WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear manpower training

  1. Nuclear Manpower Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. J.; Yoo, B. H.; Lee, E. J.

    2007-12-01

    Nuclear Training Center (NTC) has concentrated its efforts on the systemisation and specialization of education and training and has actively carried out diverse activities to create new education courses based on the experience accumulated so far. The systematic and comprehensive education system(KAERI-ACE) has been set up by streamlining the education systems for internal employees conducted sporadically over the past year and expansion and diversification of education and training has been built through a study on Systematic Approach Training (SAT) methodology for the development of efficient education courses and a survey of manpower development in on-site industry. The 6 education programs have been developed and 18 courses were newly developed and improved. Especially to be noted in relation to education program development is that NTC has compiled and published a book titled 'Practical Research Ethics'. NTC has played a leading role in providing a research ethics education, in helping to promote the importance of research ethics by publishing a research ethics book and distributing them to government, research institutes, universities, etc. The total number of people who receive education for the year of 2007 was 2,998 and a total of 65 training courses were established and 106 times operated. The number of industry courses was 31, 56 times operated, and 1,309 persons participated and that nuclear R and D personnel education areas (internal employees' education) was 34 courses, 50 times operated, 2,689 persons participated

  2. Nuclear Manpower Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. J.; Yoo, B. H.; Lee, E. J.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear Training Center (NTC) has concentrated its efforts on the systemisation and specialization of education and training and has actively carried out diverse activities to create new education courses based on the experience accumulated so far. The systematic and comprehensive education systems have been set up by streamlining the education systems for internal employees conducted sporadically over the past years and expansion and diversification of education and training has been built through a study on Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) methodology for the development of efficient education courses and a survey of manpower development in on-site industry. The 6 education programs have been developed and 15 courses were newly developed and improved. Especially to be noted in relation to education program development is that NTC has compiled and published a book titled 'current status of research ethics of science and technology and cases' and has also conducted a survey targeted at the 30 electric power/electricity industries related to nuclear power. The total number of people who receive education for the year of 2006 was 4,186 and a total of 130 training courses were established and 125 times operated. Among them, the number of collective education was 64 courses, 104 times operated and 3,190 persons participated while as for cyber education(on-line language education), 39 courses in 3 foreign language areas established, 21 times operated and 996 persons participated

  3. Nuclear manpower training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Joe, B. J.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, E. J.; Yoo, B. H.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, W. K.; Jun, H. I.; Yang, K. N.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. Y.; Choi, I. G.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. the scope and contents are as follows: 1. Regional and interregional training courses 2. Training courses assisted by foreign experts 3. Training courses for nuclear industry personnel 4. Training courses for internal staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. This Nuclear Training Center executed the open-door training courses for 2,400 engineers/scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations by means of offering 51 training courses during the fiscal year 1996. (author). 23 refs

  4. Nuclear manpower training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Joe, B. J.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, E. J.; Yoo, B. H.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, W. K.; Jun, H. I.; Yang, K. N.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. Y.; Choi, I. G.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. the scope and contents are as follows: 1. Regional and interregional training courses 2. Training courses assisted by foreign experts 3. Training courses for nuclear industry personnel 4. Training courses for internal staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. This Nuclear Training Center executed the open-door training courses for 2,400 engineers/scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations by means of offering 51 training courses during the fiscal year 1996. (author). 23 refs.

  5. Nuclear manpower training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Lee, E. J.; Yang, K. N.; Jun, H. R.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Joe, B. J.; Koh, Y. S.; Yoo, B. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. U.; Choi, I. K.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J.

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. The scope and contents are as follows: 1. Education program development of nuclear field 2. International training courses for foreigners 3. Training courses for industry personnel 4. Training courses for R and D staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. The nuclear training center executed 65 training courses for 2,700 engineers/ scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations during the fiscal year 1997. (author). 18 refs., 3 tabs

  6. Nuclear manpower training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, In Suk; Lee, H. Y.; Lee, E. J.; Yang, K. N.; Jun, H. R.; Seo, K. W.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, I. H.; Joe, B. J.; Koh, Y. S.; Yoo, B. H.; Kim, M. Y.; Ju, Y. C.; Hyun, H. U.; Choi, I. K.; Hong, C. S.; Won, J. Y.; Nam, J. Y.; Lee, H. J

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. The scope and contents are as follows: 1. Education program development of nuclear field 2. International training courses for foreigners 3. Training courses for industry personnel 4. Training courses for R and D staff-members 5. Training courses under the law. The nuclear training center executed 65 training courses for 2,700 engineers/ scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations during the fiscal year 1997. (author). 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. Nuclear Manpower Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K. W.; Lee, H. Y.; Lee, E. J. and others

    2004-12-01

    Through the project on nuclear human resources development in 2004, the Nuclear Training Center of KAERI has provided various nuclear education and training courses for 1,962 persons from the domestic nuclear related organizations such as Government Agencies, nuclear industries, R and D institutes, universities, and public as well as from IAEA Member States. The NTC has developed education programs for master/doctorial course on advanced nuclear engineering in cooperation with the University of Science and Technology which was established in 2003. Additionally, nuclear education programs such as nuclear technical training courses for the promotion of cooperation with member countries, have developed during the project period. The center has also developed and conducted 7 training courses on nuclear related technology. In parallel, the center has produced 20 training materials including textbooks, 3 multi-media education materials, and 56 Video On Demand (VOD) cyber training materials. In order to promote international cooperation for human resources development, the NTC has implemented a sub-project on the establishment of a web-portal including database for the exchange of information and materials within the framework of ANENT. Also, the center has cooperated with FNCA member countries to establish a model of human resources development, as well as with member countries on bilateral cooperation bases to develop training programs. The International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC), which was opened in 2002, has hosted 318 international and domestic events (training courses, conferences, workshops, etc.) during the project period

  8. Nuclear Manpower Training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, B. J.; Han, K. W.; Lee, H. Y. and others

    2006-01-15

    Through the project on nuclear human resources development in 2005, the Nuclear Training Center of KAERI has provided 67 nuclear education and training courses for 3,658 persons from the domestic nuclear related organizations such as Government Agencies, nuclear industries, R and D institutes, universities, and public as well as from IAEA Member States. In addition, 6 students (MS and Ph D.) have taken nuclear technology related courses offered by UST-KAERI. The project has developed 8 programs and 12 courses. They includes programs for IAEA training, bilateral education and training, and in-house training as well as courses dealing with maintenance of nuclear power plants and management of electricity generation, thermal-hydraulics nuclear hydrogen, nuclear safeguards, radiation emergency preparedness and etc. National and international cooperation has been promoted. For ANENT, test operation, data loading and revision of the web-portal have been undertaken. Also the web-portal operation system has been established. For FNCA, NTC has cooperated for the establishment of a model of human resource development and the exchange of information/materials. With WNU, the NTC has made an effort for hosting 2007 WNU Summer Institute. The infrastructure for nuclear education and training has been strengthened. Basic directions for providing the customers with better service, This includes showing kindness to the customer, renovation of the interior of training facilities, and upgrading of web-based management system for learning and using facilities of NTC. Other efforts have resulted in the publication of 25 course materials (10 for international courses and 15 for national courses), and the improvement of education and training equipment. The International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC), which was opened in 2002, has hosted 296 international and domestic events in 2005.

  9. Nuclear manpower planning and personnel training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Taiwan Power Company has established a nuclear manpower program to identify human resources, selection and recruitment of entry level engineers and technicians of Nuclear Energy Group. The methodology to estimate the future nuclear manpower demand of Taipower has been clearly described in this article. Also, the manpower program is being used as the bases for nuclear training program development. For safe, reliable and efficient operation of nuclear power plants, Taipower has established a systematic training program for nuclear power stations and headquarter personnel. The training program has been implemented in three stages with different patterns of training program. The first stage of nuclear training before 1975 was completed successfully. The second stage of nuclear training currently conducted since 1975 enlarges domestic training capability. The third stage of nuclear training with a long term training program is now under a systematic and compositive development effort

  10. Manpower training and development for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, E.

    1979-01-01

    Determination of the manpower required for implementation of a nuclear programme is a very important factor from the national viewpoint, as it is drawn from many sectors of industry. The author provides a case-study of manpower requirements in France. He is in favour of the establishment of a manpower programme within the educational system, involving schools and universities since technicians and engineers have an important role to play throughout the different stages of a nuclear programme. In this context, he describes the IAEA contribution to acquisition of know-how by means of training courses for developing countries. (NEA) [fr

  11. Nuclear power manpower and training requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whan, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    A broad spectrum of technical personnel is required to conduct a national nuclear power program, predominantly electrical, mechanical, and nuclear engineers and health physicists. The need for nuclear education and training, even in the early planning states, is the topic of this paper. Experience gained in the United States can provide useful information to Asia-Pacific countries developing nuclear power programs. Including both on-site and off-site personnel, U.S. plants average about 570 workers for BWRs and 700 for PWRs. The need for an additional 57,000 technical employees over the next decade is projected. The technical backgrounds of the manpower required to operate and support a nuclear power plant are distinctly different from those used by non-nuclear utilities. Manpower cannot be transferred from fossil fuel plants without extensive training. Meeting the demand for nuclear education and training must be a friendly partnership among universities, government, and industry. The long-term supply of nuclear-educated personnel requires strong, government-supported universities. Most specific training, however, must be provided by industry. (author)

  12. Training and manpower development for nuclear energy programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajakaiye, D.E.; Elegba, S.B.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to train and develop the adequately qualified manpower in the areas of nuclear science and technology. Various options were introduced by the science departments, based on the existing facilities within the university. Twenty final year students were selected annually to attend a summer school in reactor physics and technology at the Karlsruhe Institute for Nuclear Research in West Germany. Also, there was approval for an annual recruitment quota of twelve graduate assistants for the nuclear project. Fifty qualified students were trained for various courses in nuclear science and technology both in the country and abroad. There had been graduates in nuclear science and technology courses up to the doctorate degree level. Part of efforts in the manpower has been directed towards the acquisition of adequate equipment for the teaching laboratories. The establishment of a training center in nuclear technology at Ahmadu Bello University and at University of Ife can only be considered as the zero phase in the nuclear programme of Nigeria. Funding of the nuclear programme must be guaranteed. It is also suggested that the nuclear project be allocated sufficient foreign exchange to meet all its commitments. (A.S.)

  13. The manpower training and development programs of NUCLEBRAS for the Brazilian nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitalnik, J.; Lerner Neto, C.; Stilben, V.; Botelho, O.

    1984-01-01

    As technology transfer is one of the main objectives of the Brazilian Nuclear Program, the principal aim of manpower training has been to provide the conditions for absorbing this technology. The strategy used for such a program required a quantitative and qualitative planning of manpower needs, through medium-range and long-term forecasts, with the condition of maximum utilization of the existing educational infra-structure. On-the-job training which is considered one of the most important means for technology transfer, was given highest priority. Also, management development was considered very important for the implementation of the Nuclear Program. This paper shows the results achieved from 1973 up to now by the manpower training and development programs. (Author) [pt

  14. Nuclear manpower development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, I. A.; Lee, K. B.; Shin, B. C.

    2011-12-01

    The nuclear manpower development project has concentrated on the systemisation and specialization of education and training programs and has actively carried out diverse activities to create new nuclear courses based on the experience of the Nuclear Training and Education Center (NTC) accumulated over the past years. As the demand of education program for training nuclear manpower is increasing due to the remarkable growth of nuclear industry, NTC developed customized education programs making the most use of nuclear experiment equipment and providing practical exercise with research reactor. For improving organizational performance and the development of skilled manpower, KAERI-ACE 2.0 system offered diverse programs addressing the type of occupation and position based on individual competency. Also education on IT was carried out to improve public relations on nuclear and field trips were arranged to encourage local residents' better understanding of the nuclear industry. As a continuous effort, In 2011, NTC specially conducted a survey of employees who are attached to small and medium sized business, and analyzed the present business situations and education requirements for the development of a Pre/under job education program. Prior to this, a briefing session took place for mutual exchange of opinions of industry and academia, based on which a test operation on 'Basic Radiation Education' was carried out. This program has a significance that it was first step toward connection between the nuclear industry and academia as well as an opportunity to educate the employee involved in nuclear engineering field. In 2012, this program is planned to be expanded. With reference to the in-house training, NTC established an 'e-HRD system' providing available resources concerned with education program for cultivating talented personnel. All the education programs are based on individual competency. The e-HRD system will be test operated in 2012 and applied to the

  15. Indian experience in the training of manpower for a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, P.K.; Damodaran, K.K.; Sarma, M.S.R.; Wagadarikar, V.K.

    1977-01-01

    In India manpower training for the nuclear power programme started several years before the introduction of nuclear power plants. Early efforts were concentrated on developing manpower in basic sciences related to nuclear power. The setting up of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre was an important step in this direction. This enabled the first batch of engineers and scientists to be trained on design and operation in the programmes connected with research reactors and use of isotopes in industry, agriculture and medicine. The next step was to establish a Training School in the Centre where young university graduates could be given courses in their own and interconnected disciplines of nuclear sciences. An interdisciplinary approach with teaching by working scientists and engineers and attachment for short periods to the research laboratories is the framework of this training programme. At present about 3000 graduates from this Training School are involved in various capacities in India's nuclear power programme. With the commissioning of the first power reactors, it became necessary to train engineers, scientists and technicians for the operation and maintenance of such systems on a larger scale. For this purpose, a separate training centre at Rajasthan Atomic Power Project was set up. Models, simulators and courses with emphasis on heavy water reactors were introduced. In addition, a number of craftsmen for servicing equipment have also been trained in power station equipment maintenance. The paper describes the development of this programme in its present form. (author)

  16. Indian experience in the training of manpower for nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, P.K.; Damodaran, K.K.; Sarma, M.S.R.; Wagadarikar, V.K.

    1977-01-01

    In India manpower training for the nuclear power programme started several years before the introduction of nuclear power plants. Early efforts were concentrated on developing manpower in basic sciences related to nuclear power; for example, nuclear physics, chemistry, metallurgy of nuclear materials, aspects of chemical engineering etc. The setting up of the research centre viz. Atomic Energy Establishment Trombay, now named the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, was an important step in this direction. A programme of design and construction of research reactors and its utilization formed the backbone of manpower development. This enabled the first batch of engineers and scientists to be trained on the design and operation in the programmes connected with research reactors and use of isotopes in industry, agriculture and medicine. The next step was to establish a Training School in the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre in which fresh graduates from the Universities could be given courses both in their own disciplines and in other inter-connected disciplines of nuclear sciences. About 200 such graduates are being trained every year since 1957. An inter-disciplinary approach with teaching by working scientists and engineers and the attachment for short periods to the research laboratories is the framework of this training programme. At present about 3000 graduates from this Training School are involved in various capacities in India's nuclear power programme. With the commissioning of the first power reactors, it became necessary to conceive of training engineers, scientists and technicians, particularly for operation and maintenance of such systems on a larger scale. For this purpose, a separate training institute at Rajasthan Atomic Power Project near Rana Pratapsagar was set up. Models, simulators and courses, particularly emphasizing the heavy water system of reactors was introduced. In addition, a number of craftsmen for servicing equipment have also been trained as

  17. Nuclear Manpower Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, I. A.; Lee, T. J.; Lee, K. B.; and others

    2012-12-15

    The nuclear manpower development project has concentrated on the systemization and specialization of education and training programs and has actively carried out diverse activities to create new nuclear courses based on the experience of the Nuclear Training and Education Center (NTC) accumulated over the past years. NTC has developed customized education programs on 'Nuclear Introduction' to educate new employees of the Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) and on 'Technical education for criticality and shielding analysis of the spent fuel' for employees of the Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction. NTC has also developed specialized education programs for the students of nuclear engineering departments and sciences and engineering departments in universities making the most use of experimental equipment at KAERI and providing practical exercise with the research reactor, HANARO. For improving organizational performance and the development of skilled manpower, KAERI-ACE system has offered diverse programs addressing individual competency of industry personnel in terms of type of occupation and position. Also education on IT has been carried out to improve public relations on nuclear and field trips have been arranged to encourage local residents' better understanding of the nuclear industry. As the final outcome, NTC has developed 6 new education programs for employees in industry and students in academia, and offered 64 courses to 9,630 persons (273 domestic nuclear personnel, 509 university students, 8,075 KAERI staff, 773 local resident). Especially, in 2012, NTC is honored to won 'Presidential Awards of National Quality Management Awards'. This present that KAERI-ACE system has performed well through a improvement in recent years.

  18. Meeting nuclear utilities manpower needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sillin, L.F. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear-power industry must attract and train 57,000 employees during the next decade, according to a survey which found a high rate of personnel turnover, 8790 unfilled positions, and 75 new plants scheduled to come on line. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operators (INPO) and the industry need to address personnel planning to find out how to meet these needs. Studies indicate a history of on-site staffing and training deficiencies. Regulatory requirements also contribute to manpower shortages. This article examines manpower problems and suggests initiatives the industry can take to support educational programs, expand training, provide employee incentives, and pool technical resources. 7 tables

  19. An overview of the need of manpower supply for a nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palabrica, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The present paper deals with the need for trained manpower and special features of nuclear power affecting manpower requirements and gives a manpower loading schedule for the different nuclear power activities and programmes for manpower development. (orig./RW)

  20. Manpower development for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Guidebook provides policy-makers and managers of nuclear power programmes with information and guidance on the role, requirements, planning and implementation of manpower development programmes. It presents and discusses the manpower requirements associated with the activities of a nuclear power programme, the technical qualifications of this manpower and the manpower development corresponding to these requirements and qualifications. The Guidebook also discusses the purpose and conditions of national participation in the activities of a nuclear power programme

  1. The development of nuclear power and nuclear manpower training in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lin; Xu Xiyue

    2000-01-01

    There are two nuclear power plants (NPP) in operation in China. The Qinshan NPP was the first that was constructed by China's own efforts and went into operation on 1991. The Daya Bay NPP was constructed using foreign funds, technology and went into operation on 1994. Four nuclear power projects with 8 units were initiated during the State Ninth Five-years Plan. The 8 units are expected for commercial operation between 2002 and 2005. China is preparing for the Tenth Five-Year Plan, in which China will develop the nuclear power at a moderate pace. The 13 universities and colleges were offering nuclear science educations. The students from these universities and college can meet the needs of nuclear institutes and enterprises. China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) owns the Graduated School of Nuclear Industry and the Nuclear Industry Administrative Cadre College, which will turn into the nuclear training center in future. Besides, CNNC also owns 4 institutions awarding Doctorate and 9 institutes awarding Master Degree. Many programs for education and training carried out by CNNC are presented, such as direct education supported by CNNC's finances, on job training, education for the second bachelor degree, training for senior economic professionals, research course for senior professionals, short time training course and training for license. China trained nuclear personnel by international cooperation with other countries both through multilateral and bilateral cooperation programs. CNNC has established scientific and economic ties with over 40 countries. CNNC has held diversified training for nuclear industry professionals with our own efforts and with the support from the State for many years. Today, the rapid development of nuclear industry needs more professionals. We must make greater efforts to enhance human resources development. Nuclear Safety is very important for nuclear energy development. Nuclear safety is closely related to each person who works in

  2. International nuclear planning and manpower requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simnad, M.

    1977-01-01

    In the transfer of nuclear technology to developing countries one of the most pressing needs is the manpower requirements for the planning, construction, and operation of the nuclear power systems. The indigenous human resources of the respective countries must be educated and trained to a level commensurate with the demands of such an advanced and challenging technology. The issues to be addressed when discussing international nuclear planning and manpower requirements are summarized

  3. Nuclear Manpower Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, I. A.; Lee, K. B.; Shin, B. C.

    2010-12-01

    The industry-university-research collaborative education is aiming at developing national nuclear human resources to satisfy with the increasing needs from the industry. For this efforts are being made to develop curricula customized to respective industry needs by improving existing ones. As the demand for training programs for the university students and domestic nuclear personnel was increasing owing to revitalization of nuclear industry, Nuclear Training Center (NTC) improved previous education programs to meet the needs. NTC has operated 2 education programs on research reactor experiments for the university students, and 18 programs on nuclear technology related experiment courses in 2010. Furthermore, the NTC developed new education programs related to 'standardized research reactor system design'. Also the request from universities for internship programs was increased by about three times in 2010 compared to those of the previous year, and this required to develop relevant curricula. In 2005, NTC developed KAERI-ACE, as a unique competency-based staff education system of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Based on the system, the NTC has performed 'systematic education'. In 2008, NTC was awarded Best HRD(Human Resource Development) in Public sector for the first time as a government-supported research institute. In 2009, the system was improved to become KAERI-ACE 2.0, based on which, in 2010, NTC improved and diversified education programs including various cyber training programs

  4. The Brazilian nuclear power manpower development programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbalho, A.R.; Spitalnik, J.; Machado, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    Since the early stages of decision making, manpower availability has been recognized to be a key factor for the implementation of Brazil's nuclear power programme. Though care has been given to securing an industrial base and financial resources, the consequences of a lack of sufficient qualified manpower could be critical for the success of the whole programme. The broad scope of the Brazilian nuclear power programme which, as a main concept, aimed at establishing in the country a complete fuel cycle industry together with the construction of nuclear power plants, added another burden to the already complex task of providing appropriate human resources when advanced technologies are introduced in a developing country. Thus, not only the work-force required for nuclear power plant operation but also that needed for plant design, component manufacture, fuel cycle plant design and operation, had to be made available in number and qualification in accordance with the standards of the nuclear industry. The feasibility of the Brazilian programme depended on a complete transfer of technology, essentially achieved through personnel training. Again, the process of manpower preparation for an efficient know-how transfer required careful planning, and the great difficulty in its implementation was the lack of reliable experience at the time. (author)

  5. Manpower development for the nuclear power programme in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, A.; Rahman, M.A.; Quaiyum, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    Surveys undertaken in the early sixties established that nuclear power had a great potential for meeting energy demands in Bangladesh. Therefore, since then the development of the requisite manpower for producing nuclear power in the country has been supported by the authorities. Through the co-operation of the IAEA and national and international agencies, Bangladesh has been able to create a corps of scientists and engineers trained at M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels in various nuclear science and technology disciplines. Some are professional nuclear engineers who have participated in the planning, safety evaluation, construction, commissioning and the subsequent operation of nuclear power plants. This paper reviews the present activities and the future plans for developing qualified manpower for Bangladesh's nuclear power programme. The difficulties in developing skilled manpower are also discussed. Overall manpower requirements have been evaluated. It has been found that in certain areas, such as quality control and quality assurance, BAEC has no trained personnel, and existing trained manpower falls short in requirements. Hence, recruitment is being done and training in selected areas is being arranged under different IAEA and bilateral assistance programmes, and a national nuclear training institution with adequate facilities is being established. (author)

  6. Manpower

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.; Nath, B.N.; Sharma, R.

    The recruitment, training and deployment of manpower for scientific work during an oceanographic expedition is discussed. Fifty scientists and 50 technicians in various disciplines of oceanography were recruited. A training in oceanography...

  7. Manpower requirements for nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    It is recognized that each country has its individual unique characteristics and that there is no typical or average developing country. Common conditions represent exceptions, rather than the rule. Manpower requirements, however, are created by the tasks to be performed and activities to be carried out at each definite stage of a nuclear power project or programme. These tasks and activities, as well as the manpower requirements they create, are of a similar nature for any country, subject to the influence of prevailing local conditions. First, successive stages of the evolution of a nuclear power programme are defined. These are: pre-planning, planning, study and procurement, construction, operation of the first plant, confirmed and self-sufficient in implementing nuclear power projects. The developing countries are then classified according to the present stage of their evolution. Finally, the present and future manpower requirements of each country or group of countries are estimated. No attempt has been made to try to establish any precise data for any country in particular. The results obtained are global estimates, intended as indications of trends and of orders of magnitude. It is found that the developing world's present manpower requirements for nuclear power are of the order of 100,000 people, of which about 20,000 need specialized nuclear training. By the year 2000, for an installed nuclear capacity of 150 to 200 GW, overall manpower requirements should increase to more than 500,000 which would include 130,000 with specialized nuclear training. (author)

  8. On nuclear manpower development in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phung Van Duan

    2007-01-01

    Vietnam began to be interested in education and training on nuclear sciences and related subjects since the early 1960's. A department of Nuclear Physics and Engineering was established in 1970 at the Hanoi University of Technology (HUT), which is the biggest interdisciplinary technological education centre of the country. In Vietnam there are several institutions where exist programmes of education on nuclear sciences and nuclear engineering. But HUT has been being since 1970 the only institution that has underway programme of education on nuclear engineer degree. Although the Department was renamed and its education programme was adjusted, but the objectives of its education programme have been being followed without changes. These objectives are as follows: 1) To develop peaceful applications of atomic energy in Vietnam; 2) To train up engineers on nuclear instrumentation for supporting the first objective; and 3) To prepare initial manpower for introduction of Nuclear Power in Vietnam. Nuclear community of Vietnam is still not so large. Total number of its members increased until 1986, and then decreases up to now. Present average age of members of the community is of 45. In 15 coming years at least 500-700 young people must be educated on programmes on nuclear engineer degree and on nuclear bachelor degree. This is a very difficult task for a developing country such as Vietnam. From a point of view of development, the above-mentioned number is too small, and it must be much more. This makes the task much more difficult. In addition, education on nuclear engineering in the country at present is in a hard situation because of lacking in experienced people, as well as in teaching material and equipment, and, because of weakness of the education programme. So, it may be impossible to achieve success in realization of the task without a large and effective international cooperation in education on nuclear science and engineering. That is why the Asian Network for

  9. Manpower and training requirements for operation and maintenance of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    The experience in India with regard to the staffing of nuclear power station operations and maintenance is encouraging in the sense that given the effort and time, developing countries should not find it unduly difficult to meet their requirements. (orig.) [de

  10. Evaluation of Cardiology Training and Manpower Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Forrest H., Ed.; Mendenhall, Robert C., Ed.

    Begun in June, 1971 and completed in October 1973, the study had the following specific goals: to define the cardiologist's role; to determine cardiology training program objectives; to determine manpower needs for cardiologists; and to determine the educational needs of cardiologists. The major information was sought from all active cardiologists…

  11. Indian manpower for mega nuclear project

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "India is supplying critical scientific manpower and high-tech components needed for building a Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - an accelerator used in particle physics research - a mega scientific project of the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) worth billions of dollars" (1/2 page).

  12. Trained manpower resources in Brazil. Estimates and preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, R.N.; Araujo, R. de; Pinto, C.S.M.; Dale, C.M.M.; Souza, J.A.M. de; Spitalnik, J.

    1977-01-01

    The Brazilian nuclear programme will require by 1990 the installation of at least 10000MW(e) of nuclear power capacity, the implementation of the entire fuel cycle complex, and the creation of a reactor heavy-components manufacturing industry and of a nuclear power plant engineering capability. It has been estimated that such a programme will have to employ, up to 1985, some 7000-8000 people at the engineering and technician levels. The paper summarizes the consequent planning for preparation and qualification of manpower, which, as it involved such large numbers, required not only thorough analyses of sectoral requirements but also careful consideration of depletion rates and losses during the training process. Taking this into account, the Universities and Technical Schools will need to graduate, on average, 450 additional engineers and 550 additional technicians per year during the next ten years. For this purpose, the maximum use of the existing educational system in Brazil will avoid excessive reliance on external sources and will strengthen the local infrastructure. Crash specialization courses have been developed, in conjunction with the Universities, to comply specifically with the requirements of the nuclear programme. Only when no industrial experience can be provided in the country is on-the-job training in foreign firms considered. Training of nuclear power plant operators is also to be a local activity. An Operators Training Centre, by using a plant simulator, is being implemented with a scheduled operational date in the early 1980s. To implement the nuclear manpower programme, the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear has been given the task of promoting and co-ordinating the nuclear academic education, while Empresas Nucleares Brasileiras SA is responsible for specialization and training of personnel in nuclear technology. (author)

  13. Requirements for and development of trained manpower resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, R. Nazare; Araujo, R. de; Pinto, C. Syllus M.; Dale, C. Marcio M.; Souza, Jair A.M.; Spitalnik, J.

    1977-01-01

    The Brazilian nuclear programme will require, by 1990, the installation of at least 10 000 MWe of nuclear power capacity, the implementation of the entire fuel cycle complex, and the creation of a reactor heavy components manufacturing industry and of a nuclear power plant engineering capability. It has been estimated that such a programme will have to employ until 1985, some 7000 to 8000 people at the engineering and technician levels. As a consequence, planning the manpower preparation and qualification, involving such large numbers, required not only thorough analyses of sectoral requirements but also careful consideration of depletion rates and losses during the training process. Taking this into account, the Universities and Technical Schools will need to graduate, in average, 450 - 550 additional engineers and technicians respectively per year during the next 10 years. For this purpose, the maximum possible use of the existing educational system in the country will refrain from excessive reliance upon external sources and strengthen the local infrastructure. Crash specialization courses have been developed, in conjunction with the Universities, to specifically comply with the requirements of the nuclear programme. Only in the case where no industrial experience can be provided in the country, on-the-job training in foreign firms is being considered. Training of nuclear power plant operators is also to be a local activity. An Operators Training Center, by using a plant simulator, is under implementation with a scheduled operational date in the early eighties. For the implementation of the nuclear manpower programme, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN) has been given the task of promoting and coordinating the nuclear academic education, whereas Empresas Nucleares Brasileiras S.A. (NUCLEBRAS) has the responsibility for the specialization and training of personnel in the nuclear technological fields [es

  14. Economics of manpower development, costs of training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear programme, personnel organization-regulatory bodies, utility head office, nuclear power plant, industry. Selection of personnel and job assignment procedures. Training in the home country and abroad. Personnel, social and technical costs of training. Retraining and replacement training. Costs of training centers, local and regional. (orig.)

  15. Survey of competing sources of manpower demand related to the nuclear power industry. Manpower studies series, Report No. 3 (Draft)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The following is a report of a survey designed to determine competing sources of demand for technically qualified manpower. The survey is part of a larger research effort which is also designed to investigate occupational employment and training in the nuclear power industry and sources of manpower supply available to the industry. The results of those other studies have been published separately and ara available upon request. This report includes a brief discussion of the background of the study, the research methods employed, the results obtained, and some implications of those findings. The appendices contain copies of the questionnaires used in the survey as well as some additional related data

  16. Manpower development in the US nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todreas, N.E.; Foulke, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the history and current status of the university nuclear education sector and the utility training sector of the United States (US) nuclear power industry. Recently, the number of programs in the university nuclear education sector has declined, and the remaining programs are in need of both strong governmental and industrial assistance if they are to remain a stable source for educating nuclear engineers and health physicists to staff the resurgence of the nuclear power industry. The utility training sector has undergone remarkable development since the TMI-2 accident. Programs to recruit, train, and qualify the variety of personnel needed, as well as the steps to accredit these programs, are being developed on a systematic, industry-wide basis. A number of new technologies for educating and training personnel are emerging which may be used to create or improve learning environments. Manpower development for the US nuclear power industry is a shared responsibility among the universities, the nuclear utilities, and the nuclear suppliers. This shared responsibility can continue to be best discharged by enhancement of the interaction among all parties with respect to evaluating the proper level of cognitive development within the utility training program

  17. Manpower Requirements and Education in Nuclear Science: An International Perspective Nuclear Science Manpower and Education Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeisler, R.; Clark, S.B.; Parry, S.J.; Choppin, G.R.; Danesi, P.R.; Rossbach, M.; Williamson, C.; and others

    2005-01-01

    The MARC-VI conference served as an excellent setting for a session organized to present and discuss the problems in nuclear science manpower and education. A panel discussion and contributed papers reflected the world-wide situation. Major points of the panel discussion are presented. As a result, a resolution on the current situation of nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry was drafted and endorsed by the conference attendees. (author)

  18. Manpower development for safe operation of nuclear power plant. China. Simulator training for instructions. Activity: 2.1.4-Task-16. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Dong Hyun; Song, Suk Ill.

    1996-01-01

    By the request of the Qinshan Nuclear Power training center, Korea Electric Power Company (KEPCO) expert team visited the Qinshan Nuclear Power Training Center during October 7-21, 1996. The purpose of the visiting was as follows: To give some ideas, through KEPCO KNTC training experiences about operator training programme including simulator training - how to improve simulator instructors' training skill and knowledge; how to conduct classroom and simulator lectures; how to prepare lesson note for lectures; how to make the trainees evaluation; how to course analyze and feed back; how to make scenario for simulator training. To fulfill above purposes, the expert team used KNTC procedures, 1996 KNTC training plan, development and qualification for instructor, simulator training and evaluation, control and preparedness of lesson notes. These procedures were used only to establish the framework for Qinshan nuclear training center's procedures

  19. Manpower and areas of activity in the nuclear research centers in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miessner, H.

    1984-12-01

    A survey is presented of tasks and functions of the nuclear research centers, which belong to the 13 big research establishments in the Federal Republic of Germany. The central R+D-activities in the nuclear field (high temperature reactor, fast breeder, uranium enrichment, reprocessing, waste handling, nuclear safety, nuclear fusion, fusion technology, plasma physics and technology) and the manpower assigned to these activities are described. Future developments in R+D and in manpower are discussed. An outline is given of cooperation established with industry, universities and other institutions. The number of staff and its composition in terms of education and qualification are indicated. Staff mobility, especially transfer to industry, manpower development of junior staff and training efforts are discussed. (orig.) [de

  20. IAEA's role in manpower development for nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.; Skjoeldebrand, R.

    1985-01-01

    Strengthening the manpower infrastructures in the developing countries that have nuclear power programs or plan to start one is of primary importance. Though manpower development is mainly a national effort, outside assistance is also needed. The IAEA is heavily engaged in providing such assistance through an integral, co-ordinated program employing different means: publications, courses, information exchange meetings, fellowships, equipment grants and expert missions. The program is aimed at promoting awareness of need, importance, requirements and problems; providing guidance for assessment of manpower requirements; assisting in manpower development program planning and implementation; and providing specialized training. Within this program, efforts are concentrated mainly in those critical areas where the need for external assistance seems greatest and where the largest benefits are expected, such as planning, management, safety and quality assurance. The sustained and increasing demand of the member States for such assistance provides a measure of the success of this program

  1. OPTIMAL TRAINING POLICY FOR PROMOTION - STOCHASTIC MODELS OF MANPOWER SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S.S. Yadavalli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the optimal planning of manpower training programmes in a manpower system with two grades is discussed. The planning of manpower training within a given organization involves a trade-off between training costs and expected return. These planning problems are examined through models that reflect the random nature of manpower movement in two grades. To be specific, the system consists of two grades, grade 1 and grade 2. Any number of persons in grade 2 can be sent for training and after the completion of training, they will stay in grade 2 and will be given promotion as and when vacancies arise in grade 1. Vacancies arise in grade 1 only by wastage. A person in grade 1 can leave the system with probability p. Vacancies are filled with persons in grade 2 who have completed the training. It is assumed that there is a perfect passing rate and that the sizes of both grades are fixed. Assuming that the planning horizon is finite and is T, the underlying stochastic process is identified as a finite state Markov chain and using dynamic programming, a policy is evolved to determine how many persons should be sent for training at any time k so as to minimize the total expected cost for the entire planning period T.

  2. Nuclear Science: a survey of funding, facilities, and manpower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    In 1973 the Committee on Nuclear Science of the National Research Council initiated a re-examination of aspects (funding, manpower, and facilities) of the organization and operation of nuclear science research in order to evaluate any changes in the preceding four years and implications of such changes. The reports of the three ad hoc panels established for this purpose (funding and level of effort, nuclear facilities, manpower and education) are presented. Although they identify current problems in nuclear science, these reports do not provide simple solutions; rather, they attempt to provide updated information for use as background for continuing decisions

  3. Survey of sources of manpower supply for the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The following is a report of a survey designed to determine sources of manpower supply available to the Nuclear Power Industry. The survey is part of a larger research effort which is also designed to investigate occupational employment and training in the Nuclear Power Industry and competing sources of demand for technically qualified manpower. The results of those other studies have been published separately and are available upon request. This report includes a brief discussion of the background of the study, the research methods employed, the results obtained, and some implications of those findings. The appendices contain copies of the questionnaires used in the survey as well as some additional related data

  4. Characterization of health physics technician manpower supply and training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathren, R.L.; Mann, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study is twofold: (1) to determine the current status and recent trends in radiation safety manpower supply and demand among DOE contractors; and (2) to document the scope of radiation safety training activities within the DOE contractor system. A questionnaire has been developed in conjunction with Oak Ridge Associated Universities to gather data in these two areas

  5. [Problems of X-ray mammology manpower training and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkova, N I

    2014-01-01

    The paper considers the issues of manpower training in X-ray mammology. It mentions staff shortage and no special training, which reduces the efficient activities of X-ray mammographic rooms, as well as shortage of training facilities and no unified educational programs within interdisciplinary integration, inadequate technical equipment in the training facilities, the lack of an accounting system for training higher- and mid-level health workers, as well as engineers. Emphasis is placed on that the educational programs must comply with the organizational forms of testing the specialists to be employed. The introduction of a continuous education system should be accelerated to rule out the decay period of specialists' competence.

  6. Manpower requirements and development for the new 33-GW nuclear generation plan of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, K.

    1980-01-01

    The future planned level of nuclear power generation was recently amended by the Japan Atomic Energy Commission to 33 GW by the year 1985. It means that further construction of at least 19 nuclear power plants of 1000 MW(e) each will be needed for the accomplishment of this new plan during the next seven years. The technical manpower requirement for this new plan is estimated in this paper by use of a typical model, which requires a staff of 100 persons for the normal operation of a 1000-MW(e) nuclear power plant. Among these technical staff members, the number of well-trained and experienced persons, i.e. 'key personnel', is considered to be 28. A comparison between manpower requirement and supply for the new plan is made for reactor operators, technical staff, radiation safety staff and maintenance staff. Through this comparison, nuclear training programmes for the development of manpower needed for operation and maintenance is reviewed both from the aspects of quality and quantity by taking into account the functions of the existing training courses in Japan. In addition, the periodic inspection of a nuclear power plant requires almost 1300 persons per power plant; they do not belong to the nuclear power companies, but to either directly related or sub-contracted companies. The educational problems for the 'key personnel' among these people are discussed, and a new programme is proposed. (author)

  7. Nuclear power training courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The training of technical manpower for nuclear power projects in developing countries is now a significant part of the IAEA Technical Assistance Programme. Two basic courses are the cornerstones of the Agency's training programme for nuclear power: a course in planning and implementation, and a course in construction and operation management. These two courses are independent of each other. They are designed to train personnel for two distinct phases of project implementation. The nuclear power project training programme has proven to be successful. A considerable number of highly qualified professionals from developing countries have been given the opportunity to learn through direct contact with experts who have had first-hand experience. It is recognized that the courses are not a substitute for on-the-job training, but their purpose is achieved if they have resulted in the transfer of practical, reliable information and have helped developing countries to prepare themselves for the planning, construction and operation management of nuclear power stations

  8. Current status of SMPRs and manpower development for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.P.

    1994-01-01

    The development of SMPRs could make it possible for countries with small electrical grids to use nuclear power. SMPRs are still in the developing stages and none of them have the capability of good plant performance. Most of the SMPRs are in the 300 MWe range and a grid capacity of at least 2000 MWe would be required before such a power plant can be connected to the grid. There is a possibility that SMPRs could generate electricity cheaper coal plants requiring desulphurization. An unexpected increase in coal price and adverse environmental effects could make it necessary to use nuclear power in the future. Qualified manpower is required to plan, build and properly operate a nuclear power plant; and the availability of qualified manpower is a pre-condition for deciding to use nuclear power. There is a possibility that Sri Lanka would be able to use nuclear power in the next 15-20 years and a total dependence upon foreign expertise is neither possible nor desirable. Therefore pre-project activities should be considering such things as teaching nuclear science and engineering in the universities and retraining existing professionals, say from the coal power industry. Adequate emphasis must be given to manpower development and to the need to scheduling this development

  9. Development of the Manpower Demand Forecast Model of Nuclear Industry Using the System Dynamics Method - Operation Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Suk; Ahn, Nam Sung

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the resource management of nuclear engineering manpower has become an important issue in Korean nuclear industry. The government's plan for increasing the number of domestic nuclear power plants and the recent success of nuclear power plant export to UAE (United Arab Emirates) will increase demand for nuclear engineers in Korea. Accordingly, the Korean government decided to supplement 2,246 engineers in the public sector of nuclear industry in the year 2010 to resolve the manpower shortage problem in the short term. However, the experienced engineers which are essentially important in the nuclear industry cannot be supplied in the short term. Therefore, development of the long term manpower demand forecast model of nuclear industry is needed. The system dynamics (SD) is useful method for forecasting nuclear manpower demand. It is because the time-delays which is important in constructing plants and in recruiting and training of engineers, and the feedback effect including the qualitative factor can be effectively considered in the SD method. Especially, the qualitative factor like 'Productivity' is very important concept in Human Resource Management (HRM) but it cannot be easily considered in the other methods. In this paper, the concepts of the nuclear manpower demand forecast model using the SD method are presented and the some simulation results are being discussed especially for the 'Operation Sector'

  10. Development of the Manpower Demand Forecast Model of Nuclear Industry Using the System Dynamics Method - Operation Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Suk [Future and Challenges Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Nam Sung [SolBridge International School of Business, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Recently, the resource management of nuclear engineering manpower has become an important issue in Korean nuclear industry. The government's plan for increasing the number of domestic nuclear power plants and the recent success of nuclear power plant export to UAE (United Arab Emirates) will increase demand for nuclear engineers in Korea. Accordingly, the Korean government decided to supplement 2,246 engineers in the public sector of nuclear industry in the year 2010 to resolve the manpower shortage problem in the short term. However, the experienced engineers which are essentially important in the nuclear industry cannot be supplied in the short term. Therefore, development of the long term manpower demand forecast model of nuclear industry is needed. The system dynamics (SD) is useful method for forecasting nuclear manpower demand. It is because the time-delays which is important in constructing plants and in recruiting and training of engineers, and the feedback effect including the qualitative factor can be effectively considered in the SD method. Especially, the qualitative factor like 'Productivity' is very important concept in Human Resource Management (HRM) but it cannot be easily considered in the other methods. In this paper, the concepts of the nuclear manpower demand forecast model using the SD method are presented and the some simulation results are being discussed especially for the 'Operation Sector'

  11. Manpower requirements for nuclear power programmes in nations of intermediate capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantarell, I.; Cerrolaza, J.A.; Llado, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A study is made of the manpower required for initiating and carrying out a nuclear power programme in countries which have not developed their own nuclear technology but where the technical and economic level is such to permit a substantial input from local industry. The discussion is based on Spanish experience. The three basic elements in a nuclear programme are taken to be the operating company, the regulating authority and the engineering firm involved. The role of each of these is briefly considered and the manpower requirements during the design, construction and operational phases of a power station are evaluated. A short account is also given of the manpower requirements of other enterprises such as those involved in the civil engineering, the assembly and construction control. The variations in the labour force are described with the aim of deriving estimates of the number of people involved in the development of a nuclear power programme as a function of time: actual numbers are given for the case of the Spanish national energy plan. A brief description is given of the various courses on nuclear science and engineering provided in Spain and the requirements laid down by the regulations. A short account is given of Spanish nuclear development, with emphasis on the work carried out by the Nuclear Energy Board, not only as a research organization but also in its promotional and training capacities and as a source of personnel for industry. Finally, some comments are made on the possibilities opened up by international co-operation. (author)

  12. MANPOWER REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT AND A REPORT ON MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS, RESOURCES, UTILIZATION, AND TRAINING, MARCH 1966.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Labor, Washington, DC.

    HIGHLIGHTS OF THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT INCLUDED (1) IN 1965 MORE THAN 100,000 PERSONS COMPLETED TRAINING UNDER THE MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING ACT, (2) 3 OF EVERY 4 WERE PLACED IN JOBS WITHIN 90 DAYS OF COMPLETION OF THE COURSE, (3) MORE THAN 500,000 YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN WERE APPROVED FOR PARTICIPATION IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH CORPS, (4)…

  13. Meeting the manpower challenge in the transfer of nuclear power to developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chewning, J.S.; Couchman, D.L.; Kaiz, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    One of the constraints to meeting projections of nuclear power's share of energy needs in the United States has been the various manpower problems, ranging from idling of construction manpower because of disruptions in the flow of materials and construction scheduling to the comptetition between various segments of the nuclear industry, government, and educational institutions for the available supply of experienced nuclear-oriented engineering personnel. Similar problems have been encountered in other countries which are presently partially dependent upon nuclear power for energy, and the competition for qualified personnel has become international in scope with considerable migrating of engineers among these nations. The global needs for staffing personnel of nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities to 1990 indicate continued stress on the international technical manpower supply. When considering the manpower and training necessary for the execution of a country's first nuclear project, the burden imposed on the purchaser's organization needs to be clearly understood. The work load and the responsibilities that cannot be transferred to other organizations is usually underestimated. In assessing the magnitude of the workload, four important points should be emphasized: (1) The responsibility for the ultimate success or failure of the nuclear project must be borne by the purchaser's organization. Contractors can assume responsibility for the performance of specific tasks but not for the entire project; (2) Even in a turnkey contact, the prime contractor normally will not assume financial responsibility for the performance of the local subcontractors, whose performance must be monitored and controlled by the purchaser's organization; (3) Many areas of a nuclear project involving domestic bureaucracy, politics, regulations, etc., can be dealt with effectively only by nationals. Examples of such areas are customs clearances and import licenses, visas, housing

  14. The prospective United Kingdom nuclear energy programme up to 2000 AD and the UKAEA's role and manpower requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeone, R.N.; Hodgkinson, I.A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper begins by surveying the development of the United Kingdom nuclear industry, its organization in both the public and private sectors of the economy, and changes in the numbers employed up to the present day. The possible future nuclear programme and overall manpower needs, and the UKAEA's role and manpower requirements within this programme, are outlined. Manpower problems arising from national shortages of engineers and technicians and reviews of arrangements for their education and training, and also from the pattern of historical development of the UKAEA, are described. UKAEA arrangements for formulating and implementing personnel policies, current policies for recruitment, carrier management and in-service training and their relationship to present and future needs are then discussed. The final section draws attention to UKAEA facilities for the training of staff from other organizations in the United Kingdom and from overseas. (author)

  15. Training of manpower resources at the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosis de Libanati, Nelly

    1982-01-01

    The main factors that influenced the development of the manpower resources required by CNEA over its thirty years of life are discussed: a careful specialized training; basic and applied research groups as a basic support for the other activities; teams responsible for the applications and for the concrete realizations of increasing complexity carried out by CNEA, culminating with the nuclear power plants; CNEA's relations with the national educational system regarding nuclear specialization; CNEA's international interaction, either by the participation of foreigners in its internal courses, by the commissioning of Argentinians abroad, and by the cooperation with international agencies in organizing courses, seminars and conferences; the influence of the radiological protection and nuclear safety requirements on the training programs, on nuclear industry, and on the users of radioisotopes and radiations; the importance of feeding the results of each activity back into the system so as to obtain a dynamic programming adapted to the requirements at all times. (M.E.L.) [es

  16. Manpower development from client's viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, R.C.T.

    1985-01-01

    To comply with the long term power development program of Taiwan Power Company, a nuclear manpower program has been established to identify human resources, selection and recruitment of entry level engineers and technicians of the Nuclear Energy Group of Taiwan Power Company. The nuclear manpower program is developed based on the benchmark of 468 perons for a two-unit nuclear power plant with capacity ranging from 636 MW to 985 MW. The methodology to estimate the future nuclear manpower demand to Taipower has been clearly described in this article. This nuclear power program is being used as the basis for long term nuclear training program development

  17. Assessment of demand for and supply of qualified manpower for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morelle, J.

