the isotopic composition and the elemental concentration of different nuclides in nuclear fuel samples, the advantages and limitations of both techniques, the accuracy and precision of the results and typical applications for both methods will be discussed in the

  2. Fabrication of Hierarchically Micro- and Nano-structured Mold Surfaces Using Laser Ablation for Mass Production of Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Jiwhan; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Na, Suckjoo; Lim, Hyuneui; Jung, Dae-Hwan

    2010-10-01

    Many studies have examined the formation of surfaces with mixed patterns of micro- and nano-sized lotus leaves that have hydrophobic properties. In this study, micro- and nano-shapes such as lotus leaves were fabricated on a metal mold surface using laser ablation and ripple formation. A microstructure on the mold surface was replicated onto poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) using the polymer casting method to manufacture low-cost hydrophobic surfaces. A PDMS surface with micro- and nano-structures that were the inverse image of a lotus leaf showed hydrophobic characteristics (water contact angle: 157°). From these results, we deduced that portions of the microstructures were wet and that air gaps existed between the microstructures and the water drops. In this paper we suggest the possibility of the mass production of hydrophobic plastic surfaces and the development of a methodology for the hydrophobic texturing of various polymer surfaces, using the polymer casting method with laser-processed molds.

  3. Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse - CSNSM/Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy, Activity Report 1985-1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy (CSNSM) is a CNRS (National Centre for Scientific Research) laboratory affiliated with Paris-Sud University. The CSNSM is involved in pluri-disciplinary activities covering various scientific domains: Nuclear Structure (SNO), Nuclear Astrophysics (AN), Solid State Astrophysics (AS), Solid State Physics (PS) and Chemical Physics of Irradiation. This document presents the activity of the Centre during the 1985-1986-1987 years: 1 - Teams presentation; 2 - Abstracts: On the borderline of spectroscopy; Atomic spectroscopy and low-energy low-spin nuclear structure; high-energy high-spin nuclear structure; Theories and models; Nuclear astrophysics; Accelerator-based mass spectroscopy; Solid State Physics; Study of charged particles irradiation effects in astrophysics, geophysics and material sciences; Technical developments for the RF mass spectrometer and for Obelix; Technical developments for ion beams; Technical developments in electronics and their applications; CNSM's Computer Department; Developments in cryogenics; 3 - Staff and publications

  4. Mass spectrometry in nuclear technology - a review of application of thermal ionization mass spectrometry in fuel reprocessing plants. PD-7-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dakshinamoorthy, A.

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry finds the widespread application in nuclear science and technology due to the fact that it can be employed for isotope composition measurements of different elements of interest and also concentration measurements of these elements using isotope dilution techniques. Thermal ionization mass spectrometer (TIMS), Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) and gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GC-MS) are the different types of mass spectrometers used in nuclear industry for the analyses of isotope composition of special nuclear material, trace impurities in nuclear fuels and components and characterization of various solvents respectively. Among them, TIMS plays a vital role in the nuclear fuel cycle in determining precisely the isotope composition of uranium, plutonium, D/H ratio in heavy water etc. TIMS is an indispensable analytical tool for nuclear material accounting at the input stage of a reprocessing plant by carrying out precise and accurate concentration measurement of plutonium and uranium by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). It is the only accepted measurement technique for the purpose because of its high precision, better sensitivity and no quantitative separation is needed. The isotope abundance measurements of uranium and plutonium at this point are also useful for burn-up studies and isotope correlations. Mass spectrometric analysis of uranium and plutonium is also required for nuclear data measurements and calibrating other chemical methods

  5. Native Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry: Analysis of Noncovalent Protein Complexes Directly from Dried Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicholas J.; Griffiths, Rian L.; Edwards, Rebecca L.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2015-08-01

    Liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) mass spectrometry is a promising tool for the analysis of intact proteins from biological substrates. Here, we demonstrate native LESA mass spectrometry of noncovalent protein complexes of myoglobin and hemoglobin from a range of surfaces. Holomyoglobin, in which apomyoglobin is noncovalently bound to the prosthetic heme group, was observed following LESA mass spectrometry of myoglobin dried onto glass and polyvinylidene fluoride surfaces. Tetrameric hemoglobin [(αβ)2 4H] was observed following LESA mass spectrometry of hemoglobin dried onto glass and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) surfaces, and from dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper. Heme-bound dimers and monomers were also observed. The `contact' LESA approach was particularly suitable for the analysis of hemoglobin tetramers from DBS.

  6. Administrative Procedure Act and mass procedures (illustrated by the nuclear licensing procedure)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumann, R.

    1977-01-01

    The report deals with the administrative procedure law of 25.5.76 of the Fed. Government, esp. with its meaning for the administrative procedures for the permission for nuclear power plants, as fas ar so-called mass procedures are concerned. (UN) [de

  7. Uniformity measure for power-law mass spectrum in nuclear fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wislicki, W.

    1992-11-01

    Description is given in terms of the Renyi entropy and the uniformity for the canonical ensemble, the grand canonical ensemble and the power-law probability measures. The study is presented of the power-law spectra of cluster masses observed in nuclear interactions in the vicinity of the liquid-gas transition point. 6 figs., 1 tab., 15 refs. (author)

  8. Analysis of the lipidated recombinant outer surface protein A from Borrelia burgdorferi by mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouchon, B.; Klein, Michele; Bischoff, Rainer; Van Dorsselaer, A.; Roitsch, C.

    1997-01-01

    The outer surface protein A, OspA, from the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is a lipoprotein of 25 kDa. The recombinant OspA (rOspA) expressed in Escherichia coli has been purified and analyzed by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESMS). A heterogenous spectrum gave a measured mass of 28,462 +/- 9 Da

  9. The pattern of anthropogenic signal emergence in Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fyke, J.G.; Vizcaino, M.; Lipscomb, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    Surface mass balance (SMB) trends influence observed Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) mass loss, but the component of these trends related to anthropogenic forcing is unclear. Here we study the simulated spatial pattern of emergence of an anthropogenically derived GrIS SMB signal between 1850 and 2100

  10. Onsets of nuclear deformation from measurements with the Isoltrap mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Naimi, Sarah

    Mass measurements provide important information concerning nuclear structure. This work presents results from the pioneering Penning trap spectrometer ISOLTRAP at CERN-ISOLDE. High-precision mass measurements of neutron-rich manganese ($^{58−66}$Mn) and krypton isotopes ($^{96,97}$Kr) are presented, of which the $^{66}$Mn and $^{96,97}$Kr masses are measured for the first time. In particular, the mass of $^{97}$Kr was measured using the preparation trap and required the definition of a new fit function. In the case of the manganese isotopes, the N = 40 shell closure is addressed. The two-neutron-separation energies calculated from the new masses show no shell closure at N = 40 but give an estimation of the proton-neutron interaction (around 0.5 MeV) responsible for the increase of collectivity and nuclear deformation in this mass region. The new krypton masses show behavior in sharp contrast with heavier neighbors where sudden and intense deformation is present, interpreted as the establishment of a nuclea...

  11. The Role of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on Recent Greenland Surface Mass Loss and Mass Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, M.; Alexander, P.; Porter, D. F.; Fettweis, X.; Luthcke, S. B.; Mote, T. L.; Rennermalm, A.; Hanna, E.

    2017-12-01

    Despite recent changes in Greenland surface mass losses and atmospheric circulation over the Arctic, little attention has been given to the potential role of large-scale atmospheric processes on the spatial and temporal variability of mass loss and partitioning of the GrIS mass loss. Using a combination of satellite gravimetry measurements, outputs of the MAR regional climate model and reanalysis data, we show that changes in atmospheric patterns since 2013 over the North Atlantic region of the Arctic (NAA) modulate total mass loss trends over Greenland together with the spatial and temporal distribution of mass loss partitioning. For example, during the 2002 - 2012 period, melting persistently increased, especially along the west coast, as a consequence of increased insulation and negative NAO conditions characterizing that period. Starting in 2013, runoff along the west coast decreased while snowfall increased substantially, when NAO turned to a more neutral/positive state. Modeled surface mass balance terms since 1950 indicate that part of the GRACE-period, specifically the period between 2002 and 2012, was exceptional in terms of snowfall over the east and northeast regions. During that period snowfall trend decreased to almost 0 Gt/yr from a long-term increasing trend, which presumed again in 2013. To identify the potential impact of atmospheric patterns on mass balance and its partitioning, we studied the spatial and temporal correlations between NAO and snowfall/runoff. Our results indicate that the correlation between summer snowfall and NAO is not stable during the 1950 - 2015 period. We further looked at changes in patterns of circulation using self organizing maps (SOMs) to identify the atmospheric patterns characterizing snowfall during different periods. We discuss potential implications for past changes and future GCM and RCM simulations.

  12. Influence of Persistent Wind Scour on the Surface Mass Balance of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Indrani; Bell, Robin E.; Scambos, Ted A.; Wolovick, Michael; Creyts, Timothy T.; Studinger, Michael; Fearson, Nicholas; Nicolas, Julien P.; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; vandenBroeke, Michiel R.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate quantification of surface snow accumulation over Antarctica is a key constraint for estimates of the Antarctic mass balance, as well as climatic interpretations of ice-core records. Over Antarctica, near-surface winds accelerate down relatively steep surface slopes, eroding and sublimating the snow. This wind scour results in numerous localized regions (Antarctica. The scour zones are persistent because they are controlled by bedrock topography. On the basis of our Dome A observations, we develop an empirical model to predict wind-scour zones across the Antarctic continent and find that these zones are predominantly located in East Antarctica. We estimate that approx. 2.7-6.6% of the surface area of Antarctica has persistent negative net accumulation due to wind scour, which suggests that, across the continent, the snow mass input is overestimated by 11-36.5 Gt /yr in present surface-mass-balance calculations.

  13. Nuclear assay of coal. Volume 6. Mass flow devices for coal handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The mass of coal entering the boiler per unit time is an essential parameter for determinig the total rate of heat input. The mass flow rate of coal on a conveyor belt is generally determined as a product of the instantaneous mass of material on a short section of the belt and the belt velocity. Belt loading could be measured by conventional transducers incorporating mechanical or electromechanical weighers or by gamma-ray attenuation gauge. This report reviews the state of the art in mass flow devices for coal handling. The various methods are compared and commented upon. Special design issues are discussed relative to incorporating a mass flow measuring device in a Continuous On-Line Nuclear Analysis of Coal (CONAC) system

  14. Nuclear assay of coal. Volume 6. Mass flow devices for coal handling. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozani, T.; Elias, E.; Bevan, R.

    1980-04-01

    The mass of coal entering the boiler per unit time is an essential parameter for determining the total rate of heat input. The mass flow rate of coal on a conveyor belt is generally determined as a product of the instantaneous mass of material on a short section of the belt and the belt velocity. Belt loading could be measured by conventional transducers incorporating mechanical or electromechanical weighers or by gamma-ray attenuation gauge. This report reviews the state of the art in mass flow devices for coal handling. The various methods are compared and commented upon. Special design issues are discussed relative to incorporating a mass flow measuring device in a Continuous On-Line Nuclear Analysis of Coal (CONAC) system

  15. Atomic mass and characteristic constant of nuclear ground state (CENPL.MCC). Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Zongdi; Ma Lizhen; Zhou Chunmei; Ge Zhigang

    1994-01-01

    Atomic mass and characteristic constants for nuclear ground states are basic data for nuclear physics, and necessary ones for basic researches, theoretical calculations, as well as many applied researches. The atomic mass of exotic nuclei quite far from the valley stability are also very important for astrophysics researches. The above-requirement is paid attention to in our setting up this file. The recent and as many as possible data (such as the half-lives of the new nuclides 202 Pt, 208 Hg and 185 Hf and the mass excess of 199 Ir, which were produced and distinguished by Chinese scientists) have been collected, and put into the computer-based data file in brief table format. (1 fig.)

  16. The impact of global nuclear mass model uncertainties on r-process abundance predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumpower M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid neutron capture or ‘r-process’ nucleosynthesis may be responsible for half the production of heavy elements above iron on the periodic table. Masses are one of the most important nuclear physics ingredients that go into calculations of r-process nucleosynthesis as they enter into the calculations of reaction rates, decay rates, branching ratios and Q-values. We explore the impact of uncertainties in three nuclear mass models on r-process abundances by performing global monte carlo simulations. We show that root-mean-square (rms errors of current mass models are large so that current r-process predictions are insufficient in predicting features found in solar residuals and in r-process enhanced metal poor stars. We conclude that the reduction of global rms errors below 100 keV will allow for more robust r-process predictions.

  17. Liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) of food surfaces employing chip-based nano-electrospray mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikel, Daniel; Henion, Jack

    2011-08-30

    An automated surface-sampling technique called liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA), coupled with infusion nano-electrospray high-resolution mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), is described and applied to the qualitative determination of surface chemical residues resulting from the artificial spraying of selected fresh fruits and vegetables with representative pesticides. Each of the targeted pesticides was readily detected with both high-resolution and full-scan collision-induced dissociation (CID) mass spectra. In the case of simazine and sevin, a mass resolution of 100,000 was insufficient to distinguish the isobaric protonated molecules for these compounds. When the surface of a spinach leaf was analyzed by LESA, trace levels of diazinon were readily detected on the spinach purchased directly from a supermarket before they were sprayed with the five-pesticide mixture. A 30 s rinse under hot running tap water appeared to quantitatively remove all remaining residues of this pesticide. Diazinon was readily detected by LESA analysis on the skin of the artificially sprayed spinach. Finally, incurred pyrimethanil at a level of 169 ppb in a batch slurry of homogenized apples was analyzed by LESA and this pesticide was readily detected by both high-resolution mass spectrometry and full-scan CID mass spectrometry, thus showing that pesticides may also be detected in whole fruit homogenized samples. This report shows that representative pesticides on fruit and vegetable surfaces present at levels 20-fold below generally allowed EPA tolerance levels are readily detected and confirmed by the title technologies making LESA-MS as interesting screening method for food safety purposes. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. High-Speed Neutron and Gamma Flux Sensor for Monitoring Surface Nuclear Reactors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA needs compact nuclear reactors to power future bases on the moon and Mars. These reactors require robust automatic control systems using low mass, rapid...

  19. High-Speed Neutron and Gamma Flux Sensor for Monitoring Surface Nuclear Reactors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA needs compact nuclear reactors to power future bases on the moon and/or Mars. These reactors require robust automatic control systems using low mass, rapid...

  20. Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse - CSNSM/Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy, Activity Report 2002-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy (CSNSM) is a CNRS (National Centre for Scientific Research) laboratory affiliated with Paris-Sud University. The CSNSM is involved in pluri-disciplinary activities covering various scientific domains: Nuclear Structure (SNO), Nuclear Astrophysics (AN), Solid State Astrophysics (AS), Solid State Physics (PS) and Chemical Physics of Irradiation. This document presents the activity of the Centre during the 2002-2004 years: 1 - Foreword; 2 - Nuclear structure; 3 - EFIX: study of exotic nuclei-induced fission; 4 - Nuclear Astrophysics; 5 - Atomic mass; 6 - Solid state astrophysics; 7 - Accelerator-based mass spectroscopy; 8 - Solid State Physics; 9 - Physics and Chemistry of Irradiation; 10 - Activities of general interest; 11 - SEMIRAMIS (ion source and ion beam handling); 12 - Computer Department; 13 - Electronics Group; 14 - Mechanics Department; 15 - Health and safety; 16 - Permanent training; 17 - Seminars; 18 - PhDs; 19 - Staff

  1. RSMASS-D nuclear thermal propulsion and bimodal system mass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donald B.; Marshall, Albert C.

    1997-01-01

    Two relatively simple models have been developed to estimate reactor, radiation shield, and balance of system masses for a particle bed reactor (PBR) nuclear thermal propulsion concept and a cermet-core power and propulsion (bimodal) concept. The approach was based on the methodology developed for the RSMASS-D models. The RSMASS-D approach for the reactor and shield sub-systems uses a combination of simple equations derived from reactor physics and other fundamental considerations along with tabulations of data from more detailed neutron and gamma transport theory computations. Relatively simple models are used to estimate the masses of other subsystem components of the nuclear propulsion and bimodal systems. Other subsystem components include instrumentation and control (I&C), boom, safety systems, radiator, thermoelectrics, heat pipes, and nozzle. The user of these models can vary basic design parameters within an allowed range to achieve a parameter choice which yields a minimum mass for the operational conditions of interest. Estimated system masses are presented for a range of reactor power levels for propulsion for the PBR propulsion concept and for both electrical power and propulsion for the cermet-core bimodal concept. The estimated reactor system masses agree with mass predictions from detailed calculations with xx percent for both models.

  2. The management-retrieval code of the sub-library of atomic mass and characteristic constants for nuclear ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Zongdi; Ma Lizhen

    1994-01-01

    The management code of the sub-library of atomic mass and characteristic constants for nuclear ground state (MCC) is used for displaying the basic information on the MCC sub-library on the screen, and retrieving the required data. The MCC data file contains the data of 4800 nuclides ranging from Z 0, A = 1 to Z = 122, A = 318. The MCC sub-library has been set up at Chinese Nuclear Data Center (CNDC), and has been used to provide the atomic masses and characteristic constants of nuclear ground states for the nuclear model calculation, nuclear data evaluations and other fields

  3. The surface water model for assessing Canada's nuclear fuel waste disposal concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, G.A.; Stephenson, M.; Cornett, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Canada's Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (NFWMP) is investigating the concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in a vault excavated deep in crystalline rock on the Canadian Shield. Probabilistic vault, geosphere, and biosphere models are implemented using Monte Carlo simulation techniques to trace nuclides transported in groundwater to the surface environment and humans far into the future. This paper describes the surface water submodel and its parameter values, sensitivity analysis, and validation. The surface water model is a simple, time-dependent, mass balance model of a lake that calculates radioactive and stable isotope contaminant concentrations in lake water and sediment. These concentrations are input to the other submodels and used to predict the radiological dose to humans and other biota. Parameter values in the model are based on the literature and the author's own data, and are generic to Canadian Shield lakes. Most parameters are represented by log normally distributed probability density functions. Sensitivity analysis indicates that nuclide concentrations in lake water and sediment are governed primarily by hydrological flushing with catchment area being the most important parameter. When catchment area is held constant lake area and nuclide transfer rate from water to sediment strongly influence concentrations in both water and sediment. For volatile nuclides, gaseous evasion also has a marked influence on concentrations in both water and sediment, whereas sedimentation rate strongly influences sediment nuclide concentrations. Validation tests demonstrate that the models predictions for 60 Co, 134 Cs, 3 H, P, Cd and Ca are consistent with empirical data when uncertainties are taken into account

  4. Isotopic Determination of Nuclear Materials Using Nuclear Fission Track Registration Technique and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Young Sin; Pyo, Hyeong Yeol; Park, Yong Joon; Song, Kyu Seok; Kim, Won Ho; Jee, Kwang Yong

    2007-05-01

    It is very important to develope the technology for the determination of isotopic ratios of hot particles( 234 U, 235 U, 236 U etc.) detected from swipe samples of various nuclear facilities. This technology is highly competitive internationally and has to be established independently as long as our government maintains atomic energy and treats nuclear materials. In this text, sample pretreatment procedure, gamma-ray counting, alpha or fission track techniques, isotopic analysis of U and Pu, background problems and detection limits for mass determination, and their application to the real swipe sample were described with detailed procedure. This technology would contribute to the Korean economy's high growth rate as well as to superiority of government's leading research and development programs if successfully established

  5. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

  6. SEMIC: an efficient surface energy and mass balance model applied to the Greenland ice sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krapp

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We present SEMIC, a Surface Energy and Mass balance model of Intermediate Complexity for snow- and ice-covered surfaces such as the Greenland ice sheet. SEMIC is fast enough for glacial cycle applications, making it a suitable replacement for simpler methods such as the positive degree day (PDD method often used in ice sheet modelling. Our model explicitly calculates the main processes involved in the surface energy and mass balance, while maintaining a simple interface and requiring minimal data input to drive it. In this novel approach, we parameterise diurnal temperature variations in order to more realistically capture the daily thaw–freeze cycles that characterise the ice sheet mass balance. We show how to derive optimal model parameters for SEMIC specifically to reproduce surface characteristics and day-to-day variations similar to the regional climate model MAR (Modèle Atmosphérique Régional, version 2 and its incorporated multilayer snowpack model SISVAT (Soil Ice Snow Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer. A validation test shows that SEMIC simulates future changes in surface temperature and surface mass balance in good agreement with the more sophisticated multilayer snowpack model SISVAT included in MAR. With this paper, we present a physically based surface model to the ice sheet modelling community that is general enough to be used with in situ observations, climate model, or reanalysis data, and that is at the same time computationally fast enough for long-term integrations, such as glacial cycles or future climate change scenarios.

  7. Importance of banked tissues in the management of mass nuclear casualties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rita; Bhatnagar, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear detonations are the most devastating of the weapons of mass destruction. There will be large number of casualties on detonation of nuclear weapon. Biological tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and other soft tissues can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Tissues from human donor can be processed and banked for orthopaedic, spinal, trauma and other surgical procedures. Radiation technology is used to sterilize the tissues to make them safe for clinical use. This paper highlights the importance of such banked tissues in the management of the casualties. (author)

  8. Thomas-Fermi treatment of nuclear masses, deformations and density distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1994-08-01

    A recently completed Thomas-Fermi model of nuclei is described. Six adjustable parameters of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction were fitted to the shell-corrected binding energies of 1654 nuclei and to the diffuseness of the nuclear surface. The model is then successful in reproducing nuclear sizes, and only small deviations are found between calculated and measured fission barriers of 36 nuclei. The model is applied to the prediction of fission barriers of light elements, to drip-line nuclei like 82 Sn and 170 Sn, to the properties of nuclear and neutron matter and to nuclear bubble configurations with Z 2 /A ∼ 100. The relation of a Thomas-Fermi theory to the Droplet and Liquid Drop models is illustrated

  9. Effective mass of a #betta#-particle in nuclear matter and OBE #betta#-n interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bando, Hiroharu; Nagata, Sinobu.

    1982-01-01

    The effective mass of a lambda particle (M sub( lambda )*) in nuclear matter is investigated within the framework of the lowest-order Brueckner theory by employing the Nijmegen OBE lambda -N interaction model D and F. The non-locality mass (M tilde sub( lamda )) and the energy mass (anti M sub( lambda )) are evaluated and discussed in the light of the characteristics of the two models. In comparison with the model D, the model F yields smaller anti M sub( lambda ) and larger anti M sub( lamb da ) reflecting the stronger Majorana exchange force and the stronger lambda N- sigma N coupling tensor force. Final results of M sub( lambda )*/M sub( lambda ) are 0.85 for D and 0.79 for F. In view of the effective lambda mass inferred from observed properties of the single particle potential for lambda , the model D interaction seems to be more adequate. (author)

  10. The surface water submodel for the assessment of Canada's nuclear fuel waste management concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, G.A.; Stephenson, M.; Cornett, R.J.

    1992-12-01

    A requirement in assessing the safety of Canada's nuclear fuel waste management concept is the prediction of radiological doses to humans and other biota, which may occur far in the future as a result of releases of nuclides to the biosphere. A biosphere model has been developed, consisting of four integrated submodels describing surface water, soil, atmosphere, and food-dose components. This report documents the surface water submodel, which is a simple, generic mass balance model of a Canadian Shield lake. Nuclide input to the lake is the time-dependent mass output from the geosphere model. Nuclides enter the lake from compacted sediments. The surface water submodel calculates nuclide concentrations in lake water and sediment. These concentrations are used in the other biosphere submodels to predict the radiological dose to biota. Selection of parameter values for the model is based on the literature, our own data, and conservative assumptions to ensure that doses are not underestimated. MOst parameters are represented by log normal. This probabilistic approach of using distributed parameter values accounts for variability and uncertainty in parameter values, and short-term environmental fluctuations. Long-term environmental changes, such as glaciation, are not considered in the model. Sensitivity analysis indicates that nuclide concentrations in lake water and sediment are governed primarily by hydrological flushing, with lake catchment area being the most important parameter. When catchment area is held constant, as would occur at a specific site, lake area and nuclide transfer rate from water to sediment strongly influence concentrations in both water and sediment. Sediment accumulation rate also strongly influences sediment nuclide concentrations. Validation of model predictions using published studies and other data demonstrates that our model is realistic and suitable for assessing Canada's disposal concept. (Author)

  11. Study of sea surface temperature distribution, in Angra dos Reis Nuclear Plant region - Mission Angra 01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, M.R.; Steffen, C.A.; Villagra, H.M.I.

    1982-03-01

    A study of spectral and temporal variations of sea surface temperature, using data obtained from level of satellite, aircraft and surface, with the purpose of evaluate and plot the small scale variations of sea surface temperature, due to thermal discharge from a nuclear the results of the first mission called Angra 1. (maps). (C.G.C.)

  12. Mass and Elite Views on Nuclear Security: US National Security Surveys 1993-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HERRON,KERRY G.; JENKINS-SMITH,HANK C.; HUGHES,SCOTT D.

    2000-06-01

    This is the fourth report in an ongoing series of studies examining how US perspectives about nuclear security are evolving in the post-Cold War era. In Volume 1 the authors present findings from a nationwide telephone survey of randomly selected members of the US general public conducted from 13 September to 14 October 1999. Results are compared to findings from previous surveys in this series conducted in 1993, 1995, and 1997, and trends are analyzed. Key areas of investigation reported in Volume 1 include evolving perceptions of nuclear weapons risks and benefits, preferences for related policy and spending issues, and views about three emerging issue areas: deterrent utility of precision guided munitions; response options to attacks in which mass casualty weapons are used; and expectations about national missile defenses. In this volume they relate respondent beliefs about nuclear security to perceptions of nuclear risks and benefits and to policy preferences. They develop causal models to partially explain key preferences, and they employ cluster analysis to group respondents into four policy relevant clusters characterized by similar views and preferences about nuclear security within each cluster. Systematic links are found among respondent demographic characteristics, perceptions of nuclear risks and benefits, policy beliefs, and security policy and spending preferences. In Volume 2 they provide analysis of in-depth interviews with fifty members of the US security policy community.

  13. Mass and Elite Views on Nuclear Security: US National Security Surveys 1993-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herron, Kerry G.; Jenkins-Smith, Hank C.; Hughes, Scott D.

    2000-01-01

    This is the fourth report in an ongoing series of studies examining how US perspectives about nuclear security are evolving in the post-Cold War era. In Volume 1 the authors present findings from a nationwide telephone survey of randomly selected members of the US general public conducted from 13 September to 14 October 1999. Results are compared to findings from previous surveys in this series conducted in 1993, 1995, and 1997, and trends are analyzed. Key areas of investigation reported in Volume 1 include evolving perceptions of nuclear weapons risks and benefits, preferences for related policy and spending issues, and views about three emerging issue areas: deterrent utility of precision guided munitions; response options to attacks in which mass casualty weapons are used; and expectations about national missile defenses. In this volume they relate respondent beliefs about nuclear security to perceptions of nuclear risks and benefits and to policy preferences. They develop causal models to partially explain key preferences, and they employ cluster analysis to group respondents into four policy relevant clusters characterized by similar views and preferences about nuclear security within each cluster. Systematic links are found among respondent demographic characteristics, perceptions of nuclear risks and benefits, policy beliefs, and security policy and spending preferences. In Volume 2 they provide analysis of in-depth interviews with fifty members of the US security policy community

  14. The nuclear flow and the mass number dependence of the balance point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebille, F.; de la Mota, V.; Remaud, B.; Schuck, P.

    1990-01-01

    The nuclear flow is studied theoretically with the Landau Vlasov equation in the E/A = 50 to 150 MeV energy domain using the finite range Gogny force. For comparison also other equations of states based on velocity independent mean fields are used. In this paper the mass number dependence of the balance point is investigated. A sensitivity of the flow on the equation of state as a function of mass and energies around and above the balance point can tentatively be advanced

  15. Double-arm time-of-flight mass-spectrometer of nuclear fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajvazian, G.M.; Astabatyan, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    A double-arm time-of-flight spectrometer of nuclear fragments for the investigation of heavy nuclei photofission in the intermediate energy range is described. The calibration results and working characteristics of the spectrometer, obtained using 252 Cf as a source of spontaneous fission, are presented. A mass resolution of σ m ∼2-3 a.m.u. was obtained within the registered fragments mass range of 80-160 a.m.u. The spectrometer was tested in the experiment on the investigation of 238 U nuclei fission by Bremsstahlung photons with Eγ max=1.75 GeV

  16. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n ,f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. Purpose: In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Methods: Our theoretical framework is the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large-amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically by using the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). In practice, the TDGCM is implemented in two steps. First, a series of constrained EDF calculations map the configuration and potential-energy landscape of the fissioning system for a small set of collective variables (in this work, the axial quadrupole and octupole moments of the nucleus). Then, nuclear dynamics is modeled by propagating a collective wave packet on the potential-energy surface. Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. Results: We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in two-dimensional collective spaces. Theory and experiment agree typically within two mass units for the position of the asymmetric peak. As expected, calculations are sensitive to the structure of the initial state and the prescription for the collective inertia. We emphasize that results are also sensitive to the continuity of the collective landscape near scission. Conclusions: Our analysis confirms

  17. Nuclear Forensics: Measurements of Uranium Oxides Using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Isotope Ratio Analysis of Actinides , Fission Products, and Geolocators by High- efficiency Multi-collector Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry...Information, 1999. Hou, Xiaolin, and Per Roos. “ Critical Comparison of radiometric and Mass Spectrometric Methods for the Determination of...NUCLEAR FORENSICS: MEASUREMENTS OF URANIUM OXIDES USING TIME-OF-FLIGHT SECONDARY ION MASS

  18. Coupling of mass and charge distributions for low excited nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamatin, V.S.; )

    2000-01-01

    The simple model for calculation of charge distributions of fission fragments for low exited nuclear fission from experimental mass distributions is offered. The model contains two parameters, determining amplitude of even-odd effect of charge distributions and its dependence on excitation energy. Results for reactions 233 U(n th ,f), 235 U(n th ,f), 229 Th(n th ,f), 249 Cf(n th ,f) are spent [ru

  19. Monitoring the on-surface synthesis of graphene nanoribbons by mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wen

    2017-06-14

    We present a mass spectrometric approach to monitor and characterize the intermediates of graphene nanoribbon (GNR) formation by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on top of Au(111) surfaces. Information regarding the repeating units, lengths, and termini can be obtained directly from the surface sample by a modified matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) method. The mass spectrometric results reveal ample oxidative side reactions under CVD conditions which can, however, be diminished drastically by introduction of protective H2 gas at ambient pressure. Simultaneously, addition of hydrogen extends the lengths of the oligophenylenes and thus the final GNRs. Moreover, the prematurely formed cyclodehydrogenation products during the oligomer growth can be assigned by the mass spectrometric method. The obtained mechanistic insights provide valuable information for optimizing and upscaling the bottom-up fabrication of GNRs. Given the important role of GNRs as semiconductors, the mass spectrometric characterization provides a readily available tool to improve and characterize their structural perfection.

  20. Quantifying the resolution level where the GRACE satellites can separate Greenland's glacial mass balance from surface mass balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, J. A.; Chambers, D. P.

    2015-09-01

    Mass change over Greenland can be caused by either changes in the glacial dynamic mass balance (DMB) or the surface mass balance (SMB). The GRACE satellite gravity mission cannot directly separate the two physical causes because it measures the sum of the entire mass column with limited spatial resolution. We demonstrate one theoretical way to indirectly separate cumulative SMB from DMB with GRACE, using a least squares inversion technique with knowledge of the location of the glaciers. However, we find that the limited 60 × 60 spherical harmonic representation of current GRACE data does not provide sufficient resolution to adequately accomplish the task. We determine that at a maximum degree/order of 90 × 90 or above, a noise-free gravity measurement could theoretically separate the SMB from DMB signals. However, current GRACE satellite errors are too large at present to separate the signals. A noise reduction of a factor of 10 at a resolution of 90 × 90 would provide the accuracy needed for the interannual cumulative SMB and DMB to be accurately separated.

  1. Combating the terrorist use of mass destruction weapons, particularly nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barakat, M.

    2008-01-01

    The risks of mass destruction weapons vary and also forms of damages resulting therefrom. While the effects of nuclear weapons are focused, sudden and comprehensive, the chemical weapons have limited impacts relatively unless used intensively severe prejudice to the element of surprise, and thus impaired the efficacy of their influences,especially that they affect exceptionally the individuals in the area of injury and biological weapons do not announce themselves except through their effect that appears later than the time of use as they affect exceptionally the organisms in the area of injury.The mass destruction weapons have turned from being a purely military means in the early twentieth century and have now become the means of violence against governments and countries that they should prepare themselves for and respond in ways of successful and effective countermeasures. Despite the fact that the acquisition of mass destruction weapons can be considered as a priority objective, which terrorist groups and organizations steadily seek but their accessibility is flanked by a lot of difficulties. Addressing the risk of further spread of nuclear weapons, and especially after doubling the power of those high-risk weapons, the international community has an approach to take a number of arrangements that complement each other to control and resist nuclear proliferation, either for the states or for terrorist groups.

  2. : Nuclear Spirals and Mass Accretion to Supermassive Black Holes in Weakly-Barred Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woong-Tae; Elmegreen, Bruce

    2018-01-01

    Disk galaxies, especially barred-spiral galaxies, abound with rings and spirals in their nuclear regions. Nuclear spirals existing even in weakly barred galaxies are thought to channel gas inflows to supermassive black holes residing at the centers. We use high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations to study the properties of nuclear gas spirals driven by weak bar-like or oval potentials. The amplitude of the spirals increases toward the center by a geometric effect, readily developing into shocks at small radii even for very weak potentials. The shape of the spirals and shocks depends rather sensitively on the background shear. When shear is low, the nuclear spirals are loosely wound and the shocks are almost straight, resulting in large mass inflows toward the center. When shear is high, on the other hand, the spirals are tightly wound and the shocks are oblique, forming a circumnuclear disk through which gas flows inward at a relatively lower rate. The induced mass inflow rates are enough to power black hole accretion in various types of Seyfert galaxies.

  3. Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse - CSNSM/Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy, Activity Report 2001-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy (CSNSM) is a CNRS (National Centre for Scientific Research) laboratory affiliated with Paris-Sud University. The CSNSM is involved in pluri-disciplinary activities covering various scientific domains: Nuclear Structure (SNO), Nuclear Astrophysics (AN), Solid State Astrophysics (AS), Solid State Physics (PS) and Chemical Physics of Irradiation. This document presents the activity of the Centre during the 2001-2002 years: 1 - Foreword; 2 - Research topics: Nuclear structure; EFIX: study of exotic nuclei-induced fission; Nuclear Astrophysics; Accelerator-based mass spectroscopy; Solid State Astrophysics; Physics and Chemistry of Irradiation; Solid State Physics; SEMIRAMIS (ion source and ion beam handling); Digest science; 3 - Publications; 4 - Dissertations; 5 - Seminars; 6 - Technical services: Computer Department; Electronics Group; Mechanics Department; Permanent training; Health and safety; 7 - Staff

  4. Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse - CSNSM/Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy, Activity Report 1995-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy (CSNSM) is a CNRS (National Centre for Scientific Research) laboratory affiliated with Paris-Sud University. The CSNSM is involved in pluri-disciplinary activities covering various scientific domains: Nuclear Structure (SNO), Nuclear Astrophysics (AN), Solid State Astrophysics (AS), Solid State Physics (PS) and Chemical Physics of Irradiation. This document presents the activity of the Centre during the 1995-1997 years: 1 - Nuclear structure: structure of first well states, superdeformation, high-spin state populations of stable or neutron-rich nuclei, high-k isomers physics, theoretical works, technical developments; 2 - Nuclear astrophysics; 3 - Basic symmetries; 4 - Accelerator-based mass spectroscopy; 5 - Solid State Astrophysics; 6 - Physics and Chemistry of Irradiation; 7 - Solid State Physics; 8 - SEMIRAMIS (ion source and ion beam handling); 9 - Computer Department; 10 - Electronics Group; 11 - Mechanics Department; 12 - Permanent training; 13 - Health and safety; 14 - Seminars and communications; 15 - Dissertations; 16 - Publications; 17 - Staff

  5. Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse - CSNSM/Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy, Activity Report 1992-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy (CSNSM) is a CNRS (National Centre for Scientific Research) laboratory affiliated with Paris-Sud University. The CSNSM is involved in pluri-disciplinary activities covering various scientific domains: Nuclear Structure (SNO), Nuclear Astrophysics (AN), Solid State Astrophysics (AS), Solid State Physics (PS) and Chemical Physics of Irradiation. This document presents the activity of the Centre during the 1992-1994 years: 1 - Nuclear structure; 2 - Nuclear astrophysics; 3 - Basic symmetries; 4 - Accelerator-based mass spectroscopy; 5 - Solid State Astrophysics; 6 - Physics and Chemistry of Irradiation; 7 - Solid State Physics; 8 - SEMIRAMIS (ion source and ion beam handling); 9 - Computer Department; 10 - Electronics Group; 11 - Mechanics Department; 12 - Permanent training; 13 - Health and safety; 14 - Seminars; 15 - Dissertations; 16 - Publications; 17 - Staff

  6. Heat Transfer and Mass Diffusion in Nanofluids over a Moving Permeable Convective Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Qasim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer and mass diffusion in nanofluid over a permeable moving surface are investigated. The surface exhibits convective boundary conditions and constant mass diffusion. Effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis are considered. The resulting partial differential equations are reduced into coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations using suitable transformations. Shooting technique is implemented for the numerical solution. Velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are analyzed for different key parameters entering into the problem. Performed comparative study shows an excellent agreement with the previous analysis.

  7. Nuclear electronic components of surface contamination monitor based on multi-electrode proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Xiangyang; Zhang Yong; Han Shuping; Rao Xianming; Fang Jintu

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear electronic components applying in Portal Monitor and Hands and Feet Surface Contamination Monitor were based on modern integrated circuit are introduced. The detailed points in circuit design and manufacturing technique are analyzed

  8. Experimental determination of fuel surface temperature in the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khang, Ngo Phu; Huy, Ngo Quang; An, Tran Khac; Lam, Pham Van [Nuclear Research Inst., Da Lat (Viet Nam)

    1994-10-01

    Measured fuel surface temperatures, obtained at various locations of the core of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor under normal operating conditions, are presented, and some thermal characteristics of the reactor are discussed. (author). 2 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Sensitivity of Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance to surface albedo parameterization: a study with a regional climate model

    OpenAIRE

    Angelen, J. H.; Lenaerts, J. T. M.; Lhermitte, S.; Fettweis, X.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; Broeke, M. R.; Meijgaard, E.; Smeets, C. J. P. P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a sensitivity study of the surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland Ice Sheet, as modeled using a regional atmospheric climate model, to various parameter settings in the albedo scheme. The snow albedo scheme uses grain size as a prognostic variable and further depends on cloud cover, solar zenith angle and black carbon concentration. For the control experiment the overestimation of absorbed shortwave radiation (+6%) at the K-transect (west Greenland) for the period 2004–2009 is...

