WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear level densities

  1. Nuclear Level Densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent research in the area of nuclear level densities is reviewed. The current interest in nuclear astrophysics and in structure of nuclei off of the line of stability has led to the development of radioactive beam facilities with larger machines currently being planned. Nuclear level densities for the systems used to produce the radioactive beams influence substantially the production rates of these beams. The modification of level-density parameters near the drip lines would also affect nucleosynthesis rates and abundances

  2. Nuclear level density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso Junior, J.L.

    1982-10-01

    Experimental data show that the number of nuclear states increases rapidly with increasing excitation energy. The properties of highly excited nuclei are important for many nuclear reactions, mainly those that go via processes of the compound nucleus type. In this case, it is sufficient to know the statistical properties of the nuclear levels. First of them is the function of nuclear levels density. Several theoretical models which describe the level density are presented. The statistical mechanics and a quantum mechanics formalisms as well as semi-empirical results are analysed and discussed. (Author) [pt

  3. Level densities in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckerman, M.

    1978-01-01

    In the independent-particle model nucleons move independently in a central potential. There is a well-defined set of single- particle orbitals, each nucleon occupies one of these orbitals subject to Fermi statistics, and the total energy of the nucleus is equal to the sum of the energies of the individual nucleons. The basic question is the range of validity of this Fermi gas description and, in particular, the roles of the residual interactions and collective modes. A detailed examination of experimental level densities in light-mass system is given to provide some insight into these questions. Level densities over the first 10 MeV or so in excitation energy as deduced from neutron and proton resonances data and from spectra of low-lying bound levels are discussed. To exhibit some of the salient features of these data comparisons to independent-particle (shell) model calculations are presented. Shell structure is predicted to manifest itself through discontinuities in the single-particle level density at the Fermi energy and through variatons in the occupancy of the valence orbitals. These predictions are examined through combinatorial calculations performed with the Grover [Phys. Rev., 157, 832(1967), 185 1303(1969)] odometer method. Before the discussion of the experimenta results, statistical mechanical level densities for spherical nuclei are reviewed. After consideration of deformed nuclei, the conclusions resulting from this work are drawn. 7 figures, 3 tables

  4. Level density from realistic nuclear potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calboreanu, A.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear level density of some nuclei is calculated using a realistic set of single particle states (sps). These states are derived from the parameterization of nuclear potentials that describe the observed sps over a large number of nuclei. This approach has the advantage that one can infer level density for nuclei that are inaccessible for a direct study, but are very important in astrophysical processes such as those close to the drip lines. Level densities at high excitation energies are very sensitive to the actual set of sps. The fact that the sps spectrum is finite has extraordinary consequences upon nuclear reaction yields due to the leveling-off of the level density at extremely high excitation energies wrongly attributed so far to other nuclear effects. Single-particle level density parameter a parameter is extracted by fitting the calculated densities to the standard Bethe formula

  5. Systematics of nuclear level density parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucurescu, Dorel; Egidy, Till von

    2005-01-01

    The level density parameters for the back-shifted Fermi gas (both without and with energy-dependent level density parameter) and the constant temperature models have been determined for 310 nuclei between 18 F and 251 Cf by fitting the complete level schemes at low excitation energies and the s-wave neutron resonance spacings at the neutron binding energies. Simple formulae are proposed for the description of the two parameters of each of these models, which involve only quantities available from the mass tables. These formulae may constitute a reliable tool for extrapolating to nuclei far from stability, where nuclear level densities cannot be measured

  6. Combinatorial nuclear level-density model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrenholt, H.; Åberg, S.; Dobrowolski, A.; Døssing, Th.; Ichikawa, T.; Möller, P.