    1993-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency recently published a study which presents the results of a pioneering survey of the demand for and the supply of qualified manpower in various sectors of the nuclear industry (including medicine), and in the related areas of regulation and education in 12 OECD countries. The current manpower situation is presented and the future demand is reviewed. Present and future activities of OECD countries to ensure a balance between supply and demand of qualified manpower are discussed

  18. Meeting the manpower challenge in the transfer of nuclear power to developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chewning, J.S.; Couchman, D.L.; Kaiz, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    The global needs for staffing personnel of nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities to 1990 indicate continued stress on the international technical manpower supply. When considering the manpower and training necessary for the execution of a country's first nuclear project, the burden imposed on the purchaser's organization needs to be clearly understood. The work load and the responsibilities that cannot be transferred to other organizations are usually underestimated. In assessing the magnitude of the workload, four important points should be emphasized: (1) The responsibility for the ultimate success or failure of the nucler project must be borne by the purchaser's organization. Contractors can assume responsibility for the performance of specific tasks but not for the entire project. (2) Even in a turnkey contract, the prime contractor normally will not assume financial responsibility for the performance of the local subcontractors. (3) Many areas of a nuclear project involving domestic bureaucracy, politics, regulations, etc., can be dealt with effectively only be nationals. (4) The most serious problems experienced in developing country projects to date have not been the type which require additional personnel with advanced academic training in nuclear science and technology, but rather (a) personnel with practical experience and training in the organizational, contractual, and administrative aspects of large projects, and (b) technicians and skilled craft labour. (author)

  19. [Training and use of dental manpower resources in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermosillo, G G; López Cámara, V; Alvarez Manilla, J M; García Cantú, M; Silva Olivares, H

    1978-01-01

    The introductory section describes the general situation of dental care in Mexico, analyzes the prevailing service model (including the kind of work done by the dental professional and the technology he employs), and briefly reviews the evolution of dentistry in the country. There follows an account of a series of new approaches to service and manpower training in experimental implementation since 1972 in the stomatology curriculum at the Xochimilco campus of the Metropolitan Autonomous University, at the National School of Professional Studies at Zaragoza, in the School of Dentistry of Nuevo León Autonomous University, Monterrey, and in the Dental Services at Ciudad Netzahualcóyotl. In each case, the background, characteristics, and objectives of the programs, and their evolution and prospects are described.

  20. Forecasting manpower requirements for nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seltzer, N.; Schriver, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents both the methodology and results of a segment of a comprehensive construction manpower demand forecasting system aimed at forecasting virtually all construction manpower requirements in the United States of America. The part of the system dealing with the demand for construction workers needed to build nuclear powered electricity generating plants is discussed here. The object of the system is to forecast manpower construction needs for each of 29 construction crafts on a monthly basis in each of 10 geographical regions of the United States. The method used is to establish profiles of the types of workers and time phasing required in the past. Profiling was done for different types of plants, different capacity classes, and different geographical locations. An appropriate worker profile matrix cannot simply be multiplied by the capacity of the proposed plant if the number of man-hours required per kilowatt of generating capacity is not constant. The value of this latter variable has changed considerably recently - presumably because of an increased awareness of environmental and safety considerations. Econometric techniques are used to forecast values for man-hours per kilowatt which are then multiplied by projected new capacity to be put in place. The resulting total man-hour requirement is then allocated over time and by craft through use of a worker profile matrix. The summary results indicate that 20 percent increases in man-hours required per kilowatt of capacity can be expected between 1977 and 1981. Total construction labour demand will rise from 65,700 work-years in 1977 to nearly 96,600 work-years in 1981. Forecasts of the actual number of different types of workers to be demanded in each month and in each region are available from the system. (author)

  1. MANPOWER PROJECTIONS AND TRAINING NEEDS FORECAST TO 1975 FOR THE TERRE HAUTE AREA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiana State Univ., Terre Haute.

    USING U.S. CENSUS BUREAU AND INDIANA EMPLOYMENT SECURITY DIVISION DATA, A PREVIOUS STUDY WAS UPDATED TO INCLUDE PROJECTIONS OF MANPOWER AND TRAINING NEEDS FOR THE TERRE HAUTE AREA. GRAPHS SHOW TRENDS FOR EIGHT OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS IN THE UNITED STATES, THE NATION'S URBAN AREAS, INDIANA, AND THE TERRE HAUTE STANDARD METROPOLITAN AREA. MANPOWER NEEDS…

  2. Forty years of nuclear manpower development activities in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The training institute which was founded in 1958 for training researchers and engineers in atomic energy field attained to 40 years in January, 1998. During this period, it has accomplished the main role of training atomic energy engineers in Japan, but meeting the needs of the age, international training has been held, and also internally, the seminars for general public were carried out. So far, more than 45,000 persons who have finished the training have taken active parts in various atomic energy fields in Japan and abroad. The change of the training institute from initial Radioisotope Training Institute and Nuclear Reactor Training Institute to present International Atomic Energy General Technical Center is briefed. As to the training in Japan, the training of radioisotope and radiation technicians is reported about the basic course, the special course and the designated short course. As to the training of atomic energy engineers, the courses related to nuclear reactor engineering, the special courses on health physics, radiation protection, nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management, and the development of training techniques are described. As to the training of general public, the lecture on disaster prevention and atomic energy experiment seminar are performed. International training and the technical interchange in Asia and Pacific regions are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Manpower development and international cooperation in Nuclear Technology and Education Center, JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiba, Koreyuki; Tojo, Takao; Takada, Kazuo; Nomura, Masayuki

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear Technology and Education Center was founded in 1958 and now has two branches, Tokyo Education Center at Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo and Tokai Education Center at Tokai, Ibaraki-ken. The objective was to educate and train nuclear engineers and scientists for implementing the nation's program of atomic energy research, development and utilization. A variety of training courses have been prepared and carried out to meet the requirements of the nuclear community. In recent years, activities of getting the public acceptance have become important for nuclear energy deployment in Japan. Many short courses have been implemented at JAERI sites and cities for providing the public including high school teachers with basic knowledge on nuclear energy. International training programs of the center were started with the cooperation of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) in 1985 and of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in 1987. International seminars were implemented for improving nuclear safety by inviting participants from the former Soviet Union, central/east European countries and the neighboring countries of Japan under the direction of the Science and Technology Agency (STA) in 1992. STA and JAERI are starting new programs of helping Asian and Pacific countries to develop nuclear manpower. (author)

  4. Research Directory for Manpower, Personnel, Training, and Human Factors, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Malone 703-698-6225 Smart Contract Preparation Expediter (R) Ms Joan E Forester 410-278-2946 DSN:298-2946 (P) Mr R Cofod 703-359-0996 Soldier...Mike Hanuschik 513-255-3871 DSN:785-3871 Small Unit Maintenance Manpower Analyses (SUMMA) (R) Mr Edward Boyle 513-255-3871 DSN:785-3871 Smart Contract Preparation

  5. Manpower Development to Support Indian Graduate Training School Program of BARC and its Incorporation in University System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, B.K.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: • Nuclear technology is multidisciplinary, knowledge intensive, and its education and training are constrained by unusual measures demanded by the concerns about radiation and nuclear safety, physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities, and safeguards to prevent diversion of nuclear material. • This requires vast faculty resources as also extraordinary and expensive infrastructure for conducting nuclear education making the task of human resource development in nuclear science and technology a challenging one. • The human resource for the nuclear energy programme in India so far has therefore been developed in-house in the DAE. • However, large requirement of manpower to take forward the growing nuclear energy programme in the country can be met only by extending concurrently the reach of the human resource development activity in nuclear science and technology. • The DAE is therefore supporting the university system in India, and integrating the existing training program with the university system. • It may be emphasized that nuclear education, being a means of preservation and transmission of explicit knowledge, is just one component of nuclear knowledge management (NKM). • The NKM also involves creation of mechanisms to preserve and transmit implicit and tacit knowledge

  6. Future global manpower shortages in nuclear industries with special reference to india including remedial measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh Hazra, G.S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Radiation Protection Program of the Environmental Protection Agencies of countries employ scientists, engineers, statisticians, economists, lawyers, policy analysts, and public affairs professionals amongst others. These professionals aim to protect workers, the general public, and the environment from harmful radiation exposures and to provide the technical basis for radiation protection policies and regulations. Professionals include Health physicists, Bio statistician, Radio chemist, Radio ecologist, Radio biologist etc. With a large proportion of the population of the nuclear workforce of many countries now approaching retirement age, existing power plants of these countries will be hard pressed to find enough qualified professionals to support their operations. The potential shortage of skilled manpower not only affects utilities, but also impacts the entire nuclear infrastructure, including national laboratories, federal and state agencies, nuclear technology vendors and manufacturing companies, nuclear construction companies, and university nuclear engineering departments. Manpower requirements exist in the nuclear power industry, universities and research establishments, hospitals, government departments, general industry e.g. radiography, transport, instrumentation etc., specialist contractors, agencies and consultancies serving radiation protection. India is no exception. India has the world's 12 th largest economy. Assuming India's average growth rate p.a. of more than 5%, total GDP by 2050 will increase substantially which will require proportionate increase of manpower for all industries. Also chance of brain drain is very high from developing countries e.g. from India to developed countries because of much higher pay and better lifestyle as there will be shortage of manpower in developed countries as explained above. With population growth to be stabilized in future in India, the working age population may not increase in the year 2030

  7. Demand for engineering manpower at US nuclear utilities, 1987-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poling, D.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO), organized in December 1979, is an independent undertaking in self-improvement by the US nuclear utilities. INPO has conducted manpower surveys each year since 1981. The survey is designed to determine current employment, vacancies, turnover, and other employment-related matters at the 54 US electric utilities that operate or are constructing nuclear power plants. It also provides 10-yr projections of nuclear manpower demand at the utilities and current and 1-yr projections of employment opportunities for new engineering and science graduates. It should be noted that the data reported in this paper do not include nonutility employment; utility employment constitutes approximately one-third of the civilian nuclear work force as reported by the US Department of Energy

  8. Manpower requirements of quality assurance personnel for the nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, A.E.; El-sayed, A.A.; Shabaan, I.H.

    1987-01-01

    Basic principles for structuring and staffing of the quality assurance (Q.A.)organisation in the nuclear power plant (NPP) are presented. the manpower requirements of the Q.A.organisation in the NPP during both construction and operational stages are determined. the manpower requirements for Q.A./Q.C. functions in a NPP are found to be proportional to the number of craft workers needed to perform the required level of the construction. The Q.A./Q.C. personnel are about 15% of the total number of the craft workers required during construction

  9. Development of a Big Data Application Architecture for Navy Manpower, Personnel, Training, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    science IT information technology JBOD just a bunch of disks JDBC java database connectivity xviii JPME Joint Professional Military Education JSO...Joint Service Officer JVM java virtual machine MPP massively parallel processing MPTE Manpower, Personnel, Training, and Education NAVMAC Navy...27 external database, whether it is MySQL , Oracle, DB2, or SQL Server (Teller, 2015). Connectors optimize the data transfer by obtaining metadata

  10. Research and Studies Directory for Manpower, Personnel, and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    COFOD R* LICA SYSTEMS INC 703-359-0996 SMART CONTRACT PREPARATION EXPEDITER COLLINS H* ARMY TRAINING AND DOCTRINE COMMAND 205-848-3174 BATTLEFIELD...TECHNICAL SUPPORT FORESTER J HUMAN ENGINEERING LAB 301-278-2946 SMART CONTRACT PREPARATION EXPEDITER FREZELL T LTCOL HUMAN ENGINEERING LAB 301-278-5998

  11. Tackling the nuclear manpower shortage: industry, educators must work together

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzig, W.

    1981-01-01

    A 50% decline in graduate enrollment and an increase to 50% of foreign nationals among the nuclear engineering students since 1973 at Pennsylvania State University is typical of national trends, which have led to the closing of 13 undergraduate programs across the country. Penn State's proximity to Three Mile Island had less effect than its interactions with high schools and utilities in keeping the nuclear program as strong as it is. Penn State operates three separate career programs to interest high school students in a nuclear career. Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) educational assistance reflects industry interest, but more scholarships are needed to broaden student awareness

  12. Manpower requirements in the nuclear power industry, 1982-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.C.

    1982-09-01

    The objective of this study is to project occupational employment needs, created by growth and employee turnover, for the nuclear power industry over the next decade. Employment data for 1981 were collected in a survey conducted by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations of its 60 member utilities. The data were analyzed statistically to identify factors that account for variations in power plant staffing and the number of off-site nuclear support personnel employed by a utility. Total employment in the nuclear power industry is predicted to increase from 54,400 in 1981 to 73,600 in 1991. Nuclear generating capacity will increase from 58 to 124 gigawatts, based on the midline forecast of the Energy Information Administration. The projections assume that current regulations will remain in effect and no new plans for additional generating facilities will be initiated

  13. Safety Specialist Manpower, Manpower Resources. Volumes II and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booz Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Washington, DC.

    These second and third volumes of a four-volume study of manpower in state highway safety programs over the next decade estimate manpower resources by state and in national aggregate and describe present and planned training programs for safety specialists. For each educational level, both total manpower and manpower actually available for…

  14. An Analysis of the Navy Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Manpower Management Overview. Source: Hatch (2016b). ......... 21 Figure 5. Origin of Manpower Management . Source: Hatch (2016b). .......... 22 Figure...Whitney, Bradley, and Brown (WBB) Inc., a business management consultant in Reston, Virginia was contracted to teach the Navy MPT three-day course...Classification, Manpower Requirements Determination (MRD), Total Force Management , and Manpower Business Requirement Governance,” (“Navy Manpower

  15. MEN WANT WORK. REPORT TO THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, OFFICE OF MANPOWER AUTOMATION AND TRAINING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOLLIS, DAVID L.

    THE COUNCIL OF THE SOUTHERN MOUNTAINS MADE A ONE-YEAR STUDY OF THE MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING ACT IN APPALACHIA AND HELPED ESTABLISH THE YOUTH, EDUCATION, JOB DEVELOPMENT, WORK EXPERIENCE, VISTA, AND ON THE JOB TRAINING PROGRAMS WHICH ARE REVIEWED AND EVALUATED IN THIS REPORT. IT WAS CONCLUDED THAT--(1) MEN WANT JOBS, (2) WHILE UNFILLED…

  16. Nuclear instrument technician training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollesen, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on Nuclear Instrument Technician (NIT) training that has developed at an accelerated rate over the past three decades. During the 1960's commercial nuclear power plants were in their infancy. For that reason, there is little wonder that NIT training had little structure and little creditability. NIT training, in many early plants, was little more than On-The Job Training (OJT). The seventies brought changes in Instrumentation and Controls as well as emphasis on the requirements for more in depth training and documentation. As in the seventies, the eighties saw not only changes in technologies but tighter requirements, standardized training and the development of accredited Nuclear Instrument Training; thus the conclusion: Nuclear Instrument Training Isn't What It Used To Be

  17. The technical workforce: education, training, and manpower needs in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemer, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    In considering our technical workforce with respect to radiation protection, three main questions face us today and will continue to face us in the future: 1. What are the present and future personnel needs in health physics and related disciplines. 2. What kinds of education and training programs are required to meet these needs. 3. What is being done and what needs to be done to provide the required education and training programs. To address these three questions, this paper summarizes recent projections on the manpower needs for professional health physicists over the next two decades. The current status of education and training programs, both for health physicists and for other personnel requiring radiation protection training, is reviewed. Attention is directed toward present enrollment and degree trends which indicate inadequate supplies of personnel to fill present and projected positions, particularly at the BS and the graduate degree levels. Information on the job market, including numbers and types of positions and salary levels, is also summarized. The question of what needs to be done in the future to provide adequate education and training programs is discussed with respect to federal policies, regulations, and industrial responsibilities. Although the federal government will continue to have responsbilities to support education and training in radiation protection, an increasingly important and critical role is seen for the private sector

  18. Manpower development - planning and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholten, V.W.

    1978-01-01

    The demands of a nuclear technology programme on the manpower resources of a developing country are very onerous. Unlike other industries, as well as the planning and operating staff, nuclear technology requires an additional administrative infrastructure to regulate the various activities. To minimize the effect of manpower shortage, the planning and development of manpower resources need to be carried out on a national scale. To introduce a nuclear programme, a special preparatory phase is required. During this phase the special conditions appertaining to the country are first considered, as are the evaluation and then the promotional aspects of the programme. In a second phase, all the partners involved in the implementation are considered, with reference to their roles and interrelationships. Their various tasks and obligations are fully assessed. This is a wide-ranging study covering, in addition to the construction of a nuclear power plant, the industrial collaboration and licensing agreements, and the utility operational training schemes. Finally, the third phase considers the different and necessary educational requirements, and the existent and developed level of the manpower, with respect to the scope and content of the know-how transfer. When all the relevant aspects have been considered, the expansion of the universities and educational establishments must be carried out. This whole phase needs to be started as early as possible because it involves a period of some years. (author)

  19. International inventory of training facilities in nuclear power and its fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Because the development of trained manpower is important for full use of nuclear power, the International Atomic Energy Agency has compiled this first inventory of training facilities and programs. It is based on information submitted by Member States and received up to 31 January 1977. The inventory is arranged by country, type of training organization, and by subject

  20. Manpower development for safe operation of nuclear power plant. China. Simulator software development. UNDP-Activity: 2.1.8-IAEA-Task-01. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, C.P.

    1994-01-01

    In the frameworks of the project ''manpower development for safe operation of nuclear power plant'' the development of reactor simulator software is described. Qinshan nuclear power plant was chosen as a reference one

  1. Nuclear and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaofeng, T.; Perotin, J.P.; Gavrilovic, M.; Vermot-Desroches, J.P.; Leflefian, Ch.

    2009-01-01

    The present text presents the characteristics of a project of a nuclear power plant construction and the notion of culture of safety and explains the necessity of the implementation of the management team asked to diffuse the culture of nuclear safety and to insure it the control and analyzes the example of the nuclear power plant construction of Ling Ao in China. To complete the different training in nuclear field are reviewed through National education. (N.C.)

  2. Manpower allocation in a cellular manufacturing system considering the impact of learning, training and combination of learning and training in operator skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a manpower allocation and cell loading problem is studied, where demand is sto-chastic. The inter-cell and intra-cell movements are considered and attention is focused on as-signing operators with different skill levels to operations, because cell performance in addition to load cell is dependent on manpower. The purpose of this article is manpower allocation in cellu-lar manufacturing with consideration to learning and training policies. The manpower skill levels are determined in order to enhance production rate. The main contribution of this approach is the scenarios of training and learning in addition to the combination of training and learning being simulated. By using these three scenarios, the skill level of workers increase which reduces the processing time. In this regard cell layout is static where processing times and customer demand follow a normal distribution. As one of the significant costs of industrial unit is related to pro-duction cost, this study has attempted to reduce these costs by increasing the skill level of opera-tor which causes to reduce the processing time. Scenarios are evaluated by using a simulation method that finally attained results indicate this simulation provides better manpower assign-ments.

  3. Development of Nuclear R and D Man-power Genealogy DB and preparation of Guiding Principle in Assets Application for Nuclear R and D Fund

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Uk; Song, Seung Hyun; Kim, Hak Jun; Chung, Chul Eun

    2007-08-15

    Information search for nuclear professional man-power, technology genealogy search, project participation history etc. is serviced, and present limits to KAERI additionally, but constructed Site-Based DB that service is embodied as well as subject responsible person's pedigree. Information of professional man-power include origin school, last degree, distinction of sex, age etc. and technology genealogy consist of NuTRM classification, national science technology classification, and technology tree system classified in KAERI. Technology possession present condition for professional man-power of only KAERI is included within DB. Hereafter, professional manpower of the other nuclear energy company should be strengthened on the basis of DB structure that is developed. Technology tree system classified in KAERI also required to be strengthened on the man-power DB that has effectiveness for long-term as that embody by technology tree system which can represent nuclear energy through the verification of the other nuclear energy company. By applying readying guiding principle in assets application for nuclear R and D fund, secure lucency of assets application.

  4. Development of Nuclear R and D Man-power Genealogy DB and preparation of Guiding Principle in Assets Application for Nuclear R and D Fund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Uk; Song, Seung Hyun; Kim, Hak Jun; Chung, Chul Eun

    2007-08-01

    Information search for nuclear professional man-power, technology genealogy search, project participation history etc. is serviced, and present limits to KAERI additionally, but constructed Site-Based DB that service is embodied as well as subject responsible person's pedigree. Information of professional man-power include origin school, last degree, distinction of sex, age etc. and technology genealogy consist of NuTRM classification, national science technology classification, and technology tree system classified in KAERI. Technology possession present condition for professional man-power of only KAERI is included within DB. Hereafter, professional manpower of the other nuclear energy company should be strengthened on the basis of DB structure that is developed. Technology tree system classified in KAERI also required to be strengthened on the man-power DB that has effectiveness for long-term as that embody by technology tree system which can represent nuclear energy through the verification of the other nuclear energy company. By applying readying guiding principle in assets application for nuclear R and D fund, secure lucency of assets application

  5. Training Nuclear Power Specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulikas, V.

    2003-01-01

    Situation of preparation of nuclear energy specialists in Lithuania is presented. Nuclear engineers are being prepared at Kaunas University of Technology. In view with decision to decommission Unit 1, the Ignalina NPP is limiting the number of new personnel to fill in vacancies. The main attention is given to the training courses for improvement skills of existing Ignalina NPP, VATESI personnel. Main topics of the training courses are listed. Comparison with previous years on personnel hired and dismissed in Ignalina NPP is made

  6. Surveillance and analysis of nuclear R and D manpower for efficient utilization of KAERI's nuclear R and D resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Jun; Yang, M. H.; Song, K. D.; Chung, W. S.; Yun, S. W.; Won, B. C.; Yoon, H. M.

    1999-11-01

    This study aimed at securing row data on KAERI's manpower resources, which be useful to establish the short and long term R and D policy of KAERI. To coincide with the objectives, this study covered following scopes; (1) identification of status and issues of manpower in science and technology fields, (2) identification of status and issues of KAERI's manpower management policy, (3) gathering row data on KAERI's manpower through surveillance and analysis, and analyzing staff's perception on KAERI's manpower utilization policy, (4) suggestion of short and long term policy direction of manpower management of KAERI. (author)

  7. Nuclear science and technology education and training in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsono

    2007-01-01

    Deployment of nuclear technology requires adequate nuclear infrastructure which includes governmental infrastructure, science and technology infrastructure, education and training infrastructure, and industrial infrastructure. Governmental infrastructure in nuclear, i.e. BATAN (the National Nuclear Energy Agency) and BAPETEN (the Nuclear Energy Control Agency), need adequate number of qualified manpower with general and specific knowledge of nuclear. Science and technology infrastructure is mainly contained in the R and D institutes, education and training centers, scientific academies and professional associations, and national industry. The effectiveness of this infrastructure mainly depends on the quality of the manpower, in addition to the funding and available facilities. Development of human resource needed for research, development, and utilization of nuclear technology in the country needs special attention. Since the national industry is still in its infant stage, the strategy for HRD (human resource development) in the nuclear field addresses the needs of the following: BATAN for its research and development, promotion, and training; BAPETEN for its regulatory functions and training; users of nuclear technology in industry, medicine, agriculture, research, and other areas; radiation safety officers in organizations or institutions licensed to use radioactive materials; the education sector, especially lecturers and teachers, in tertiary and secondary education. Nuclear science and technology is a multidisciplinary and a highly specialized subject. It includes areas such as nuclear and reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, chemistry, material science, radiation protection, nuclear safety, health science, and radioactive waste management. Therefore, a broad nuclear education is absolutely essential to master the wide areas of science and technology used in the nuclear domain. The universities and other institutions of higher education are the only

  8. Nuclear training and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandklef, S.

    2008-01-01

    There is a large need in this period of anticipated growth of the nuclear industry to keep and increase the level of competence beyond that provided by universities, technical institutes and on-the-job training. ANT International has developed several programs to assist the nuclear industry in meeting this need. The programs are based on utilizing the experience and skills of a network of experts who have a wide experience in the relevant technical areas of importance to nuclear power operations. Examples of these programs are given in this report together with an extensive list of ANT International reports in the field of nuclear fuel technology, water chemistry and reactor materials. These reports have been and are used for training and education in Europe, North America and Asia. (author)

  9. Training Tomorrow's Nuclear Workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Training tomorrow's Nuclear Workforce Start with the children. That is the message Brian Molloy, a human resources expert in the IAEA's Nuclear Power Engineering Section, wants to convey to any country considering launching or expanding a nuclear power programme. Mathematics and science curricular and extra-curricular activities at secondary and even primary schools are of crucial importance to future recruiting efforts at nuclear power plants, he says:''You need to interest children in science and physics and engineering. The teaching needs to be robust enough to teach them, but it must also gain their interest.'' Recruiting high-calibre engineers needed for the operation of nuclear power plants is a growing challenge, even for existing nuclear power programmes, because of a wave of retirements combined with increasing global demand. But essential as engineers are, they are only a component of the staff at any nuclear power plant. In fact, most employees at nuclear power plants are not university graduates - they are skilled technicians, electricians, welders, fitters, riggers and people in similar trades. Molloy argues that this part of the workforce needs more focus. ''It's about getting a balance between focusing on the academic and the skilled vocational'', he says, adding that countries considering nuclear power programmes often initially place undue focus on nuclear engineers.

  10. Nuclear security officer training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, W.F.

    1981-01-01

    Training has become complex and precise in today's world of critical review and responsibility. Entrusted to a security officer is the success or demise of large business. In more critical environments the security officer is entrusted with the monitoring and protection of life sensitive systems and devices. The awareness of this high visibility training requirement has been addressed by a limited few. Those involved in the nuclear power industry through dedication and commitment to the American public have without a doubt become leading pioneers in demanding training excellence

  11. Management of nuclear training center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, In Suk; Lee, Han Young; Cho, Boung Jae; Lee, Seung Hee; Lee, Eoi Jin; You, Byung Hoon; Lee, Won Ku; Jeon, Hyung Ryeon; Seo, Kyung Won; Kim, Young Joong; Kim, Ik Hyun; Hyun, Ha Il; Choi, Il Ki; Hong, Choon Sun; Won, Jong Yeul; Joo, Yong Chang; Nam, Jae Yeul; Sin, Eun Jeong

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. The scope and contents are as follows : 1. Regional and interregional training courses, 2. Training courses assisted by foreign experts, 3. Training courses for nuclear industry personnel, 4. Training courses for internal staff-members, 5. Training courses under the law. The nuclear training center executed the open-door training courses for 2,699 engineers/scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations by means of offering 69 training courses during the fiscal year 1995. (Author) .new

  12. Financial requirements and manpower needs of nuclear energetics for the next fifty years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spital'nik, Dzh.

    1997-01-01

    Forecasts on financial and manpower requirements of rich and poor countries for NPPs construction by 2050 showed that the NPPs capacities will increase from 320 up to 2500 GW, whereby the ratio between the rich and poor countries will constitute approximately 2:1. Investments in NPPs construction will equal from 1600 up to 2700 billions dollars. Global need in manpower for NPPs will constitute by 2050 240000 man/year

  13. Nuclear education, training and support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vityazev, Vsevolod; Ushakov Artem

    2016-01-01

    The structure and key elements of the ROSATOM education and training system are presented. Educational and training services and technical support are provided during the NPP lifetime, including nuclear Infrastructure, nuclear power plant personnel training, equipment and post-warranty spare parts, nuclear power plant operation support, maintenance and repair, modernization and lifetime extension

  14. Professionalism in nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, R.

    1983-01-01

    The approach of an individual in the nuclear training environment to his colleagues, trainees, and his own personal growth should be determined by his desire to be a professional. This paper discusses professionalism as an on-going process. That is, professionalism is not an entity that a person can acquire; rather it is a complicated superposition of many facets of an individual's attempt to work for solutions to problems, not problems with solutions

  15. Cooperation in regional nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newstead, C.M.; Lee, D.S.; Spitalnik, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the nuclear training currently being undertaken in the countries of the co-authors, and considers the degree to which training problems are amenable to common solutions such as cooperative regional training programs. Different types of cooperation are discussed including the development of regional and international training centers, cooperative bilateral and multilateral training, and the proposed US International Nuclear Safety Training Academy. The paper provides suggestions of ways for enhancing regional cooperation

  16. Training requirements for chemists in radiotracer development for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, R.; Fowler, J.

    1988-01-01

    This panel was organized to address the current and anticipated future shortage of chemists with advanced training to fill positions in the nuclear medicine field. Although hard data and statistics are difficult to acquire, we will attempt to highlight the impact of chemistry on nuclear medicine and to describe the growth of the field which has led to an increasing need for chemists resulting in the current manpower shortage. We also will make recommendations for attracting Ph.D. chemists to careers in nuclear medicine research and possible mechanisms for postgraduate training. Solving this problem and establishing a long term committment and mechanism for advanced training is critically important to meet the current needs of the profession and to assure future growth and innovation. 3 tabs

  17. Manpower development for nuclear power programme. China. Project findings and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) project was conceived in April 1985, implementation was started on preliminary authorization by summer 1986, and it was approved and signed in early 1987. The duration was originally planned for three years with a UNDP input of US$ 1,657.500 (including Government cost sharing of US$ 280,000). The project is now essentially completed with a few items still pending, though committed as firmly planned, and the current cost estimate is US$ 1,707.617. The objective of the project was to assist in establishing long-term training programmes in two training centres in the People's Republic of China (Qinshan and Suzhou) and strengthen the training capabilities at these centres. The two centres are intended to provide specialized comprehensive training in basic and applied nuclear power engineering disciplines as well as in construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants to technical personnel assigned to the nuclear power plants in the People's Republic of China

  18. Manpower Evaluations: Vulnerable but Useful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, Charles C.

    1975-01-01

    Most of the evaluations of institutional training under the Manpower Development and Training Act are highly favorable. Negative criticisms, however, emphasize the uncertainties in these studies and displacement effects of the programs. The article answers these criticisms. (MW)

  19. Personnel supply and demand issues in the nuclear power industry. Final report of the Nuclear Manpower Study Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The anticipated personnel needs of the nuclear power industry have varied widely in recent years, in response to both increasing regulatory requirements and declining orders for new plants. Recent employment patterns in the nuclear energy field, with their fluctuations, resemble those of defense industries more than those traditionally associated with electric utilities. Reactions to the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 by industry and regulators have increased the demand for trained and experienced personnel, causing salaries to rise. Industry, for example, has established several advisory organizations like the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). At the same time, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has imposed many new construction and operating requirements in an effort to take advantage of lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident and to respond to the perceived public interest in better regulation of nuclear power. Thus, at present, utilities, architect-engineer firms, reactor vendors, and organizations in the nuclear development community have heavy workloads

  20. Computer aided instruction in the nuclear training classroom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives formulated for introducing computer aided instruction into the nuclear training programme are discussed and the process of comparative evaluation which was followed to arrive at a preferred system is described. Three points must be remembered. First it is unlikely that specialized training will benefit from any cost reduction since the total manpower invested can seldom be applied over enough students to represent an overall cost saving when compared with conventional classroom methods. Second it is unnecessary to present on a video screen material which would be better left in its original printed textbook or manual. Thirdly care must be taken not to assume too much or too little prior knowledge in the student. In nuclear training, concentrated information transfer is required in a short period of time. Carefully planned and executed computer assisted instruction can improve teaching effectiveness and provide a welcome alternative to conventional classroom instruction. (U.K.)

  1. Nuclear Education & Training — Showcasing the Best Practices of the United Kingdom and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dato Syed Ahmad Idid, S.N. K. A.-I.

    2015-01-01

    Skilled, competent and sufficient human resources is fundamental for the safe and successful implementation and expansion of a nuclear power programme (NPP). As nuclear education and training (E&T) stakeholders deliberate and discuss to identify suitable syllabus and courses to offer for education and training to support NPP, it is critical that the nuclear fuel cycle as well as the nuclear power value-chain is taken into consideration in the selection and introduction of relevant courses by Universities and Institutions to nurture and educate skilled manpower for the nuclear power industry. This paper strives to share with the education and training stakeholders, that the task of educating and training students is not solely to prepare them to work in a nuclear power plant, but importantly also to train human resources to support other organizations that require skilled and competent personnel in nuclear related field including Government agencies and Ministries, Business and Industry, Financial sector, International agencies and media agencies, amongst others. Additionally this paper aims to dovetail that a critical mass of skilled manpower along the entire value-chain or scope of nuclear power sector covering planning, construction, manufacturing, commissioning, operation and maintenance and decommissioning must be trained to implement the related tasks required to support NPP competently. Thus, it is within this context, that this paper will outline best practices in nuclear education and training offered by the United Kingdom and France which trains students, professionals, technicians as well as craftsmen not only for employment in a nuclear power plant but also for supporting the nuclear policy formulation in Government Agencies and for supporting nuclear power industry sectors including engineering, construction, manufacturing and services. This paper will offer recommendations for enhancing cooperation in nuclear education and training aimed at building

  2. Investigation on Current Status of World Nuclear Education and Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J. Y.; Min, M. J.; Noh, B. C.

    2010-04-01

    All over the world, the interest of nuclear energy is increasing and the expectations of it are getting more as one of the most practical alternative energy resources. However, since 1990s, as a lot of nuclear specialists are being retired, now the problem of manpower shortage is taken into consideration for all of us and will be continued until 2011. In this point of view, the good quality of the professional nuclear training and education systems and the nuclear education centers are requested in order to breed and supply the next generation nuclear scientists and engineers. Thus, the objective of this study is to explore the current status of world nuclear education for both of nuclear power countries and potential nuclear power utilization countries in the near future. This report introduces the importance of nuclear energy, the current status of world nuclear power plants operation and the contribution of nuclear energy. Besides, it also includes the nuclear energy development plan of potential nuclear developing countries in the near future. In addition, this study also explores the nuclear training and education systems of the nuclear development countries and the current status of nuclear education in various fields such as government, industries, nuclear power plants ect. Especially, as considering the status of nuclear education classified such as Asia, the Americas, East and West Europe, the Middle East and Africa, it shows the different characteristics of nuclear education systems in each regions aimed to identify the good practices on the nuclear education systems. Finally, through observation of international cooperation and networks of the various nuclear organizations, this will be contributed to the development of nuclear education for member states and be suggested the various of the direction of development for nuclear education in Korea. The report presents in the basis of the recent status data of the world nuclear education systems collected

  3. Training in nuclear engineering companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perezagua, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of training is growing in all business areas and fields and especially in hi-tech companies like engineering firms. Nuclear projects are highly multidisciplinary and, even in the initial awarding and pre-construction phases, need to be staffed with personnel that is well-prepared and highly-qualified in areas that, in most cases, are not covered by university studies. This article examines the variables that influence the design of specific training for nuclear projects in engineering firms, along with new training technologies (e-learning) and new regulatory aspects (IS-12). (Author)

  4. Appendices to the guidebook on the education and training of technicians for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    The current publication, a supplement to the IAEA Guidebook on the Education and Training of Technicians for Nuclear Power, in conjunction with which it should be read, aims to assist Member States, especially the developing countries which are in the process of implementing, or intending to implement, a nuclear power programme, to understand and meet their requirements for qualified technicians in the most effective and efficient manner. It specifically seeks to assist policy makers and planners, as well as those designing and implementing education and training programmes. The Guidebook and this TECDOC complement the IAEA Guidebook on Manpower Development for Nuclear Power, as well as the IAEA Guidebook on the Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Operations Personnel. This TECDOC supplements the Guidebook with valuable information on the national experience of IAEA Member States in the education and training of technicians for nuclear power, as well as examples of such education and training from various Member States. Figs and tabs

  5. Manpower development in Africa and the regional manpower development project RAF/0/003. Special evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    At the start of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in 1958, many of its developing Member States were just embarking on nuclear activities. To make basic nuclear training available for these countries became the first concern of the Agency and initially fellowships constituted more than 80% of the assistance provided. During the 1960s, while the programmes' expert and equipment components grew steadily, fellowships still represented more than 50% of the assistance provided to individual Member States. As counterpart institutions slowly build up small cadres of qualified staff, the share of training in the Agency's programme of technical co-operation became less dominant and, by 1986, only 22% of the funds spent on country programmes were devoted to fellowships. In the Africa region, where the share of fellowship training provided to individual Member States had dropped even below the 20% mark, and where the participation in group training events was the lowest of any region, this was having serious consequences on manpower development, as was pointed out in two separate evaluations. At least some opportunities exist in about 60% of the countries in the region for training in selected areas of nuclear science and technology, but only 20% of the countries provide training up to the MSc/PhD level. The number of trainees in nuclear science and technology graduating each year from national institutions is very small and cannot be considered adequate to satisfy existing manpower needs of the country concerned and of the region as a whole. Very few - if any - opportunities for nuclear training abroad are available for candidates from the region other than those funded by the Agency. There is very little awareness at the national level as to the actual training needs in the nuclear field in most countries of the region, underlining the importance of the role of the Agency, not only as a provider of training, but also as an adviser on assessing training needs at

  6. Cultivating Safety Culture in Malaysia Nuclear Industries through Education and Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Sabariah Kader; Choi, Kwang Sik

    2012-01-01

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) is a national R and D organisation under Ministry of Science, Technology and the Innovation Malaysia, focusing on the application and promotion of nuclear and related technologies for national development. The core business of Nuclear Malaysia is R and D, and our approach has been customer focused, and remains in line with the mainstream of national socio-economic agenda. Thus Nuclear Malaysia.s activities support the short and long- terms national developmental programme. As a result of conducting R and D we generate products and services, including marketing of products and providing technical services, consultancy and training. Hence we would be able to move forwards towards achieving self-reliance and sustainability. Training service centre has been entrusted to enhance the application of nuclear technology in various socio-economic sectors i.e. industry, medical, agricultural and the environment. Thus, skill manpower should be developed and able to participate in various activities to support national development agenda. In executing the functions, the Centre has sufficient resources in term of manpower (for coordinating and training), finance and facilities. In addition, the Centre is backed by a pool of experienced and skilled personnel from other divisions in Nuclear Malaysia and also from our associates or partners to ensure smooth implementation of training

  7. Cultivating Safety Culture in Malaysia Nuclear Industries through Education and Training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Sabariah Kader [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kwang Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) is a national R and D organisation under Ministry of Science, Technology and the Innovation Malaysia, focusing on the application and promotion of nuclear and related technologies for national development. The core business of Nuclear Malaysia is R and D, and our approach has been customer focused, and remains in line with the mainstream of national socio-economic agenda. Thus Nuclear Malaysia.s activities support the short and long- terms national developmental programme. As a result of conducting R and D we generate products and services, including marketing of products and providing technical services, consultancy and training. Hence we would be able to move forwards towards achieving self-reliance and sustainability. Training service centre has been entrusted to enhance the application of nuclear technology in various socio-economic sectors i.e. industry, medical, agricultural and the environment. Thus, skill manpower should be developed and able to participate in various activities to support national development agenda. In executing the functions, the Centre has sufficient resources in term of manpower (for coordinating and training), finance and facilities. In addition, the Centre is backed by a pool of experienced and skilled personnel from other divisions in Nuclear Malaysia and also from our associates or partners to ensure smooth implementation of training

  8. A Littoral Combat Ship Manpower Analysis Using The Fleet Response Training Plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams-Robinson, Mckinnya J

    2007-01-01

    ...), scheduled to be commissioned in May 2007, introduces an advanced technological platform. It includes but is not limited to several new optimal manning and training concepts such as SHIPTRAIN and SMARTSHIP introduced by the U. S. Navy...

  9. Planning manual for energy resource development on Indian lands. Volume III. Manpower and training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    This volume addresses ways to bridge the gap between existing tribal skill levels and the skill levels required for higher-paying jobs in energy resource development projects. It addresses opportunities for technical, skilled, and semiskilled employment as well as professional positions, because it is important to have tribal participation at all levels of an operation. Section II, ''Energy-Related Employment Opportunities,'' covers three areas: (1) identification of energy-resource occupations; (2) description of these occupations; and (3) identification of skill requirements by type of occupation. Section III, ''Description of Training Programs,'' also covers three areas: (a) concept of a training-program model; (b) description of various training methods; and (c) an assessment of the cost of training, utilizing different programs. Section IV concentrates on development of a training program for target occupations, skills, and populations. Again this section covers three areas: (i) overview of the development of a skills training program; (ii) identification of target occupations, skills, and populations; and (iii) energy careers for younger tribal members.

  10. Computer training aids for nuclear operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.G.P.; Binns, J.B.H.

    1983-01-01

    The Royal Navy's Nuclear Propulsion School at HMS SULTAN which is responsible for training all ratings and officers who operate Submarine Pressurised Water Reactor plants, has available a varied selection of classroom simulator training aids as well as purpose built Submarine Manoeuvring Room simulators. The use of these classroom training aids in the twelve months prior to Autumn 1981 is discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of using relatively expensive computer based aids to support classroom instruction for students who do not investigate mathematically the dynamics of the Reactor Plant are identified. The conclusions drawn indicate that for students of limited academic ability the classroom simulators are disproportionately expensive in cost, maintenance load, and instructional time. Secondly, the experience gained in the use of the Manoeuvring Room Simulators to train future operators who have just finished the academic phase of their training is outlined. The possible pitfalls for the instructor are discussed and the lessons learnt, concluding that these simulators provide a valuable substitute for the live plant enabling trainees to be brought up to a common standard and reducing their on job training time to an acceptable level. (author)

  11. Manpower development for each level of nuclear power plant personnel, experience and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    The following topics to be covered in this report are: Power plant organization and staff categories; basic education and training; practical experience requirements; effects of promotion and fluctuation; social problems associated with training abroad; technical problems and solutions. (orig.)

  12. Military Manpower Training Report for FY 1985. Volume 4. Force Readiness Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    behavioral patterns that are related to the civilian academic calendar. Enlistments increase (1) shortly after high school graduation, (2) when peers...historical information available, tempered by judgment of how in the future personnel policies, the state of the economy, behavioral patterns, and other...squadron aircrew training management workload to existing unit hardware, program- ming resources and directives. Only increased comsumable costs are

  13. Managerial challenges in nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholand, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear personnel training programs have existed since the infancy of the commercial nuclear power industry. The scope and complexity of these programs have increased dramatically, especially since the Three Mile Island mishap in 1979. Whether voluntary or regulated, the changes of the past several years have greatly increased the responsibilities and roles of the nuclear training managers. Events and our own diligence have compounded two problems (or challenges) that have been with us all along. First, training managers have frequently been excluded from the change-making process, leaving them to react as best they can to new regulatory mandates and new utility innovations in a de facto fashion. Second, the additional resources needed to meet new requirements (personnel, equipment, facilities, and funds) have not been made available, or have been insufficient to accomplish new tasks. This paper discusses these challenges and considers several responses (including a national nuclear trainers association) that can go a long way to place nuclear training managers and their employees more in control of their own fate

  14. DOE Manpower Assessment Brief. No. 37: Nuclear-related employment declines in 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The 1993-1995 period represents a time of significant transition for workers engages in nuclear-related activities. Total nuclear-related employment fell markedly from about 300,000 workers in 1993 to 265, 000 in 1995, a 12% decline. This is the lowest level since the 1970s. In 1995, a third of all nuclear-related employment was in the reactor operation and maintenance segment. 6 figs, 1 table

  15. Safer nuclear power. Strengthening training for operational safety at Paks nuclear power plant - Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    For a nuclear power plant, safety must always be paramount. There can be no compromise on safety to meet production targets or to reduce costs. For any reactor, and in particular where older type reactors are in place, their operational safety can be enhanced by upgrading the training of personnel responsible for operating and maintaining the plant. The Department of Technical Co-operation is sponsoring a programme with technical support from the Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Safety Departments to help improve facilities at the PAKS plant in Hungary and establish self sufficiency in training to the highest international standards for all levels of nuclear power plant manpower. The Model Project described will have a direct impact on the improvement of operational safety and performance at PAKS NPP. It will lead to a more efficient use of resources which in turn will result in lower electricity generation costs. The impact of the project is not expected to be limited to Hungary. WWER reactors are common in Eastern Europe and provide one third to one half of the electricity supply to the region. The training programmes and facilities at PAKS offer a possibility in the future to provide training to experts from other countries operating WWER units and serve as a model to be emulated. Slovakia and the Czech Republic have already expressed interest in using the PAKS experience

  16. Nuclear education and training: assuring a competent workforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urso, M.E.; Murphy, B.P.; Giot, M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the years the NEA has been instrumental in raising awareness on issues related to education and training (E and T) in nuclear science and technology. Ten years ago the OECD/NEA report 'Nuclear Education and Training: Cause for Concern?' [Ref. 1] highlighted that core competencies in nuclear technology were suffering a significant decline, becoming increasingly difficult to sustain. The study acted as a wake-up call, urging prompt and decisive actions by governments and other stakeholders to avert the risk of irreversible consequences. Combined with more recent studies and activities subsequently undertaken by OECD/NEA [Ref. 2 and 3] and following a policy debate on 'Nuclear Research' [Ref. 4], a statement on the need for qualified human resources in the nuclear field was unanimously adopted by the NEA Steering Committee [Ref. 5], underlying the prime responsibilities of governments. After 10 years, awareness has generally grown on the gravity and urgency of the issue, triggering, in some cases, significant initiatives. However, in a much altered context of growing nuclear reactor fleets, concerns still prevail regarding the availability of sufficient, skilled manpower and the adequacy of infrastructures. Strains in the human resources capacity still remain high and any potential increase in use of nuclear power might be hampered by a dearth of qualified personnel. The current NEA project has thus been undertaken to revise and update the 2000 OECD/NEA publication [Ref. 1]. The study provides a qualitative characterisation of human resource needs, distinguishing among nuclear professionals, technical staff and crafts: categories which require different types and degrees of E and T. Instruments to address such needs, already available, underway or planned are appraised. An assessment on the current and future uses of nuclear research facilities for E and T purposes was also undertaken, based on the factual foundation of data gathered through quantitative surveys

  17. Operator training and requalification at GPU Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Newton, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    The operator training and requalification programs at GPU Nuclear's Oyster Creek (650 MWe BWR) and Three Mile Island-1 (776 MWe PWR) nuclear plants have undergone significant revisions since the Three Mile Island-2 accident. This paper describes the Training and Education organization, the expanded training facilities, including basic principle trainers and replica simulators, and the present operator training and requalification programs

  18. Current status nuclear training and education in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsono

    2007-01-01

    Instrumentation. The development of human resources in nuclear science and technology in Indonesia in the last few years has been challenged by several issues such as economic crisis, brain drain, zero-growth policy of the government, the aging of manpower, and the declining interest of the youth in the nuclear field. At present, formal education in nuclear science and technology in Indonesia is limited to only a few institutions of higher education. Indonesia would require many more scientists and engineers with graduate and post-graduate qualifications to intensify its efforts in nuclear R and D. Through ANENT, Indonesia students would have the opportunity to obtain graduate and post-graduate degrees in ANENT member organizations. The establishment of a reference curricula as well as the mutual recognition of degrees may offer students the flexibility to conduct part of the course in their home countries and not have to spend the full course time in institution in another country. Such an arrangement is especially attractive to students who are already employed in nuclear or related organizations. The exchange of academic staff among ANENT member organizations would also benefit countries with limited experience in nuclear education. Academic staff from member organizations with established nuclear education and training courses could assist in curricula design and teaching

  19. Health manpower development in Bayelsa State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McFubara KG

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kalada G McFubara,1 Elizabeth R Edoni,2 Rose E Ezonbodor-Akwagbe21Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, 2Department of Community Health Nursing, Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island, NigeriaBackground: Health manpower is one of the critical factors in the development of a region. This is because health is an index of development. Bayelsa State has a low level of health manpower. Thus, in this study, we sought to identify factors necessary for effective development of health manpower.Methods: Three methods were used to gather information, ie, face-to-face interviews, postal surveys, and documentary analysis. Critical incidents were identified, and content and thematic analyses were conducted.Results: There is no full complement of a primary health care workforce in any of the health centers in the state. The three health manpower training institutions have the limitations of inadequate health care educators and other manpower training facilities, including lack of a teaching hospital.Conclusion: Accreditation of health manpower training institutions is a major factor for effective development of health manpower. Public officers can contribute to the accreditation process by subsuming their personal interest into the state's common interest. Bayelsa is a fast-growing state and needs a critical mass of health care personnel. To develop this workforce requires a conscious effort rich in common interests in the deployment of resources.Keywords: health manpower, development, health care education

  20. [The becoming of public medicine in the second half of XVIII-first half of XIX centuries. Report II. The development of public systems of training of medical manpower and charity provision to socially unprotected groups of population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochik, A M; Zatravkin, S N; Stochik, A A

    2013-01-01

    The present report considers the history of becoming of concept of medical police in second half of XVIII century. This concept became one of the most important instruments of public management in Austria, France, Prussia and Russia. Two directions of activity of public authorities in the area of implementation of medical police are discussed i.e. control of frauds and development of public systems of training of medical manpower and charity provision to socially unprotected groups of population. The historiographical data is presented concerning the development of public systems of training of medical manpower, reform of university medical education, implementation of hospital reform.