  10. Nuclear structure studies of neutron-rich heavy nuclei by mass measurements of francium and radium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbusch, Marco [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Collaboration: ISOLTRAP-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The mass is a unique property of an atomic nucleus reflecting its binding energy and thus the sum of all interactions at work. Precise measurements of nuclear masses especially of short-lived exotic nuclides provide important input for nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, tests of the Standard Model, and weak interaction studies. The Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at the on-line isotope separator ISOLDE/CERN has been set up for precision mass measurements and continuously improved for accessing more exotic nuclides. The mass uncertainty is typically δm / m=10{sup -8} and the accessible half-life has been reduced to about 50 ms. In this contribution, the results of a measurement campaign of neutron-rich francium and radium isotopes will be presented, i.e. the masses of the isotopic chain of {sup 224-233}Fr and {sup 233,234}Ra, one of the most neutron-rich ensemble obtainable at ISOL facilities. The mass {sup 234}Ra denotes the heaviest mass ever measured with ISOLTRAP. Experimental data in the neutron-rich, heavy mass region is of great interest for studies of structural evolution far from stability, especially because the knowledge from nuclear mass models is scarce. The impact of the new data on the physics in this mass region as well as recent technical developments of ISOLTRAP are discussed.

  11. Electron paramagnetic resonance and dynamic nuclear polarization of char suspensions: surface science and oximetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarkson, R B; Odintsov, B M; Ceroke, P J

    1998-01-01

    ; they can be calibrated and used for oximetry. Biological stability and low toxicity make chars good sensors for in vivo measurements. Scalar and dipolar interactions of water protons at the surfaces of chars may be utilized to produce dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of the nuclear spin population...

  12. Chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    These analytical procedures are designed to show whether a given material meets the purchaser's specifications as to plutonium content, effective fissile content, and impurity content. The following procedures are described in detail: plutonium by controlled-potential coulometry; plutonium by amperometric titration with iron(II); free acid by titration in an oxalate solution; free acid by iodate precipitation-potentiometric titration method; uranium by Arsenazo I spectrophotometric method; thorium by thorin spectrophotometric method; iron by 1,10-phenanthroline spectrophotometric method; chloride by thiocyanate spectrophotometric method; fluoride by distillation-spectrophotometric method; sulfate by barium sulfate turbidimetric method; isotopic composition by mass spectrometry; americium-241 by extraction and gamma counting; americium-241 by gamma counting; gamma-emitting fission products, uranium, and thorium by gamma-ray spectroscopy; rare earths by copper spark spectrochemical method; tungsten, niobium (columbium), and tantalum by spectrochemical method; simple preparation by spectrographic analysis for general impurities

  13. Trace and surface analysis of ceramic layers of solid oxide fuel cells by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J S; Breuer, U; Westheide, J; Saprykin, A I; Holzbrecher, H; Nickel, H; Dietze, H J

    1996-06-01

    For the trace analysis of impurities in thick ceramic layers of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) sensitive solid-state mass spectrometric methods, such as laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and radiofrequency glow discharge mass spectrometry (rf-GDMS) have been developed and used. In order to quantify the analytical results of LA-ICP-MS, the relative sensitivity coefficients of elements in a La(0.6)Sr(0.35)MnO(3) matrix have been determined using synthetic standards. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) - as a surface analytical method - has been used to characterize the element distribution and diffusion profiles of matrix elements on the interface of a perovskite/Y-stabilized ZrO(2) layer. The application of different mass spectrometric methods for process control in the preparation of ceramic layers for the SOFC is described.

  14. Isotopic abundance measurements on solid nuclear-type samples by glow discharge mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betti, M.; Rasmussen, G.; Koch, L.

    1996-01-01

    A double-focusing glow discharge mass spectrometer (GDMS) installed in a glovebox for nuclear sample screening has been employed for isotopic measurements. Isotopic compositions of zirconium, silicon, lithium, boron, uranium and plutonium which are elements of nuclear concern have been determined. Interferences arising from the matrix sample and the discharge gas (Ar) for each of these elements are discussed. The GDMS results are compared with those from thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). For boron and lithium at μg/g-ng/g levels, the two methods gave results in good agreement. In samples containing uranium the isotopic composition obtained by GDMS was in agreement with those from TIMS independently of the enrichment. Attempts for the determination of plutonium isotopic composition were also made. In this case, due to the interferences of uranium at mass 238 and americium at mass 241, the GDMS raw data are complementary with those values obtained from physical non-destructive techniques. (orig.). With 2 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Advertising campaigns on the necessity of nuclear energy through mass-media in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwano, Sadaji

    1998-01-01

    provide the public with materials and elements to think and decide with as information. In the background of those circumstances, the attitudes of PA activities toward the public-has changed recently to draw public attention to the wide range of issues from current severe energy conditions in Japan to global environmental problems connecting to the role and the position of nuclear power among overall national energy policies in Japan and let have urgent feelings among the public. Followings are the examples that we are taking up in promotion of advertising campaigns through mass media, including inter- net and other information tools. (1) To show concrete measures to be taken to meet national long- term energy supply/demand outlook for the year to 2030 that encourage energy- saving efforts, increased use of new energy sources and further development of nuclear power generation. (2) In this December, the 3rd Conference of the Parties to United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change will be held at Kyoto, Japan. At this very moment that national attentions are increasingly concentrating toward the energy and environment issues, we will intend to hold advertising campaigns widely through mass media to heighten public awareness on the necessity of nuclear power promotion, as well as conservation and energy efficiency measures, introduction of alternative energy sources, such as solar, wind etc. in connection with the necessity of tackling the environmental problems, especially global warming phenomenon due to the greenhouse gas emissions. At this occasion, taking up some topics of specifically rapid energy demand which will obviously continue well into the next century and will very likely cause impending energy situations in Asian countries, expectations of serious environmental problems particularly in those of Asian countries, and among that appealing the role of nuclear energy as a clean energy source

  16. Low mass dilepton production at the SPS probing hot and dense nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez de los Heros, C; Baur, R; Breskin, Amos; Chechik, R; Drees, A; Jacob, C; Faschingbauer, U; Fisher, P H; Fraenkel, Zeev; Fuchs, C; Gatti, E; Glässel, P; Günzel, T F; Hess, F; Irmscher, D; Lenkeit, B C; Olsen, L H; Panebratsev, Yu A; Pfeiffer, A; Ravinovich, I; Rehak, P; Schön, A; Schükraft, Jürgen; Sampietro, M; Shimansky, S S; Shor, A; Specht, H J; Steiner, V; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tel-Zur, G; Tserruya, Itzhak; Ullrich, T S; Wurm, J P; Yurevich, V I

    1996-01-01

    CERES and HELIOS-3 have detected a significant enhancement of low--mass dileptons in nuclear collisions at 200 GeV/nucleon with respect to the expected ``conventional'' sources. The onset of the excess, starting at a mass of $\\sim2m_{\\pi}$, and the possibility of a quadratic dependence on the event multiplicity suggest the opening of the $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\rightarrow e^+e^-(\\mu^+\\mu^-)$ annihilation channel. This would be the first observation of thermal radiation from dense hadronic matter. Possible interpretations of these results are presented, including the reduction of the $\\rho$ mass due to partial restoration of chiral symmetry in the dense fireball formed in the collision.

  17. Measurement of Iodine-129 in surface soil collected near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Yasuto; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Saito, Takumi; Yamagata, Takeyasu; Honda, Maki

    2013-01-01

    Iodine-129 in soil around Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant were measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and isotopic ratio of radioiodine was estimated. Surface deposition amount of Iodine-129 resulted in 6.7 to 5500 mBq/m"2. The mean isotopic ratio between Iodine-129 and Iodine-131 at the accident was estimated that "1"2"9"I"/"1"3"1I = 26±6 as of March 11 2011. This result was compared to the calculation result of ORIGEN2 code to test the validity of this estimation. (author)

  18. Surface topography of cylindrical gear wheels after smoothing in abrasive mass, honing and shot peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalski, J; Pawlus, P; Zelasko, W

    2011-01-01

    The present paper presents the analysis of surface topography of gear teeth as the result of final machining processes. Teeth of multiple cylindrical gears shaped by grinding were smoothed in abrasive mass, honed or shot peened. The measurement of gears were made using coordinate measuring machine and 3D surface topography stylus instrument. The following deviations were studied; pitch deviation, total pitches deviations, variation of teeth thickness and deviation of gear radial run-out. Changes in teeth surface topography during machining process were determined. 3D surface topography parameters, surface directionality as well as areal autocorrelation and power spectral density functions were taken into consideration. As the results of the analysis, the best surface topography with regard to gear operational properties was recommended.

  19. Mass transfer coefficient in disturbed flow due to orifice for flow accelerated corrosion in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Mahendra; Gaikwad, Avinash J.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Parida, Smrutiranjan

    2015-01-01

    The flow of fluid in pipes cause corrosion wherein the inner surface of pipe becomes progressively thinner and susceptible to failure. This form of corrosion dependent on flow dynamics is called Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) and has been observed in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Mass transfer coefficient (MTC) is related to extent of wall thinning and it changes from its value in a straight pipe (with same fluid parameters) for flow in orifices, bends, junctions etc. due to gross disturbance of the velocity profile. This paper presents two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for an orifice configuration in a straight pipe. Turbulent model K- ω with shear stress transport and transition flow was the model used for simulation studies. The mass transfer boundary layer (MTBL) thickness δ mtbl is related to the Schmidt number (Sc) and hydrodynamic boundary layer thickness δ h , as δ mtbl ~ δh/(Sc 1/3 ). MTBL is significantly smaller than δ h and hence boundary layer meshing was carried out deep into δ mtbl . Uniform velocity profile was applied at the inlet. Post orifice fluid shows large recirculating flows on the upper and lower wall. At various locations after orifice, mass transfer coefficient is calculated and compared with the value in straight pipe with fully developed turbulent flow. The MTC due to the orifice increases and it is correlated with enhanced FAC in region after orifice. (author)

  20. EFFECT OF CENTRAL MASS CONCENTRATION ON THE FORMATION OF NUCLEAR SPIRALS IN BARRED GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Parijat; Jiang, I.-G.; Ann, H. B.

    2009-01-01

    We have performed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to study the response of the central kiloparsec region of a gaseous disk to the imposition of nonaxisymmetric bar potentials. The model galaxies are composed of three axisymmetric components (halo, disk, and bulge) and a nonaxisymmetric bar. These components are assumed to be invariant in time in the frame corotating with the bar. The potential of spherical γ-models of Dehnen is adopted for the bulge component whose density varies as r -γ near the center and r -4 at larger radii and, hence, possesses a central density core for γ = 0 and cusps for γ>0. Since the central mass concentration of the model galaxies increases with the cusp parameter γ, we have examined here the effect of the central mass concentration by varying the cusp parameter γ on the mechanism responsible for the formation of the symmetric two-armed nuclear spirals in barred galaxies. Our simulations show that the symmetric two-armed nuclear spirals are formed by hydrodynamic spiral shocks driven by the gravitational torque of the bar for the models with γ = 0 and 0.5. On the other hand, the symmetric two-armed nuclear spirals in the models with γ = 1 and 1.5 are explained by gas density waves. Thus, we conclude that the mechanism responsible for the formation of symmetric two-armed nuclear spirals in barred galaxies changes from hydrodynamic shocks to gas density waves as the central mass concentration increases from γ = 0 to 1.5.

  1. The Next Generation Fornax Survey (NGFS). IV. Mass and Age Bimodality of Nuclear Clusters in the Fornax Core Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Puzia, Thomas H.; Eigenthaler, Paul; Taylor, Matthew A.; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Zhang, Hongxin; Alamo-Martínez, Karla; Ribbeck, Karen X.; Grebel, Eva K.; Ángel, Simón; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Hilker, Michael; Lançon, Ariane; Mieske, Steffen; Miller, Bryan W.; Rong, Yu; Sánchez-Janssen, Ruben

    2018-06-01

    We present the analysis of 61 nucleated dwarf galaxies in the central regions (≲R vir/4) of the Fornax galaxy cluster. The galaxies and their nuclei are studied as part of the Next Generation Fornax Survey using optical imaging obtained with the Dark Energy Camera mounted at Blanco/Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and near-infrared data obtained with VIRCam at VISTA/ESO. We decompose the nucleated dwarfs in nucleus and spheroid, after subtracting the surface brightness profile of the spheroid component and studying the nucleus using point source photometry. In general, nuclei are consistent with colors of confirmed metal-poor globular clusters, but with significantly smaller dispersion than other confirmed compact stellar systems in Fornax. We find a bimodal nucleus mass distribution with peaks located at {log}({{ \\mathcal M }}* /{M}ȯ )≃ 5.4 and ∼6.3. These two nucleus subpopulations have different stellar population properties: the more massive nuclei are older than ∼2 Gyr and have metal-poor stellar populations (Z ≤ 0.02 Z ⊙), while the less massive nuclei are younger than ∼2 Gyr with metallicities in the range 0.02 < Z/Z ⊙ ≤ 1. We find that the nucleus mass ({{ \\mathcal M }}nuc}) versus galaxy mass ({{ \\mathcal M }}gal}) relation becomes shallower for less massive galaxies starting around 108 M ⊙, and the mass ratio {η }n={{ \\mathcal M }}nuc}/{{ \\mathcal M }}gal} shows a clear anticorrelation with {{ \\mathcal M }}gal} for the lowest masses, reaching 10%. We test current theoretical models of nuclear cluster formation and find that they cannot fully reproduce the observed trends. A likely mixture of in situ star formation and star cluster mergers seems to be acting during nucleus growth over cosmic time.

  2. Spatial distribution of Iodine-129 in surface soil around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Yasuto; Tagi, Kazuhiro; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Saito, Takumi; Yamagata, Takeyasu; Tsuchiya, Yoko; Nakano, Chuichiro; Honda, Maki

    2011-01-01

    Due to the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, which was caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake, a lot of radioactive materials were released into the environment. Among them, Iodine-131, which has a short half-life of 8 days, is thought to be hardly detected after the accident is concluded. It is very important to research how leaked out Iodine-131 was diffused in order to estimate the health impact of radiation at the time of the accident. On the other hand, Iodine-129, which was leaked out and was thought to act chemically-identically as Iodine-131, has an extremely long half-life of 15.7 million years and we are able to measure it equally after the accident. By following the trail of Iodine-129, it is considered to estimate the distribution of Iodine-131. To do this, at first, it is essential to measure simultaneously Iodine-131 and Iodine-129 in the same sample picked from near-the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and examine the relation between them (for example, the isotopic ratio of Iodine derived from the nuclear power plant (I-129/I-131)). At this study, we measured Iodine-129 in surface soil within 60 kilometers of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, which was picked by research team of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, the University of Tokyo. We discuss Iodine-129 derived from the nuclear power plant by considering the concentration range, the relation of a distance or a direction from the nuclear power plant, and the relation between I-129 and other radioactive nuclides (Cs-134, Cs-137, I-131). Since Iodine-129, which had been leaked out from the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Europe, was already transferred to Japan by way of the atmospheric transportation before the accident, it is important to distinguish between Iodine-129 from this accident and from the reprocessing plant. Then, we want to obtain the I-129/I-131 ratio originating in the accident precisely and discuss the

  3. Nuclear-deformation energies according to a liquid-drop model with a sharp surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blocki, J.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1982-05-01

    We present an atlas of 665 deformation-energy maps and 150 maps of other properties of interest, relevant for nuclear systems idealized as uniformly charged drops endowed with a surface tension. The nuclear shapes are parametrized in terms of two spheres modified by a smoothly fitted quadratic surface of revolution and are specified by three variables: asymmetry, sphere separation, and a neck variable (that goes over into a fragment-deformation variable after scission). The maps and related tables should be useful for the study of macroscopic aspects of nuclear fission and of collisions between any two nuclei in the periodic table

  4. Surface analysis of lipids by mass spectrometry: more than just imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Shane R; Brown, Simon H; In Het Panhuis, Marc; Blanksby, Stephen J; Mitchell, Todd W

    2013-10-01

    Mass spectrometry is now an indispensable tool for lipid analysis and is arguably the driving force in the renaissance of lipid research. In its various forms, mass spectrometry is uniquely capable of resolving the extensive compositional and structural diversity of lipids in biological systems. Furthermore, it provides the ability to accurately quantify molecular-level changes in lipid populations associated with changes in metabolism and environment; bringing lipid science to the "omics" age. The recent explosion of mass spectrometry-based surface analysis techniques is fuelling further expansion of the lipidomics field. This is evidenced by the numerous papers published on the subject of mass spectrometric imaging of lipids in recent years. While imaging mass spectrometry provides new and exciting possibilities, it is but one of the many opportunities direct surface analysis offers the lipid researcher. In this review we describe the current state-of-the-art in the direct surface analysis of lipids with a focus on tissue sections, intact cells and thin-layer chromatography substrates. The suitability of these different approaches towards analysis of the major lipid classes along with their current and potential applications in the field of lipid analysis are evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Basin-scale heterogeneity in Antarctic precipitation and its impact on surface mass variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fyke

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Annually averaged precipitation in the form of snow, the dominant term of the Antarctic Ice Sheet surface mass balance, displays large spatial and temporal variability. Here we present an analysis of spatial patterns of regional Antarctic precipitation variability and their impact on integrated Antarctic surface mass balance variability simulated as part of a preindustrial 1800-year global, fully coupled Community Earth System Model simulation. Correlation and composite analyses based on this output allow for a robust exploration of Antarctic precipitation variability. We identify statistically significant relationships between precipitation patterns across Antarctica that are corroborated by climate reanalyses, regional modeling and ice core records. These patterns are driven by variability in large-scale atmospheric moisture transport, which itself is characterized by decadal- to centennial-scale oscillations around the long-term mean. We suggest that this heterogeneity in Antarctic precipitation variability has a dampening effect on overall Antarctic surface mass balance variability, with implications for regulation of Antarctic-sourced sea level variability, detection of an emergent anthropogenic signal in Antarctic mass trends and identification of Antarctic mass loss accelerations.

  6. Higher surface mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet revealed by high - resolution climate modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, Janneke; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; van Meijgaard, Erik; van de Berg, Willem Jan; Bamber, Jonathan L.; Box, Jason E.; Bales, Roger C.

    2009-01-01

    High‐resolution (∼11 km) regional climate modeling shows total annual precipitation on the Greenland ice sheet for 1958–2007 to be up to 24% and surface mass balance up to 63% higher than previously thought. The largest differences occur in coastal southeast Greenland, where the much higher

  7. An experimental study on mass loading of soil particles on plant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J. G.; Gerzabek, M. H.; Mueck, K.

    1994-01-01

    Radionuclide contaminated soil adhered to plant surfaces can contribute to human ingestion dose. To determine this contribution, a method of 46 Sc neutron activation analysis was established and tested, by which a detection limit of 0.05 mg soil per g dry plant biomass can be obtained. In the field and greenhouse experiment the mass loading of soil on ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and broadbean (Vicia faba L.) was investigated and the contribution from rainsplash and wind erosion were evaluated separately. Soil retained on plant surfaces in field conditions in Seibersdorf/Austria was 5.77 ± 1.44 mg soil per g dry plant for ryegrass and 9.51 ± 0.73 mg soil per g dry plant for broadbean. Estimates of contribution from rainsplash and wind erosion to soil contamination of plants during the experimental period are 68 % and 32 % for broadbean 47 % and 53 % for ryegrass respectively. Mass loading results from field studies indicate that soil adhesion on plant surfaces can contribute up to 23 % of plant 137 Cs contamination, the transfer factors modified by mass loading decline differently, depending on 137 Cs concentration of the soil and the soil mass adhered to plant surfaces. (author)

  8. An experimental study on mass loading of soil particles on plant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Gerzabek, M.H.; Mueck, K.

    1994-03-01

    Radionuclide contaminated soil adhered to plant surfaces can contribute to human ingestion dose. To determine this contribution, a method of 46 Sc neutron activation analysis was established and tested, by which a detection limit of 0.05 mg soil per g dry plant biomass can be obtained. In the field and greenhouse experiment the mass loading of soil on ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and broad bean (Vicia faba L.) was investigated and the contribution from rainsplash and wind erosion were evaluated separately. Soil retained on plant surfaces in field conditions in Seibersdorf/Austria was 5.77 ± 1.44 mg soil per g dry plant for ryegrass and 9.51 ± 0.73 mg soil per g dry plant for broad bean. Estimates of contribution from rainsplash and wind erosion to soil contamination of plant during the experimental period are 68 % and 32 % for broadbean, 47 % and 53 % for ryegrass, respectively. Mass loading results from field studies indicate that soil adhesion on plant surfaces can contribute up to 23 % of plant 137 Cs contamination, the transfer factors modified by mass loading decline differently, depending on 137 Cs concentration of the soil and the soil mass adhered to plant surfaces. (authors)

  9. Ultrasensitive probing of the protein resistance of PEG surfaces by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kingshott, P.; McArthur, S.; Thissen, H.

    2002-01-01

    The highly sensitive surface analytical techniques X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight static secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used to test the resistance of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings towards adsorption of lysozyme (LYS) and fibronectin (FN). PEG co...

  10. Signal and noise in Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observed surface mass variations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrama, E.J.O.; Wouters, B.; Lavallée, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) product used for this study consists of 43 monthly potential coefficient sets released by the GRACE science team which are used to generate surface mass thickness grids expressed as equivalent water heights (EQWHs). We optimized both the smoothing

  11. Future climate warming increases Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fyke, J.G.; Vizcaino, M.; Lipscomb, W.; Price, S.

    2014-01-01

    The integrated surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) has large interannual variability. Long-term future changes to this variability will affect GrIS dynamics, freshwater fluxes, regional oceanography, and detection of changes in ice volume trends. Here we analyze a simulated

  12. Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance: evaluating simulations and making projections with regional climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rae, J.G.L.; Aðalgeirsdóttir, G.; Edwards, T.L.; Fettweis, X.; Gregory, J.M.; Hewitt, H.T.; Lowe, J.A.; Lucas-Picher, P.; Mottram, R.H.; Payne, A.J.; Ridley, J.K.; Shannon, S.R.; van de Berg, W.J.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; van den Broeke, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Four high-resolution regional climate models (RCMs) have been set up for the area of Greenland, with the aim of providing future projections of Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB), and its contribution to sea level rise, with greater accuracy than is possible from coarser-resolution

  13. Ferromagnetic nuclear resonance investigation of the surface magnetization in iron sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, L.; Tompa, K.

    1977-09-01

    The role of the domain structure and domain properties in ferromagnetic nuclear resonance (FNR) experiments is reconsidered. Using the FNR signal intensity as a measure of surface domain wall volume, it is found that the behaviour of the surface magnetization differs from that of the bulk magnetization of iron sheets. Namely, a critical field below which the FNR signal remains unchanqed is observed in the surface magnetization. This lag of surface domain wall annihilation is sensitive to the given surface conditions and in particular to the rolling deformation. Considering the small skin depth, FNR as a surface testing method is discussed. (D.P.)

  14. Exploring surface photoreaction dynamics using pixel imaging mass spectrometry (PImMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershis, Matthew D.; Wilson, Daniel P.; White, Michael G.; John, Jaya John; Nomerotski, Andrei; Brouard, Mark; Lee, Jason W. L.; Vallance, Claire; Turchetta, Renato

    2013-08-01

    A new technique for studying surface photochemistry has been developed using an ion imaging time-of-flight mass spectrometer in conjunction with a fast camera capable of multimass imaging. This technique, called pixel imaging mass spectrometry (PImMS), has been applied to the study of butanone photooxidation on TiO2(110). In agreement with previous studies of this system, it was observed that the main photooxidation pathway for butanone involves ejection of an ethyl radical into vacuum which, as confirmed by our imaging experiment, undergoes fragmentation after ionization in the mass spectrometer. This proof-of-principle experiment illustrates the usefulness and applicability of PImMS technology to problems of interest within the surface science community.

  15. Corporal surface as indicator of muscular mass in the adult of the masculine sex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Vieitez, Jorge Alberto

    2003-01-01

    With the objective of finding out the body surface area equation (BSA, m2) that is most suitable as indicator of musculature because of its higher correlation with the muscle mass (MM,kg), a correlation analysis was made between the MM and the BSA estimated by 11 weight and height-based formulae. Primary weight, height and MM data were obtained from these studies (N=41) in which MM was determined by cadaver dissection or by computerized axial tomography. A remarkable variability was observed in the BSA values estimated by 11 equations (F=59,7; p< 0,05). The correlation coefficients between the body surface estimated by different equations and the muscle mass were statistically significant and very similar. It was concluded that there is no BSA equation that is far better than the rest as muscle mass indicator. Mostellers equation is recommended due to its calculation simplicity

  16. Mass spectrum of secondary ions knocked-out from copper surface by argon ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval', A.G.; Bobkov, V.V.; Klimovskij, Yu.A.; Fogel', Ya.M.

    1976-01-01

    The mass-spectrum of secondary ions was studied within a mass range of 1-400. The ions were knocked-out by the beam of ions Ar + from the copper surface with different content of oxygen and sulphur solved in the volume. The studies were conducted at three temperatures of the target. The atomic and molecular ions of the metal matrix, volumetric impurities of metal and ions of chemical compounds molecules of the metal under study with gas particles adsorbed on its surface and atoms of the metal volumetric admixtures may be observed in the mass spectrum. Detection of secondary ions of the copper multi-atomic complexes and ions of these complexes compounds with the adsorbed molecules is of interest

  17. Nuclear or conventional power for surface combatant ships: Department of the Navy. Report to the Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    GAO reviewed the controversy over whether the Navy's major surface combatant ships should be all nuclear powered, all conventionally powered, or a mix of both. Nuclear ships are more capable but cost more and their relative cost-effectiveness cannot be measured because Navy analysts cannot quantify many benefits of nuclear power. The Congress, in reviewing Navy shipbuilding plans for surface combatant ships, should be cognizant that buying only conventional ships will maximize naval firepower; buying only nuclear ships will provide mobility and greater freedom from logistics support; and buying a mix is a third option providing, to varying degrees, the advantages and disadvantages of the all-nuclear and all-conventional options

  18. Past and future sea-level change from the surface mass balance of glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Marzeion

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present estimates of sea-level change caused by the global surface mass balance of glaciers, based on the reconstruction and projection of the surface mass balance of all the individual glaciers of the world, excluding the ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica. The model is validated using a leave-one-glacier-out cross-validation scheme against 3997 observed surface mass balances of 255 glaciers, and against 756 geodetically observed, temporally integrated volume and surface area changes of 341 glaciers. When forced with observed monthly precipitation and temperature data, the glaciers of the world are reconstructed to have lost mass corresponding to 114 ± 5 mm sea-level equivalent (SLE between 1902 and 2009. Using projected temperature and precipitation anomalies from 15 coupled general circulation models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5 ensemble, they are projected to lose an additional 148 ± 35 mm SLE (scenario RCP26, 166 ± 42 mm SLE (scenario RCP45, 175 ± 40 mm SLE (scenario RCP60, or 217 ± 47 mm SLE (scenario RCP85 during the 21st century. Based on the extended RCP scenarios, glaciers are projected to approach a new equilibrium towards the end of the 23rd century, after having lost either 248 ± 66 mm SLE (scenario RCP26, 313 ± 50 mm SLE (scenario RCP45, or 424 ± 46 mm SLE (scenario RCP85. Up until approximately 2100, ensemble uncertainty within each scenario is the biggest source of uncertainty for the future glacier mass loss; after that, the difference between the scenarios takes over as the biggest source of uncertainty. Ice mass loss rates are projected to peak 2040 ∼ 2050 (RCP26, 2050 ∼ 2060 (RCP45, 2070 ∼ 2090 (RCP60, or 2070 ∼ 2100 (RCP85.

  19. Scientometric mapping of mass spectrometry research in nuclear science and technology: a global perspective. IT-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, Anil; Kademani, B.S.; Vijai Kumar

    2007-01-01

    This paper attempts to analyse quantitatively the growth and development of Mass Spectrometry research in Nuclear Science and Technology in terms of publication output as reflected in International Nuclear Information System (INIS) database (1970-2005). During 1970-2005, a total of 10913 papers were published in various domains: Chemistry, Materials and Earth Sciences (5286) (48.44%), Physical Sciences (2367) (21.69%), Engineering and Technology (1434) (13.14), Life and Environmental Sciences (1212) (11.11), other aspects of Nuclear and Non Nuclear Energy (492) (4.51%) and Isotopes, Isotope and Radiation Applications (122) (1.12%). There were only three papers published in 1970. The highest number of papers (816) were published in 2004. The average number of publications published per year was 303.13. United States topped the list with 2247 publications followed by Germany with 1333 publications, Japan with 820 publications, France with 525 publications, and India with 460 publications. Authorship and collaboration trend was towards multi-authored papers as 81.83 percent of the papers were collaborative is indicative of the multidisciplinary nature of research activity. The most prolific authors were: S.K. Aggarwal, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India with 113 publications, W. Kutschera, University of Vienna, Austria with 85 publications, and H.C. Jain, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India with 70 publications. The highly productive institutions were: Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India) with 233 publications, Argonne National Laboratory (USA) with 150 publications, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (USA) with 146 publications, University of California (USA) with 118 publications, Los Alamos National Laboratory (USA) with 104 publications and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan) with 91 publications. The journals most preferred by the scientists for publication of papers were: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research

  20. The coating of surfaces for use in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This Code of Practice provides general advice to designers and others on the factors affecting the choice of coating for use within the nuclear industry. It itemises those design features, which are pertinent to facilitating decontamination and specifies the optimum generic types of coating for a variety of working conditions. Data sheets on commercially available products are included in Section 6 of the Code under the appropriate generic type. Information provided on the data sheets includes a measure of the ease of decontamination of the coating using the accepted method of testing (currently as specified in BS 4247 Part 1) and other nuclear information, where available, i.e. radiation resistance, exhalation rate for radionuclide gases radon and thoron. It also indicates the more important conventional properties of the product. (author)

  1. Quantitative surface analysis using deuteron-induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afarideh, Hossein

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) technique consists of looking at the energies of the reaction products which uniquely define the particular elements present in the sample and it analysis the yield/energy distribution to reveal depth profiles. A summary of the basic features of the nuclear reaction analysis technique is given, in particular emphasis is placed on quantitative light element determination using (d,p) and (d,alpha) reactions. The experimental apparatus is also described. Finally a set of (d,p) spectra for the elements Z=3 to Z=17 using 2 MeV incident deutrons is included together with example of more applications of the (d,alpha) spectra. (author)

  2. Weapons of mass destruction: Overview of the CBRNEs (Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prockop, Leon D

    2006-11-01

    The events of September 11, 2001, made citizens of the world acutely aware of disasters consequent to present-day terrorism. This is a war being waged for reasons obscure to many of its potential victims. The term "NBCs" was coined in reference to terrorist weapons of mass destruction, i.e., nuclear, biological and chemical. The currently accepted acronym is "CBRNE" which includes Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosive weapons. Non-nuclear explosives are the most common terrorist weapon now in use. Nuclear and radiological weapons are beyond the scope of this publication, which focuses on the "CBEs", i.e. chemical, biological and explosive weapons. Although neurologists will not be the first responders to CBEs, they must know about the neurological effects in order to provide diagnosis and treatment to survivors. Neurological complications of chemical, biological and explosive weapons which have or may be used by terrorists are reviewed by international experts in this publication. Management and treatment profiles are outlined.

  3. Terror weapons. Ridding the world of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons - Commission on mass destruction weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.; Journe, V.

    2010-01-01

    This book approaches in 8 chapters the ambitious challenge of ridding the world of all mass destruction weapons: 1 - re-launching disarmament; 2 - terror weapons: nature of threats and answers (weakness of traditional answers, counter-proliferation); 3 - nuclear weapons: preventing proliferation and terrorism, reducing threat and nuclear weapons number, from regulation to banning); 4 - biological or toxin weapons; 5 - chemical weapons; 6 - vectors, anti-missile defenses and space weapons; 7 - exports control, international assistance and non-governmental actors; 8 - respect, verification, enforcement and role of the United Nations. The recommendations and works of the Commission are presented in appendix together with the declaration adopted on April 30, 2009. (J.S.)

  4. Simple, empirical approach to predict neutron capture cross sections from nuclear masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, A.; Casten, R. F.; Cakirli, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    Background: Neutron capture cross sections are essential to understanding the astrophysical s and r processes, the modeling of nuclear reactor design and performance, and for a wide variety of nuclear forensics applications. Often, cross sections are needed for nuclei where experimental measurements are difficult. Enormous effort, over many decades, has gone into attempting to develop sophisticated statistical reaction models to predict these cross sections. Such work has met with some success but is often unable to reproduce measured cross sections to better than 40 % , and has limited predictive power, with predictions from different models rapidly differing by an order of magnitude a few nucleons from the last measurement. Purpose: To develop a new approach to predicting neutron capture cross sections over broad ranges of nuclei that accounts for their values where known and which has reliable predictive power with small uncertainties for many nuclei where they are unknown. Methods: Experimental neutron capture cross sections were compared to empirical mass observables in regions of similar structure. Results: We present an extremely simple method, based solely on empirical mass observables, that correlates neutron capture cross sections in the critical energy range from a few keV to a couple hundred keV. We show that regional cross sections are compactly correlated in medium and heavy mass nuclei with the two-neutron separation energy. These correlations are easily amenable to predict unknown cross sections, often converting the usual extrapolations to more reliable interpolations. It almost always reproduces existing data to within 25 % and estimated uncertainties are below about 40 % up to 10 nucleons beyond known data. Conclusions: Neutron capture cross sections display a surprisingly strong connection to the two-neutron separation energy, a nuclear structure property. The simple, empirical correlations uncovered provide model-independent predictions of

  5. Large geometry secondary ion mass spectrometry (LG-SIMS) for the enhancement of nuclear safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helberg, P.M.L.; Wallenius, M.; Vincent, C.; Albert, N.; Peres, P.; Truyens, J.

    2013-01-01

    A new LG-SIMS (Large Geometry Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) laboratory is currently being established at the Joint Research Centre, the Institute of Transuranium Elements for the purpose of improving the analytical capabilities within the European Commission. The laboratory will mainly be used for analysing uranium bearing aerosol particles collected on cotton swipes from nuclear Safeguards inspections but it will also be used for Nuclear Forensics and other Safeguards related applications. Until recently, this type of analysis has predominantly been performed using the small geometry CAMECA IMS 3F-7F instrument series. These instruments provide both particle screening and isotope ratio capabilities. The performance of these instruments was however limited by the occurrence of isobaric interferences, in particular for the minor isotopes ( 234 U, 236 U), that could not be resolved without compromising the transmission of the instrument. A recent breakthrough to solve this problem has been the implementation of Large Geometry SIMS, the CAMECA 1270 / 1280 / 1280-HR models, for this type of analysis. This instrument has originally been developed for geosciences applications requiring both high transmission and high mass resolution capabilities. This came out to be a key instrumental advantage also for uranium particle analyses, as it allows efficient removal of common molecular interferences with minimum loss in transmission. Furthermore an electrostatic ion optical device has been added for increasing the mass dispersion which allows the simultaneous detection of all uranium isotopes. The Automated Particle Measurement (APM) software has been developed to perform screening measurement in an automated mode. Combined with the APM screening software, LG-SIMS instruments greatly improve the overall performance and throughput of isotopic analyses of U particles for nuclear Safeguards purposes. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (A.C.)

  6. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering in Bucharest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stan-Sion, C.; Catana, D.; Plostinaru, D.; Radulescu, M.; Enachescu, M.; Ivascu, M.; Marinescu, L.; Dima, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is today the experimental physical method capable to measure the lowest concentration of a particular nuclide in a sample material. Ratios of radionuclides in the range 10 -13 - 10 -15 are normally measured with this technique, corresponding to a sensitivity which makes possible the detection of only 1 Atom in a surrounding material of about 1 Million of Billions of other Atoms. Thus, the AMS has advanced the art of Classical Mass Spectrometry (sensitivity 10 -11 ) to a sensitivity which allows for the first time the performance of special applications in environmental physics, medicine, pharmacology, geology, archaeology, measurements of radio nuclides in the Earth's atmosphere produced by cosmic-rays or by nuclear power plants, applications in astrophysics and in nuclear physics.An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility was constructed at the FN - 8 MV tandem accelerator of the National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering . The construction was possible in the frame of a co-operation with the Technical University Munich and with financial support from IAEA-Vienna. It represents the first experimental set-up of this type in the large geographical area of Eastern Europe. The main components of the facility are: the ion injector deck, the AMS beam line and the detector systems. The injector deck is polarized at 50 kV and contains the high current sputtering ion source (spherical ionizer) followed, for beam transport, by electrostatic devices (single lenses, steerers, quadrupole lenses) a double focussing, 90 angle analyzing magnet (Danfysik), a pre-acceleration tube (NEC) and several diagnose and defining elements. The AMS samples are placed in an eight-stack magazine attached to the ion source. On the exit side of the tandem accelerator tank, a velocity filter and the particle detection system are mounted. The beam line, on the high-energy side, is optically achromatic and contains two 90 angle analyzing magnets of

  7. Ftreign system studieo of hydrodynamics and heat-mass transfer at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltanov, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Status and the main problems of system studies on hydrodynamics and heat-and-mass transfer at nuclear power plant transients and accidents are considered. Experimental benchmarks used for studying the loss of coolant accidents are described. The conclusion is made that contemporary level of measuring apparatus development and a large number of fast-response monitors of temperature, pressure and coolant level at most of described benchmarks permit to obtain sufficiently complete information of the behaviour of most important parts of a reactor unit during transients and accidents of different type [ru

  8. Probabilistic fracture mechanics of nuclear structural components. Consideration of transition from embedded crack to surface crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagawa, Genki; Yoshimura, Shinobu; Kanto, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis of aged nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material. New interpolation formulas are first derived for both embedded elliptical surface cracks and semi-elliptical surface cracks. To investigate effects of transition from embedded crack to surface crack in PFM analyses, one of PFM round-robin problems set by JSME-RC111 committee, i.e. 'aged RPV under normal and upset operating conditions' is solved, employing the interpolation formulas. (author)

  9. Layer protecting the surface of zirconium used in nuclear reactors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ashcheulov, Petr; Škoda, R.; Škarohlíd, J.; Taylor, Andrew; Fendrych, František; Kratochvílová, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2016), 59-65 ISSN 2212-4020 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-05095S; GA TA ČR TA04020156; GA MŠk LO1409; GA ČR GA13-31783S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-10279S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition * Raman spectroscopy * SEM * thin polycrystalline diamond film * Zircaloy2 pins protection against oxidation Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics

  10. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for subsampling and for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride UF6. Most of these test methods are in routine use to determine conformance to UF6 specifications in the Enrichment and Conversion Facilities. 1.2 The analytical procedures in this document appear in the following order: Note 1—Subcommittee C26.05 will confer with C26.02 concerning the renumbered section in Test Methods C761 to determine how concerns with renumbering these sections, as analytical methods are replaced with stand-alone analytical methods, are best addressed in subsequent publications. Sections Subsampling of Uranium Hexafluoride 7 - 10 Gravimetric Determination of Uranium 11 - 19 Titrimetric Determination of Uranium 20 Preparation of High-Purity U3O 8 21 Isotopic Analysis 22 Isotopic Analysis by Double-Standard Mass-Spectrometer Method 23 - 29 Determination of Hydrocarbons, Chlorocarbons, and Partially Substitut...