    2013-01-01

    A microscopic nuclear level-density model is presented. The model is a completely combinatorial (micro-canonical) model based on the folded-Yukawa single-particle potential and includes explicit treatment of pairing, rotational and vibrational states. The microscopic character of all states enables extraction of level-distribution functions with respect to pairing gaps, parity and angular momentum. The results of the model are compared to available experimental data: level spacings at neutron separation energy, data on total level-density functions from the Oslo method, cumulative level densities from low-lying discrete states, and data on parity ratios. Spherical and deformed nuclei follow basically different coupling schemes, and we focus on deformed nuclei

  7. Study of nuclear level densities for exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasrabadi, M. N.; Sepiani, M.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear level density is one of the properties of nuclei with widespread applications in astrophysics and nuclear medicine. Since there has been little experimental and theoretical research on the study of nuclei which are far from stability line, studying nuclear level density for these nuclei is of crucial importance. Also, as nuclear level density is an important input for nuclear research codes, hence studying the methods for calculation of this parameter is essential. Besides introducing various methods and models for calculating nuclear level density for practical applications, we used exact spectra distribution (SPDM) for determining nuclear level density of two neutron and proton enriched exotic nuclei with the same mass number.

  8. Nuclear Level densities from drip line to drip line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilaire, S.; Goriely, S.

    2007-01-01

    New energy-, spin-, parity-dependent level densities based on the microscopic combinatorial model are presented and compared with available experimental data as well as with other nuclear level densities usually employed in nuclear reaction codes. These microscopic level densities are made available in a table format for nearly 8500 nuclei

  9. Effect of pairing in nuclear level density at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhine Kumar, A.K.; Modi, Swati; Arumugam, P.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear level density (NLD) has been an interesting topic for researchers, due its importance in many aspects of nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear medicine, and other applied areas. The calculation of NLD helps us to understand the energy distribution of the excited levels of nuclei, entropy, specific heat, reaction cross sections etc. In this work the effect of temperature and pairing on level-density of the nucleus 116 Sn has been studied

  10. Tables of nuclear level density parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Ghosh, S.K.; Majumdar, H.

    1976-03-01

    The Renormalized Gas Model (RGM) has been used to calculate single particle level density parameters for more than 2000 nucleides over the range 9<=Z<=126 (15<=A<=338). Three separate tables present the elements on or near the valley of beta stability, neutron-rich fission fragment nucleides, and transitional nuclei, actinides and light-mass super heavy elements. Each table identifies the nucleus in terms of Z and N and presents the RGM deformation energy of binding, the total RGM structural energy correction over the free gas Fermi surface, and the level density parameter

  11. Study of nuclear level density parameter and its temperature dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasrabadi, M. N.; Behkami, A. N.

    2000-01-01

    The nuclear level density ρ is the basic ingredient required for theoretical studies of nuclear reaction and structure. It describes the statistical nuclear properties and is expressed as a function of various constants of motion such as number of particles, excitation energy and angular momentum. In this work the energy and spin dependence of nuclear level density will be presented and discussed. In addition the level density parameter α will be extracted from this level density information, and its temperature and mass dependence will be obtained

  12. Recent advances in measurements of the nuclear level density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Bency

    2007-01-01

    A short review of recent advances in measurements of the nuclear level density is given. First results of the inverse level density parameter - angular momentum correlation in a number of nuclei around Z∼50 shell region at an excitation energy around 0.3 MeV/nucleon are presented. Significant variations observed over and above the expected shell corrections are discussed in context of the emerging trends in microscopic calculations of the nuclear level density. (author)

  13. Effect of vibrational states on nuclear level density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plujko, V. A.; Gorbachenko, O. M.

    2007-01-01

    Simple methods to calculate a vibrational enhancement factor of a nuclear level density with allowance for damping of collective state are considered. The results of the phenomenological approach and the microscopic quasiparticle-phonon model are compared. The practical method of calculation of a vibrational enhancement factor and level density parameters is recommended

  14. Thermodynamics of excited nuclei and nuclear level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamurthy, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    A review has been made of the different approaches that are being used for a theoretical calculation of nuclear level densities. It is pointed out that while the numerical calculations based on the partition function approach and shell model single particle level schemes have shed important insight into the influence of nuclear shell effects on level densities and its excitation energy dependence and have brought out the inadequacy of the conventional Bethe Formula, these calculations are yet to reach a level where they can be directly used for quantitative comparisons. Some of the important drawbacks of the numerical calculations are also discussed. In this context, a new semi-empirical level density formula is described which while retaining the simplicity of analytical formulae, takes into account nuclear shell effects in a more realistic manner. (author)