  1. Guidebook on the education and training of technicians for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The IAEA Guidebook on the Education and Training of Technicians for Nuclear Power aims to assist Member States, especially the developing countries which are in the process of implementing, or intending to implement, a nuclear power programme, to understand and meet their requirements for qualified technicians in the most effective and efficient manner. It specifically seeks to assist policy makers and planners, as well as those designing and implementing education and training programmes. In this Guidebook, technician level occupations include those filled by technicians and higher level technicians (techniciens superieurs or technologists) and also by non-graduate engineers. The Guidebook complements the IAEA Guidebook on Manpower Development for Nuclear Power, as well as the IAEA Guidebook on the Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Operations Personnel. The key objectives of this Guidebook are to describe: (1) the level and content of conventional education and training which a technician must have before nuclear oriented education and training can begin; (2) the level and content of nuclear oriented education and training; (3) measures to bridge the gap between the education and training acquired by technicians in the national technical schools (i.e. the level attained before upgrading) and the level of education and training qualifications needed for technicians to work in the nuclear power programme (i.e. the level attained after completion of nuclear oriented education and training). Valuable information on the national experiences of IAEA Member States in the education and training of technicians for nuclear power, as well as examples of such education and training from various Member States, are included in IAEA-TECDOC-526, which should be read in conjunction with the present text. 3 refs, 13 figs, 3 tabs

  2. Training nuclear technicians in two-year, post-secondary educational programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, D.M.; Roney, M.W.

    1975-01-01

    An available and economical supply to future manpower requirements for various types of nuclear technicians can be met by developing and/or restructuring two-year, post-secondary programs at local educational institutions. The Technical Education Research Centers program is under contract from the U.S. Office of Education to delineate the job requirements and develop curricula and instructional materials for two-year, post-secondary training of nuclear technicians. Six job categories have been identified along with corresponding tasks which the technician performs. These categories are: Reactor Operator, Nuclear Instrumentation Technician, Nuclear QA/QC Technician, Radiochemistry Technician, Radiation Protection Technician and Nuclear Medicine Technician. For the first five categories curricula have been established, courses have been described, and instructional materials are being written

  3. Cooperation of nuclear manpower development between Viet Nam and Korea in order to enhance establishment of infrastructure in exporting nuclear technology to Viet Nam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. J.; Han, K. W.; Park, J. K.; Kim, Y. T.; Nam, Y. M.; Jang, Y. H.; Yang, M. H.

    2003-08-01

    Through this project, KAERI provided OJT Programme to 3 nuclear experts of Viet Nam at the KAERI for 3 months as a cooperation of human resource development in the field of nuclear policy, nuclear safety analysis and thermo hydraulic. We could have publicity activities of S/W and H/W then achieve an advantage position of economical and technical in exporting nuclear technology to Viet Nam. Also we have provided a training course and seminar for a high-level delegation of nuclear policy decision makers, which is consisted of 5 deputy ministers and general directors of Viet Nam in Korea. Thus we could have Vietnamese who are favoring Korea. The KAERI will also prepare a data base of trained Vietnamese in Korea for the maximum utilization of them in cooperating with Viet Nam. We accomplished the cooperation of human resource development and providing program and curriculum of the nuclear education and training in Viet Nam. Furthermore, it is expected that the enhancement of nuclear technical cooperation between Viet Nam and Korea and the nuclear human resource development

  4. Cooperation of nuclear manpower development between Viet Nam and Korea in order to enhance establishment of infrastructure in exporting nuclear technology to Viet Nam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. J.; Han, K. W.; Park, J. K.; Kim, Y. T.; Nam, Y. M.; Jang, Y. H.; Yang, M. H

    2003-08-15

    Through this project, KAERI provided OJT Programme to 3 nuclear experts of Viet Nam at the KAERI for 3 months as a cooperation of human resource development in the field of nuclear policy, nuclear safety analysis and thermo hydraulic. We could have publicity activities of S/W and H/W then achieve an advantage position of economical and technical in exporting nuclear technology to Viet Nam. Also we have provided a training course and seminar for a high-level delegation of nuclear policy decision makers, which is consisted of 5 deputy ministers and general directors of Viet Nam in Korea. Thus we could have Vietnamese who are favoring Korea. The KAERI will also prepare a data base of trained Vietnamese in Korea for the maximum utilization of them in cooperating with Viet Nam. We accomplished the cooperation of human resource development and providing program and curriculum of the nuclear education and training in Viet Nam. Furthermore, it is expected that the enhancement of nuclear technical cooperation between Viet Nam and Korea and the nuclear human resource development.

  5. Nuclear Business Acumen Training for Executives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The presentation is structured as follows: Failure in large technology projects; Simulations in industry; Training in reactor simulators; Business simulation; NPP business simulation Nuclear Inc.; Knowledge retention; Boosting the effect of training; Contact

  6. Nuclear power training programmes in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanarro, A.; Izquierdo, L.

    1977-01-01

    The introduction of nuclear power in Spain is developing very rapidly. At present 1.1GW(e) are installed in Spain and this is expected to increase to 8GW(e) in 1980 and to 28GW(e) in 1990. Spanish industry and technology are also rapidly increasing their participation in building nuclear stations, in manufacturing the necessary components and in the activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle. All of this requires properly trained personnel, which is estimated to become approximately 1200 high-level technicians, 1100 medium-level technicians and 1500 technical assistants by 1980. This personnel is trained: (a) in engineering schools; (b) in the Nuclear Studies Institute; (c) in the electric companies with nuclear programmes. The majority of the high-level engineering schools in the country include physics and basic nuclear technology courses in their programmes. Some of them have an experimental low-power nuclear reactor. The Nuclear Studies Institute is an official organism dependent on the Nuclear Energy Commission and responsible, among other subjects, for training personnel for the peaceful use and development of nuclear energy in the country. The electric companies also participate in training personnel for future nuclear stations and they plan to have advanced simulators of PWR and BWR type stations for operator training. The report deals with the personnel requirement forecasts and describes the training programmes. (author)

  7. Upgrade the website of Nuclear Training Center for online training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Minh Duc; Nguyen Thuy Hang; Nguyen Thi Lien; Luu Thi Thu Hoa; Pham Thi Thu Trang

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, Nuclear Training Center (NTC) proposed the task of improving and upgrading NTC website’s technology for better performance, more attractive interface and more accessible information to site visitors. This website will be designed to meet the demand for integrated online training site, integrated training management page later. For this task, it is expected to build a website with full modules, English interface of website and especially, the professional website to apply online training technology and tightly integrated close to the present site of a nuclear training center. (author)

  8. Questions/problems of QA/QC personnel training and qualification in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaramamoorthy, K.

    1984-01-01

    In India, nuclear power stations are designed, constructed, commissioned, operated and owned by the Department of Atomic Energy. The Indian nuclear energy programme is based on utilization of indigenous resources for the economic generation of power. The need for self-sufficiency in nuclear fuel fabrication is imperative for a sustained nuclear power programme. Since training of scientific and technical manpower is an important activity in a developing country, a manpower training programme was initiated in India several years before the introduction of nuclear power plants. It is essential to have a very broad based planning of manpower training in all its aspects for the successful implementation of nuclear power plants. The paper deals in detail with the practices of establishing the manpower needs, training of requisite personnel, problems faced and how they were resolved. It also deals with the organizational philosophy and highlights the areas of concern for special training. (orig.)

  9. Nuclear safety education and training network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, J.; Ulfkjaer, L.

    2004-01-01

    In March 2001, the Secretariat convened an Advisory Group on Education and Training in nuclear safety. The Advisory Group considered structure, scope and means related to the implementation of an IAEA Programme on Education and Training . A strategic plan was agreed and the following outputs were envisaged: 1. A Training Support Programme in nuclear safety, including a standardized and harmonized approach for training developed by the IAEA and in use by Member States. 2. National and regional training centres, established to support sustainable national nuclear safety infrastructures. 3. Training material for use by lecturers and students developed by the IAEA in English and translated to other languages. The implementation of the plan was initiated in 2002 emphasizing the preparation of training materials. In 2003 a pilot project for a network on Education and Training in Asia was initiated

  10. Nuclear science training in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewamanna, R.

    2007-01-01

    There are two major levels of obtaining radiation or nuclear education and training in Sri Lanka : the University and training courses in nuclear related technology and radiation protection offered by the Atomic Energy Authority of the Ministry of Science and Technology . This paper summarizes the status, some of the activities and problems of radiation education in Sri Lanka. (author)

  11. Nuclear safety training program (NSTP) for dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cretskens, Pieter; Lenie, Koen; Mulier, Guido

    2014-01-01

    European Control Services (GDF Suez) has developed and is still developing specific training programs for the dismantling and decontamination of nuclear installations. The main topic in these programs is nuclear safety culture. We therefore do not focus on technical training but on developing the right human behavior to work in a 'safety culture' environment. The vision and techniques behind these programs have already been tested in different environments: for example the dismantling of the BN MOX Plant in Dessel (Belgium), Nuclear Safety Culture Training for Electrabel NPP Doel..., but also in the non-nuclear industry. The expertise to do so was found in combining the know-how of the Training and the Nuclear Department of ECS. In training, ECS is one of the main providers of education in risky tasks, like elevation and manipulation of charges, working in confined spaces... but it does also develop training on demand to improve safety in a certain topic. Radiation Protection is the core business in the Nuclear Department with a presence on most of the nuclear sites in Belgium. Combining these two domains in a nuclear safety training program, NSTP, is an important stage in a dismantling project due to specific contamination, technical and other risks. It increases the level of safety and leads to a harmonization of different working cultures. The modular training program makes it possible to evaluate constantly as well as in group or individually. (authors)

  12. Nuclear training: we just keep learning!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Years ago GPU Nuclear made a commitment to behavioral based training and to the development of high quality training for the personnel running their nuclear plants. The paper shares some of our latest developments and techniques being used to achieve outstanding results. (author)

  13. Deregulation and Nuclear Training: Cost Effective Alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard P. Coe; Patricia A. Lake

    2000-01-01

    Training is crucial to the success of any organization. It is also expensive, with some estimates exceeding $50 billion annually spent on training by U.S. corporations. Nuclear training, like that of many other highly technical organizations, is both crucial and costly. It is unlikely that the amount of training can be significantly reduced. If anything, current trends indicate that training needs will probably increase as the industry and workforce ages and changes. With the advent of energy deregulation in the United States, greater pressures will surface to make the costs of energy more cost-competitive. This in turn will drive businesses to more closely examine existing costs and find ways to do things in a more cost-effective way. The commercial nuclear industry will be no exception, and nuclear training will be equally affected. It is time for nuclear training and indeed the entire nuclear industry to begin using more aggressive techniques to reduce costs. This includes the need for nuclear training to find alternatives to traditional methods for the delivery of cost-effective high-quality training that meets regulatory requirements and produces well-qualified personnel capable of working in an efficient and safe manner. Computer-based and/or Web-based training are leading emerging technologies

  14. Nuclear training and experience feedback in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olofsson, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    There are several different ways of educating and training the personnel at the Swedish nuclear power plants: centralized training in full-scale and part-task simulators; centralized education in the form of technical academic courses where computerized teaching is also used; extensive decentralized training out at the nuclear power plants, where compact simulators are also used; and experience feedback forms an important part of the training. Five performance indicators will be identified and the results will be presented. The excellent results are a good indication of the fact that well-executed education and training and smoothly functioning experience feedback give results

  15. YK1 Basic professional training course on nuclear safety, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.

    2005-01-01

    In the fall of 2002, Finnish organizations re-evaluated the manpower situation and established an organizing committee to develop and organize basic post-graduate professional training of new recruits and staff members; especially for the acute needs of the new NPP project, but also to provide in the long-term a new generation of nuclear experts to replace the present generation which will retire within the next ten years. The organizing committee included representatives of the following organizations: Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority STUK, nuclear power utilities TVO and Fortum, the Technical Research Centre of Finland VTT, the Lappeenranta and Helsinki Universities of Technology, LUT and HUT, respectively, and the Ministry of Trade and Industry, KTM. The committee decided to promptly organize a national training course on nuclear safety based on a similar course developed by the IAEA: the course structure and syllabus are alike. Although part of the course material is based on the IAEA material, it has been adapted to the Finnish conditions, and a large part of the material is completely new. The Finnish application was developed in order to make visible different standpoints of all organizations. The location of the first six-week course YK1 from September 2003 to February 2004 rotated between different organizations. There were altogether 120 lecturers and rehearsal, demonstration or excursion leaders. Half of them came from the utilities TVO and Fortum, a quarter from the authority STUK, and the rest from VTT, universities and others. The 51 participants of the course came from these same organisations. The lectures were held in Finnish, and the slides in Finnish were distributed to the participants. However, it is useful and even mandatory to know the terms also in English, and therefore the extended abstracts of the lectures were written in English. The YK1 course material was laid on the website of LUT to look for in advance or in more detail with

  16. YK1 Basic professional training course on nuclear safety, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.

    2005-01-01

    In the fall of 2002, Finnish organizations re-evaluated the manpower situation and established an organizing committee to develop and organize basic post-graduate professional training of new recruits and staff members; especially for the acute needs of the new NPP project, but also to provide in the long-term a new generation of nuclear experts to replace the present generation which will retire within the next ten years. The organizing committee included representatives of the following organizations: Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority STUK, nuclear power utilities TVO and Fortum, the Technical Research Centre of Finland VTT, the Lappeenranta and Helsinki Universities of Technology, LUT and HUT, respectively, and the Ministry of Trade and Industry, KTM. The committee decided to promptly organize a national training course on nuclear safety based on a similar course developed by the IAEA: the course structure and syllabus are alike. Although part of the course material is based on the IAEA material, it has been adapted to the Finnish conditions, and a large part of the material is completely new. The Finnish application was developed in order to make visible different standpoints of all organizations. The location of the first six-week course YK1 from September 2003 to February 2004 rotated between different organizations. There were altogether 120 lecturers and rehearsal, demonstration or excursion leaders. Half of them came from the utilities TVO and Fortum, a quarter from the authority STUK, and the rest from VTT, universities and others. The 51 participants of the course came from these same organisations. The lectures were held in Finnish, and the slides in Finnish were distributed to the participants. However, it is useful and even mandatory to know the terms also in English, and therefore the extended abstracts of the lectures were written in English. The YK1 course material was laid on the website of LUT to look for in advance or in more detail with

  17. Activities to foster training in nuclear and radiochemistry from IACS, IAEA-Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossbach, M.; Narasimhan, D.V.S.; Chmielewski, A.; Einav, I.; Thereska, J.; Haji-Saeid, M.

    2005-01-01

    Uses of radioisotopes and radiation in medicine, industry, agriculture are amongst the most beneficial applications of atomic energy for peaceful purposes. The International Atomic Energy Agency aims - in accordance with its statute - to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world. The various Technical Divisions of the Agency carry out this mandate and enhance, particularly through 'manpower development activities' the nuclear applications of radiation and isotopes. Staff members of the 'Industrial Applications and Chemistry Section' in the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications of the IAEA have supported more than 600 trainees per year for education in nuclear and radiochemistry through fellowships, training courses and workshops. Provision of printed material in various disciplines is supporting our educational efforts. (author)

  18. Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlesser, J.A. [ed.] [comp.

    1997-02-01

    This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used as Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; have participated in conducting two critical experiments; be asked to complete a critique of the nuclear criticality safety training course.

  19. Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used as Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; have participated in conducting two critical experiments; be asked to complete a critique of the nuclear criticality safety training course

  20. Training within the French nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jusselin, F.

    1987-01-01

    Training dispensed by the EDF Nuclear and Fossil Generation Division has contributed significantly toward successful startup and operation of French nuclear power plants. In 1986, the time-based availability of 900 MW PWRs totaled 85 %. This is just one example of how EDF training programs have benefited from 150 reactor-years of operating experience and the ensuing opportunities for perfecting and testing of training tool effectiveness. These programs have been adopted by utilities in other countries where suitable local facilities are making advantageous use of EDF training experience and methods. EDF expertise is also transferred to these countries indirectly through the simulator manufacturer

  1. Description of the Nuclear Training Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagadarikar, V.K.

    1974-01-01

    The Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India has developed an on-going programme for constructing and operating heavy water moderated, natural uranium fuelled power stations of the CANDU-type. With the view to train personnel required for operation and maintenance of these stations, a Nuclear Training Centre has been set up at the site of the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station. A description of the nuclear training centre with its facilities is given. The training programme for engineers, operators, mechanical, electrical and control maintainers etc. is given in detail, along with the actual syllabi for respective courses. Examples of the typical field check list are provided. (K.B.)

  2. Basic training of nuclear power reactor personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palabrica, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The basic training of nuclear power reactor personnel should be given very close attention since it constitutes the foundation of their knowledge of nuclear technology. Emphasis should be given on the thorough understanding of basic nuclear concepts in order to have reasonable assurance of successful assimilation by those personnel of more specialized and advanced concepts to which they will be later exposed. Basic training will also provide a means for screening to ensure that those will be sent for further spezialized training will perform well. Finally, it is during the basic training phase when nuclear reactor operators will start to acquire and develop attitudes regarding reactor operation and it is important that these be properly founded. (orig.)

  3. Training in radiological protection for nuclear programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Many Member States are developing or already have developed their own national training programmes. The IAEA is actively involved in promoting training in radiological protection for nuclear programmes. The various types of training are fully discussed, with suggested curricula. An earlier report was published as Technical Reports Series No.31 in 1964. In 1973, new and additional information was received from Member States which is reflected in the present report. Training programmes are classified, according to those requiring training: specialists; persons whose work is closely related to radiological protection (administrators, public health officers and industrial health personnel, safety inspectors and engineers in nuclear installations, public service personnel); persons working with radiation; and the general public. Forms, scope and duration of training are discussed. Different types of training programmes are currently required for training of medical doctors (those providing medical surveillance for radiation workers and others dealing with public health aspects of radiation hazards), for technical supervisors, radiologists, and qualified workers in nuclear medicine, technological staff, administrators, persons working with radiation, and public service personnel. Standard curricula and desirable experiments and exercises are discussed. The organization of training together with the facilities, equipment and teaching staff required are considered, as is follow-up training. Annexes 1 to 4 give examples of training curricula and training courses available in various countries, a suggested syllabus for training of technical supervisors, and a bibliography consisting of 210 references dealing with general topics, nuclear radiation physics, radiochemistry and radiation chemistry, radiation biology and biophysics, dosimetry and health physics and radiation protection, medical aspects and toxicology, and environmental aspects

  4. Experiences in manpower planning for geomatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbairn, D.

    2014-04-01

    This paper addresses the issue of manpower planning in meeting the needs of national and international economies for trained geomatics professionals. Estimated statistics for the numbers of such personnel, and experience in assessing recruitment into the profession reveal considerable skills gaps, particularly in the mature economies of the developed world. In general, centralised manpower planning has little official role in western economies. However, informal surveys of shortfalls in supply of qualified graduates in many fields, including geomatics, are undertaken by professional organisations, educational establishments and consultancies. This paper examines examples of such manpower surveys and considers whether more effective manpower planning would ensure a more efficient geomatics industry in a nation, and what the nature of such an exercise should be.

  5. Training options for countering nuclear smuggling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, D Y; Erickson, S A

    1999-01-01

    The burden of stopping a nuclear smuggling attempt at the border rests most heavily on the front-line customs inspector. He needs to know how to use the technological tools at his disposal, how to discern tell-tale anomalies in export documents and manifests, how to notice psychological signs of a smuggler's tension, and how to search anything that might hide nuclear material. This means that assistance in the counter-nuclear smuggling training of customs officers is one of the most critical areas of help that the United States can provide. This paper discusses the various modes of specialized training, both in the field and in courses, as well as the types of assistance that can be provided. Training for nuclear customs specialists, and supervisors and managers of nuclear smuggling detection systems is also important, and differs from front-line inspector training in several aspects. The limitations of training and technological tools such as expert centers that will overcome these limitations are also discussed. Training assistance planned by DOE/NN-43 to Russia within the Second Line of Defense program is discussed in the light of these options, and future possibilities for such training are projected

  6. Cook's Carteaux: Trends in nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The following Nuclear News interview, conducted by associate editor Gregg M. Taylor, is with Paul F. Carteaux, training superintendent at Indiana/Michigan Power Company's Cook nuclear power plant. The site has two Westinghouse pressurized water reactors. Cook-1, rated 1020-MWe (net), started commercial operation in August 1975, and the 1060-MWe Cook-2 began operation in July 1978

  7. Data management strategies for nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbo, J.N.; Gwinn, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    Use of systematic training development technologies has become a standard for the commercial nuclear power industry and for many Department of Energy facilities. Such systems involve detailed analysis of job functions, tasks and skill requirements and correlation of that information to the courses, curricula and testing instruments used in the training process. Nuclear training programs are subject to audit and evaluation by a number of government and industry organizations. The ability to establish an audit trail, from initial task analysis to final examination is crucial to demonstrating the completeness and validity of a systematic training program. This paper provides perspective on aspects of the training data management problem, status of technological solutions, and characteristics of data base management systems that are best suited for application to training programs

  8. A Review of the Labor Market, Manpower Characteristics and Training of Motor Vehicle Repair Personnel. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, R. W.; And Others

    To determine whether current automotive mechanic training programs provide adequate exposure to the knowledge and skills needed to properly service and repair motor vehicles, data were gathered on the tasks, service and repair establishments, job market, labor force, and training programs. Primary sources of data are reports prepared by various…

  9. Training and qualification of nuclear power plant operators (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsuga, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Training center using the simulators, instructor training, training upgrade, deployment of digital control panel and review of training were described with overseas practice. Recently, nuclear power plant on-site simulators were also used for respective operator training. Operator teamwork training, training team performance upgrade, reflection of operating experiences in nuclear power plant accidents, development of training support equipments and management of training records were needed to review and upgrade training and qualification programs. (T. Tanaka)

  10. Nuclear education and training: cause for concern?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Mankind now enjoys many benefits from nuclear-related technologies. There is, however, growing concern in many OECD countries that nuclear education and training is decreasing, perhaps to problematic levels. This booklet, a summary of the full report, conveys the results of a pioneering survey on nuclear education and training in almost 200 organisations in 16 countries. The current situation is presented and causes for concern are examined. Recommendations are made as to the actions governments, academia and industry must take in order to assure that crucial present requirements are met and future options are not precluded. (authors)

  11. NRC influences on nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    NRC influences on utility training programs through prescriptive requirements and evaluation of industry self-initiatives are discussed. NRC regulation and industry initiatives are complimentary and in some instances industry initiatives are replacing NRC requirements. Controls and feedback mechanisms designed to enhance positive NRC influences and minimize or eliminate negative influences are discussed. Industry and NRC efforts to reach an acceptable mix between regulator oversight and self-initiatives by the industry are recognized. Problem areas for continued cooperation to enhance training and minimize conflicting signals to industry are discussed. These areas include: requalification examination scope and content, depth of training and examination on emergency procedures; improved learning objectives as the basis for training and examination, and severe accident training

  12. Nuclear criticality safety department training implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Department (NCSD) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The NCSD Qualification Program is described in Y/DD-694, Qualification Program, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSD personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This document supersedes Y/DD-696, Revision 2, dated 3/27/96, Training Implementation, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department. There are no backfit requirements associated with revisions to this document

  13. Operator training simulator for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozuka, Hiromi

    1977-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, training of the operators is important. In Japan, presently there are two training centers, one is BWR operation training center at Okuma-cho, Fukushima Prefecture, and another the nuclear power generation training center in Tsuruga City, Fukui Prefecture, where the operators of PWR nuclear power plants are trained. This report describes the BWR operation training center briefly. Operation of a nuclear power plant is divided into three stages of start-up, steady state operation, and shut down. Start-up is divided into the cold-state start-up after the shut down for prolonged period due to periodical inspection or others and the hot-state start-up from stand-by condition after the shut down for a short time. In the cold-state start-up, the correction of reactivity change and the heating-up control to avoid excessive thermal stress to the primary system components are important. The BWR operation training center offers the next three courses, namely beginner's course, retraining course and specific training course. The training period is 12 weeks and the number of trainees is eight/course in the beginner's course. The simulator was manufactured by modeling No. 3 plant of Fukushima First Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co. The simulator is composed of the mimic central control panel and the digital computer. The software system comprises the monitor to supervise the whole program execution, the logic model simulating the plant interlock system and the dynamic model simulating the plant physical phenomena. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  14. Current status of education and training in nuclear technology in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, F.U.

    2007-01-01

    Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission (BAEC) is the national authority for the introduction, promotion and safety issues of nuclear science and technology in the country. During the last four decades, a significant development has been achieved in the field of food and agriculture, medicine, industries and environment using nuclear technology. Education and training in science and technology played a vital role to achieve the significant development in these fields. Some local public universities and BAEC training facilities at home and abroad have played mainly a key role to develop the human resource in the field of nuclear science and technology. Over the last four decades, BAEC with its various specialized establishments has played a focused role in the advancement, understanding and usage of nuclear science and technologies in the country. Through years of cumulative efforts, BAEC has developed a pool of research infrastructure, capacity and human resources having been trained extensively at home and abroad in their respective fields. The trained manpower in the different fields of science and technology are working in the country to solve some national problems like arsenic contamination in drinking water, iodine deficiency disease goitre, cancer and many others. BAEC is going to establish a Nuclear Training Institute which will also have residential facilities. Government has already assured to fund to establish the Nuclear Training Centre in the campus of AERE, Savar. BAEC placed a formal proposal for Affiliation with Jahangirnagar University for Awarding Post Graduate Degrees in different specialized fields of nuclear science and technology. As this might take some time for implementation; therefore, BAEC has decided to start the academic program immediately under the present set-up of the organization. With this view, BAEC proposes to affiliate its Nuclear Training Institute with the Jahangirnagar University for pursuing academic degree programmes i.e. post

  15. Simulators for training nuclear power plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Simulator training and retraining of operations personnel is essential for their acquiring the necessary knowledge, skills and qualification for operating a nuclear power plant, and for effective feedback of experience including human based operating errors. Simulator training is the most effective way by far of training operations personnel in co-operation and communication in a team, which also involves instilling attitudes and approaches for achieving excellence and individual responsibility and alertness. This technical document provides guidance to Member States on the procurement, setting up and utilization of a simulator training centre; it will also be useful for organizations with previous experience in the use of simulators for training. The document is the result of a series of advisory and consultants meetings held in the framework of the International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation in 1989-1992. 17 refs, 2 tabs

  16. Training of operating personnel for nuclear ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, J.R.A.; Gibbs, D.C.C.

    1983-01-01

    Training for Nuclear Power Plant Operators is provided by the Royal Navy in support of the Nuclear Submarine Programme which is based on the Pressurised Water Reactor. The Royal naval college has 21 years of experience in this training field in which the core is the preparation of graduate electro-mechanical engineers to assume the duties of marine engineer in command of a team of supporting Engineer Officers of the Watch and Fleet Chief Petty Officers. The paper describes the training programme and shows how it is monitored by academic, professional and naval authorities and indicates the use of feedback from the user. The lynch pin of the programme is a post-graduate diploma course in Nuclear Reactor Technology attended by graduates after gaining some practical experience at sea. The course which is described in detail makes use of simplified simulators and models to develop the principles, these are applied on the JASON Training Reactor with the emphasis on in-core experiments demonstrating reactivity effects and instrumentation interpretation. The training programme provides for interaction between academic education, practical experience, applied education, full plant simulation training and on-the-job training in which boards or examinations have to be successfully passed at each stage. (author)

  17. Nuclear Power Plant Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, George A.

    1975-01-01

    The author recognizes a body of basic knowledge in nuclear power plant technoogy that can be taught in school programs, and lists the various courses, aiming to fill the anticipated need for nuclear-trained manpower--persons holding an associate degree in engineering technology. (Author/BP)

  18. Manpower Projections, Recruitment Needs and Training Requirements for Commercial Airline Pilots in the United States 1968-1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Robert Marchand

    This study evaluated the reported airline pilot shortage in relation to certified air carriers; recruitment needs for qualified applicants; training requirements as recommended by air carriers, airline captains, and flight officers; and airline pilot supply and demand during 1968-79. A literature review on foreign and domestic pilot shortages was…

  19. Evolution of GPU nuclear's training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, R.L.; Coe, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    GPU Nuclear Corporation (GPUN) manages the operators of Three Mile Island Unit 1 and Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Stations and the recovery activities at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 plant. From the time it was formed in January 1980 GPUN emphasized the use of behavioral learning objectives as the basis for all its training programs. This paper describes the evolution to a formalized performance based Training System Development (TSD) Process. The Training and Education Department staff increased from 10 in 1979 to the current 120 dedicated professionals, with a corresponding increase in facilities and acquisition of sophisticated Basic Principles Training Simulators and a Three Mile Island Unit 1 control Room Replica Simulator. The impact of these developments and achievement of full INPO accreditation are discussed and related to plant performance improvements

  20. Education and training in nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcon, S.; Marco, M.

    2014-01-01

    CIEMAT participates in the European project Matisse (Materials Innovations for a Safe and Sustainable nuclear in Europe) belonging to FP7, whose main objective is to promote the link between the respective national research programs through networking and integration of activities for innovation in materials for advanced nuclear systems, sharing among partners best practices and implementation of training tools and efficient communication. The draft four years, from 2013 to 2017, includes aspects such as the interaction between infrastructure, R and D programs and postgraduate education and training. (Author)

  1. Nuclear energy and education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soentono, S.

    1996-01-01

    In the modern society, education and training is a must since without it one is impossible to a part of the society. It is also indispensable since human resource is more important than natural resources to sustain the development. The modern society needs, and is also the product of a very long effort of human race, 'education and training'. Nuclear energy education and trainings, as one of the efforts to enhance the modern society, are currently demanded to assure the quality and reliability of personnel being involved in various kinds, levels, and stages of nuclear industries. These education and trainings are also required to suffice the demand for assurance of the quality and reliability of the products, e.g. nuclear components, systems, installations, other products, techniques, and services. Linking and matching of these education and trainings are also required. In the developing countries, it will be better to start with the non-energy application, e.g. application of isotopes and radiation in various fields. There must be cooperation giving rise to strong links between universities. The mechanism and cooperation should facilitate the character building of nuclear energy man power covering attitudes for pioneering, having scientific tradition and industrial orientated views, considering the safety first toward safety culture, and mastering communication. (J.P.N.)

  2. Grass-roots approach: developing qualified nuclear personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear power plants experiencing personnel recruitment problems are trying a grass-roots approach to increase the manpower pool. The Philadelphia Electric Co. and the Toledo Edison Co. are working with local educational institutions to offer nuclear-technology training specific to the needs of nuclear plants. The utilities' investment covers much of the cost of instruction as well as continued training for employees

  3. Nuclear education and training: cause for concern?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power plants have played an important role in electricity generation in the OECD member countries, contributing an average 24% over the past few years. One major criterion for the success of this technology has always been the education and training of competent personnel in all sectors of nuclear development and application. The high level of competence and know-how reached must be maintained in the future. Qualified personnel is required for running existing plants, building new nuclear power plants - at present especially in Japan and Korea - and for all activities associated with supply and waste management, decommissioning, and for all applications of nuclear technology above and beyond energy generation. The number of university graduates in the OECD countries is decreasing alarmingly, among other reasons because of the diminished attractiveness of these courses as a consequence of the reduced number of nuclear engineering courses offered in curricula. A broad-based program of disseminating basic information in nuclear technology in university curricula is urgently required. In industry, internal advanced and in-career training measures and programs are offered to ensure broad-based qualification as well as specialization in nuclear subjects of the staff, as demands are rising and flexibility is required of all staff members. This development implies that governments in particular are called upon to ensure, by long-term planning, that nuclear competence is preserved in science and research, in industry and applications, as part of their areas of responsibility and competence. Note: The full text of the study on which this contribution is based has been published under the title of 'Nuclear Education and Training: Cause for Concern?' by OECD-NEA, Paris, 2000, 124 pages. (orig.) [de

  4. Manpower and Transportation Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, S.W.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies three routing and scheduling problems arising in manpower and transportation planning. These problems are rooted in real applications, and carry interesting characteristics. By exploiting the structures of the problems, this thesis provides effective mathematical models and

  5. Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1992-11-01

    This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: (1) be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; (2) be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; (3) be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; (4) be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used at Los Alamos; (5) be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; (6) have participated in conducting two critical experiments

  6. An evaluation of the AnCO training service: a contextual study of the national manpower development process

    OpenAIRE

    Sheehy, P. J

    1995-01-01

    This is a study of the AnCO Training Advisory Service set up by government to promote skills development within industry. The research reported here attempts to account for the rise and decline of the division. It asks why an expensive mechanism for state intervention in the labour market failed to have the desired effect, and why it took so long to have the failure recognised. At a more generic level the study examines the role and effectiveness of state agencies which have an intervening fu...

  7. Nuclear Power Reactor simulator - based training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, S.A.S.

    2009-01-01

    nuclear power stations will continue playing a major role as an energy source for electric generation and heat production in the world. in this paper, a nuclear power reactor simulator- based training program will be presented . this program is designed to aid in training of the reactor operators about the principles of operation of the plant. also it could help the researchers and the designers to analyze and to estimate the performance of the nuclear reactors and facilitate further studies for selection of the proper controller and its optimization process as it is difficult and time consuming to do all experiments in the real nuclear environment.this program is written in MATLAB code as MATLAB software provides sophisticated tools comparable to those in other software such as visual basic for the creation of graphical user interface (GUI). moreover MATLAB is available for all major operating systems. the used SIMULINK reactor model for the nuclear reactor can be used to model different types by adopting appropriate parameters. the model of each component of the reactor is based on physical laws rather than the use of look up tables or curve fitting.this simulation based training program will improve acquisition and retention knowledge also trainee will learn faster and will have better attitude

  8. Nuclear energy education and training in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In its continuing use of nuclear power, France faces numerous challenges, including the operation and maintenance of its existing array of reactors, waste management, the decommissioning of obsolete reactors, and research and development for future nuclear systems. All of these efforts must recognize and conform to international requirements. These activities mean that all participants in the French nuclear industry must continually update their approaches and skills, with respect to both domestic and worldwide nuclear power development. This requirement calls for the hiring and training of thousands of scientists and engineers each year in France and its partner or customer countries. Over the next ten years, domestic and international nuclear power activities in France will call for the recruitment of about 13,000 engineers with Master of Science or Ph.D. degrees, and 10,000 science technicians and operators with Bachelor of Science degrees. The chief employers will be EDF, AREVA, GDF-Suez, national agencies such as the Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs (ANDRA), sub-contractors, and R and D agencies such as the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), and the technical safety organization, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN). France has made a commitment to support countries that are ready to create the human, institutional, and technical conditions required to establish a civilian nuclear energy programme that meets all the requirements of safety, security, non-proliferation and environmental protection for present and future generations. These efforts are conducted through the France International Nuclear Agency (AFNI). In response to the need for competence-building in nuclear energy production, France now offers training opportunities in both French and English education programmes. Partnerships created by French nuclear energy participants and by AFNI can provide dedicated programmes

  9. Instructional skills evaluation in nuclear industry training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazour, T.J.; Ball, F.M.

    1985-11-01

    This report provides information to nuclear power plant training managers and their staffs concerning the job performance requirements of instructional personnel to implement prformance-based training programs (also referred to as the Systems Approach Training). The information presented in this report is a compilation of information and lessons learned in the nuclear power industry and in other industries using performance-based training programs. The job performance requirements in this report are presented as instructional skills objectives. The process used to develop the instructional skills objectives is described. Each objective includes an Instructional Skills Statement describing the behavior that is expected and an Instructional Skills Standard describing the skills/knowledge that the individual should possess in order to have achieved mastery. The instructional skills objectives are organized according to the essential elements of the Systems Approach to Training and are cross-referenced to three categories of instructional personnel: developers of instruction, instructors, and instructional managers/supervisors. Use of the instructional skills objectives is demonstrated for reviewing instructional staff training and qualification programs, developing criterion-tests, and reviewing the performance and work products of individual staff members. 22 refs

  10. Inr training programme in nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cretu, I.; Ionila, M.; Gyongyosi, E.; Dragan, E.; Petra, M.

    2013-01-01

    The field of scientific research goes through rapid changes to which organizations must dinamically and efficiently adapt, which leads to the need to develop a continuous learning process that should be the basis for a long-term operational performance. Thus, human resource management systems and continuous learning should be perfectly correlated/alligned with the organizational strategy and knowledge. The research institutes through the nature of their activity are constantly undergoing a transformation process by exploring new research areas which presumes ensuring competent human resources who have to continuously learn and improve. The «learning organization » concept represents a metaphor rooted in the search of a strategy for promoting the personal development of the individual within an organization through a continuous transformation. Learning is associated with the idea of continuous transformation based on the individual and organizational development. Within « learning organizations » the human development strategy occupies a central role in management strategies. It was learned that organizations which perform excellently depend on the employees committment, especially in the budget constraints environment. For this, the human resources have to be used at maximum capacity but this is possible only with an increased committment of the employee towards the organization. The purpose of this paper is to present the basic training programme for the new employees which is part of the training strategy which carry out activities in the nuclear field of SCN Pitesti. With the majority of the research personnel aged between 45 and 60 years old there is the risk of loosing the knowledge gained in this domain. The expertise gained by experienced experts in the institute nationally and internationally can be exploited through the knowledge transfer to the new employees by organizing training programmes. The knowledge transfer between generations is one of the

  11. Nuclear training facilities at the Royal Naval College, Greenwich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head, J.L.; Lowther, C.A.; Marsh, J.R.W.

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes some of the nuclear training facilities at the Royal Naval College and the way the facilities are used in the training of personnel for the Naval nuclear propulsion programme. (author)

  12. Development of training courses in the field of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Han Young; Soe, In Seok; Lee, Ui Jin; Park, Jae Chang; Kim, Ik Hyeon; Won, Jong Yeol; Nam, Jae Yeol

    1993-12-01

    The nuclear training center provides various training courses in such areas of nuclear energy as nuclear power technology, radioisotope applications technology, non-destructive technology, nuclear safety, etc. The center also provides in-house staff training courses in project management, computer applications, and other research areas. The objective of the project is to develop new specialized training courses not only nuclear energy areas but also in management, so that localization of nuclear project can be accomplished as early as possible. The scope and contents of the project envision the following aims; 1. to develop specialized nuclear training programs; 2. to develop project management training courses for KAERI staff; 3. to collect and analyze foreign training programs and materials; 4. to develop foreign-assisted training courses; and 5. to develop international training courses for developing country trainese

  13. Digital innovations for teaching and nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanjas, Y.; Schoevaerts, D.; Beliazi, L.

    2017-01-01

    The article reviews various digital tools that have been developed for nuclear training. The 'internet virtual laboratory' has been developed by the IAEA, it allows the live broadcasting through the web of experiments and practical exercises performed on the ISIS reactor located in France at Saclay. Virtual reality is booming and allows professionals to move in a nuclear facility virtually. For instance the SecureVI tool is based on 360 degrees photographs of the facility that are associated with goggles to get the immersive effect. The last generation of full-scale reactor simulators are based on 3-dimensional calculations made by the latest version of neutron transport codes and thermal-hydraulic codes. The EPR-FA3 simulator represents the control room of the Flamanville EPR, it is used for the training of reactor operators. The X1300 simulator replicates PWR operations and the SOFIA tool allows the trainees to understand how a nuclear reactor works. The CAVE tool was first developed to be used as an help to engineers and now it has been adapted to training purposes: CAVE allows a complete immersion in a nuclear facility. (A.C.)

  14. Nuclear instrument maintenance and technical training in Nuclear Energy Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Nasir Abdul Wahid

    1987-01-01

    Instrument maintenance service is a necessity in a Nuclear Research Institute, such as the Nuclear Energy Unit (NEU) to ensure the smooth running of our research activities. However, realising that maintenance back-up service for either nuclear or other scientific equipment is a major problem in developing countries such as Malaysia, NEU has set up an Instrumentation and Control Department to assist in rectifying the maintenance problem. Beside supporting in house activities in NEU, the Instrumentation and Control Department (I and C) is also geared into providing services to other organisations in Malaysia. This paper will briefly outline the activities of NEU in nuclear instrument maintenance as well as in technical training. (author)

  15. Academic training for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    In view of the increasing emphasis being placed upon academic training of nuclear power plant operators, it is important that institutions of higher education develop and implement programs which will meet the educational needs of operational personnel in the nuclear industry. Two primary objectives must be satisfied by these programs if they are to be effective in meeting the needs of the industry. One objective is for academic quality. The other primary objective is for programs to address the specialized needs of the nuclear plant operator and to be relevant to the operator's job. The Center for Nuclear Studies at Memphis State University, therefore, has developed a total program for these objectives, which delivers the programs, and/or appropriate parts thereto, at ten nuclear plant sites and with other plants in the planning stage. The Center for Nuclear Studies program leads to a Bachelor of Professional Studies degree in nuclear industrial operations, which is offered through the university college of Memphis State University

  16. maintainability of manpower system with restricted recruitment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JERRY

    departmentalized manpower systems. ... homogenous k × k probability transition matrix of the manpower system; r and w be 1 .... is an advantage in manpower planning, especially in the area of manpower control, Bartholomew, et al (1991).

  17. Studies in training nuclear plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlin, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    One of the lessons learned from the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident was that the nuclear industry was ineffective in learning from previous events at other plants. As training programs and methods have improved since TMI, the nuclear industry has searched for effective methods to teach the lessons learned from industry events. The case study method has great potential as a solution. By reviewing actual plant events in detail, trainees can be challenged with solving actual problems. When used in a seminar or discussion format, these case studies also help trainees compare their decision-making processes with other trainees, the instructor, and the personnel involved in the actual case study event

  18. Manpower use and requirements in OAPEC states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Wattari, A A

    1978-10-01

    The capital-intensive petroleum industry employs only a small, largely skilled labor force, which has social and economic implication for over-populated areas. The constraints imposed on other sectors and downstream industries by industrialization and the transfer of high technology has kept the Arab world's employment level little more than half that of the industrialized nations. The employment of large numbers of high-cost, highly trained foreign workers in Arab countries indicates the need for manpower training and development. Efforts to remedy this situation are evident in the planning for regional literacy and vocational training programs and in professional development at the Arab Petroleum Training Institute. The results of a manpower survey and educational goals are summarized.

  19. Training of nuclear power plant operating personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-04-01

    A collection is presented containing 11 papers submitted at a conference on the selection and education of specialists for operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. The conference was attended by specialists from universities and colleges, research institutes and production plants. It debated the methods and aims of both general and specialized theoretical and practical personnel education, the proposals for teaching centre equipment, the use of simulators, computers and other aids in the teaching process; training on school reactors was included. A proposal was put forward of the system of education, the teaching process itself, the content of the basic theoretical subjects, and the method of testing pupils' knowledge. The importance was stressed of establishing a national coordination centre to safeguard the syllabus, methodology, teaching aids, and also the training proper. The system of personnel education in the Paks nuclear power plant, Hungary, is presented as an example. (M.S.)

  20. Experiments for training in nuclear and radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moebius, S.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental training program for education in Nuclear and Radiochemistry is outlined. Didactical aspects are discussed, the installation of a suitable radiochemical laboratory is described and the precautions for radiation protection summarized. Experiments including theoretical introduction, survey of apparatus and materials involved and experimental procedures are given for the topics of radiation and their measurement, radiochemical methods and application of radioisotopes. Technical terms most often used during the course are explained and a comprehensive literature survey is finally compiled. (orig.) [de

  1. Experiments for training in nuclear and radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moebius, S.

    1985-03-01

    An experimental training program for education in Nuclear and Radiochemistry is outlined. Didactical aspects are discussed, the installation of a suitable radiochemical laboratory is described and the precautions for radiation protection summarized. Experiments including theoretical introduction, survey of apparatus and materials involved and experimental procedures are given for the topics of Radiation and Their Measurement, Radiochemical Methods and Application of Radioisotopes. Technical Terms most often used during the course are explained and a comprehensive literature survey is finally compiled. (orig.) [de

  2. Strategic planning approach to nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Detroit Edison Company's Nuclear Training group used an organizational planning process that yielded significant results in 1984. At the heart of the process was a concept called the Driving Force which served as the basis for the development of goals, objectives, and action plants. A key ingredient of the success of the planning process was the total, voluntary participation by all members of the organization

  3. Manpower management information system /MIS/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravette, M. C.; King, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    System of programs capable of building and maintaining data bank provides all levels of management with regular manpower evaluation reports and data source for special management exercises on manpower.

  4. Organizing for change: new priorities for training organization in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammuto, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    Traditional training organizations will require a new look in light of the efforts being applied since TMI. the emphasis to incorporate basic educational technology into power plant training and trends of past, present, and future program development, point out the need for change in training philosophy and manpower needs. The functional responsibilities within a typical training organization will be described with an emphasis on interrelationships of each group activity and the effect of the systems approach to training organization and administration

  5. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teresinska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bozena; Krolicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Miroslaw

    2014-01-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes regular

  6. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresinska, Anna [Institute of Cardiology, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Birkenfeld, Bozena [Pomeranian Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Szczecin (Poland); Krolicki, Leszek [Warsaw Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Dziuk, Miroslaw [Military Institute of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-10-15

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes

  7. Development of training courses in the field of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Han Young; Seo, In Seok; Lee, Eui Jin; Seo, Kyung Won; Won, Jong Yeol; Nam, Jae Yeol

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the final results of D evelopment of training courses in the field of nuclear energy . The scope and contents are as follows : 1. to develop specialized nuclear training programs. 2. to collect and analyze foreign training programs and materials. 3. to develop foreign assisted training courses. 4. to develop interregional training courses for developing country trainees. and 5. to develop text materials for the implementation of training courses. 16 refs. (Author)

  8. Enhancing Nuclear Training with 3D Visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, V.; Gagnon, B.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: While the nuclear power industry is trying to reinforce its safety and regain public support post-Fukushima, it is also faced with a very real challenge that affects its day-to-day activities: a rapidly aging workforce. Statistics show that close to 40% of the current nuclear power industry workforce will retire within the next five years. For newcomer countries, the challenge is even greater, having to develop a completely new workforce. The workforce replacement effort introduces nuclear newcomers of a new generation with different backgrounds and affinities. Major lifestyle differences between the two generations of workers result, amongst other things, in different learning habits and needs for this new breed of learners. Interactivity, high visual content and quick access to information are now necessary to achieve a high level of retention. To enhance existing training programmes or to support the establishment of new training programmes for newcomer countries, L-3 MAPPS has devised learning tools to enhance these training programmes focused on the “Practice-by-Doing” principle. L-3 MAPPS has coupled 3D computer visualization with high-fidelity simulation to bring real-time, simulation-driven animated components and systems allowing immersive and participatory, individual or classroom learning. (author

  9. Training 1983 and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Quality training is necessary to assure competent, safe, efficient, and economical operation of a Nuclear Power Plant thereby providing the best insurance for our investors, customers and employees. By providing quality training programs to meet our needs, we can also meet the requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Programs designed and administered to meet the utility needs will assure the rapid integration of new employees into the Nuclear Mission staff and operating units. The task of providing quality training for such diverse groups of employees, each with differing needs, is a challenge to the utility both financially and in manpower availability to perform training. A review of current training needs and resources is discussed. A new approach to training is presented to identify possible resources available and cooperative units which could be developed to increase the manpower available for operations, utilize the manpower available for training more effectively, provide more efficient use of classroom facilities, and to be more cost effective providing the funds that will be necessary to support the new needs of the total Nuclear organization

  10. The role of nuclear education and training in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B.J.; Han, K.W.; Lee, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Since the commercial operation of the first nuclear power plant in April 1978, Korea has achieved a rapid growth in nuclear power. In 2004, 19 nuclear power plants are currently in operation and 8 nuclear power plants are under construction. The installed nuclear capacity is 16,716MW. Also nuclear power generation reached 129,672GWh which are about 40% of the total electricity generation. Nuclear energy has been a backbone for Korea's economic growth over the past decades, and will continue to play role for the prosperity of next generation in this century. In this context, Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant and Advanced Power Reactor-1400 have been developed, and System-Integrated Modular Advanced Reactor for desalination of seawater, Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor and Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU are being developed. In parallel, a Radiation Technology R and D Center and a High Power Proton Accelerator Center are being established. Along with the progress of the nuclear energy program, the nuclear education and training has been progressed stepwise, i.e. overseas training, basic training, domestic nuclear human resource development, IAEA regional training, and global nuclear human resource development. Nuclear engineering education program started at Universities from 1958. In order to provide training courses for nuclear personnel, the Nuclear Training Center was established at KAERI in 1967. During the construction of the first nuclear power plant, basic training courses were conducted at NTC/KAERI. And specific training courses were conducted by the reactor suppliers in Korea and the supplier's countries. During this period, reactor operation license laws and the national technical qualification system (engineer, technician, craftsman) with a linkage to the national education system were established in 1970, 1975, respectively. When the utility (now the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Company) started operation of the first nuclear power plant in 1978, the

  11. Proposed plan for education and training in nonnuclear and nuclear energy technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vachon, R.I.; Griffith, D.E.