  11. Measurement of particle size distribution and mass concentration of nuclear fuel aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, S.

    1982-01-01

    The particle size distribution and particle mass concentration of a nuclear fuel aerosol is measured by admitting the aerosol into a vertically-extending container, positioning an alpha particle detector within the container so that its window is horizontal and directed vertically, stopping the admission of aerosol into the container, detecting the alpha-activity of the particles of the aerosol sedimenting onto the detector window (for example in a series of equal time intervals until a constant level is reached), and converting the alpha-activity measurements into particle size distribution and/or particle mass concentration measurements. The detector is attached to a pivotted arm and by raising a counterweight can be lowered from the container for cleaning. (author)

  12. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade boron carbide

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade boron carbide powder and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Total Carbon by Combustion and Gravimetry 7-17 Total Boron by Titrimetry 18-28 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrometry 29-38 Chloride and Fluoride Separation by Pyrohydrolysis 39-45 Chloride by Constant-Current Coulometry 46-54 Fluoride by Ion-Selective Electrode 55-63 Water by Constant-Voltage Coulometry 64-72 Impurities by Spectrochemical Analysis 73-81 Soluble Boron by Titrimetry 82-95 Soluble Carbon by a Manometric Measurement 96-105 Metallic Impurities by a Direct Reader Spectrometric Method 106-114

  13. Nuclear quantum shape-phase transitions in odd-mass systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, S.; Li, Z. P.; Vretenar, D.; Meng, J.

    2018-03-01

    Microscopic signatures of nuclear ground-state shape-phase transitions in odd-mass Eu isotopes are explored starting from excitation spectra and collective wave functions obtained by diagonalization of a core-quasiparticle coupling Hamiltonian based on energy density functionals. As functions of the physical control parameter—the number of nucleons—theoretical low-energy spectra, two-neutron separation energies, charge isotope shifts, spectroscopic quadrupole moments, and E 2 reduced transition matrix elements accurately reproduce available data and exhibit more-pronounced discontinuities at neutron number N =90 compared with the adjacent even-even Sm and Gd isotopes. The enhancement of the first-order quantum phase transition in odd-mass systems can be attributed to a shape polarization effect of the unpaired proton which, at the critical neutron number, starts predominantly coupling to Gd core nuclei that are characterized by larger quadrupole deformation and weaker proton pairing correlations compared with the corresponding Sm isotopes.

  14. Development of a Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (LITMS) Investigation for Future Planetary Surface Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinckerhoff, W.; Danell, R.; Van Ameron, F.; Pinnick, V.; Li, X.; Arevalo, R.; Glavin, D.; Getty, S.; Mahaffy, P.; Chu, P.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Future surface missions to Mars and other planetary bodies will benefit from continued advances in miniature sensor and sample handling technologies that enable high-performance chemical analyses of natural samples. Fine-scale (approx.1 mm and below) analyses of rock surfaces and interiors, such as exposed on a drill core, will permit (1) the detection of habitability markers including complex organics in association with their original depositional environment, and (2) the characterization of successive layers and gradients that can reveal the time-evolution of those environments. In particular, if broad-based and highly-sensitive mass spectrometry techniques could be brought to such scales, the resulting planetary science capability would be truly powerful. The Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (LITMS) investigation is designed to conduct fine-scale organic and inorganic analyses of short (approx.5-10 cm) rock cores such as could be acquired by a planetary lander or rover arm-based drill. LITMS combines both pyrolysis/gas chromatograph mass spectrometry (GCMS) of sub-sampled core fines, and laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) of the intact core surface, using a common mass analyzer, enhanced from the design used in the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) instrument on the 2018 ExoMars rover. LITMS additionally features developments based on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on MSL and recent NASA-funded prototype efforts in laser mass spectrometry, pyrolysis, and precision subsampling. LITMS brings these combined capabilities to achieve its four measurement objectives: (1) Organics: Broad Survey Detect organic molecules over a wide range of molecular weight, volatility, electronegativity, concentration, and host mineralogy. (2) Organic: Molecular Structure Characterize internal molecular structure to identify individual compounds, and reveal functionalization and processing. (3) Inorganic Host Environment Assess the local chemical

  15. Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-01-01

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  16. Application of gas chromatography-surface ionization organic mass spectrometry to forensic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Akira; Watanabe-Suzuki, Kanako; Seno, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Osamu; Katsumata, Yoshinao

    2002-08-25

    Surface ionization (SI), which consists in the formation of positive and negative ions along the course of thermal desorption of particles from a solid surface, was first applied as a detector for gas chromatography (GC), GC-surface ionization detection (SID); we developed many new sensitive methods for the determination of abused and other drugs by GC-SID. Recently, Fujii has devised a combination of SI and a quadrupole mass spectrometer and named this system a surface ionization organic mass spectrometer (SIOMS), which is highly selective and sensitive for organic compounds containing tertiary amino groups. We have tried to apply this mass spectrometer to forensic toxicological study; so far we have succeeded in determining important drugs-of-abuse and toxic compounds, such as phencyclidine (PCP), pethidine, pentazocine, MPTP and its derivatives from human body fluids with high sensitivity and selectivity. In this review, we describe our recent studies on the application of GC-SIOMS to forensic toxicology. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND THE SURFACE DENSITY PROFILE OF NGC 6231

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Hwankyung [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Sejong University, 98, Kunja-dong, Kwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Sana, Hugues [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekeok' , Amsterdam University, Science Park 904, 1098-XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bessell, Michael S., E-mail: sungh@sejong.ac.kr, E-mail: H.Sana@uva.nl, E-mail: bessell@mso.anu.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, MSO, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2013-02-01

    We have performed new wide-field photometry of the young open cluster NGC 6231 to study the shape of the initial mass function (IMF) and mass segregation. We also investigated the reddening law toward NGC 6231 from optical to mid-infrared color excess ratios, and found that the total-to-selective extinction ratio is R{sub V} = 3.2, which is very close to the normal value. But many early-type stars in the cluster center show large color excess ratios. We derived the surface density profiles of four member groups, and found that they reach the surface density of field stars at about 10', regardless of stellar mass. The IMF of NGC 6231 is derived for the mass range 0.8-45 M{sub Sun }. The slope of the IMF of NGC 6231 ({Gamma} = -1.1 {+-} 0.1) is slightly shallower than the canonical value, but the difference is marginal. In addition, the mass function varies systematically, and is a strong function of radius-it is very shallow at the center, and very steep at the outer ring suggesting the cluster is mass segregated. We confirm the mass segregation for the massive stars (m {approx}> 8 M{sub Sun }) by a minimum spanning tree analysis. Using a Monte Carlo method, we estimate the total mass of NGC 6231 to be about 2.6 ({+-} 0.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }. We constrain the age of NGC 6231 by comparison with evolutionary isochrones. The age of the low-mass stars ranges from 1 to 7 Myr with a slight peak at 3 Myr. However, the age of the high-mass stars depends on the adopted models and is 3.5 {+-} 0.5 Myr from the non-rotating or moderately rotating models of Brott et al. as well as the non-rotating models of Ekstroem et al. But the age is 4.0-7.0 Myr if the rotating models of Ekstroem et al. are adopted. This latter age is in excellent agreement with the timescale of ejection of the high-mass runaway star HD 153919 from NGC 6231, albeit the younger age cannot be entirely excluded.

  18. Application of »Mass Titration« to Determination of Surface Charge of Metal Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The mass titration method, used for the point of zero charge determination, was extended to the measurement of the surface charge density. The results agree with the common method, which is the acid-base titration of the colloidal suspension. The advantage of mass titration is that one does not need to perform blank titration, instead one simply adds metal oxide powder to the electrolyte aqueous solution of known pH. To cover the pH range above and below the point of zero charge, two experime...

  19. Mass composition studies using the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlberg, Hernan

    2009-01-01

    The mass composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays is a critical issue to understand their origin and nature. The Pierre Auger Observatory is a hybrid instrument which provides a powerful environment for the determination of the primary mass. The Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory alone allows the study of several shower parameters with high discriminating power between primary elements. Novel analysis techniques using different features of signals in the Cherenkov stations are discussed. These are the signal risetime, the azimuthal time asymmetry and the muon density of the showers.

  20. Effect of mass density on surface morphology of electrodeposited manganese oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Avtar; Kumar, Davinder; Thakur, Anup; Kaur, Raminder

    2018-05-01

    This work focus on high surface area morphology of manganese oxide films which are currently required for electrochemical capacitor electrode to enhance their performance. Electrodeposition of manganese oxide films was carried out using Chronoamperometry for different deposition time ranging from 30 to 120 sec. Cronoamperomertic I-T integrated data have been used to analyze active mass of all electrodeposited films. Morphological study of the deposited films with different mass was carried out through scanning electron microscopy. Film deposited for 30 sec time show highest porous morphology than others. Manganese oxide films with high porosity are suitable for electrochemical capacitor electrode.

  1. Isospin splitting of nucleon effective mass and symmetry energy in isotopic nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ya-Fei; Chen, Peng-Hui; Niu, Fei; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Jin, Gen-Ming; Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2017-10-01

    Within an isospin and momentum dependent transport model, the dynamics of isospin particles (nucleons and light clusters) in Fermi-energy heavy-ion collisions are investigated for constraining the isospin splitting of nucleon effective mass and the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities. The impacts of the isoscalar and isovector parts of the momentum dependent interaction on the emissions of isospin particles are explored, i.e., the mass splittings of and (). The single and double neutron to proton ratios of free nucleons and light particles are thoroughly investigated in the isotopic nuclear reactions of 112Sn+112Sn and 124Sn+124Sn at incident energies of 50 and 120 MeV/nucleon, respectively. It is found that both the effective mass splitting and symmetry energy impact the kinetic energy spectra of the single ratios, in particular at the high energy tail (larger than 20 MeV). The isospin splitting of nucleon effective mass slightly impacts the double ratio spectra at the energy of 50 MeV/nucleon. A soft symmetry energy with stiffness coefficient of γ s=0.5 is constrained from the experimental data with the Fermi-energy heavy-ion collisions. Supported by Major State Basic Research Development Program in China (2014CB845405, 2015CB856903), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11722546, 11675226, 11675066, U1332207) and Youth Innovation Promotion Association of Chinese Academy of Sciences

  2. Calculation of nuclear electromagnetic pulse propagation along the earth's surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Rui; Zheng Yi; Song Lijun; Zhang Xueqin; Lip Peng

    2010-01-01

    It calculates the LF/VLF wave of NEMP propagation along the earth's surface. The earth-wave and the sky-wave are taken into account in the calculation. With the distance increase, the earth wave attenuates fast than the sky wave, and the time difference between the earth wave and the sky wave is reduced. (authors)

  3. Constraints on the nuclear equation of state from nuclear masses and radii in a Thomas-Fermi meta-modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, D.; Gulminelli, F.; Raduta, Ad. R.; Margueron, J.

    2017-12-01

    The question of correlations among empirical equation of state (EoS) parameters constrained by nuclear observables is addressed in a Thomas-Fermi meta-modeling approach. A recently proposed meta-modeling for the nuclear EoS in nuclear matter is augmented with a single finite size term to produce a minimal unified EoS functional able to describe the smooth part of the nuclear ground state properties. This meta-model can reproduce the predictions of a large variety of models, and interpolate continuously between them. An analytical approximation to the full Thomas-Fermi integrals is further proposed giving a fully analytical meta-model for nuclear masses. The parameter space is sampled and filtered through the constraint of nuclear mass reproduction with Bayesian statistical tools. We show that this simple analytical meta-modeling has a predictive power on masses, radii, and skins comparable to full Hartree-Fock or extended Thomas-Fermi calculations with realistic energy functionals. The covariance analysis on the posterior distribution shows that no physical correlation is present between the different EoS parameters. Concerning nuclear observables, a strong correlation between the slope of the symmetry energy and the neutron skin is observed, in agreement with previous studies.

  4. Evaluating Greenland glacial isostatic adjustment corrections using GRACE, altimetry and surface mass balance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutterley, Tyler C; Velicogna, Isabella; Csatho, Beata; Rezvan-Behbahani, Soroush; Babonis, Greg; Van den Broeke, Michiel

    2014-01-01

    Glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) represents a source of uncertainty for ice sheet mass balance estimates from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) time-variable gravity measurements. We evaluate Greenland GIA corrections from Simpson et al (2009 Quat. Sci. Rev. 28 1631–57), A et al (2013 Geophys. J. Int. 192 557–72) and Wu et al (2010 Nature Geosci. 3 642–6) by comparing the spatial patterns of GRACE-derived ice mass trends calculated using the three corrections with volume changes from ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) and OIB (Operation IceBridge) altimetry missions, and surface mass balance products from the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO). During the period September 2003–August 2011, GRACE ice mass changes obtained using the Simpson et al (2009 Quat. Sci. Rev. 28 1631–57) and A et al (2013 Geophys. J. Int. 192 557–72) GIA corrections yield similar spatial patterns and amplitudes, and are consistent with altimetry observations and surface mass balance data. The two GRACE estimates agree within 2% on average over the entire ice sheet, and better than 15% in four subdivisions of Greenland. The third GRACE estimate corrected using the (Wu et al 2010 Nature Geosci. 3 642–6)) GIA shows similar spatial patterns, but produces an average ice mass loss for the entire ice sheet that is 64 − 67 Gt yr −1 smaller. In the Northeast the recovered ice mass change is 46–49 Gt yr −1 (245–270%) more positive than that deduced from the other two corrections. By comparing the spatial and temporal variability of the GRACE estimates with trends of volume changes from altimetry and surface mass balance from RACMO, we show that the Wu et al (2010 Nature Geosci. 3 642–6) correction leads to a large mass increase in the Northeast that is inconsistent with independent observations. (paper)

  5. Mass spectrometric investigation of synthetic glycoside of muramyl dipeptide immobilized on fumed silica surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulik, Tetiana V., E-mail: tanyakulyk@gala.net [O.O. Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 17 Generala Naumova Str., Kyiv 03164 (Ukraine); Azizova, Liana R., E-mail: liana_azizova@ukr.net [O.O. Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 17 Generala Naumova Str., Kyiv 03164 (Ukraine); Palyanytsya, Borys B. [O.O. Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 17 Generala Naumova Str., Kyiv 03164 (Ukraine); Zemlyakov, Alexander E.; Tsikalova, Victoria N. [Vernadsky Tauric National University, pr. Akademika Vernadskogo 4, Simferopol, 95007 (Ukraine)

    2010-05-25

    N-Acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine or muramyl dipeptide is a cleavage product of peptidoglycan by lysozyme. This study explored the use of the temperature-programmed desorption mass spectrometry (TPDMS) in analysis of glycoside of muramyl dipeptide: O-{l_brace}(4-tert-butylcyclohexyl)-2-acetamido-2, 3-dideoxy-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside-3-yl{r_brace}-D-lactoyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP) on the surface of fumed silica. Stages of pyrolysis of MDP in condensed state and on the silica surface have been determined. Three stages have been clear identified under pyrolysis of MDP on the silica surface. Kinetic parameters of thermal reactions on the fumed silica surface and in the condensed state have been calculated.

  6. Alterations in the nuclear matrix protein mass correlate with heat-induced inhibition of DNA single-strand-break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warters, R.L.; Brizgys, L.M.; Lyons, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    The total protein mass co-isolating with the nuclear matrix or nucleoid from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was observed to increase in heated cells as a function of increasing exposure temperature between 43 0 C and 45 0 C or of exposure time at any temperature. The sedimentation distance of the CHO cell nucleoid in sucrose gradients increased with increasing exposure time at 45 0 C. Both these nuclear alterations correlated in a log-linear manner with heat-induced inhibition of DNA strand break repair. A two-fold threshold increase in nuclear matrix protein mass preceded any substantial inhibition of repair of DNA single-strand breaks. When preheated cells were incubated at 37 0 C the nuclear matrix protein mass and nucleoid sedimentation recovered with a half-time of about 5 h, while DNA single-strand-break repair recovered with a half-time of about 2 h. When preheated cells were placed at 41 0 C a further increase was observed in the nuclear matrix protein mass and the half-time of DNA strand break repair, while nucleoid sedimentation recovered toward control values. These results implicate alterations in the protein mass of the nuclear matrix in heat-induced inhibition of repair of DNA single-strand breaks. (author)

  7. Molecular theory for nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein solutions and tissue; Surface diffusion and free-volume analogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmich, R; Nusser, W; Gneiting, T [Ulm Universitaet (Federal Republic of Germany). Sektion Kernresonanzspektroskopie

    1990-04-01

    A model theory is presented explaining a series of striking phenomena observed with nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein systems such as solutions or tissue. The frequency, concentration and temperature dependences of proton or deuteron relaxation times of protein solutions and tissue are explained. It is concluded that the translational diffusion of water molecules along the rugged surfaces of proteins and, to a minor degree, protein backbone fluctuations are crucial processes. The rate limiting factor of macromolecular tumbling is assumed to be given by the free water content in a certain analogy to the free-volume model of Cohen ad Turnbull. There are two characteristic water mass fractions indicating the saturation of the hydration shells and the onset of protein tumbling. A closed and relatively simple set of relaxation formulas is presented. The potentially fractal nature of the diffusion of water molecules on the protein surface is discussed. (author). 43 refs.; 4 figs.

  8. Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Temperature, Melt, and Mass Loss: 2000-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Luthcke, Scott B.; DiGirolamo, Nocolo

    2007-01-01

    Extensive melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet has been documented by a variety of ground and satellite measurements in recent years. If the well-documented warming continues in the Arctic, melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet will likely accelerate, contributing to sea-level rise. Modeling studies indicate that an annual or summer temperature rise of 1 C on the ice sheet will increase melt by 20-50% therefore, surface temperature is one of the most important ice-sheet parameters to study for analysis of changes in the mass balance of the ice-sheet. The Greenland Ice Sheet contains enough water to produce a rise in eustatic sea level of up to 7.0 m if the ice were to melt completely. However, even small changes (centimeters) in sea level would cause important economic and societal consequences in the world's major coastal cities thus it is extremely important to monitor changes in the ice-sheet surface temperature and to ultimately quantify these changes in terms of amount of sea-level rise. We have compiled a high-resolution, daily time series of surface temperature of the Greenland Ice Sheet, using the I-km resolution, clear-sky land-surface temperature (LST) standard product from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), from 2000 - 2006. We also use Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data, averaged over 10-day periods, to measure change in mass of the ice sheet as it melt and snow accumulates. Surface temperature can be used to determine frequency of surface melt, timing of the start and the end of the melt season, and duration of melt. In conjunction with GRACE data, it can also be used to analyze timing of ice-sheet mass loss and gain.

  9. Characterization of spent nuclear fuels by an online combination of chromatographic and mass spectrometric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther-Leopold, Ines; Wernli, Beat; Kopajtic, Zlatko

    2003-01-01

    The determination of the burn-up is one of the essential parts in post-irradiation examinations on nuclear fuel samples. In the frame of national and international research programs the analysis of the isotopic vectors of uranium, plutonium, neodymium and some other fission products and actinides was carried out in the Hot lab of the Paul Scherrer Institute in the last years by using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled online with an inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the meantime a multicollector ICP-MS, suitable for high precision isotope ratio measurements, was installed within the Hot lab and has been used now in combination with a chromatographic separation system for the first time for burn-up determinations of nuclear fuel samples. The results of these investigations, a comparison of both methods with the classical technique for burn-up analyses (thermal ionization mass spectrometry), the advantages and limitations of the methods and the accuracy and precision of this type of analyses are presented in the paper. (author)

  10. Double Beta Decay and Neutrino Masses Accuracy of the Nuclear Matrix Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faessler, Amand

    2005-01-01

    The neutrinoless double beta decay is forbidden in the standard model of the electroweak and strong interaction but allowed in most Grand Unified Theories (GUT's). Only if the neutrino is a Majorana particle (identical with its antiparticle) and if it has a mass, the neutrinoless double beta decay is allowed. Apart of one claim that the neutrinoless double beta decay in 76 Ge is measured, one has only upper limits for this transition probability. But even the upper limits allow to give upper limits for the electron Majorana neutrino mass and upper limits for parameters of GUT's and the minimal R-parity violating supersymmetric model. One further can give lower limits for the vector boson mediating mainly the right-handed weak interaction and the heavy mainly right-handed Majorana neutrino in left-right symmetric GUT's. For that one has to assume that the specific mechanism is the leading one for the neutrinoless double beta decay and one has to be able to calculate reliably the corresponding nuclear matrix elements. In the present contribution, one discusses the accuracy of the present status of calculating the nuclear matrix elements and the corresponding limits of GUT's and supersymmetric parameters

  11. Atmospheric pressure surface sampling/ionization techniques for direct coupling of planar separations with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-06-18

    Planar separations, which include thin layer chromatography and gel electrophoresis, are in widespread use as important and powerful tools for conducting separations of complex mixtures. To increase the utility of planar separations, new methods are needed that allow in situ characterization of the individual components of the separated mixtures. A large number of atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques for use with mass spectrometry have emerged in the past several years, and several have been investigated as a means for mass spectrometric read-out of planar separations. In this article, we review the atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques that have been used for the read-out of planar separation media. For each technique, we briefly explain the operational basics and discuss the analyte type for which it is appropriate and some specific applications from the literature. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Re-discovering surface mass spectrometry: chemical mapping from micro to macro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, K.G.; O' Keefe, D.P

    2004-06-15

    New developments in electronics, devices, micro-encapsulation, and other areas demand the ability to acquire molecularly-specific information from smaller and smaller features. ToF-SIMS provides molecularly-specific mass spectral data, but sufficient high-mass signal has historically been difficult to obtain from organic/polymeric surfaces in the point-mapping mode of operation. Use of chemometric data reduction methods and the development of heavier primary ion sources enhance and extend the chemical information in the mapping data. Large-area chemical mapping via sample stage rastering has also opened up new applications. This capability allows single-experiment mapping of large or multiple features, provides information on surface uniformity over end-use-relevant areas, and offers potential for combinatorial and other screening applications. Examples of these applications are presented.

  13. Mineralization of bacterial cell mass on a photocatalytic surface in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoby, W.A.; Maness, P.C.; Wolfrum, E.J.; Blake, D.M.; Fennell, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Whole cells deposited on a titanium dioxide-coated surface have been oxidized in air to carbon dioxide via photocatalysis. This paper provides the first evidence that the organic matter in whole cells can be completely oxidized. Three experimental techniques were employed to monitor this reaction: scanning electron microscopy, 14 C radioisotope labeling experiments establish that the carbon content of E. coli is oxidized to form carbon dioxide with substantial closure of the mass balance. The batch reactor experiments corroborate the mass balance and provide a preliminary indication of the rate of the oxidation reaction. These results provide evidence that a photocatalytic surface used for disinfection can also be self-cleaning in an air-solid system

  14. Quantitative Caffeine Analysis Using a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Michael J [ORNL; Deibel, Michael A. [Earlham College; Tomkins, Bruce A [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 {mu}m/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methods determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 {mu}L) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by 8% or more) than the literature values.

  15. Stark effect of excitons in corrugated lateral surface superlattices: effect of centre-of-mass quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Sun

    1998-11-01

    The quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) of excitons in GaAs/AlAs corrugated lateral surface superlattices (CLSSLs) is calculated. Blue and red shifts in the exciton energies are predicted for the heavy- and light-excitons in the CLSSLs, respectively, comparing with those in the unmodulated quantum well due to the different effective hole masses in the parallel direction. Sensitive dependence of the QCSE on the hole effective mass in the parallel direction is expected because of the ''centre-of-mass'' quantization (CMQ) induced by the periodic corrugated interfaces of the CLSSLs. The effect of the CMQ on the exciton mini-bands and the localization of the excitons in the CLSSLs is discussed. (author)

  16. Modeling the improvement of ultrafiltration membrane mass transfer when using biofiltration pretreatment in surface water applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netcher, Andrea C; Duranceau, Steven J

    2016-03-01

    In surface water treatment, ultrafiltration (UF) membranes are widely used because of their ability to supply safe drinking water. Although UF membranes produce high-quality water, their efficiency is limited by fouling. Improving UF filtrate productivity is economically desirable and has been attempted by incorporating sustainable biofiltration processes as pretreatment to UF with varying success. The availability of models that can be applied to describe the effectiveness of biofiltration on membrane mass transfer are lacking. In this work, UF water productivity was empirically modeled as a function of biofilter feed water quality using either a quadratic or Gaussian relationship. UF membrane mass transfer variability was found to be governed by the dimensionless mass ratio between the alkalinity (ALK) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). UF membrane productivity was optimized when the biofilter feed water ALK to DOC ratio fell between 10 and 14. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ambient mass spectrometry: From the planar to the non-planar surface analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Cvačka, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2017), s. 31 ISSN 2336-7202. [Mezioborové setkání mladých biologů, biochemiků a chemiků /17./. 30.05.2017-01.06.2017, Milovy] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ambient mass spectrometry * thin layer chromatography * non-planar surface analysis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  18. Mechanical Q-factor measurements on a test mass with a structured surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawrodt, R [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Zimmer, A [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Koettig, T [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Clausnitzer, T [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Bunkowski, A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut) and Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Kley, E B [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Schnabel, R [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut) and Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Danzmann, K [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut) and Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Nietzsche, S [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Vodel, W [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Tuennermann, A [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Seidel, P [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    We present mechanical Q-factors (quality factors) of a crystalline quartz test mass with a nano-structured surface, measured in the temperature regime from 5 to 300 K. The nano-structure was a grating with a period of 2 {mu}m and a depth of about 0.1 {mu}m. Comparative measurements were performed on the plain substrate and on the structured test mass with different numbers of SiO{sub 2}/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} coating layers. The measurements at different stages of the test mass fabrication process show that the surface distortion induced by the nanostructure does not severely lower the mechanical Q-factor of the substrate. Damping due to a multi-layer coating stack was found to be orders of magnitude higher. The results provide vital information concerning the potential usage of low-thermal noise nano-structured test masses in future generations of high-precision laser interferometers and in current attempts to measure quantum effects of macroscopic mirror oscillators.

  19. Study of the interaction of liquid with the surface of mass standards of high accuracy stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Varas, Lautaro; Castro, Claudio S.C.; Cacais, Fabio L.; Pires, Manoel J. M.; Loayza Mendoza, Victor M.

    2011-01-01

    The long term stability of mass standards depends on the interaction between the surface and environment molecules. From this point of view, a study was investigated of the effect on stainless steel surfaces by liquids frequently used in hydrostatic weighing (FC40) and in cleaning procedures of mass standards (isopropyl alcohol). Firstly, mass weighing difference was measured as function of time with a gravimetric method. Additionally, stainless steel samples were analyzed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The standard used for the gravimetric mass difference determination was immersed in FC40. The samples analyzed by XPS were previously immersed in both FC40 and isopropyl alcohol. Mass differences were obtained with an uncertainty of 1 μg when FC40 was used. Preliminary results have suggested that FC40 is not chemically bound to stainless steel surfaces and the mass gain was due to physisorbed molecules on the surface. (author) [es

  20. Implementation of Mass Spectrometry for Bulk Analysis of Environmental and Nuclear Material Inspection Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulyha, S.; Cunningham, A.; Koepf, A.; Macsik, Z.; Poths, J.

    2015-01-01

    In the frame of the ECAS project (Enhancing Capabilities of Safeguards Analytical Services) the IAEA Office of Safeguards Analytical Services has implemented the latest-generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometers, or ICP-MS, for (i) bulk analysis of uranium and plutonium isotopes in environmental inspection samples and (ii) impurity analyzes in uranium samples. The measurement accuracy for n(U-235)/ n(U-238) ratios has been improved by approximately five times with the new multi-collector ICP-MS equipment. Use of modern ICP-MS enabled also an improvement of instrumental detection limits for U-233 and U-236 and Pu isotopes by at least one order of magnitude in comparison to the values, which had been achieved with the previously used methods. The improved accuracy and precision for isotope ratio measurements is mainly due to the higher sensitivity and the possibility to simultaneously detect several U isotopes with a multi-collector detector block. Implementation of the ICP-MS has also demonstrated a possibility for an increased sample throughput. In parallel to the implementation of the ICP-MS, a new version of the ''modified total evaporation'' (MTE) method has been developed for isotopic analysis of uranium samples by multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). The MTE method provides a measurement performance which is, in particular for minor uranium isotopes, by several orders of magnitude superior compared to the commonly used ''total evaporation'' method. The new mass spectrometric techniques significantly improve the capability of the IAEA safeguards laboratories to detect the presence of non-natural uranium and plutonium isotopes in environmental swipe samples and to identify previously imperceptible differences in nuclear ''signatures''. Thus, they enhance the IAEA's ability to obtain independent, timely and quality-assured safeguards-relevant data and ensure

  1. Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Large Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichman, P.B.; Lavely, E.M.; Ritzwoller, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    The general theory of surface NMR imaging of large electromagnetically active systems is considered, motivated by geophysical applications. A general imaging equation is derived for the NMR voltage response, valid for arbitrary transmitter and receiver loop geometry and arbitrary conductivity structure of the sample. When the conductivity grows to the point where the electromagnetic skin depth becomes comparable to the sample size, significant diffusive retardation effects occur that strongly affect the signal. Accounting for these now allows more accurate imaging than previously possible. It is shown that the time constant T 1 may in principle be inferred directly from the diffusive tail of the signal. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  2. Improvement to surface lagging systems in a nuclear reactor, particularly of the fast neutron type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemercier, Guy.

    1979-01-01

    Improvements to surface lagging systems in a nuclear reactor, particularly of the fast neutron kind. This system is composed of an assembly of panels each formed of a stack of metal fabric or trellis held against the surface to be protected, by a double fixing system comprising (a) a tubular component passing through a hole in the panel and applying it against the surface through a bearing plate, and (b) a bolt fitted in the centre of the tubular component, also secured to the surface and holding a washer capable of preventing the fall of the tubular component and the panel should the tubular component fracture [fr

  3. Mass transfer of CO2 to groundwaters from a near-surface waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, F.; Wilkinson, S.R.; Manni, G.; Torok, J.

    1995-01-01

    Gaseous 14 CO 2 originating from buried low-level radioactive wastes (LLRW) in a near-surface disposal site can be released to the environment via two major paths: gas-phase diffusion through soils to the atmosphere, and dissolution in groundwater, followed by aqueous migration. Aqueous migration would give the highest dose to an individual, especially if C-14 was converted to an organic form and ingested. Gaseous diffusion would give a lower dose, largely because of atmospheric dispersion and dilution. The objective of this study was to develop the capability to estimate which of the two paths will likely be dominant for typical near-surface disposal facilities. The main missing parameter for making this estimate was a mass-transfer coefficient (K L ) of 14 CO 2 to groundwaters, which was determined experimentally using a large sand box. The K L thus determined was approximately 10 to 20 times smaller than for an open liquid surface. This suggests that there is a potential resistance to mass transfer, probably caused by the capillary fringe. The value obtained was incorporated into a simple model of CO 2 transport around a typical near-surface disposal site. The model suggests that CO 2 transport via both gaseous release and aqueous migration paths are of similar magnitude for a repository located ∼2 m above the water table. (author). 11 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  4. Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse - CSNSM/Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy, Activity Report 2007-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy (CSNSM) is a CNRS (National Centre for Scientific Research) laboratory affiliated with Paris-Sud University. The CSNSM is involved in pluri-disciplinary activities covering various scientific domains: Nuclear Structure (SNO), Nuclear Astrophysics (AN), Solid State Astrophysics (AS), Solid State Physics (PS) and Chemical Physics of Irradiation. This document presents the activity of the Centre during the 2007-2009 years: Nuclear Astrophysics; Solid State Astrophysics; Physics and Chemistry of Irradiation; Solid State Physics and cryogenic detectors; Solid State Physics, Condensed Matter and Irradiation; Structure of the Atomic Nucleus; Teaching and training activities; Spreading scientific culture; Administrative services; Electronics Group; Computer Department; Mechanics Department; RESET Service (Radiation-Environment-Safety- Maintenance-Work); SEMIRAMIS (ion source and ion beam handling)

  5. Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse - CSNSM/Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy, Activity Report 2010-2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    The Centre for nuclear and mass spectroscopy (CSNSM) is a CNRS (National Centre for Scientific Research) laboratory affiliated with Paris-Sud University. The CSNSM is involved in pluri-disciplinary activities covering various scientific domains: Nuclear Structure (SNO), Nuclear Astrophysics (AN), Solid State Astrophysics (AS), Solid State Physics (PS) and Chemical Physics of Irradiation. This document presents the activity of the Centre during the 2010-2012 years: Nuclear Astrophysics; Solid State Astrophysics; Physics and Chemistry of Irradiation; Solid State Physics Group; Condensed Matter and Irradiation: from fundamental to functional; Structure of the Atomic Nucleus; Teaching activities; Spreading scientific culture; Administrative services; Electronics Group; Computer Department; Mechanics Department; RESET Service (Radiation-Environment-Safety- Maintenance-Work); SEMIRAMIS (ion source and ion beam handling)

  6. Mass balance and surface movement of the Greenland Ice Sheet at Summit, Central Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, C.S.; Keller, K.; Gundestrup, N.S.

    1997-01-01

    During the GRIP deep drilling in Central Greenland, the ice sheet topography and surface movement at Summit has been mapped with GPS. Measurements of the surface velocity are presented for a strain net consisting of 13 poles at distances of 25-60 km from the GRIP site. Some results are: The GRIP...... site is located approximately 2 km NW of the topographic summit; the surface velocity at the GISP 2 site is 1.7 m/yr in the W direction. The present mass balance at Summit is calculated to be -0.03+/-0.04 m/yr, i.e. close to steady state. This result is the best now available for Summit. A small...... thinning rate might be a transient response of the Greenland Ice Sheet due to the temperature increase at the Wisconsin-Holocene transition....

  7. Discussion on the Heat and Mass Transfer Model on the Pool Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Soon-Joon; Choo, Yeon-Jun; Ha, Sang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Heat transfer on the pool surface involves the evaporation and condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensable gas. It is a kind of inter-phase heat transfer. This phenomenon has been regarded as less important on the thermal hydraulic behaviors such as pressure, temperature, hydrogen distribution, and so on in the nuclear reactor containment building. As a matter of fact, several RAIs (requests for additional information) during the licensing review of the developed CAP have been presented. And early in 2000s the steam condensation on the water surface of IRWST was a concern of APR1400 design. Such an increased concern is believed because it is a newly adopted system. This study discusses the pool surface heat transfer by reviewing the models of several well-known containment analysis codes, and conducting the sensitivities. This study discussed the pool surface heat transfer. The related models of CAP, GOTHIC, CONTEMPT-LT, and CONTEMPT4 were compared. The sensitivity of heat transfer coefficient for SKN3 and 4 using conventional code CONTEMPT-LT/028-A showed little effect. And the sensitivity of relative humidity and heat transfer area for latent heat transfer shows that CAP locates between GOTHIC and CONTEMPT4/MOD. The sensitivity for sensible heat transfer also shows similar trend. Conclusively, current CAP model of pool surface heat transfer has no fatal defect

  8. Discussion on the Heat and Mass Transfer Model on the Pool Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Soon-Joon; Choo, Yeon-Jun [FNC Tech., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Sang-Jun [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Heat transfer on the pool surface involves the evaporation and condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensable gas. It is a kind of inter-phase heat transfer. This phenomenon has been regarded as less important on the thermal hydraulic behaviors such as pressure, temperature, hydrogen distribution, and so on in the nuclear reactor containment building. As a matter of fact, several RAIs (requests for additional information) during the licensing review of the developed CAP have been presented. And early in 2000s the steam condensation on the water surface of IRWST was a concern of APR1400 design. Such an increased concern is believed because it is a newly adopted system. This study discusses the pool surface heat transfer by reviewing the models of several well-known containment analysis codes, and conducting the sensitivities. This study discussed the pool surface heat transfer. The related models of CAP, GOTHIC, CONTEMPT-LT, and CONTEMPT4 were compared. The sensitivity of heat transfer coefficient for SKN3 and 4 using conventional code CONTEMPT-LT/028-A showed little effect. And the sensitivity of relative humidity and heat transfer area for latent heat transfer shows that CAP locates between GOTHIC and CONTEMPT4/MOD. The sensitivity for sensible heat transfer also shows similar trend. Conclusively, current CAP model of pool surface heat transfer has no fatal defect.

  9. Nuclear momentum distribution and potential energy surface in hexagonal ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Morrone, Joseph; Car, Roberto; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-03-01

    The proton momentum distribution in ice Ih has been recently measured by deep inelastic neutron scattering and calculated from open path integral Car-Parrinello simulation. Here we report a detailed investigation of the relation between momentum distribution and potential energy surface based on both experiment and simulation results. The potential experienced by the proton is largely harmonic and characterized by 3 principal frequencies, which can be associated to weighted averages of phonon frequencies via lattice dynamics calculations. This approach also allows us to examine the importance of quantum effects on the dynamics of the oxygen nuclei close to the melting temperature. Finally we quantify the anharmonicity that is present in the potential acting on the protons. This work is supported by NSF and by DOE.

  10. A desk study of surface diffusion and mass transport in clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    Research into the properties of clays as barrier materials for nuclear waste disposal has led to the realization that they have important transport properties which are relatively insignificant in most other geological materials. Sorption has always been regarded as a purely retarding mechanism, but laboratory experiments over the past decade have indicated that surface diffusion of sorbed cations is a potentially significant transport mechanism in both compacted montmorillonite, and biotite gneiss. The present desk study about these issues was part of the CEC coordinated project Mirage-Second phase, research area Natural analogues

  11. Durable and mass producible polymer surface structures with different combinations of micro–micro hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yu; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tapani A

    2016-01-01

    Extensive studies have been performed with the aim of fabricating hierarchical surface structures inspired by nature. However, synthetic hierarchical structures have to sacrifice mechanical resistance to functionality by introducing finer scaled structures. Therefore, surfaces are less durable. Surface micro–micro hierarchy has been proven to be effective in replacing micro–nano hierarchy in the sense of superhydrophobicity. However, less attention has been paid to the combined micro–micro hierarchies with surface pillars and pits incorporated together. The fabrication of this type of hierarchy may be less straightforward, with the possibility of being a complicated multi-step process. In this study, we present a simple yet mass producible fabrication method for hierarchical structures with different combinations of surface pillars and pits. The fabrication was based on only one aluminum (Al) mold with sequential mountings. The fabricated structures exhibit high mechanical durability and structural stabilities with a normal load up to 100 kg. In addition, the theoretical estimation of the wetting state shows a promising way of stabilizing a water droplet on the surface pit structures with a more stable Cassie–Baxter state. (paper)

  12. Deposition of RuO 4 on various surfaces in a nuclear reactor containment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Joachim; Glänneskog, Henrik; Ekberg, Christian

    2009-07-01

    During a severe nuclear reactor accident with air ingress, ruthenium can be released from the nuclear fuel in the form of ruthenium tetroxide. Hence, it is important to investigate how the reactor containment is able to reduce the source term of ruthenium. The aim of this work was to investigate the deposition of gaseous ruthenium tetroxide on aluminium, copper and zinc, which all appear in relatively large amounts in reactor containment. The experiments show that ruthenium tetroxide is deposited on all the metal surfaces, especially on the copper and zinc surfaces. A large deposition of ruthenium tetroxide also appeared on the relatively inert glass surfaces in the experimental set-ups. The analyses of the different surfaces, with several analytical methods, showed that the form of deposited ruthenium was mainly ruthenium dioxide.