    1977-02-01

    This report presents the results of a systems approach by an ERDA/ASEE Task Force to a charge from the 94th Congress to the Energy Research and Development Administration to develop a plan for a comprehensive program for education and training in nonnuclear energy technologies. The PLAN as presented is the recommendation of the Task Force and is not to be construed as the ERDA Plan. The interpretation of the charge leads to the following definitive statements. The PLAN should consist of a program and organizational and administrative means within ERDA to develop and manage the program. The program should: (1) include general educational subprograms, vocational skill subprograms to degree and post degree programs; (2) include nuclear as well as nonnuclear education and training; (3) encourage, assist, and utilize all institutions from labor unions to universities to assure educated and trained manpower to meet the nation's energy needs; (4) be catalytic in nature and rely not only on funding as a catalytic agent but also on information and leadership; (5) give equal opportunity to all seeking or needing education and training to become a part of the energy labor market in all regions of the nation; (6) be supplementary to what can be accomplished by the private sector; (7) promote interaction between ERDA and other Federal government agencies and state and local governments; (8) be responsive as well as anticipatory; (9) be applicable from energy resource exploration to energy and use; and (10) provide for input and feedback from the private sector

  12. Training device for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoessow, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    A simulated nuclear energy power plant system with visible internal working components comprising a reactor adapted to contain a liquid with heating elements submerged in the liquid and capable of heating the liquid to an elevated temperature, a steam generator containing water and a heat exchanger means to receive the liquid at an elevated temperature, transform the water to steam, and return the spent liquid to the reactor; a steam turbine receiving high energy steam to drive the turbine and discharging low energy steam to a condenser where the low energy steam is condensed to water which is returned to the steam generator; an electric generator driven by the turbine; indicating means to identify the physical status of the reactor and its contents; and manual and automatic controls to selectively establish normal or abnormal operating conditions in the reactor, steam generator, pressurizer, turbine, electric generator, condenser, and pumps; and to be selectively adjusted to bring the reactor to acceptable operating condition after being placed in an abnormal operation. This device is particularly useful as an education device in demonstrating nuclear reactor operations and in training operating personnel for nuclear reactor systems and also as a device for conducting research on various safety systems to improve the safety of nuclear power plants

  13. Training diagnostic skills for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodstein, L.P.

    1986-11-01

    Operators of large-scale industrial process plants such as nuclear power stations and chemical plants are faced with a critical and complex task when confronted with disturbances in normal operation caused by technical failures or mainte- nances errors. Great care must be taken to prepare and support the operators during such situations. Procedural systems are provided, trained on full-scale highfidelity simulators is often a prerequisite and decision-support systems are starting to be incorporated, especially in modern control rooms. During recent years, it has become increasingly clear from ''real-life'' studies in complex production and transport industries that professional highly skilled troubleshooters can develop effective general purpose search strategies for locating and dealing with faults and, most importantly, with new and not previously experienced faults. This research has indicated that means for training of these general diagnostic abilities can be developed. In addition, other work has dealt with the problem of observing and analyzing operator behaviour in coping with disturbances. The NKA/LIT-4 project has continued these efforts in studying methods for training diagnostic skills as well as for observing and testing operator behaviour on training simulators. (author)

  14. European Nuclear Decommissioning Training Facility II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demeulemeester, Y.

    2005-01-01

    SCK-CEN co-ordinates a project called European Nuclear Decommissioning Training Facility II (EUNDETRAF II) in the Sixth Framework Programme on Community activities in the field of research, technological development and demonstration for the period 2002 to 2006. This was a continuation of the FP5 project EUNDETRAF. EUNDETRAF II is a consortium of main European decommissioners, such as SCK-CEN, EWN (Energie Werke Nord, Greifswald Germany), Belgatom (Belgium), SOGIN Societa Gestione Impiantio Nucleari, Italy), Universitaet Hannover (Germany), RWE NUKEM (United Kingdom), DECOM Slovakia Slovakia), CEA Centre d'Energie Atomique, France), UKAEA (United Kingdom's Atomic Energy Agency, United Kingdom) and NRG (Nuclear Research and consultancy Group, Netherlands). The primary objective of this project is to bring together this vast skill base and experience; to consolidate it for easy assimilation and to transfer to future generations by organising a comprehensive training programme.Each training course has a one-week theoretical and a one-week practical component. The theoretical part is for a broader audience and consists of lectures covering all the main aspects of a decommissioning. The practical part of the course includes site visits and desk top solutions of anticipated decommissioning problems. Due to operational constraints and safety considerations, the number of participants to this part of the course is strictly limited. The partners intend to organise altogether two two-week EUNDETRAF II training courses over a period of three years. Another goal is to disseminate the existing theory as well as the practical know-how to personnel of the third countries. Finally it is important to bring together the principal decommissioning organisations undertaking various decommissioning activities. The project creates a forum for regular contacts to exchange information and experiences for mutual benefit of these organisations as well as to enhance skill base in Europe to

  15. The study for the high qualification of international nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Byong Chull; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2012-12-01

    It is suggested how to reach high qualification of KAERI international nuclear training and how to play a leading role for new paradigm on the international training on the world. 1. The formulation of the core nuclear training framework- The systematic formulation of nuclear training framework based on the existing turning course design 2. Planning and operation of KAERI- Excellent Technology Series training course- The advertisement for KAERI Excellent Technology through the continuous international training and the future market development on the world for the nuclear technology 3. e-Learning training contents development- e-Learning training contents development to play a leading role for new training paradigm on the world and to overcome the limit of time/spacy

  16. The study for the high qualification of international nuclear training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Byong Chull; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2012-12-15

    It is suggested how to reach high qualification of KAERI international nuclear training and how to play a leading role for new paradigm on the international training on the world. 1. The formulation of the core nuclear training framework- The systematic formulation of nuclear training framework based on the existing turning course design 2. Planning and operation of KAERI- Excellent Technology Series training course- The advertisement for KAERI Excellent Technology through the continuous international training and the future market development on the world for the nuclear technology 3. e-Learning training contents development- e-Learning training contents development to play a leading role for new training paradigm on the world and to overcome the limit of time/spacy.

  17. Contribution of Nuclear Training Centre in Ljubljana to Training and Information in the Area of Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, A.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear Training Centre in Ljubljana ia a part of the Jozef Stefan Institute. The paper presents its main activities, which consist of training for NPP Krsko staff, training in the area of radiation protection, organization of international training courses and public information. NPP Krsko personnel obtains initial technical training at our training centre. We are also offering training courses and licensing for people working with radioactive substances in medicine, industry and science. We are internationally recognized training centre for organization of regional and interregional courses and meeting. Our fourth activity is public information. We are visited by around 7000 students per year and answer to every question about nuclear energy. (author)

  18. Selection and training of instructors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chang-Kook

    1996-01-01

    Korea, a poor natural resources country, has to choose to construct nuclear power plants. In order to construct nuclear power plant on time and to operate it safely, capable manpower is needed. KNTC is the organization to supply such manpower requirement. Furthermore, nuclear safety is the most sensitive area among the general public. To improve the safety of nuclear power plants, training of the operator is the one of the best way to achieve it. The performance of Korean nuclear power plants is somewhat good. Average capacity factor of operating NPPs was over 85% for the last three years. One of the reasons Korea achieves such high performance of nuclear power plant is good training system of KEPCO. 2 figs, 5 tabs

  19. [Health manpower in the Americas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, R P; Brito, P

    1986-01-01

    The article summarizes the country studies on the development of the health manpower situation published in this issue of Educación médica y Salud, Vol. 20, No. 3, 1986. The countries covered are Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Cuba, Colombia, Mexico, and the United States of America. In these studies, the concept of disequilibrium or lack of balance and proportion was used to describe and examine some specific situations. However, no study took this concept as an object of further theoretical development, and in some it was preferred to replace it explicitly with the term "problem." The following categories of health personnel are considered: physicians, nurses and "other professions" (the latter very briefly). Professional training, the labor market, the relationship between supply and demand and the relationship with the geographic distribution of members of the health professions in the country are discussed. The studies summarized show that the situations and trends are similar in most of the countries, but that specific variations exist owing to structural and situational aspects in each. The most notable differences are seen between the characteristics of the manpower in the developed and in the developing countries. The variations in the English-speaking countries of the Caribbean are also brought out. Finally, there is a discussion of the occupational pyramid of the human resources in the health field, which consists of three horizontal segments. At the vertex are the university-trained categories; the middle is occupied by the technicians and auxiliary personnel, and at the base are the occupations requiring a low educational level.

  20. Regional manpower planning

    OpenAIRE

    G. Erens; P. Salamink; C.A. Van der Merwe CA

    2003-01-01

    Particular problems come to the fore when planning development at the regional level. These range from the complexities of the multifarious interactions between the sect oral and local components of the region to the necessity of achieving extensive participation of regional stakeholders in the planning process. In this paper a methodology for regional manpower planning is proposed. The methodology is designed to accommodate the full range of problems by applying a systems approach which is b...

  1. Nuclear education and training: from concern to capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) first published in 2000 Nuclear Education and Training: Cause for Concern?, which highlighted significant issues in the availability of human resources for the nuclear industry. Ten years on, Nuclear Education and Training: From Concern to Capability considers what has changed in that time and finds that, while some countries have taken positive actions, in a number of others human resources could soon be facing serious challenges in coping with existing and potential new nuclear facilities. This is exacerbated by the increasing rate of retirement as the workforce ages. This report provides a qualitative characterisation of human resource needs and appraises instruments and programmes in nuclear education and training initiated by various stakeholders in different countries. In this context, it also examines the current and future uses of nuclear research facilities for education and training purposes. Regarding the nuclear training component of workforce competence, it outlines a job taxonomy which could be a basis for addressing the needs of workers across this sector. It presents the taxonomy as a way of enhancing mutual recognition and increasing consistency of education and training for both developed and developing countries. Contents: 1 - A decade of change: Background; The evolving environment; A key resource - a competent workforce; 2 - Review of nuclear education and associated facilities: Introduction; Education and training - progress over the last decade; Present use of research infrastructure for education and training in NEA member countries; 3 - Towards a blueprint for workforce development: The benefits of a competent nuclear workforce; Classifying competence; Analysis ; 4 - Ensuring capability - the recommendations: Nuclear human resource features and requirements; Ten years on - the developments; Approach to developing a common job taxonomy; 5 - Appendices: Recommendations from Nuclear Education and Training

  2. Master Training in Radiological Protection Facilities Radioactive and Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdu, G.; Mayo, P.; Campayo, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The master includes general aspects of radiation protection in nuclear facilities. also an advanced module to acquire a high level training highlights as nuclear decommissioning, shielding calculation using advanced codes, particle accelerators, international law, etc.

  3. Nuclear education, training and knowledge management in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeley, Phil; Slugen, Vladimir; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Rita [European Nuclear Society ENS, Brussels (Belgium). ENS High Scientific Council

    2010-04-15

    The situation in the nuclear education today is complex as it relates to nuclear technology for both peaceful and security applications. After more than 20 years period of depression in nuclear facility construction (significant mainly in Europe and USA), there is strong renewed interest in nuclear-generated electricity. Many factors have contributed to ''nuclear renaissance'' including concerns about possible climate changes due to carbon emissions. The Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) study in 2000, ''Nuclear Education and Training. Cause for Concern'', highlighted the necessity for a renaissance in nuclear education and training with some recommendations. The European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF) identified the nuclear education as one of highest risks in nuclear industry. The nuclear renaissance depends on the increased number of engineers properly educated in wide spectrum of nuclear disciplines. The world has responded. Networks have been established to respond to the necessity to maintain and perpetuate nuclear knowledge in order to provide a suitably qualified workforce for the future operation of nuclear power plants. The quality in Education, Training and Knowledge Management (ETKM) is strongly influenced and supported by development of nuclear research, exploitation of experimental and training facilities, existence of proper education and training networks, software tools, distance and e-learning and a variety of knowledge management activities. The projected global annual requirements for new nuclear engineers over the next 10 years will challenge existing academic and training institutions with respect to capacity and load factors on classrooms, laboratories and other facilities such as basic principles simulators. Additionally, the nuclear academic workforce may need to increase to meet the demand for educating/training the new industrial workforce and this will take time. Within the European context many of the

  4. Nuclear education, training and knowledge management in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeley, Phil; Slugen, Vladimir; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Rita

    2010-01-01

    The situation in the nuclear education today is complex as it relates to nuclear technology for both peaceful and security applications. After more than 20 years period of depression in nuclear facility construction (significant mainly in Europe and USA), there is strong renewed interest in nuclear-generated electricity. Many factors have contributed to ''nuclear renaissance'' including concerns about possible climate changes due to carbon emissions. The Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) study in 2000, ''Nuclear Education and Training. Cause for Concern'', highlighted the necessity for a renaissance in nuclear education and training with some recommendations. The European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF) identified the nuclear education as one of highest risks in nuclear industry. The nuclear renaissance depends on the increased number of engineers properly educated in wide spectrum of nuclear disciplines. The world has responded. Networks have been established to respond to the necessity to maintain and perpetuate nuclear knowledge in order to provide a suitably qualified workforce for the future operation of nuclear power plants. The quality in Education, Training and Knowledge Management (ETKM) is strongly influenced and supported by development of nuclear research, exploitation of experimental and training facilities, existence of proper education and training networks, software tools, distance and e-learning and a variety of knowledge management activities. The projected global annual requirements for new nuclear engineers over the next 10 years will challenge existing academic and training institutions with respect to capacity and load factors on classrooms, laboratories and other facilities such as basic principles simulators. Additionally, the nuclear academic workforce may need to increase to meet the demand for educating/training the new industrial workforce and this will take time. Within the European context many of the programmes will continue through

  5. Training to the Nuclear emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera Navascues, I.

    2003-01-01

    In 1994 the Civil Protection Directorate outlined a formation plan related to the Nuclear emergency plans with the purpose of guaranteeing for the communities involved in this material a basic and homogeneous formation. In the preparation of this Plan the following phases had been developed: 1. Study of formative needs of the different participant communities involved in nuclear plans. This has been done throw the information collected by: nuclear emergency plans and procedures that develop them, questionnaires, observation list, exercise, drills, etc. 2. With all the needs detected and in function of them was designed the objectives to teach in relation with the knowledge and the abilities that the formation can give to the participants. 3. Definition of thematic areas related with the different matters to teach, derived from the different objectives. 4. Organization: The development of the formative activities through a specific material with orientations for the professors (content of material to impart, didactic resources, etc.) and a short summary of the Didactic Units imparted to the students. The methodology is based in short theoretical classes and in the active implication through practice activities exercises and drills to train its functions and the coordination of the different implied organizations. 5. Evaluation: the implantation of the formation plan contributes new formative needs. (Author)

  6. Development of cyber training system for nuclear fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Taek; Park, Jong Kyun; Lee, Eui Jin; Lee, Han Young; Choi, Nan Young

    2002-02-01

    This report describes on technical contents related cyber training system construct on KAERI Nuclear Training Center, and on using cases of cyber education in domestic and foreign countries. Also realtime training system through the internet and cyber training management system for atomic fields is developed. All users including trainee, course managers and lecturers can use new technical for create new paradigm

  7. Training of nuclear power plant personnel in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennant, D.

    1993-01-01

    All of the utilities, Ontario Hydro, Hydro Quebec and New Brunswick Power, operating Nuclear Power Plants in Canada have Training Centres which provide training for all of their plant personnel whose job activities could affect plant and personnel safety. This report points out the methods used for training, which generally conform to that described by the IAEA as a Systematic Approach to Training (SAT)

  8. Hungarian-Vietnamese Nuclear Energy Train the Trainers Course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aszódi, Attila; Boros, Ildikó; Czifrus, Szabolcs; Kiss, István

    2014-01-01

    HUVINETT 2012-2013: Hungarian-Vietnamese Nuclear Energy „Train the Trainers” Course: HUVINETT Courses at Paks NPP - • 3 weeks of practice oriented training; • Practical application of nuclear theory and knowledge; • Plant technology; • Importance of nuclear safety; • Behavioral standards and required attitude in a nuclear power plant; • Practice in real working environment: – Maintenance Performance Improvement Center; – Simulator; – Labs and workshops of the plant

  9. Training of nuclear facility personnel: boon or boondoggle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remick, F.J.

    1975-01-01

    The training of nuclear facility personnel has been a requirement of the reactor licensing process for over two decades. However, the training of nuclear facility personnel remains a combination of boon and boondoggle. The opportunity to develop elite, well trained, professionally aggressive reactor operation staffs is not being realized to its full potential. Improvements in the selection of personnel, training programs, operational tools and professional pride can result in improved plant operation and contribute to improved plant capacity factors. Industry, regulatory agencies, professional societies and universities can do much to improve standards and quality of the training of nuclear facility personnel and to improve the professional level of plant operation

  10. Manpower development for safe operation of nuclear power plant. China. Main steam bypass system operation and maintenance. Task: 6.1.6. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubley, P.H.

    1994-01-01

    This mission concentrated on the Steam Bypass system of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant. The system had experienced spurious opening of the bypass valves, disrupting the steam pressure control and the steam generator level control system. A series of commissioning type tests were defined which should allow the operators to revise the setpoints used in the control of the bypass system, and thus prevent spurious opening while maintaining the desired steam pressure control during power maneuvering. Training also included giving experience from other operating plants on aspects of steam and feedwater systems and components, especially as this experience affected maintenance or gave rise to problems. Steam generated maintenance experience is especially applicable, and a future mission is planned for an expert in this field. In addition other aspects of the Chinese nuclear program was assessed to guide future missions. This included assessment of operating procedures from an availability point of view

  11. International cooperation experiences of Korea in nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, In-Suk

    1996-01-01

    Man power development is an essential key to success in implementing nuclear projects, especially when maximum local participation is an important issue in every sector of nuclear industry. Bearing this in mind, the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) founded the Nuclear Training Center (NTC). The Center began to train technical personnel in the fields of radioisotope utilization and radiation protection in 1960s. During the first stage of nuclear power project in ROK in 1970s, the main effort was exerted to the training of those in nuclear power and nuclear engineering sectors. During the stage of increased technical self-reliance in 1980s, its training role was extended to the implementation of more specific training courses on nuclear power and safety fields. As of the end of 1995, about 23,000 people received the training courses. In an attempt to upgrade the nuclear technology, the advanced training courses at the NTC by invited foreign experts and by IAEA technical cooperation program have been implemented. Also the training under IAEA Regional Cooperative Agreement in Asia Pacific Region has been offered. The change of the NTC to the International Training Center is recommended. (K.I.)

  12. Manpower Requirements for Pollution Control and Water Resources in Indiana and a Related Pollution Control Technology Curriculum. Manpower Report 69-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN. Office of Manpower Studies.

    The purpose of this study was to identify the trained manpower needed to cope with Indiana's mounting problems in air and water pollution control, liquid and solid waste disposal, and water supply and resources. This report contains data concerning the present employment, current job opportunities, and projected manpower needs for related…

  13. CRM training for nuclear power plant operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsuga, Y.; Sudou, K.; Sugimura, Z.

    2008-01-01

    It is training which expects that as for feature of CRM training, trainees observe the image of their own simulator training and become aware of the state of their selves. With this training, it is important for training crew to understand the idea and the skill of the CRM training. The CRM training consists of the lecture in order to understand what it is, the observation of simulator training image and the de-briefing which trainees discuss after their simulator practices. (author)

  14. Atomic Energy Commissions as Fulcrums for the Development of National Frameworks for the Building of Pertinent Nuclear Technology Education and Training Programmes: The Nigerian Example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osaisai, F.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear technology development is human capital intensive. Consequently, the successful and effective deployment of nuclear technology for multifarious applications to benefit human society in a sustainable, safe and secure manner is critically hinged on the availability of a competent, robust and experienced human resource base. Many countries use nuclear and isotopic techniques to promote sustainable development objectives in energy and power, food and agriculture, human health and water resource management, as well as in the marine environment and industrial applications, amongst others. For many developing countries with limited educational training infrastructure in nuclear science and engineering, building the requisite manpower and national capacity, as well as management and retention of knowledge, to optimally reap the benefits of nuclear technology in the various sectors may be challenging. While the responsibility for growing the critical sectoral manpower in the areas of applications may rest with the mandated national institutions, the respective national atomic energy commissions (AECs) could play a catalytic role. This paper highlights the central coordinating role, that an AEC, as the national focal agency for atomic energy development, as in the case of Nigeria, could play in setting out the national agenda and strategy, and laying the foundation for the building of the critical human resource base for successful and sustainable programme implementation. (author

  15. Systematic evaluation of nuclear operator team skills training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, D.K.; Kello, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, the nuclear industry has increasingly recognized with the technical training given its control room operators. As yet, however, little has been done to determine the actual effectiveness of such nontechnical training. Thus, the questions of how team training should be carried out for maximum impact on the safety and efficiency of control room operation and just what the benefits of such training might be remain open. We are in the early stages of establishing a systematic evaluation process that will help nuclear utilities assess the effectiveness of their existing team skills training programs for control room operators. Research focuses on defining the specific behavioral and attitudinal objectives of team skills training. Simply put, what does good practice look like and sound like in the control room environment? What specific behaviors and attitudes should the training be directed toward? Obviously, the answers to the questions have clear implications for the design of nuclear team skills training programs

  16. Westinghouse Nuclear Core Design Training Center - a design simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altomare, S.; Pritchett, J.; Altman, D.

    1992-01-01

    The emergence of more powerful computing technology enables nuclear design calculations to be done on workstations. This shift to workstation usage has already had a profound effect in the training area. In 1991, the Westinghouse Electric Corporation's Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division (CNFD) developed and implemented a Nuclear Core Design Training Center (CDTC), a new concept in on-the-job training. The CDTC provides controlled on-the-job training in a structured classroom environment. It alllows one trainer, with the use of a specially prepared training facility, to provide full-scope, hands-on training to many trainees at one time. Also, the CDTC system reduces the overall cycle time required to complete the total training experience while also providing the flexibility of individual training in selected modules of interest. This paper provides descriptions of the CDTC and the respective experience gained in the application of this new concept

  17. Training and qualification of nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsuga, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Based on training experiences of the nuclear power plant operators of pressurized water reactors (PWR) at the Nuclear Power Training Center Ltd. (NTC) in Japan, training programs were reviewed referring to US training programs. A systematic approach is deployed to them, which mainly consist of on-the-job training and the NTC training courses to meet the needs of all operators from beginners to experienced veterans according to their experiences and objectives. The NTC training is conducted using the simulators that simulate the nuclear power plant dynamics through the use of computers. The operators trained at the NTC work in the central control room of every PWR power plant. The NTC also carries out the qualification examinations for the shift managers. (T. Tanaka)

  18. Professional development for nuclear power programs in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanter, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Countries entering nuclear power programs for the first time find that inadequate planning for the development of trained manpower is a critical factor in the success of their programs. This requires the early training of a team for the planning and acquisition effort to be followed by training for the supervision of construction. In addition, there is the more readily recognized training for operation. Typical manpower needs for such projects have been documented by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The basic academic training of engineers and scientists, which should be available within the country; advanced academic training, which is often secured in institutions abroad; specialized training abroad by international agencies; specialized training by the vendors of nuclear equipment; and the development of indigenous training. This paper outlines all of these avenues but will concentrate on the training available through international agencies and on the development of indigenous training capability

  19. Training of fire protection personnel in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaser, W.

    1980-01-01

    Training of fire protection personnel in nuclear power plants is divided up in three categories: training of fire protection commissioners which is mostly carried out externally; training of fire fighting personnel in the form of basic and repeated training usually by the fire protection commissioner; training of other employers with regard to behaviour in case of fire and during work involving a fire hazard. (orig.) [de

  20. Selection, qualification and training of personnel for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This standard provides criteria for the selection, qualification and training of personnel for stationary nuclear power plants. Qualifications, responsibilities, and training of personnel in operating and support organizations appropriate for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants are addressed

  1. Nuclear Training Excellence Project in Slovenské elektrárne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvočková, Alena; Tonkovičová, Martina; Baláž, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Goals 2013-2015: • Set and implement nuclear training in accordance with the best nuclear practice: → Change understanding of nuclear training by line management – nuclear training is part of core business; → Apply Systematic Approach to Training methodology thoroughly; → Develop and start implementing new training programs. • Prepare practical training centers in EBO and EMO for real operation

  2. IAEA activities in nuclear power plant personnel training and qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mautner-Markhof, F.

    1993-01-01

    Training to achieve and maintain the qualification and competence of nuclear power personnel is essential for safe and economic nuclear power. Technical Cooperation Meeting on Training-Related Activities for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Personnel in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe (CEEC) and of the former Soviet Union (FSU) has as its main objective the identification, through information exchange and discussion, of possible Technical Cooperation (TC) projects to assist Member States in meeting NPP personnel training needs and priorities, including the enhancing of training capabilities

  3. High-level manpower movement and Japan's foreign aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, K

    1992-01-01

    "Japan's technical assistance programs to Asian countries are summarized. Movements of high-level manpower accompanying direct foreign investments by private enterprise are also reviewed. Proposals for increased human resources development include education and training of foreigners in Japan as well as the training of Japanese aid experts and the development of networks for information exchange." excerpt

  4. Background and future activities of PBNCC's nuclear training working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong Hun Rieh; Kunmo Chung; Hamlin, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the background and activities of the nuclear training working group of the Pacific Basin Nuclear Cooperation Committee. The working group has examined various mechanisms for regional cooperation including the development of aregional catalog of training programs and the conceptualization of sharing training facilities among nuclear operators in the region. The working group has focused its attention on the exchange of information on the on-going training programs, operator training facilities, available resources for training assistance and proposed cooperative schemes. These activities are expected to continue and will provide invaluable information for nuclear power programs in the Pacific Basin region. The group also reviewed problems and issues associated with developing regional cooperation. (author)

  5. Background and future activities of PBNCC's nuclear training working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieh, C.H.; Chung, K.; Hamlin, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the background and activities of the nuclear training working group of the Pacific Basin Nuclear Cooperation Committee. The working group has examined various mechanisms for regional cooperation including the development of a regional catalog of training programs and the conceptualization of sharing training facilities among nuclear operators in the region. The working group has focused its attention on the exchange of information on the on-going training programs, operator training facilities, available resources for training assistance and proposed cooperative schemes. These activities are expected to continue and will provide invaluable information for nuclear power programs in the Pacific Basin region. The group also reviewed problems and issues associated with developing regional cooperation

  6. Training of troubleshooting skills in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, W.; Szlapetis, I.J.; Casselman, K.

    1995-12-01

    This report details the study of training of troubleshooting skills for Canadian nuclear power plant operators and maintainers. The study was conducted in three distinct stages: 1) literature review and production of annotated bibliographies; 2) survey of experts in training for troubleshooting skills in North America; 3) survey of Canadian nuclear power plant training centres. Within this report are 12 annotated bibliographies of significant documents and an extensive bibliographic listing of relevant literature. The review of the literature and the survey of training experts identified the state-of-art in troubleshooting training with respect to training approaches and training tools. Trainers in the military, pharmaceutical, petro-chemical, and nuclear industries were surveyed and/or interviewed to determine the current approaches and technologies used in training for troubleshooting. Training personnel responsible for Canada's major nuclear generating stations (Bruce, Darlington, Pickering, and Point Lepreau) were interviewed and surveyed to determine the status of troubleshooting training in the Canadian nuclear industry. This information has been integrated and presented in this report. Conclusions and recommendations regarding the nature of the troubleshooting tasks performed by operators and maintainers and the related training were submitted. (author). 152 refs., 7 tabs., 1 fig

  7. Training of troubleshooting skills in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, W; Szlapetis, I J; Casselman, K [Rhodes and Associates, Inc., Willowdale, ON (Canada)

    1995-12-01

    This report details the study of training of troubleshooting skills for Canadian nuclear power plant operators and maintainers. The study was conducted in three distinct stages: (1) literature review and production of annotated bibliographies; (2) survey of experts in training for troubleshooting skills in North America; (3) survey of Canadian nuclear power plant training centres. Within this report are 12 annotated bibliographies of significant documents and an extensive bibliographic listing of relevant literature. The review of the literature and the survey of training experts identified the state-of-art in troubleshooting training with respect to training approaches and training tools. Trainers in the military, pharmaceutical, petro-chemical, and nuclear industries were surveyed and/or interviewed to determine the current approaches and technologies used in training for troubleshooting. Training personnel responsible for Canada`s major nuclear generating stations (Bruce, Darlington, Pickering, and Point Lepreau) were interviewed and surveyed to determine the status of troubleshooting training in the Canadian nuclear industry. This information has been integrated and presented in this report. Conclusions and recommendations regarding the nature of the troubleshooting tasks performed by operators and maintainers and the related training were submitted. (author). 152 refs., 7 tabs., 1 fig.

  8. Class notes from the first international training course on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, P.B. (ed.)

    1979-05-01

    The International Training Course on Physical Protection of Nuclear Facilities and Materials was intended for representatives from the developing countries who are responsible for preparing regulations and designing and assessing physical protection systems. The first part of the course consists of lectures on the objectives, organizational characteristics, and licensing and regulations requirements of a state system of physical protection. Since the participants may have little experience in nuclear energy, background information is provided on the topics of nuclear materials, radiation hazards, reactor systems, and reactor operations. Transportation of nuclear materials is addressed and emphasis is placed on regulations. Included in these discussions are presentations by guest speakers from countries outside the United States of America who present their countries' threat to nuclear facilities. Effectiveness evaluation methodology is introduced to the participants by means of instructions which teach them how to use logic trees and the EASI (Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption) program. The following elements of a physical protection system are discussed: barriers, protective force, intrusion detection systems, communications, and entry-control systems. Total systems concepts of physical protection system design are emphasized throughout the course. Costs, manpower/technology trade-offs, and other practical considerations are discussed. Approximately one-third of the course is devoted to practical exercises during which the attendees participatein problem solving. A hypothetical nuclear facility is introduced, and the attendees participate in the conceptual design of a physical protection system for the facility.

  9. Class notes from the first international training course on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrington, P.B.

    1979-05-01

    The International Training Course on Physical Protection of Nuclear Facilities and Materials was intended for representatives from the developing countries who are responsible for preparing regulations and designing and assessing physical protection systems. The first part of the course consists of lectures on the objectives, organizational characteristics, and licensing and regulations requirements of a state system of physical protection. Since the participants may have little experience in nuclear energy, background information is provided on the topics of nuclear materials, radiation hazards, reactor systems, and reactor operations. Transportation of nuclear materials is addressed and emphasis is placed on regulations. Included in these discussions are presentations by guest speakers from countries outside the United States of America who present their countries' threat to nuclear facilities. Effectiveness evaluation methodology is introduced to the participants by means of instructions which teach them how to use logic trees and the EASI (Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption) program. The following elements of a physical protection system are discussed: barriers, protective force, intrusion detection systems, communications, and entry-control systems. Total systems concepts of physical protection system design are emphasized throughout the course. Costs, manpower/technology trade-offs, and other practical considerations are discussed. Approximately one-third of the course is devoted to practical exercises during which the attendees participatein problem solving. A hypothetical nuclear facility is introduced, and the attendees participate in the conceptual design of a physical protection system for the facility

  10. Simulators in the training program for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, E.

    1988-01-01

    The principle simulator of the reactor school of the Paul Scherrer Institute is described. A compact simulator at the nuclear power plant Beznau is used for beginners as well as for refresher courses. Full simulator training cannot be taken in Switzerland. The Swiss nuclear power plants take advantage of the services of foreign nuclear power plants or training centers. The role of the instructor is discussed

  11. AB Manpower Plan 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The present exercise is not as such a "manpower plan" but a purely budgetary comparison of known plus requested resources with the known commitments over the period 2007-2012. From a purely budgetary point of view, AB will have the capacity to maintain all those recently hired staff who fulfill the criteria for long term employment at CERN. Following this budgetary exercise, AB proposes to perform a CERN-wide staff work plan so as to compare the manpower available to the quantity of work to be done in the totality of the work-packages. If there is a significant mismatch between these two quantities then we propose the following measures which would create personnel economies and allow us to redress the mismatch by increased recruitment: a new job severance scheme; CERN restructuring; use of the new CERN-ITER agreement; more flexibility in transfers from Materials to Personnel budgets. Failing this a re-examination of possible closure of lower priority facilities may be needed.

  12. Building trust with the schoolchildren in the nuclear training centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, Andrej; Istenie, Radko

    1995-01-01

    Although Krsko Nuclear Power Plant has been in operation for more than ten years, comparatively little has been done in the field of systematic education and public information. Deficiencies in this field are causing serious misunderstandings about the role of nuclear power and is having a negative impact on its public acceptance. At The Nuclear Training Centre Milan Copic (NTC) in Ljubljana we have prepared a presentation on nuclear energy encompassing a short description of a PWR nuclear power plant, importance of nuclear power in the world and in Slovenia, basic ideas of nuclear safety and radioactive waste disposal

  13. IAEA world survey on nuclear power plant personnel training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Training of personnel is acknowledged to be essential for safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. The preparation of this TECDOC was recommended by the IAEA International Working group on Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and Qualification and represents a unique compilation of information including all aspects of NPP personnel training from 23 Member States and 129 training organizations. The basic aims of this survey are: to provide a worldwide overview of all aspects of NPP personnel training; to foster both national and international cooperation between organizations involved in nuclear training; to provide the means of exchange of experiences and practices in systematic approach to training (SAT). The survey provides information for each corresponding country on the: national system and organization of training; job positions for which SAT is used; training programmes for key operations, maintenance, instructor and other jobs; role of management and the regulatory body; training facilities; recommended training practices; availability of training personnel from organizations outside the country; and contact points. The three main parts of the publication are the summary, the analysis of training programmes for each job position and the analysis of training resources, and the country reports

  14. Training at the Australian School of Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culley, D.; Fredsall, J.R.; Toner, B.

    1987-01-01

    The Australian School of Nuclear Technology was founded in 1964 as a joint enterprise of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and the University of New South Wales to support nuclear developments primarily in Australia. However, ASNT has developed into an important centre for nuclear science and technology training within the South East Asian Region with participants also attending from countries outside this Region. (author)

  15. Training at the Australian School of Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culley, D.; Fredsall, J.R.; Toner, B.

    1987-04-01

    The Australian School of Nuclear Technology (ASNT) was founded in 1964 as a joint enterprise of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and the University of New South Wales to support nuclear developments primarily in Australia. However, ASNT has developed into an important centre for nuclear science and technology training within the South East Asian Region with participants also attending from countries outside this Region

  16. Training needs for chemists in nuclear medicine research and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    The field Nuclear Medicine has expanded rapidly over the last two decades. Individuals with training in radiochemistry are needed in industry, medical centers and hospitals. Although basic training in organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, biochemistry or pharmacy are required, radiochemistry knowledge is essential for all these individuals. Opportunities and training requirements in these areas will be discussed. (author) 7 refs.; 5 tabs

  17. Nuclear power plant personnel training and its evaluation. A guidebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Guidebook will prove especially useful for, and is addressed primarily to: nuclear power operating organizations establishing or upgrading their NPP personnel training systems; regulatory personnel responsible for setting requirements and/or evaluating NPP personnel training; and organizations (within or outside the operating organization) responsible for the development, implementation and evaluation of training programmes for NPP personnel. Figs, tabs

  18. Experience in training of health personnel for response to radiological and nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurmo, Alexandre M.; Leite, Teresa C.S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Eletronuclear Healthcare Foundation is the Institution responsible for the actions of health response involving ionizing radiation in the area of Nuclear Power Plant Almirante Alvaro Alberto in Angra dos Reis. Because of their specific assignments and references for being in training health manpower in the field of ionizing radiation developed a range of Training Courses for Professionals Area Health to prepare them for Response to Radiological and Nuclear Accidents. Modules are proposed specifically for the professional response of the Technical Level and Higher Level, the level Pre-hospital and hospital. These modules are further divided into specific levels or modules, Basic or Introductory, Intermediate and Advanced. Are applied pretests and post tests to monitor the content of fixing, maintaining a historical series of reviews. Your content is theoretical and practical applications developed in 30 to 48 hours, with simulations (drills) and distribution of educational materials. We already have more than 80 applications training, focusing on internal staff and external to the institution, developing interesting partner with the Armed Forces and Civil Defense. It still maintained a link on the institution seeking access and download over 400 titles on the subject and exchange of information and experiences. For improving the teaching material, the authors launched in 2011 the first manual in Portuguese on the subject with new revised edition in 2013: 'Manual of Medical Actions In Radiological Emergencies'. The results indicate increased knowledge and appropriateness of the themes and the strategy proposed for this activity, demonstrating yet passed that information can be multiplied and meets the growing demand of the country that has hosted and will host international events relevant at QBNRE risk. (author)

  19. Team training process for nuclear plant technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macris, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of team training is the cooperative and coordinated actions of individual to attain a common goal. Such training requires the development of more sophisticated educational techniques than those previously established for training individuals alone. Extensive research has been conducted to devise methods and techniques to bring about effective team training. This paper discusses current team training methods and present an instructional strategy for the application of effective team training techniques

  20. Study on training of nuclear power system operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Lifeng; Zhou Gang; Yu Lei

    2012-01-01

    In order to satisfy new requirements about operators of nuclear power system, which are brought up by development and changes of social environment, science and technology, we do research on and make analysis of the problem of operator training. This paper focuses on development and changes of operator training system and content, mentality training, application of new technology to training, feedback of experience and so on. Analysis showed that the content of operator training is also confronted with some new requirements. So we bring up the new requirements to the operator, such as mentality training, cognizance ability training, adaptability training of special environment and endurance training. Besides, it is important for perfecting operator cultivation mechanism and improving training effect to feed back experience and apply new technology. So the trainer must improve training content and cultivation mechanism continuously. (authors)

  1. Training of nuclear disasters at Fukui prefecture in 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Hiromi; Yoshioka, Mitsuo; Hayakawa, Hironobu

    2004-01-01

    A large scale of training of nuclear disasters was carried out by Fukui prefecture, reference cities, towns, organizations and residents in Japan on November 7, 2003. Its abstract, the nuclear disaster measures system of Fukui and the emergency monitoring system, the principle and characteristics of nuclear disaster measure plans and emergency monitoring, abstract of training of the emergency monitoring from fiscal 2000 to 2002 are described. On the training of emergency monitoring in fiscal 2003, abstract, assumption of accident, training contents and evaluation are stated. Table of training schedule of emergency monitoring, measurement results of the fixed points, Ohi nuclear power plant accident scenario, the conditions of the plant at accident, forecast and simulation of effective dose by external exposure, change of space dose rate at the fixed observation points, measurement values of monitoring cars are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  2. Nuclear education and training: marriages that work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, H.D.

    1985-01-01

    Public Service Electric and Gas Company is meeting the education and training needs of its nuclear department operations, support, and services personnel through a variety of activities in association with institutions of higher education. Activities include credit or credit recommendation programs at the associates, undergraduate, and graduate degree level. The paper emphasizes the process of working with a local college in the development of a new degree program for submission through the State Board of Education. The development, review, evaluation, and approval process is detailed as well as lessons learned. Plans for further development of the program toward ABET accreditation are also described. Samples of the surveys conducted to determine employee interest in terms of academic area, academic level, offering strategies, etc. are presented. The process of soliciting program proposals from universities and colleges, the selection process, and implementation of the programs are also discussed. More briefly described is the preparation for credit recommendation process from regionally accredited groups. External degree programs, off-hours course presentations on-site for undergraduate and graduate credit, faculty extern, student intern, and co-op activities are also discussed

  3. Attracting students to nuclear careers: INPO educational assistance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkle, M.

    1981-01-01

    The utility industry is responding to a manpower shortage of 2000 at nuclear plants with a concerted analysis of regional training centers and educational assistance programs through the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). University support and cooperation are generally strong. The INPO program includes undergraduate- and graduate-level scholarships and fellowships

  4. Health physics training at V.C. Summer Nuclear Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blue, L.A.; Bellmore, J.R.; Shultz, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    Health Physics training for radiation workers and Health Physics Specialists continues to receive full attention by regulatory agencies such as the NRC and ANI. Guidance for such training continues to develop in a direction which forces utilities to continuously increase the quality and quantity of their Health Physics Training Program. This occurs at a time when our rapidly growing industry is placing greatly increased demands on the available work force of highly trained nuclear workers

  5. Training of technical staff for nuclear power station operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, T.P.; Myerscough, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    The statutory training requirements covering the technical staff in the CEGB (Central Electricity Generating Board) are discussed. Details of the training programmes emphasize the importance of the staff having a thorough understanding of the nuclear processes involved in the station operation and not relying solely upon a mechanistic approach to operating procedures. The impact of this philosophy on the design of training simulators is examined and a brief comparison is made with the training philosophies in other countries. (U.K.)

  6. Experience with performance based training of nuclear criticality safety engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.

    1993-01-01

    For non-reactor nuclear facilities, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) does not require that nuclear criticality safety engineers demonstrate qualification for their job. It is likely, however, that more formalism will be required in the future. Current DOE requirements for those positions which do have to demonstrate qualification indicate that qualification should be achieved by using a systematic approach such as performance based training (PBT). Assuming that PBT would be an acceptable mechanism for nuclear criticality safety engineer training in a more formal environment, a site-specific analysis of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job was performed. Based on this analysis, classes are being developed and delivered to a target audience of newer nuclear criticality safety engineers. Because current interest is in developing training for selected aspects of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job, the analysis is incompletely developed in some areas

  7. 3. national conference on training of personnel for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacko, J.

    1983-01-01

    A national conference with international participation was held in Podbanske to evaluate the results and experiences with the training of personnel for nuclear power in training centres of the sector of fuel and energy, within the educational system and at other workplaces. The rational development of the system of personnel training must contribute towards reducing the hazards of nuclear power caused by the human factor. The results and experiences were evaluated gained in the process of the unified system of training personnel for nuclear power plants, namely training centres of various institutions, institutions of higher education and in-operation training of personnel. In 1984, the first Czechoslovak simulator of a WWER 440 unit will be put into operation. (M.D.)

  8. Memphis State University Center for Nuclear Studies progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    Progress made on the development of specialized education programs for the nuclear industry through the month of October, 1975, is outlined. The survey of the nuclear industry includes manpower resources and requirements of nuclear industry, annual training requirements of nuclear plants, and the educational curriculum for nuclear plant operational staff. Also discussed are the general organization of the project, student enrollment and progress and industrial participation

  9. Nuclear power plant personnel training process management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjona Vazquez, Orison; Venegas Bernal, Maria del Carmen; Armeteros Lopez, Ana L.

    1996-01-01

    The system in charge the management of the training process personnel from a nuclear power plant was designed taking into account all the requirements stated in the training guide for nuclear power plant personnel and their evaluation, which were prepared by the IAEA in 1995 in order to implement the SAT in the training programs for nuclear plant personnel. In the preparations of formats and elements that shape the system, account has been taken of the views expressed in such a guide, in some other bibliography that was consulted, and in the authors own opinion mainly with regard to those issues which the guide does not go deeper into

  10. a markovian study of manpow an study of manpower planning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The Markovian method of manpower planning foretell the future. ... ive years from a soft drink manufacturing company based in Lagos, Nigeria company based ... ces management approach. ... handbook have also used Markov processes for.

  11. Review of training methods employed in nuclear fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, W.D.; Browder, F.N.

    1975-01-01

    A search of the literature through the Nuclear Safety Information Center revealed that 86 percent of the incidents that have occurred in fuel fabrication plants can be traced directly or indirectly to insufficient operator training. In view of these findings, a review was made of the training programs now employed by the nuclear fuel fabrication industry. Most companies give the new employee approximately 20 hours of orientation courses, followed by 60 to 80 hours of on-the-job training. It was concluded that these training programs should be expanded in both scope and depth. A proposed program is outlined to offer guidance in improving the basic methods currently in use

  12. Joint project to implement a training course/seminar for high-level decision making officals on nuclear policy between Korea and IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. J.; Suh, S. H.; Kim, S. H. and others

    2001-09-01

    Through this project, the KAERI has published a english text book titled 'Nuclear Power project: Policy and Korean Experience' with the cooperation with the Agency. Korean experts, who have more than 30 years experiences in nuclear policy and nuclear power project management, involved to prepare the contents. Experts, who are working for Department of Nuclear Energy and Department of Technical Cooperation in the Agency, reviewed the contents. The KAERI has provided a training course/seminar for a high-level delegation of nuclear policy decision makers, which is consisted of 3 deputy ministers and 3 general directors in Viet Nam Communist Party, Assembly, Government Departments, upon the agreement between Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission (VAEC) and MOST at Hanoi in November 2000. The KAERI decided to provide the IAEA regional training course for middle level managers of nuclear policy and project management in RCA member states in November 2001 and 2002 under the cooperation with the Agency and the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA). The training course curricula, a english text book will be utilized as basic technical materials to promote the national nuclear cooperation program with the developing countries, that are considering to introduce the first or a new nuclear power plant, such as China, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Morocco, Egypt, Ukraine, etc. Through the project, the bilateral nuclear cooperation between Viet Nam and Korea in the field of nuclear manpower development has improved practically. The KAERI has decided to provide on-the job-training program for Vietnamese experts in the field of nuclear policy, safety analysis, thermal-hydraulic analysis, etc under the 2000 KISTEP Scientist Exchange Program

  13. Joint project to implement a training course/seminar for high-level decision making officals on nuclear policy between Korea and IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. J.; Suh, S. H.; Kim, S. H. and others

    2001-09-01

    Through this project, the KAERI has published a english text book titled 'Nuclear Power project: Policy and Korean Experience' with the cooperation with the Agency. Korean experts, who have more than 30 years experiences in nuclear policy and nuclear power project management, involved to prepare the contents. Experts, who are working for Department of Nuclear Energy and Department of Technical Cooperation in the Agency, reviewed the contents. The KAERI has provided a training course/seminar for a high-level delegation of nuclear policy decision makers, which is consisted of 3 deputy ministers and 3 general directors in Viet Nam Communist Party, Assembly, Government Departments, upon the agreement between Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission (VAEC) and MOST at Hanoi in November 2000. The KAERI decided to provide the IAEA regional training course for middle level managers of nuclear policy and project management in RCA member states in November 2001 and 2002 under the cooperation with the Agency and the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA). The training course curricula, a english text book will be utilized as basic technical materials to promote the national nuclear cooperation program with the developing countries, that are considering to introduce the first or a new nuclear power plant, such as China, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Morocco, Egypt, Ukraine, etc. Through the project, the bilateral nuclear cooperation between Viet Nam and Korea in the field of nuclear manpower development has improved practically. The KAERI has decided to provide on-the job-training program for Vietnamese experts in the field of nuclear policy, safety analysis, thermal-hydraulic analysis, etc under the 2000 KISTEP Scientist Exchange Program.

  14. A study for developing training courses of the nuclear training center -with priority given to the training goals of KAERI-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong; Seo, In Seok; Kim, Deok In; Lee, Won Koo; Lee, Sueng Hee; Lee, Byoung Soen; Lee, Uei Jin; Kim, Young Joong; Oh, Sei Ki; Jeon, Hyong Ryon; Kim, Dong Soo; Lee, Han Young; Lee, Dong Jin

    1993-01-01

    The final goal of this project, which covers 3 years (from 1992 to 1994), is to develop personnel training courses of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and to derive the most desirable training system therefrom. To achieve this final goal successfully the first year's research was designed and has been carried on; firstly, to analyze the on-going issues and what kind of reform measures should be introduced to both the input and conversion processes of KAERI to efficiently achieve the organization goals, secondly, to derive personnel training goals of KAERI based on the analyses. First, this study introduced the viewpoint of systems approach for organization analysis, and defined that the productivity of an organization mainly depends on manpower quality of the input section and efficiency of the conversion process. Next, general organization theories and characteristics of research and development organization were studied, and derived that in research and development organization the expertise of a specialist should be regarded as the main value rather than his position, and the atmosphere should be human-centered, being free and democratic rather than authoritarian. And the study emphasizes more flatted structure of organization, necessity of sense of Management By Objectives (MBO), future planning capability, quality of manager with democratic leadership as criteria for the analysis of research and development organization. Finally, analyzing organization structure and behavior of KAERI based on the criteria, the study derived the ends-means hierarchy of personnel training of KAERI and discussed the necessity of organization reform of KAERI. (Author)

  15. Common modelling approaches for training simulators for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    Training simulators for nuclear power plant operating staff have gained increasing importance over the last twenty years. One of the recommendations of the 1983 IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Nuclear Power Plant Training Simulators in Helsinki was to organize a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on some aspects of training simulators. The goal statement was: ''To establish and maintain a common approach to modelling for nuclear training simulators based on defined training requirements''. Before adapting this goal statement, the participants considered many alternatives for defining the common aspects of training simulator models, such as the programming language used, the nature of the simulator computer system, the size of the simulation computers, the scope of simulation. The participants agreed that it was the training requirements that defined the need for a simulator, the scope of models and hence the type of computer complex that was required, the criteria for fidelity and verification, and was therefore the most appropriate basis for the commonality of modelling approaches. It should be noted that the Co-ordinated Research Programme was restricted, for a variety of reasons, to consider only a few aspects of training simulators. This report reflects these limitations, and covers only the topics considered within the scope of the programme. The information in this document is intended as an aid for operating organizations to identify possible modelling approaches for training simulators for nuclear power plants. 33 refs

  16. Nuclear criticality safety training: guidelines for DOE contractors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowell, M.R.