  13. Deposition of RuO{sub 4} on various surfaces in a nuclear reactor containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.holm@chalmers.s [Department of Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Se-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Glaenneskog, Henrik [Ringhals AB, SE-430 22, Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Ekberg, Christian [Department of Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Se-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    During a severe nuclear reactor accident with air ingress, ruthenium can be released from the nuclear fuel in the form of ruthenium tetroxide. Hence, it is important to investigate how the reactor containment is able to reduce the source term of ruthenium. The aim of this work was to investigate the deposition of gaseous ruthenium tetroxide on aluminium, copper and zinc, which all appear in relatively large amounts in reactor containment. The experiments show that ruthenium tetroxide is deposited on all the metal surfaces, especially on the copper and zinc surfaces. A large deposition of ruthenium tetroxide also appeared on the relatively inert glass surfaces in the experimental set-ups. The analyses of the different surfaces, with several analytical methods, showed that the form of deposited ruthenium was mainly ruthenium dioxide.

  14. Calibrating a surface mass-balance model for Austfonna ice cap, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Thomas Vikhamar; Loe, Even; Taurisano, Andrea; Eiken, Trond; Hagen, Jon Ove; Kohler, Jack

    2007-10-01

    Austfonna (8120 km2) is by far the largest ice mass in the Svalbard archipelago. There is considerable uncertainty about its current state of balance and its possible response to climate change. Over the 2004/05 period, we collected continuous meteorological data series from the ice cap, performed mass-balance measurements using a network of stakes distributed across the ice cap and mapped the distribution of snow accumulation using ground-penetrating radar along several profile lines. These data are used to drive and test a model of the surface mass balance. The spatial accumulation pattern was derived from the snow depth profiles using regression techniques, and ablation was calculated using a temperature-index approach. Model parameters were calibrated using the available field data. Parameter calibration was complicated by the fact that different parameter combinations yield equally acceptable matches to the stake data while the resulting calculated net mass balance differs considerably. Testing model results against multiple criteria is an efficient method to cope with non-uniqueness. In doing so, a range of different data and observations was compared to several different aspects of the model results. We find a systematic underestimation of net balance for parameter combinations that predict observed ice ablation, which suggests that refreezing processes play an important role. To represent these effects in the model, a simple PMAX approach was included in its formulation. Used as a diagnostic tool, the model suggests that the surface mass balance for the period 29 April 2004 to 23 April 2005 was negative (-318 mm w.e.).

  15. Analysis of GAA/TTC DNA triplexes using nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, S V Santhana; Cheng, Xun; van Breemen, Richard B; Silks, Louis A; Gupta, Goutam

    2004-11-15

    The formation of a GAA/TTC DNA triplex has been implicated in Friedreich's ataxia. The destabilization of GAA/TTC DNA triplexes either by pH or by binding to appropriate ligands was analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and positive-ion electrospray mass spectrometry. The triplexes and duplexes were identified by changes in the NMR chemical shifts of H8, H1, H4, 15N7, and 15N4. The lowest pH at which the duplex is detectable depends upon the overall stability and the relative number of Hoogsteen C composite function G to T composite function A basepairs. A melting pH (pHm) of 7.6 was observed for the destabilization of the (GAA)2T4(TTC)2T4(CTT)2 triplex to the corresponding Watson-Crick duplex and the T4(CTT)2 overhang. The mass spectrometric analyses of (TTC)6.(GAA)6 composite function(TTC)6 triplex detected ions due to both triplex and single-stranded oligonucleotides under acidic conditions. The triplex ions disappeared completely at alkaline pH. Duplex and single strands were detectable only at neutral and alkaline pH values. Mass spectrometric analyses also showed that minor groove-binding ligands berenil, netropsin, and distamycin and the intercalating ligand acridine orange destabilize the (TTC)6.(GAA)6 composite function (TTC)6 triplex. These NMR and mass spectrometric methods may function as screening assays for the discovery of agents that destabilize GAA/TTC triplexes and as general methods for the characterization of structure, dynamics, and stability of DNA and DNA-ligand complexes.

  16. Surface Energy and Mass Balance Model for Greenland Ice Sheet and Future Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojian

    The Greenland Ice Sheet contains nearly 3 million cubic kilometers of glacial ice. If the entire ice sheet completely melted, sea level would raise by nearly 7 meters. There is thus considerable interest in monitoring the mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Each year, the ice sheet gains ice from snowfall and loses ice through iceberg calving and surface melting. In this thesis, we develop, validate and apply a physics based numerical model to estimate current and future surface mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The numerical model consists of a coupled surface energy balance and englacial model that is simple enough that it can be used for long time scale model runs, but unlike previous empirical parameterizations, has a physical basis. The surface energy balance model predicts ice sheet surface temperature and melt production. The englacial model predicts the evolution of temperature and meltwater within the ice sheet. These two models can be combined with estimates of precipitation (snowfall) to estimate the mass balance over the Greenland Ice Sheet. We first compare model performance with in-situ observations to demonstrate that the model works well. We next evaluate how predictions are degraded when we statistically downscale global climate data. We find that a simple, nearest neighbor interpolation scheme with a lapse rate correction is able to adequately reproduce melt patterns on the Greenland Ice Sheet. These results are comparable to those obtained using empirical Positive Degree Day (PDD) methods. Having validated the model, we next drove the ice sheet model using the suite of atmospheric model runs available through the CMIP5 atmospheric model inter-comparison, which in turn built upon the RCP 8.5 (business as usual) scenarios. From this exercise we predict how much surface melt production will increase in the coming century. This results in 4-10 cm sea level equivalent, depending on the CMIP5 models. Finally, we try to bound melt water

  17. GAMA/H-ATLAS: THE DUST OPACITY-STELLAR MASS SURFACE DENSITY RELATION FOR SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grootes, M. W.; Tuffs, R. J.; Andrae, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Popescu, C. C.; Pastrav, B. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Gunawardhana, M.; Taylor, E. N. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 206 (Australia); Kelvin, L. S.; Driver, S. P. [Scottish Universities' Physics Alliance (SUPA), School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Liske, J. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Seibert, M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Graham, Alister W. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Baes, M. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Baldry, I. K. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Twelve Quays House, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Bourne, N. [Centre for Astronomy and Particle Theory, The School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham University, University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Brough, S. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 296, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Dariush, A. [Physics Department, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); De Zotti, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Dunne, L., E-mail: meiert.grootes@mpi-hd.mpg.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); and others

    2013-03-20

    We report the discovery of a well-defined correlation between B-band face-on central optical depth due to dust, {tau}{sup f}{sub B}, and the stellar mass surface density, {mu}{sub *}, of nearby (z {<=} 0.13) spiral galaxies. This relation was derived from a sample of spiral galaxies taken from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, which were detected in the FIR/submillimeter (submm) in the Herschel-ATLAS science demonstration phase field. Using a quantitative analysis of the NUV attenuation-inclination relation for complete samples of GAMA spirals categorized according to stellar mass surface density, we demonstrate that this correlation can be used to statistically correct for dust attenuation purely on the basis of optical photometry and Sersic-profile morphological fits. Considered together with previously established empirical relationships of stellar mass to metallicity and gas mass, the near linearity and high constant of proportionality of the {tau}{sub B}{sup f} - {mu}{sub *} relation disfavors a stellar origin for the bulk of refractory grains in spiral galaxies, instead being consistent with the existence of a ubiquitous and very rapid mechanism for the growth of dust in the interstellar medium. We use the {tau}{sub B}{sup f} - {mu}{sub *} relation in conjunction with the radiation transfer model for spiral galaxies of Popescu and Tuffs to derive intrinsic scaling relations between specific star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, and stellar surface density, in which attenuation of the UV light used for the measurement of SFR is corrected on an object-to-object basis. A marked reduction in scatter in these relations is achieved which we demonstrate is due to correction of both the inclination-dependent and face-on components of attenuation. Our results are consistent with a general picture of spiral galaxies in which most of the submm emission originates from grains residing in translucent structures, exposed to UV in the diffuse interstellar

  18. Estimation of surface area concentration of workplace incidental nanoparticles based on number and mass concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. Y.; Ramachandran, G.; Raynor, P. C.; Kim, S. W.

    2011-10-01

    Surface area was estimated by three different methods using number and/or mass concentrations obtained from either two or three instruments that are commonly used in the field. The estimated surface area concentrations were compared with reference surface area concentrations (SAREF) calculated from the particle size distributions obtained from a scanning mobility particle sizer and an optical particle counter (OPC). The first estimation method (SAPSD) used particle size distribution measured by a condensation particle counter (CPC) and an OPC. The second method (SAINV1) used an inversion routine based on PM1.0, PM2.5, and number concentrations to reconstruct assumed lognormal size distributions by minimizing the difference between measurements and calculated values. The third method (SAINV2) utilized a simpler inversion method that used PM1.0 and number concentrations to construct a lognormal size distribution with an assumed value of geometric standard deviation. All estimated surface area concentrations were calculated from the reconstructed size distributions. These methods were evaluated using particle measurements obtained in a restaurant, an aluminum die-casting factory, and a diesel engine laboratory. SAPSD was 0.7-1.8 times higher and SAINV1 and SAINV2 were 2.2-8 times higher than SAREF in the restaurant and diesel engine laboratory. In the die casting facility, all estimated surface area concentrations were lower than SAREF. However, the estimated surface area concentration using all three methods had qualitatively similar exposure trends and rankings to those using SAREF within a workplace. This study suggests that surface area concentration estimation based on particle size distribution (SAPSD) is a more accurate and convenient method to estimate surface area concentrations than estimation methods using inversion routines and may be feasible to use for classifying exposure groups and identifying exposure trends.

  19. Estimation of surface area concentration of workplace incidental nanoparticles based on number and mass concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. Y.; Ramachandran, G.; Raynor, P. C.; Kim, S. W.

    2011-01-01

    Surface area was estimated by three different methods using number and/or mass concentrations obtained from either two or three instruments that are commonly used in the field. The estimated surface area concentrations were compared with reference surface area concentrations (SA REF ) calculated from the particle size distributions obtained from a scanning mobility particle sizer and an optical particle counter (OPC). The first estimation method (SA PSD ) used particle size distribution measured by a condensation particle counter (CPC) and an OPC. The second method (SA INV1 ) used an inversion routine based on PM1.0, PM2.5, and number concentrations to reconstruct assumed lognormal size distributions by minimizing the difference between measurements and calculated values. The third method (SA INV2 ) utilized a simpler inversion method that used PM1.0 and number concentrations to construct a lognormal size distribution with an assumed value of geometric standard deviation. All estimated surface area concentrations were calculated from the reconstructed size distributions. These methods were evaluated using particle measurements obtained in a restaurant, an aluminum die-casting factory, and a diesel engine laboratory. SA PSD was 0.7–1.8 times higher and SA INV1 and SA INV2 were 2.2–8 times higher than SA REF in the restaurant and diesel engine laboratory. In the die casting facility, all estimated surface area concentrations were lower than SA REF . However, the estimated surface area concentration using all three methods had qualitatively similar exposure trends and rankings to those using SA REF within a workplace. This study suggests that surface area concentration estimation based on particle size distribution (SA PSD ) is a more accurate and convenient method to estimate surface area concentrations than estimation methods using inversion routines and may be feasible to use for classifying exposure groups and identifying exposure trends.

  20. Central configurations of the collinear three-body problem and singular surfaces in the mass space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Zhifu, E-mail: zxie@vsu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Virginia State University, Petersburg, VA 23806 (United States)

    2011-09-12

    This Letter is to provide a new approach to study the phenomena of degeneracy of the number of the collinear central configurations under geometric equivalence. A direct and simple explicit parametric expression of the singular surface H{sub 3} is constructed in the mass space (m{sub 1},m{sub 2},m{sub 3}) element of (R{sup +}){sup 3}. The construction of H{sub 3} is from an inverse respective, that is, by specifying positions for the bodies and then determining the masses that are possible to yield a central configuration. It reveals the relationship between the phenomena of degeneracy and the inverse problem of central configurations. We prove that the number of central configurations is decreased to 3!/2-1=2, m{sub 1}, m{sub 2}, and m{sub 3} are mutually distinct if m element of H{sub 3}. Moreover, we know not only the number of central configurations but also what the nonequivalent central configurations are. -- Highlights: → Provide a new method to study the degeneracy of number of CC. → Results advanced the understanding of number of central configurations. → Singular mass surface H{sub 3} is given by a direct and simple parametric expression. → The proof only requires some basic knowledge of linear algebra. → The method can be applied to some other collinear n-body problem.

  1. Composite Fermi surface in the half-filled Landau level with anisotropic electron mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippoliti, Matteo; Geraedts, Scott; Bhatt, Ravindra

    We study the problem of interacting electrons in the lowest Landau level at half filling in the quantum Hall regime, when the electron dispersion is given by an anisotropic mass tensor. Based on experimental observations and theoretical arguments, the ground state of the system is expected to consist of composite Fermions filling an elliptical Fermi sea, with the anisotropy of the ellipse determined by the competing effects of the isotropic Coulomb interaction and anisotropic electron mass tensor. We test this idea quantitatively by using a numerical density matrix renormalization group method for quantum Hall systems on an infinitely long cylinder. Singularities in the structure factor allow us to map the Fermi surface of the composite Fermions. We compute the composite Fermi surface anisotropy for several values of the electron mass anisotropy which allow us to deduce the functional dependence of the former on the latter. This research was supported by Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences through Grant No. DE-SC0002140.

  2. Characterization of Nuclear Materials Using Complex of Non-Destructive and Mass-Spectroscopy Methods of Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunova, A.; Kramchaninov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Information and Analytical Centre for nuclear materials investigations was established in Russian Federation in the February 2 of 2009 by ROSATOM State Atomic Energy Corporation (the order #80). Its purpose is in preventing unauthorized access to nuclear materials and excluding their illicit traffic. Information and Analytical Centre includes analytical laboratory to provide composition and properties of nuclear materials of unknown origin for their identification. According to Regulation the Centre deals with: · identification of nuclear materials of unknown origin to provide information about their composition and properties; · arbitration analyzes of nuclear materials; · comprehensive research of nuclear and radioactive materials for developing techniques characterization of materials; · interlaboratory measurements; · measurements for control and accounting; · confirmatory measurements. Complex of non-destructive and mass-spectroscopy techniques was developed for the measurements. The complex consists of: · gamma-ray techniques on the base of MGAU, MGA and FRAM codes for uranium and plutonium isotopic composition; · gravimetrical technique with gamma-spectroscopy in addition for uranium content; · calorimetric technique for plutonium mass; · neutron multiplicity technique for plutonium mass; · measurement technique on the base of mass-spectroscopy for uranium isotopic composition; · measurement technique on the base of mass-spectroscopy for metallic impurities. Complex satisfies the state regulation requirements of ensuring the uniformity of measurements including the Russian Federation Federal Law on Ensuring the Uniformity of Measurements #102-FZ, Interstate Standard GOST R ISO/IEC 17025-2006, National Standards of Russian Federation GOST R 8.563-2009, GOST R 8.703-2010, Federal Regulations NRB-99/2009, OSPORB 99/2010. Created complex is provided in reference materials, equipment end certificated techniques. The complex is included in accredited

  3. Analytic model for surface ground motion with spall induced by underground nuclear tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacQueen, D.H.

    1982-04-01

    This report provides a detailed presentation and critique of a model used to characterize the surface ground motion following a contained, spalling underground nuclear explosion intended for calculation of the resulting atmospheric acoustic pulse. Some examples of its use are included. Some discussion of the general approach of ground motion model parameter extraction, not dependent on the specific model, is also presented

  4. Estimation of the Waste Mass from a Pyro-Process of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Soo; Choi, Jong Won; Choi, Heui Joo (and others)

    2008-04-15

    Pyro-Process is now developing to retrieve reusable uranium and TRU, and to reduce the volume of high level waste from a nuclear power plant. In this situation, it is strongly required for the estimation of expected masses and their physical properties of the wastes. In this report, the amount of wastes and their physical properties are presupposed through some assumptions in regard to 10MTHM of Oxide Fuel with 4.5wt% U-235, 45,000 MWD/MTU, and 5yrs cooling. The produced wastes can be divided into three categories such as metal, CWF(Ceramic Waste Form), and VWF(Vitrified Waste Form). The 42 nuclrides in a spent nuclear fuel are distributed into the waste categories on the their physical and thermodynamic properties when they exist in metal, oxide, or chloride forms. The treated atomic groups are Uranium, TRU, Noble metal, Rare earth, Alkali metal, Halogens, and others. The mass of each waste is estimated by the distribution results. The off-gas waste is included into a CWF. The heat generations by the wastes in this Pyro-Process are calculated using a ORIGEN-ARP program. It is possible to estimate the amounts of wastes and their heat generation rates in this Pyro-Process analysis. These information are very helpful to design a waste container and its quantity also can be determined. The number of container and its heat generation rate will be key factor for the construction of interim storage facilities including a underground disposal site.

  5. Aluminum surface modification by a non-mass-analyzed nitrogen ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Shigeo; Iwaki, Masaya

    Non-mass-analyzed nitrogen ion implantation into polycrystal and single crystal aluminum sheets has been carried out at an accelerating voltage of 90 kV and a dose of 1 × 10 18 N ions/cm 2 using a Zymet implanter model Z-100. The pressure during implantation rose to 10 -3 Pa due to the influence of N gas feeding into the ion source. The characteristics of the surface layers were investigated by means of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron diffraction (TED), and microscopy (TEM). The AES depth profiling shows a rectangular-like distribution of N atoms and little migration of O atoms near the surface. The high dose N-implantation forms c-axis oriented aluminum nitride (AIN) crystallines, and especially irradiation of Al single crystals with N ions leads to the formation of a hcp AlN single crystal. It is concluded that the high dose N-implantation in Al can result in the formation of AlN at room temperature without any thermal annealing. Furthermore, non-mass-analyzed N-implantation at a pressure of 10 -3 Pa of the nitrogen atmosphere causes the formation of pure AlN single crystals in the Al surface layer and consequently it can be practically used for AlN production.

  6. Mass Redistribution in the Core and Time-varying Gravity at the Earth's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Fang, Ming

    2003-01-01

    The Earth's liquid outer core is in convection, as suggested by the existence of the geomagnetic field in much of the Earth's history. One consequence of the convection is the redistribution of mass resulting from relative motion among fluid parcels with slightly different densities. This time dependent mass redistribution inside the core produces a small perturbation on the gravity field of the Earth. With our numerical dynamo solutions, we find that the mass redistribution (and the resultant gravity field) symmetric about the equator is much stronger than that anti-symmetric about the equator. In particular, J(sub 2) component is the strongest. In addition, the gravity field variation increases with the Rayleigh number that measures the driving force for the geodynamo in the core. With reasonable scaling from the current dynamo solutions, we could expect that at the surface of the Earth, the J(sub 2) variation from the core is on the order of l0(exp -16)/year relative to the mean (i.e. spherically symmetric) gravity field of the Earth. The possible shielding effect due to core-mantle boundary pressure variation loading is likely much smaller and is therefore negligible. Our results suggest that time-varying gravity field perturbation due to core mass redistribution may be measured with modem space geodetic observations, which will result a new means of detecting dynamical processes in the Earth's deep interior.

  7. Surface-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry techniques for application in forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinan, Taryn; Kirkbride, Paul; Pigou, Paul E; Ronci, Maurizio; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent analytical technique for the rapid and sensitive analysis of macromolecules (>700 Da), such as peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, and synthetic polymers. However, the detection of smaller organic molecules with masses below 700 Da using MALDI-MS is challenging due to the appearance of matrix adducts and matrix fragment peaks in the same spectral range. Recently, nanostructured substrates have been developed that facilitate matrix-free laser desorption ionization (LDI), contributing to an emerging analytical paradigm referred to as surface-assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) MS. Since SALDI enables the detection of small organic molecules, it is rapidly growing in popularity, including in the field of forensics. At the same time, SALDI also holds significant potential as a high throughput analytical tool in roadside, work place and athlete drug testing. In this review, we discuss recent advances in SALDI techniques such as desorption ionization on porous silicon (DIOS), nano-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) and nano assisted laser desorption ionization (NALDI™) and compare their strengths and weaknesses with particular focus on forensic applications. These include the detection of illicit drug molecules and their metabolites in biological matrices and small molecule detection from forensic samples including banknotes and fingerprints. Finally, the review highlights recent advances in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) using SALDI techniques. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Sequential estimation of surface water mass changes from daily satellite gravimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramillien, G. L.; Frappart, F.; Gratton, S.; Vasseur, X.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a recursive Kalman filtering approach to map regional spatio-temporal variations of terrestrial water mass over large continental areas, such as South America. Instead of correcting hydrology model outputs by the GRACE observations using a Kalman filter estimation strategy, regional 2-by-2 degree water mass solutions are constructed by integration of daily potential differences deduced from GRACE K-band range rate (KBRR) measurements. Recovery of regional water mass anomaly averages obtained by accumulation of information of daily noise-free simulated GRACE data shows that convergence is relatively fast and yields accurate solutions. In the case of cumulating real GRACE KBRR data contaminated by observational noise, the sequential method of step-by-step integration provides estimates of water mass variation for the period 2004-2011 by considering a set of suitable a priori error uncertainty parameters to stabilize the inversion. Spatial and temporal averages of the Kalman filter solutions over river basin surfaces are consistent with the ones computed using global monthly/10-day GRACE solutions from official providers CSR, GFZ and JPL. They are also highly correlated to in situ records of river discharges (70-95 %), especially for the Obidos station where the total outflow of the Amazon River is measured. The sparse daily coverage of the GRACE satellite tracks limits the time resolution of the regional Kalman filter solutions, and thus the detection of short-term hydrological events.

  9. Isospin effects on the system mass dependence of nuclear stopping around the energy of vanishing flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anupriya; Kumar, Suneel

    2014-10-01

    We study the effect of isospin degree of freedom on nuclear stopping throughout the mass range 50 and 350 for two sets of isotopic systems with N/Z ≈ 1.5 and 1.8, as well as isobaric systems with N/Z = 1.0 and 1.4. Analysis is carried out at incident energies below, at, and above the energy of vanishing flow (EVF) using the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. Our findings reveal that nuclear stopping does not show any particular behavior at the EVF. Moreover, system size effects dominate the isospin effects throughout the range of colliding geometry. The Coulomb effects, however, become important at peripheral geometry. The comparative study of the counterbalancing of Coulomb and mean field by removing the nucleon-nucleon collisions and symmetry potential clearly indicates the dominance of nucleon-nucleon cross-section over the Coulomb repulsions. Moreover, the theoretical results presented in this manuscript for the set of reactions can be experimentally verified.

  10. Isospin effects on the system mass dependence of nuclear stopping around the energy of vanishing flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Anupriya; Kumar, Suneel

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of isospin degree of freedom on nuclear stopping throughout the mass range 50 and 350 for two sets of isotopic systems with N/Z ≈ 1.5 and 1.8, as well as isobaric systems with N/Z = 1.0 and 1.4. Analysis is carried out at incident energies below, at, and above the energy of vanishing flow (EVF) using the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. Our findings reveal that nuclear stopping does not show any particular behavior at the EVF. Moreover, system size effects dominate the isospin effects throughout the range of colliding geometry. The Coulomb effects, however, become important at peripheral geometry. The comparative study of the counterbalancing of Coulomb and mean field by removing the nucleon–nucleon collisions and symmetry potential clearly indicates the dominance of nucleon–nucleon cross-section over the Coulomb repulsions. Moreover, the theoretical results presented in this manuscript for the set of reactions can be experimentally verified. (paper)

  11. Determination of uranium from nuclear fuel in environmental samples using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulyga, S.F.; Becker, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    As a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) the environment was contaminated with spent nuclear fuel. The 236 U isotope was used in this study to monitor the spent uranium from nuclear fallout in soil samples collected in the vicinity of the Chernobyl NPP. A rapid and sensitive analytical procedure was developed for uranium isotopic ratio measurement in environmental samples based on inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry with a hexapole collision cell (HEX-ICP-QMS). The figures of merit of the HEX-ICP-QMS were studied with a plasma-shielded torch using different nebulizers (such as an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) and Meinhard nebulizer) for solution introduction. A 238 U + ion intensity of up to 27000 MHz/ppm in HEX-ICP-QMS with USN was observed by introducing helium into the hexapole collision cell as the collision gas at a flow rate of 10 ml min -1 . The formation rate of uranium hydride ions UH + /U + of 2 x 10 -6 was obtained by using USN with a membrane desolvator. The limit of 236 U/ 238 U ratio determination in 10 μg 1 -1 uranium solution was 3 x 10 -7 corresponding to the detection limit for 236 U of 3 pg 1 -1 . The precision of uranium isotopic ratio measurements in 10 μg 1 -1 laboratory uranium isotopic standard solution was 0.13% ( 235 U/ 238 U) and 0.33% ( 236 U/ 238 U) using a Meinhard nebulizer and 0.45% ( 235 U/ 238 U) and 0.88% ( 236 U/ 238 U) using a USN. The isotopic composition of all investigated Chernobyl soil samples differed from those of natural uranium; i.e. in these samples the 236 U/ 238 U ratio ranged from 10 -5 to 10 -3 . (orig.)

  12. Improving Surface Mass Balance Over Ice Sheets and Snow Depth on Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Lora Suzanne; Box, Jason; Kurtz, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Surface mass balance (SMB) over ice sheets and snow on sea ice (SOSI) are important components of the cryosphere. Large knowledge gaps remain in scientists' abilities to monitor SMB and SOSI, including insufficient measurements and difficulties with satellite retrievals. On ice sheets, snow accumulation is the sole mass gain to SMB, and meltwater runoff can be the dominant single loss factor in extremely warm years such as 2012. SOSI affects the growth and melt cycle of the Earth's polar sea ice cover. The summer of 2012 saw the largest satellite-recorded melt area over the Greenland ice sheet and the smallest satellite-recorded Arctic sea ice extent, making this meeting both timely and relevant.

  13. Large scale mass redistribution and surface displacement from GRACE and SLR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, M.; Ries, J. C.; Tapley, B. D.

    2012-12-01

    Mass transport between the atmosphere, ocean and solid earth results in the temporal variations in the Earth gravity field and loading induced deformation of the Earth. Recent space-borne observations, such as GRACE mission, are providing extremely high precision temporal variations of gravity field. The results from 10-yr GRACE data has shown a significant annual variations of large scale vertical and horizontal displacements occurring over the Amazon, Himalayan region and South Asia, African, and Russian with a few mm amplitude. Improving understanding from monitoring and modeling of the large scale mass redistribution and the Earth's response are a critical for all studies in the geosciences, in particular for determination of Terrestrial Reference System (TRS), including geocenter motion. This paper will report results for the observed seasonal variations in the 3-dimentional surface displacements of SLR and GPS tracking stations and compare with the prediction from time series of GRACE monthly gravity solution.

  14. Heat and mass transfer in magnetohydrodynamic Casson fluid over an exponentially permeable stretching surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S.K. Raju

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyzed the flow, heat and mass transfer behavior of Casson fluid past an exponentially permeable stretching surface in presence of thermal radiation, magneticfield, viscous dissipation, heat source and chemical reaction. We presented dual solutions by comparing the results of the Casson fluid with the Newtonian fluid. The governing partial nonlinear differential equations of the flow, heat and mass transfer are transformed into ordinary differential equations by using similarity transformation and solved numerically by using Matlab bvp4c package. The effects of various non-dimensional governing parameters on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are discussed and presented graphically. Also, the friction factor, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are analyzed and presented in tabular form for both Casson and Newtonian fluids separately. Under some special conditions the results of the present study have an excellent agreement with existing studies for both Casson and Newtonian fluid cases.

  15. Ion optics of a new time-of-flight mass spectrometer for quantitative surface analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veryovkin, Igor V.; Calaway, Wallis F.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A new time-of-flight instrument for quantitative surface analysis was developed and constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. It implements ion sputtering and laser desorption for probing analyzed samples and can operate in regimes of secondary neutral mass spectrometry with laser post-ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The instrument incorporates two new ion optics developments: (1) 'push-pull' front end ion optics and (2) focusing and deflecting lens. Implementing these novel elements significantly enhance analytical capabilities of the instrument. Extensive three-dimensional computer simulations of the instrument were conducted in SIMION 3D (c) to perfect its ion optics. The operating principles of the new ion optical systems are described, and a scheme of the new instrument is outlined together with its operating modes

  16. MOIRCS DEEP SURVEY. V. A UNIVERSAL RELATION FOR STELLAR MASS AND SURFACE BRIGHTNESS OF GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Takashi; Kajisawa, Masaru; Yamada, Toru; Akiyama, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Onodera, Masato; Konishi, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    We present a universal linear correlation between the stellar mass and surface brightness (SB) of galaxies at 0.3 -2.0∼-0.8 , in addition to dimming as (1 + z) 4 by the cosmological expansion effect. The brightening depends on galaxy color and stellar mass. The blue population (rest-frame U - V -0.8±0.3 in the rest-V band. On the other hand, the red population (U - V>0) and the massive galaxies (M * >10 10 M sun ) show stronger brightening, (1 + z) -1.5±0.1 . By comparison with galaxy evolution models, the phenomena are well understood by the pure luminosity evolution of galaxies out to z ∼ 3.

  17. Nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal beam-helicity and beam-charge asymmetries in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, Z.

    2009-11-01

    The nuclear-mass dependence of azimuthal cross section asymmetries with respect to charge and longitudinal polarization of the lepton beam is studied for hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons. The observed beam-charge and beam-helicity asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the Bethe-Heitler and deeply virtual Compton scattering processes. For various nuclei, the asymmetries are extracted for both coherent and incoherent-enriched regions, which involve different (combinations of) generalized parton distributions. For both regions, the asymmetries are compared to those for a free proton, and no nuclear-mass dependence is found. (orig.)

  18. Surface acoustic wave nebulization of peptides as a microfluidic interface for mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Scott R; Wilson, Rab; Shaffer, Scott A; Goodlett, David R; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2010-05-15

    We describe the fabrication of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device on a LiNbO(3) piezoelectric transducer for the transfer of nonvolatile analytes to the gas phase at atmospheric pressure (a process referred to as nebulization or atomization). We subsequently show how such a device can be used in the field of mass spectrometry (MS) detection, demonstrating that SAW nebulization (SAWN) can be performed either in a discontinuous or pulsed mode, similar to that for matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) or in a continuous mode like electrospray ionization (ESI). We present data showing the transfer of peptides to the gas phase, where ions are detected by MS. These peptide ions were subsequently fragmented by collision-induced dissociation, from which the sequence was assigned. Unlike MALDI mass spectra, which are typically contaminated with matrix ions at low m/z, the SAWN generated spectra had no such interference. In continuous mode, the SAWN plume was sampled on a microsecond time scale by a linear ion trap mass spectrometer and produced multiply charged peptide precursor ions with a charge state distribution shifted to higher m/z compared to an identical sample analyzed by ESI. The SAWN technology also provides the opportunity to re-examine a sample from a flat surface, repeatedly. The process can be performed without the need for capillaries, which can clog, reservoirs, which dilute the sample, and electrodes, which when in direct contact with sample, cause unwanted electrochemical oxidation. In both continuous and pulsed sampling modes, the quality of precursor ion scans and tandem mass spectra of peptides was consistent across the plume's lifetime.

  19. Strengthening of the nuclear valve sealing surface by laser cladding technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Shihong; Huang Guodong

    1998-07-01

    A 5 kW laser with CO 2 flow transverse for cladding Co-base alloy or Ni-base alloy coat on the austenite matrix of the nuclear valve sealing surface is introduced. The results show that, after the sealing surface of valve is processed by the laser cladding, the coat of 3.0 mm thick can be made with smooth surface. The test and comparison analysis indicate that the structure and all performance have obvious advantages over that of the plasma spurt welding, bead welding and flame welding processing

  20. Application of tomographic techniques to two-dimensional surface analysis using the Harwell nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huddleston, J.; Hutchinson, I.G.; Pierce, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear methods of surface analysis are discussed briefly, and the circumstances are described in which a two-dimensional analysis of the sample surface is desirable to enable the surface composition to be mapped accurately. Tomographic techniques of data manipulation are outlined. Data acquisition in the present case is performed by moving the sample in a defined sequence of positions, at each of which analytical data are gathered by the proton microprobe. The method and equipment are outlined. Data processing leading to the reconstruction of the image is summarised. (U.K.)

  1. Probabilistic fracture mechanics of nuclear structural components: consideration of transition from embedded crack to surface crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagawa, G.; Yoshimura, S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis of aged nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material. New interpolation formulas of three-dimensional stress intensity factors are presented for both embedded elliptical surface cracks and semi-elliptical surface cracks. To investigate effects of transition from embedded crack to surface crack in PFM analyses, one of the PFM round-robin problems set by JSME-RC111 committee (i.e. aged RPV under normal and upset operating conditions) is solved, employing the interpolation formulas. (orig.)

  2. Levels of surface contamination with radioactive materials at workplaces of nuclear research centre at Rez

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoelgye, Z.; Nemcova, I.; Kasikova, M.; Popper, J.; Chysky, J.

    1983-01-01

    A hygiene supervision unit at workplaces of the nuclear Research Institute in Rez monitored on a long-term basis surface contamination with radioactive substances. Surface contamination was found at workplaces with open sources. Of the 4343 monitored places action levels were only exceeded in 13 cases. The obtained data were used for typifying workplaces with the highest level of surface contamination, to determine in certain instances the mechanism of the escape of radioactive substances from insulating facilities and to determine the rate of the spread of the radioactive substance into adjacent non-active workplaces. (author)

  3. Distribution of 137Cs in the Surface Soil of Serpong Nuclear Site

    OpenAIRE

    Lubis, E

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of 137Cs in the surface soil layer of Serpong Nuclear Site (SNS) was investigated by field sampling. The Objectives of the investigation is finding the profile of 137Cs distribution in the surface soil and the Tf value that can be used for estimation of radiation dose from livestock product-man pathways. The results indicates that the 137Cs activity in surface soil of SNS is 0.80 ± 0,29 Bq/kg, much lower than in the Antarctic. The contribution value of 137Cs from the operatio...

  4. Standard test methods for chemical and mass spectrometric analysis of nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) powder

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical and mass spectrometric analysis of nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide powders to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Carbon by Direct CombustionThermal Conductivity C1408 Test Method for Carbon (Total) in Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets By Direct Combustion-Infrared Detection Method Total Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis Ion Selective Electrode C1502 Test Method for Determination of Total Chlorine and Fluorine in Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinium Oxide Loss of Weight on Ignition 7-13 Sulfur by CombustionIodometric Titration Impurity Elements by a Spark-Source Mass Spectrographic C761 Test Methods for Chemical, Mass Spectrometric, Spectrochemical,Nuclear, and Radiochemical Analysis of Uranium Hexafluoride C1287 Test Method for Determination of Impurities In Uranium Dioxide By Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Gadolinium Content in Gadolinium Oxid...

  5. Radionuclide mass inventory, activity, decay heat, and dose rate parametric data for TRIGA spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterbentz, J.W.

    1997-03-01

    Parametric burnup calculations are performed to estimate radionuclide isotopic mass and activity concentrations for four different Training, Research, and Isotope General Atomics (TRIGA) nuclear reactor fuel element types: (1) Aluminum-clad standard, (2) Stainless Steel-clad standard, (3) High-enrichment Fuel Life Improvement Program (FLIP), and (4) Low-enrichment Fuel Life Improvement Program (FLIP-LEU-1). Parametric activity data are tabulated for 145 important radionuclides that can be used to generate gamma-ray emission source terms or provide mass quantity estimates as a function of decay time. Fuel element decay heats and dose rates are also presented parametrically as a function of burnup and decay time. Dose rates are given at the fuel element midplane for contact, 3.0-feet, and 3.0-meter detector locations in air. The data herein are estimates based on specially derived Beginning-of-Life (BOL) neutron cross sections using geometrically-explicit TRIGA reactor core models. The calculated parametric data should represent good estimates relative to actual values, although no experimental data were available for direct comparison and validation. However, because the cross sections were not updated as a function of burnup, the actinide concentrations may deviate from the actual values at the higher burnups

  6. Very fast isotopic and mass balance calculations used for strategic planing of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marguet, S.D.

    1993-01-01

    Owing to the prevalence in France of nuclear generated electricity, the french utility, EDF focuses much research on fuel cycle strategy. In this context, analysis of scenarios combining problems related to planning and economics, but also reactor physics, necessitate a relatively thorough understanding of fuel response to irradiation. The main purpose of the fuel strategy program codes is to predict mass balance modifications with time for the main actinides involved in the cycle, including the minor actinides associated with the current back end fuel cycle key issues. Considering the large number of calculations performed by a strategy code in an iterative process covering a range of about a hundred years, it was important to develop basic computation modules for both the ''reactor'' and ''fabrication'' items. These had to be high speed routines, but on an accuracy level compatible with the strategy code efficiency. At the end of 1992, the EDF Research and Development Division (EDF/DER) developed a very simple, extremely fast method of calculating transuranian isotope masses. This approach, which resulted in the STRAPONTIN software, considerably increased the scope of the EDF/DER fuel strategy code TIRELIRE without undue impairment of machine time requirements for a scenario. (author). 2 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs

  7. Nuclear Gas Dynamics of NGC2110: A Black Hole Offset from the Host Galaxy Mass Center?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, C. G.; Ferruit, P.; Nagar, N.; Wilson, A. S.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the central regions of many galaxies are unlikely to be in a static steady state, with instabilities caused by sinking satellites, the influence of a supermassive black hole or residuals of galaxy formation, resulting in the nuclear black hole orbiting the galaxy center. The observational signature of such an orbiting black hole is an offset of the active nucleus (AGN) from the kinematic center defined by the galaxy rotation curve. This orbital motion may provide fuel for the AGN, as the hole 'grazes' on the ISM, and bent radio jets, due to the motion of their source. The early type (E/SO) Seyfert galaxy, NGC2210, with its striking twin, 'S'-shaped radio jets, is a unique and valuable test case for the offset-nucleus phenomenon since, despite its remarkably normal rotation curve, its kinematically-measured mass center is displaced both spatially (260 pc) and kinematically (170 km/s) from the active nucleus located in optical and radio studies. However, the central kinematics, where the rotation curve rises most steeply, have been inaccessible with ground-based resolutions. We present new, high resolution WFPC2 imaging and long-slit STIS spectroscopy of the central 300 pc of NGC2110. We discuss the structure and kinematics of gas moving in the galactic potential on subarcsecond scales and the reality of the offset between the black hole and the galaxy mass center.

  8. Data acquisition and processing system for surface ionization mass spectrometers (types MS5 and R20)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, J.-C.; Retali, G.; Grandcollot, P.; Hagemann, R.

    1977-01-01

    The data acquisition and processing system developed for surface ionization mass spectrometers is described. The main interest of the system is to shorten significantly the duration of isotopic analysis, the results of which are printed almost immediately after the end of the acquisition of the data. The quality of the results is also improved, particularly for isotopes at low concentration owing to an automatic range selection unit driven by the computer. The processing program, which includes several options, is adapted to all types of isotopic analysis. This system, in use for more than two years, has demonstrated its versatility and its safety [fr

  9. A coupled mass transfer and surface complexation model for uranium (VI) removal from wastewaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenhart, J.; Figueroa, L.A.; Honeyman, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    A remediation technique has been developed for removing uranium (VI) from complex contaminated groundwater using flake chitin as a biosorbent in batch and continuous flow configurations. With this system, U(VI) removal efficiency can be predicted using a model that integrates surface complexation models, mass transport limitations and sorption kinetics. This integration allows the reactor model to predict removal efficiencies for complex groundwaters with variable U(VI) concentrations and other constituents. The system has been validated using laboratory-derived kinetic data in batch and CSTR systems to verify the model predictions of U(VI) uptake from simulated contaminated groundwater

  10. Monitoring glacier albedo as a proxy to derive summer and annual surface mass balances from optical remote-sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davaze, Lucas; Rabatel, Antoine; Arnaud, Yves; Sirguey, Pascal; Six, Delphine; Letreguilly, Anne; Dumont, Marie

    2018-01-01

    Less than 0.25 % of the 250 000 glaciers inventoried in the Randolph Glacier Inventory (RGI V.5) are currently monitored with in situ measurements of surface mass balance. Increasing this archive is very challenging, especially using time-consuming methods based on in situ measurements, and complementary methods are required to quantify the surface mass balance of unmonitored glaciers. The current study relies on the so-called albedo method, based on the analysis of albedo maps retrieved from optical satellite imagery acquired since 2000 by the MODIS sensor, on board the TERRA satellite. Recent studies revealed substantial relationships between summer minimum glacier-wide surface albedo and annual surface mass balance, because this minimum surface albedo is directly related to the accumulation-area ratio and the equilibrium-line altitude. On the basis of 30 glaciers located in the French Alps where annual surface mass balance data are available, our study conducted on the period 2000-2015 confirms the robustness and reliability of the relationship between the summer minimum surface albedo and the annual surface mass balance. For the ablation season, the integrated summer surface albedo is significantly correlated with the summer surface mass balance of the six glaciers seasonally monitored. These results are promising to monitor both annual and summer glacier-wide surface mass balances of individual glaciers at a regional scale using optical satellite images. A sensitivity study on the computed cloud masks revealed a high confidence in the retrieved albedo maps, restricting the number of omission errors. Albedo retrieval artifacts have been detected for topographically incised glaciers, highlighting limitations in the shadow correction algorithm, although inter-annual comparisons are not affected by systematic errors.

  11. Enhancement of J estimation for typical nuclear pipes with a circumferential surface crack under tensile load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Doo Ho; Woo, Seung Wan; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Young Jin; Chang, Yoon Suk; Jhung, Myung Jo; Choi, Young Hwan

    2010-01-01

    This paper is to report enhancement of engineering J estimation for semi-elliptical surface cracks under tensile load. Firstly, limitation of the sole solution suggested by Zahoor is shown for reliable structural integrity assessment of thin-walled nuclear pipes. An improved solution is then developed based on extensive 3D FE analyses employing deformation plasticity theory for typical nuclear piping materials. It takes over the structure of the existing solution but provides new tabulated plastic influence functions to cover a wide range of pipe geometry and crack shape. Furthermore, to facilitate easy prediction of the plastic influence function, an alternative simple equation is also developed by using a statistical response surface method. The proposed H 1 values can be used for elastic-plastic fracture analyses of thin-walled pipes with a circumferential surface crack subjected to tensile loading

  12. Enhancement of J estimation for typical nuclear pipes with a circumferential surface crack under tensile load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Doo Ho; Woo, Seung Wan; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Young Jin [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yoon Suk [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Jhung, Myung Jo; Choi, Young Hwan [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    This paper is to report enhancement of engineering J estimation for semi-elliptical surface cracks under tensile load. Firstly, limitation of the sole solution suggested by Zahoor is shown for reliable structural integrity assessment of thin-walled nuclear pipes. An improved solution is then developed based on extensive 3D FE analyses employing deformation plasticity theory for typical nuclear piping materials. It takes over the structure of the existing solution but provides new tabulated plastic influence functions to cover a wide range of pipe geometry and crack shape. Furthermore, to facilitate easy prediction of the plastic influence function, an alternative simple equation is also developed by using a statistical response surface method. The proposed H{sub 1} values can be used for elastic-plastic fracture analyses of thin-walled pipes with a circumferential surface crack subjected to tensile loading

  13. Nanofluidic transport over a curved surface with viscous dissipation and convective mass flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehmood, Zaffar; Iqbal, Z.; Azhar, Ehtsham; Maraj, E.N. [HITEC Univ., Taxila (Pakistan). Dept. of Mathematics

    2017-06-01

    This article is a numerical investigation of boundary layer flow of nanofluid over a bended stretching surface. The study is carried out by considering convective mass flux condition. Contribution of viscous dissipation is taken into the account along with thermal radiation. Suitable similarity transformations are employed to simplify the system of nonlinear partial differential equations into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Computational results are extracted by means of a shooting method embedded with a Runge-Kutta Fehlberg technique. Key findings include that velocity is a decreasing function of curvature parameter K. Moreover, Nusselt number decreases with increase in curvature of the stretching surface while skin friction and Sherwood number enhance with increase in K.

  14. Nuclear structure studies in A∼100 and A∼130 mass regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihotra, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the nuclear structure studies in the mass A∼ 100 and A∼130 regions. The investigations were performed in 98,99 Rh, 99 Pd, 96 Tc, 106,107 In, and 129,131 Cs nuclei near the proton (Z = 50) and neutron (N = 50, 64) shell closures with a view to understand the structural features that result from interplay between single particle and collective degrees of freedom. The nuclei in these regions are characterized by a small quadrupole deformation and soft to gamma deformation at low spins. In order to compare experimental results directly with the theoretical calculations, the experimental spins and level energies have been transformed into the rotating (intrinsic) frame of nucleus. The level schemes have been interpreted in the framework of theoretical model calculations. Configurations assigned to various bands are discussed in the framework of Principal/Tilted Axis Cranking (PAC/TAC) model and the deformed Hartree-Fock and angular momentum projection (PHF) calculations. Level energies and B(M1)/B(E2) ratios have, on the whole, been reproduced for the assigned configurations. Triaxial deformation in these mass regions has been inferred from the observed rotational-alignment frequencies, staggering behavior, M1 reduced transition probabilities and chiral-twin bands. Another important feature observed in these isotopes is the magnetic dipole bands generated through the shears mechanism. Observation of new E1 transitions linking the opposite-parity bands based on the proton/neutron h 11/2 and d 5/2 orbitals (Δl = 3, Δj = 1, Δπ = -1) in 131 Cs and 99 Pd provide fingerprints of possible octupole correlations in these mass-regions. (author)

  15. The creation of the analytical information system to serve the process of complex decommissioning of nuclear submarines (NSM) and surface ships (SS) with nuclear power installations (NPI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terentiev, V.G.; Yakovlev, N.E.; Tyurin, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    Management of the decommissioning of nuclear vessels includes information collection, accumulation, systematisation and analysis on the complex utilization of nuclear submarines and surface ships with nuclear power installations and on treatment of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive wastes. The relevant data on radiation and ecology, science and technology, law and economy, administration and management should be properly processed. The general objective of the analytical information system (AIS) development, described in the present paper, is the efficiency upgrading for nuclear submarine utilization management and decision making. The report considers information provision and functioning principles as well as software/hardware solutions associated with the AIS creation. (author)

  16. SURFACE BRIGHTNESS PROFILES OF DWARF GALAXIES. II. COLOR TRENDS AND MASS PROFILES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Kimberly A. [Penn State Mont Alto, 1 Campus Drive, Mont Alto, PA 17237 (United States); Hunter, Deidre A. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G., E-mail: kah259@psu.edu, E-mail: dah@lowell.edu, E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    In this second paper of a series, we explore the B  −  V , U  −  B , and FUV−NUV radial color trends from a multi-wavelength sample of 141 dwarf disk galaxies. Like spirals, dwarf galaxies have three types of radial surface brightness profiles: (I) single exponential throughout the observed extent (the minority), (II) down-bending (the majority), and (III) up-bending. We find that the colors of (1) Type I dwarfs generally become redder with increasing radius, unlike spirals which have a blueing trend that flattens beyond ∼1.5 disk scale lengths, (2) Type II dwarfs come in six different “flavors,” one of which mimics the “U” shape of spirals, and (3) Type III dwarfs have a stretched “S” shape where the central colors are flattish, become steeply redder toward the surface brightness break, then remain roughly constant beyond, which is similar to spiral Type III color profiles, but without the central outward bluing. Faint (−9 >  M{sub B}  > −14) Type II dwarfs tend to have continuously red or “U” shaped colors and steeper color slopes than bright (−14 >  M{sub B}  > −19) Type II dwarfs, which additionally have colors that become bluer or remain constant with increasing radius. Sm dwarfs and BCDs tend to have at least some blue and red radial color trend, respectively. Additionally, we determine stellar surface mass density (Σ) profiles and use them to show that the break in Σ generally remains in Type II dwarfs (unlike Type II spirals) but generally disappears in Type III dwarfs (unlike Type III spirals). Moreover, the break in Σ is strong, intermediate, and weak in faint dwarfs, bright dwarfs, and spirals, respectively, indicating that Σ may straighten with increasing galaxy mass. Finally, the average stellar surface mass density at the surface brightness break is roughly 1−2  M {sub ⊙} pc{sup −2} for Type II dwarfs but higher at 5.9  M {sub ⊙} pc{sup −2} or 27  M {sub ⊙} pc{sup −2} for

  17. Atmospheric summer teleconnections and Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass variations: insights from MERRA-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Schubert, Siegfried D; Molod, Andrea M; Cullather, Richard I; Zhao, Bin; Nowicki, Sophie M J; Lee, Jae N; Velicogna, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between leading atmospheric teleconnection patterns and Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) temperature, precipitation, and surface mass balance (SMB) are investigated for the last 36 summers (1979–2014) based on Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications version 2 reanalyses. The results indicate that the negative phase of both the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Arctic Oscillation, associated with warm and dry conditions for the GrIS, lead to SMB decreases within 0–1 months. Furthermore, the positive phase of the East Atlantic (EA) pattern often lags the negative NAO, reflecting a dynamical linkage between these modes that acts to further enhance the warm and dry conditions over the GrIS, leading to a favorable environment for enhanced surface mass loss. The development of a strong negative NAO in combination with a strong positive EA in recent years leads to significantly larger GrIS warming compared to when the negative NAO occurs in combination with a negative or weak positive EA (0.69 K versus 0.13 K anomaly). During 2009 and 2011, weakened (as compared to conditions during the severe surface melt cases of 2010 and 2012) local high pressure blocking produced colder northerly flow over the GrIS inhibiting warming despite the occurrence of a strong negative NAO, reflecting an important role for the EA during those years. In particular, the EA acts with the NAO to enhance warming in 2010 and 2012, and weaken high pressure blocking in 2009 and 2011. In general, high pressure blocking primarily impacts the western areas of the GrIS via advective temperature increases, while changes in net surface radiative fluxes account for both western and eastern GrIS temperature changes. (letter)

  18. Geologic surface effects of underground nuclear testing, Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, D.N.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents a new Geographic Information System composite map of the geologic surface effects caused by underground nuclear testing in the Yucca Flat Physiographic Area of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The Nevada Test Site (NTS) was established in 1951 as a continental location for testing nuclear devices (Allen and others, 1997, p.3). Originally known as the ''Nevada Proving Ground'', the NTS hosted a total of 928 nuclear detonations, of which 828 were conducted underground (U.S. Department of Energy, 1994). Three principal testing areas of the NTS were used: (1) Yucca Flat, (2) Pahute Mesa, and (3) Rainier Mesa including Aqueduct Mesa. Underground detonations at Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa were typically emplaced in vertical drill holes, while others were tunnel emplacements. Of the three testing areas, Yucca Flat was the most extensively used, hosting 658 underground tests (747 detonations) located at 719 individual sites (Allen and others, 1997, p.3-4). Figure 1 shows the location of Yucca Flat and other testing areas of the NTS. Figure 2 shows the locations of underground nuclear detonation sites at Yucca Flat. Table 1 lists the number of underground nuclear detonations conducted, the number of borehole sites utilized, and the number of detonations mapped for surface effects at Yucca Flat by NTS Operational Area

  19. Determination of long-lived radionuclide (10Be, 41Ca, 129I) concentrations in nuclear waste by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nottoli, Emmanuelle; Bienvenu, Philippe; Labet, Alexandre; Bertaux, Maite; Bourles, Didier; Arnold, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Bethe-Block law (1). (1) dE/dx=(k * Z 2 )/v 2 . The use of a particle accelerator in conjunction with a selective ion source, mass and energy filters and a high-performance detector thus allow unambiguously identifying and measuring analyte concentration against much more abundant interfering isobars. The development of AMS and of related applications have recently been extensively reviewed. Up to now, the potentialities of the accelerator mass spectrometry technique were explored for the measurement of cosmogenic radionuclides produced in the Earth's environment either in the atmosphere or in the Earth's crust (in situ-production). Many applications aiming to date and/or quantify Earth surface processes have been developed in the fields of geology, geomorphology and planetary sciences as well as archaeology paleo-anthropology and biomedicine. The present study extends the scope of AMS to nuclear industry. Because AMS facilities are not widely accessible and difficult to handle, LLRN concentrations in nuclear waste are usually determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and radiometric techniques. However for the measurement of very low LLRN concentrations, AMS becomes the most effective measurement method with detection limits of 10 5 -10 6 atoms per sample. In this study, AMS measurements were performed using the French AMS national facility ASTER located at the Centre Europeen de Recherche et d'Enseignement des Geosciences de l'Environnement (CEREGE). The challenge was to define a chemical treatment procedure allowing the measurement of the three nuclides, 10 Be, 41 Ca and 129 I, by AMS. Each method selection was based on three main requirements: 1) a quantitative recovery in solution of Be, Ca, I and key radionuclides after resin mineralization, 2) a selective extraction from the sample matrix and the separation from β-γ emitters ( 3 H, 14 C, 55 Fe, 59 Ni, 60 Co, 63 Ni, 90 Sr, 125 Sb, 134 Cs, 137 Cs) and isobars, 3

  20. Nuclear microanalysis of 16O and 18O in near-surface regions of solids. Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amsel, G.

    The best suited nuclear technique for 18 O analysis is the direct observation of nuclear reactions. Here, instead of measuring an induced radioactivity, one observes the particles emitted as a result of the O 18 (p,α)N 15 reaction. The α particles which are produced may be detected with surface barrier semiconductor detectors; they present unit detection efficiency and allow one to realize large solid angles of detection, while their energy resolution is excellent. For getting O 18 /O 16 ratios, 16 O must also be measured. This is achieved in a similar way, using the O 16 (d,p) 17 O reaction [fr

  1. Nuclear matter with a pseudo-particle model: static bulk and surface properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idier, D.; Benhassine, B.; Farine, M.; Remaud, B.; Sebille, F.

    1993-01-01

    Direct calculations of cold and hot nuclear matter (bulk and surface properties) are carried out within the frame of a pseudo-particle model using a gaussian decomposition of the distribution function. Comparisons with Hartree-Fock calculations, for a large class of effective interactions, show that such a model is reliable to reproduce accurately the equation of state of nuclear matter for large ranges of densities and temperatures. The number of gaussians per nucleon and the gaussian widths are critical parameters in that semi-classical model. (orig.)

  2. Nuclear matter with pseudo-particle model: static bulk and surface properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idier, D.; Benhassine, B.; Farine, M.; Remaud, B.; Sebille, F.

    1993-12-31

    Direct calculations of cold and hot nuclear matter (bulk and surface properties) are carried out within the frame of a pseudo-particle model using a Gaussian decomposition of the distribution function. Comparisons with Hartree-Fock calculations, for a large class of effective interactions, show that such a model is reliable to reproduce accurately the equation of state of nuclear matter for large ranges of densities and temperatures. The number of Gaussian per nucleon and the Gaussian widths are critical parameters in that semi-classical model. (author) 13 refs.; 9 figs.; 2 tabs.

  3. Nuclear matter with pseudo-particle model: static bulk and surface properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idier, D.; Benhassine, B.; Farine, M.; Remaud, B.; Sebille, F.

    1993-01-01

    Direct calculations of cold and hot nuclear matter (bulk and surface properties) are carried out within the frame of a pseudo-particle model using a Gaussian decomposition of the distribution function. Comparisons with Hartree-Fock calculations, for a large class of effective interactions, show that such a model is reliable to reproduce accurately the equation of state of nuclear matter for large ranges of densities and temperatures. The number of Gaussian per nucleon and the Gaussian widths are critical parameters in that semi-classical model. (author) 13 refs.; 9 figs.; 2 tabs

  4. Nuclear matter with a pseudo-particle model: static bulk and surface properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idier, D. (Lab. de Physique Nucleaire CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. de Nantes (France)); Benhassine, B. (Lab. de Physique Nucleaire CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. de Nantes (France)); Farine, M. (Lab. de Physique Nucleaire CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. de Nantes (France)); Remaud, B. (Lab. de Physique Nucleaire CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. de Nantes (France)); Sebille, F. (Lab. de Physique Nucleaire CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. de Nantes (France))

    1993-11-15

    Direct calculations of cold and hot nuclear matter (bulk and surface properties) are carried out within the frame of a pseudo-particle model using a gaussian decomposition of the distribution function. Comparisons with Hartree-Fock calculations, for a large class of effective interactions, show that such a model is reliable to reproduce accurately the equation of state of nuclear matter for large ranges of densities and temperatures. The number of gaussians per nucleon and the gaussian widths are critical parameters in that semi-classical model. (orig.)

  5. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Glenn Charles [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  6. Re-assessment of recent (2008–2013 surface mass balance over Dome Argus, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghu Ding

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available At Dome Argus, East Antarctica, the surface mass balance (SMB from 2008 to 2013 was evaluated using 49 stakes installed across a 30×30 km area. Spatial analysis showed that at least 12 and 20 stakes are needed to obtain reliable estimates of SMB at local scales (a few hundred square metres and regional scales (tens of square kilometres, respectively. The estimated annual mean SMB was 22.9±5.9 kg m−2 yr−1, including a net loss by sublimation of −2.22±0.02 kg m−2 yr−1 and a mass gain by deposition of 1.37±0.01 kg m−2 yr−1. Therefore, ca. 14.3% of precipitation was modified after deposition, which should be considered when interpreting snow or ice core records produced by future drilling projects. The surface snow density and SMB in the western portion of Dome Argus are higher than in other areas, and these differences are likely related to the katabatic wind, which is strengthened by topography in this sector. A new digital elevation model (DEM of Dome Argus was generated, confirming that both peaks of the dome can be considered as the summit of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Findings from this study should be valuable for validating SMB estimates obtained from regional climate models and DEMs established using remote-sensing data.

  7. Upper limit of the muon-neutrino mass and charged-pion mass from the momentum analysis of a surface muon beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettle, P R [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    Using a surface muon beam and a magnetic spectrometer equipped with a position-sensitive detector, we have measured the muon momentum from pion decay at rest {pi}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}, to be p{sub {mu}{sup +}}=(29.79200{+-}0.00011)MeV/c. This value together with the muon mass and the favoured pion mass leads to an upper limit of 0.17 MeV (90%CL) for the muon-neutrino mass. (author) 4 figs., 5 refs.

  8. Strong orientation dependence of surface mass density profiles of dark haloes at large scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osato, Ken; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Oguri, Masamune; Takada, Masahiro; Okumura, Teppei

    2018-06-01

    We study the dependence of surface mass density profiles, which can be directly measured by weak gravitational lensing, on the orientation of haloes with respect to the line-of-sight direction, using a suite of N-body simulations. We find that, when major axes of haloes are aligned with the line-of-sight direction, surface mass density profiles have higher amplitudes than those averaged over all halo orientations, over all scales from 0.1 to 100 Mpc h-1 we studied. While the orientation dependence at small scales is ascribed to the halo triaxiality, our results indicate even stronger orientation dependence in the so-called two-halo regime, up to 100 Mpc h-1. The orientation dependence for the two-halo term is well approximated by a multiplicative shift of the amplitude and therefore a shift in the halo bias parameter value. The halo bias from the two-halo term can be overestimated or underestimated by up to {˜ } 30 per cent depending on the viewing angle, which translates into the bias in estimated halo masses by up to a factor of 2 from halo bias measurements. The orientation dependence at large scales originates from the anisotropic halo-matter correlation function, which has an elliptical shape with the axis ratio of ˜0.55 up to 100 Mpc h-1. We discuss potential impacts of halo orientation bias on other observables such as optically selected cluster samples and a clustering analysis of large-scale structure tracers such as quasars.

  9. Probing protein surface with a solvent mimetic carbene coupled to detection by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Gabriela E; Mundo, Mariana R; Craig, Patricio O; Delfino, José M

    2012-01-01

    Much knowledge into protein folding, ligand binding, and complex formation can be derived from the examination of the nature and size of the accessible surface area (SASA) of the polypeptide chain, a key parameter in protein science not directly measurable in an experimental fashion. To this end, an ideal chemical approach should aim at exerting solvent mimicry and achieving minimal selectivity to probe the protein surface regardless of its chemical nature. The choice of the photoreagent diazirine to fulfill these goals arises from its size comparable to water and from being a convenient source of the extremely reactive methylene carbene (:CH(2)). The ensuing methylation depends primarily on the solvent accessibility of the polypeptide chain, turning it into a valuable signal to address experimentally the measurement of SASA in proteins. The superb sensitivity and high resolution of modern mass spectrometry techniques allows us to derive a quantitative signal proportional to the extent of modification (EM) of the sample. Thus, diazirine labeling coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) detection can shed light on conformational features of the native as well as non-native states, not easily addressable by other methods. Enzymatic fragmentation of the polypeptide chain at the level of small peptides allows us to locate the covalent tag along the amino acid sequence, therefore enabling the construction of a map of solvent accessibility. Moreover, by subsequent MS/MS analysis of peptides, we demonstrate here the feasibility of attaining amino acid resolution in defining the target sites. © American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2011

  10. Atmospheric river impacts on Greenland Ice Sheet surface melt and mass balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, K.; Mote, T. L.

    2017-12-01

    Mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has accelerated during the early part of the 21st Century. Several episodes of widespread GrIS melt in recent years have coincided with intense poleward moisture transport by atmospheric rivers (ARs), suggesting that variability in the frequency and intensity of these events may be an important driver of the surface mass balance (SMB) of the GrIS. ARs may contribute to GrIS surface melt through the greenhouse effect of water vapor, the radiative effects of clouds, condensational latent heating within poleward-advected air masses, and the energy provided by liquid precipitation. However, ARs may also provide significant positive contributions to GrIS SMB through enhanced snow accumulation. Prior research on the role of ARs in Arctic climate has consisted of case studies of ARs associated with major GrIS melt events or examined the effects of poleward moisture flux on Arctic sea ice. In this study, a long-term (1979-2016) record of intense moisture transport events affecting Greenland is compiled using a conventional AR identification algorithm as well as a self-organizing map (SOM) classification applied to integrated water vapor transport (IVT) data from several atmospheric reanalysis datasets. An analysis of AR effects on GrIS melt and SMB is then performed with GrIS surface melt data from passive microwave satellite observations and the Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR) regional climate model. Results show that meltwater production is above normal during and after AR impact days throughout the GrIS during all seasons, with surface melt enhanced most by strong (> 85th percentile IVT) and extreme (> 95th percentile IVT) ARs. This relationship holds at the seasonal scale, as the total amount of water vapor transported to the GrIS by ARs is significantly greater during above-normal melt seasons. ARs exert a more complex influence on SMB. Normal (< 85th percentile IVT) ARs generally do not have a substantial impact on

  11. Controlled Dissolution of Surface Layers for Elemental Analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorge, Susan Elizabeth [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Determining the composition of thin layers is increasingly important for a variety of industrial materials such as adhesives, coatings and microelectronics. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are some of the techniques that are currently employed for the direct analysis of the sample surface. Although these techniques do not suffer from the contamination problems that often plague sample dissolution studies, they do require matrix matched standards for quantification. Often, these standards are not readily available. Despite the costs of clean hoods, Teflon pipette tips and bottles, and pure acids, partial sample dissolution is the primary method used in the semiconductor industry to quantify surface impurities. Specifically, vapor phase decomposition (VPD) coupled to ICP-MS or total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) provides elemental information from the top most surface layers at detection sensitivities in the 107-1010atoms/cm2 range. The ability to quantify with standard solutions is a main advantage of these techniques. Li and Houk applied a VPD-like technique to steel. The signal ratio of trace element to matrix element was used for quantification. Although controlled dissolution concentrations determined for some of the dissolved elements agreed with the certified values, concentrations determined for refractory elements (Ti, Nb and Ta) were too low. LA-ICP-MS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements indicated that carbide grains distributed throughout the matrix were high in these refractory elements. These elements dissolved at a slower rate than the matrix element, Fe. If the analyte element is not removed at a rate similar to the matrix element a true

  12. Extending and refining the mass surface around $^{208}$Pb by high-precision Penning-trap mass spectrometry with ISOLTRAP

    CERN Multimedia

    Herfurth, F; Stora, T; Blaum, K; Beck, D; Kowalska, M; Schwarz, S; Stanja, J; Herlert, A J; Yamaguchi, T

    We propose high-precision mass spectrometry of nuclides around the doubly magic $^{208}$Pb. On the neutron-rich side, we aim to extend the knowledge of Fr, At, Hg, and Au masses to study the robustness of the N = 126 shell closure and to provide mass data necessary for modeling the rapid-neutron-capture process. On the proton-rich side, we aim at high-resolution mass spectrometry of selected Au, At, and Fr isotopes to verify the predicted existence of very low-lying isomeric states. The proposal will make use of newly-available laser-ionization schemes for Au and At. Finally, the recently implemented multi-reflection time-of-flight mass separator for auxiliary isobaric purification now allows measurements which were not feasible before.

  13. PACTOLUS, Nuclear Power Plant Cost and Economics by Discounted Cash Flow Method. CLOTHO, Mass Flow Data Calculation for Program PACTOLUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffner, D.R.

    1976-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: PACTOLUS is a code for computing nuclear power costs using the discounted cash flow method. The cash flows are generated from input unit costs, time schedules and burnup data. CLOTHO calculates and communicates to PACTOLUS mass flow data to match a specified load factor history. 2 - Method of solution: Plant lifetime power costs are calculated using the discounted cash flow method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 40 annual time periods into which all costs and mass flows are accumulated, 20 isotopic mass flows charged into and discharged from the reactor model

  14. Actinide Isotope Ratios Measured by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Optimization of Ionization Schemes and Demonstration Using Nuclear Fallout

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    9 2. The Time -Dependent Schrödinger Equation ............................12 3. Stimulated Excitation to Bound States...response, including the time for reviewing instruction, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and...SNM Special Nuclear Material TDC Time to Digital Converter Ti:Saph Titanium Sapphire TOF-MS Time -of-Flight Mass Spectrometry xvi THIS

  15. Measuring the strangeness content of the nucleon by observing the ϕ-meson mass shift in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubler, Philipp; Ohtani, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    The modification of the ϕ-meson at finite density is studied by using QCD sum rules in combination with the maximum entropy method. As a result, it is found that the mass shift of the ϕ-meson is strongly correlated to the strangeness content of the nucleon, , which governs the depletion of the strange quark condensate in nuclear matter. (author)

  16. Interactions of RuO4(g) with different surfaces in nuclear reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, J.; Glaenneskog, H.; Ekberg, C.

    2008-07-01

    During a severe nuclear reactor accident with air ingress, ruthenium in the form of RuO4 can be released from the nuclear fuel. Hence, it is important to investigate how the reactor containment is able to reduce the source term of ruthenium. This work has investigated the distribution of RuO4 between an aqueous and gaseous phase in the temperature interval of 20-50 deg. C by on-line measurements with an experimental set-up made of glass. The experiments showed that RuO4 is almost immediately distributed in the aqueous phase after its introduction in the set-up in the entire temperature interval. However, the deposition of ruthenium on the glass surfaces in the system was significant. The speciation of the ruthenium on the glass surfaces was studied by SEM-EDX and ESCA and was determined to be the expected RuO2. Experiments of interactions between gaseous ruthenium tetroxide and the metals aluminium, copper and zinc have been investigated. The metals were treated by RuO4 (g) at room temperature and analyzed with ESCA, SEM and XRD. The analyses show that the black ruthenium deposits on the metal surfaces were RuO2, i.e. the RuO4 (g) has been transformed on the metal surfaces to RuO2(s). The analyses showed also that there was a significant deposition of ruthenium tetroxide especially on the copper and zinc samples. Aluminium has a lower ability to deposit gaseous ruthenium tetroxide than the other metals. The conclusion that can be made from the results is that surfaces in nuclear reactor containments will likely reduce the source term in the case of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant. (au)

  17. Analysis of the behavior of tubular-type equipment for nuclear waste treatment: sensitivities of the parameters affecting mass transfer yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae Hyung; Lee, Byung Jik; Shim, Joon Bo; Kim, Eung Ho

    2007-01-01

    It was intended in this study to investigate the effects of various parameters on the chemical reaction or mass transfer yield in a tubular-type nuclear waste treatment equipment. Since such equipment. as a tubular reactor, multistage solvent extractor, and adsorption column, accompany chemical reaction or mass transfer along the fluid-flowing direction, mathematical modeling for each equipment was carried out first. Then their behaviors of the chemical reaction or mass transfer were predicted through computer simulations. The inherent major parameters for each equipment were chosen and their sensitivities affecting the reaction or mass transfer yield were analyzed. For the tubular reactor, the effects of axial diffusion coefficient and reaction rate constant on the reaction yield were investigated. As for the multistage solvent extractor, the back mixing of continuous phase and the distribution coefficient between fluid and solvent were considered as the major parameters affecting the extraction yield as well as concentration profiles throughout the axial direction of the extractor. For the adsorption column, the equilibrium constant between fluid and adsorbent surface. and the overall mass transfer coefficient between the two phases were taken as the major factors that affect the adsorption rate

  18. UO2 Fuel pellet impurities, pellet surface roughness and n(18O)/n(16O) ratios, applied to nuclear forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajo, L.

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade, law enforcement has faced the problem of illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. Nuclear forensic science is a new branch of science that enables the identification of seized nuclear material. The identification is not based on a fixed scheme, but further identification parameters are decided based on previous identification results. The analysis is carried out by using traditional analysis methods and applying modern measurement technology. The parameters are generally not unambiguous and not self-explanatory. In order to have a full picture about the origin of seized samples, several identification parameters should be used together and the measured data should be compared to corresponding data from known sources. A nuclear material database containing data from several fabrication plants is installed for the purpose. In this thesis the use of UO 2 fabrication plant specific parameters, fuel impurities, fuel pellet surface roughness and oxygen isotopic ratio in UO 2 were investigated for identification purposes in nuclear forensic science. The potential use of these parameters as 'fingerprints' is discussed for identification purposes of seized nuclear materials. Impurities of the fuel material vary slightly according to the fabrication method employed and a plant environment. Here the impurities of the seized UO 2 were used in order to have some clues about the origin of the fuel material by comparing a measured data to nuclear database information. More certainty in the identification was gained by surface roughness of the UO 2 fuel pellets, measured by mechanical surface profilometry. Categories in surface roughness between a different fuel element type and a producer were observed. For the time oxygen isotopic ratios were determined by Thermal Ionisation Mass Speckometry (TIMS). Thus a TIMS measurement method, using U 16 O + and U 18 0 + ions, was developed and optimised to achieve precise oxygen isotope ratio measurements for the

  19. Design of a compact thermal ionization mass spectrometer for isotopic ratio measurement of nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, R.K.; Yadav, V.K.; Ravisankar, E.; Nataraju, V.; Gadkari, S.C.

    2017-01-01

    High precision isotope ratio analysis of materials of interest in nuclear and geological applications is carried out by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) technique. One of the important mandates of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has been developing these instruments and several TIMS instruments have been developed and deployed at user sites covering a wide range material of interest relevant to various stages of the nuclear power cycle. The instrument designs for above applications are based on two geometries of magnetic sector ie., 15 cm sector radius and 30 cm sector radius with resolutions as 200 and 400 respectively. There has been a conscious effort to improve the the sensitivity and precision of these models by modifying the designs of the sub-systems. In the recent past, a new ion optical element viz., variable dispersion zoom optics (VDZO) was introduced in the collector system of the standard model with 30cm radius magnet, to increase the dispersion of the ion beams which enabled to fix the locations of the Faraday cups (upto 6 nos.) instead of the conventional movable ones. After establishing the usefulness of VDZO, an attempt is being made to design and develop a 20 cm magnet based TIMS which will have a much smaller foot print compared to the standard 30 cm model and also covers the usual range of elements (viz. Li - U). The ion optical design was optimized using computer simulations with SIMION 7.0 software and subsequently the mechanical design was carried out using Autocad computer software. Some of the details of this new design are presented in this abstract

  20. Assessing modeled Greenland surface mass balance in the GISS Model E2 and its sensitivity to surface albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Patrick; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Koenig, Lora S.; Tedesco, Marco; Moustafa, Samiah E.; Ivanoff, Alvaro; Fischer, Robert P.; Fettweis, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) plays an important role in global sea level change. Regional Climate Models (RCMs) such as the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) have been employed at high spatial resolution with relatively complex physics to simulate ice sheet SMB. Global climate models (GCMs) incorporate less sophisticated physical schemes and provide outputs at a lower spatial resolution, but have the advantage of modeling the interaction between different components of the earth's oceans, climate, and land surface at a global scale. Improving the ability of GCMs to represent ice sheet SMB is important for making predictions of future changes in global sea level. With the ultimate goal of improving SMB simulated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Model E2 GCM, we compare simulated GrIS SMB against the outputs of the MAR model and radar-derived estimates of snow accumulation. In order to reproduce present-day climate variability in the Model E2 simulation, winds are constrained to match the reanalysis datasets used to force MAR at the lateral boundaries. We conduct a preliminary assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated Model E2 SMB to surface albedo, a parameter that is known to strongly influence SMB. Model E2 albedo is set to a fixed value of 0.8 over the entire ice sheet in the initial configuration of the model (control case). We adjust this fixed value in an ensemble of simulations over a range of 0.4 to 0.8 (roughly the range of observed summer GrIS albedo values) to examine the sensitivity of ice-sheet-wide SMB to albedo. We prescribe albedo from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) MCD43A3 v6 to examine the impact of a more realistic spatial and temporal variations in albedo. An age-dependent snow albedo parameterization is applied, and its impact on SMB relative to observations and the RCM is assessed.

  1. Properties of the surface snow in Princess Elizabeth Land, East Antarctica - climate and non-climate dependent variability of the surface mass balance and stable water isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirova, D.; Ekaykin, A.; Lipenkov, V.; Popov, S. V.; Petit, J. R.; Masson-Delmotte, V.

    2017-12-01

    Glaciological and meteorological observations conducted during the past four decades in Princess Elizabeth Land, East Antarctica, are compiled. The database is used to investigate spatial patterns of surface snow isotopic composition and surface mass balance, including detailed information near subglacial lake Vostok. We show diverse relationships between snow isotopic composition and surface temperature. In the most inland part (elevation 3200-3400 m a.s.l.), surface snow isotopic composition varies independently from surface temperature, and is closely related to the distance to the open water source (with a slope of 0.98±0.17 ‰ per 100 km). Surface mass balance values are higher along the ice sheet slope, and relatively evenly distributed inland. The minimum values of snow isotopic composition and surface mass balance are identified in an area XX km southwestward from Vostok station. The spatial distribution of deuterium excess delineates regions influenced by the Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean air masses, with Vostok area being situated close to their boundary. Anomalously high deuterium excess values are observed near Dome A, suggesting high kinetic fractionation for its moisture source, or specifically high post-deposition artifacts. The dataset is available for further studies such as the assessment of skills of general circulation or regional atmospheric models, and the search for the oldest ice.

  2. Examining the decontaminability of surfaces from the beginnings of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, S.

    2003-01-01

    Parallel with the development of nuclear technology in the 1950s, methods of examining the decontaminability of surface materials were elaborated, improved, and partly standardized in many countries. In 1988, ISO 8690 was adopted as an internationally accepted method of examination (technically identical to DIN 25 415, Part 1). A first range of coatings for nuclear applications were compiled from the large number of commercial products available on the market on the basis of the test method developed since 1962 at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center and then at the Karlsruhe Research Center. Subsequently, the continuously improved test method was used to study, in mainly chemically curing two-component coatings, the reduction of gloss by dulling agents and fillers as well as various shades of color. Floor and container coatings were also examined for their resistance to radiation and to chemicals as well as wear. (orig.) [de

  3. Investigation of surface and underground waters about the Blayais nuclear site - 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migeon, A.; Bernollin, A.; Dunand, E.; Barbey, P.; Boilley, D.; Josset, M.

    2011-01-01

    This investigation aims at proposing a first assessment of the impact of releases on surface and underground waters around the Blayais nuclear power station, i.e. the assessment of the (mainly radiological) quality of waters. The report identifies the various pollution sources: old sources (like atmospheric nuclear tests, nuclear accidents), incidents in the Blayais station, and potential sources for the present contamination. Different radionuclides are searched like tritium, carbon 14, gamma radioactivity (from different elements), some beta emitters, radon as well as some chemicals related to the station activity (hydrazine, boric acid, EDTA, lithium, morpholine). Sampling sites are presented (estuary, canals, reservoirs). Radiological and chemical analysis are reported and commented. Significant presence of Tritium and Nickel-63 are noticed

  4. Determination of uranium from nuclear fuel in environmental samples using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulyga, S.F. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Zentralabteilung fuer Chemische Analysen]|[Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk (Belarus); Becker, J.S. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Zentralabteilung fuer Chemische Analysen

    2000-11-01

    As a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) the environment was contaminated with spent nuclear fuel. The {sup 236}U isotope was used in this study to monitor the spent uranium from nuclear fallout in soil samples collected in the vicinity of the Chernobyl NPP. A rapid and sensitive analytical procedure was developed for uranium isotopic ratio measurement in environmental samples based on inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry with a hexapole collision cell (HEX-ICP-QMS). The figures of merit of the HEX-ICP-QMS were studied with a plasma-shielded torch using different nebulizers (such as an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) and Meinhard nebulizer) for solution introduction. A {sup 238}U{sup +} ion intensity of up to 27000 MHz/ppm in HEX-ICP-QMS with USN was observed by introducing helium into the hexapole collision cell as the collision gas at a flow rate of 10 ml min{sup -1}. The formation rate of uranium hydride ions UH{sup +}/U{sup +} of 2 x 10{sup -6} was obtained by using USN with a membrane desolvator. The limit of {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U ratio determination in 10 {mu}g 1{sup -1} uranium solution was 3 x 10{sup -7} corresponding to the detection limit for {sup 236}U of 3 pg 1{sup -1}. The precision of uranium isotopic ratio measurements in 10 {mu}g 1{sup -1} laboratory uranium isotopic standard solution was 0.13% ({sup 235}U/{sup 238}U) and 0.33% ({sup 236}U/{sup 238}U) using a Meinhard nebulizer and 0.45% ({sup 235}U/{sup 238}U) and 0.88% ({sup 236}U/{sup 238}U) using a USN. The isotopic composition of all investigated Chernobyl soil samples differed from those of natural uranium; i.e. in these samples the {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U ratio ranged from 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -3}. (orig.)