    1983-09-01

    The DOE Order 5480.1A, Chapter V, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, establishes safety procedures and requirements for DOE nuclear facilities. This guide has been developed as an aid to implementing the Chapter V requirements pertaining to nuclear criticality safety training. The guide outlines relevant conceptual knowledge and demonstrated good practices in job performance. It addresses training program operations requirements in the areas of employee evaluations, employee training records, training program evaluations, and training program records. It also suggests appropriate feedback mechanisms for criticality safety training program improvement. The emphasis is on academic rather than hands-on training. This allows a decoupling of these guidelines from specific facilities. It would be unrealistic to dictate a universal program of training because of the wide variation of operations, levels of experience, and work environments among DOE contractors and facilities. Hence, these guidelines do not address the actual implementation of a nuclear criticality safety training program, but rather they outline the general characteristics that should be included

  17. The European Nuclear Safety Training and Tutoring Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The European Nuclear Safety Training and Tutoring Institute, ENSTTI, is an initiative of European Technical Safety Organizations (TSO) in order to provide vocational training and tutoring in the methods and practices required to perform assessment in nuclear safety, nuclear security and radiation protection. ENSTTI calls on TSOs' expertise to maximize the transmission of safety and security knowledge, practical experience and culture. Training, tutoring and courses for specialists are achieved through practical lectures, working group and technical visits and lead to a certificate after knowledge testing. ENSTTI contributes to the harmonization of nuclear safety and security practices and to the networking of today and future nuclear safety experts in Europe and beyond. (A.C.)

  18. Impact evaluation of the nuclear training program of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relunia, Estrella D.

    2000-01-01

    This study attempted to determine the factors that influenced the impact of the institute's training program in nuclear science and technology to the institution where the trainee works and to the trainee himself and this study involved engineers, scientists, teachers, medical doctor, technologist and professionals who have successfully completed the PNRI nuclear science and technology training courses

  19. Pilot training of non-nuclear professionals within CORONA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, K.; Manolova, M.; Belousov, S.

    2013-01-01

    The pilot training results shown that the used approach is appropriate and could be disseminate among the interested parties. • The interest from the side of the different professionals is an important indicator about the necessity to care such courses for non-nuclear professionals.The effectiveness of the training program for non-nuclear specialists will be assessed using the replies of the Course evaluation form as well as the feedback from employers, trainers and observers

  20. Certification of the instructional competence of nuclear training specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollert, T.N.

    1990-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the qualification requirements and the means to assess the unique knowledge and skills necessary to perform the instructional activities needed by nuclear training specialist at Fort Saint Vrain Nuclear Generating Station. A survey questionnaire with 233 task statements categorized into eleven duty areas was distributed to twenty-three nuclear training specialists at Fort Saint Vrain Nuclear Generating Station. On the basis of the data accumulated for this study, the researcher identified the following findings. A list of 158 task statements were identified as being relevant; this list was considered a core knowledge, skills, and abilities needed as a nuclear training specialist. The list consisted of ten duty areas which were relevant to the effective performance of a nuclear training specialist. Thirty-three task statements were identified as being relevant for the duty area Conductive Training. These were considered the core of knowledge, skills, and abilities needed in the development of the initial test instrument and the instructor classroom skills observation checklist. The significant correlation between the results of these two instruments, using a rank-order correlation coefficient, was interpreted by the researcher as indicating that the initial test instrument possessed concurrent validity. The researcher interpreted the reliability value as a positive indicator that the initial test instrument demonstrated internal consistency. It was concluded that it could be determined whether personnel possessed the level of competence needed to perform the instructional duties of a nuclear training specialist by using a written test. Data from this research supported the use of the initial test developed for this study as a valid means to certify nuclear training specialists for the duty area Conducting Training

  1. Measurement implications for effective testing in nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaret, R.; Pawlowski, V.

    1983-01-01

    The primary thrust of this paper is to present an overview of the measurement concepts of reliability and validity. Techniques and issues are presented which will allow Nuclear Training Personnel to have greater confidence in the accuracy of scores obtained from in-house developed tests. While it is realized that the conditions under which tests are developed in Nuclear Training environments are less than ideal, the concepts and techniques addressed can be applied under any conditions

  2. Virtual-Reality training system for nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    At the Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Security (ISCN) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, the virtual reality (VR) training system is under development for providing a practical training environment to implement experience-oriented and interactive lessons on nuclear security for wide range of participants in human resource development assistance program mainly to Asian emerging nuclear-power countries. This system electrically recreates and visualizes nuclear facilities and training conditions in stereoscopic (3D) view on a large-scale display (CAVE system) as virtual reality training facility (VR facility) and it provides training participants with effective environments to learn installation and layout of security equipment in the facility testing and verifying visually the protection performances under various situations such as changes in day-night lighting and weather conditions, which may lead to practical exercise in the design and evaluation of the physical protection system. This paper introduces basic concept of the system and outline of training programs as well as featured aspects in using the VR technology for the nuclear security. (author)

  3. Training of nuclear power facility personnel. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The proceedings of the conference entitled ''Training of Nuclear Power Facility Personnel'' and held in Tale, Czechoslovakia, on 24 - 27 April 1989, contain full texts of 58 contributions, 57 of which fall in the INIS subject scope. The aim of the conference was to summarize experience gained during the training and education of Czechoslovak nuclear power plants operating personnel, to put forth new suggestions for increasing the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants, and to establish the needs and new trends in the training and education of nuclear power plants personnel. The topics treated at the conference can be divided into three basic groups as follows: 1. professional qualification of nuclear power plant staff members; 2. development of technical means for the nuclear power plants personnel training; and 3. training of maintenance personnel, the system and organization of this training and education. The proceedings are published in two volumes. Part 1 contains the texts of 25 papers falling in the INIS subject scope. (Z.M.)

  4. Study on Model for Human Resources Development Strategy in the Nuclear Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eui Jin

    2005-01-01

    Qualified manpower is an essential for the successful implementation of a national long-term nuclear development program as well as the associated R and D programs. Such manpower could only be developed systematically under a well-established national model and strategy, which addresses the demand for human resources, number of personnel and timing, and the education and training. To discuss a model for human resources development, it is suggested to consider the following: approach to the Human Resources Development (HRD) Model, HRD policy targets, estimation of the manpower requirement, organizational coordination frameworks for the HRD, promotion of HRD in the action plan

  5. Education and training in nuclear science/engineering in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, C.

    1994-01-01

    The present status of nuclear education and training in Taiwan is reviewed. The nuclear science/engineering program has been established in Taiwan under the College of Nuclear Science at the National Tsing Hua University since 1956; it remains the only program among 123 universities and colleges in Taiwan where education and training in nuclear fields are offered. The program, with 52 faculty members, offers advanced studies leading to BSc, MSc, and PhD degrees. Lectures and lab classes are given to 600 students currently registered in the program. Career placement program geared for the 200 graduate and 400 undergraduate students is to orientate them into the local nuclear power utilities as well as agricultural, medical, industrial, academic and governmental sectors where nuclear scientists and engineers at all levels are needed. 8 refs., 1 fig

  6. Cyber Learning Platform for Nuclear Education and Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojtela, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Cyber Learning Platform for Nuclear Education and Training: … support capacity building and knowledge transfer in the nuclear sector by empowering web-based development and dissemination of high-quality learning resources in a way that is cost-effective, scalable and easy to use …

  7. Radiation protection courses in the Milan Copic Nuclear Training Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozelj, M.; Stritar, A.

    1998-01-01

    We have briefly described the legal framework for the radiation protection training in Slovenia. The history of that activity at the Milan Copic Nuclear Training Center in Ljubljana is than described with the detailed description and summary of all performed courses.(author)

  8. Supplementary training of nuclear power plant occupational physicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letard, H.; Carre, M.

    1980-01-01

    A short description is given of the supplementary training course given to nuclear power plant occupational physicians within the frame of the Division of occupational medicine at Electricite de France. Such training is necessary to deal with the specific problems involved. However, it is only a complement to medical studies and the special degree in occupational medicine and industrial hygiene [fr

  9. IAEA education and training programme in nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, J.L.F.; Lederman, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the IAEA education and training (E and T) programme in nuclear safety. A strategic planning for the programme implementation is described in terms of objectives, outputs and activities. A framework based on areas of competency and the level of depth of the training is presented as well as the main achievements to date. (author)

  10. Nuclear engineering training and advanced training at universities and in manufacturing industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, A.

    1984-01-01

    The lecture describes: the qualification of the staff of one nuclear power plant building company, the structure of university studies in the Federal Republic of Germany, in the USA and in the GDR, technical colleges, continuation studies, in-service training in the manufacturing industry, training programmes for short-term benefits, training of German and foreign operating personnel by the manufacturers, training within the framework of technology transfer. (HSCH) [de

  11. Education and training requirements of nuclear power plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donato, R.; Perlas, C.A.; Conti, E.

    1978-01-01

    This bibliography was compiled by the Scientific Library staff to help in the intensified training program being undertaken by the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) for the nuclear power plant personnel of the Philippines' first nuclear power reactor. This bibliography covers the period 1955 - 1976 of the Nuclear Science Abstracts and is composed of 281 entries. Arrangement of these entries is by broad subject category

  12. Training of engineers for nuclear power station operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myerscough, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    The requirements for staffing and training of a nuclear electric utility are described. Current training facilities at the Central Electricity Generating Board are applicable to gas-cooled technology with the possibility of the introduction of a thermal water system and fast reactors in the future. The CEGB training centres provide for the initial training of operational staff, revision training of experienced operational staff, and training of non-operational staff from the stations and supporting departments. Details are given of the content of the training courses which also provide simulation facilities of the basic dynamics of the CEGB stations. Further developments in simulation will include dynamics of the boiler and turbine plants in Magnox stations. The flexibility of the AGR simulations will enable the training exercises to be adjusted to meet changing operating patterns for each AGR station. (U.K.)

  13. Initiatives in training program evaluation outside the nuclear utility industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Training literature is reviewed, and program evaluative practices outside the nuclear utility industry are reported. The findings indicate some innovations in philosophy and practice and program evaluation, although not necessarily in the context of evaluation as a route to assessing the impact of training. Program evaluation is described in the context of the impact of training, suggesting continued efforts to accept a multivariate concept of individual and organizational performance

  14. Activities of nuclear training centre in Ljubljana for nuclear community in Slovenia and internationally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, Andrej

    1998-01-01

    It is the vision of the Nuclear Training Centre to be a respected source of knowledge about nuclear technologies in the country and internationally. Our main mission is training of NPP Krsko personnel. For that purpose the training centre was established ten years ago. In addition we are spreading our activities also to other users. We are organizing international training courses, mainly under the sponsorship of the International Atomic Energy Agency. We are also authorized to train professionals, dealing with ionizing radiation in medicine, industry and science. Growing importance is given to our public information activity in our information centre. (author)

  15. India: Kudankulam NPP. Manpower and documentation. Annex 7A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, S.

    1999-01-01

    This annex deals with manpower and documentation. It illustrates flexibility in personnel retention arising from having a multi-unit, national nuclear power programme, supported by in-house technology. Steps taken to retrain and continually develop personnel are described. Also highlighted is the relative ease with which documentation is obtained and preserved. (author)

  16. Nuclear education and training in OECD member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    Mankind now enjoys many benefits from nuclear-related technologies. There is, however, growing concern in many OECD countries that nuclear education and training is decreasing, perhaps to problematic levels. This report conveys the results of a pioneering survey on nuclear education and training in almost 200 organizations in 16 countries. In most countries there are now fewer comprehensive, high-quality nuclear technology programs at universities than before. Facilities and faculties for nuclear education are aging, and the number of nuclear programs is declining. The principal reason for the deterioration of nuclear education is the downward spiral of budgetary cut and low enrolment of student whose perception is affected by the educational circumstances, negative public perception, the downsizing of the industry, and reductions in government-funded nuclear programmes, where little strategic planning is occurring. Unless something is done to arrest it, this downward spiral of declining student interest and academic opportunities will continue. Failure to take appropriate steps now will seriously jeopardize the provision of adequate expertise tomorrow. We must act now on the following recommendations: strategic role of governments; the challenges of revitalizing nuclear education by university; vigorous research and maintaining high-quality training; and benefits of collaboration and sharing best practices. (author)

  17. An Evaluation of Manpower Training Needs in the Hotel-Restaurant Industry on Kauai, 1968, with Recommendations on Programs, Sources of Students, Instructors, and Funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Robert W.

    This report, requested and funded by a committee of community leaders, investigates the recruiting, training and employment of cooks, waitresses, maids, and small business managers needed on the island of Kauai through the year 1973. Projected increases in tourism and hotel construction indicate substantial need for well trained personnel. Courses…

  18. Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization training implementation. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-05-19

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization (NCSO) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSO personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This Training Implementation document is applicable to all technical and managerial NCSO personnel, including temporary personnel, sub-contractors and/or LMES employees on loan to the NCSO, who are in a qualification program.

  19. Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization training implementation. Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization (NCSO) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSO personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This Training Implementation document is applicable to all technical and managerial NCSO personnel, including temporary personnel, sub-contractors and/or LMES employees on loan to the NCSO, who are in a qualification program

  20. Present status of nuclear education and training in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyose, R.; Sumita, K.; Moriya, F.

    1994-01-01

    In Japan, where about 30% of electricity is supplied by nuclear actives require a good number of able and ambitious young scientists and engineers especially in the future. On the other hand, almost all Japanese electric power companies, which operate nuclear power plants, are striving to keep expertise of reactor operators as high as possible. Present status in Japan of education at universities, research and training reactors, training courses at governmental institutions and nonprofit organizations, and operator training centers of electric power companies, are reviewed. 3 tabs

  1. Description of training activities and re-training system for nuclear professionals at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jambrich, I.; Trampus, P.

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear power units of Paks, Hungary, have always been operated by Hungarian personnel, from the very beginning. The operator staff of unit 1 acquired its knowledge primarily outside of the country, but since 1983 the overall training process has been run entirely in Hungary, in Paks. This report gives details of present system of training programme in Hungary. The system of training for professionals builds up in vertically linked modules and is job oriented. It begins with theoretical training, followed by programmed on-the-job training which must successfully be finished before a release onto in-company or authority licensing exams for individual job performance

  2. The INSTN trains the future professionals of nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, P.

    2017-01-01

    The INSTN (Institute for Nuclear Sciences and Nuclear Technologies) is the applied school in nuclear technologies that has been present for 60 years for specialized training and vocational training. The integration of numerical technologies has allowed INSTN to adapt its way of teaching and to overcome difficulties like distances and to propose for instance practical exercises on the ISIS experimental reactor through the web for foreign graduate schools. The INSTN has realized its first SPOC (Small Private Online Course) and is preparing 2 MOOC (Massive Open Online Course). Since 2016, the INSTN has become 1 of the 2 training centers appointed as 'collaborating center' by the IAEA in the field of nuclear technologies and their industrial and radio-pharmaceutical applications. (A.C.)

  3. ICT based training on nuclear technology applications in Tanzania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mdoe, S.L. [Nuclear Technology Applications Directorate, Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 743, Arusha (Tanzania)]. E-mail: slcmdoe@yahoo.com; Kimaro, E. [Nuclear Technology Applications Directorate, Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 743, Arusha (Tanzania)]. E-mail: taec@habari.co.tz

    2006-07-01

    Peaceful application of nuclear technology has contributed to socio-economic resource development in Tanzania. The Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission has taken some active steps for the incorporation and or adoption of ICT-based training modules in nuclear science and technology and its applications. The overall objective of this programme is to establish a sustainable national capability for using the potential of information communication technologies (ICTs) for training and education in the field of nuclear science and technology. This paper reviews some of the experience which the authors gained in the area of ICT based training in nuclear technology applications, it describes some of the challenges experienced, and some proposals to address the issues involved. (author)

  4. Course in fire protection training for nuclear power plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, K.L.; Bates, E.F.; Randall, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    Proposed Regulatory Guide 1.120, entitled ''Fire Protection Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants,'' provides detailed requirements for the overall fire protection programs at nuclear power plant sites in the United States. An essential element in such a program in the training of plant fire brigade personnel is the use of proper firefighting techniques and equipment. The Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center (NSC) in conjunction with the Fire Protection Training Division of the Texas Engineering Extension Service has developed a one-week course to meet this training need. The program emphasizes hands-on exercises. The course is designed for up to 18 students with all protective clothing provided. Fire instructors are certified by the State of Texas, and registered nuclear engineers and certified health physicists supervise the radiological safety exercises. The first course was conducted during the week of January 8--12, 1979

  5. ICT based training on nuclear technology applications in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mdoe, S.L.; Kimaro, E.

    2006-01-01

    Peaceful application of nuclear technology has contributed to socio-economic resource development in Tanzania. The Tanzania Atomic Energy Commission has taken some active steps for the incorporation and or adoption of ICT-based training modules in nuclear science and technology and its applications. The overall objective of this programme is to establish a sustainable national capability for using the potential of information communication technologies (ICTs) for training and education in the field of nuclear science and technology. This paper reviews some of the experience which the authors gained in the area of ICT based training in nuclear technology applications, it describes some of the challenges experienced, and some proposals to address the issues involved. (author)

  6. Steps to nuclear power: Draft guidebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    IAEA has produced this Guidebook as a general summary of the considerations applying to the introduction of nuclear power and in particular the decisions that have to be taken and the requirements for studies, organization and trained manpower on the path to the first nuclear power plant. Nuclear Power is described functionally from the point of view of an alternative energy source in power system expansion

  7. Education, training and work experience among nuclear power plant workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, L.M.; Doggette, J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper uses a unique data set to examine the prior work experience, training, and education of skilled and technical workers in United States nuclear power plants. The data were collected in the latter half of 1977 by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) in a survey of union locals in nuclear power plants. The survey results provided substantial evidence that workers in United States nuclear power plants have a relatively high level of education, training, and skill development. Analysis of average education by age did not reveal any significant differences in years of schooling between younger and older workers. Very high rates of participation in formal training programmes were reported by all types of workers. The most common type of training programme was held on-site at the power plant and was provided by utility personnel. The majority of workers reported previous work experience related to nuclear power plant activities. Almost one-third of the workers had been directly involved in nuclear energy in a previous job, the majority of these through the United States Navy nuclear programme. However, the newer plants are hiring relatively fewer persons with previous nuclear experience. (author)

  8. Nuclear medicine training and practice in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear medicine in the Czech Republic is a full specialty with an exclusive practice. Since the training program was organized and structured in recent years, residents have had access to the specialty of nuclear medicine, starting with a two-year general internship (in internal medicine or radiology). At present, nuclear medicine services are provided in 45 departments. In total, 119 nuclear medicine specialists are currently registered. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, five years of training are necessary; the first two years consist of a general internship in internal medicine or radiology. The remaining three years consist of training in the nuclear medicine specialty itself, but includes three months of practice in radiology. Twenty-one physicians are currently in nuclear medicine training and a mean of three specialists pass the final exam per year. The syllabus is very similar to that of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), namely concerning the minimum recommended numbers for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In principle, the Czech law requires continuous medical education for all practicing doctors. The Czech Medical Chamber has provided a continuing medical education (CME) system. Other national CMEs are not accepted in Czech Republic. (orig.)

  9. Nuclear medicine training and practice in the Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel [University Hospital Olomouc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15

    Nuclear medicine in the Czech Republic is a full specialty with an exclusive practice. Since the training program was organized and structured in recent years, residents have had access to the specialty of nuclear medicine, starting with a two-year general internship (in internal medicine or radiology). At present, nuclear medicine services are provided in 45 departments. In total, 119 nuclear medicine specialists are currently registered. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, five years of training are necessary; the first two years consist of a general internship in internal medicine or radiology. The remaining three years consist of training in the nuclear medicine specialty itself, but includes three months of practice in radiology. Twenty-one physicians are currently in nuclear medicine training and a mean of three specialists pass the final exam per year. The syllabus is very similar to that of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), namely concerning the minimum recommended numbers for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In principle, the Czech law requires continuous medical education for all practicing doctors. The Czech Medical Chamber has provided a continuing medical education (CME) system. Other national CMEs are not accepted in Czech Republic. (orig.)

  10. Training programs for the systems approach to nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In support of United States Government (USG) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) nuclear security programs, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has advocated and practiced a risk-based, systematic approach to nuclear security. The risk equation has been developed and implemented as the basis for a performance-based methodology for the design and evaluation of physical protection systems against a design basis threat (DBT) for theft and sabotage of nuclear and/or radiological materials. Integrated systems must include technology, people, and the man-machine interface. A critical aspect of the human element is training on the systems-approach for all the stakeholders in nuclear security. Current training courses and workshops have been very beneficial but are still rather limited in scope. SNL has developed two primary international classes - the international training course on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials, and the design basis threat methodology workshop. SNL is also completing the development of three new courses that will be offered and presented in the near term. They are vital area identification methodology focused on nuclear power plants to aid in their protection against radiological sabotage, insider threat analysis methodology and protection schemes, and security foundations for competent authority and facility operator stakeholders who are not security professionals. In the long term, we envision a comprehensive nuclear security curriculum that spans policy and technology, regulators and operators, introductory and expert levels, classroom and laboratory/field, and local and offsite training options. This training curriculum will be developed in concert with a nuclear security series of guidance documents that is expected to be forthcoming from the IAEA. It is important to note that while appropriate implementation of systems based on such training and documentation can improve the risk reduction, such a

  11. Simulator training and licensing examination for nuclear power station operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Pingsheng

    2007-01-01

    For the recruitment, training and position qualification of the simulator instructors and feedback of training effect, the management approaches are formulated in 'The System for Simulator Training and Licensing Examination of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station Operators'. The concrete requirements on the professional knowledge, work experience and foreign language ability of a simulator instructor are put forward. The process of instructor training is designed. The training items include the trainer training, pedagogy training, time management training, operation activities training during outage of unit, 'shadow' training and on-the-jot training on simulator courses. Job rotation is realized between simulator instructor and licensing personnel on site. New simulator instructor must pass the qualification identification. After a duration of 2 years, re-qualification has to be carried out. On the basis of the operator training method introduced from EDF (electricite De France), some new courses are developed and the improvement on the initial training, retaining courses, the technical support and the experience feedback by using the simulator is done also. (authors)

  12. Training implementation matrix. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EATON, G.L.

    2000-01-01

    This Training Implementation Matrix (TIM) describes how the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.20A, Personnel Selection, Qualification, and Training Requirements for Reactor and Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. The TIM defines the application of the selection, qualification, and training requirements in DOE Order 5480.20A at the SNFP. The TIM also describes the organization, planning, and administration of the SNFP training and qualification program(s) for which DOE Order 5480.20A applies. Also included is suitable justification for exceptions taken to any requirements contained in DOE Order 5480.20A. The goal of the SNFP training and qualification program is to ensure employees are capable of performing their jobs safely and efficiently

  13. Special feature article-very urgent nuclear energy personnel training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo; Tsujikura, Yonezo; Kawahara, Akira

    2007-01-01

    Securing human resources is important for the sustainable development of research, development and utilization of nuclear energy. However, concerns have been raised over the maintenance of human resources due to the decline of public and private investment in research and development of nuclear energy in recent years. To that end, it is essential for the workplace in the field of nuclear energy to be engaging. This special feature article introduced the Government's fund program supporting universities and vocational colleges to develop human resources in the area of nuclear energy. Electric utilities, nuclear industries, nuclear safety regulators and related academia presented respective present status and issues of nuclear energy personnel training with some expectations to the program to secure human resources with professional qualifications. (T. Tanaka)

  14. Training and Public Information Activities of the Milan Copic Nuclear Training Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jencic, I.

    2006-01-01

    The mission of the Milan Copic Nuclear Training Centre is training in the field of nuclear technologies and radioactivity. In addition we are actively informing general public about those technologies. Activities can be divided into four areas: training in the area of nuclear technologies, radiological protection training, organization of international training courses and public information. Training in the area of nuclear technologies is the primary mission. Two types of courses are regularly offered: The Theory of nuclear technology is the initial training of future control room operators, and the Basics of nuclear technology is intended for non-control room personnel of Krsko NPP and for staff of some other organizations. Each year there are also some specific courses in this area, mainly for the regulatory body and for the NPP. Jozef Stefan Institute is one of the two institutions in Slovenia, authorized for radiological protection training and the training centre is the actual performer. About 15 courses yearly are organized for people from medicine, industry and science courses about open, closed and industrial sources of ionizing radiation. We are also responsible for the training of NPP Krsko personnel in that area. Organization of international courses is a usually a collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), but we have worked also with other international organizations, such as European Commission, US Department of Energy etc. The topics of international courses and workshops cover a wide range from nuclear safety to radiological protection or illegal trafficking of nuclear materials etc. Depending on the subject, part of lectures on these courses is given by domestic experts. 6 - 10 international courses are organized yearly. Very important is the area of public information. Groups of school children and other visitors are coming regularly to listen to a lecture and to visit the exhibition. In 2005, both the lecture and the

  15. Respiratory care manpower issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Paul; Drumheller, Lois; Carlow, John J

    2006-03-01

    Although respiratory care is a relatively new profession, its practitioners are deeply involved in providing patient care in the critical care. In preparation for writing this article, we sought to explore the respiratory therapy manpower needs and activities designed to fulfill those needs in critical care practice. We began by delineating the historical development of respiratory care as a profession, the development of its education, and the professional credentialing system. We then conducted several literature reviews with few articles generated. We requested and received data from the American Association for Respiratory Care (AARC), The National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC), and the Committee on Accreditation of Respiratory Care education (CoARC) relative to their membership, number of credentialed individuals, and educational program student and graduate data for 2000 through 2004. We then conducted two electronic surveys. Survey 1 was a six-item survey that examined the use of mandatory overtime in respiratory care departments. We used a convenience sample of 30 hospitals stratified by size (or=500 beds). Survey 2 was a five-item instrument distributed by blast E-mail to the Society of Critical Care Medicine's Respiratory Care Section members and members of the RC_World list serve. This survey elicited 51 usable and non-duplicative responses from geographically and size-varied institutions. We analyzed these data in several ways from distribution analysis to one-way analysis of variance procedure and appropriate post hoc analysis techniques. Where appropriate, a matched-pairs analysis was performed and these were compared across the variables intensive care unit (ICU) beds per actual number of respiratory care practitioners (RCPs) and ICU beds per preferred number of RCPs. The data gathered from the professional organizations indicated a relatively stable attrition rate (35.2%+/-1.7-3.1%), even in the face of varying enrollments (6,231 in 2004 vs. 4

  16. Establishment of the International Nuclear Education/Training and its Cooperation Framework for Nuclear Transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. J.; Han, K. W.; Lee, E. J.

    2009-02-01

    This project covered development and implementation of international nuclear education/training programs, cooperation for nuclear human resource development and education/training. provision of MS and PhD courses for qualified students from developing countries, and strengthening of infrastructure for the nuclear education/training. The WNU one week summer course was held for domestic future generation in nuclear field. NTC operated the ANENT web portal and cyber platform, supported training on their use, and prepared a KAERI-IAEA Practical Arrangement for the promotion of web-base nuclear education/training. For FNCA, an analysis was conducted on the need of nuclear education/training in South East Asian countries. The bilateral cooperation included cooperation with Vietnam. provision of Korean experience for nuclear power personnel from Egypt, and commencing of cooperation with South Africa. Also, NTC participated in GENEP for sharing Korean experience in the nuclear human resource development project. KAERI-UST MA and PhD courses with 3 foreign students started in spring 2008 and implemented. The courses were advance nuclear reactor system engineering, accelerator and nano-beam engineering, and radiation measurement science. 13 international nuclear education/training courses (IAEA, KOICA, RCARO and bilateral) were implemented for 226 foreign trainees. A reference education/training program was developed, which consisted of 15 courses that can be customized to learner levels and project stages of countries in question (e.g. Middle East. Africa). A textbook entitled 'Research Reactor Design, Management and Utilization' was developed presenting Korean experience with research reactors

  17. Harmonization of nuclear education and training in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglierin, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: At the Lisbon 2000 summit, a strategic goal was proposed for the European Union: to become the most competitive knowledge-based economy with more and better employment and social cohesion by 2010. In the particular case of nuclear fission technologies, this EC initiative was widely accepted by the stake holders concerned. In Europe, the main 'end users' of nuclear research or stake holders are actually: the research organisations (with mixed public / private funding), the manufacturing industry, the utilities and waste management organisations, the regulatory bodies (or technical safety organisations) and the academic (e.g. universities). With the aim to better integrate European education and training in nuclear engineering and safety in order to combat the decline in both student numbers and teaching establishments a FP6 EU project entitled NEPTUNO (Nuclear European Platform of Training and University Organizations) has started in 2004. In total 35 partner institutions from 17 countries have formed a network aimed in providing the necessary competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and other uses of radiation in industry and medicine. The project focuses on a harmonised approach for education and training in nuclear engineering in Europe and its implementation, including the better integration of national resources and capabilities. The expected result is an operational network for training and lifelong learning schemes as well as on academic education at the master, doctoral and post-doctoral level, underpinning: Substantiality of Europe's excellence in nuclear technology; Harmonised approaches to safety and best practices, both operational and regulatory, at European level in Member States and Accession Countries; Preservation of competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and other uses of radiation in industry and medicine; Harmonised approach for training and education in nuclear engineering

  18. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Zehra; Bozkurt, M Fani; Erbas, Belkıs; Durak, Hatice

    2017-05-01

    Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years. This article describes past and present facts in this field and attempts to provide insights into the future which hopefully will be brighter than before.

  19. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Zehra [Ege University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Izmir (Turkey); Bozkurt, M. Fani; Erbas, Belkis [Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Durak, Hatice [Dokuz Eyluel University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Izmir (Turkey)

    2017-05-15

    Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years. This article describes past and present facts in this field and attempts to provide insights into the future which hopefully will be brighter than before. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozcan, Zehra; Bozkurt, M. Fani; Erbas, Belkis; Durak, Hatice

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years. This article describes past and present facts in this field and attempts to provide insights into the future which hopefully will be brighter than before. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear education and training: cause for concern?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, H.

    2000-01-01

    Many diverse technologies, currently serving nations worldwide, would be adversely affected if there was an inadequate number of nuclear scientists and engineers in the future with appropriate scientific and technical backgrounds and university curricula. (author)

  2. Nuclear power plant training simulator fidelity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.J.; Laughery, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    The fidelity assessment portion of a methodology for evaluating nuclear power plant simulation facilities in regard to their appropriateness for conducting the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's operating test was described. The need for fidelity assessment, data sources, and fidelity data to be collected are addressed. Fidelity data recording, collection, and analysis are discussed. The processes for drawing conclusions from the fidelity assessment and evaluating the adequacy of the simulator control-room layout were presented. 3 refs

  3. Nuclear utility education and training becoming too plant specific?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, F.

    1986-01-01

    As the Supervisor of a university nuclear reactor and operations curriculum, the author has also been offering education and training programs for nuclear utility technical support and operations personnel. Similar results have been reported by other universities offering similar programs. These programs also provide very important benefits to university nuclear engineering departments in terms of much needed revenues during this time of declining student enrollment and also by the information flow from the nuclear utility participants to the university personnel, which can yield both improved courses and identify research opportunities. University programs serve an important complementary function to plant-specific programs and should be continued and supported

  4. Experience with performance based training of nuclear criticality safety engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.

    1993-01-01

    Historically, new entrants to the practice of nuclear criticality safety have learned their job primarily by on-the-job training (OJT) often by association with an experienced nuclear criticality safety engineer who probably also learned their job by OJT. Typically, the new entrant learned what he/she needed to know to solve a particular problem and accumulated experience as more problems were solved. It is likely that more formalism will be required in the future. Current US Department of Energy requirements for those positions which have to demonstrate qualification indicate that it should be achieved by using a systematic approach such as performance based training (PBT). Assuming that PBT would be an acceptable mechanism for nuclear criticality safety engineer training in a more formal environment, a site-specific analysis of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job was performed. Based on this analysis, classes are being developed and delivered to a target audience of newer nuclear criticality safety engineers. Because current interest is in developing training for selected aspects of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job, the analysis i's incompletely developed in some areas. Details of this analysis are provided in this report

  5. Development of Training Aids for Nuclear Forensics Exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangjun; Lee, Seungmin; Lim, Hobin; Hyung, Sangcheol; Kim, Jaekwang [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Current radioactive-related training has focused on the prevention of a radiation disaster. Procedures to recover nuclear and radiological materials have been simplified due to the lack of training tools to reproduce real conditions for security and staff at nuclear facilities. The process of recovering materials is crucial in order to collect evidence and secure the safety of response forces. Moreover, exercises for recovering lost or missing a low dose radiation sources, does not well match with explosive like RDD blast situations. Therefore KINAC has been developing training aids in order to closely reproduce conditions of an actual terrorist attack and enhance effectiveness of exercises. These tools will be applied to Nuclear Forensics Exercises in which evidence collection is important at the time of an incident. KINAC has been developing training aids to enhance the effectiveness of such exercises by providing simulated conditions of actual terrorist incidents. Simulated training aids, based on the beacon system, operate with electromagnetic waves. These tools are able to simulate environments close to actual conditions by supplying similar properties of radioactivity. Training aids will be helpful in giving experience to security personnel and staff in the event of a terrorist incident. This experience includes collecting evidence for nuclear forensics. KINAC also has a plan to hold drills using these tools this year with The Armed Force CBR Defense Command.

  6. Development of Training Aids for Nuclear Forensics Exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sangjun; Lee, Seungmin; Lim, Hobin; Hyung, Sangcheol; Kim, Jaekwang

    2015-01-01

    Current radioactive-related training has focused on the prevention of a radiation disaster. Procedures to recover nuclear and radiological materials have been simplified due to the lack of training tools to reproduce real conditions for security and staff at nuclear facilities. The process of recovering materials is crucial in order to collect evidence and secure the safety of response forces. Moreover, exercises for recovering lost or missing a low dose radiation sources, does not well match with explosive like RDD blast situations. Therefore KINAC has been developing training aids in order to closely reproduce conditions of an actual terrorist attack and enhance effectiveness of exercises. These tools will be applied to Nuclear Forensics Exercises in which evidence collection is important at the time of an incident. KINAC has been developing training aids to enhance the effectiveness of such exercises by providing simulated conditions of actual terrorist incidents. Simulated training aids, based on the beacon system, operate with electromagnetic waves. These tools are able to simulate environments close to actual conditions by supplying similar properties of radioactivity. Training aids will be helpful in giving experience to security personnel and staff in the event of a terrorist incident. This experience includes collecting evidence for nuclear forensics. KINAC also has a plan to hold drills using these tools this year with The Armed Force CBR Defense Command

  7. Operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tadasu

    1988-01-01

    For the operation management of nuclear power stations with high reliability and safety, the role played by operators is very important. The effort of improving the man-machine interface in the central control rooms of nuclear power stations is energetically advanced, but the importance of the role of operators does not change. For the training of the operators of nuclear power stations, simulators have been used from the early stage. As the simulator facilities for operator training, there are the full scope simulator simulating faithfully the central control room of an actual plant and the small simulator mainly aiming at learning the plant functions. For BWR nuclear power stations, two full scope simulators are installed in the BWR Operator Training Center, and the training has been carried out since 1974. The plant function learning simulators have been installed in respective electric power companies as the education and training facilities in the companies. The role of simulators in operator training, the BTC No.1 simulator of a BWR-4 of 780 MWe and the BTC No.2 simulator of a BWR-5 of 1,100 MWe, plant function learning simulators, and the design of the BTC No.2 simulator and plant function learning simulators are reported. (K.I.)

  8. The Philippine Atomic Energy Commission and its training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragot, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    This article briefly but comprehensively enumerates the functions and responsibilities of the Commission with emphasis on its local and overseas training program. It emphasizes the significance of these programs in meeting the manpower need of the country especially with the construction of the first nuclear power plant. (author)

  9. Improvement of quality with Nuclear Power Training Center (NTC) operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Power Training Center (NTC) was established in 1972 for PWR operator training. As the result of introduction of quality assurance management into NTC operator training, it became possible to confirm each step of systematic approach to training (SAT) process and then feedback process became clearer. Simulation models were modified based on domestic or overseas accidents cases and so training was improved using simulators closer to actual plants. Also a new multipurpose simulator with modified reactor coolant system (RCS) visual display device (RVD) and parameter-event-log (PEL) device was introduced in 2003 to provide more information so as to upgrade knowledge level of operators. (T. Tanaka)

  10. Nuclear renaissance in the reactor training of Areva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Braquilanges, Bertrand; Napior, Amy; Schoenfelder, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Because of the perspectives of new builds, a significant increase in the number of design, construction and management personnel working in AREVA, their clients and sub-contractors has been estimated for the next future. In order to cope with the challenge to integrate newly hired people quickly and effectively into the AREVA workforce, a project - 'Training Task Force (TTF)' - was launched in 2008. The objective was to develop introductory and advanced courses and related tools harmonized between AREVA Training Centers in France, Germany and USA. First, a Global Plants Introductory Session (GPIS) was developed for newly hired employees. GPIS is a two weeks training course introducing in a modular way AREVA and specifically the activities and the reactors technical basics. As an example, design and operation of a nuclear power plant is illustrated on EPRTM. Since January 2009, these GPIS are held regularly in France, Germany and the US with a mixing of employees from these 3 regions. Next, advanced courses for more experienced employees were developed: - Advanced EPR TM , giving a detailed presentation of the EPR TM reactor design; - Codes and Standards; - Technical Nuclear Safety. Finally, feasibility studies on a Training Material Management (TMM) system, able to manage the training documentation, and on a worldwide training administration tool, were performed. The TTF project was completed mid of 2009; it transferred their recurrent activities to a new AREVA training department. This unit now consists of the French, German and US Reactors Training Centers. In particular, all courses developed by the TTF are now implemented worldwide with an opening to external trainees. The current worldwide course catalogue includes training courses for operation and maintenance personnel as well as for managers, engineers and non technical personnel of nuclear operators, suppliers, safety authorities and expert organizations. Training delivery is supported effectively by tools

  11. Nuclear renaissance in the reactor training of Areva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Braquilanges, Bertrand [Reactor Training Center/France Manager, La Tour Areva - 1, place Jean Millier - 92084 Paris - La Defense (France); Napior, Amy [Reactor Training Center/USA Manager, 1300 Old Graves Mill Road - Lynchburg VA, 2450 (United States); Schoenfelder, Christian [Reactor Training Center/Germany Manager, Kaiserleistrasse 29 - 63067 Offenbach (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Because of the perspectives of new builds, a significant increase in the number of design, construction and management personnel working in AREVA, their clients and sub-contractors has been estimated for the next future. In order to cope with the challenge to integrate newly hired people quickly and effectively into the AREVA workforce, a project - 'Training Task Force (TTF)' - was launched in 2008. The objective was to develop introductory and advanced courses and related tools harmonized between AREVA Training Centers in France, Germany and USA. First, a Global Plants Introductory Session (GPIS) was developed for newly hired employees. GPIS is a two weeks training course introducing in a modular way AREVA and specifically the activities and the reactors technical basics. As an example, design and operation of a nuclear power plant is illustrated on EPRTM. Since January 2009, these GPIS are held regularly in France, Germany and the US with a mixing of employees from these 3 regions. Next, advanced courses for more experienced employees were developed: - Advanced EPR{sup TM}, giving a detailed presentation of the EPR{sup TM} reactor design; - Codes and Standards; - Technical Nuclear Safety. Finally, feasibility studies on a Training Material Management (TMM) system, able to manage the training documentation, and on a worldwide training administration tool, were performed. The TTF project was completed mid of 2009; it transferred their recurrent activities to a new AREVA training department. This unit now consists of the French, German and US Reactors Training Centers. In particular, all courses developed by the TTF are now implemented worldwide with an opening to external trainees. The current worldwide course catalogue includes training courses for operation and maintenance personnel as well as for managers, engineers and non technical personnel of nuclear operators, suppliers, safety authorities and expert organizations. Training delivery is supported

  12. Innovative training techniques in the Canadian nuclear regulatory environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    One of the contributors to the safety of nuclear installations is properly-trained personnel. This applies equally to the staff of a regulatory agency, as they are charged with the task of evaluating the safety of installations and operations involving radioactive materials. In 1990, the nuclear regulatory agency of Canada, the Atomic Energy Control Board, set up a Training Center to train AECB staff and to provide assistance to foreign regulatory agencies who had asked for such assistance. In setting up the Training Centre, the authors considered factors which adversely affect the efficacy of training courses. The technical content must, of course, be of sufficiently high quality, but there are other, significant factors which are independent of the content: consider a presentation in which the lecturer shows a slide which is unreadable from the back of the room. The training value of this slide is zero, even though the content may be sound. Pursuing this thought, they decided to examine the mechanics of presentations and the form of training materials, with a view to optimizing their effectiveness in training. The results of this examination were that they decided to use three technologies as the basis for production of training, support and presentation materials. This paper briefly describes these technologies and their advantages. The technologies are: desktop publishing, video and multimedia

  13. Current training initiatives at Nuclear Electric plc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, C.D.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear Electric, one of the three generating companies to emerge from the demise of the U.K.'s Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB), owns and operates the commercial nuclear power stations in England and Wales. The U.K. government proscribed further construction beyond Sizewell B, the United Kingdom's first pressurized water reactor (PWR) station, pending the outcome of a review of the future of nuclear power to be held in 1994. The major challenges facing Nuclear Electric at its formation in 1990 were therefore to demonstrate that nuclear power is safe, economical, and environmentally acceptable and to complete the PWR station under construction on time and within budget. A significant number of activities were started that were designed to increase output, reduce costs, and ensure that the previous excellent safety standards were maintained. A major activity was to reduce the numbers of staff employed, with a recognition from the outset that this reduction could only be achieved with a significant human resource development program. Future company staff would have to be competent in more areas and more productive. This paper summarizes some of the initiatives currently being pursued throughout the company and the progress toward ensuring that staff with the required competences are available to commission and operate the Sizewell B program in 1994

  14. Instructional skills training - the Westinghouse program to insure competence of nuclear training instructors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widen, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear training engineer as well as being competent technically must be able to teach effectively. Westinghouse have developed a course for training instructors which aims to improve their teaching skills. The course, which has both theoretical and practical content covers the role of the instructor, the learning process, communications, test construction and analysis and stress identification and analysis. (U.K.)

  15. Assessment of field training for nuclear operations personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.

    1995-08-01

    Training of station personnel is an important component of the safe operation of the nuclear generating station. On-the-job training (OJT) is an important component of training. The AECB initiated this project to develop a process to assess the effectiveness of OJT for field operators, and perform an initial trial of the developed process. This report describes the recommended process to assess the effectiveness of OJT for field operators, as well as the results of the initial assessment at Pickering Nuclear Generating Station. The assessment's conclusions included: (1) Ontario Hydro policies and procedures are generally consistent with industry guidelines requiring a systematic approach to training; (2) Pickering NGS field operator performance is not always consistent with documented station requirements and standards, nor industry guidelines and practices; and (3) The Pickering NGS field operator on-the-job training is not consistent with a systematic approach to training, a requirement recognized in Ontario Hydro's Policy NGD 113, and does not contribute to a high level of performance in field operator tasks. Recommendations are made regarding the use of the developed process for future assessments of on-the-job training at nuclear power plants. (author). 36 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs

  16. Assessment of field training for nuclear operations personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, M [Safety Management Services, Inc. (Canada)

    1995-08-01

    Training of station personnel is an important component of the safe operation of the nuclear generating station. On-the-job training (OJT) is an important component of training. The AECB initiated this project to develop a process to assess the effectiveness of OJT for field operators, and perform an initial trial of the developed process. This report describes the recommended process to assess the effectiveness of OJT for field operators, as well as the results of the initial assessment at Pickering Nuclear Generating Station. The assessment`s conclusions included: (1) Ontario Hydro policies and procedures are generally consistent with industry guidelines requiring a systematic approach to training; (2) Pickering NGS field operator performance is not always consistent with documented station requirements and standards, nor industry guidelines and practices; and (3) The Pickering NGS field operator on-the-job training is not consistent with a systematic approach to training, a requirement recognized in Ontario Hydro`s Policy NGD 113, and does not contribute to a high level of performance in field operator tasks. Recommendations are made regarding the use of the developed process for future assessments of on-the-job training at nuclear power plants. (author). 36 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs.

  17. Development of instructors for nuclear power plant personnel training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    In 1996 the IAEA published Technical Reports Series No. 380, Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation, A Guidebook, which provides guidance with respect to development, implementation and evaluation of training programmes. The IAEA Technical Working Group on Training and Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel recommended that an additional publication be prepared to provide further details concerning the development of instructors for NPP personnel training. The quality of nuclear power plant personnel training is strongly dependent on the availability of competent instructors. Instructors must have a comprehensive practical as well as theoretical understanding of all aspects of the subjects being taught and the relationship of the subject to nuclear plant operation. Instructors should have the appropriate knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSAs) in their assigned areas of responsibility. They should thoroughly understand all aspects of the contents of the training programmes and the relationship between these contents and overall plant operation. This means that they should be technically competent and show credibility with the trainees and other plant personnel. In addition, the instructors should be familiar with the basics of adult learning and a systematic approach to training, and should have adequate instructional and assessment skills. This TECDOC provides practical guidance on various aspects of instructor selection, development and deployment, by quoting actual examples from different countries. It highlights the importance of having an appropriate training policy, especially considering the various organisational arrangements that exist in different utilities/countries. This should result in: plant performance improvement, improved human performance, meeting goals and objectives of the business (quality, safety, productivity), and improving training programs. This publication is available in two formats - as a conventional printed

  18. Certified training for nuclear and radioactive source security management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive sources are used by hospitals, research facilities and industry for such purposes as diagnosing and treating illnesses, sterilising equipment and inspecting welds. Unfortunately, many States, regulatory authorities and licensees may not appreciate how people with malevolent intentions could use radioactive sources, and statistics confirm that a number of security incidents happen around the globe. The adversary could be common thieves, activists, insiders, terrorists and organised crime groups. Mitigating this risk requires well trained and competent staff who have developed the knowledge, attributes and skills necessary to successfully discharge their security responsibilities. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Institute for Nuclear Security are leading international training efforts. The target audience is a multi-disciplinary group of professionals with management responsibilities for security at facilities with radioactive sources. These efforts to promote training and competence amongst practitioners have been recognised at the 2014 and 2016 Nuclear Security and Nuclear Industry Summits. (author)

  19. Nuclear criticality safety specialist training and qualification programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Nuclear Criticality Safety Division of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) in 1967, the nuclear criticality safety (NCS) community has sought to provide an exchange of information at a national level to facilitate the education and development of NCS specialists. In addition, individual criticality safety organizations within government contractor and licensed commercial nonreactor facilities have developed training and qualification programs for their NCS specialists. However, there has been substantial variability in the content and quality of these program requirements and personnel qualifications, at least as measured within the government contractor community. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief, general history of staff training and to describe the current direction and focus of US DOE guidance for the content of training and qualification programs designed to develop NCS specialists

  20. Innovative real time simulation training and nuclear probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisinger, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    Operator errors have been an area of public concern for the safe operation of nuclear power plants since the TMI2 incident. Simply stated, nuclear plants are very complex systems and the public is skeptical of the operators' ability to comprehend and deal with the vast indications and complexities of potential nuclear power plant events. Prior to the TMI2 incident, operator errors and human factors were not included as contributing factors in the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) studies of nuclear power plant accidents. More recent efforts in nuclear risk assessment have addressed some of the human factors affecting safe nuclear plant operations. One study found four major factors having significant impact on operator effectiveness. This paper discusses human factor PRAs, new applications in simulation training and the specific potential benefits from simulation in promoting safer operation of future power plants as well as current operating power plants

  1. A study for developing training courses of the nuclear training center -with priority given to the training goals of KAERI-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong; Seo, In Seok; Kim, Deok In; Lee, Won Koo; Lee, Sueng Hee; Lee, Byoung Soen; Lee, Uei Jin; Kim, Young Joong; Oh, Sei Ki; Jeon, Hyong Ryon; Kim, Dong Soo; Lee, Han Young; Lee, Dong Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Res. Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-01-01

    The final goal of this project, which covers 3 years (from 1992 to 1994), is to develop personnel training courses of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and to derive the most desirable training system therefrom. To achieve this final goal successfully the first year`s research was designed and has been carried on; firstly, to analyze the on-going issues and what kind of reform measures should be introduced to both the input and conversion processes of KAERI to efficiently achieve the organization goals, secondly, to derive personnel training goals of KAERI based on the analyses. First, this study introduced the viewpoint of systems approach for organization analysis, and defined that the productivity of an organization mainly depends on manpower quality of the input section and efficiency of the conversion process. Next, general organization theories and characteristics of research and development organization were studied, and derived that in research and development organization the expertise of a specialist should be regarded as the main value rather than his position, and the atmosphere should be human-centered, being free and democratic rather than authoritarian. And the study emphasizes more flatted structure of organization, necessity of sense of Management By Objectives (MBO), future planning capability, quality of manager with democratic leadership as criteria for the analysis of research and development organization. Finally, analyzing organization structure and behavior of KAERI based on the criteria, the study derived the ends-means hierarchy of personnel training of KAERI and discussed the necessity of organization reform of KAERI. (Author).