  5. Methodology for nuclear magnetic resonance and ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, Akansha

    2014-01-01

    This thesis encompasses methodological developments in both nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The NMR section explores the effects of scalar relaxation on a coupled nucleus to measure fast exchange rates. In order to quantify these rates accurately, a precise knowledge of the chemical shifts of the labile protons and of the scalar couplings is normally required. We applied the method to histidine where no such information was available a priori, neither about the proton chemical shifts nor about the one-bond scalar coupling constants J( 1 H 15 N), since the protons were invisible due to fast exchange. We have measured the exchange rates of the protons of the imidazole ring and of amino protons in histidine by indirect detection via 15 N. Not only the exchange rate constants, but also the elusive chemical shifts of the protons and the coupling constants could be determined. For the mass spectrometry section, the ion isolation project was initiated to study the effect of phase change of radiofrequency pulses. Excitation of ions in the ICR cell is a linear process, so that the pulse voltage required for ejecting ions must be inversely proportional to the pulse duration. A continuous sweep pulse propels the ion to a higher radius, whereas a phase reversal causes the ion to come to the centre. This represents the principle of 'notch ejection', wherein the ion for which the phase is reversed is retained in the ICR cell, while the remaining ions are ejected. The manuscript also contains a theoretical chapter, wherein the ion trajectories are plotted by solving the Lorentzian equation for the three-pulse scheme used for two-dimensional ICR. Through our simulations we mapped the ion trajectories for different pulse durations and for different phase relations. (author)

  6. Fission product nuclear data obtained by use of an on-line mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeder, P.L.; Wright, J.F.; Anderl, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A Spectrometer for On-Line Analysis of Radionuclides (SOLAR) has been installed at a 1 MW TRIGA reactor at Washington State University. Fission product ions from a combination target/ion source located within the thermal column are brought out to a 60 0 magnetic sector mass spectrometer. Surface ionization provides copious beams of Rb + and Cs + ions and less intense beams of Br - and I - ions with negligible contamination by other elements. About 40 fission product nuclides can thus be chemically and physically separated in times of less than 1 second. Past results on independent and cumulative fission yields along with measurements of half-lives of some very neutron-rich nuclides are presented. Current work on delayed-neutron emission probabilities and energy spectra of delayed neutrons from individual nuclides is described. (7 tables, 2 figures) (U.S.)

  7. A 30-year record of surface mass balance (1966-95) and motion and surface altitude (1975-95) at Wolverine Glacier, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Lawrence R.; Trabant, Dennis C.; March, Rod S.

    2004-01-01

    Scientific measurements at Wolverine Glacier, on the Kenai Peninsula in south-central Alaska, began in April 1966. At three long-term sites in the research basin, the measurements included snow depth, snow density, heights of the glacier surface and stratigraphic summer surfaces on stakes, and identification of the surface materials. Calculations of the mass balance of the surface strata-snow, new firn, superimposed ice, and old firn and ice mass at each site were based on these measurements. Calculations of fixed-date annual mass balances for each hydrologic year (October 1 to September 30), as well as net balances and the dates of minimum net balance measured between time-transgressive summer surfaces on the glacier, were made on the basis of the strata balances augmented by air temperature and precipitation recorded in the basin. From 1966 through 1995, the average annual balance at site A (590 meters altitude) was -4.06 meters water equivalent; at site B (1,070 meters altitude), was -0.90 meters water equivalent; and at site C (1,290 meters altitude), was +1.45 meters water equivalent. Geodetic determination of displacements of the mass balance stake, and glacier surface altitudes was added to the data set in 1975 to detect the glacier motion responses to variable climate and mass balance conditions. The average surface speed from 1975 to 1996 was 50.0 meters per year at site A, 83.7 meters per year at site B, and 37.2 meters per year at site C. The average surface altitudes were 594 meters at site A, 1,069 meters at site B, and 1,293 meters at site C; the glacier surface altitudes rose and fell over a range of 19.4 meters at site A, 14.1 meters at site B, and 13.2 meters at site C.

  8. Innovative nuclear technologies based on radiation induced surface activation (RISA). 1. The project overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Kyosuke; Morooka, Shinichi; Hishida, Mamoru

    2004-01-01

    This research of the Innovative nuclear technologies based on Radiation Induced Surface Activation (RISA) is due to start from 2003 and to be ended to 2006, and performed fund by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) Japan. One of the innovative technologies is to develop a high performance corrosion-proof film to prevent the surface of reactor internals from stress corrosion cracking (SCC), the other one is to develop the film for improving the heat transfer performance a high performance of the nuclear fuel rod. Both of these properties are derived under gamma ray irradiation by the RISA effect. This paper reports about the summary of this subsidy enterprise by METI. (author)

  9. Quantification of Hydrogen Concentrations in Surface and Interface Layers and Bulk Materials through Depth Profiling with Nuclear Reaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Markus; Ohno, Satoshi; Ogura, Shohei; Fukutani, Katsuyuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-29

    Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) via the resonant (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C reaction is a highly effective method of depth profiling that quantitatively and non-destructively reveals the hydrogen density distribution at surfaces, at interfaces, and in the volume of solid materials with high depth resolution. The technique applies a (15)N ion beam of 6.385 MeV provided by an electrostatic accelerator and specifically detects the (1)H isotope in depths up to about 2 μm from the target surface. Surface H coverages are measured with a sensitivity in the order of ~10(13) cm(-2) (~1% of a typical atomic monolayer density) and H volume concentrations with a detection limit of ~10(18) cm(-3) (~100 at. ppm). The near-surface depth resolution is 2-5 nm for surface-normal (15)N ion incidence onto the target and can be enhanced to values below 1 nm for very flat targets by adopting a surface-grazing incidence geometry. The method is versatile and readily applied to any high vacuum compatible homogeneous material with a smooth surface (no pores). Electrically conductive targets usually tolerate the ion beam irradiation with negligible degradation. Hydrogen quantitation and correct depth analysis require knowledge of the elementary composition (besides hydrogen) and mass density of the target material. Especially in combination with ultra-high vacuum methods for in-situ target preparation and characterization, (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C NRA is ideally suited for hydrogen analysis at atomically controlled surfaces and nanostructured interfaces. We exemplarily demonstrate here the application of (15)N NRA at the MALT Tandem accelerator facility of the University of Tokyo to (1) quantitatively measure the surface coverage and the bulk concentration of hydrogen in the near-surface region of a H2 exposed Pd(110) single crystal, and (2) to determine the depth location and layer density of hydrogen near the interfaces of thin SiO2 films on Si(100).

  10. GIS surface effects archive of underground nuclear detonations conducted at Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, D.N.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents a new comprehensive, digital archive of more than 40 years of geologic surface effects maps produced at individual detonation sites throughout the Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa nuclear testing areas of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The Geographic Information System (GIS) surface effects map archive on CD-ROM (this report) comprehensively documents the surface effects of underground nuclear detonations conducted at two of the most extensively used testing areas of the Nevada Test Site. Between 1951 and 1992, numerous investigators of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency meticulously mapped the surface effects caused by underground nuclear testing. Their work documented the effects of more than seventy percent of the underground nuclear detonations conducted at Yucca Flat and all of the underground nuclear detonations conducted at Pahute Mesa

  11. 21st century changes in the surface mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet simulated with the global model CESM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizcaíno, M.; Lipscomb, W. H.; Van den Broeke, M.

    2012-04-01

    We present here the first projections of 21st century surface mass balance change of the Greenland ice sheet simulated with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). CESM is a fully-coupled, global climate model developed at many research centers and universities, primarily in the U.S. The model calculates the surface mass balance in the land component (the Community Land Model, CLM), at the same resolution as the atmosphere (1 degree), with an energy-balance scheme. The snow physics included in CLM for non-glaciated surfaces (SNiCAR model, Flanner and Zender, 2005) are used over the ice sheet. The surface mass balance is calculated for 10 elevation classes, and then downscaled to the grid of the ice sheet model (5 km in this case) via vertical linear interpolation between elevation classes combined with horizontal bilinear interpolation. The ice sheet topography is fixed at present-day values for the simulations presented here. The use of elevation classes reduces computational costs while giving results that reproduce well the mass balance gradients at the steep margins of the ice sheet. The simulated present-day surface mass balance agrees well with results from regional models. We focus on the regional model RACMO (Ettema et al. 2009) to compare the results on 20th-century surface mass balance evolution and two-dimensional patterns. The surface mass balance of the ice sheet under RCP8.5. forcing becomes negative in the last decades of the 21st century. The equilibrium line becomes ~500 m higher on average. Accumulation changes are positive in the accumulation zone. We examine changes in refreezing, accumulation, albedo, surface fluxes, and the timing of the melt season.

  12. Detection of submonolayer oxygen-18 on a gold surface by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L S; Kenny, M J; Wieczorek, L [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1994-12-31

    A gold substrate is the preferred solid surface for formation of an organic self-assembled monolayer ( SAM ). Device fabrication process may require the gold film to be exposed to photolithographic processing and plasma treatment prior to molecular assembly. It has been observed that oxygen plasma treatment prevents the formation of SAMs; however, subsequent treatment with an argon plasma allows assembly of the organic monolayers. To understand the mechanisms involved, a plasma containing 98% {sup 18}O was used and the film surface was analysed using the {sup 18}O (p,{alpha}){sup 15}N nuclear reaction. 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  13. Surface localization of the nuclear receptor CAR in influenza A virus-infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Moriyama, Yusuke; Ikari, Akira; Sugatani, Junko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miwa, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Constitutive active/androstane receptor CAR is a member of the nuclear receptors which regulate transcription of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes. CAR is usually localized in the cytosol and nucleus. Here, we found that CAR was localized at the cell surface of influenza A virus (IAV)-infected cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that expression of a viral envelope glycoprotein, either hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA), but not viral nucleoprotein (NP), was responsible for this localization. This report is the first demonstration of CAR at the surface of tissue culture cells, and suggests that CAR may exert the IAV infection mechanism

  14. Detection of submonolayer oxygen-18 on a gold surface by nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielunski, L.S.; Kenny, M.J.; Wieczorek, L. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1993-12-31

    A gold substrate is the preferred solid surface for formation of an organic self-assembled monolayer ( SAM ). Device fabrication process may require the gold film to be exposed to photolithographic processing and plasma treatment prior to molecular assembly. It has been observed that oxygen plasma treatment prevents the formation of SAMs; however, subsequent treatment with an argon plasma allows assembly of the organic monolayers. To understand the mechanisms involved, a plasma containing 98% {sup 18}O was used and the film surface was analysed using the {sup 18}O (p,{alpha}){sup 15}N nuclear reaction. 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  15. Surface Coatings as Xenon Diffusion Barriers for Improved Detection of Clandestine Nuclear Explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Bläckberg, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This thesis investigates surface coatings as xenon diffusion barriers on plastic scintillators. The motivation for the work is improved radioxenon detection systems, used within the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). One type of radioxenon detection systems used in this context is the Swedish SAUNA system. This system uses a cylindrical plastic scintillator cell to measure the beta decay from radioxenon isotopes. The detector cell also acts as a container...

  16. Surface coatings as xenon diffusion barriers on plastic scintillators : Improving Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty verification

    OpenAIRE

    Bläckberg, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    This thesis investigates the ability of transparent surface coatings to reduce xenon diffusion into plastic scintillators. The motivation for the work is improved radioxenon monitoring equipment, used with in the framework of the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. A large part of the equipment used in this context incorporates plastic scintillators which are in direct contact with the radioactive gas to be detected. One problem with such setup is that radioxenon...

  17. Greenland Surface Mass Balance as Simulated by the Community Earth System Model. Part II: Twenty-First-Century Changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vizcaino, M.; Lipscomb, W.H.; Sacks, W.J.; van den Broeke, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the first twenty-first-century projections of surface mass balance (SMB) changes for the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) with the Community Earth System Model (CESM), which includes a new ice sheet component. For glaciated surfaces, CESM includes a sophisticated calculation of energy

  18. Elevation change of the Greenland Ice Sheet due to surface mass balance and firn processes, 1960-2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.; Ligtenberg, S. R M; Noël, B. P Y; Howat, I. M.; Box, J. E.; Mosley-Thompson, E.; McConnell, J. R.; Steffen, K.; Harper, J. T.; Das, S. B.; Van Den Broeke, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Observed changes in the surface elevation of the Greenland Ice Sheet are caused by ice dynamics, basal elevation change, basal melt, surface mass balance (SMB) variability, and by compaction of the overlying firn. The last two contributions are quantified here using a firn model that includes

  19. Detection of surface deformation and ionospheric perturbation by the North Korea nuclear test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S. C.; Lee, W. J.; Sohn, D. H.; Lee, D. K.; Jung, H. S.

    2017-12-01

    We used remote sensing data to detect the changes on surface and ionosphere due to the North Korea nuclear test. To analyze the surface deformation before and after the 6th North Korea (NK) nuclear test, we used Satellite Aperture Radar (SAR) images. It was reported that there were some surface deformation with about 10 cm by the 4th test (Wei, 2017) and the 5th test (Jo, 2017) using Interferometric SAR (InSAR) technique. However we could not obtain surface deformation by the 6th test using InSAR with Advanced Land Observation Satellite 2 (ALOS-2) data because of low coherence in the area close to the epicenter. Although the low coherence can be occurred due to several reasons, the main reason may be large deformation in this particular case. Therefore we applied pixel offset method to measure the amount of surface deformation in the area with low coherence. Pixel offset method calculates the deformation in the directions along track and Line-of-Sight (LOS) using cross correlation of intensity of two SAR images before and after the event for a pixel and is used frequently to obtain large deformation of glacier (e.g. Lee et al., 2015). Applying pixel offset method to the area of the 6th NK nuclear test, we obtained about 3 m surface deformation in maximum. It seems that the larger deformation occurs as the mountain slope is steeper.We then analyzed ionospheric perturbation using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data. If acoustic wave by a nuclear test goes up to the ionosphere and disturbs electron density, then the changes in slant total electron content (STEC) may be detected by GNSS satellites. STEC perturbation has been reported in the previous NK nuclear tests (e.g. Park et al., 2011). We analyzed the third order derivatives of STEC for 51 GNSS stations in South Korea and found that some perturbation were appeared at 4 stations about 20 40 minutes after the test.

  20. Comparative mass spectrometry & nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomic approaches for nutraceuticals quality control analysis: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mohamed A

    2014-01-01

    The number of botanical dietary supplements in the market has recently increased primarily due to increased health awareness. Standardization and quality control of the constituents of these plant extracts is an important topic, particularly when such ingredients are used long term as dietary supplements, or in cases where higher doses are marketed as drugs. The development of fast, comprehensive, and effective untargeted analytical methods for plant extracts is of high interest. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are the most informative tools, each of which enables high-throughput and global analysis of hundreds of metabolites in a single step. Although only one of the two techniques is utilized in the majority of plant metabolomics applications, there is a growing interest in combining the data from both platforms to effectively unravel the complexity of plant samples. The application of combined MS and NMR in the quality control of nutraceuticals forms the major part of this review. Finally I will look at the future developments and perspectives of these two technologies for the quality control of herbal materials.

  1. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  2. Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-05-01

    As part of the Department of Energy's spent nuclear fuel acceptance criteria, the mass of uranium and transuranic elements in spent research reactor fuel must be specified. These data are, however, not always known or readily determined. It is the purpose of this report to provide estimates of these data for some of the more common research reactor fuel assembly types. The specific types considered here are MTR, TRIGA and DIDO fuel assemblies. The degree of physical protection given to spent fuel assemblies is largely dependent upon the photon dose rate of the spent fuel material. These data also, are not always known or readily determined. Because of a self-protecting dose rate level of radiation (dose rate greater than 100 ren-x/h at I m in air), it is important to know the dose rate of spent fuel assemblies at all time. Estimates of the photon dose rate for spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are given in this report

  3. Automatic extraction of discontinuity orientation from rock mass surface 3D point cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianqin; Zhu, Hehua; Li, Xiaojun

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a new method for extracting discontinuity orientation automatically from rock mass surface 3D point cloud. The proposed method consists of four steps: (1) automatic grouping of discontinuity sets using an improved K-means clustering method, (2) discontinuity segmentation and optimization, (3) discontinuity plane fitting using Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC) method, and (4) coordinate transformation of discontinuity plane. The method is first validated by the point cloud of a small piece of a rock slope acquired by photogrammetry. The extracted discontinuity orientations are compared with measured ones in the field. Then it is applied to a publicly available LiDAR data of a road cut rock slope at Rockbench repository. The extracted discontinuity orientations are compared with the method proposed by Riquelme et al. (2014). The results show that the presented method is reliable and of high accuracy, and can meet the engineering needs.

  4. Mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet - a study of ICESat data, surface density and firn compaction modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, L. S.; Simonsen, Sebastian Bjerregaard; Nielsen, K.

    2010-01-01

    ICESat has provided surface elevation measurements of the ice sheets since the launch in January 2003, resulting in a unique data set for monitoring the changes of the cryosphere. Here we present a novel method for determining the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet derived from ICESat...... in estimating the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. We find firn dynamics and surface densities to be important factors in deriving the mass loss from remote sensing altimetry. The volume change derived from ICESat data is corrected for firn compaction, vertical bedrock movement and an intercampaign...... boundary conditions. We find an annual mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet of 210 ± 21 Gt yr-1 in the period from October 2003 to March 2008. This result is in good agreement with other studies of the Greenland ice sheet mass balance, based on different remote sensing techniques....

  5. Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance: evaluating simulations and making projections with regional climate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. L. Rae

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Four high-resolution regional climate models (RCMs have been set up for the area of Greenland, with the aim of providing future projections of Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB, and its contribution to sea level rise, with greater accuracy than is possible from coarser-resolution general circulation models (GCMs. This is the first time an intercomparison has been carried out of RCM results for Greenland climate and SMB. Output from RCM simulations for the recent past with the four RCMs is evaluated against available observations. The evaluation highlights the importance of using a detailed snow physics scheme, especially regarding the representations of albedo and meltwater refreezing. Simulations with three of the RCMs for the 21st century using SRES scenario A1B from two GCMs produce trends of between −5.5 and −1.1 Gt yr−2 in SMB (equivalent to +0.015 and +0.003 mm sea level equivalent yr−2, with trends of smaller magnitude for scenario E1, in which emissions are mitigated. Results from one of the RCMs whose present-day simulation is most realistic indicate that an annual mean near-surface air temperature increase over Greenland of ~ 2°C would be required for the mass loss to increase such that it exceeds accumulation, thereby causing the SMB to become negative, which has been suggested as a threshold beyond which the ice sheet would eventually be eliminated.

  6. Isotope dilution surface ionization mass spectrometry of silver in environmental materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murozumi, M; Nakamura, S; Suga, K [Muroran Inst. of Tech., Hokkaido (Japan)

    1981-03-01

    Surface ionization mass spectrometry has been developed to measure isotopic abundances and concentrations of silver in commercial high-purity metals, environmental materials such as rocks and plants, and /sup 109/Ag and /sup 107/Ag spikes. A minute amount of silver is extracted into a dithizone chloroform solution from a nitric acid solution of above samples. After the silver is back-extracted into 6.0 ml of a 7 mol/l HNO/sub 3/ solution, the solution is evaporated to dryness under the nitrogen atmosphere. Silver nitrate thus formed is dissolved in a mixture of 60 ..mu..l of an 0.003% silica gel suspended water and 5 ..mu..l of a 2% phosphoric acid. An aliquot of this solution is applied to the mass spectrometry using a rhenium single filament as an ion emitter. The proposed method can detect the presence of 10/sup -14/ g of silver on the ion emitter, and measure the /sup 109/Ag//sup 107/Ag isotopic ratio in environmental materials with the accuracy of 0.1 -- 0.2% in the coefficient of variation. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry using a /sup 107/Ag spike has revealed the silver concentration in the environmental standard materials, which were prepared by the National Bureau of Standards, U.S.A. and National Institute of Environmental Studies of Japan, as follows; 27.9 +- 0.2 ppb for the Orchard Leaves and 34.3 +- 0.3 ppb in the Pepper Bush. The determined values of silver in the Granodiorite, JG-1, and Basalt, JB-1 powders made by the Geological Survey of Japan are 25.4 +- 0.4 ppb and 41.3 +- 0.1 ppb respectively. Silver concentration in a coastal sea water sample is found to be at the level of 2.5 +- 0.4 ppt.

  7. The current state and issues regarding communication from the nuclear energy industry to the mass media in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Tatsuro; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The mass media has the potential to effect the utilization of nuclear power in Japan. In most cases journalists contact PR staff of the nuclear energy industry (hereinafter called 'the industry') to collect information about various events of nuclear energy. The industry is always ready to distribute related information and hold a press conference timely when necessary. In terms of the organizational structure for the PR activities each electric power company organizes the PR section in-house. The PR staff provides journalists with information on a daily basis. For the purpose of grasping the mass media's awareness, the author conducted interviews with 22 journalists who had experience in reporting news on nuclear energy subjects. The result showed that the journalists recognized the necessity of nuclear energy. The interviewees suggested that a proper press launch should be needed at just the right time especially in emergency situations and a press release should be more easily understandable. This interview showed that journalists considered the media reports as reflection of citizens' opinion. Most of the journalists realize that the influence of the media coverage should not be negligible and they acknowledge commutation between the two sides is gradually improved compared to before. (author)

  8. Guide for the preparation of applications for special nuclear material licenses of less than critical mass quantities - July 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    This guide describes the type of information needed to evaluate an application for a specific license for receipt, possession, use, and transfer of special nuclear material. It is intended for applicants requesting authorization to possess and use up to 2000 grams of plutonium, total, in the form of sealed plutonium-beryllium neutron sources, and any special nuclear material in quantities and forms not sufficient to form a critical mass. The latter quantities are considered to be 350 grams of contained uranium-235, 200 grams of uranium-233, 200 grams of plutonium (in any form other than plutonium-beryllium neutron sources) or any combination of them

  9. Analysis of supramolecular surface nanostructures using secondary ion mass spectrometry (poster)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halaszova, S.; Velic, D.

    2013-01-01

    Our system consists of host molecules β-cyclodextrin (C 42 H 70 O 35 ), of implemented Iron nanoparticles (guest). Whole supramolecular complex is placed on a gold substrate. In our project we work with monotiolated β-cyclodextrin (C 42 H 70 O 34 S), consisting of seven α-D-1-4 glucopyranose units. Cyclodextrins have been selected deliberately because of their ability to form inclusion complexes .They are also capable of forming structures similar to self-assembly monolayers. To study the formation of these supramolecular surface nanostructures mass secondary ion spectrometry is used. With this technique fragmentation of monotiolated β-cyclodextrin and the presence of the supramolecular complex on a gold surface can be examined. The observed fragments of monotiolated cyclodextrines films can be divided into three groups: Au X H Y S Z , fragments originating from cyclodextrin molecules associated with Au. Fragments as (C 42 H 70 O 34 S)Na + , (C 42 H 70 O 35 )Na + and (AuC 42 H 69 O 34 S)Na + were identified as well as fragments thereof in cationized form with K + . The main objective of the project is a detailed study and preparation of supramolecular nanostructures consisting of complex guest-host monotiolated β-cyclodextrin host-iron), and a gold substrate. (Authors)

  10. Effects of Cable Sway, Electrode Surface Area, and Electrode Mass on Electroencephalography Signal Quality during Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symeonidou, Evangelia-Regkina; Nordin, Andrew D; Hairston, W David; Ferris, Daniel P

    2018-04-03

    More neuroscience researchers are using scalp electroencephalography (EEG) to measure electrocortical dynamics during human locomotion and other types of movement. Motion artifacts corrupt the EEG and mask underlying neural signals of interest. The cause of motion artifacts in EEG is often attributed to electrode motion relative to the skin, but few studies have examined EEG signals under head motion. In the current study, we tested how motion artifacts are affected by the overall mass and surface area of commercially available electrodes, as well as how cable sway contributes to motion artifacts. To provide a ground-truth signal, we used a gelatin head phantom with embedded antennas broadcasting electrical signals, and recorded EEG with a commercially available electrode system. A robotic platform moved the phantom head through sinusoidal displacements at different frequencies (0-2 Hz). Results showed that a larger electrode surface area can have a small but significant effect on improving EEG signal quality during motion and that cable sway is a major contributor to motion artifacts. These results have implications in the development of future hardware for mobile brain imaging with EEG.

  11. Analysis of personal care products on model skin surfaces using DESI and PADI ambient mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Tara L; Green, Felicia M; Faruqui, Nilofar; Gilmore, Ian S

    2011-08-21

    Two ambient ionisation techniques, desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) and plasma assisted desorption ionisation (PADI), have been used to analyse personal care products (PCPs) on fixed fibroblast cell surfaces. The similarities and differences between the two techniques for this type of analysis have been explored in various ways. Here, we show the results of DESI and PADI analysis of individual PCP ingredients as well as the analysis of these as complex creams on model skin surfaces, with minimal sample preparation. Typically, organosiloxanes and small molecules were detected from the creams. A study of the morphological damage of the fibroblast cells by the two ionisation techniques showed that for a less than 10% reduction in cell number, acquisition times should be limited to 5 s for PADI, which gives good signal levels; with DESI, the morphological damage was negligible. The operating parameters for the plasma source were optimised, and it was also found that the parameters could be modified to vary the relative intensity of different ions in the mass spectrum.

  12. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry of polymer surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeson, A.M.

    1997-09-01

    The effects of polymer variables (molecular weight, polydispersity, and tacticity) and sample preparation parameters (film thickness and casting solvent) on ToF SIMS spectra were studied using a series of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polybutyl methacrylate (PBMA) standards. The polymers were extensively characterized by a variety of spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. Films were prepared by solution casting and spin casting methods onto aluminium substrates, which were evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These films were characterized by high- and unit-mass resolution ToF SIMS. To determine the level of spectral repeatability standard errors were calculated using three methods of data analysis (absolute intensity (counts), normalised peak intensities (NPIs), and ion intensity ratios). Molecular weight and film thickness had the greatest influence on the SIMS spectra of PMMA, with the differences being most marked at low molecular weight. This was observed in both total negative ion counts and negative ion intensity ratios. An explanation based on the surface concentration of polymer end groups is presented. From these results an extension to the existing mechanisms of ion formation is postulated, which includes end group cleavage. An ion beam damage study of PMMA showed that molecular weight and film thickness affect negative ion spectra. Extended 'surface lifetime' was seen in thin (spun cast) films when compared to thick (solution cast) films. This effect, which was only observed with 'Low' PMMA, was explained in terms of surface chain mobility. The effect of molecular weight was dramatic and an explanation in terms of different origins of diagnostic ions is presented. Molecular weight affected the SIMS spectra of PBMA. However, it was not possible to draw definitive conclusions, because the end groups in three of the samples were not known. (author)

  13. Global deformation of the Earth, surface mass anomalies, and the geodetic infrastructure required to study these processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusche, J.; Rietbroek, R.; Gunter, B.; Mark-Willem, J.

    2008-12-01

    Global deformation of the Earth can be linked to loading caused by mass changes in the atmosphere, the ocean and the terrestrial hydrosphere. World-wide geodetic observation systems like GPS, e.g., the global IGS network, can be used to study the global deformation of the Earth directly and, when other effects are properly modeled, provide information regarding the surface loading mass (e.g., to derive geo-center motion estimates). Vice versa, other observing systems that monitor mass change, either through gravitational changes (GRACE) or through a combination of in-situ and modeled quantities (e.g., the atmosphere, ocean or hydrosphere), can provide indirect information on global deformation. In the framework of the German 'Mass transport and mass distribution' program, we estimate surface mass anomalies at spherical harmonic resolution up to degree and order 30 by linking three complementary data sets in a least squares approach. Our estimates include geo-center motion and the thickness of a spatially uniform layer on top of the ocean surface (that is otherwise estimated from surface fluxes, evaporation and precipitation, and river run-off) as a time-series. As with all current Earth observing systems, each dataset has its own limitations and do not realize homogeneous coverage over the globe. To assess the impact that these limitations might have on current and future deformation and loading mass solutions, a sensitivity study was conducted. Simulated real-case and idealized solutions were explored in which the spatial distribution and quality of GPS, GRACE and OBP data sets were varied. The results show that significant improvements, e.g., over the current GRACE monthly gravity fields, in particular at the low degrees, can be achieved when these solutions are combined with present day GPS and OBP products. Our idealized scenarios also provide quantitative implications on how much surface mass change estimates may improve in the future when improved observing

  14. Surface behaviour of the pairing gap in a slab of nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldo, M.; Farine, M.; Lombardo, U.; Saperstein, E.E.; Zverev, M.V.; Schuck, P.

    2003-01-01

    The surface behavior of the pairing gap previously studied for semi-infinite nuclear matter is analyzed in the slab geometry. The gap-shape function is calculated in two cases: a) pairing with the Gogny force in a hard-wall potential and b) pairing with the separable Paris interaction in a Saxon-Woods mean-field potential. It is shown that the surface features are preserved in the case of slab geometry, being almost independent of the width of the slab. It is also demonstrated that the surface enhancement is strengthened as the absolute value of chemical potential vertical stroke μvertical stroke decreases which simulates the approach to the nucleon drip line. (orig.)

  15. The dependence of the nuclear charge form factor on short range correlations and surface fluctuation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massen, S. E.; Garistov, V. P.; Grypeos, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of nuclear surface fluctuations on harmonic oscillator elastic charge form factor of light nuclei are investigated, simultaneously approximating the short-range correlations through a Jastrow correlation factor. Inclusion of the surface fluctuation effects within this description, by truncating the cluster expansion at the two-body part, is found to improve somewhat the fit to the elastic charge form-factor of 16 O and 40 Ca. However, the convergence of the cluster expansion is expected to deteriorate. An additional finding is that surface-fluctuation correlations produce a drastic change in the asymptotic behaviour of the point-proton form-factor, which now falls off quite slowly (i.e. as const.q -4 ) at large values of the momentum transfer q

  16. A technique for the geometric modeling of underground surfaces: Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.L.

    1988-03-01

    There is a need within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) project to develop three-dimensional surface definitions for the subterranean stratigraphies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The nature of the data samples available to the project require an interpolation technique that can perform well with sparse and irregularly spaced data. Following an evaluation of the relevant existing methods, a new technique, Multi-Kernel Modulation (MKM), is presented. MKM interpolates sparse and irregularly spaced data by modulating a polynomial trend surface with a linear summation of regular surfaces (kernels). A perspective discussion of MKM, Kriging, and Multiquadric Analysis reveals that MKM has the advantage of simplicity and efficiency when used with sparse samples. An example of the use of MKM to model a complex topography is presented. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Thermal impact of waste emplacement and surface cooling associated with geologic disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Mangold, D.C.; Spencer, R.K.; Tsang, C.F.

    1982-01-01

    The age of nuclear waste - the length of time between its removal from the reactor cores and its emplacement in a repository - is a significant factor in determining the thermal loading of a repository. The surface cooling period as well as the density and sequence of waste emplacement affects both the near-field repository structure and the far-field geologic environment. To investigate these issues, a comprehensive review was made of the available literature pertaining to thermal effects and thermal properties of mined geologic repositories. This included a careful evaluation of the effects of different surface cooling periods of the wastes, which is important for understanding the optimal thermal loading of a repository. The results led to a clearer understanding of the importance of surface cooling in evaluating the overall thermal effects of a radioactive waste repository. The principal findings from these investigations are summarized in this paper

  18. Identification of a probable new adrenergic agonist by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boatto, Gianpiero [Department of Toxicological Chemistry, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Culeddu, Nicola [CNR Biomolecular Chemistry Institute, Sassari (Italy); Testa, Cecilia [IZS della Sardegna, Sassari (Italy); Neri, Bruno [IZS delle Regioni Lazio e Toscana, Rome (Italy); Brambilla, Gianfranco [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Environment Department, Toxicological Chemistry Unit, Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: g.brambi@iss.it; Barbosa, Jorge [LNIV, Lisbon (Portugal); Cruz, Clara [LNIV, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2007-03-14

    In animal production, it is consolidated the synthesis and the illegal use of growth promoters of new generation, able to skip routine screening and confirmatory analysis. In this work it is reported the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and the mass spectrometry identification of a probable new adrenergic drug found in a feed premix. The substance was selectively purified on alpha 1 acid glycoprotein affinity columns; then its structure was first achieved by recording the {sup 13}C NMR spectrum that gave the total number of carbons of the molecule, successively sorted by DEPT experiments into quaternary, CH, CH{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3} groups. However, the complete assignments of all resonances were derived from the bi-dimensional analysis and the crucial indications from the {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C reverse experiments. Further characterisation was performed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation both in positive and negative ion mode, matching the molecular ion and the fragmentation pattern with those of most recently described new adrenergic agonists. After the loss of a ter-butylic group, the structure shows an internal symmetry along with the presence of Chlorine clusters. The proposed formula of the compound, the 8,8'-diamino-9,9'-dichloro-1-terbutyl-1,1',4,4-tetrahydro-5H,5'H-2,2'-bi -1-benzazepine-5,5'-dione, partially resembles that of Zilpaterol for the presence of a heterocyclic ring; Further work is in progress to characterise the structure-activity relationship.

  19. Role of cytogenetic biodosimetry in meeting the needs of a mass casualty radiological/nuclear event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balajee, A.S.; Dainiak, N.

    2016-01-01

    Radiological/nuclear (R/N) terrorism constitutes a potential threat to all nations that can result in significant morbidity and mortality among hundreds of thousands individuals. In addition to the timing and severity of clinical signs and symptoms, individual radiation dose informs risk assessment and mitigation of radiation-associated injuries. The 'gold standard' for individual whole-body radiation dosimetry is the dicentric chromosome assay. The Cytogenetics Biodosimetry Laboratory at REAC/TS is a WHO Collaborating Centre and member of IAEA's RANET that employs DCA, as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization, premature chromosome condensation, and micronuclei assays to assess radiation dose. The quality of dose estimates and standard operating procedures for DCA at REAC/TS have been validated in multiple inter-comparison studies involving CBLs in Asia, Europe, North America and South America. DCA is scalable to meet the needs of a mass casualty R/N incident. The CBL at REAC/TS has made seminal contributions to augment surge capacity for DCA and develop CBLs worldwide through initiatives such as modification of 'Share Point' in 2010 to transmit images of metaphases for simultaneous telescoring; (2) development of an on-line training program for metaphase scoring; (3) proactive participation as a WCC to create ISO standards; and (4) guidance of regulatory agencies to monitor quality of results and SOPs. The precision of dose estimates by DCA can be vastly improved by using a universal calibration curve. With this view, REAC/TS has organized a collaboration with CBLs at Health Canada and Yale University to construct and validate a common calibration curve for gamma rays

  20. Synthesis and purification of some alkyl phenanthrenes and presentation of their infrared, ultraviolet, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persaud, K.

    1965-01-01

    We have carried out the synthesis of: - phenanthrene - its five monomethyl derivatives - three dimethyl derivatives - two trimethyl derivatives. We have then purified these products as well as a certain number of others obtained from various sources. We have been able to obtain in the majority of cases, a purity of 99.5 per cent or over, these figures being obtained by low voltage mass spectrometry. Finally we have recorded the infrared, ultraviolet, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectra of these products for which an atlas has been drawn up. (author) [fr

  1. Detecting unfrozen sediments below thermokarst lakes with surface nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsekian, Andrew D.; Grosse, Guido; Walbrecker, Jan O.; Müller-Petke, Mike; Keating, Kristina; Liu, Lin; Jones, Benjamin M.; Knight, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    A talik is a layer or body of unfrozen ground that occurs in permafrost due to an anomaly in thermal, hydrological, or hydrochemical conditions. Information about talik geometry is important for understanding regional surface water and groundwater interactions as well as sublacustrine methane production in thermokarst lakes. Due to the direct measurement of unfrozen water content, surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a promising geophysical method for noninvasively estimating talik dimensions. We made surface NMR measurements on thermokarst lakes and terrestrial permafrost near Fairbanks, Alaska, and confirmed our results using limited direct measurements. At an 8 m deep lake, we observed thaw bulb at least 22 m below the surface; at a 1.4 m deep lake, we detected a talik extending between 5 and 6 m below the surface. Our study demonstrates the value that surface NMR may have in the cryosphere for studies of thermokarst lake hydrology and their related role in the carbon cycle.

  2. Nuclear analysis of the Chornobyl fuel containing masses with heterogeneous fuel distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turski, R. B.

    1998-01-01

    Although significant data has been obtained on the condition and composition of the fuel containing masses (FCM) located in the concrete chambers under the Chernobyl Unit 4 reactor cavity, there is still uncertainty regarding the possible recriticality of this material. The high radiation levels make access extremely difficult, and most of the samples are from the FCM surface regions. There is little information on the interior regions of the FCM, and one cannot assume with confidence that the surface measurements are representative of the interior regions. Therefore, reasonable assumptions on the key parameters such as fuel concentration, the concentrations of impurities and neutron poisons (especially boron), the void fraction of the FCM due to its known porosity, and the degrees of fuel heterogeneity, are necessary to evaluate the possibility of recriticality. The void fraction is important since it introduces the possibility of water moderator being distributed throughout the FCM. Calculations indicate that the addition of 10 to 30 volume percent (v/o) water to the FCM has a significant impact on the calculated reactivity of the FCM. Therefore, water addition must be considered carefully. The other possible moderators are graphite and silicone dioxide. As discussed later in this paper, silicone dioxide moderation does not represent a criticality threat. For graphite, both heterogeneous fuel arrangements and very large volume fractions of graphite are necessary for a graphite moderated system to go critical. Based on the observations and measurements of the FCM compositions, these conditions do not appear creditable for the Chernobyl FCM. Therefore, the focus of the analysis reported in this paper will be on reasonable heterogeneous fuel arrangements and water moderation. The analysis will evaluate a range of fuel and diluent compositions

  3. Mass media communication of emergency issues and countermeasures in a nuclear accident: Fukushima reporting in European newspapers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego, Eduardo; Cantone, Marie Claire; Oughton, Deborah H.; Tomkiv, Yevgeniya; Perko, Tanja; Prezelj, Iztok

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a large study of 1340 articles published by two major newspapers in six European countries (Belgium, Italy, Norway, Slovenia, Spain and Russia) in the first 2 months after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. The focus of the analysis is on the application and overall impact of protective actions, both during the emergency phase and later, how the newspapers describe those actions, which differences were apparent between countries and what recommendations can be extracted in order to improve general communication about these issues. A clear lesson is that, even under uncertainty and recognising limitations, responsible authorities need to provide transparent, clear and understandable information to the public and the mass media right from the beginning of the early phase of any nuclear emergency. Clear, concise messages should be given. Mass media could play a key role in reassuring the public if the countermeasures are clearly explained. (authors)

  4. Surface analytical investigation of diamond coatings and nucleation processes by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.