  2. Manpower requirements for quality assurance during operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, J.M.; Sollenberger, L.G.

    1982-01-01

    As a result of the Three Mile Island accident and the findings presented in various investigatory reports, some fundamental changes are taking place in the role and scope of quality assurance. Recent changes to United States national codes, guides and standards are analysed in order to identify the principles involved. This analysis shows that the scope of the programme is being extended beyond the equipment designated 'nuclear safety related' and greater emphasis is being placed upon the independent verification of the satisfactory performance of activities affecting safety. Such fundamental changes could lead to a significant increase in the number of quality assurance personnel required to support an operating nuclear power plant. The evolving quality assurance organization at Three Mile Island is used to illustrate how these fundamental changes could affect the quality assurance organization and manpower requirements. (author)

  3. Basic professional training course on nuclear safety - Finland YK4 preface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.

    2006-01-01

    This publication comprises the abstracts of the YK4 basic professional training course on nuclear safety arranged now for fourth time in Finland. Part of the abstracts has again been updated for this publication. When more renewed abstracts are received during the YK4 course, they are put in the distance learning pages of Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) being thus immediately available for the participants. In the fall of 2002, Finnish organizations re-evaluated the man-power situation and established an organizing committee to develop and organize basic post-graduate professional training of new recruits and staff members; especially for the acute needs of the new NPP project, but also to provide in the long-term a new generation of nuclear experts to replace the present generation which will retire within the next ten years. The organizing committee included representatives of the following organizations: Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority STUK, nuclear power utilities TVO and Fortum, the Technical Research Centre of Finland VTT, the Lappeenranta (LUT) and Helsinki Universities of Technology (TKK), and the Ministry of Trade and Industry, KTM. The committee decided to promptly organize a national training course on nuclear safety based on a similar course developed by the IAEA: the course structure and syllabus are alike. Although part of the course material is based on the IAEA material, it has been adapted to the Finnish conditions, and a large part of the material is completely new. The Finnish application aims to make visible different standpoints of all organizations and the location of the five-week course rotates between different organizations. In the academic year 2006-2007, the course is starting fourth time as YK4. There are again over 100 lecturers and rehearsal, demonstration or excursion leaders. Half of them come from the utilities TVO and Fortum, a quarter from the authority STUK, and the rest from VTT, universities and others. The

  4. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasingly technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for nuclear medicine. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists who are based in a clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA) for the Asia-Pacific region. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in this region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in nuclear medicine was started in 2009 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experience of clinical training in Australia, Croatia and Sweden and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. The present publication follows the approach of earlier IAEA publications in the Training Course Series, specifically Nos 37 and 47, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology and Clinical Training of Medical Physicists

  5. Training practices to support decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourassa, J.; Clark, C.R.; Kazennov, A.; Laraia, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Scott, A.; Yoder, J.

    2006-01-01

    Adequate numbers of competent personnel must be available during any phase of a nuclear facility life cycle, including the decommissioning phase. While a significant amount of attention has been focused on the technical aspects of decommissioning and many publications have been developed to address technical aspects, human resource management issues, particularly the training and qualification of decommissioning personnel, are becoming more paramount with the growing number of nuclear facilities of all types that are reaching or approaching the decommissioning phase. One of the keys to success is the training of the various personnel involved in decommissioning in order to develop the necessary knowledge and skills required for specific decommissioning tasks. The operating organisations of nuclear facilities normally possess limited expertise in decommissioning and consequently rely on a number of specialized organisations and companies that provide the services related to the decommissioning activities. Because of this there is a need to address the issue of assisting the operating organisations in the development and implementation of human resource management policies and training programmes for the facility personnel and contractor personnel involved in various phases of decommissioning activities. The lessons learned in the field of ensuring personnel competence are discussed in the paper (on the basis of information and experiences accumulated from various countries and organizations, particularly, through relevant IAEA activities). Particularly, the following aspects are addressed: transition of training from operational to decommissioning phase; knowledge management; target groups, training needs analysis, and application of a systematic approach to training (SAT); content of training for decommissioning management and professional staff, and for decommissioning workers; selection and training of instructors; training facilities and tools; and training as

  6. Virginia power nuclear power station engineer training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.M.; Haberstroh-Timpano, S.

    1987-01-01

    In response to the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) accreditation requirements for technical staff and manager, Virginia Power developed the Nuclear Power Station Engineer Training Programs (NPSETP). The NPSETP is directed toward enhancing the specific knowledge and skills of company engineers, especially newly hired engineers. The specific goals of the program are to promote safe and reliable plant operation by providing engineers and appropriate engineering technicians with (1) station-specific basic skills; (2) station-specific specialized skills in the areas of surveillance and test, plant engineering, nuclear safety, and in-service inspection. The training is designed to develop, maintain, and document through demonstration the required knowledge and skills of the engineers in the identified groups at North Anna and Surry Power Stations. The program responds to American National Standards Institute, INPO, and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission standards

  7. CORONA project -contribution to VVER nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, M.; Miteva, R.; Takov, T.

    2016-01-01

    CORONA Project is established to stimulate the transnational mobility and lifelong learning amongst VVER end users. The project aims to provide a special purpose structure for training of specialists and to maintain the nuclear expertise by gathering the existing and generating new knowledge in the VVER area. CORONA Project consists of two parts: CORONA I (2011-2014) ''Establishment of a regional center of competence for VVER technology and Nuclear Applications'', co-financed by the Framework Program 7 of the European Union (EU) and CORONA II (2015-2018) ''Enhancement of training capabilities in VVER technology through establishment of VVER training academy'', co-financed by HORIZON 2020, EURATOM 2014-2015. The selected form of the CORONA Academy, together with the online availability of the training opportunities will allow trainees from different locations to access the needed knowledge on demand. The project will target also new-comers in VVER community like Vietnam, Turkey, Belarus, etc. (authors)

  8. Review of training methods employed in nuclear fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, W.D.; Browder, F.N.

    A search of the literature through the Nuclear Safety Information Center revealed that approximately 86 percent of the incidents that have occurred in fuel fabrication plants can be traced directly or indirectly to insufficient operator training. In view of these findings, a review was made of the training programs now employed by the nuclear fuel fabrication industry. Most companies give the new employee approximately 20 h of orientation courses, followed by 60 to 80 h of on-the-job training. It was concluded that these training programs should be expanded in both scope and depth. A proposed program is outlined to offer guidance in improving the basic methods currently in use. (U.S.)

  9. The training of operating personnel at Spanish nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Antonio Burgos

    2011-01-01

    An essential condition in order to ensure that nuclear power plants are operated reliably and safely is the availability in the Control Room of duly qualified persons capable both of preventing accidents and of responding to them should they occur. Training of the Control Room operating crews is accomplished in two major stages: a lengthy process of initial training in which the knowledge acquired at high school and university is built upon, leading to the specialisation required to appropriately carry out the tasks to be performed in the Control Room, and a continuous training program aimed at maintaining and improving the knowledge and skills required to operate the plant, with feedback of the lessons learned from the industry's operating experience. The use of full-scope simulators replicating the physical conditions and environment of the Control Room allows the period of initial training to be reduced and is the most appropriate method for the continuous training program of the control room personnel, since these simulators increase the realism of the training scenarios, help to better understand the response of the plant and provide an accurate idea of transient response times. Tecnatom is the Training Centre for Spanish Operators; it is the 'Operator Training Factory' and its mission is to train the nuclear power plant operating personnel in both technological fundamentals and the development of diagnostic skills through practical scenarios on the simulator and on-the-job training. Our training programmes are based on a SAT (Systematic Approach to Training) methodology that has been implemented at both Spanish and overseas plants. (author)

  10. Manpower Policy in Norway. Reviews of Manpower and Social Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    In recent years the Norwegian manpower authorities have recognized the need for reevaluating and reformulating their objectives and functions and the scope of their activities. Problem areas have been identified and steps undertaken to implement recommended solutions. Efforts have been made to improve labor force participation rates, provide labor…

  11. Evaluating training and information to teachers on nuclear energy issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnell, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    In England and Wales, school programs are defined by National Curricula; the method of teaching is left for the teacher to determine. This establishes the framework within which nuclear energy issues are taught. Teachers need a good understanding of what they teach and competence in the appropriate and effective learning strategies. A range of training opportunities is available to teachers (conferences from Local Education Authority, etc.), but the attention given to nuclear energy matters and controversial issues varies significantly between them. Many teaching resources are available but alone they cannot satisfy the training needs of all teachers (practical works, visits). 2 refs

  12. Manpower development for safe operation of nuclear power plant. China. Steam generator maintenance, cleaning and repair. Activity: 3.1.8-Task-04. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this mission was to present detailed state-of-the-art information on steam generator design, operations and maintenance, to the management, engineers and operators of the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plants. In addition, some limited operation was presented by the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant representatives in order to aid in focussing the presentations and promoting a high level of discussion

  13. An intelligent tool for the training of nuclear plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, B.

    1990-01-01

    A new type of pedagogical tool has been developped for the training of nuclear power plant operation. This tool combines simulation and expert system. The first process developped is about Steam Generator Tube Rupture (S.G.T.R.). All nuclear power plants will be equiped with this system in 1989 and 1990. After this first experiment, others processes will be developped for this tool

  14. Improved operations through manpower management in the oil sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Hiba

    2007-01-01

    The need for improved operations was never higher than today in the oil industry. The world's demand for energy, especially for oil and natural gas, is rising rapidly and for many years to come. In order to meet this rising demand and to keep price volatility to a minimum; oil companies worldwide are looking for ways to improve operations in order to achieve increased production with decreased costs. This paper describes data from Southern Area Oil Operations (SAOO); an organization within the Saudi Arabian Oil Company (ARAMCO), to show how manpower management can be used to achieve improved operations. For the years 1983 to 2004, manpower management in SAOO focused on addressing both the quantity and quality dimensions of manpower. First, the level of manpower gradually declined by 35% for both the Saudi Arab and Expatriate categories for the entire period. Expatriate labor is defined as labor in three main categories: US/Canadian, UK, and Asians and Other Arabs. Second, the level of training slowly increased to align manpower to better fit organizational functions and work responsibilities. Not only a number of new training and development programs were initiated but also the percentage of employees involved in such programs doubled from 4.5% in 1990 to 8.9% in 2004. Third, technology based initiatives such as the use of computers, Internet, and intranet were heavily introduced to employees in the last 10 yrs. Due to these three changes reduced costs and increased manpower efficiency were achieved. In the period 1983 to 2004 the total labor bill declined by 35% and Net Direct Expenditures NDE by 24% after adjusting for inflation and using 2004 dollars. Net Direct Expenditure NDE is defined by SAOO to be the summation of labor cost, material cost, invoices cost, and net service income. In addition two signs of improved efficiency of manpower were apparent in the same period. First, SAOO manpower, despite its smaller size, could actually sustain an increased

  15. Training and research on the nuclear reactor VR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, K.

    1998-01-01

    The VR-1 training reactor is a light water reactor of the pool type using enriched uranium as the fuel. The moderator is demineralized light water, which also serves as the neutron reflector, biological shielding, and coolant. Heat evolved during the fission process is removed by natural convection. The reactor is used in the education of students in the field of reactor and neutron physics, dosimetry, nuclear safety, and instrumentation and control systems for nuclear facilities. Although primarily intended for students in various branches of technology (power engineering, nuclear engineering, physical engineering), this specialized facility is also used by students of faculties educating future natural scientists and teachers. Typical tasks trained at the VR-1 reactor include: measurement of delayed neutrons; examination of the effect of various materials on the reactivity of the reactor; measurement of the neutron flux density by various procedures; measurement of reactivity by various procedures; calibration of reactor control rods by various procedures; approaching the critical state; investigation of nuclear reactor dynamics; start-up, control and operation of a nuclear reactor; and investigation of the effect of a simulated nucleate boil on reactivity. In addition to the education of university-level students, training courses are also organized for specialists in the Czech nuclear programme

  16. Training programs for the systems approach to nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, Doris E.

    2005-01-01

    In support of the US Government and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Security Programmes, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has advocated and practiced a risk-based, systematic approach to nuclear security. The risk equation has been implemented as the basis for a performance methodology for the design and evaluation of Physical Protection Systems against a Design Basis Threat (DBT) for theft or sabotage of nuclear and/or radiological materials. Since integrated systems must include people as well as technology and the man-machine interface, a critical aspect of the human element is to train all stakeholders in nuclear security on the systems approach. Current training courses have been beneficial but are still limited in scope. SNL has developed two primary international courses and is completing development of three new courses that will be offered and presented in the near term. In the long-term, SNL envisions establishing a comprehensive nuclear security training curriculum that will be developed along with a series of forthcoming IAEA Nuclear Security Series guidance documents.

  17. Game-based training environment for nuclear plant control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung Tamin; Sun Tienlung; Yang Chihwei; Yang Lichen; Cheng Tsungchieh; Wang Jyhgang

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power plant's safety is very important problem. In this very conscientious environment if operator has a little mistake, they may threaten with many people influence their safety. Therefore, operating training of control room is very important. However, the operator training is in limited space and time. Each operator must go to simulative control room do some training. If we can let each trainee having more time to do training and does not go to simulative control room. It may have some advantages for trainee. Moreover, in the traditional training ways, each operator may through the video, teaching manual or through the experienced instructor to learn the knowledge. This training way may let operator feel bored and stressful. So, in this paper aims, we hope utilizing virtual reality technology developing a game-based virtual training environment of control room. Finally, we will use presence questionnaire evaluating realism and feasibility of our virtual training environment. Expecting this initial concept of game-based virtual training environment can attract trainees having more learning motivation to do training in off-hour. (author)

  18. Instructor training at the Swedish Nuclear Power Training and Safety Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, P.-E.

    1988-01-01

    In spite of the fact that full-scope simulators are very powerful training tools, the transfer of knowledge and skills to the trainees during simulator training is completely dependent on the instructors' technical competence and their ability to transfer it to the trainees by efficient use of these training tools. Accordingly, the instructor candidates must pass a technical training programme equivalent to that for shift supervisors and have at least a few months of experience in each operator position at a nuclear power plant. To be authorized, the instructors must also pass a teacher training programme consisting of four 2 week instructor courses. To stay authorized the instructors must pass an annual retraining programme consisting of at least two weeks of technical refresher and one week teacher retraining. The retraining programme also includes at least three weeks of operational practice at a nuclear power plant. (author)

  19. Manpower development for safe operation of nuclear power plant. China. Seminar on the technical support functions. Activity: 6.1.1-Task-03. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groom, S.H.

    1994-01-01

    The workshop which was intended to present operating experiences from utilities with a wide range of numbers of operating nuclear units. The speaker, S.H. Groom, presented N.B. Power's experience with a single nuclear unit, and intended to: Present the objectives, organization, and scope of work of the central and site Technical Service groups within N.B. Power which support the operation of the Point Lepreau NGS; Define responsibilities of, and interfaces between the on-site and the central technical service staff; Recommend methods for the establishment and maintenance of an efficient technical support group for the operation of any nuclear power plant

  20. Experience in training of health personnel for response to radiological and nuclear accidents; Experiencia na capacitacao de profissionais de saude para a resposta a acidentes radiologicos e nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurmo, Alexandre M., E-mail: ammaurmo@gmail.com [Fundacao Eletronuclear de Assistencia Medica (CMRI/CTNV/FEAM), Praia Brava, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Medicina das Radiacoes Ionizantes. Centro de Treinamento Prof. Nelson Valverde; Leite, Teresa C.S.B., E-mail: feam@feam-etn.org.br [Fundacao Eletronuclear de Assistencia Medica (CIRA/FEAM), Praia Brava, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Informacoes em Radioepidemiologia

    2013-07-01

    Eletronuclear Healthcare Foundation is the Institution responsible for the actions of health response involving ionizing radiation in the area of Nuclear Power Plant Almirante Alvaro Alberto in Angra dos Reis. Because of their specific assignments and references for being in training health manpower in the field of ionizing radiation developed a range of Training Courses for Professionals Area Health to prepare them for Response to Radiological and Nuclear Accidents. Modules are proposed specifically for the professional response of the Technical Level and Higher Level, the level Pre-hospital and hospital. These modules are further divided into specific levels or modules, Basic or Introductory, Intermediate and Advanced. Are applied pretests and post tests to monitor the content of fixing, maintaining a historical series of reviews. Your content is theoretical and practical applications developed in 30 to 48 hours, with simulations (drills) and distribution of educational materials. We already have more than 80 applications training, focusing on internal staff and external to the institution, developing interesting partner with the Armed Forces and Civil Defense. It still maintained a link on the institution seeking access and download over 400 titles on the subject and exchange of information and experiences. For improving the teaching material, the authors launched in 2011 the first manual in Portuguese on the subject with new revised edition in 2013: 'Manual of Medical Actions In Radiological Emergencies'. The results indicate increased knowledge and appropriateness of the themes and the strategy proposed for this activity, demonstrating yet passed that information can be multiplied and meets the growing demand of the country that has hosted and will host international events relevant at QBNRE risk. (author)

  1. ENEN's approaches and initiatives for nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safieh, Joseph; De Regge, Peter; Kusumi, Ryoko

    2011-01-01

    The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN), established in 2003 through the EU Fifth Framework Programme (FP) project, was given a more permanent character by the foundation of the ENEN Association, a legal nonprofit-making body pursuing an instructive and scientific aim. Its main objective is the preservation and further development of expertise in the nuclear fields by higher education and training. This objective is realized through the cooperation between EU universities involved in education and research in nuclear disciplines, nuclear research centers and the nuclear industry. As of May 2009, the ENEN has 47 members in 17 EU countries. Since 2007 the ENEN Association has concluded a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with partners beyond Europe for further cooperation, such as South Africa, Russian Federation and Japan. The ENEN has good collaboration with national networks and international organizations, like Belgian Nuclear Education Network (BNEN) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The ENEN has provided support to its Members for the organization of and participation to selected E and T courses in nuclear fields. Based on the mutual recognition of those courses, the ENEN developed a reference curriculum in nuclear engineering, consisting of a core package of courses and optional substitute courses in nuclear disciplines, to be realized as the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE). From the experience gained through the EMSNE, a European Master of Science in Nuclear Disciplines will be delivered in the near future, extending ENEN's certification to other disciplines such as radiation protection and waste management and disposal. The ENEN-II Coordination Action consolidated and expanded the achievements of the ENEN and the NEPTUNO projects attained by the ENEN in respectively the 5th and 6th Framework Programmes. The objective of the ENEN-II project was to develop the ENEN Association in a sustainable way in the areas

  2. Training in nuclear safety and technology at Ciemat (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galan, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Hernando, E.

    2006-01-01

    Fission nuclear energy acceptance has suffered great change from its discovery. During 50 s and 70 s, was worldwide approved but a high social repulse is experimented nowadays in some societies. This fact has led to a contradictory situation in the world. We can find some countries where the majority of their electric energy is produced in nuclear power plants (NPPs). In Europe, France produces over the 75% of the electric energy consumed, moreover, in Asia, new NPPs are being constructed in China, Japan or India; but on the contrary, other countries, such as Spain, has signed the nuclear moratorium. The result of this situation has conducted to a lower interest in nuclear training at universities and few implementation of superior studies in Nuclear Technology. But nuclear and radioactive installations are still opened and need qualified staff. The training Unit of C.I.E.M.A.T. has been organizing courses on nuclear energy and radiation protection for more than 30 years and develops all the educational program which has been required by Spanish Radiation Protection Education. Within the training courses variety, a course of about 68 E.C.T.S. (following Bologna Process, 1999) to permit young graduated to be specialized in this area, has been organised. E.C.T.S. credits indicate the average student work load to successfully complete a course. 68 E.C.T.S. represents, in terms of workload, near one year of study. The programme contents subjects like Fission, Fusion, NPPs Operation and Control, Nuclear Fuel and Cycle. At a more interdisciplinary level, the programme also provides knowledge in other fields of application such as Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Effects, Radiation Protection, Shielding against Radiation, Material Science, Radiation Measurements and Instruments, Waste Management and Decommissioning, Environmental Impact of NPPs and National and International Regulation. The theoretical schedules are completed by practical sessions on computational codes

  3. Simulation in training for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stammers, R.B.

    1979-08-01

    The need for simulation in nuclear operator training is reviewed, and the use of simulators is justified on a number of criteria. The role of simulators is discussed against the background of training media that are or could be used. The question of the degree of realism or fidelity of simulation is tackled, with comparisons being made between views from the industry and views from the area of instructional technology. Training research in the general area of process control is outlined and emphasis is placed on the importance of instructional control. Finally, some future directions for study are sketched. (author)

  4. Training for effective environmental protection in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, D.; Brake, J.; Hickman, C.; Tamm, J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the role of environmental training in the delivery of effective environmental protection programs for construction projects in the nuclear industry. The paper uses a case study approach, based on Point Lepreau Generating Station's Refurbishment Project, to demonstrate how the underpinning principles of 'training, awareness and competence' can be delivered within a structured environmental management framework, to achieve sustained excellence in environmental management and performance. Key issues addressed by the paper include the early identification of different target audiences, making effective use of communication themes, and the importance of reinforcement and follow-up in support of training goals. (author)

  5. Study on Nuclear Facility Cyber Security Awareness and Training Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Woon; Song, Jae-Gu; Lee, Cheol-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Cyber security awareness and training, which is a part of operational security controls, is defined to be implemented later in the CSP implementation schedule. However, cyber security awareness and training is a prerequisite for the appropriate implementation of a cyber security program. When considering the current situation in which it is just started to define cyber security activities and to assign personnel who has responsibilities for performing those activities, a cyber security awareness program is necessary to enhance cyber security culture for the facility personnel to participate positively in cyber security activities. Also before the implementation of stepwise CSP, suitable education and training should be provided to both cyber security teams (CST) and facility personnel who should participate in the implementation. Since such importance and urgency of cyber security awareness and training is underestimated at present, the types, trainees, contents, and development strategies of cyber security awareness and training programs are studied to help Korean nuclear facilities to perform cyber security activities more effectively. Cyber security awareness and training programs should be developed ahead of the implementation of CSP. In this study, through the analysis of requirements in the regulatory standard RS-015, the types and trainees of overall cyber security training programs in nuclear facilities are identified. Contents suitable for a cyber security awareness program and a technical training program are derived. It is suggested to develop stepwise the program contents in accordance with the development of policies, guides, and procedures as parts of the facility cyber security program. Since any training programs are not available for the specialized cyber security training in nuclear facilities, a long-term development plan is necessary. As alternatives for the time being, several cyber security training courses for industrial control systems by

  6. Study on Nuclear Facility Cyber Security Awareness and Training Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung-Woon; Song, Jae-Gu; Lee, Cheol-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Cyber security awareness and training, which is a part of operational security controls, is defined to be implemented later in the CSP implementation schedule. However, cyber security awareness and training is a prerequisite for the appropriate implementation of a cyber security program. When considering the current situation in which it is just started to define cyber security activities and to assign personnel who has responsibilities for performing those activities, a cyber security awareness program is necessary to enhance cyber security culture for the facility personnel to participate positively in cyber security activities. Also before the implementation of stepwise CSP, suitable education and training should be provided to both cyber security teams (CST) and facility personnel who should participate in the implementation. Since such importance and urgency of cyber security awareness and training is underestimated at present, the types, trainees, contents, and development strategies of cyber security awareness and training programs are studied to help Korean nuclear facilities to perform cyber security activities more effectively. Cyber security awareness and training programs should be developed ahead of the implementation of CSP. In this study, through the analysis of requirements in the regulatory standard RS-015, the types and trainees of overall cyber security training programs in nuclear facilities are identified. Contents suitable for a cyber security awareness program and a technical training program are derived. It is suggested to develop stepwise the program contents in accordance with the development of policies, guides, and procedures as parts of the facility cyber security program. Since any training programs are not available for the specialized cyber security training in nuclear facilities, a long-term development plan is necessary. As alternatives for the time being, several cyber security training courses for industrial control systems by

  7. Manpower development for safe operation of nuclear power plant. China. Advice on maintenance planning. Activity: 3.1.2-Task-06. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chihara, Yasutaka; Imai, Kazuhide.

    1995-01-01

    Advice on maintenance planning for Qinshan nuclear power plant in China for their reference, based on the experience in Japan is presented. Specifically, the advice was given in the lecture and through the questions and answers, on such subjects as the establishment of a long-term plan, preparation of the work schedule, and the proper work management in relation to the periodic inspection and the routine check for the nuclear power facility. 1 tab

  8. Present status of the Nuclear Maintenance Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotani, Fumio

    1995-01-01

    The education and training to keep and improve the knowledge and skills of the maintenance personnel and to hand down the skills undoubtedly play important roles in safe operation and increased reliability to a nuclear power station. The Nuclear Maintenance Training Center (hereafter called the Center) provides a variety of education and training curriculums based on the levels and abilities of the trainees. The Center aims to enhance the personnel's maintenance technique by offering the curriculums on maintenance basic education for operators and supporting education and training for the personnel of contractors. The Center has two main features: first, it has the actual components or the equipment similar to the actual components which will enable the practical training; second, we regard the past troubles as valuable experiences and, therefore, focuses on the education to prevent recurrence of troubles by teaching the trainees the meaning and necessity of the training they take. For eleven years since the establishment of the Center, it has been utilized by the total number of about 60,000 people. As for the tasks in the future, the Center is expected to vitalize itself to give attractive education and training and become more actively involved in development of the maintenance personnel with the adequate knowledge and skills. (author)

  9. Challenges in developing TSO to provide technical support in nuclear safety and security to Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, Shahid A.; Sherwani, Uzman Habib; Mehdi, M. Ammar

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights the needs for the establishment of a technical support organization (TSO) in Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority (PNRA), challenges faced during its development, application of training need assessment required for the competency development of its technical manpower and difficulties encountered after its evolution. Key issues addressed include recruitment of technical manpower and enhancing their competencies, acquisition of proper tools required for safety review and assessment, development of a sustainable education and training program consistent with the best international practices and taking the measures to get confidence of the regulatory body. (author)

  10. Nuclear quality assurance: indoctrination and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternberg, A.

    1977-01-01

    Quality Assurance is defined as ''all the planned and systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that a structure, system or component will perform satisfactorily in service''. Within Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSEandG) Quality Assurance, a discipline which involves everyone within the company, is considered. In order to economically and effectively communicate this discipline throughout the concerned areas of the Company so that involved personnel are made fully aware of the complete scope of their tasks, a detailed comprehensive indoctrination and training program has been developed and implemented. 3 refs

  11. The nuclear technology education consortium: an innovative approach to nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Dzh.; Klark, Eh.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report on the Nuclear Technology Education Consortium (NTEC) that includes 12 UK universities and Higher Education Institutes. It was established in 2005 to provide nuclear education and training at the Masters, Diploma, Certificate and Continuing Professional Development (CPD) levels. Module and providers of the NTEC are described (all modules are available in industry-friendly short formats). Students are allowed to select from 22 different modules, taught by experts, covering all aspects of nuclear education and training. It is the acknowledgement by each partner that they cannot deliver the range of modules individually but by cooperating. The NTEC program structure is given [ru

  12. Training in nuclear engineering companies; La formacion en las empresas de ingenieria del ambito nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perezagua, R. L.

    2013-03-01

    The importance of training is growing in all business areas and fields and especially in hi-tech companies like engineering firms. Nuclear projects are highly multidisciplinary and, even in the initial awarding and pre-construction phases, need to be staffed with personnel that is well-prepared and highly-qualified in areas that, in most cases, are not covered by university studies. This article examines the variables that influence the design of specific training for nuclear projects in engineering firms, along with new training technologies (e-learning) and new regulatory aspects (IS-12). (Author)

  13. Experience with training of operating and maintenance personnel of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospisil, M.; Cencinger, F.

    1988-01-01

    The system is described of the specialist training of personnel for Czechoslovak nuclear power plants. Training consists of basic training, vocational training and training for the respective job. Responsible for the training is the Research Institute for Nuclear Power Plants; actual training takes place at three training centres. Personnel are divided into seven categories for training purposes: senior technical and economic staff, shift leaders, whose work has immediate effect on nuclear safety, engineering and technical personnel of technical units, shift leaders of technical units, personnel in technical units, shift service personnel and operating personnel, maintenance workers. Experience with training courses run at the training centre is summed up. Since 1980 the Centre has been training personnel mainly for the Dukovany nuclear power plant. Recommendations are presented for training personnel for the Temelin nuclear power plant. (Z.M.)

  14. Status and problem for Nuclear Power Plant Maintenance Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanjoh, Takuo

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Plant Maintenance Training Center of Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. was founded in October, 1983, and seven years elapsed since then. The education and training of 37,000 persons were carried out to meet the situation in the plants and to enhance the facilities. Though the main policy of the practical training for preventing the recurrence of troubles does not change, the situation changed from the time of the foundation, and the role has expanded, including PA activities. The see-through plant model installed for technical education in April, 1989 is the about 1/25 scale model of the actual machine with two loops, which actually generates steam and slight electric power, and is useful for promoting the understanding of nuclear power generation theory. It accomplishes the important role that the visitors to the Center (7500 persons in 1989 fiscal year) understand the mechanism of nuclear power generation. In 1990, the education curriculum, the method of education, the time of education and so on are reviewed, aiming at the improvement of education. The execution of education and training, the training of practical techniques, the reflection of the examples of troubles to education, and the expansion of facilities are reported. (K.I.)

  15. Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities: Training and Human Resource Considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    One of the cornerstones of the success of nuclear facility decommissioning is the adequate competence of personnel involved in decommissioning activities. The purpose of this publication is to provide methodological guidance for, and specific examples of good practices in training as an integral part of human resource management for the personnel performing decommissioning activities. The use of the systematic methodology and techniques described in this publication may be tailored and applied to the development of training for all types of nuclear facilities undergoing decommissioning. Examples of good practices in other aspects of human resources, such as knowledge preservation, management of the workforce and improvement of human performance, are also covered. The information contained in this publication, and the examples provided in the appendices and enclosed CD-ROM, are representative of the experience of decommissioning of a wide variety of nuclear facilities.

  16. Education and training on nuclear security in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pafilis, C. N.; Kamenopoulou, V.; Maltezos, A.; Seferlis, S.; Dimitriou, P.; Matikas, T. E.

    2009-01-01

    The Greek Atomic Energy Commission is the competent authority responsible for designing, implementing and supervising the radiation protection programme in Greece. According to its statutory law one of its main responsibilities is the provision of education and training to people involved in the national emergency response plan against nuclear and radiological threats. Due to the high requirements demanded for the safe conduct of the Athens 2004 Olympic Games, a nuclear security programme was established and the nuclear security infrastructure of the country was upgraded. Under this framework, GAEC provided training on radiation protection, prevention, detection, emergency preparedness and response to the personnel involved in the emergency plan. Since that time, the GAEC continues to organize seminars frequently addressed to the organizations involved in the emergency plan, in order to establish the sustainability of national operational capability on preparedness and response. (authors)

  17. International training course on nuclear materials accountability for safeguards purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    The two volumes of this report incorporate all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Nuclear Materials Accountability and Control for Safeguards Purposes, held May 27-June 6, 1980, at the Bishop's Lodge near Santa Fe, New Mexico. The course, authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a National system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both National and IAEA International safeguards objectives. Volume I, covering the first week of the course, presents the background, requirements, and general features of material accounting and control in modern safeguard systems. Volume II, covering the second week of the course, provides more detailed information on measurement methods and instruments, practical experience at power reactor and research reactor facilities, and examples of operating state systems of accountability and control

  18. International training course on nuclear materials accountability for safeguards purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The two volumes of this report incorporate all lectures and presentations at the International Training Course on Nuclear Materials Accountability and Control for Safeguards Purposes, held May 27-June 6, 1980, at the Bishop's Lodge near Santa Fe, New Mexico. The course, authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a National system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both National and IAEA International safeguards objectives. Volume I, covering the first week of the course, presents the background, requirements, and general features of material accounting and control in modern safeguard systems. Volume II, covering the second week of the course, provides more detailed information on measurement methods and instruments, practical experience at power reactor and research reactor facilities, and examples of operating state systems of accountability and control.

  19. Experiences in the use of systematic approach to training (SAT) for nuclear power plant personnel training. Working material. Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    This document complements two previous IAEA documents: the Guidebook on Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation (IAEA-TRS 380) and the IAEA World Survey of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training. It provides a detailed overview and analysis of the experience gained world-wide on the introduction and use of SAT, including the reasons why SAT was introduced and important lessons learned. The Technical Document will be especially useful for nuclear power plant management and supervisors, all those responsible for the training of nuclear power plant personnel, and those in regulatory bodies whose duties relate to nuclear power plant personnel training and qualification. 41 refs, figs, tabs

  20. Experiences in the use of systematic approach to training (SAT) for nuclear power plant personnel training. Working material. Final draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This document complements two previous IAEA documents: the Guidebook on Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation (IAEA-TRS 380) and the IAEA World Survey of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training. It provides a detailed overview and analysis of the experience gained world-wide on the introduction and use of SAT, including the reasons why SAT was introduced and important lessons learned. The Technical Document will be especially useful for nuclear power plant management and supervisors, all those responsible for the training of nuclear power plant personnel, and those in regulatory bodies whose duties relate to nuclear power plant personnel training and qualification. 41 refs, figs, tabs.

  1. Nuclear criticality safety: 3-day training course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1993-06-01

    The open-quotes 3-Day Training Courseclose quotes is an intensive course in criticality safety consisting of lectures and laboratory sessions, including active student participation in actual critical experiments, a visit to a plutonium processing facility, and in-depth discussions on safety philosophy. The program is directed toward personnel who currently have criticality safety responsibilities in the capacity of supervisory staff and/or line management. This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. It represents the contributions of many people, particularly Tom McLaughlin, the course's primary instructor. It should be noted that when chapters were extracted, an attempt was made to maintain footnotes and references as originally written. Photographs and illustrations are numbered sequentially

  2. Cellular dosimetry in nuclear medicine imaging: training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardin, I.; Faraggi, M.; Stievenart, J.L.; Le Guludec, D.; Bok, B.

    1998-01-01

    The radionuclides used in nuclear medicine imaging emit not only diagnostically useful photons, but also energy electron emissions, responsible for dose heterogeneity at the cellular level. The mean dose delivered to the cell nucleus by electron emissions of 99m Tc, 123 I, 111 In, 67 Ga, and 201 Tl, has been calculated, for the cell nucleus, a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distribution of radioactivity. This model takes into account both the self-dose which results from the radionuclide located in the target cell, and the cross-dose, which comes from the surrounding cells. The results obtained by cellular dosimetry (D cel ) have been compared with those obtained with conventional dosimetry (D conv ), by assuming the same amount of radioactivity per cell. Cellular dosimetry shows, for a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distributions of radioactivity, that the main contribution to the dose to the cell nucleus, comes from the surrounding cells. On the other hand, for a cell nucleus distribution of radioactivity, the self-dose is not negligible and may be the main contribution. The comparison between cellular and conventional dosimetry shows that D cel /D conv ratio ranges from 0.61 and O.89, in case of a cytoplasmic and a cell membrane distributions of radioactivity, depending on the radionuclide and cell dimensions. Thus, conventional dosimetry slightly overestimates the mean dose to the cell nucleus. On the other hand, D cel /D conv ranges from 1.1 to 75, in case of a cell nucleus distribution of radioactivity. Conventional dosimetry may strongly underestimates the absorbed dose to the nucleus, when radioactivity is located in the nucleus. The study indicates that in nuclear medicine imaging, cellular dosimetry may lead to a better understanding of biological effects of radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  3. Education and training in nuclear engineering and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.; Safieh, J.; Giot, M.; Mavko, B.; Sehgal, Raj B.; Schaefer, A.; Van Goethem, G.; D'haeseleer, W.

    2007-01-01

    The need to preserve, enhance or strengthen nuclear knowledge is worldwide recognized since a couple of years. Within the 5th framework program the European Commission supports the European nuclear higher education network. The ENEN contract started on Jan 1, 2002 and lasts for 24 months. The Commission support for this 'accompanying measure' amounts to EUR 197 716. Based upon a year-long extensive exchange of views between the partners of ENEN, consisting of a representative cross section of nuclear academic institutions and research laboratories of the EU-25, a coherent and practicable concept for a European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering has emerged. The concept is compatible with the Bologna philosophy of higher education for academic education in Europe. Pursuing the sustainability of the concept, the ENEN partners organized themselves in a non-profit-making association. Within the 6th framework program, the Commission services favourably evaluated the proposal: 'Nuclear European Platform of Training and University Organisations'. The objectives of the NEPTUNO co-ordination action are to establish a fair dialogue and a strong interaction between the academic and the industrial world and to bring all nuclear education and training activities under a common strategy of the ENEN type. The present proposal schedules for 18 months and the Commission earmarked a financial contribution of EUR 830 619. (author)

  4. Nuclear Education and training: addressing a global need

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn Lee, Janice

    2008-01-01

    There is growing concern about the difficulties nuclear institutions in many OECD/NEA member countries are experiencing in recruiting qualified specialists. Recent studies have also shown that nuclear education and training have been suffering declines of various degrees. If no action is taken on this issue, the nuclear sector risks facing a shortage of qualified human resources to ensure the appropriate regulation and operation of existing nuclear facilities as well as the construction of new ones in those countries wishing to do so. The NEA Steering Committee for Nuclear Energy issued a statement on this subject in October 2007, the complete text of which is available at: www.nea.fr/html/general/press/2007/2007-05.html. The NEA has for many years been involved in efforts to define and address the need for qualified human resources. In this regard, the Agency: 1- carries out assessments of requirements and availability of qualified human resources in the nuclear field, 2- enhances nuclear education programmes, such as the International School of Nuclear Law, and 3- encourages large, high-profile international research and development programmes. These areas are addressed in the NEA Strategic Plan as well as in the specific NEA programmes discussed below. The presentation will focus on ways to address the issue of qualified human resources, share information about what others are doing, and discuss what we might do collectively. (author)

  5. Manpower development for safe operation of nuclear power plant. China. Seminar on the technical support functions. Activity: 6.1.1-Task-03. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kofron, K.L.

    1994-01-01

    The seminar was held in Wuhan PRC from 01.10/94 - 01/14/94. It revolved about the role of the Technical Support Groups, both onsite and offsite, of the Nuclear Power Plant. This was to assist the Chinese in deciding their best course of action for the establishment and operation of this group

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Authority Personnel Educating and Training within the National Nuclear Program Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapov, V.; Goryaeva, T.; Moiseenko, A.; Kapralov, E.; Museridze, A.

    2014-01-01

    International Cooperation for Nuclear Education and Knowledge: Aims: •Creation of system of continuous personnel training for EvrAzES states in the field of nuclear power applications based on the international standards; •Development of educational service export as following of export of Russian nuclear technology; • Development of educational and scientific contacts to IAEA, WNU, ENEN, ANENT, biggest scientific centers and universities of USA, EU and Asia. Directions of activities: • Education. Transfer of knowledge to new generation, to new developing countries and cooperation with the nuclear education of leading powers; • Scientific enlightening activity – students, specialists, decision makers; • Informational and analytical work

  7. Korean efforts for education and training network in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Kyong-Won; Lee, Eui-Jin

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear energy has been a backbone for Korea's remarkable economic growth, and will continue its essential role with 18 nuclear power plants in operation, 2 more units under construction, 6 more units in planning. Korea is operating its own designed nuclear power plants, such as KSNP, 1400, as well as self-design and operation of 30 MW Hanaro research reactor. Korea makes strong efforts to develop future nuclear technology. They are the System-Integrated Modular Advanced Reactor, SMART, Korea Advanced Liquid Metal reactor, KALIMER, Hydrogen Production reactor, and Proliferation-resistant Nuclear Fuel Cycle. In parallel, Korea is establishing an Advanced Radiation Technology R and D Center and a High Power Proton Accelerator Center. International, next generation nuclear power technologies are being developed through projects such as the IAEA Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycle, INPRO, Generation IV International Forum, GIF, and International thermonuclear Experimental reactor, ITER. In the new millennium, Korea expects that radiation technology combined with bio, nano, and space technology will sustain our civilization. About 21,000 qualified nuclear human resources are engaged in power and non-power fields such as design and manufacturing of equipment, plant operation and maintenance, safety, RI production, R and D, etc. However, it is recognized that the first generation of nuclear work force is getting older and retired, less of our youth are studying nuclear science and engineering. Korean Government has established a promotion program on nuclear human resources development, which is needed until 2010. For the sustainable development of nuclear science and technology, it calls for more qualified human resources. We ought to encourage our youth to become more interested in nuclear studies and careers. Korea is making strong efforts to support nuclear education and training for young generations. It is believed that internationally accepted advanced

  8. Computerized based training in nuclear safety in the nuclear research center Negev

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Shachar, B.; Krubain, H.; Sberlo, E.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Human Resources and Training in the Nuclear Research Center, Negev, in collaboration with the Department of Radiation Protection and Safety used to organize different kinds of training and refresher courses for different aspects of safety in nuclear centers (radiation safety, biological effects of ionizing radiation, industrial safety, fire fighting, emergency procedures, etc.). All radiation workers received a training program of several days in all these subjects, each year. The administrative employees received a shorter training, each second year. The training included only frontal lectures and no quiz or exams were done. No feedback of the employees was received after the training, as well. Recently, a new training program was developed by the NRC-Negev and the CET (Center for Educational Technology), in order to perform the refresher courses. The training includes CBT-s (Computer Based Training), e.g. tutorials and quiz. The tutorial is an interactive course in one subject, including animations, video films and photo stills. The employee gets a simple and clear explanation (including pictures). After each tutorial there is a quiz which includes 7 American style questions. In the following lecture different parts from two of the tutorials used for the refresher courses, will be presented

  9. Manpower development for safe operation of nuclear power plant. China. Advice on maintenance planning. Activity: 3.1.2-Task-06. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chihara, Y.; Imai, K.

    1996-01-01

    Regarding the matter of quality assurance related to maintenance activities, we provided appropriate advice on the details of maintenance technologies and on quality control for the nuclear power plant. The advice was provided based on our experience in Japan, with explanations made from specialists' points of view in the form of a lecture. This also included an exchange of questions and answers regarding our experiences with quality control and maintenance activities in Japan

  10. Manpower development for safe operation of nuclear power plant. China. Probabilistic safety assessment. Activity: 5.1.2-Task-09. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, M.T.; Kolaczkowski, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of this mission was to provide assistance (primarily in the form of instruction via lecture) on applications of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) with emphasis on; data needs and methods for collection; description of current computer codes for PSA and applications; demonstrated applications of PSA and related achievements; and specific uses of PSA for operation, maintenance and inspection of commercial nuclear power plants

  11. Nuclear education and training in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-03-01

    The purpose of this summary is to give a survey of the facilities for further education and training in the field of nuclear science and nuclear technology within the FRG. The classification of the different facilities presently existing, such as universities, technical colleges, engineering schools, and special institutes, seemed the most appropriate way of making the survey as straight forward as possible. The survey is mainly based on information received from the institutes concerned in reply to questionnaires distributed at the end of 1976. Further references are available in the Personal- und Vorlesungsverzeichnisse of the universities as well as in the Deutscher Fachhochschulfuehrer. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Computer based training simulator for Hunterston Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowden, R.S.M.; Hacking, D.

    1978-01-01

    For reasons which are stated, the Hunterston-B nuclear power station automatic control system includes a manual over-ride facility. It is therefore essential for the station engineers to be trained to recognise and control all feasible modes of plant and logic malfunction. A training simulator has been built which consists of a replica of the shutdown monitoring panel in the Central Control Room and is controlled by a mini-computer. This paper highlights the computer aspects of the simulator and relevant derived experience, under the following headings: engineering background; shutdown sequence equipment; simulator equipment; features; software; testing; maintenance. (U.K.)