    1993-10-01

    Imaging SIMS for the investigation of substrate surfaces: the influence of the substrate surface on diamond nucleation is a major topic in the investigation of the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of diamond. It is well known that the nucleation density can be enhanced by scratching the substrate surface with abrasive powders. Diamond can nucleate at scratches or at residues of the polishing material. In the present work the surface of refractory metals (Mo, Nb, Ta, W) polished with silicon carbide and diamond powder is studied by imaging (2- or 3-D) secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). In first experiments the distribution of SiC and/or diamond residues after polishing was determined. The reaction of diamond with the substrate during heating to deposition temperatures was investigated. Investigation of WC/Co hardmetal substrates: it is well known that Co contained in the binder phase of the hard metal inhibits a strong adhesion between the diamond film and the substrate, which is need for an application as cutting tool. Several attempts to improve the adhesion have been reported up to now. In this work a pre-treatment procedure leading to the formation of Co compounds (borides and silicides) which are stable under diamond deposition conditions were investigated. Furthermore, the application of intermediate sputter layers consisting of chromium and titanium were studied. Investigation of P-doped diamond coatings: in the quaternary phase diagram C-P-B-N exist some phases with diamond structure and superhard phases (e.g BP, c-BN). Also a hypothetical superhard phase of the composition C 3 N 4 is predicted. A scientific objective is the synthesis of such phases by chemical vapour deposition. An increase of the phosphorus concentration effects a distinct change in the morphology of the deposited coatings. A major advantage of SIMS is that the concentration profiles can be measured through the whole film, due to the sputter removal of the sample, and the interface

  5. Electron paramagnetic resonance and dynamic nuclear polarization of char suspensions: surface science and oximetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarkson, R.B.; Odintsov, B.M.; Ceroke, P.J.; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, J.H.; Fruianu, M.; Belford, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon chars have been synthesized in our laboratory from a variety of starting materials, by means of a highly controlled pyrolysis technique. These chars exhibit electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line shapes which change with the local oxygen concentration in a reproducible and stable fashion; they can be calibrated and used for oximetry. Biological stability and low toxicity make chars good sensors for in vivo measurements. Scalar and dipolar interactions of water protons at the surfaces of chars may be utilized to produce dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of the 1 H nuclear spin population in conjunction with electron Zeeman pumping. Low-frequency EPR, DNP and DNP-enhanced MRI all show promise as oximetry methods when used with carbon chars. (author)

  6. Mass effect of redox reactions: A novel mode for surface plasmon resonance-based bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Pei-Xin; Deng, Sheng-Yuan; Xin, Peng; Ji, Xu-Bo; Shan, Dan; Cosnier, Serge

    2015-12-15

    The pursuit of more specific and sensitive response is a perpetual goal for modern bioassays. This work proposed a novel label-free strategy about redox-related mass effect based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique for ultrasensitive determination of DNA. The protocol starts with the modification of SPR gilded disk with the capture DNA (cDNA). After the conjugation of immobilized cDNA with the target DNA (tDNA), the hybridization chain reaction was triggered by the introduction of mutual partial complementary primers to elongate the terminal into a nanoscale duplex. As it is reported that porphyrin could intercalate into the grooves of the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) scaffold, multiple positive-charged Fe(III)meso-tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine (FeTMPyP) with symmetric structure were uptaken for in situ formation of porphyrin-dsDNA complex. Given FeTMPyP a highly efficient catalysis for the peroxide reduction, its presence as a biomimetic cofactor was validated via circular dichroism and UV-vis spectroscopy, demonstrating a tight binding as well as high catalytic activity and stability. Using 4-chloro-1-naphthol as a proton donor, the catalytic reduction of H2O2 would oxidize it into insoluble benzo-4-chloro-hexadienone, which simultaneously deposited on the heterogeneous interface, leading to a significant amplification in both SPR response and topological height profile. The signal increment was proportional to the concentration of tDNA, thus an ultrasensitive SPR-based DNA assay was developed with a linear range over four orders of magnitudes and a sub-femtomolar detection limit of 0.73 fM. The developed methodology exemplifies a different way of thinking about mass-sensing modes, extending conventional SPR-based DNA analysis to relevant biomedical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantitative Thin-Layer Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Caffeine Using a Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Michael J [ORNL; Deibel, Michael A. [Earlham College; Tomkins, Bruce A [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative determination of caffeine on reversed-phase C8 thin-layer chromatography plates using a surface sampling electrospray ionization system with tandem mass spectrometry detection is reported. The thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method employed a deuterium-labeled caffeine internal standard and selected reaction monitoring detection. Up to nine parallel caffeine bands on a single plate were sampled in a single surface scanning experiment requiring 35 min at a surface scan rate of 44 {mu}m/s. A reversed-phase HPLC/UV caffeine assay was developed in parallel to assess the mass spectrometry method performance. Limits of detection for the HPLC/UV and thin-layer chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry methods determined from the calibration curve statistics were 0.20 ng injected (0.50 {mu}L) and 1.0 ng spotted on the plate, respectively. Spike recoveries with standards and real samples ranged between 97 and 106% for both methods. The caffeine content of three diet soft drinks (Diet Coke, Diet Cherry Coke, Diet Pepsi) and three diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape, Speed Stack Fruit Punch) was measured. The HPLC/UV and mass spectrometry determinations were in general agreement, and these values were consistent with the quoted values for two of the three diet colas. In the case of Diet Cherry Coke and the diet sports drinks, the determined caffeine amounts using both methods were consistently higher (by 8% or more) than the literature values.

  8. Review of Global Ocean Intermediate Water Masses: 1.Part A,the Neutral Density Surface (the 'McDougall Surface') as a Study Frame for Water-Mass Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuzhu You

    2006-01-01

    This review article commences with a comprehensive historical review of the evolution and application of various density surfaces in atmospheric and oceanic studies.The background provides a basis for the birth of the neutral density idea.Attention is paid to the development of the neutral density surface concept from the nonlinearity of the equation of state of seawater.The definition and properties of neutral density surface are described in detail as developed from the equations of state of seawater and the buoyancy frequency when the squared buoyancy frequency N2 is zero, a neutral state of stability.In order to apply the neutral density surface to intermediate water-mass analysis, this review also describes in detail its practical oceanographic application.The mapping technique is focused for the first time on applying regularly gridded data in this review.It is reviewed how a backbone and ribs framework was designed to flesh out from a reference cast and first mapped the global neutral surfaces in the world's oceans.Several mapped neutral density surfaces are presented as examples for each world ocean.The water-mass property is analyzed in each ocean at mid-depth.The characteristics of neutral density surfaces are compared with those of potential density surfaces.

  9. Analysis of antithyroid drugs in surface water by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Fernández, Virginia; Marchese, Stefano; Gentili, Alessandra; García, María Ángeles; Curini, Roberta; Caretti, Fulvia; Perret, Daniela

    2014-11-07

    This paper describes development and validation of a new method for the simultaneous determination of six antithyroid drugs (ATDs) in surface waters by using liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Target compounds include two ATD classes: thiouracil derivatives (thiouracil (TU), methyl-thiouracil (MTU), propyl-thiouracil (PTU), phenyl-thiouracil (PhTU)) and imidazole derivatives (tapazole (TAP), and mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI)). Sensitivity and selectivity of the LC-multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) analysis allowed applying a simple pre-concentration procedure and "shooting" the concentrated sample into the LC-MS/MS system without any other treatment. Recoveries were higher than 75% for all analytes. Intra-day precision and inter-day precision, calculated as relative standard deviation (RSD), were below 19 and 22%, respectively. Limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.05 to 0.25 μg/L; limits of quantitation (LOQs) varied between 0.15 and 0.75 μg/L. The validated method was successfully applied to the analysis of ATD residues in surface water samples collected from the Tiber River basin and three lakes of Lazio (central Italy). The analytes were quantified based on matrix-matched calibration curves with mercaptobenzimidazole-d4 (MBI-d4) as the internal standard (IS). The most widespread compound was TAP, one of the most common ATDs used in human medicine, but also TU and MBI were often detected in the analysed samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Modeling of Plutonium Ionization Probabilities for Use in Nuclear Forensic Analysis by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    masses collide, they form a supercritical mass . Criticality refers to the neutron population within the system. A critical system is one that can...Spectrometry, no. 242, pp. 161–168, 2005. [9] S. Raeder, “Trace analysis of actinides in the environment by means of resonance ionization mass ...first ionization potential of actinide elements by resonance ionization mass spectrometry.” Spectrochimica Acta part B: Atomic Spectroscopy. vol. 52

  11. Chemical effluents in surface waters from nuclear power plants. Quarterly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, F.L.

    1978-01-01

    The objectives of this research project are threefold: to obtain data on the behavior of potentially toxic substances introduced into surface waters from nuclear power plants; to determine the magnitude of the impact of these substances on representative and economically important aquatic species; and to develop models with which to predict the partitioning of these substances among the abiotic aquatic compartments. To fulfill these objectives in our investigation of copper, we are determining copper partitioning in marine and freshwater systems, evaluating the toxicity of copper to representative aquatic organisms, and developing a mathematical model to predict copper partitioning

  12. Neutron-Proton Mass Difference in Nuclear Matter and in Finite Nuclei and the Nolen-Schiffer Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakhshiev U.T.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The neutron-proton mass difference in (isospin asymmetric nuclear matter and finite nuclei is studied in the framework of a medium-modified Skyrme model. The proposed effective Lagrangian incorporates both the medium influence of the surrounding nuclear environment on the single nucleon properties and an explicit isospin-breaking effect in the mesonic sector. Energy-dependent charged and neutral pion optical potentials in the s- and p-wave channels are included as well. The present approach predicts that the neutron-proton mass difference is mainly dictated by its strong part and that it markedly decreases in neutron matter. Furthermore, the possible interplay between the effective nucleon mass in finite nuclei and the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly is discussed. In particular, we find that a correct description of the properties of mirror nuclei leads to a stringent restriction of possible modifications of the nucleon’s effective mass in nuclei.

  13. A Preliminary Model for Spacecraft Propulsion Performance Analysis Based on Nuclear Gain and Subsystem Mass-Power Balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Suman; Schmidt, George R.; Thio, Y. C.; Hurst, Chantelle M.

    1999-01-01

    A preliminary model for spacecraft propulsion performance analysis based on nuclear gain and subsystem mass-power balances are presented in viewgraph form. For very fast missions with straight-line trajectories, it has been shown that mission trip time is proportional to the cube root of alpha. Analysis of spacecraft power systems via a power balance and examination of gain vs. mass-power ratio has shown: 1) A minimum gain is needed to have enough power for thruster and driver operation; and 2) Increases in gain result in decreases in overall mass-power ratio, which in turn leads to greater achievable accelerations. However, subsystem mass-power ratios and efficiencies are crucial: less efficient values for these can partially offset the effect of nuclear gain. Therefore, it is of interest to monitor the progress of gain-limited subsystem technologies and it is also possible that power-limited systems with sufficiently low alpha may be competitive for such ambitious missions. Topics include Space flight requirements; Spacecraft energy gain; Control theory for performance; Mission assumptions; Round trips: Time and distance; Trip times; Vehicle acceleration; and Minimizing trip times.

  14. A new method for automated discontinuity trace mapping on rock mass 3D surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojun; Chen, Jianqin; Zhu, Hehua

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an automated discontinuity trace mapping method on a 3D surface model of rock mass. Feature points of discontinuity traces are first detected using the Normal Tensor Voting Theory, which is robust to noisy point cloud data. Discontinuity traces are then extracted from feature points in four steps: (1) trace feature point grouping, (2) trace segment growth, (3) trace segment connection, and (4) redundant trace segment removal. A sensitivity analysis is conducted to identify optimal values for the parameters used in the proposed method. The optimal triangular mesh element size is between 5 cm and 6 cm; the angle threshold in the trace segment growth step is between 70° and 90°; the angle threshold in the trace segment connection step is between 50° and 70°, and the distance threshold should be at least 15 times the mean triangular mesh element size. The method is applied to the excavation face trace mapping of a drill-and-blast tunnel. The results show that the proposed discontinuity trace mapping method is fast and effective and could be used as a supplement to traditional direct measurement of discontinuity traces.

  15. Quantification of four artificial sweeteners in Finnish surface waters with isotope-dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkola, Noora; Sainio, Pirjo

    2014-01-01

    The artificial sweeteners sucralose (SCL), acesulfame (ACS), saccharin (SAC), and cyclamate (CYC) have been detected in environmental waters in Europe and North America. Higher environmental levels are expected in view of the increasing consumption of these food additives. In this study, an isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) LC–MS/MS method was developed and validated for quantifying the four artificial sweeteners in boreal lakes (n = 3) and rivers (n = 12). The highest concentrations of ACS, SAC, CYC and SCL were 9,600, 490, 210 and 1000 ng/L, respectively. ACS and SAC were detected in all studied samples, and CYC and SCL in 98% and 56% of the samples. Seasonal trends of ACS and SAC were observed in some rivers. ACS and SCL concentrations in rivers correlated linearly with population equivalents of the wastewater treatment plants in the catchment areas, whereas SAC and CYC concentrations depend more on the source. -- Highlights: • A reliable method for analysing artificial sweeteners in water was validated. • Artificial sweeteners were quantified in boreal rivers and lakes. • Most concentrations were in accordance with previous European studies. • Acesulfame and saccharine concentrations were high in the most contaminated rivers. • Correlation observed between concentrations and mean water throughflow in rivers. -- High concentrations of artificial sweeteners were obtained, which indicates slow or negligible degradation of these compounds in boreal surface waters

  16. Heat and mass transfer boundary conditions at the surface of a heated sessile droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Anna-Lena; Lundström, T. Staffan

    2017-12-01

    This work numerically investigates how the boundary conditions of a heated sessile water droplet should be defined in order to include effects of both ambient and internal flow. Significance of water vapor, Marangoni convection, separate simulations of the external and internal flow, and influence of contact angle throughout drying is studied. The quasi-steady simulations are carried out with Computational Fluid Dynamics and conduction, natural convection and Marangoni convection are accounted for inside the droplet. For the studied conditions, a noticeable effect of buoyancy due to evaporation is observed. Hence, the inclusion of moisture increases the maximum velocities in the external flow. Marangoni convection will, in its turn, increase the velocity within the droplet with up to three orders of magnitude. Results furthermore show that the internal and ambient flow can be simulated separately for the conditions studied, and the accuracy is improved if the internal temperature gradient is low, e.g. if Marangoni convection is present. Simultaneous simulations of the domains are however preferred at high plate temperatures if both internal and external flows are dominated by buoyancy and natural convection. The importance of a spatially resolved heat and mass transfer boundary condition is, in its turn, increased if the internal velocity is small or if there is a large variation of the transfer coefficients at the surface. Finally, the results indicate that when the internal convective heat transport is small, a rather constant evaporation rate may be obtained throughout the drying at certain conditions.

  17. Mass transfer behavior of tritium from air to water through the water surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takata, Hiroki; Nishikawa, Masabumi; Kamimae, Kozo

    2005-01-01

    It is anticipated that a certain amount of tritiated water exists in the atmosphere of tritium handling facilities, and it is recognized that the hazardous potential of tritiated water is rather high. Then, it is important to grasp the behavior of tritiated water for preserving of the radiation safety. The mass transfer behavior of tritium from air to water through the water surface was discussed in this study. The evaporation rate of water and the condensation rate of water were experimentally examined from measurement of change of the weight of distilled water. The tritium transfer rate from the tritiated water in air to the distilled water was also experimentally examined by using a liquid scintillation counter. Experimental results about change of tritium level in a small beaker placed in the atmosphere with tritiated water showed that diffusion of tritium in water and gas flow in the atmosphere gives considerable effect on tritium transfer. The estimation method of the tritium transfer made in this study was applied to explain the data at The Japan Atomic Power Company second power station at Tsuruga and good agreement was obtained. (author)

  18. On-line nuclear half life and spectroscopic measurements on mass-separated fission product nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.; Fogelberg, B.; Baecklin, A.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of the methods and equipment employed for nuclear spectroscopy studies of short lived fission product nuclei at the OSIRIS ISOL facility in Studsvik, Sweden. Furthermore a table of new nuclear half-lives measured with this equipment is presented. (author)

  19. On-surface Fenton and Fenton-like reactions appraised by paper spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, S F; Oliveira, B S; Augusti, R

    2018-06-21

    On-surface degradation of sildenafil (an adequate substrate as it contains assorted functional groups in its structure) promoted by the Fenton (Fe 2+ / H 2 O 2 ) and Fenton-like (M n+ / H 2 O 2 ; M n+ = Fe 3+ , Co 2+ , Cu 2+ , Mn 2+ ) systems was investigated by using paper spray ionization mass spectrometry (PS-MS). The performance of each system was compared by measuring the ratio between the relative intensities of the ions of m/z 475 (protonated sildenafil) and m/z 235 (protonated lidocaine, used as a convenient internal standard and added to the paper just before the PS-MS analyzes). The results indicated the following order in the rates of such reactions: Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 > H 2 O 2 > Cu 2+ /H 2 O 2 > M n+ / H 2 O 2 (M n+ = Fe 3+ , Co 2+ , Mn 2+ ) ~ M n+ (M n+ = Fe 2+ , Fe 3+ , Co 2+ , Cu 2+ , Mn 2 . The superior capability of Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 in causing the degradation of sildenafil indicates that Fe 2+ efficiently decomposes H 2 O 2 to yield hydroxyl radicals, quite reactive species that cause the substrate oxidation. The results also indicate that H 2 O 2 can spontaneously decompose likely to yield hydroxyl radicals, although in a much smaller extension than the Fenton system. This effect, however, is strongly inhibited by the presence of the other cations, i. e. Fe 3+ , Co 2+ , Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ . A unique oxidation by-product was detected in the reaction between Fe 2+ /H 2 O 2 with sildenafil and a possible structure for it was proposed based on the MS/MS data. The on-surface reaction of other substrates (trimethoprim and tamoxifen) with the Fenton system was also investigated. In conclusion, PS-MS shown to be a convenient platform to promptly monitor on-surface oxidation reactions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium dioxide powders and pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium dioxide powders and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium Sample Handling 8 to 10 Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Ceric Sulfate Titration Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Nitrogen by Distillation Spectrophotometry Using Nessler Reagent 11 to 18 Carbon (Total) by Direct Combustion–Thermal Conductivity 19 to 30 Total Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis 31 to 38 Sulfur by Distillation Spectrophotometry 39 to 47 Plutonium Isotopic Analysis by Mass Spectrometry Rare Earth Elements by Spectroscopy 48 to 55 Trace Elements by Carrier–Distillation Spectroscopy 56 to 63 Impurities by ICP-AES Impurity Elements by Spark-Source Mass Spectrography 64 to 70 Moisture by the Coulomet...

  1. Estimating the ice thickness of mountain glaciers with an inverse approach using surface topography and mass-balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Laurent; Picasso, Marco; Farinotti, Daniel; Bauder, Andreas; Funk, Martin; Blatter, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    We present a numerical method to estimate the ice thickness distribution within a two-dimensional, non-sliding mountain glacier, given a transient surface geometry and a mass-balance distribution, which are relatively easy to obtain for a large number of glaciers. The inverse approach is based on the shallow ice approximation (SIA) of ice flow and requires neither filtering of the surface topography with a lower slope limit nor approximation of constant basal shear stress. We first address this problem for a steady-state surface geometry. Next, we use an apparent surface mass-balance description that makes the transient evolution quasi-stationary. Then, we employ a more elaborated fixed-point method in which the bedrock solution is iteratively obtained by adding the difference between the computed and known surface geometries at the end of the considered time interval. In a sensitivity study, we show that the procedure is much more susceptible to small perturbations in surface geometry than mass-balance. Finally, we present preliminary results for bed elevations in three space dimensions. (paper)

  2. In Situ SIMS and IR Spectroscopy of Well-Defined Surfaces Prepared by Soft Landing of Mass-Selected Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Gunaratne, Kalupathirannehelage Don D.; Laskin, Julia

    2014-06-16

    Soft landing of mass-selected ions onto surfaces is a powerful approach for the highly-controlled preparation of materials that are inaccessible using conventional synthesis techniques. Coupling soft landing with in situ characterization using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) enables analysis of well-defined surfaces under clean vacuum conditions. The capabilities of three soft-landing instruments constructed in our laboratory are illustrated for the representative system of surface-bound organometallics prepared by soft landing of mass-selected ruthenium tris(bipyridine) dications, [Ru(bpy)3]2+, onto carboxylic acid terminated self-assembled monolayer surfaces on gold (COOH-SAMs). In situ time-of-flight (TOF)-SIMS provides insight into the reactivity of the soft-landed ions. In addition, the kinetics of charge reduction, neutralization and desorption occurring on the COOH-SAM both during and after ion soft landing are studied using in situ Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR)-SIMS measurements. In situ IRRAS experiments provide insight into how the structure of organic ligands surrounding metal centers is perturbed through immobilization of organometallic ions on COOH-SAM surfaces by soft landing. Collectively, the three instruments provide complementary information about the chemical composition, reactivity and structure of well-defined species supported on surfaces.

  3. Structure-reactivity relationships in the interactions between humic substances, pollutants from the nuclear cycle, and mineral surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiller, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    This document proposes an analysis of the structure-reactivity relationships in the interaction between humic substances, metallic pollutants from the nuclear cycle, and mineral surfaces. It composes the scientific document, which allowed the author to defend a Habilitation degree. It is mainly focused on the research works into which the author have been involved in on this particular thematic. Humic substances are issued from the degradation of the living. They have an important influence onto migration of metals in the environment. They are showing particular intrinsic physic and chemical, metal complexation, and adsorption onto mineral surfaces properties, which render the global comprehension of the different mechanisms somehow difficult. These three aspects are covered in this document. The first part is dedicated to the studies on composition, structure, and organization of humic substances, which cannot be considered as a well-defined type of chemical. They are a heterogeneous degradation product with a supramolecular organization, which is showing fractal properties from fractions up to several nanometers. Second part is on the complexation reactions. The different modelling strategies come from the difficulties on apprehending composition, structure, and organization of humic substances. The different models used are showing more or less strongly empiric characteristics. They can be derived from the mass action law, or explicitly account for heterogeneity, acid-basic, or ionic strength related parameters. The third and latter part covers the adsorption studies. The main property is adsorptive fractionation, which induces modification of chemical composition of humic substances between the surface and the solution. It also induces modification of complexation properties between the adsorbed and non-adsorbed fractions. Because of adsorptive fractionation, and the particular influence of ionic strength on humic substances, and of complexed metals, adsorption

  4. Mass and heat transfer at the outer surface of helical coils under single and two phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aziz, M.H.; Nirdosh, I.; Sedahmed, G.H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The work aims to develop reactors which need rapid temperature control. • Mass and heat transfer at the outer surface of helical coils was studied experimentally. • The experiments were conducted under gas sparing, single and two phase flow. • Variables were helical tube diameter, physical properties, and gas and liquid velocity. • Results verification in terms of natural convection and surface renewal mechanism was explained. - Abstract: The mass transfer behavior of the outer surface of vertical helical coil was studied by the electrochemical technique under single phase flow, gas sparging and two phase flow. Variables studied were helical tube diameter, physical properties of the solution, solution velocity and superficial gas velocity. The mass transfer data were correlated by dimensionless equations. Mass transfer enhancement ratio in case of two phase flow ranged from 1.1 to 4.9 compared to single phase flow. Implication of the results for the design and operation of helical coil reactors used to conduct L–S exothermic diffusion controlled reactions which need rapid temperature control were outlined. In this case the inner coil surface will act as a cooler while the outer surface will act a reaction surface. Immobilized enzyme catalyzed biochemical reactions where heat sensitive materials may be involved represent an example for the reactions which can employ the helical coil reactor. Also the importance of the results in the design of and operation of diffusion controlled membrane processes which employ helical coil membrane was noted. In view of the analogy between heat and mass transfer the possibility of using the results in the design and operation of helical coil heat exchangers was highlighted.

  5. On the long standing question of nuclear track etch induction time: Surface-cap model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, Mukhtar Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Using a systematic set of experiments, nuclear track etch induction time measurements in a widely used CR-39 detector were completed for accessible track-forming particles (fission fragments, 5.2 MeV alpha particles and 5.9 MeV antiprotons). Results of the present work are compared with appropriately selected published results. The possibility of the use of etch induction time for charged particle identification is evaluated. Analysis of experimental results along with the use of well-established theoretical concepts yielded a model about delay in the start of chemical etching of nuclear tracks. The suggested model proposes the formation of a surface-cap (top segment) in each nuclear track consisting of chemically modified material with almost same or even higher resistance to chemical etching compared with bulk material of the track detector. Existing track formation models are reviewed very briefly, which provide one of the two bases of the proposed model. The other basis of the model is the general behavior of hot or energised material having a connection with an environment containing a number of species like ordinary air. Another reason for the delay in the start of etching is suggested as the absence of localization of etching atoms/molecules, which is present during etching at depth along the latent track

  6. Assessment of interannual variations in the surface mass balance of 18 Svalbard glaciers from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer/Terra albedo product

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greuell, W.; Kohler, J.; Obleitner, F.; Glowacki, P.; Melvold, K.; Bernsen, E.; Oerlemans, J.

    2007-01-01

    We estimate annual anomalies of the surface mass balance of glaciers on Svalbard for the period 2000–2005 (six years), by calculating the so-called ‘‘satellite-derived mass balance’’ (Bsat) from time series of satellite-derived surface albedos. The method needs no other input variables. Surface

  7. Do galaxy global relationships emerge from local ones? The SDSS IV MaNGA surface mass density-metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zhu, Guangtun B.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Law, David; Wake, David; Green, Jenny E.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Malanushenko, Elena; Pan, Kaike; Roman Lopes, Alexandre; Lane, Richard R.

    2016-12-01

    We present the stellar surface mass density versus gas metallicity (Σ*-Z) relation for more than 500 000 spatially resolved star-forming resolution elements (spaxels) from a sample of 653 disc galaxies included in the SDSS IV MaNGA survey. We find a tight relation between these local properties, with higher metallicities as the surface density increases. This relation extends over three orders of magnitude in the surface mass density and a factor of 4 in metallicity. We show that this local relationship can simultaneously reproduce two well-known properties of disc galaxies: their global mass-metallicity relationship and their radial metallicity gradients. We also find that the Σ*-Z relation is largely independent of the galaxy's total stellar mass and specific star formation rate (sSFR), except at low stellar mass and high sSFR. These results suggest that in the present-day universe local properties play a key role in determining the gas-phase metallicity in typical disc galaxies.

  8. Simulation Study of Near-Surface Coupling of Nuclear Devices vs. Equivalent High-Explosive Charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Kevin B [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walton, Otis R [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benjamin, Russ [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlop, William H [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-29

    A computational study was performed to examine the differences in near-surface ground-waves and air-blast waves generated by high-explosive energy sources and those generated by much higher energy - density low - yield nuclear sources. The study examined the effect of explosive-source emplacement (i.e., height-of-burst, HOB, or depth-of-burial, DOB) over a range from depths of -35m to heights of 20m, for explosions with an explosive yield of 1-kt . The chemical explosive was modeled by a JWL equation-of-state model for a ~14m diameter sphere of ANFO (~1,200,000kg – 1 k t equivalent yield ), and the high-energy-density source was modeled as a one tonne (1000 kg) plasma of ‘Iron-gas’ (utilizing LLNL’s tabular equation-of-state database, LEOS) in a 2m diameter sphere, with a total internal-energy content equivalent to 1 k t . A consistent equivalent-yield coupling-factor approach was developed to compare the behavior of the two sources. The results indicate that the equivalent-yield coupling-factor for air-blasts from 1 k t ANFO explosions varies monotonically and continuously from a nearly perfec t reflected wave off of the ground surface for a HOB ≈ 20m, to a coupling factor of nearly zero at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear air - blast coupling curve, on the other hand, remained nearly equal to a perfectly reflected wave all the way down to HOB’s very near zero, and then quickly dropped to a value near zero for explosions with a DOB ≈ -10m. The near - surface ground - wave traveling horizontally out from the explosive source region to distances of 100’s of meters exhibited equivalent - yield coupling - factors t hat varied nearly linearly with HOB/DOB for the simulated ANFO explosive source, going from a value near zero at HOB ≈ 5m to nearly one at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear-source generated near-surface ground wave coupling-factor remained near zero for almost all HOB’s greater than zero, and then appeared to vary nearly - linearly with depth

  9. Limit to mass sensitivity of nanoresonators with random rough surfaces due to intrinsic sources and interactions with the surrounding gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate initially the influence of thermomechanical and momentum exchange noise on the limit to mass sensitivity Delta m of nanoresonators with random rough surfaces, which are characterized by the roughness amplitude w, the correlation length xi, and the roughness exponent 0

  10. Salinity maxima associated with some sub-surface water masses in the upper layers of the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varadachari, V.V.R.; Murty, C.S.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    The distribution of some sub-surface water masses in the western bay of Bengal during the south-west monsoon period is presented. Based on the salinity maxima and sigma t values the existence of waters of Persian Gulf and Red Sea origin could...

  11. Studies on the determination of surface deuterium in AISI 1062, 4037, and 4140 steels by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastri, V. S.; Donepudi, V. S.; McIntyre, N. S.; Johnston, D.; Revie, R. W.

    1988-12-01

    The concentration of deuterium at the surface of cathodically charged high strength steels AISI 1062, 4037, and 4140 has been determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The beneficial effects of pickling in NAP (a mixture of nitric, acetic, and phosphoric acids) to remove surfacebound deuterium have been observed.

  12. Estimating Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance contribution to future sea level rise using the regional atmospheric climate model MAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fettweis, X.; Franco, B.; Tedesco, M.; van Angelen, J.H.; Lenaerts, J.T.M.; van den Broeke, M.R.; Gallee, H

    2012-01-01

    We report future projections of Surface Mass Balance (SMB) over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) obtained with the regional climate model MAR, forced by the outputs of three CMIP5 General Circulation Models (GCMs) when considering two different warming scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5). The GCMs

  13. Secular changes in Earth's shape and surface mass loading derived from combinations of reprocessed global GPS networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, David; Clarke, Peter J.; Lavallée, David A.

    2014-09-01

    The changing distribution of surface mass (oceans, atmospheric pressure, continental water storage, groundwater, lakes, snow and ice) causes detectable changes in the shape of the solid Earth, on time scales ranging from hours to millennia. Transient changes in the Earth's shape can, regardless of cause, be readily separated from steady secular variation in surface mass loading, but other secular changes due to plate tectonics and glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) cannot. We estimate secular station velocities from almost 11 years of high quality combined GPS position solutions (GPS weeks 1,000-1,570) submitted as part of the first international global navigation satellite system service reprocessing campaign. Individual station velocities are estimated as a linear fit, paying careful attention to outliers and offsets. We remove a suite of a priori GIA models, each with an associated set of plate tectonic Euler vectors estimated by us; the latter are shown to be insensitive to the a priori GIA model. From the coordinate time series residuals after removing the GIA models and corresponding plate tectonic velocities, we use mass-conserving continental basis functions to estimate surface mass loading including the secular term. The different GIA models lead to significant differences in the estimates of loading in selected regions. Although our loading estimates are broadly comparable with independent estimates from other satellite missions, their range highlights the need for better, more robust GIA models that incorporate 3D Earth structure and accurately represent 3D surface displacements.

  14. Modification of the ASME code z-factor for circumferential surface crack in nuclear ferritic pipings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Hwan; Chung, Yon Ki; Koh, Wan Young; Lee, Joung Bae

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to modify the ASME Code Z-Factor, which is used in the evaluation of circumferential surface crack in nuclear ferritic pipings. The ASME Code Z-Factor is a load multiplier to compensate plastic load with elasto-plastic load. The current ASME Code Z-Factor underestimates pipe maximum load. In this study, the original SC. TNP method is modified first because the original SC. TNP method has a problem that the maximum allowable load predicted from the original SC. TNP method is slightly higher than that measured from the experiment. Then the new Z-Factor is developed using the modified SC. TNP method. The desirability of both the modified SC. TNP method and the new Z-Factor is examined using the experimental results for the circumferential surface crack in pipings. The results show that (1) the modified SC. TNP method is good for predicting the circumferential surface crack behavior in pipings, and (2) the Z-Factor obtained from the modified SC. TNP method well predicts the behavior of circumferential surface crack in ferritic pipings. 30 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs. (author)

  15. Origin and evolution of cup-shaped structures on leached nuclear waste containment glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, C.; Villa, F.; Chambaudet, A.; Vernaz, E.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional surface microanalysis system equipped with a sensitive topographical probe was used to quantify the evolution of cup-shaped structures formed by aqueous leaching of nuclear waste containment glass. A model of the dissolution phenomenon provides satisfactory correlation between calculated and measured cup radius and depth. Dissolution cups form from cracks on the initially cut glass surface. Large cracks control the phenomenon by forming the largest cups, which gradually absorb smaller ones. The evolution of the size and shape of the dissolution cups was described by a model that assumes a constant dissolution rate on the surface, diminishing with crack depth. The best fit with the experimental data was obtained with a dissolution rate one hundred times lower at the bottom of the crack than at the surface. Moreover, it is predictable that all the cups will gradually disappear as they grow larger and flatter over a leaching period of some 2 years, for the glass composition and experimental leaching procedures used in this work

  16. Study of ablation on surfaces of nuclear-use metals irradiated with Femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Alessandro F.; Samad, Ricardo E.; Vieira Junior, Nilson D.; Rossi, Wagner de

    2017-01-01

    The use of ultrashort pulsed lasers is an alternative for micro-machining in metal surfaces, with diverse applications in several industrial areas, such as aeronautics, aerospace, naval, nuclear, among others, where there is a growing concern with reliability in service. In this work, micro-machining were performed on titanium surfaces using femtosecond ultrashort pulses. Such a process resulted in minimal heat transfer to the material, thus avoiding and surface deformation of the titanium plate and the formation of resolidified material in the ablated region, which are drawbacks present in the use of the long pulsed keyed laser of the order of nanoseconds. Three types of micro-machining were performed, with variations in the distances between the machined lines. It was also verified that the wettability increases when there is an increase in the distance between machined lines. Finally, in order to change the surface with minimal removal of material, it has been found that the use of ultra-short pulse lasers provide great benefits for the integrity of the ablated material. This initial study is the starting point for the study of other metals, such as Maraging Steels and Zircaloy that will be the target of future work. (author)

  17. Study of ablation on surfaces of nuclear-use metals irradiated with Femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Alessandro F.; Samad, Ricardo E.; Vieira Junior, Nilson D.; Rossi, Wagner de, E-mail: alessandro.nogueira@usp.br, E-mail: resamad@ipen.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Engenharia de Sorocaba (FACENS), Ipero, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The use of ultrashort pulsed lasers is an alternative for micro-machining in metal surfaces, with diverse applications in several industrial areas, such as aeronautics, aerospace, naval, nuclear, among others, where there is a growing concern with reliability in service. In this work, micro-machining were performed on titanium surfaces using femtosecond ultrashort pulses. Such a process resulted in minimal heat transfer to the material, thus avoiding and surface deformation of the titanium plate and the formation of resolidified material in the ablated region, which are drawbacks present in the use of the long pulsed keyed laser of the order of nanoseconds. Three types of micro-machining were performed, with variations in the distances between the machined lines. It was also verified that the wettability increases when there is an increase in the distance between machined lines. Finally, in order to change the surface with minimal removal of material, it has been found that the use of ultra-short pulse lasers provide great benefits for the integrity of the ablated material. This initial study is the starting point for the study of other metals, such as Maraging Steels and Zircaloy that will be the target of future work. (author)

  18. Distribution of 137Cs in the Surface Soil of Serpong Nuclear Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, E.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of 137 Cs in the surface soil layer of Serpong Nuclear Site (SNS) was investigated by field sampling. The Objectives of the investigation is finding the profile of 137 Cs distribution in the surface soil and the T f value that can be used for estimation of radiation dose from livestock product-man pathways. The results indicates that the 137 Cs activity in surface soil of SNS is 0.80 ± 0.29 Bq/kg, much lower than in the Antarctic. The contribution value of 137 Cs from the operation of G.A. Siwabessy Reactor until now is undetectable. The T f of 137 Cs from surface soil to Panisetum Purpureum, Setaria Spha Celata and Imperata Cylindrica grasses were 0.71 ± 0.14, 0.84 ± 0.27 and 0.81 ± 0.11 respectively. The results show that value of the transfer factor of 137 Cs varies between cultivated and uncultivated soil and also with the soils with thick humus. (author)

  19. Distribution of {sup 137}Cs in the Surface Soil of Serpong Nuclear Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubis, E., E-mail: erlub@batan.go.id [Center for Radioactive Waste Technology, National Nuclear Energy Agency, Serpong (Indonesia)

    2011-08-15

    The distribution of {sup 137}Cs in the surface soil layer of Serpong Nuclear Site (SNS) was investigated by field sampling. The Objectives of the investigation is finding the profile of {sup 137}Cs distribution in the surface soil and the T{sub f} value that can be used for estimation of radiation dose from livestock product-man pathways. The results indicates that the {sup 137}Cs activity in surface soil of SNS is 0.80 {+-} 0.29 Bq/kg, much lower than in the Antarctic. The contribution value of {sup 137}Cs from the operation of G.A. Siwabessy Reactor until now is undetectable. The T{sub f} of {sup 137}Cs from surface soil to Panisetum Purpureum, Setaria Spha Celata and Imperata Cylindrica grasses were 0.71 {+-} 0.14, 0.84 {+-} 0.27 and 0.81 {+-} 0.11 respectively. The results show that value of the transfer factor of {sup 137}Cs varies between cultivated and uncultivated soil and also with the soils with thick humus. (author)

  20. Distribution of 137Cs In the Surface Soil of Serpong Nuclear Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lubis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of 137Cs in the surface soil layer of Serpong Nuclear Site (SNS was investigated by field sampling. The Objectives of the investigation is finding the profile of 137Cs distribution in the surface soil and the Tf value that can be used for estimation of radiation dose from livestock product-man pathways. The results indicates that the 137Cs activity in surface soil of SNS is 0.80 ± 0,29 Bq/kg, much lower than in the Antarctic. The contribution value of 137Cs from the operation of G.A.Siwabessy Reactor until now is undetectable. The Tf of 137Cs from surface soil to Panisetum Purpureum, Setaria Spha Celata and Imperata Cylindrica grasses were 0.71 ± 0.14, 0.84 ± 0.27 and 0.81 ± 0.11 respectively. The results show that value of the transfer factor of 137Cs varies between cultivated and uncultivated soil and also with the soils with thick humus

  1. Surface crack behavior in socket weld of nuclear piping under fatigue loading condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.H.; Kim, J.S.; Choi, S.Y.

    2005-01-01

    The ASME B and PV Code Sec. III allows the socket weld for the nuclear piping in spite of the weakness on the weld integrity. Recently, the integrity of the socket weld is regarded as a safety concern in nuclear power plants because many failures and leaks have been reported in the socket weld. OPDE (OECD Piping Failure Data Exchange) database lists 108 socket weld failures among 2,399 nuclear piping failure cases during 1970 to 2001. Eleven failures in the socket weld were also reported in Korean NPPs. Many failure cases showed that the root cause of the failure is the fatigue and the gap requirement for the socket weld given in ASME Code was not satisfied. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the fatigue crack behavior of a surface crack in the socket weld under fatigue loading condition considering the gap effect. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed to estimate the fatigue crack behavior of the surface crack. Three types of loading conditions such as the deflection due to vibration, the pressure transient ranging from P=0 to 15.51 MPa, and the thermal transient ranging from T=25 C to 288 C were considered. The results are as follows; 1) The socket weld is susceptible to the vibration where the vibration levels exceed the requirement in the ASME operation and maintenance (OM) Code. 2) The effect of pressure or temperature transient load on the socket weld integrity is not significant. 3) No-gap condition gives very high possibility of the crack initiation at the socket weld under vibration loading condition. 4) For the specific systems having the vibration condition to exceed the requirement in the ASME Code OM and/or the transient loading condition from P=0 and T=25 C to P=15.51 MPa and T=288 C, radiographic examination to examine the gap during the construction stage is recommended. (orig.)

  2. Ontogenetic body-mass scaling of nitrogen excretion relates to body surface area in diverse pelagic invertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirst, Andrew G.; Lilley, M.K.S.; Glazier, D.S.

    2017-01-01

    . Among diverse pelagic invertebrates that change shape during ontogeny, recent analysis has demonstrated a significant positive correlation between the body-mass allometry of respiration rates (measured as the ontogenetic body mass-scaling exponent bR) and the allometry of body surface area (b......A, as predicted from body-shape changes using a Euclidean model). As many pelagic invertebrates use a large portion of their external body surface for both resource uptake and waste excretion, we predicted that body-mass scaling exponents for rates of excretion of soluble N (bN) should also then relate...... to the degree of body-shape change during growth. We tested this hypothesis using literature data on bN for 39 species of pelagic invertebrates across five different phyla, and find strong support: bN is significantly positively correlated with predicted bA, whilst also co-varying with bR. Intraspecific...

  3. Applications of computer simulation, nuclear reactions and elastic scattering to surface analysis of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco de Carvalho, J. A.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This article involves computer simulation and surface analysis by nuclear techniques, which are non-destructive. Both the “energy method of analysis” for nuclear reactions and elastic scattering are used. Energy spectra are computer simulated and compared with experimental data, giving target composition and concentration profile information. The method is successfully applied to thick flat targets of graphite, quartz and sapphire and targets containing thin films of aluminium oxide. Depth profiles of 12C and 16O nuclei are determined using (d,p and (d,α deuteron induced reactions. Rutherford and resonance elastic scattering of (4He+ ions are also used.

    Este artículo trata de simulación por ordenador y del análisis de superficies mediante técnicas nucleares, que son no destructivas. Se usa el “método de análisis en energia” para reacciones nucleares, así como el de difusión elástica. Se simulan en ordenador espectros en energía que se comparan com datos experimentales, de lo que resulta la obención de información sobre la composición y los perfiles de concentración de la muestra. Este método se aplica con éxito em muestras espesas y planas de grafito, cuarzo y zafiro y muestras conteniendo películas finas de óxido de aluminio. Se calculan perfiles en profundidad de núcleos de 12C y de 16O a través de reacciones (d,p y (d,α inducidas por deuterones. Se utiliza también la difusión elástica de iones (4He+, tanto a Rutherford como resonante.

  4. Intracellular lysyl oxidase: Effect of a specific inhibitor on nuclear mass in proliferating cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, Fawzy A. [Laboratory for the Study of Skeletal Disorders and Rehabilitation, Department of Orthopedics, Children' s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue EN926, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Torres, Marie [Laboratory for the Study of Skeletal Disorders and Rehabilitation, Department of Orthopedics, Children' s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue EN926, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Wang, Hao [Laboratory for the Study of Skeletal Disorders and Rehabilitation, Department of Orthopedics, Children' s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue EN926, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Graham, Lila, E-mail: lilagraham@cs.com [Laboratory for the Study of Skeletal Disorders and Rehabilitation, Department of Orthopedics, Children' s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue EN926, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-06-11

    LOX, the principal enzyme involved in crosslinking of collagen, was the first of several lysyl oxidase isotypes to be characterized. Its active form was believed to be exclusively extracellular. Active LOX was later reported to be present in cell nuclei; its function there is unknown. LOX expression opposes the effect of mutationally activated Ras, which is present in about 30% of human cancers. The mechanism of LOX in countering the action of Ras is also unknown. In the present work, assessment of nuclear protein for possible effects of lysyl oxidase activity led to the discovery that proliferating cells dramatically increase their nuclear protein content when exposed to BAPN ({beta}-aminopropionitrile), a highly specific lysyl oxidase inhibitor that reportedly blocks LOX inhibition of Ras-induced oocyte maturation. In three cell types (PC12 cells, A7r5 smooth muscle cells, and NIH 3T3 fibroblasts), BAPN caused a 1.8-, 1.7-, and 2.1-fold increase in total nuclear protein per cell, respectively, affecting all major components in both nuclear matrix and chromatin fractions. Since nuclear size is correlated with proliferative status, enzyme activity restricting nuclear growth may be involved in the lysyl oxidase tumor suppressive effect. Evidence is also presented for the presence of apparent lysyl oxidase isotype(s) containing a highly conserved LOX active site sequence in the nuclei of PC12 cells, which do not manufacture extracellular lysyl oxidase substrates. Results reported here support the hypothesis that nuclear lysyl oxidase regulates nuclear growth, and thereby modulates cell proliferation.

  5. Structural characterization of a poly(methacrylic acid)-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymer by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordanengo, Remi [Universites Aix-Marseille I, II et III - CNRS, UMR 6264: Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Spectrometries Appliquees a la Chimie Structurale, F-13397 Marseille (France); Viel, Stephane [Aix-Marseille Universite - CNRS, UMR 6263: Institut des Sciences Moleculaires de Marseille, Chimiometrie et Spectrometries, F-13397 Marseille (France); Hidalgo, Manuel; Allard-Breton, Beatrice [ARKEMA, Centre de Recherche Rhone Alpes, Rue Henri Moissan, F-69493 Pierre-Benite (France); Thevand, Andre [Universites Aix-Marseille I, II et III - CNRS, UMR 6264: Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Spectrometries Appliquees a la Chimie Structurale, F-13397 Marseille (France); Charles, Laurence, E-mail: laurence.charles@univ-provence.fr [Universites Aix-Marseille I, II et III - CNRS, UMR 6264: Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Spectrometries Appliquees a la Chimie Structurale, F-13397 Marseille (France)

    2009-11-03

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been combined to achieve the complete microstructural characterization of a poly(methacrylic acid)-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMAA-PMMA) copolymer synthesized by nitroxide-mediated polymerization. Various PMAA-PMMA species could be identified which mainly differ in terms of terminaisons. {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR experiments revealed the structure of the end-groups as well as the proportion of each co-monomer in the copolymers. These end-group masses were further confirmed from m/z values of doubly charged copolymer anions detected in the single stage mass spectrum. In contrast, copolymer composition derived from MS data was not consistent with NMR results, obviously due to strong mass bias well known to occur during electrospray ionization of these polymeric species. Tandem mass spectrometry could reveal the random nature of the copolymer based on typical dissociation reactions, i.e., water elimination occurred from any two contiguous MAA units while MAA-MMA pairs gave rise to the loss of a methanol molecule. Polymer backbone cleavages were also observed to occur and gave low abundance fragment ions which allowed the structure of the initiating end-group to be confirmed.

  6. Combined use of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry for cell surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dague, Etienne; Delcorte, Arnaud; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2008-04-01

    Understanding the surface properties of microbial cells is a major challenge of current microbiological research and a key to efficiently exploit them in biotechnology. Here, we used three advanced surface analysis techniques with different sensitivity, probing depth, and lateral resolution, that is, in situ atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry, to gain insight into the surface properties of the conidia of the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. We show that the native ultrastructure, surface protein and polysaccharide concentrations, and amino acid composition of three mutants affected in hydrophobin production are markedly different from those of the wild-type, thereby providing novel insight into the cell wall architecture of A. fumigatus. The results demonstrate the power of using multiple complementary techniques for probing microbial cell surfaces.

  7. Chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade mixed oxides [(U,Pu)O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Mixed oxide, a mixture of uranium and plutonium oxides, is used as a nuclear-reactor fuel in the form of pellets. The plutonium content may be up to 10 wt %, and the diluent uranium may be of any U-235 enrichment. In order to be suitable for use as a nuclear fuel, the material must meet certain criteria for combined uranium and plutonium content, effective fissile content, and impurity content. Analytical procedures used to determine if mixed oxides comply with specifications are: uranium by controlled-potential coulometry; plutonium by controlled-potential coulometry; plutonium by amperometric titration with iron (II); nitrogen by distillation spectrophotometry using Nessler reagent; carbon (total) by direct combustion-thermal-conductivity; total chlorine and fluorine by pyrohydrolysis; sulfur by distillation-spectrophotometry; moisture by the coulometric, electrolytic moisture analyzer; isotopic composition by mass spectrometry; rare earths by copper spark spectroscopy; trace impurities by carrier distillation spectroscopy; impurities by spark-source mass spectrography; total gas in reactor-grade mixed dioxide pellets; tungsten by dithiol-spectrophotometry; rare earth elements by spectroscopy; plutonium-238 isotopic abundance by alpha spectrometry; uranium and plutonium isotopic analysis by mass spectrometry; oxygen-to-metal atom ratio by gravimetry

  8. Detected Surface Effects of the September 3, 2017 Declared Nuclear Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabian, F. V.

    2017-12-01

    Satellite-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data of North Korea's Punggye-ri Nuclear Test Site, together with new electro-optical commercial satellite imagery and a short official video (apparently recorded during the most recent test), provide additional insights on the widespread surface disturbances[1] around the peak of Mt. Mantap that were caused by North Korea's sixth and by far largest nuclear test (over one hundred kilotons). While a number of visible landslides have already been reported by this author and others, this additional data reveals more information about the widespread nature of the detected movements that indicate a general slumping/compression of the top 200 meters of the mountain consisting of loosely consolidated volcanic ash deposits above a nonconformity with underlying basement diorite/granites. A closer look at the one previously noted zone of localized slippage/subsidence located within the volcanic deposits, revealed that several healthy trees have been knocked down. The new image data empirically confirms previous seismological estimates that the detonation occurred somewhere under Mt. Mantap. The North Korean-sourced short video, which shows a large dust cloud rising up from the mountain along with a probable active rockfall in a pre-existing landslide scar, provides additional new evidence consistent with that conclusion. However, the broad-scale nature of those movements inhibits more precise geolocation of the test within the mountain using imagery. [1] Surface displacements include landslides, spall, cracks, rock falls, small fault displacements, and earth movement including slippage/subsidence within pre-existing surface features such as small depressions as previously reported here: http://www.38north.org/2017/01/fpabiandcoblentz010617/ and http://www.38north.org/2017/09/punggye090517/ and http://www.38north.org/2017/09/punggye091217/

  9. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 This test method covers the determination of uranium and the oxygen to uranium atomic ratio in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powder and pellets. 1.4 This test method covers the determination of chlorine and fluorine in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide. With a 1 to 10-g sample, concentrations of 5 to 200 g/g of chlorine and 1 to 200 μg/g of fluorine are determined without interference. 1.5 This test method covers the determination of moisture in uranium dioxide samples. Detection limits are as low as 10 μg. 1.6 This test method covers the determination of nitride nitrogen in uranium dioxide in the range from 10 to 250 μg. 1.7 This test method covers the spectrographic analysis of nuclear-grade UO2 for the 26 elements in the ranges indicated in Table 2. 1.8 For simultaneous determination of trace ele...

  10. Quantization of Differences Between Atomic and Nuclear Rest Masses and Self-organization of Atoms and Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareev, F. A.; Zhidkova, I. E.

    2007-03-01

    We come to the conclusion that all atomic models based on either the Newton equation and the Kepler laws, or the Maxwell equations, or the Schrodinger and Dirac equations are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. We can only suspect that these equations are grounded on the same fundamental principle(s) which is (are) not known or these equations can be transformed into each other. We proposed a new mechanism of LENR: cooperative processes in the whole system nuclei + atoms + condensed matter - nuclear reactions in plasma - can occur at smaller threshold energies than the corresponding ones on free constituents. We were able to quantize phenomenologically the first time the differences between atomic and nuclear rest masses by the formula: δδM =n1/n2 X 0.0076294 (in MeV/ c^2), ni=1,2,3,.... Note that this quantization rule is justified for atoms and nuclei with different A, N and Z and the nuclei and atoms represent a coherent synchronized systems - a complex of coupled oscillators (resonators). The cooperative resonance synchronization mechanisms can explain how electron volt (atomic-) scale processes can induce and control nuclear MeV (nuclear-) scale processes and reactions., F.A. Gareev, I.E. Zhidkova, E-print arXiv Nucl-th/ 0610002 2006.

  11. Storage ion trap of an 'In-Flight Capture' type for precise mass measurement of radioactive nuclear reaction products and fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarantin, N.I.

    2001-01-01

    Data on nuclear masses provide a basis for creating and testing various nuclear models. A tandem system of FLNR comprised of the U-400M cyclotron, the COMBAS magnetic separator and the mass-spectrometric ion trap of an 'in-flight capture' type is considered as a possible complex for producing of the short-lived nuclei in fragmentation reactions by heavy ions and for precise mass measurement of these nuclei. The plan of scientific and technical FLNR research includes a project DRIBs for producing beams of accelerated radioactive nuclear reaction products and photofission fragments. This project proposes also precise mass measurements of the fission fragment with the help of the ion trap. The in-flight entrance of the ions and their capture in the mass-spectrometric ion trap using the monochromatizing degrader, the static electric and magnetic fields and a new invention, a magnetic unidirectional transporting ventil, is considered

  12. New lumped-mass-stick model based on modal characteristics of structures: development and application to a nuclear containment building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hwasung; Lee, Huseok; Lee, Jong Seh

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a new lumped-mass-stick model (LMSM) is developed based on the modal characteristics of a structure such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The simplified model, named the "frequency adaptive lumped-massstick model," hasonly a small number of stick elements and nodes to provide the same natural frequencies of the structure and is applied to a nuclear containment building. To investigate the numerical performance of the LMSM, a time history analysis is carried out on both the LMSM and the finite element model (FEM) for a nuclear containment building. A comparison of the results shows that the dynamic responses of the LMSM in terms of displacement and acceleration are almost identical to those of the FEM. In addition, the results in terms of fl oor response spectra at certain elevations are also in good agreement.

  13. Impact of the use of low or medium enriched uranium on the masses of space nuclear reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    The design process for determining the mass increase for the substitution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) for high-enriched uranium (HEU) in space nuclear reactor systems is an optimization process which must simultaneously consider several variables. This process becomes more complex whenever the reactor core operates on an in-core thermionic power conversion, in which the fissioning of the nuclear fuel is used to directly heat thermionic emitters, with the subsequent elimination of external power conversion equipment. The increased complexity of the optimization process for this type of system is reflected in the work reported herein, where considerably more information has been developed for the moderated in-core thermionic reactors

  14. Adaptation of a glow discharge mass spectrometer in a glove-box for the analysis of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betti, M.; Rasmussen, G.; Hiernaut, T.; Koch, L.

    1994-01-01

    A VG9000 glow discharge mass spectrometer has been modified for the direct analysis of solid nuclear samples within a glove-box environment. Because containment is needed for the analysis of this kind of material, the glove-box encloses all parts of the instrument that come into contact with the sample, namely the ion source chamber, sample interlock and associated pumping system. External modifications eliminate outside contamination by the fitting of absolute filters on all source supplies. Internally the design of the ion source has been altered to minimize the number of operations performed inside the glove-box thereby simplifying operation and routine maintenance. These modifications retain the ion extraction and focusing properties of the instrument. The data presented show that there is no compromise in the analytical performance of the instrument when placed in the glove-box. Data representative of nuclear materials is also shown. (Author)

  15. GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. II. THE GRAND-DESIGN GALAXY M51

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González-Lópezlira, Rosa A.; Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass and surface densities of total gas (Σ gas ), molecular gas (Σ H 2 ), neutral gas (Σ H I ), and star formation rate (Σ SFR ) in the grand-design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. By comparing the two-dimensional distribution of cluster masses and gas surface densities, we find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M 3rd ∝Σ H I 0.4±0.2 , whereM 3rd is the median of the five most massive clusters. There is no correlation withΣ gas ,Σ H2 , orΣ SFR . For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M 3rd ∝Σ H I 0.6±0.1 and M 3rd ∝Σ gas 0.5±0.2 ; there is no correlation with either Σ H 2 orΣ SFR . The results could hardly be more different from those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but we have determined M 3rd ∝Σ gas 3.8±0.3 , M 3rd ∝Σ H 2 1.2±0.1 , and M 3rd ∝Σ SFR 0.9±0.1 . For the older sample in M51, the lack of tight correlations is probably due to the combination of strong azimuthal variations in the surface densities of gas and star formation rate, and the cluster ages. These two facts mean that neither the azimuthal average of the surface densities at a given radius nor the surface densities at the present-day location of a stellar cluster represent the true surface densities at the place and time of cluster formation. In the case of the younger sample, even if the clusters have not yet traveled too far from their birth sites, the poor resolution of the radio data compared to the physical sizes of the clusters results in measuredΣ that are likely quite diluted compared to the actual densities relevant for the formation of the clusters.

  16. Nonlinear estimation of weathering rate parameters for uranium in surface soil near a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Rope, S.K.; Shleien, B.; Voilleque, P.G.

    1999-01-01

    A dynamic mass-balance model has been calibrated by a nonlinear parameter estimation method, using time-series measurements of uranium in surface soil near the former Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) near Fernald, Ohio, USA. The time-series data, taken at six locations near the site boundary since 1971, show a statistically significant downtrend of above-background uranium concentration in surface soil for all six locations. The dynamic model is based on first-order kinetics in a surface-soil compartment 10 cm in depth. Median estimates of weathering rate coefficients for insoluble uranium in this soil compartment range from about 0.065-0.14 year -1 , corresponding to mean transit times of about 7-15 years, depending on the location sampled. The model, calibrated by methods similar to those discussed in this paper, has been used to simulate surface soil kinetics of uranium for a dose reconstruction study. It was also applied, along with other data, to make confirmatory estimates of airborne releases of uranium from the FMPC between 1951 and 1988. Two soil-column models (one diffusive and one advective, the latter similar to a catenary first-order kinetic box model) were calibrated to profile data taken at one of the six locations in 1976. The temporal predictions of the advective model approximate the trend of the time series data for that location. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Michael B.; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Davis, James A.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Although "intragranular" pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment procedure using tritiated water as a high-resolution diffusive tracer to characterize the intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site (Washington). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, followed by a replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and the monitoring of tracer release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ("wet" and "dry") techniques allowed for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of ~1% of the solid volume and intragranular surface areas of ~20%–35% of the total surface area. Analogous experiments using bromide ion as a tracer yielded very different results, suggesting very little penetration of bromide into the intragranular porosity.

  18. Direct Measurement of Surface Dissolution Rates in Potential Nuclear Waste Forms: The Example of Pyrochlore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Cornelius; Finkeldei, Sarah; Brandt, Felix; Bosbach, Dirk; Luttge, Andreas

    2015-08-19

    The long-term stability of ceramic materials that are considered as potential nuclear waste forms is governed by heterogeneous surface reactivity. Thus, instead of a mean rate, the identification of one or more dominant contributors to the overall dissolution rate is the key to predict the stability of waste forms quantitatively. Direct surface measurements by vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) and their analysis via material flux maps and resulting dissolution rate spectra provide data about dominant rate contributors and their variability over time. Using pyrochlore (Nd2Zr2O7) pellet dissolution under acidic conditions as an example, we demonstrate the identification and quantification of dissolution rate contributors, based on VSI data and rate spectrum analysis. Heterogeneous surface alteration of pyrochlore varies by a factor of about 5 and additional material loss by chemo-mechanical grain pull-out within the uppermost grain layer. We identified four different rate contributors that are responsible for the observed dissolution rate range of single grains. Our new concept offers the opportunity to increase our mechanistic understanding and to predict quantitatively the alteration of ceramic waste forms.

  19. Multi-dimensional Inversion Modeling of Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNMR Data for Groundwater Exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warsa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is an important economic source of water supply for drinking water and irrigation water for agriculture. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR sounding is a relatively new geophysical method that can be used to determine the presence of culturally and economically important substances, such as subsurface water or hydrocarbon distribution. SNMR sounding allows the determination of water content and pore size distribution directly from the surface. The SNMR method is performed by stimulating an alternating current pulse through an antenna at the surface in order to confirm the existence of water in the subsurface. This paper reports the development of a 3-D forward modeling code for SNMR amplitudes and decay times, after which an improved 2-D and 3-D inversion algorithm is investigated, consisting of schemes for regularizing model parameterization. After briefly reviewing inversion schemes generally used in geophysics, the special properties of SNMR or magnetic resonance sounding (MRS inversion are evaluated. We present an extension of MRS to magnetic resonance tomography (MRT, i.e. an extension for 2-D and 3-D investigation, and the appropriate inversions.

  20. Design Considerations and Conceptual Designs for Surface Nuclear Power Systems for the Moon and Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blessing, David L.; Kirkland, Joel

    2006-01-01

    A set of design considerations is proposed for nuclear power systems to provide power on the Moon or Mars. Setting the initial requirements is extremely important since they govern the choices that determine the final design. In addition, the choice of reactor and its operating conditions depends on details of the energy conversion and heat rejection systems, which must be studied in tandem. Refractory materials are not suitable for the primary pressure boundary for the reactor due to their susceptibility to chemical attack from particles of regolith on the Moon and Mars or by the carbon dioxide atmosphere on Mars. High nickel superalloys would be acceptable in these environments, but their limited creep strength at elevated temperatures limits reactor outlet temperature to about 1150 K or less. This temperature restriction results in the mass of a gas cooled reactor coupled to a Brayton power conversion system being somewhat lighter than that of a liquid metal-cooled reactors coupled to a Brayton power conversion system. The mass of a liquid metal-cooled reactor coupled to an advanced Stirling power conversion system would be in between that of the gas and liquid metal cooled systems which use Brayton power conversion

  1. Up-down quark mass difference effect in nuclear many-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, S.; Muto, K.; Oka, M.; Takeuchi, S.; Oda, T.

    1995-01-01

    A charge-symmetry-breaking nucleon-nucleon force due to the up-down quark mass difference is evaluated in the quark cluster model. It is applied to the shell-model calculation for the isovector mass shifts of isospin multiplets and the isospin-mixing matrix elements in 1s0d-shell nuclei. We find that the contribution of the quark mass difference effect is large and agrees with experiment. This contribution may explain the Okamoto-Nolen-Schiffer anomaly, alternatively to the meson-mixing contribution, which is recently predicted to be reduced by the large off-shell correction. (author)

  2. Up-down quark mass difference effect in nuclear many-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, S.; Muto, K.; Oka, M.; Takeuchi, S.; Oda, T.

    1996-01-01

    A charge-symmetry-breaking nucleon-nucleon force due to the up-down quark mass difference is evaluated in the quark cluster model. It is applied to the shell-model calculation for the isovector mass shifts of isospin multiplets in 1s0d-shell nuclei. We find that the contribution of the quark mass difference effect explains the systematic behavior of experiment. This contribution is large and may explain the Okamoto-Nolen-Schiffer anomaly, alternatively to the meson-mixing contribution, which is recently predicted to be reduced by the large off-shell correction. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  3. Calculation of three-dimensional mass flow and temperature distributions of nuclear reactors using the hardy cross iterative global solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Neto, A.J. da; Alvim, A.C.M.

    1989-01-01

    This work describes the thermalhydraulics code CROSS, designed for micro-computer calculation of heat and mass flow distributions in LWR nuclear reactor cores using the Hardy Cross method. Equations to calculate the pressure variations in the coolant channels are presented, along with derivation of a linear system of equations to calculate the energy balance. This system is solved through the Benachievicz method. A case study is presented, showing that the methodology developed in this work can be used in place of the forward marching multi-channel codes. (author) [pt

  4. Modeling of 3d Space-time Surface of Potential Fields and Hydrogeologic Modeling of Nuclear Waste Disposal Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestopalov, V.; Bondarenko, Y.; Zayonts, I.; Rudenko, Y.

    Introduction After the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) disaster (04.26.1986) a huge amount (over 2000 sq. km) of nuclear wastes appeared within so-called "Cher- nobyl Exclusion Zone" (CEZ). At present there are not enough storage facilities in the Ukraine for safe disposal of nuclear wastes and hazardous chemical wastes. The urgent problem now is safe isolation of these dangerous wastes. According to the developed state program of radioactive waste management, the construction of a na- tional storage facility of nuclear wastes is planned. It is also possible to create regional storage facilities for hazardous chemical wastes. The region of our exploration cov- ers the eastern part of the Korosten Plutone and its slope, reaching the CNPP. 3D Space-Time Surface Imaging of Geophysical Fields. There are only three direct meth- ods of stress field reconstruction in present practice, namely the field investigations based on the large-scale fracturing tests, petrotectonic and optical polarization meth- ods. Unfortunately, all these methods are extremely laborious and need the regular field tests, which is difficult to conduct in the areas of anisotropic rock outcrops. A compilation of magnetic and gravity data covering the CNPP area was carried out as a prelude to an interpretation study. More than thirty map products were generated from magnetic, gravity and geodesy data to prepare the 3D Space-Time Surface Images (3D STSI). Multi-layer topography and geophysic surfaces included: total magnetic intensity, isostatically-corrected Bouguer gravity, aspect and slope, first and second derivatives, vertical and horizontal curvature, histogram characteristics and space cor- relation coefficients between the gradient fields. Many maps shows the first and sec- ond derivatives of the potential fields, with the results of lineament (edge) structure detection superimposed. The lineament or edges of the potential fields are located from maximal gradient in many directions

  5. An HI selected sample of galaxies : The HI mass function and the surface brightness distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, M; Briggs, F; Sprayberry, D

    Results from the Arecibo HI Strip Survey, an unbiased extragalactic HI survey, combined with optical and 21 cm follow-up observations, determine the HI mass function and the cosmological mass density of HI at the present epoch. Both are consistent with earlier estimates, computed for the population

  6. Mass spectrometry imaging of surface lipids on intact Drosophila melanogaster flies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaftan, Filip; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Kynast, P.; Kulkarni, P.; Böcker, S.; Cvačka, Josef; Knaden, M.; Svatoš, Aleš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2014), s. 223-232 ISSN 1076-5174 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0139 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : MALDI * laser desorption * mass spectrometric imaging * fruit flies * neutral lipids * sex pheromones * mass shift correction Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.379, year: 2014

  7. A MASS BALANCE OF SURFACE WATER GENOTOXICITY IN PROVIDENCE RIVER (RHODE ISLAND USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White and Rasmussen (Mutation Res. 410:223-236) used a mass balance approach to demonstrate that over 85% of the total genotoxic loading to the St. Lawrence River at Montreal is non-industrial. To validate the mass balance approach and investigate the sources of genotoxins in sur...

  8. Shell Effect and Temperature Influence on Nuclear Level Density Parameter: the role of the effective mass interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queipo-Ruiz, J.; Guzman-Martinez, F.; Rodriguez-Hoyos, O.

    2011-01-01

    The level density parameter is a very important ingredient in statistic study of nuclear reaction, it has been studied to low energies excitation E < 2MeV where it values is approximately constant, experimental results to energies of excitation more than 2 MeV has been obtained of evaporation spectrum, to nuclei with A=160. In this work we present a calculation of densities level parameter, for a wide range of mass and temperature, taking in accounts the shell effects and the mass effective interaction. The result has been carried out within the semi classical approximation, for the single particle level densities. We results have a reasonable agreement with the experimental data available. (Author)

  9. Direct Energy Conversion for Nuclear Propulsion at Low Specific Mass Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Low specific mass (< 3  kg/kW) in-space electric power and propulsion can drastically alter the paradigm for exploration of the Solar System, changing human...

  10. Mass extraction rates of radionuclides in fallout material from a 170-kt nuclear crater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, E H [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1969-07-01

    The quantity k is defined as the fraction of a nuclide in the environment which must be ingested each day over a given time period to receive a maximum allowable dose, in accordance with the International Commission on Radiological Protection guidelines. Values of k were computed for radionuclides produced in a single cratering detonation using current design technology. A new concept, called the 'Mass Extraction Rate,' is presented. This concept is defined as the mass of earth material from which the entire quantity of the radionuclide must be extracted and ingested each day by some natural process over a given time interval, which results in a permissible dose. Mass Extraction Rate values are tabulated. A comparison is made between the Mass Extraction Rate and the specific activity methods. (author)

  11. Mass extraction rates of radionuclides in fallout material from a 170-kt nuclear crater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, E.H.

    1969-01-01

    The quantity k is defined as the fraction of a nuclide in the environment which must be ingested each day over a given time period to receive a maximum allowable dose, in accordance with the International Commission on Radiological Protection guidelines. Values of k were computed for radionuclides produced in a single cratering detonation using current design technology. A new concept, called the 'Mass Extraction Rate,' is presented. This concept is defined as the mass of earth material from which the entire quantity of the radionuclide must be extracted and ingested each day by some natural process over a given time interval, which results in a permissible dose. Mass Extraction Rate values are tabulated. A comparison is made between the Mass Extraction Rate and the specific activity methods. (author)

  12. Development of new Z-factors for the evaluation of the circumferential surface crack in nuclear pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.H.; Chung, Y.K.; Park, Y.W.; Lee, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop new Z-factors to evaluate the behavior of a circumferential surface crack in nuclear pipe. Z-factor is a load multiplier used in the Z-factor method, which is one of the ASME Code Sec. XI's recommendations for the estimation of a surface crack in nuclear pipe. It has been reported that the load carrying capacities predicted from the current ASME Code Z-factors, are not well in agreement with the experimental results for nuclear pipes with a surface crack. In this study, new Z-factors for ferritic base metal, ferritic submerged arc welding (SAW) weld metal, austenitic base metal, and austenitic SAW weld metal are obtained by use of the surface crack for thin pipe (SC.TNP) method based on GE/EPRI method. The desirability of both the SC.TNP method and the new Z-factors is examined using the results from 48 pipe fracture experiments for nuclear pipes with a circumferential surface crack. The results show that the SC.TNP method is good for describing the circumferential surface crack behavior and the new Z-factors are well in agreement with the measured Z-factors for both ferritic and austenitic pipes. (orig.)

  13. The origin of nuclear mass number dependence in EMC-effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Y.; Date, S.; Nakamura, A.; Sato, H.; Sumiyoshi, H.; Yoshinada, K.

    1985-03-01

    The origin of the mass number dependence of the nucleon structure functions extracted from the deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering is investigated by factorizing the structure function into A and x dependent parts. It is found that the mass number dependence is determined by the probability of exotic components in multi-nucleon overlap. This suggests that the deformation of the nucleon structure function is caused by the interaction among nucleons during their overlap. (author)

  14. Two-step Laser Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry to Elucidate Organic Diversity in Planetary Surface Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cornish, Timothy; Li, Xiang; Floyd, Melissa; Arevalo, Ricardo Jr.; Cook, Jamie Elsila; Callahan, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD-TOF-MS) holds promise to be a low-mass, compact in situ analytical capability for future landed missions to planetary surfaces. The ability to analyze a solid sample for both mineralogical and preserved organic content with laser ionization could be compelling as part of a scientific mission pay-load that must be prepared for unanticipated discoveries. Targeted missions for this instrument capability include Mars, Europa, Enceladus, and small icy bodies, such as asteroids and comets.

  15. Characterization of anti-theft devices directly from the surface of banknotes via easy ambient sonic spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eduardo Morgado; Franco, Marcos Fernando; Cuelbas, Claudio José; Zacca, Jorge Jardim; de Carvalho Rocha, Werickson Fortunato; Borges, Rodrigo; de Souza, Wanderley; Sawaya, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Correa, Deleon Nascimento

    2015-09-01

    Using Brazilian banknotes as a test case, forensic examination and identification of Rhodamine B dye anti-theft device (ATD) staining on banknotes were performed. Easy ambient sonic spray ionization mass spectrometry (EASI-MS) was used since it allows fast and simple analysis with no sample preparation providing molecular screening of the surface with direct desorption and ionization of the security dye. For a more accurate molecular characterization of the ATD dye, Q Exactive Orbitrap™ Fourier transform (tandem) mass spectrometry using eletrospray ionization (ESI-HRMS/MS) was also applied. Copyright © 2015 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Observationally constrained surface mass balance of Larsen C ice shelf, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kuipers Munneke

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The surface mass balance (SMB of the Larsen C ice shelf (LCIS, Antarctica, is poorly constrained due to a dearth of in situ observations. Combining several geophysical techniques, we reconstruct spatial and temporal patterns of SMB over the LCIS. Continuous time series of snow height (2.5–6 years at five locations allow for multi-year estimates of seasonal and annual SMB over the LCIS. There is high interannual variability in SMB as well as spatial variability: in the north, SMB is 0.40 ± 0.06 to 0.41 ± 0.04 m w.e. year−1, while farther south, SMB is up to 0.50 ± 0.05 m w.e. year−1. This difference between north and south is corroborated by winter snow accumulation derived from an airborne radar survey from 2009, which showed an average snow thickness of 0.34 m w.e. north of 66° S, and 0.40 m w.e. south of 68° S. Analysis of ground-penetrating radar from several field campaigns allows for a longer-term perspective of spatial variations in SMB: a particularly strong and coherent reflection horizon below 25–44 m of water-equivalent ice and firn is observed in radargrams collected across the shelf. We propose that this horizon was formed synchronously across the ice shelf. Combining snow height observations, ground and airborne radar, and SMB output from a regional climate model yields a gridded estimate of SMB over the LCIS. It confirms that SMB increases from north to south, overprinted by a gradient of increasing SMB to the west, modulated in the west by föhn-induced sublimation. Previous observations show a strong decrease in firn air content toward the west, which we attribute to spatial patterns of melt, refreezing, and densification rather than SMB.

  17. The effect of nuclear gas distribution on the mass determination of supermassive black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Restrepo, J. E.; Lira, P.; Netzer, H.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Capellupo, D. M.

    2018-01-01

    Supermassive black holes reside in the nuclei of most galaxies. During their active episodes, black holes are powered by accretion discs where gravitational energy is converted into radiation1. Accurately determining black hole masses is key to understand how the population evolves over time and how the black holes relate to their host galaxies2-4. Beyond the local universe, z ≳ 0.2, the mass is commonly estimated assuming a virialized motion of gas in the close vicinity of the active black holes, traced through broad emission lines5,6. However, this procedure has uncertainties associated with the unknown distribution of the gas clouds. Here, we show that the black hole masses derived from the properties of the accretion disk and virial mass estimates differ by a factor that is inversely proportional to the width of the broad emission lines. This leads to virial mass misestimations up to a factor of six. Our results suggest that a planar gas distribution that is inclined with respect to the line of sight may account for this effect. However, radiation pressure effects on the distribution of gas can also reproduce our results. Regardless of the physical origin, our findings contribute to mitigating the uncertainties in current black hole mass estimations and, in turn, will help us to better understand the evolution of distant supermassive black holes and their host galaxies.

  18. Heat and mass transfer across gas-filled enclosed spaces between a hot liquid surface and a cooled roof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralph, J C; Bennett, A W [Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    1977-01-01

    A detailed knowledge is required of the amounts of sodium vapour which may be transported from the hot surface of a fast reactor coolant pool through the cover gas to cooler regions of the structure. Evaporation from the unbounded liquid surfaces of lakes and seas has been studied extensively but the heat and mass transfer mechanisms in gas-vapour mixtures which occur in enclosed spaces have received less attention. Recent work at Harwell has provided a theoretical model from which the heat and mass transfer in idealised plane cavities can be calculated. An experimental study is reported in this paper which seeks to verify the theoretical prediction. Heat and mass transfer measurements have been made on a system in which a heated water pool transfers heat and mass across a gas-filled space to a cooled horizontal cover plate. Several cover gases were used in the experiments and the results show that, provided the partial density of the vapour is low compared with that of the gas, the heat transfer mechanism is that of combined convection and radiation. The enhancement in heat transfer due to the presence of the vapour is broadly consistent with assumption of a direct analogy between heat and mass transfer neglecting condensation in the interspace. The mass transfer measurements, in which water condensing on the cooled roof was measured directly, showed for low roof temperatures an imbalance between the mass and heat transfer. This observation is consistent with the theoretical predictions that heat transfer in the convecting system should be independent of the amount of condensation and 'rain-back' within the cavity. The results of tests with helium showed that convection was entirely suppressed by the presence of the water vapour. This confirms the behaviour predicted for gas-vapour mixtures in which the vapour density is of the same order as the gas density. (author)

  19. Light scattering by microstructures in plastic nuclear track detector plane surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wipasuramonton, O.

    1985-01-01

    The angular distributions of light elastically scattered by finite dielectric conical and cylindrical microstructures in plastic nuclear track detector plane surfaces have been measured. These microstructures are the chemically etched tracks of various nuclei, viz., protons, neutrons, 3 He, alphas, and 56 Fe. The base diameters of the structures are larger than twice the wavelength of the incident light. The results show the dependence of the scattering patterns on shape, size, orientation, and refractive index of the structures as well as the polarization of the incident light. It is also observed that in the single and independent scattering regime, the intensity at the intermediate angular region exhibits linear proportionality to the number of the microstructures per unit area. 84 refs., 96 figs., 4 tabs

  20. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance surface coil study of ischemic preconditioned isolated perfused rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Yongbin; Luo Xuechun; Zhang Riqing; Wang Xiaoyin; Zuo Lin; Liu Wei

    2000-01-01

    ischemic preconditioning (IPC) will protect the heart from the damage caused by a subsequent long ischemia period. 31 P spectra of isolated perfused rat heart measured by the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) surface coil technique can be used to continually, dynamically and noninvasively obtain metabolism information. This paper explores the IPC mechanisms by NMR. This study shows that IPC has no effect on enhancing the ATP and PCr levels during reperfusion but makes significantly slows and smooths the changes of intracellular pH and ATP during ischemia periods. The ATP and PCr recovery rate of the IPC group after ischemia is significantly higher than that of the control group. In conclusion, the above results support that IPC can protect the rat heart by reducing damage during the ischemia period