  13. International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN) and the Nuclear Security Training and Support Centre (NSSC) Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, Dmitriy

    2013-01-01

    International Nuclear Security Education Network established in 2010: A partnership between the IAEA and universities, research institutions and other stakeholders - •Promotion of nuclear security education; • Development of educational materials; • Professional development for faculty members; • Collaborative research and resource sharing. Currently over 90 members from 38 member states. Mission: to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. Nuclear Security Support Centre: Primary objectives are: • Develop human resources through the implementation of a tailored training programme; • Develop a network of experts; • Provide technical support for lifecycle equipment management and scientific support for the detection of and the response to nuclear security events

  14. Proceedings of the ninth symposium on the training of nuclear facility personel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This document provides reports presented on training of nuclear facility personnel. The papers were presented in the following categories: engineering technical staff; specialty training; customer perspective/plant side; human factors/soft science; maintenance; simulator centered training; hands-on training devices; management training; and reduced O ampersand M costs through training. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. (FI)

  15. Proceedings of the seventh symposium on training of nuclear facility personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 45 papers in this conference proceedings. Topics covered include influences on nuclear training, the relationship between human factors and training, factors affecting job performance, current training methods, the relationship between training and education, emerging training techniques, evaluation to improve performance, and measurement of the impact of training

  16. Education and training of operators and maintenance staff at Hamaoka Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makido, Hideki; Hayashi, Haruhisa

    1999-01-01

    At Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, in order to ensure higher safety and reliability of plant operation, education and training is provided consistently, on a comprehensive basis, for all operating, maintenance and other technical staff, aimed at developing more capable human resources in the nuclear power division. To this end, Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station has the 'Nuclear Training Center' on its site. The training center provides the technical personnel including operators and maintenance personnel with practical training, utilizing simulators for operation training and the identical facilities with those at the real plant. Thus, it plays a central role in promoting comprehensive education and training concerning nuclear power generation. Our education system covers knowledge and skills necessary for the safe and stable operation of nuclear power plant, targeting new employees to managerial personnel. It is also organized systematically in accordance with experience and job level. We will report the present education and training of operators and maintenance personnel at Hamaoka Nuclear Training Center. (author)

  17. EU Activities for Training and Tutoring of Nuclear Regulatory Authorities and Technical Support Organisations Outside EU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, Henri; Daures, Pascal; Stockmann, Ynte

    2014-01-01

    Aim of Training and Tutoring Projects: Transfer of European Union nuclear safety regulatory experience and best practices. The following courses are listed: Courses in Nuclear Safety Regulation, Licensing and Enforcement; Nuclear Safety Assessment and Inspection

  18. Physics teachers' nuclear in-service training in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujvari, Sandor

    2005-01-01

    Teaching of science subjects, specifically physics among others, is important in Hungarian schools. The paper starts with some historical aspects on how the modern physics reached Hungarian schools, what kinds of methods the physics teachers use for their in-service training and what is their success. In 1985 Hungarian Government introduced the system of physics teacher's in-service training for a year. The courses end with a thesis and examination. Teachers have a possibility to join the nuclear physics intensive course of Nuclear Physics Department at Eottvos University. Curriculum and topics of laboratory practice are given together with some dissertations of the course. Moreover, several competition (Leo Szilard competition) is mentioned with starting that in each year the 5 best students get free entrance to the Hungarian universities. (S. Ohno)

  19. Nuclear power plant diagnostics study at the Midland training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifman, J.; Rank, P.; Lee, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    Training simulators provide a real world environment for testing advanced diagnostic and control systems as an aid to nuclear power plant operators. The simulators not only duplicate the hardware din the actual control room, allowing for analysis of man-machine interface, but also represent the dynamic behavior of the reference plant in real-time, in a realistic manner. Training simulators provide the means to representing the reference plant operations in a wide range of operation conditions including off-normal and emergency conditions. Transient events with very low probability of occurrence can then be represented and used to test the capabilities of advanced diagnostic and control systems. For these reasons, full-scope operator training simulators have been used as a test bed for a number of advanced diagnostic concepts. The University of Michigan and Consumers Power Company have been collaborating in a program devoted to the development and study of advanced concepts for automatic diagnostics and control of nuclear power plants. The program has been focused on the use of the full-scope operator training Midland Nuclear Power Plant Unit 2 (MNP-2) Simulator for development, testing, and verification of advanced diagnostics concepts. In their current efforts, the authors have developed two artificial intelligent (AI) diagnostic concepts that have been applied to the MNP-2 Simulator: the systematic generation and updating of a rule-based knowledge system for nuclear power plant diagnostics and a nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm called the simulation filter. The simulation filter algorithm is used with the MNP-2 Simulator to improve the simulation of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. 11 refs., 4 figs

  20. Training in radioprotection in INB - Brazilian Nuclear Industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Py Junior, Delcy de A.; Taddei, Jose F.C.; Dias, Pedro L. dos S.; Iatesta, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    This work describes the ideas that guided the training in radiation protection and the first results obtained in the first half of 2004. The training took place in the Uranium Concentrate Unit URA, in Caetite, BA, in the Ore Treatment Unit - UTM, in Caldas, MG, and in the Heavy Mineral Unit - UMP, in San Francisco de Itabapuana, RJ, Brazil. In URA it was spent 9 days. 79 students were trained in 6 classes (average 13 pupils per class). Each group spent 9 hour of training, for a total of 54 hours of training given. There was no disapproval, and the grade average of the students was 9.2, with the lowest grade 7.5 and the highest 10.0. In UTM, it was spent 9 days. 200 students were trained in 9 classes (an average of 22 students per class). Each class spent 9h of training, totaling 81 hours. There were 18 deprecations, due to the the lack of education of the students. The overall average of the grades was 8.8, with lower note zero and higher 10.0. In UTM 158 people were trained in 5 classes, with an average of 31 students per class.It is concluded that in classes with few students (7 to 12) there were few parallel discussions. In classes with many students (over thirty) there was a scattering of ideas, which interfered in the progress of training. As proposal for upcoming classes can be suggested an average 20 people per class. The division of classes in groups working together was beneficial, giving a unit, which allowed greater freedom in questions, increasing parallel content taught. The classes have evaluated positively the initiative of the work done, which will be extended to other units of DRM, and subsequently all of the INB - Brazilian Nuclear Industries

  1. Training of nuclear power professionals in international courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanter, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has presented nine international courses in the IAEA Nuclear Power Training Program. Five have been overview courses fifteen weeks in length and four have been specialized courses ranging from five to nine weeks. A total of 286 participants from 38 countries have been traned in these courses. The Argonne courses comprise approximately 40% of the Agency's program, which is also carried out in France, Spain, and the Federal Republic of Germany. The two types of overview courses, one covering the planning phase of a project and the other the construction and operation phase, surveyed all aspects of nuclear power programs--economic, managerial, regulatory, and technical. Experience has shown that the majority of the participants in those courses had concentrated interest in specialized areas. Specialized courses have now been offered on five specific subjects. Based on past course evaluations by our staff, 37% of those trained were judged capable of making significant contribution to their country's nuclear program, 44% were judged potentially capable of such contributions, 17% were capable of only limited contribution, and 2% were inappropriately selected. Participation in international training has been very useful because of the exposure to working experts and because of the interaction between participants from the different developing countries. It is clear that such courses of moderate length sometimes attract senior management personnel, but in general can best be directed to responsible staff at middle management levels. More junior staff would be more effectively trained at the national level. Preliminary results of a Center survey of those participants who were trained two years ago have confirmed these conclusions

  2. Certified Training for Nuclear and Radioactive Source Security Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Radioactive sources are used by hospitals, research facilities and industry for such purposes as diagnosing and treating illnesses, sterilising equipment and inspecting welds. Unfortunately, many States, regulatory authorities and licensees may not appreciate how people with malevolent intentions could use radioactive sources, and statistics confirm that a number of security incidents happen around the globe. The adversary could be common thieves, activists, insiders, terrorists and organised crime groups. Mitigating this risk requires well trained and competent staff who have developed the knowledge, attributes and skills necessary to successfully discharge their security responsibilities. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Institute for Nuclear Security are leading international training efforts. The target audience is a multi-disciplinary group of professionals with management responsibilities for security at facilities with radioactive sources. These efforts to promote training and competence amongst practitioners have been recognised at the 2014 and 2016 Nuclear Security and Nuclear Industry Summits. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Enhancing Nuclear Newcomer Training with 3D Visualization Learning Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, V.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: While the nuclear power industry is trying to reinforce its safety and regain public support post-Fukushima, it is also faced with a very real challenge that affects its day-to-day activities: a rapidly aging workforce. Statistics show that close to 40% of the current nuclear power industry workforce will retire within the next five years. For newcomer countries, the challenge is even greater, having to develop a completely new workforce. The workforce replacement effort introduces nuclear newcomers of a new generation with different backgrounds and affinities. Major lifestyle differences between the two generations of workers result, amongst other things, in different learning habits and needs for this new breed of learners. Interactivity, high visual content and quick access to information are now necessary to achieve a high level of retention. To enhance existing training programmes or to support the establishment of new training programmes for newcomer countries, L-3 MAPPS has devised learning tools to enhance these training programmes focused on the “Practice-by-Doing” principle. L-3 MAPPS has coupled 3D computer visualization with high-fidelity simulation to bring real-time, simulation-driven animated components and systems allowing immersive and participatory, individual or classroom learning. (author

  4. The method research of the simulator training and examination of the nuclear electricity staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Fangzhi; Zhang Yuanfang

    1994-01-01

    The simulator training and examination of nuclear power plant operator are of an important guarantee for the nuclear power plant operation safety. The authors introduce various training courses which have been held in the Nuclear Power Plant Simulation Training Center of Tsinghua University since 1988, and analyze the different requirements and features for different classes such as operator candidate training course, operator retraining course and nuclear and electricity staff course. The lesson arrangement, examination method and mark standard are presented, which is carried out in the Nuclear Power Plant Simulation Training Center of Tsinghua University

  5. Training system enhancement for nuclear safety at PAKS NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KIss, I.

    2000-01-01

    Paks Nuclear Power Plant is the only commercial nuclear facility in Hungary, which has been operational since 1982. The over 15 years operation of the plant can from all aspects be considered as a success, to which the well qualified, competent staff significantly contributes. Like other N-plants, Paks NPP is also exposed to major challenges due to plant ageing and changes in circumstances that affect the operation. The management focusing on maintaining nuclear safety launched an overall programme to upgrade quality of personnel training and to improve its infrastructure. Though this programme has successfully finished with visible proofs, further actions to develop a reconsidered human resource policy is needed so that the plant would successfully stand against the challenges of the 21. century. (author)

  6. Training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    A training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff personnel has been developed and implemented. The program is compliant with requirements and provides evidence that a systematic approach has been taken to indoctrinate new technical staff. Development involved task analysis to determine activities where training was necessary and the standard which must be attained to qualify. Structured mentoring is used where experienced personnel interact with candidates using checksheets to guide candidates through various steps and to provide evidence that steps have been accomplished. Credit can be taken for the previous experience of personnel by means of evaluation boards which can credit or modify checksheet steps. Considering just the wealth of business practice and site specific information a new person at a facility needs to assimilate, the program has been effective in indoctrinating new technical staff personnel and integrating them into a productive role. The program includes continuing training

  7. Training in radiation protection for personnels in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constancis, J.; Gauthier, A.

    1980-01-01

    For more than 10 years, in order to meet the wishes of their members, the A.P.A.V.E. associations have organised training courses in personnel radiation protection, as a consequence of their activities in the inspection of ionizing radiation sources in industrial or medical environments. Because of their experience, the A.P.A.V.E. associations were asked to provide for the training of the film personnel likely to work in nuclear power stations, in the field of occupational radiation protection. For the last 3 years, nearly 5,000 people have attended these training sessions. The present report describes the approach, draws the first conclusions and state some considerations on this subject [fr

  8. The training for nuclear fuel handling at EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The handling of fuel assemblies in a nuclear power plant presents 3 types of work: the taking delivery of fresh fuel, the refueling and the disposal of spent fuel. These operations are realized by teams made up of 3 handling operators and a supervisor. The refueling is made by 3*8-hour teams. These handling operations are important for the nuclear safety, a mishandling can damage the fuel cladding which is the first containment barrier, so a training center (CETIC) has been created. This center was founded in 1986 by EDF and Framatome, the purpose was to validate maintenance procedures, to test handling equipment and to train the teams which work on site. Various training programmes have been set up and a system of qualification degrees has been organized. The CETIC is fitted up with equipment that are full-sized mockups of real installations. Fuel assemblies don't react in a similar way to the different mechanical and neutronic stresses they undergo while they are in the core, they get deformed and the handling operations become more delicate. The mockup fuel assemblies are quite deformed to train the teams and prepare them to face any real situation. (A.C.)

  9. An international comparison of nuclear plant training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    In 1990, I visited four utility companies that own and operate pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants in different countries. The purpose of my visits and associated research was to compare nuclear power plant operator and technician training programs. The companies were: Duke Power Company (DUKE) in the United States, Electricite de France (EDF) in France, Kansai Electric Power Company (KEPCO) in Japan, and RWE Energie AG (RWE) in Germany. The purpose of this paper is to highlight selected aspects of the comparison. First, comparisons of the four subject utilities and four typical nuclear power stations operated by each company, McGuire, Paluel, Ohi, and Biblis, are provided. Then comparisons of new employee demographics and training program specific content are provided. Finally, some general observations are drawn from the comparisons. The comparisons are based on information obtained from documents, interviews, and visits to stations and training centers. However, some interpretation of the information was necessary in order to enable a comparison. For example, categorization of training modules requires judgement, interpretation, and translation. In all cases, the information is intended to be representative or typical, rather than statistically precise

  10. Training of nuclear power plant personnel on Czechoslovak WWER-440 simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugovic, M.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of simulator training is to train personnel for control work observing technical and technological regulations of nuclear power plant operation. Training is implemented in two forms: basic training and recurrent training. The daily regime of the training course is divided into theoretical education, simulator training and evaluation. Simulator training is oriented to the preparation of the workplace, presentation, controlled intermittent work and independent control work. (J.C.)

  11. The Nuclear Department, Royal Naval School of Marine Engineering - Provision of nuclear education and training to the naval nuclear propulsion programme and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trethewey, K.R.; Beeley, P.A.; Lockwood, R.S.; Harrop, I.

    2004-01-01

    The Nuclear Department at HMS SULTAN provides education, training and research support to the Royal Navy Nuclear Propulsion Programme, as well as a growing number of civilian programmes within the wider British nuclear industry. As an aspiring centre of excellence in nuclear engineering, the Department will play an important role as a repository of nuclear knowledge for the foreseeable future. (author)

  12. Lessons Learned in Performing and Implementing the Results of TNA in a Newly Developed Regulatory Body with a Mandate to Regulate the Country's Expanding Nuclear Power Programme: A Case Study of PNRA no. 97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahzad, Moazzam

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: → It is essential that regulatory bodies apply a systematic approach to training need assessment; → Education and training requires capital investment, time and effort; it must be planned long in advance to be effective; → It is essential for a country considering a nuclear power programme to establish and implement a corresponding manpower development programme for its regulatory body

  13. Manpower, Personnel, and Training Assessment (MPTA) Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    programs. 8. Target Audience Description ( TAD ) The TAD is the initial description of the number and type of personnel required to operate, maintain...requirements, etc.) describing the Soldiers operating or maintaining the system. In cases where operating a system requires a security clearance, the TAD ...Authority. Milestone Decision Authority Target Audience Description ( TAD ) AR 602-2 AR 611-1 DA Pam 611-21 X X X X X X The TAD lists

  14. People transfer-sinequanon for nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.

    1977-01-01

    The main obstacles facing the developing countries which wish to adopt sophisticated nuclear technology can be the following: lack of trained personnel, lack of entrepreneurs and capital, and bureaucracy. Of these the greatest problem is undoubtedly the lack of trained manpower. Urgently required skilled manpower may be obtained through training of selected persons in foreign countries on a crash program of nuclear energy. Exchange of expertise can also take place among the developing countries themselves. Another problem particularly peculiar to the poor developing countries is the lack of entrepreneurs and capital. It therefore becomes necessary to attract entrepreneurs from abroad with all the benefit of managerial know-how and capital transfer that it entails. Exchange of scientist, teachers, managerial and administrative personnel between the developed and developing countries and also among the developing countries themselves is therefore essential for an effective transfer of nuclear technology

  15. European Nuclear Education Network Association - Support for nuclear education, training and knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitescu, Petre

    2009-01-01

    Developed in 2002-2003 the FP5 EURATOM project 'European Nuclear Engineering Network - ENEN' aimed to establish the basis for conserving nuclear knowledge and expertise, to create an European Higher Education Area for nuclear disciplines and to facilitate the implementation of the Bologna declaration in the nuclear disciplines. In order to ensure the continuity of the achievements and results of the ENEN project, on 22 September 2003, the European Nuclear Higher Education Area was formalized by creating the European Nuclear Education Network Association. ENEN Association goals are oriented towards universities by developing a more harmonized approach for education in the nuclear sciences and engineering in Europe, integrating European education and training in nuclear safety and radiation protection and achieving a better cooperation and sharing of resources and capabilities at the national and international level. At the same time it is oriented towards the end-users (industries, regulatory bodies, research centers, universities) by creating a secure basis of knowledge and skills of value to the EU. It maintains an adequate supply of qualified human resources for design, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear infrastructures and plants. Also it maintains the necessary competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and applications of radiation in industry and medicine. In 2004-2005, 35 partners continued and expanded the started in FP 5 ENEN Association activities with the FP6 project 'NEPTUNO- Nuclear Education Platform for Training and Universities Organizations'. Thus ENEN established and implemented the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering, expanded its activities from education to training, organized and coordinated training sessions and pilot courses and included in its activities the Knowledge Management. At present, the ENEN Association gathers 45 universities, 7 research centers and one multinational company

  16. Shaping talent for sustainable business development - Nuclear training practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillot, V.; Thoral, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The AREVA group, which is committed to offering its customers technological solutions for reliable CO 2 -free power generation, is both a designer and vendor of nuclear units and operator of nuclear facilities. The group's ambitions are to maintain its knowledge capabilities and develop skills at the level necessary to respond to its business objectives around the world. The AREVA Human Resources department has developed an action plan to support business strategy which aims to accelerate its investment in people, to reinforce recruitment and retain high quality talents and valuable skills and knowledge. Today, there is a global challenge for attracting the best talent and becoming an employer of choice. The group must be creative in attracting, retaining, mobilising, engaging, developing and rewarding its people. AREVA has 61 100 employees worldwide, of which 38 000 work in nuclear activities. In 2006, some 10% of the nuclear workforce represented newcomers, and the group anticipates recruiting a similar significant ratio in 2007. The group has to be ready to tackle a surge in recruitment which is believed will continue over the next 5 years. AREVA has developed, on an international level, networks and partnerships with academic institutions. New programs are being created and promoted to prepare for the integration of future skills needed in the nuclear business. The group has coordinated and pooled resources to gain efficiencies and to strengthen its presence on the employment market. Plans are in place for employee integration and development, mobility, and managing the transfer of knowledge and specific skills. In this context, internal professional training paths are being developed and reinforced, including geology of uranium, dismantling, reactors, nuclear safety and the environment. AREVA is developing a common methodology to lever the transfer of knowledge through training modules, sharing experience and mentoring. Mentoring programs have been

  17. Infrastructure needs and organizational aspect of nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    I. Introduction. II. Infrastructure development for nuclear power program: a) pre-requisites and requirements for a nuclear power program; b) long-term national policy for a nuclear power (long-term policy reason; national commitment); c) manpower development (role of academic institutions; practical manpower training); d) laws and regulations (regulatory framework; main national laws and regulations); e) nuclear research and development implementation (researches in the university; long term nuclear R and D program; research reactors); f) functions of government organizations (Atomic Energy Commission (PNRI); Department of Science and Technology; Department of Energy; Department of Education and Culture); g) industrial infrastructure; h) technology transfer (recipients's preparedness); i) safeguards obligations; j) public acceptance activities. III. Stages of nuclear power development (stage 1: planning; stage 2: detailed study and procurement; stage 3: construction; stage 4: operation) IV. Conclusion/Recommendation. (author)

  18. Experience with Nuclear Inspector Training at JRC, Ispra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berndt, R.; Mortreau, P.

    2013-01-01

    About 500 nuclear safeguards inspectors are working at the IAEA, EURATOM and as national inspectors in Europe. Up to 50 of them are recruited every year and need training for their new work, comprising all its aspects. More than 1050 trainees have attended nuclear inspector training courses at the Ispra site of the Joint Research Centre of the EU within more than 20 years. A higher number of inspectors need refreshment courses or introductions into new working fields. Moreover, new instruments or techniques require special training, in class, laboratory or in field. The Preparatory course, 'NDA (Non-Destructive Assay of nuclear material) basic physics', is held at the EURATOM headquarters at Luxembourg. It is foreseen mainly for new inspectors. The four NDA laboratory courses in PERLA are of special importance for the inspectors. They demonstrate clearly the possibility for an inspector to verify with non-destructive methods the presence of nuclear material, its quality and its quantity. Most of the EURATOM inspectors have followed them at the beginning of their inspector service. The advanced/special laboratory courses in PERLA combine different elements: the 'Pu physical inventory verification course' comprises inspection planning, qualitative and quantitative measurements and statistical data evaluation. The 'Advanced hands-on RADAR/CRISP/XSEAT course' combines automatic measurement stations, installation of informatics tools, unattended data collection, data evaluation and inspection report. The reaction of course participants proofed that these demanding courses are good for the motivation of experienced inspectors. Special instrument courses are always changing and often held only one or two times. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation

  19. Training Solutions to the Global Challenges of a Nuclear Renaissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garces, M.; Chan, S.; Leo, C.; Garcia, S.; Vidal, B.

    2010-07-01

    From East Asia to the United States and all over Europe, the nuclear re-birth is generating demands the training simulation vendors had not faced before. Companies involved in the planning, design, construction and operation of new plants increasingly require simulation tools to satisfy very different needs, all of them on a large scale: education and support of inexperienced newcomer staff, human factors analysis and control room design, e-learning, verification and validation of I and C systems or training and licensing of crews before the actual installations are complete. There is a full set of applications already available to the whole industry to satisfy these needs. End-user friendly Thunder Real-Time Executive (T-REX), poised to become the standard simulation platform for U.S. plants, makes it possible to provide full-scope simulator and simulator exercises to students and others on a memory stick or over the internet. AREVA EPR full-scope training simulator, based on the ALICES integrated object-oriented simulation environment, becomes an engineering simulator for the Flamanville 3 plant under construction in Normandy; the same will happen to the Taishan 1 and 2 simulators in Guangdong (China) while UniStar plans to apply this approach to the future EPR's to be built in the United States. SIREP PWR Basic Principle Simulator, with simplified models which can run on an ordinary PC, is used at GDF SUEZ offices in Brussels to implement their Nuclear Trainees Program. EDF Training Department chooses On-line Micro Simulation (MicroSel), which can be managed with Learning Management Systems, for classroom and stand-alone learning of the basic characteristics of French reactors. All these are examples of how extensive R and D and innovation programs implemented by the simulator providers, some of them under way here in Spain, will help to overcome some of the challenges of the current nuclear expansion.

  20. Training Solutions to the Global Challenges of a Nuclear Renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garces, M.; Chan, S.; Leo, C.; Garcia, S.; Vidal, B.

    2010-01-01

    From East Asia to the United States and all over Europe, the nuclear re-birth is generating demands the training simulation vendors had not faced before. Companies involved in the planning, design, construction and operation of new plants increasingly require simulation tools to satisfy very different needs, all of them on a large scale: education and support of inexperienced newcomer staff, human factors analysis and control room design, e-learning, verification and validation of I and C systems or training and licensing of crews before the actual installations are complete. There is a full set of applications already available to the whole industry to satisfy these needs. End-user friendly Thunder Real-Time Executive (T-REX), poised to become the standard simulation platform for U.S. plants, makes it possible to provide full-scope simulator and simulator exercises to students and others on a memory stick or over the internet. AREVA EPR full-scope training simulator, based on the ALICES integrated object-oriented simulation environment, becomes an engineering simulator for the Flamanville 3 plant under construction in Normandy; the same will happen to the Taishan 1 and 2 simulators in Guangdong (China) while UniStar plans to apply this approach to the future EPR's to be built in the United States. SIREP PWR Basic Principle Simulator, with simplified models which can run on an ordinary PC, is used at GDF SUEZ offices in Brussels to implement their Nuclear Trainees Program. EDF Training Department chooses On-line Micro Simulation (MicroSel), which can be managed with Learning Management Systems, for classroom and stand-alone learning of the basic characteristics of French reactors. All these are examples of how extensive R and D and innovation programs implemented by the simulator providers, some of them under way here in Spain, will help to overcome some of the challenges of the current nuclear expansion.

  1. Training of instructors on nuclear safety in Asian Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikuta, Yuko; Shitomi, Hajimu; Saeki, Masakatsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Technology and Education Center

    2002-11-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)is conducting the international cooperation's of training of the foreign instructors and sending the Japanese teacher to the countries of Indonesia, Thailand (both from 1996) and Vietnam (2000). The training is performed in the JAERI for the future instructors of the concerned country for the period of essentially 2 months and is mainly on nuclear safety principles and safety handling of unsealed radioactive sources. Until 2001, 22 instructors from those countries have been trained in 142 courses. The sent Japanese teacher together with the trained instructor conduct the education of mainly radiation protection and measurement for personnel in ETC of BATAN (Education and Training Center, Indonesia atomic energy agency), radiation protection and atomic energy technology/application in OAEP (Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Thailand) and the same subjects as BATAN in VAEC (Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission). Instruments for radiation measurement are essentially from Japan. This JAERI international cooperation will be open to other Asian countries. (K.H.)

  2. Training of instructors on nuclear safety in Asian Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Yuko; Shitomi, Hajimu; Saeki, Masakatsu

    2002-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)is conducting the international cooperation's of training of the foreign instructors and sending the Japanese teacher to the countries of Indonesia, Thailand (both from 1996) and Vietnam (2000). The training is performed in the JAERI for the future instructors of the concerned country for the period of essentially 2 months and is mainly on nuclear safety principles and safety handling of unsealed radioactive sources. Until 2001, 22 instructors from those countries have been trained in 142 courses. The sent Japanese teacher together with the trained instructor conduct the education of mainly radiation protection and measurement for personnel in ETC of BATAN (Education and Training Center, Indonesia atomic energy agency), radiation protection and atomic energy technology/application in OAEP (Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Thailand) and the same subjects as BATAN in VAEC (Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission). Instruments for radiation measurement are essentially from Japan. This JAERI international cooperation will be open to other Asian countries. (K.H.)

  3. Need and supply gap in occupational health manpower in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kavya; Zodpey, Sanjay P; Tiwari, Rajnarayan R

    2013-07-01

    Industrial growth in India has resulted in increased employment opportunities, thereby inflating the size of the workforce engaged in both organized and unorganized sectors. This workforce is exposed to various occupational factors at workplace and hence is susceptible to occupational diseases, which requires trained occupational health manpower. The present study is undertaken to estimate the need and supply gap of occupational health manpower, based on present regulations. The total workforce in the organized sector in India is 26.92 million. There are 254,951 working registered industrial factories in India, with about 11.16 million workers. These factories have employed 6953 factory medical officers (FMOs) and 2308 safety officers (SOs). Hence, for 26.92 million of total workforce engaged in organized sector, we would require a total of 16,728 FMOs and 5619 SOs, thereby estimating the deficit of 58% for FMOs and 59% for SOs based on current ratio of employment.

  4. The European Nuclear Safety Training and Tutoring Institute (ENSTTI). Annex III [Example of Knowledge Management and Training for TSOs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    ENSTTI is an initiative of members of the ETSON. It was created in 2010 to put in place a high quality training mechanism to meet the training needs of experts at nuclear regulatory authorities and TSOs; to ensure the continuous development of qualified experts in this area; and to foster harmonization of technical practices in nuclear safety, nuclear security and radiation protection. This is achieved through the regular provision of vocational training and tutoring exclusively delivered by senior professionals of European TSOs that take into consideration the latest technical developments and is continuously up-dated and improved by applying a systematic approach to training.

  5. Enhancing international radiation/nuclear detection training opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Thomas L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bersell, Bridget M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Booker, Paul M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Gerald E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leitch, Rosalyn M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meagher, John B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Siefken, Rob R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Spracklen, James L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-23

    The United States has worked domestically to develop and provide radiological and nuclear detection training and education initiatives aimed at interior law enforcement, but the international community has predominantly focused efforts at border and customs officials. The interior law enforcement officials of a State play a critical role in maintaining an effective national-level nuclear detection architecture. To meet this vital need, DNDO was funded by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to create and deliver a 1-week course at the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in Budapest, Hungary to inform interior law enforcement personnel of the overall mission, and to provide an understanding of how the participants can combat the threats of radiological and nuclear terrorism through detection efforts. Two courses, with approximately 20 students in each course, were delivered in fiscal year (FY) 2013, two were delivered in FY 2014 and FY 2015, and as of this report’s writing more are planned in FY 2016. However, while the ILEA courses produced measurable success, DNDO requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research potential avenues to further increase the course impact.In a multi-phased approach, PNNL researched and analyzed several possible global training locations and venues, and other possible ways to increase the impact of the course using an agreed-to data-gathering format.

  6. Liver phantom for quality control and training in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Ferreira, Fernanda Carla; Nascimento Souza, Divanizia do

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, liver scintigraphy aims to verify organ function based on the radionuclide concentration in the liver and bile flow and is also used to detect tumors. Therefore it is necessary to perform quality control tests in the gamma camera before running the exam to prevent false results. Quality control tests of the gamma camera should thus be performed before running the exam to prevent false results. Such tests generally use radioactive material inside phantoms for evaluation of gamma camera parameters in quality control procedures. Phantoms can also be useful for training doctors and technicians in nuclear medicine procedures. The phantom proposed here has artifacts that simulate nodules; it may take on different quantities, locations and sizes and it may also be mounted without the introduction of nodules. Thus, its images may show hot or cold nodules or no nodules. The phantom consists of acrylic plates hollowed out in the centre, with the geometry of an adult liver. Images for analyses of simulated liver scintigraphy were obtained with the detector device at 5 cm from the anterior surface of the phantom. These simulations showed that this object is suitable for quality control in nuclear medicine because it was possible to visualize artifacts larger than 7.9 mm using a 256x256 matrix and 1000 kcpm. The phantom constructed in this work will also be useful for training practitioners and technicians in order to prevent patients from repeat testing caused by error during examinations.

  7. Liver phantom for quality control and training in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Ferreira, Fernanda Carla [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Sao Cristovao, SE, 49100 000 (Brazil); Nascimento Souza, Divanizia do, E-mail: divanizi@ufs.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Sao Cristovao, SE, 49100 000 (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    In nuclear medicine, liver scintigraphy aims to verify organ function based on the radionuclide concentration in the liver and bile flow and is also used to detect tumors. Therefore it is necessary to perform quality control tests in the gamma camera before running the exam to prevent false results. Quality control tests of the gamma camera should thus be performed before running the exam to prevent false results. Such tests generally use radioactive material inside phantoms for evaluation of gamma camera parameters in quality control procedures. Phantoms can also be useful for training doctors and technicians in nuclear medicine procedures. The phantom proposed here has artifacts that simulate nodules; it may take on different quantities, locations and sizes and it may also be mounted without the introduction of nodules. Thus, its images may show hot or cold nodules or no nodules. The phantom consists of acrylic plates hollowed out in the centre, with the geometry of an adult liver. Images for analyses of simulated liver scintigraphy were obtained with the detector device at 5 cm from the anterior surface of the phantom. These simulations showed that this object is suitable for quality control in nuclear medicine because it was possible to visualize artifacts larger than 7.9 mm using a 256x256 matrix and 1000 kcpm. The phantom constructed in this work will also be useful for training practitioners and technicians in order to prevent patients from repeat testing caused by error during examinations.

  8. Liver phantom for quality control and training in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Ferreira, Fernanda Carla; Souza, Divanizia do Nascimento

    2011-10-01

    In nuclear medicine, liver scintigraphy aims to verify organ function based on the radionuclide concentration in the liver and bile flow and is also used to detect tumors. Therefore it is necessary to perform quality control tests in the gamma camera before running the exam to prevent false results. Quality control tests of the gamma camera should thus be performed before running the exam to prevent false results. Such tests generally use radioactive material inside phantoms for evaluation of gamma camera parameters in quality control procedures. Phantoms can also be useful for training doctors and technicians in nuclear medicine procedures. The phantom proposed here has artifacts that simulate nodules; it may take on different quantities, locations and sizes and it may also be mounted without the introduction of nodules. Thus, its images may show hot or cold nodules or no nodules. The phantom consists of acrylic plates hollowed out in the centre, with the geometry of an adult liver. Images for analyses of simulated liver scintigraphy were obtained with the detector device at 5 cm from the anterior surface of the phantom. These simulations showed that this object is suitable for quality control in nuclear medicine because it was possible to visualize artifacts larger than 7.9 mm using a 256×256 matrix and 1000 kcpm. The phantom constructed in this work will also be useful for training practitioners and technicians in order to prevent patients from repeat testing caused by error during examinations.

  9. Cognitive skill training for nuclear power plant operational decision making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumaw, R.J.; Swatzler, D.; Roth, E.M. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Thomas, W.A. [Quantum Technologies, Inc., Oak Brook, IL (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Training for operator and other technical positions in the commercial nuclear power industry traditionally has focused on mastery of the formal procedures used to control plant systems and processes. However, decisionmaking tasks required of nuclear power plant operators involve cognitive skills (e.g., situation assessment, planning). Cognitive skills are needed in situations where formal procedures may not exist or may not be as prescriptive, as is the case in severe accident management (SAM). The Westinghouse research team investigated the potential cognitive demands of SAM on the control room operators and Technical Support Center staff who would be most involved in the selection and execution of severe accident control actions. A model of decision making, organized around six general cognitive processes, was developed to identify the types of cognitive skills that may be needed for effective performance. Also, twelve SAM scenarios were developed to reveal specific decision-making difficulties. Following the identification of relevant cognitive skills, 19 approaches for training individual and team cognitive skills were identified. A review of these approaches resulted in the identification of general characteristics that are important in effective training of cognitive skills.

  10. Cognitive skill training for nuclear power plant operational decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumaw, R.J.; Swatzler, D.; Roth, E.M.; Thomas, W.A.

    1994-06-01

    Training for operator and other technical positions in the commercial nuclear power industry traditionally has focused on mastery of the formal procedures used to control plant systems and processes. However, decisionmaking tasks required of nuclear power plant operators involve cognitive skills (e.g., situation assessment, planning). Cognitive skills are needed in situations where formal procedures may not exist or may not be as prescriptive, as is the case in severe accident management (SAM). The Westinghouse research team investigated the potential cognitive demands of SAM on the control room operators and Technical Support Center staff who would be most involved in the selection and execution of severe accident control actions. A model of decision making, organized around six general cognitive processes, was developed to identify the types of cognitive skills that may be needed for effective performance. Also, twelve SAM scenarios were developed to reveal specific decision-making difficulties. Following the identification of relevant cognitive skills, 19 approaches for training individual and team cognitive skills were identified. A review of these approaches resulted in the identification of general characteristics that are important in effective training of cognitive skills

  11. General aspects of a manpower development programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calori, F.; Goodman, E.I.

    1977-01-01

    A manpower development program as a long term program for developing countries, requirements based on objectives, organizations and roles, a utility program, the level of domestic involvement, the methodology of a manpower development program and the identification of requirements are treated. (HK) [de

  12. Manpower simulation for the power plant design engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, B.S.; Juhn, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    Some observation from the examination of actual manhour curves for the power design engineering obtained from Sargent and Lundy Engineers and of a few of the model curves proposed by Bechtel, are analyzed in this paper. A model curve representing typical design engineering manhour has been determined as probability density function for the Gamma Distribution. By means of this model curve, we strategically forecast the future engineering manpower requirements to meet the Covernment's long range nuclear power plan. As a sensitivity analysis, the directions for the localization of nuclear power plant design engineering, are studied in terms of the performance factor for the experienced versus inexperienced engineers. (Author)

  13. Nuclear-related training and education offered by nonacademic organizations (preliminary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, L.

    1981-11-01

    The results of a survey of nuclear-related training and education provided by nonacademic training organizations are presented in this report. The survey instrument was distributed by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations to 136 training organizations. The scope of the survey was not intended to be comprehensive, but rather to include the primary sources of nonacademic nuclear-related training and education offered to utility personnel. The survey universe was compiled from training organizations listed in the 1981 Nuclear News Buyer's Guide. Forty-three percent of the survey population (59 organizations) responded to the questionnaire of which 31 percent (42) reported they offered nuclear-related training programs and 12 percent (17) reported they did not offer any nuclear-related training

  14. Role of INPO in improving training in the US nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangin, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    In response to their newly recognized degree of interdependence, the US nuclear utilities formed the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) in late 1979 to enhance nuclear plant safety and reliability nationwide. Because this interdependence extends across national boundaries, in 1981 INPO began accepting participants from outside the United States. To promote excellence in nuclear power plant training, INPO's Training and Education Division has established three objectives: to establish standards of excellence for industry training; to evaluate the quality and effectiveness of industry training programs; and to assist member utilities in providing high quality performance-based training. A variety of activities and projects have been undertaken to accomplish these objectives

  15. Principles of education and training of plant engineers for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackermann, G.; Meyer, K.; Brune, W.

    1978-01-01

    Experience in education and advanced training of nuclear engineers in the GDR is reviewed. The basic education of engineers is carried out at universities and colleges. Graduate engineers who have been working in non-nuclear industries for a longer time receive their basic education in nuclear engineering through postgraduate studies. Graduate engineers with a basic knowledge of nuclear engineering are trained at the Nuclear Power Plant School of the Rheinsberg nuclear power plant and at the nuclear power plants of the GDR under operational conditions relating to their future job. In addition to basic theoretical knowledge, training at a nuclear power plant simulator plays an important role. This permits training of the staff under normal operating conditions including transient processes and under unusual conditions. Further particular modes of advanced professional training such as courses in radiation protection and further postgraduate studies are described. This system of education has proved successful. It will be developed further to meet the growing demands. (author)

  16. Crew resource management training adapted to nuclear power plant operators for enhancing safety attitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Akira; Kitamura, Masaharu; Takahashi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    A conventional training program for nuclear power plant operators mainly focuses on the improvement of knowledge and skills of individual operators. Although it has certainly contributed to safety operation of nuclear power plants, some recent incidents have indicated the necessity of an additional training program aiming at the improvement of team performance. In the aviation domain, crew resource management (CRM) training has demonstrated the effectiveness in resolving team management issues of flight crews, aircraft maintenance crews, and so on. In the present research, we attempt to introduce the CRM concept into operator training in nuclear power plant for the training of conceptual skill (that is, non-technical skill). In this paper an adapted CRM training for nuclear power plant operators is proposed. The proposed training method has been practically utilized in the training course of the managers of nuclear power plants. (author)

  17. Progress report of Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center for 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Presented are the research works carried out in 1980 in Physics, Chemistry, Nuclear engineering, Radiobiology, Reactor operation and reactor enlargement, Health physics, Radioisotope production, Electronic, Industrial application of radioisotopes, Nuclear fuel technology, Technical services, Construction control, Publication and documentation, Training division of Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center

  18. 10 CFR 50.120 - Training and qualification of nuclear power plant personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training and qualification of nuclear power plant... Training and qualification of nuclear power plant personnel. (a) Applicability. The requirements of this... each holder of a combined license issued under part 52 of this chapter for a nuclear power plant of the...

  19. Issues of improving quality of training personnel for nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacko, J.

    1987-01-01

    The basic stages are characterized of the development of a standard system of personnel training for the start-up, operation and maintenance of nuclear power facilities. The experience is analyzed gained by the Branch Training Centre of the Nuclear Power Plant Research Institute. Suggestions are submitted for improving the quality of personnel training based on Czechoslovak and foreign experiences. (author). 3 refs

  20. Nuclear education and training in the Internet age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereznai, G.; Garland, W.

    2001-01-01

    Student enrolment in nuclear engineering programs offered by Canadian universities has been declining, and at some universities has fallen below the minimum level needed to sustain the program. At the same time, a significant number of engineers working in the nuclear industry have retired and many more will be reaching retirement age in the next few years. The operation and maintenance of the 14 in-service CANDU units, the refurbishment of the four Pickering 'A' units and of the four Bruce 'A' units will require a significant level of new engineers and scientists. Service support for the CANDU units operating overseas, the construction of two units in China, the completion of Cernavoda 2, and the market for several more CANDU units in Asia, will also require significant numbers of new graduates. The vast amount of information that the future practitioners of the nuclear power industry need to be aware of will be increasingly difficult to disseminate with the traditional classroom-based education and training methods. Almost all of the documents required for the design, analysis, procurement and operation of a nuclear unit are now generated by computer, and increasingly such information is accessible where and when needed via the company lntranet. The authors have developed an lnternet/Intranet compatible self-paced interactive multimedia approach to deliver a course on CANDU Systems and Operations. The course has been offered at ten universities in six countries, including Thailand, China, Indonesia, Vietnam, the Philippines, as well as Canada. (author)

  1. Nuclear power plant training simulator system and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, R.W.; Converse, R.E. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A system is described for simulating the real-time dynamic operation of a full scope nuclear powered electrical generating plant for operator training utilizing apparatus that includes a control console with plant component control devices and indicating devices for monitoring plant operation. A general purpose digital computer calculates the dynamic simulation data for operating the indicating devices in accordance with the operation of the control devices. The functions for synchronization and calculation are arranged in a priority structure so as to insure an execution order that provides a maximum overlap of data exchange and simulation calculations. (Official Gazette)

  2. Early Years of Neutron Scattering and Its Manpower Development in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsongkohadi

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I shall give a short history of the development of neutron scattering at the Research Centre for Nuclear Techniques (PPTN), in Bandung, and the early development of a more advanced facilities at the Neutron Scattering Laboratory (NSL BATAN), Centre of Technology for Nuclear Industrial Materials, in Serpong. The first research reactor in Indonesia was the TRIGA MARK II in Bandung, which became operational in 1965, with a power of 250 KW, upgraded to 1 MW in 1971, and to 2 MW in 2000. The neutron scattering activities was started in 1967, with the design and construction of the first powder diffractometer, and put in operation in 1970. It was followed by the second instrument, the filter detector spectrometer built in 1975 in collaboration with the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), India. A powder diffractometer for magnetic studies was built in 1980, and finally, a modification of the filter detector spectrometer to measure textures was made in 1986. A brief description of the design and construction of the instruments, and a highlight of some research topics will be presented. Early developments of neutron scattering activities at the 30 MW, RSG-GAS reactor in Serpong in choosing suitable research program, which will be mainly centred around materials testing/characterization, and materials/condensed matter researches has been agreed. Instrument planning and layout which were appropriate to carry out the program had been decided. Manpower development for the neutron scattering laboratory is a severe problem. The efforts to overcome this problem has been solved. International Cooperation through workshops and on the job trainings also support the supply of qualified manpower

  3. Development of Capacity Building Training Programs for Nuclear R and D Personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eui Jin; Nam, Youngmi; Hwang, Hyeseon; Jang, Eunsook; Song, Eun Ju

    2016-01-01

    The Nuclear Training and Education Center of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has been operating technical training courses on nuclear engineering, engineering mathematics, management leadership training, out sourced practical training, legal education, etc. Strengthening nuclear R and D capacity is essential for the long-term mission and goals of the institute. Therefore, it requires a comprehensive training program to strengthen the unique capability of the institute that reflects diversity and differentiation. In this regard, the capacity building training program has developed on a modular basis, and the developed training program should be tailored to operate according to the institute needs. The capacity building training program for nuclear R and D personnel was developed to reflect the technology strengths of the institute. The developed training program will be developed into a leading branded education of the institute in the future

  4. The training and assessment of operations engineers at Hinkley Point 'B' nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsey, B.A.; Howard, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Training Centre at Oldbury-on-Severn was established to provide a common training of staff at all nuclear power stations operated by the Central Electricity Generating Board, following the ''Standard Specification for the Nuclear Training of Staff at CEGB Nuclear Power Stations''. The paper deals with the following aspects of AGR Stations: The Legislation applicable to these stations. The current training requirements for Operations Staff. The development of training for operations staff at Hinkley Point 'B' including training for career progression within the Operations Department. A detailed explanation of the training package developed for Reactor Desk Drivers at Hinkley 'B'. Revision training of Operations staff to ensure that they continue to run the plant in a safe and commercially viable manner. The training of Shift Operations Engineers for their duties under the Station Emergency Plan. (author)

  5. Development of Capacity Building Training Programs for Nuclear R and D Personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eui Jin; Nam, Youngmi; Hwang, Hyeseon; Jang, Eunsook; Song, Eun Ju [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The Nuclear Training and Education Center of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has been operating technical training courses on nuclear engineering, engineering mathematics, management leadership training, out sourced practical training, legal education, etc. Strengthening nuclear R and D capacity is essential for the long-term mission and goals of the institute. Therefore, it requires a comprehensive training program to strengthen the unique capability of the institute that reflects diversity and differentiation. In this regard, the capacity building training program has developed on a modular basis, and the developed training program should be tailored to operate according to the institute needs. The capacity building training program for nuclear R and D personnel was developed to reflect the technology strengths of the institute. The developed training program will be developed into a leading branded education of the institute in the future.

  6. The best and brightest. Concern over tomorrow's workforce opens new doors for education and training in nuclear fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedekind, Lothar

    2001-01-01

    The article discusses the results of a study by the Nuclear Energy Agency to address concerns about downward trends in nuclear education and training at universities. The implications of a shortage of trained nuclear energy specialists are discussed

  7. Memoir 1985. Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A brief review of the National Institute of Nuclear Research is given and its activities in 1985 summarized, among which were the Institute's fabrication of nuclear fuel rods, advisory and technical support of the national nucleoelectric program, encouragement of the utilization of nuclear techniques in farming, livestock breeding, industry and health, improving processes in radioisotope production, construction of a metrology building for ionizing radiation measurement, training of manpower for the nucleoelectric industry, for applying nuclear techniques, and the assemblying of a pelletron electron accelerator. (m.r.)

  8. Training and education in nuclear medicine at the Medical Faculty of the University of Zagreb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivancevic, D.; Popovic, S.; Simonovic, I.; Vlatkovic, M.

    1986-01-01

    Training for specialization in nuclear medicine in Yugoslavia includes 12 months of training in departments of clinical medicine and 24 months of training in departments of nuclear medicine. Since 1974 many physicians have passed the specialist examination in Zagreb. A postgraduate study in nuclear medicine began at the Medical Faculty of the University of Zagreb in 1979. It includes four semesters of courses and research on a selected subject leading to the degree of Magister (Master of Science). Most of the training is conducted by the Institute of Nuclear Medicine at the University Hospital, Rebro, in Zagreb, which has the necessary teaching staff, equipment and space. Forty-four students have completed this postgraduate study. Nuclear medicine in a developing country faces several problems. Scarcity of expensive equipment and radiopharmaceuticals calls for modifications of methods, home made products and instrument maintenance. These, mostly economic, factors are given special emphasis during training. Nuclear power generation may solve some of the country's energy problems; therefore, specialists in nuclear medicine must obtain additional knowledge about the medical care and treatment of persons who might be subject to irradiation and contamination in nuclear power plants. Lower economic resources in developing countries require better trained personnel, stressing the need for organized training and education in nuclear medicine. With some support the Institute of Nuclear Medicine will be able to offer various forms of training and education in nuclear medicine for physicians, chemists, physicists, technologists and other personnel from developing countries. (author)

  9. Qualification and training of personnel for nuclear equipment programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montagnier, S.

    1980-01-01

    The Equipment Department of Electricite de France has the task of designing, co-ordinating the construction of and commissioning the power stations required to feed the grid as part of the country's energy policity. The French nuclear programme may seem ambitious - 35.000 to 40.000 MW in service by 1985 - but it should be remembered that the first nuclear power plant construction in France goes back more than 20 years and that, as a result of this, the Equipment Department already has qualified staff at its disposal. Hence the proposed training activities take into account the educational background of such personnel and the number of persons concerned. These activities can be divided into (1) the professional orientation phase, intended for recently recruited staff members and consisting of discussion and instruction seminars aimed at facilitating the induction of the young recruit into EDF's departments, and (2) the training and retraining phase, intended for all staff in accordance with each person's particular job and made up, as the case may be, of courses in new theoretical knowledge, updating of previous knowledge, often accompanied by extensive practical work in the field, discussion of working methods, study of new operational techniques, and so forth. The teaching methods adopted naturally take into account the professional level of the trainees and are therefore usually 'active' or 'semi-active', entailing groups of the order of 12 persons, with effective participation by their supervisors. (author)

  10. QA manpower requirement for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, M.

    1980-01-01

    To ensure the quality of the plant, QA activities are to be performed by the owner, the main contractor, the subcontractors and the Licensing Authority. The responsibilities of the QA-personnel of these organizations comprise as a minimum the control of the quality assurance systems and the proof of the quality requirements. Numbers of the required QA-personnel, designated for different tasks and recommended educational levels and professional qualifications will be given. (orig./RW)

  11. Training method for enhancement of safety attitude in nuclear power plant based on crew resource management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Akira; Karikawa, Daisuke; Takahashi, Makoto; Wakabayashi, Toshio; Kitamura, Masaharu

    2010-01-01

    A conventional training program for nuclear power plant operators has been developed with emphasis on improvement of knowledge and skills of individual operators. Although it has certainly contributed to safety operation of nuclear power plants, some recent incidents have indicated the necessity of an improved training program aiming at improvement of the performance of operators working as a team. In the aviation area, crew resource management (CRM) training has shown the effect of resolving team management issues of flight crews, aircraft maintenance crews, and so on. In the present research, we attempted to introduce the CRM concept into operator training in nuclear power plants as training for conceptual skill enhancement. In this paper, a training method specially customized for nuclear power plant operators based on CRM is proposed. The proposed method has been practically utilized in the management training course of Japan Nuclear Technology Institute. The validity of the proposed method has been evaluated by means of a questionnaire survey. (author)

  12. Nuclear skills and education training in the UK through the Dalton nuclear institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard Clegg

    2006-01-01

    -level nuclear training called NTEC (Nuclear Technology Education Consortium). The consortium has received funding from the UK research councils and industry. Its first student intake was in October 2005 and eventually the modules on offer will cover the broad spectrum from reactor systems and fuel cycles through to decommissioning and clean-up, with modules also on offer covering fusion, nuclear medicine and socio-economics. A key aim of NTEC is to forge international teaching collaborations to share material as well as student exchanges. (author)

  13. Progress report of Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center for 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Presented are the research works carried out in 1981 in Energy, Radiological Safety, Radioisotope, Application of Nuclear Techniques and Basic Research of Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center. (author)

  14. A simulator-based nuclear reactor emergency response training exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Edward; Bereznai, George; Shaw, John; Chaput, Joseph; Lafortune, Jean-Francois

    Training offsite emergency response personnel basic awareness of onsite control room operations during nuclear power plant emergency conditions was the primary objective of a week-long workshop conducted on a CANDU® virtual nuclear reactor simulator available at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Canada. The workshop was designed to examine both normal and abnormal reactor operating conditions, and to observe the conditions in the control room that may have impact on the subsequent offsite emergency response. The workshop was attended by participants from a number of countries encompassing diverse job functions related to nuclear emergency response. Objectives of the workshop were to provide opportunities for participants to act in the roles of control room personnel under different reactor operating scenarios, providing a unique experience for participants to interact with the simulator in real-time, and providing increased awareness of control room operations during accident conditions. The ability to "pause" the simulator during exercises allowed the instructors to evaluate and critique the performance of participants, and to provide context with respect to potential offsite emergency actions. Feedback from the participants highlighted (i) advantages of observing and participating "hands-on" with operational exercises, (ii) their general unfamiliarity with control room operational procedures and arrangements prior to the workshop, (iii) awareness of the vast quantity of detailed control room procedures for both normal and transient conditions, and (iv) appreciation of the increased workload for the operators in the control room during a transient from normal operations. Based upon participant feedback, it was determined that the objectives of the training had been met, and that future workshops should be conducted.

  15. EPRI training to support digital upgrades in nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, R.; Naser, J.

    2006-01-01

    In response to the growing challenges of obsolescence and rising maintenance costs, utilities are increasingly upgrading or replacing their existing instrumentation and control (I and C) systems and components. In most cases, this involves analog-to-digital or digital-to-newer-digital replacements. However, the use of digital technology often raises new technical and licensing issues, particularly for safety-related applications. Examples include: new failure modes and the potential for common-mode failure of redundant components; electromagnetic compatibility (EMC); potential human-system interface problems; and software verification, validation, and configuration management. Successful implementation, operation and maintenance of digital systems depend to a great extent on having processes in place that are tailored for digital technology. Nuclear plants are therefore updating their processes as they start the migration to digital I and C. For several years, EPRI has been developing guidelines to address the key technical issues and interfacing with the U.S. NRC to ensure the acceptability of the approaches developed. A framework for implementing digital upgrades now exists, but practical experience under the current regulatory environment is sparse. Significant uncertainty exists in regard to both technical and licensing issues. Many utilities still need to prepare their staff and processes to properly handle the new technology. In recent years, this need has been exacerbated by staff reductions, changing job assignments, and declining training budgets. EPRI has responded by developing a training program to help utilities efficiently bring design and licensing engineers up to speed on the latest issues and guidance affecting the implementation of digital upgrades in nuclear plants. This paper describes the key technical issues in the context of the EPRI training program. (authors)

  16. Impact evaluation of the nuclear training program of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relunia, Estrella Duran

    1999-10-01

    This study attempted to determine the factors that influenced the impact of the PNRI training program in nuclear science and technology. The population of the study consisted of all graduate trainees who successfully completed the training courses conducted at the PNRI Training Center for the period 1989 to 1994. A stratified random sampling of 600 or 50% of the population were chosen from the 4 sectors of the population namely industry/service, medicine, education and research sector. Of the 600 samples only 395 or 66% of the samples responded to the mailed questionnaires. The following hypotheses were tested: 1) trainee - organization- related factors and overall satisfaction of the participants on the training program determine the impact of training; 2) there are significant differences among the perceptions of the participants on impact. Frequency counts and percentages were used to determine the number of trainees by sector and the description of the sample. T-test was used to measure whether or not the relationship between the ''Before'' and ''After'' training scores of the trainees is significant and whether the perceptions of the trainee respondents by sector on impact differed significantly. Multiple regression was used to determine whether the independent variables are significantly associated with the measures of program impact. The t-test was used to measure the significance of regression coefficient. (Author)

  17. Impact evaluation of the nuclear training program of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Relunia, Estrella Duran

    1999-10-01

    This study attempted to determine the factors that influenced the impact of the PNRI training program in nuclear science and technology. The population of the study consisted of all graduate trainees who successfully completed the training courses conducted at the PNRI Training Center for the period 1989 to 1994. A stratified random sampling of 600 or 50% of the population were chosen from the 4 sectors of the population namely industry/service, medicine, education and research sector. Of the 600 samples only 395 or 66% of the samples responded to the mailed questionnaires. The following hypotheses were tested: (1) trainee - organization- related factors and overall satisfaction of the participants on the training program determine the impact of training; (2) there are significant differences among the perceptions of the participants on impact. Frequency counts and percentages were used to determine the number of trainees by sector and the description of the sample. T-test was used to measure whether or not the relationship between the ''Before'' and ''After'' training scores of the trainees is significant and whether the perceptions of the trainee respondents by sector on impact differed significantly. Multiple regression was used to determine whether the independent variables are significantly associated with the measures of program impact. The t-test was used to measure the significance of regression coefficient. (Author)

  18. The Modeling of Factors That Influence Coast Guard Manpower Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    applications, and common data warehouses needed to fully develop an effective and efficient manpower requirements engineering and management program. The... manpower requirements determination ensures a ready force, and safe and effective mission execution. Shortage or excess of manpower is the catalyst...FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE COAST GUARD MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS by Kara M. Lavin December 2014 Thesis Advisor: Ronald E. Giachetti Co-Advisor

  19. International inventory of training facilities in nuclear power and its fuel cycle 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The revised inventory is arranged according to the following subject areas: nuclear power plant (NPP) engineering, nuclear safety, quality assurance, NPP operation and maintenance, NPP instrumentation and control, nuclear fuel management, nuclear materials control. Training in each subject area is classified into five groups depending on the type of organization offering the training courses. Each course is briefly described by its name or purpose, institution and location, duration, frequency, language, and content

  20. Nuclear training as the integral part of managing of human resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazennov, A.Yu.; )

    2010-01-01

    The author reports on the personnel training that is one of important measures to achieve and maintain the required competence of various categories of nuclear facility employees, including nuclear power plants, and one of important activities in the framework of overall management system to improve organizational and human performance of a nuclear facility. The role of the IAEA in the assistance in the development of training systems for nuclear power plants is described, in particular the activity of the Technical Working Group on Managing Human Resources in the Field of Nuclear Energy (TWG-MHR) and The Education and Training Support Group (ETSG) [ru

  1. Education and Training, and Knowledge Networks for Capacity-Building in Nuclear Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrabit, Khammar

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: • Capacity Building (CB) is critical for States to establish and maintain effective and sustainable nuclear security regime. • IAEA is a worldwide platform promoting international cooperation for CB in nuclear security involving more than 160 countries and over 20 Organizations and Initiatives. • IAEA Division of Nuclear Security is ready to continue supporting States in developing their CB through: – Comprehensive Training Programme: more than 80 training events annually – International Nuclear Security Training and Support Centre Network (NSSC) – Comprehensive Education Programme – International Nuclear Security Network (INSEN)

  2. The problems and countermeasures of staff training in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Bo

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid development of nuclear energy, China faces a great challenge to meet its increasing demand on a large amount of well-educated and highly-trained nuclear workforce. The above demands make it uniquely important for the nuclear industry in both improving nuclear education and in attracting young talents. Good practices in staff training have been identified and are summarized, through which CNNC's nuclear power plants have developed a systematic approach for new employee training to support the development of strategies. (author)

  3. Education and training for nuclear scientists and engineers at NuTEC/JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushita, Kouhei; Sugimoto, Jun; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Arai, Nobuyoshi; Hattori, Takamitsu; Matsuda, Kenji; Ikuta, Yuko; Sato, K.

    2009-01-01

    Because of the increasing demand of nuclear engineers in recent years, which is sometimes called as the age of nuclear Renaissance, while nuclear engineers have been decreasing and technical knowledge and expertise have not necessarily been transferred to the younger generations, human resources development (HRD) has been regarded as one of the most important issues in the nuclear field in Japan as well as in the world. Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) have conducted comprehensive nuclear education and training activities in the past half century, which cover; 1) education and training for domestic nuclear engineers, 2) cooperation with universities, and 3) international cooperation. The main feature of NuTEC's training programs is that emphasis is placed on the laboratory exercise with well-equipped training facilities and expertise of lecturers mostly from JAEA. The wide spectrum of cooperative activities have been pursued with universities, which includes newly developed remote-education system, and also with international organizations, such as with FNCA countries and IAEA. For the nuclear education and trainings, utilization of nuclear reactors is of special importance. Examples of training programs using nuclear reactors are reported. Future plan to use nuclear reactors such as JMTR for the nuclear educations is also introduced. (author)

  4. Approach to team skills training of nuclear power plant control room crews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, L.T.; Gaddy, C.D.; Turney, J.R.

    1985-07-01

    An investigation of current team skills training practices and research was conducted by General Physics Corporation for the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The methodology used included a review of relevant team skills training literature and a workshop to collect inputs from team training practitioners and researchers from the public and private sectors. The workshop was attended by representatives from nuclear utility training organizations, the commercial airline industry, federal agencies, and defense training and research commands. The literature reviews and workshop results provided the input for a suggested approach to team skills training that can be integrated into existing training programs for control room operating crews. The approach includes five phases: (1) team skills objectives development, (2) basic team skills training, (3) team task training, (4) team skills evaluation, and (5) team training program evaluation. Supporting background information and a user-oriented description of the approach to team skills training are provided. 47 refs

  5. Some aspects of increasing the quality of personnel training for nuclear power plants in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacko, J.; Frimmelova, A.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear power plant personnel in Czechoslovakia is subject to periodical training in accordance with the Unified System of Nuclear Facility Personnel Training. This training is the responsibility of the Educational and Training Centre of the Nuclear Plant Research Institute in Trnava. Nuclear plant personnel is divided into 7 groups as follows: A - supervisory technical-administrative management staff; B - selected operating personnel such as shift supervisors, unit supervisors, reactor operators and secondary circuit operators; C - engineering-technical personnel of technical and maintenance departments; D - managing shift-operating staff; E - workers at technical plant departments; F - operational shift workers and servicemen; and G - maintenance personnel. These groups are respected in the training, which includes basic training, re-training and additional training. The basic training comprises 8 stages: general theoretical education; specialized theoretical education; on-the-job training in a plant designated for training; training on a simulator (group B); preparing for and taking final examinations for the certificate; doubling in the NPP designated for training (groups B, D, F); preparation in the NPP of future employment; preparing for and taking the state examination for obtaining the license (group B). Details of the management of the training process, experience gained during the implementation of the training and challenges for future improvement of the system are outlined. (P.A.)

  6. ACR-SNM Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training: report of the task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberteau, Milton J; Graham, Michael M

    2011-06-01

    The expansion of knowledge and technological advances in nuclear medicine and radiology require physicians to have more expertise in functional and anatomic imaging. The convergence of these two specialties into the new discipline of molecular imaging has also begun to place demands on residency training programs for additional instruction in physiology and molecular biology. These changes have unmasked weaknesses in current nuclear medicine and radiology training programs. Adding to the impetus for change are the attendant realities of the job market and uncertain employment prospects for physicians trained in nuclear medicine but not also trained in diagnostic radiology. With this background, the ACR and the Society of Nuclear Medicine convened the Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training to define the issues and develop recommendations for resident training.

  7. International Cooperation in Nuclear E&T: On the Way to Nuclear Training Harmonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipev, I.; Karmanov, F.; Artisyuk, V.; Karezin, V.; Sushkov, P.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Global use of nuclear power is likely to continue to grow in the coming decades. Some countries have chosen to invite multiple vendors for NPP technology supply. The worldwide expansion of nuclear power use and the multi-vendor paradigm inevitably lead to the need of harmonized approaches towards safety and the initial step here is harmonization of education and training (E&T) efforts between recipient and vendor countries and between vendors as well. Establishing international and regional E&T networks is the vital mechanism of the harmonization. The present paper gives an example of collaboration between Russia and the EU through achievements of ENEN-RU projects aimed at harmonization of E&T efforts in nuclear field. One of the goals of this activity is to introduce double-degree programmes in nuclear engineering in Russian and EU universities. To support this initiative ROSATOM-CICE&T is currently developing multimedia-based fundamental educational courses in Russian and English languages. The courses will be also used as the backbone for new nuclear engineering programmes in the universities of newcomer states. To provide a harmonized development of operating personnel career trajectories in these countries an applied bachelor programme for operating personnel has been developed. (author

  8. 507 Developing Industrial and Technological Manpower via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sustainable industrial and technological advancement and security for national development. ... industrial/technological manpower for Nigeria is the technical vocational education and ..... Business and Social Sciences, 2 (2), 71-77. Retrieved ...

  9. Improving practical training ability at Nuclear Research Institute oriented to nuclear human resource development within First Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Xuan Hai; Nguyen Nhi Dien; Pham Dinh Khang; Pham Ngoc Tuan; Tuong Thi Thu Huong

    2016-01-01

    This report presents results of a research project “Improving practical training ability at Nuclear Research Institute oriented to nuclear human resource development within first phase”. In the frameworks of the project, a guiding document on 27 Ortec’s experiments was translated into Vietnamese. Several equipment are used in the experiments such as neutron howitzer, gamma counter, multi-channel analyzer and alpha-gamma coincidence spectroscopy were designed and fabricated. These products contributed to improving the ability of research and training of Training and Education Center, Nuclear Research Institute (NRI). (author)

  10. Global mainpower requirements for projected nuclear programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, S.B.; Lane, J.A.; Rogov, A.; Skjoeldebrand, R.

    1976-01-01

    The scarcity of trained engineers and technicians may be an important bottleneck to the continued growth of nuclear power, particularly in developing countries, if steps are not taken at an early date to insure against such a limitation. This paper presents a quantitative indication of both regional and global needs for trained manpower in all sectors of the nuclear power industry and compares these with estimates of the corresponding output of engineers. Studies of a few selected countries are also presented to illustrate potential problems on a national scale. (orig./UA) [de

  11. Risk informed analysis of training effectiveness for mitigating accidents of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Ju

    2012-01-01

    A critical area for deriving expected benefits from training and exercise is the measurement of 'training effectiveness'-how well the training inputs are serving the intended purpose. This aspect is often neglected by nuclear organizations, saying that measurement is difficult. However, I believe that a technique in nuclear society has developed sufficiently to measure most important aspects of training by way of human reliability analysis (HRA) used in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of nuclear power plants (NPPs). The consequences of errors caused by lack of training can be evaluated in terms of the overall vulnerability to human error of the facility under consideration. This study presents current situation and considerations for measures of robustness on nuclear accidents and HRA technique on the training effectiveness. In view of risk informed approach with this consideration and an example case, I'd like to identify appropriate relationship between risk measures of robustness and training effectiveness

  12. Sustainable training for customs officer involved in illicit nuclear trafficking detection: national solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes Gilisman, Jorge Luis; Lopez Forteza, Yamil

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The illicit nuclear trafficking detection capabilities demand adequate training, cooperation and equipment. Often customs personnel changing takes place in our countries. A sustainable training strategy should be implemented for avoiding forfeit on detection capabilities. Cuba, not excluded from this particular, designed an Action Plan to provide Customs authorities with basic tools for their own training. The Nuclear Regulatory Authority developed three main addresses: initial training, development of e-tools and preparation of train-of-trainers. Experiences, outcomes and challenges are shown in the present paper. In a simple, quick and not expensive way answer has been given to a national sustainable training strategy. (author)

  13. Training of nuclear power plant personnel in the member states of the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misenta, R.; Matfield, R.S.; Volta, G.; Ancarani, A.; Lhoir, J.

    1981-01-01

    After the Three Mile Island accident the Commission of the European Communities undertook various actions in order to assess the status of the training of nuclear power plant personnel with particular attention to their training for incidents and accidents. This presentation attempts a review of the training situation in the six member states of the European Community together with some other European states, that are operating nuclear power plants. Schemes for the training of control room operators, shift leaders, major European training centres and simulator training will be described

  14. Training nuclear power plant personnel on SR-O reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerny, K.; Boucek, F.; Kveton, M.; Prokopec, Z.; Fleischhans, J.

    1983-01-01

    The SR-O reactor is an experimental pool-type reactor with a maximum output of 1 MW and maximum thermal neutron flux density of 5.3x10 13 m -2 s -1 . The reactor is described in detail and its specifications are given. The protection and control systems of the reactor permit both manual and automatic operation. The reactor is used for training courses for nuclear power plant operators and for post-graduate study courses for other specialists. Intensive courses for 4 to 6 persons take 15 to 20 days. The course is adjusted to the results of introductory theoretical tests. An optimal teaching method has been developed based on the flowchart algorithmic method, dividing activities into operations (manipulations with controls, issuing commands, making records, etc.) and decision making (information reception and processing). (M.D.)

  15. Current NDT activities at Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekinci, S.

    2004-01-01

    Nondestructive testing (NDT) activities at Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center (CNAEM) has been initiated in the Industrial Application Department of the Center which was established in 1976 as the Radioisotope Applications Group for Industry. The Department started its first NDT activity with industrial radiography. The NDT activities have been developed by the support of various national (State Planning Organization (DPT)) and international (IAEA and UNDP) projects. Today, there are five basic NDT techniques (radiography, ultrasonic, magnetic particle, liquid penetrant and eddy current) used in the Industrial Application Department. The Department arranges routinely NDT qualification courses according to ISO 9712 and TS EN 473 standards for level 1 and 2 for Turkish Industry. It also carries out national DPT and IAEA Technical Co-operation projects and gives NDT services in the laboratory and in the field. Digital radiography and digital ultrasonic techniques are being used in advanced NDT applications. This paper describes the NDT activities of CNAEM. (author)

  16. Quality management system of Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurellier, R.; Akchay, S.; Zararsiz, S.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : Technical competence and national/international acceptance of independency of laboratories is ensured by going through accreditations. It provides decreasing the risk of a slowdown in international trade due to unnecessary repetition of testing and analyses. It also eliminates the cost of additional experiments and analyses. Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center (SANAEM) has performed intensive studies to establish an effective and well-functioning QMS (Quality Management System) by full accordance with the requirements of ISO/IEC 17025, since the begining of 2006. Laboratories, especially serving to public health studies and important trade duties require urgent accreditation. In this regard, SANAEM has established a quality management system and performed accreditation studies

  17. An optimal control approach to manpower planning problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. W. J. Lee

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A manpower planning problem is studied in this paper. The model includes scheduling different types of workers over different tasks, employing and terminating different types of workers, and assigning different types of workers to various trainning programmes. The aim is to find an optimal way to do all these while keeping the time-varying demand for minimum number of workers working on each different tasks satisfied. The problem is posed as an optimal discrete-valued control problem in discrete time. A novel numerical scheme is proposed to solve the problem, and an illustrative example is provided.

  18. Training of nuclear facility personnel: proceedings of the sixth symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning excellence in operator training; achieving excellence through the accreditation process; managing and organizing the training function; operations training methods and processes; the role of simulators in achieving excellence; maintenance and technical training methods and processes; staffing and qualifying the training organization; and measuring training effectiveness

  19. Training of nuclear facility personnel: proceedings of the sixth symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-04-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning excellence in operator training; achieving excellence through the accreditation process; managing and organizing the training function; operations training methods and processes; the role of simulators in achieving excellence; maintenance and technical training methods and processes; staffing and qualifying the training organization; and measuring training effectiveness.

  20. [Clinical nursing manpower: development and future prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Fen; Kao, Ching-Chiu

    2014-04-01

    The significant changes in nursing manpower utilization in Taiwan over the past two decades are due in large part to the implementation of the National Health Insurance program and the rising need for long-term care. The changes have impacted clinical nursing manpower utilization in two important ways. Firstly, there has been a substantial increase in overall demand for nursing manpower. In particular, the need for clinical nurses has nearly quadrupled during this time period. Secondly, the level of difficulty involved in patient care has risen dramatically, with factors including increased disease severity and increased care quality expectations, among others. These changes, coupled with demands on nursing manpower imposed from other sectors, underpin and further exacerbate the problem of nursing manpower shortages throughout the healthcare system. To raise the quality of the nursing work environment, the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MOHW) brought together Taiwan's key professional nursing organizations to promote 10 care-reform strategies, establish the nursing-aid manpower system, and create the nursing classification system as an approach to effectively attract nurses to take positions in the medical system.

  1. Full-scope nuclear training simulator -brought to the desktop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaPointe, D.J.; Manz, A.; Hall, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    further tools are developed to enhance the system, all users of the system will benefit from these improvements. We feel this will have meaningful benefit to training and engineering analysis users who will in turn be better able to contribute to nuclear recovery in Ontario Hydro. (author)

  2. Nuclear power plant diagnostics study at the Midland Training Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifman, J.; Rank, P.; Lee, J.C.; Wehe, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of two advanced diagnostic concepts for nuclear power plant diagnostics, the systematic generation and updating of a rule-based system and the simulation filter, at the Midland Nuclear Power Plant Unit 2 Training Simulator. The authors use an entropy minimax pattern recognition algorithm for the systematic construction of the diagnostic rule base. By extracting information from a transient database constructed with the Midland Simulator, the algorithm searches for trends in plant parameters, forming patterns or rules that describe the behavior of the transients. The rules are updated in an incremental manner within the context of the entropy minimax algorithm. The simulation filter is a nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm based on the extended Kalman filter. The authors use the simulation filter to improve the results of crude simulation models by optimally estimating system states given a set of measurements and results from a nonlinear simulation program. The Midland Simulator results of the Three Mile Island accident are significantly improved with the use of the simulation filter

  3. Technology and Manpower in the Textile Industry of the 1970's. Bulletin No. 1578.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    This bulletin describes changes in technology in the textile industry, one of the major industries of the economy, projects their impact on productivity, employment, and occupational requirements, and discusses methods of adjustment. It is designed to partially meet the requirement of the Manpower Development and Training Act that the Secretary of…

  4. VR-1 training reactor in use for twelve years to train experts for the Czech nuclear power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, K.; Sklenka, L.

    2003-01-01

    The VR-1 training reactor has been serving students of the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, for more than 12 years now. The operation history of the reactor is highlighted. The major changes made at the VR-1 reactor are outlined and the main experimentally verified core configurations are shown. Some components of the new equipment installed on the VR-1 reactor are described in detail. The fields of application are shown: the reactor serves not only the training of university students within whole Czech Republic but also the training of specialists, research activities, and information programmes in the nuclear power domain. (P.A.)

  5. Good practices in provision of nuclear safeguards and security training courses at the Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available More than five years have passed since the Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Security (ISCN was established under the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA in December 2010 and started its activities, in response to the commitment of Japan at the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington D.C.. The ISCN has been vigorously involved in capacity building assistance on nuclear nonproliferation (safeguards and nuclear security, mainly in the Asian region. It has provided 105 training courses to 2901 participants in total as of August 2016. The ISCN plays a major role in strengthening nuclear nonproliferation and nuclear security in the region, and this can be considered one of the great results of the Nuclear Security Summit process. The ISCN has cooperated with the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL to establish a base of instructors, particularly for the Center's flagship two-week courses, the Regional Training Course on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Facilities (RTC on PP and the Regional Training Course on State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material (RTC on SSAC. Furthermore, the ISCN has provided training courses for experts in Japan, making the best use of the Center's knowledge and experience of organizing international courses. The ISCN has also started joint synchronized training with the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission (EC JRC on nuclear safeguards. This paper describes the good practices at the ISCN through its five years of activities, focusing on its progress in nuclear safeguards and nuclear security training.

  6. Proceedings of the eighth symposium on training of nuclear facility personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    This conference brought together those persons in the nuclear industry who have a vital interest in the training and licensing of nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel processing plant operators, senior operators, and support personnel for the purpose of an exchange of ideas and information related to the various aspects of training, retraining, examination, and licensing. The document contains 64 papers; each paper was abstracted for the data.

  7. Proceedings of the eighth symposium on training of nuclear facility personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    This conference brought together those persons in the nuclear industry who have a vital interest in the training and licensing of nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel processing plant operators, senior operators, and support personnel for the purpose of an exchange of ideas and information related to the various aspects of training, retraining, examination, and licensing. The document contains 64 papers; each paper was abstracted for the data

  8. Comparison on the working mode and training mode of nuclear safety inspectors between China and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Haiyun

    2013-01-01

    Because of the rapid development of nuclear industry, the nuclear safety regulation work becomes heavier than before. Young inspectors are needed for the regulatory body. It is our important subject to help enhance the inspection ability of inspectors through on-the-job training. This article presents the different approaches on work and training for French and Chinese inspectors, and gives some suggestions for inspector training. (author)

  9. Minority and female training programs at the Ford Nuclear Reactor, University of Michigan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear power industry operations staffs are composed predominantly of white males because most of the personnel come from the nuclear submarine and surface branches of the U.S. Navy. The purpose of the minority and female training programs sponsored by the Ford Nuclear Reactor at the University of Michigan is to provide a path for minorities and women to enter the nuclear industry as operators, technicians, and, in the long term, as graduate engineers. The training programs are aimed at high school students, preferably juniors. While the training is directed toward operation of a nuclear reactor, it is equally applicable to careers in most other technical fields. It is hoped that some of the participants will remain at the Ford Nuclear Reactor as reactor operators, enter college, and obtain college degrees, after which they will enter the nuclear industry as graduate engineers

  10. A systematic approach to the training in the nuclear power industry: The need for standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    The five elements of a open-quotes Systematic Approach to Trainingclose quotes (SAT) are analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation. These elements are also present in the effective application of basic process control. The fundamental negative feedback process control loop is therefore an excellent model for a successful, systematic approach to training in the nuclear power industry. Just as standards are required in today's manufacturing and service industries, eg ISO 9000, so too are control standards needed in the training industry and in particular in the training of nuclear power plant staff. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) produced its TECDOC 525 on open-quotes Training to Establish and Maintain the Qualification and Competence of Nuclear Power Plant Operations Personnelclose quotes in 1989 and the American Nuclear Society published its open-quotes Selection, Qualification, and Training of Personnel for Nuclear Power Plants, an American National Standardclose quotes in 1993. It is important that community colleges, training vendors and organizations such as the Instrument Society of America (ISA), who may be supplying basic or prerequisite training to the nuclear power industry, become aware of these and other standards relating to training in the nuclear power industry

  11. Education and training of operators and maintenance staff at commercial nuclear power stations in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Kataoka, H.

    1998-01-01

    Safe and stable operation of a nuclear power station requires personnel fostering. In Japan, with the objectives of systematically securing qualified people for a long period of time, and maintaining and improving their skills and knowledge, the utilities have created strict personnel training plans, for continuous education and training. Concrete examples of education and training for operators and maintenance personnel at commercial nuclear power stations in Japan, such as education systems training, facility and contents of curriculum, are detailed including some related matters. Recent activities to catch up with environment changes surrounding education and training of operators and maintenance staff are also mentioned. (author)

  12. Nuclear power plant personnel training and its evaluation. A guidebook. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    The Guidebook will prove especially useful for, and is addressed primarily to: nuclear power operating organizations establishing or upgrading their NPP personnel training systems; regulatory personnel responsible for setting requirements and/or evaluating NPP personnel training; and organizations (within or outside the operating organization) responsible for the development, implementation and evaluation of training programmes for NPP personnel. Figs

  13. Development of a Virtual Reality (VR) system for nuclear security training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuo; Hanai, Tasuku

    2014-01-01

    The Integrated Support Center for Nuclear nonproliferation and Nuclear Security (ISCN) under the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) began the development of Virtual Reality (VR) training system for the purpose of teaching trainees nuclear security. ISCN set up two VR training courses by 2013. One is for teaching a nuclear security system of nuclear plants. The VR training system allows trainees to have virtual experiences visiting a nuclear plant. Through these experiences, trainees are able to learn how physical protection systems work in the plant. The course focuses on learning fundamental knowledge and is suitable for trainees having little experiences in the field of nuclear security. The other is for teaching fundamental skills corresponding to a contingency plan in a Central Alarm Station (CAS) of nuclear power plant. Computers of the VR training system deploy an intrusion scenario in a virtual space. Trainees in a group sit in front of 3-D screens and play a role play game in a virtual CAS. Through the exercise, trainees are able to learn skills necessary to the contingency case of nuclear plants. In my presentation, I will introduce the two training courses, advantages and disadvantages of the VR training system, reactions of trainees and future plans. (author)

  14. Center for Nuclear Studies, Memphis State University. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    Programs developed under technical assistance grants address primarily fundamental training of paraprofessional personnel in the operation of power plants and the radiological safety of employees. As such, the programs will represent an important milestone in the training of power plant personnel. However, programs related to maintenance functions have not been developed. Approximately three times as many technicians perform maintenance functions as those who perform operational functions. These technicians are also drawn from the local area residents and must receive training before assuming jobs in nuclear facilities. Development and implementation of training programs for these maintenance technicians represent the next challenge which must be addressed in the development of an energy manpower pool

  15. Evaluation formulas of manpower needs for dismantling of equipments in uranium refining and conversion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumo, Sari; Usui, Hideo; Kubota, Shintaro; Tachibana, Mitsuo; Kawagoshi, Hiroshi; Tokuyasu, Takashi; Takahashi, Nobuo; Morimoto, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Yoshio; Sugitsue, Noritake

    2014-07-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has developed PROject management data evaluation code for DIsmantling Activities (PRODIA) to make an efficient decommissioning for nuclear facilities. PRODIA is a source code which provides estimated value such as manpower needs, costs, etc., for dismantling by evaluation formulas according to the type of nuclear facility. Evaluation formulas of manpower needs for dismantling of equipments about reprocessed uranium conversion in Uranium Refining and Conversion Plant (URCP) have been developed in this report. In the result, evaluation formulas of manpower needs for dismantling of equipment were derived based on the classifications of equipment's functions or work items. These evaluation formulas are widely applicable to the estimation of the manpower needs for dismantling the other nuclear facilities, in particular uranium handling facilities. It was confirmed that some of these evaluation formulas with the same applicable condition could be unified to some inclusive evaluation formulas. It turned out that all steel equipment contaminated by uranium could be evaluated by one evaluation formula. (author)

  16. Current status of international training center for nuclear security and security issues in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong-UK; Sin, Byung Woo

    2013-01-01

    During the 2010 Nuclear Security Summit (NSS) President Lee declared that Korea will establish an international training center (ITC) for nuclear security near the Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC). It will be open to the world in 2014. The government's long term goal is to make the center a hub for education and training in the nuclear field in Asia. The ITC will accomplish this by establishing facilities for practical and realistic exercises through the use of a test bed and various other experiments. The center will also provide comprehensive educational programs for nuclear newcomers. Its main programs include: a well designed educational program, customized training courses, and on-the-job training. This paper will discuss the current status of the ITC and describe practical plans for solving current security issues in Korea. (authors)

  17. Euratom research and training in nuclear reactor safety: Towards European research and the higher education area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, G. van

    2004-01-01

    In this invited lecture, research and training in nuclear fission are looked at from a European perspective with emphasis on the three success factors of any European policy, namely: common needs, vision and instruments, that ought to be strongly shared amongst the stakeholders across the Member States concerned. As a result, the following questions are addressed: What is driving the current EU trend towards more research, more education and more training, in general? Regarding nuclear fission, in particular, who are the end-users of Euratom 'research and training' and what are their expectations from EU programmes? Do all stakeholders share the same vision about European research and training in nuclear fission? What are the instruments proposed by the European Commission (EC) to conduct joint research programmes of common interest for the nuclear fission community? In conclusion, amongst the stakeholders in Europe, there seems to be a wide consensus about common needs and instruments, but not about a common vision regarding nuclear. (author)

  18. Utilization of a full-scope simulation for training the operating personel of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathias, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    A full-scope simulator of the Angra-2 Nuclear Power Plant has been installed at the NUCLEBRAS Training Center in Mambucaba - close to the site where that Plant is being built -, the goal of providing training for the operating personnel of the KWU-design nuclear power plants to be installed in Brazil. Due to the delays which occurred in the construction of Angra-2, NUCLEBRAS has established an extensive program for the utilization of the simulator for the training of operators for German nuclear power plants and for Spain's Trillo Plant. Besides yielding profits to NUCLEBRAS, that program is resulting in considerable experience in the area of nuclear power plant operators' training generating international recognition to the NUCLEBRAS Training Center. (Author) [pt

  19. Training Activities to Maintain Competences in Nuclear Safety and Security: A Case Study of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesteloot, N.; Clarijs, T.; Coeck, M.; Vermeersch, F.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK•CEN, is one of the largest research centers in Belgium. More than 700 employees advance research into nuclear energy and ionizing radiation for civilian use, and develop nuclear technologies for socially valuable purposes. Next to independent fundamental and applied research SCK-CEN provides advice, training, services and products. This paper describes the general approach towards the continuous professional development of all SCK-CEN personnel. The objective of these training activities is to maintain and increase the required competences, in order to optimize the output and the wellbeing on the work floor. Given the nature of the SCK-CEN activities, special attention is given to themes like radiation protection, security and industrial safety. A combination of classical face-to-face training, e-learning and on-the-job training is offered during the onboarding and further career path of an SCK-CEN employee. (author

  20. Nuclear-related training and education offered by academic institutions (less-than-baccalaureate degree)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, L.

    1982-01-01

    Current projections indicate that in addition to the 10,100 technician positions and 6100 existing operator positions in the nuclear power industry, another 9100 technicians and 9700 operators will be required over the next decade. With 56 nuclear plants currently in operation and an additional 35 plants under construction, it is essential that trained technical personnel be available for employment in the nuclear utilities. Because of the growing demand for technicians in the nuclear utility industry, this report has been prepared to identify the nuclear-related, less-than-baccalaureate, technical educational programs provided by academic institutions and to ascertain both the current number of students and the maximum number that could be trained, given present staff and facilities. The data serve as a gauge for the proportion of technician training required by the nuclear industry that can be provided by academic institutions

  1. Training of personnel for nuclear power in Ceske Energeticke Zavody Concern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodny, J.; Krestan, J.

    1983-01-01

    The projects of training of personnel and recruitment of apprentices have to be started 10 years prior to the commissioning of a nuclear power plant. Training starts three years prior to the physical start-up. The education and training of personnel in the nuclear programme including the implementation of their social background is an equivalent component of nuclear safety. The most important aspects are presented of personnel training with regard to organization, recruitment, theoretical and practical education and training, material and technical provisions and social programme. At present personnel training and the education of specialists have reached a high standard but the problem of social care of personnel in future plants is serious and has not been solved. (M.D.)

  2. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor

  3. Interactive Virtual Reactor and Control Room for Education and Training at Universities and Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Yoshinori; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xuefeng; Rizwan, Uddin [University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Efficient and effective education and training of nuclear engineering students and nuclear workers are critical for the safe operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. With an eye toward this need, we have focused on the development of 3D models of virtual labs for education, training as well as to conduct virtual experiments. These virtual labs, that are expected to supplement currently available resources, and have the potential to reduce the cost of education and training, are most easily developed on game-engine platforms. We report some recent extensions to the virtual model of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor.

  4. The nuclear industry in transition: Methods and effects of cross training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starrett, D.M.; Wilczek, T.A.; Armstrong, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    As DOE facilities transition from defense programs to environmental management, cross training is becoming increasingly important as an essential component of change management. When applied to those specific segments of nuclear industry undergoing transition, cross training methods can be especially effective. Use of methodologies such as team approach, change agents, strategic plans, operations plans, specific training, and formal transition techniques can generate many positive benefits to the industry. This paper explores the benefits of cross training, proposes methodology for use when developing cross training for the transition of employees from DOE defense programs to environmental projects, and provides two examples of successful implementation of cross training methods

  5. Systematic Approach to Training for System Engineers in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Jeong-keun

    2015-01-01

    In my paper, comprehensive preparations, tangible applications, and final establishments of training for system engineers are described using practical materials in KHNP. The purpose of this paper is to formulate SAT based training in KHNP, especially for system engineers. Hence, to achieve this goal, over one year study was performed considering voluminous materials and working experiences. Through the process, SAT based training package for system engineers was finished, in the end. In terms of training in NPPs, SAT methodology is the unwavering trend in South Korea since NPPs export to UAE. Therefore, materialization of SAT based training for system engineers from the origin of SAT to the finalization of SAT should not be overlooked. A variety of accident preventive approaches have been adopted since the first commercial NPP operation in Calder Hall, United Kingdom. Among diverse event preventive ways, training has played an important role for the improvement of NPPs reliability and safety. This is reason why nuclear industry in every country has established and maintained own training institutes and methods. Since the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) recommended many betterment plans to US nuclear industry for the elevation of NPPs safety. In the suggested considerations, systematic approach to training, so called SAT appeared in the world. Basically, SAT is composed of five stages, what is called ADDIE. Hence, through ADDIE process, holistic and trustworthy training could be realized in the actual NPPs operation and maintenance. For this reason, SAT is the representative training methodology in the US nuclear business

  6. A report on disaster prevention trainings of nuclear energy, in fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Tamotsu; Katagiri, Hiromi; Akiyama, Takashi; Kikuchi, Masayuki

    2001-05-01

    Trainings on nuclear disaster prevention are often planned and practiced since early times at the nuclear energy relating organizations on many courses. A training carried out in fiscal year 2000 by the Emergent Assistance and Training Center in the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute is decided to a portion on disaster prevention measure at a viewpoint of 'Crisis Management' which is essential element in present disaster prevention measure to fall short at present. In concrete, a crisis management training for nuclear disaster prevention (senior and business courses), an emergent publicity response training, and a disaster prevention training planning training were designed and decided. These trainings were established according to experiences accumulated by inter-company crisis management learning, and were constructed by containing items relating to respective special knowledge, conditions on chemical plants and disaster prevention measure system in U.S.A. and Europe, and so on. Here was described on design and practice of training plan, and practice of the trainings. (G.K)

  7. Systematic Approach to Training for System Engineers in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Jeong-keun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In my paper, comprehensive preparations, tangible applications, and final establishments of training for system engineers are described using practical materials in KHNP. The purpose of this paper is to formulate SAT based training in KHNP, especially for system engineers. Hence, to achieve this goal, over one year study was performed considering voluminous materials and working experiences. Through the process, SAT based training package for system engineers was finished, in the end. In terms of training in NPPs, SAT methodology is the unwavering trend in South Korea since NPPs export to UAE. Therefore, materialization of SAT based training for system engineers from the origin of SAT to the finalization of SAT should not be overlooked. A variety of accident preventive approaches have been adopted since the first commercial NPP operation in Calder Hall, United Kingdom. Among diverse event preventive ways, training has played an important role for the improvement of NPPs reliability and safety. This is reason why nuclear industry in every country has established and maintained own training institutes and methods. Since the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) recommended many betterment plans to US nuclear industry for the elevation of NPPs safety. In the suggested considerations, systematic approach to training, so called SAT appeared in the world. Basically, SAT is composed of five stages, what is called ADDIE. Hence, through ADDIE process, holistic and trustworthy training could be realized in the actual NPPs operation and maintenance. For this reason, SAT is the representative training methodology in the US nuclear business.

  8. Training smarter: Refocus through reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, L.B.

    1991-01-01

    In this era of ever increasing operations and maintenance (O and M) costs, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) like most other nuclear utilities, has been faced with the problem of reducing its overhead costs while at the same time maintaining its commitment to providing effective training. Due in part to the extended shutdown of its operating nuclear plants (Sequoyah and Browns Ferry Nuclear Plants) and faced with continued delays in its construction programs at the Watts Bar and Bellefonte Nuclear Plants, TVA had relied on an expanded complement of personnel in all facets of its nuclear program to get back on track and operating once again. Nuclear Training was no exception. At one point in the recovery process (1988), Nuclear Training had an authorized manpower level of 573. Faced with spiraling O and M costs, potential loss of long-term customers to neighboring utilities, and enormous outstanding debt, TVA management responded by setting goals that included becoming the best electric utility in North America and the most productive and effective agency in the Federal government. Operating TVA like a business became second only to safety as a managerial objective. Accountability for planning ahead, achieving goals, and operating within authorized budgets became a way of life. Work forces were reduced significantly including reduction of Nuclear Training's complement to 203. In spite of the importance of training to a nuclear utility, Nuclear Training was not immune to such sweeping changes. Program scope was refocused on accredited and regulatory training. The purpose of this paper is to explain the major elements of this revitalization program

  9. Nuclear power plant personnel qualifications and training. TSORT: an automated technique to assign tasks to training strategies. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, C.C.

    1984-10-01

    This report discusses TSORT, a technique to assist the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in evaluating whether training program developers have allocated nuclear power plant tasks to appropriate training strategies. The TSORT structure is presented including training categories selected, dimensions of task information considered, measurement metrics used, and a guide to application. TSORT is implemented as an automated software tool for an IBM-PC. It uses full color graphics and interactive menu selection to provide NRC with a variety of evaluation options including: rank ordering of training strategies reasonable for each task, rank ordering of tasks within strategies, and a variety of special analyses. The program code is also presented along with a comprehensive example of 20 realistic tasks illustrating each of 17 options available

  10. Present status of nuclear science education and training in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewamanna, R.

    2007-01-01

    Like others Sri Lankans too have fear of nuclear radiation, probably because of the weak system of proper radiation education. Some National Institutes and few Universities are involved in nuclear science teaching and research. There are two major levels of obtaining radiation or nuclear education and training in Sri Lanka : the University and training courses in nuclear related technology and radiation protection offered by the Atomic Energy Authority of the Ministry of Science and Technology. This paper summarizes the status, some of the activities and problems of radiation education in Sri Lanka. (author)

  11. Group fellowship training in nuclear spectroscopy instrumentation maintenance at the Seibersdorf Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Y.; Abdel-Rassoul, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear spectroscopy instruments are important tools for nuclear research and applications. Several types of nuclear spectrometers are being sent to numerous laboratories in developing countries through technical co-operation projects. These are mostly sophisticated systems based on different radiation detectors, analogue and digital circuitry. In most cases, they use microprocessor or computer techniques involving software and hardware. Maintenance service and repair of these systems is a major problem in many developing countries because suppliers do not set up service stations. The Agency's Laboratories at Seibersdorf started conducting group fellowship training on nuclear spectroscopy instrumentation maintenance in 1987. This article describes the training programme

  12. A method for determining the content of knowledge training for nuclear professionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, C.K.

    2004-01-01

    A developer of knowledge training materials for nuclear professionals is faced with the challenge of determining the appropriate scope and depth of training. This paper presents a method for establishing the content starting from overall objectives of the activity and breaking it down into the job and task level of an individual's specific jobs and tasks. Nuclear safety training is used as an example. In this case there are four stages of break down in the knowledge base before its implementation in jobs and tasks of the station's work processes. This process also satisfies the training principles for enabling effective operational decision making. (author)

  13. Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization guidance for the development of continuing technical training. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization (NCSO) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of highly qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in nuclear criticality safety at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and throughout the DOE complex. Continuing technical training is training outside of the initial qualification program to address identified organization-wide needs. Typically, this training is used to improve organization performance in the conduct of business. This document provides guidelines for the development of the technical portions of the Continuing Training Program. It is not a step-by-step procedure, but a collection of considerations to be used during the development process

  14. Training methods and facilities on reactor and simulators at the Grenoble Nuclear Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destot, M.; Siebert, S.

    1987-01-01

    Siloette is a CEA unit with a threshold vocation: operation of the Siloette 100 KW pool-type research reactor; basic training in reactor physics for nuclear power plant operators; and production of nuclear power plant simulators: PWR, GCR and more generally of all types of industrial unit simulators, thermal power plant, network, chemical plant, etc. From this experience, they would emphasize in particular the synergy arising from these complementary activities, the essential role of training in basic principles as a complement to operation training, and the ever-increasing importance of design ergonomics of the training means

  15. Research of training device on goniometry detector of nuclear burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Shuijun; Wu Jiangfeng; Qin Jin

    2012-01-01

    The problem is that a Goniometry Detector is unable to be used to train, which lacks of simulation training environment and real training conditions. Its basic working principle is analyzed, and the overall program which is suitable to the training simulator is raised. We also describe the design of light source. We developed a set of experimental device and did some experiments on the basis of it. The experimental results show that technical approach of the program is feasible and the basic performance can meet training needs. The set of experimental device can solve practical training problems and play an important military benefit by improvements. (authors)

  16. IAEA Technical Co-operation activities: Asia and the Pacific. Workshop on training nuclear laboratory technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeed, S.S.

    1976-01-01

    The workshop was held to exchange information on existing facilities and programmes in Asia and the Pacific for training nuclear laboratory technicians, to identify future training needs and to assess the need for IAEA's involvement in this field. As the participants outlined the requirements for nuclear laboratory technician training and the facilities available in their respective countries, it became evident that, in addition to the training of radioisotope laboratory technicians, they also wished to review the need for technician training for the operation of nuclear power plants and industrial application of atomic energy. The terms of reference of the workshop were extended accordingly. The opening address by Chang Suk Lee, the Korean Vice Minister of Science and Technology, noted the valuable contribution to quality control and other industrial uses that nuclear techniques have made in his country. He also reviewed the application of nuclear techniques in Korean agriculture and medicine. The participants explored various forms of co-operation that could be established between countries of the region. Exchange programmes, not only for students but also for expert teachers, and the exchange or loan of equipment were suggested. It was felt that some generalized training courses could be organized on a regional basis, and two countries advocated the setting up of a regional training centre. One suggestion was to arrange regional training courses in special fields that would move from one country to another. The need was felt for periodic regional meetings on training methods, course content and other questions relating to training of laboratory technicians. The IAEA was requested to act as a clearinghouse for information on available training facilities in the region and to advise on the curricula for technician training courses. The Agency was also asked to organize short courses for the training of instructors of technicians in the various fields of atomic

  17. Establishment of Oversea HRD Network and Operation of International Nuclear Education/Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. J.; Min, B. J.; Han, K. W.

    2008-02-01

    The project deals with establishment of international network for human resources and the development of international nuclear education and training programs. The primary result is the establishment of KAERI International Nuclear R and D Academy as a new activity on cooperation for human resource development and building network. For this purpose, KAERI concluded the MOU with Vietnamese Universities and selected 3 students to provide Master and Ph. D. Courses in 2008. KAERI also held the 3rd World Nuclear University Summer Institute, in which some 150 international nuclear professionals attended for 6 weeks. Also, as part of regional networking, the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) was promoted through development of a cyber platform and accomplishment the first IAEA e-training course. There were 3 kind of development activities for the international cooperation of human resources development. Firstly, the project provided training courses on nuclear energy development for the Egyptian Nuclear personnel under the bilateral cooperation. Secondly, the project published the English textbook and its lecture materials on introduction to nuclear engineering and fundamentals on OPR 1000 system technology. Lastly, the project developed a new KOICA training course on research reactor and radioisotope application technology to expand the KOICA sponsorship from 2008. The international nuclear education/training program had offered 15 courses to 314 people from 52 countries. In parallel, the project developed 11 kinds of lecturer materials and also developed 29 kinds of cyber lecturer materials. The operation of the International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC) has contributed remarkably not only to the effective implementation of education/training activities of this project, but also to the promotion of other domestic and international activities of KAERI and other organizations

  18. Establishment of Oversea HRD Network and Operation of International Nuclear Education/Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. J.; Min, B. J.; Han, K. W. (and others)

    2008-02-15

    The project deals with establishment of international network for human resources and the development of international nuclear education and training programs. The primary result is the establishment of KAERI International Nuclear R and D Academy as a new activity on cooperation for human resource development and building network. For this purpose, KAERI concluded the MOU with Vietnamese Universities and selected 3 students to provide Master and Ph. D. Courses in 2008. KAERI also held the 3rd World Nuclear University Summer Institute, in which some 150 international nuclear professionals attended for 6 weeks. Also, as part of regional networking, the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) was promoted through development of a cyber platform and accomplishment the first IAEA e-training course. There were 3 kind of development activities for the international cooperation of human resources development. Firstly, the project provided training courses on nuclear energy development for the Egyptian Nuclear personnel under the bilateral cooperation. Secondly, the project published the English textbook and its lecture materials on introduction to nuclear engineering and fundamentals on OPR 1000 system technology. Lastly, the project developed a new KOICA training course on research reactor and radioisotope application technology to expand the KOICA sponsorship from 2008. The international nuclear education/training program had offered 15 courses to 314 people from 52 countries. In parallel, the project developed 11 kinds of lecturer materials and also developed 29 kinds of cyber lecturer materials. The operation of the International Nuclear Training and Education Center (INTEC) has contributed remarkably not only to the effective implementation of education/training activities of this project, but also to the promotion of other domestic and international activities of KAERI and other organizations.

  19. Design of training centres for nuclear power plants. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists` meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to provide an international forum for presentation and discussion of experiences in the design and operation of training centres for nuclear power plant personnel. The term ``training centre``, as used during this meeting, includes both those facilities that are dedicated to provide training for an individual nuclear power plants, and that are often located near that plant, as well as facilities that provide training for multiple NPPs, and which are operated by vendors or by utility organizations that are not directly controlled by the NPP organizations which they serve. The topic, ``design of training centres`` was used in its broadest sense to include not only facilities (such as classrooms, laboratories and simulators), but also design of: training organizations; training programmes and materials; and examination/evaluation methods. Refs, figs, tabs.

  20. Design of training centres for nuclear power plants. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to provide an international forum for presentation and discussion of experiences in the design and operation of training centres for nuclear power plant personnel. The term ''training centre'', as used during this meeting, includes both those facilities that are dedicated to provide training for an individual nuclear power plants, and that are often located near that plant, as well as facilities that provide training for multiple NPPs, and which are operated by vendors or by utility organizations that are not directly controlled by the NPP organizations which they serve. The topic, ''design of training centres'' was used in its broadest sense to include not only facilities (such as classrooms, laboratories and simulators), but also design of: training organizations; training programmes and materials; and examination/evaluation methods. Refs, figs, tabs