  15. Nuclear level density parameter 's dependence on angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta; Kailas, S.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear level densities represent a very important ingredient in the statistical Model calculations of nuclear reaction cross sections and help to understand the microscopic features of the excited nuclei. Most of the earlier experimental nuclear level density measurements are confined to low excitation energy and low spin region. A recent experimental investigation of nuclear level densities in high excitation energy and angular momentum domain with some interesting results on inverse level density parameter's dependence on angular momentum in the region around Z=50 has motivated us to study and analyse these experimental results in a microscopic theoretical framework. In the experiment, heavy ion fusion reactions are used to populate the excited and rotating nuclei and measured the α particle evaporation spectra in coincidence with ray multiplicity. Residual nuclei are in the range of Z R 48-55 with excitation energy range 30 to 40 MeV and angular momentum in 10 to 25. The inverse level density parameter K is found to be in the range of 9.0 - 10.5 with some exceptions

  16. Systematics of nuclear mass and level density formulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hisashi [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    The phenomenological models of the nuclear mass and level density are close related to each other, the nuclear ground and excited state properties are described by using the parameter systematics on the mass and level density formulas. The main aim of this work is to provide in an analytical framework the improved energy dependent shell, pairing and deformation corrections generalized to the collective enhancement factors, which offer a systematic prescription over a great number of nuclear reaction cross sections. The new formulas are shown to be in close agreement with not only the empirical nuclear mass data but the measured slow neutron resonance spacings, and experimental systematics observed in the excitation energy dependent properties. (author)

  17. Unified model of nuclear mass and level density formulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hisashi

    2001-01-01

    The objective of present work is to obtain a unified description of nuclear shell, pairing and deformation effects for both ground state masses and level densities, and to find a new set of parameter systematics for both the mass and the level density formulas on the basis of a model for new single-particle state densities. In this model, an analytical expression is adopted for the anisotropic harmonic oscillator spectra, but the shell-pairing correlation are introduced in a new way. (author)

  18. Nuclear level density variation with angular momentum induced shape transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    Variation of Nuclear level density (NLD) with the excitation energy and angular momentum in particular has been a topic of interest in the recent past and there have been continuous efforts in this direction on the theoretical and experimental fronts but a conclusive trend in the variation of nuclear level density parameter with angular momentum has not been achieved so far. A comprehensive investigation of N=68 isotones around the compound nucleus 119 Sb from neutron rich 112 Ru (Z=44) to neutron deficient 127 Pr (Z= 59) nuclei is presented to understand the angular momentum induced variations in inverse level density parameter and the possible influence of deformation and structural transitions on the variations on NLd

  19. Combinatorial nuclear level density by a Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerf, N.

    1994-01-01

    We present a new combinatorial method for the calculation of the nuclear level density. It is based on a Monte Carlo technique, in order to avoid a direct counting procedure which is generally impracticable for high-A nuclei. The Monte Carlo simulation, making use of the Metropolis sampling scheme, allows a computationally fast estimate of the level density for many fermion systems in large shell model spaces. We emphasize the advantages of this Monte Carlo approach, particularly concerning the prediction of the spin and parity distributions of the excited states,and compare our results with those derived from a traditional combinatorial or a statistical method. Such a Monte Carlo technique seems very promising to determine accurate level densities in a large energy range for nuclear reaction calculations

  20. Angular momentum dependence of the nuclear level density parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta; Kailas, S.

    2010-01-01

    Dependence of nuclear level density parameter on the angular momentum and temperature is investigated in a theoretical framework using the statistical theory of hot rotating nuclei. The structural effects are incorporated by including shell correction, shape, and deformation. The nuclei around Z≅50 with an excitation energy range of 30 to 40 MeV are considered. The calculations are in good agreement with the experimentally deduced inverse level density parameter values especially for 109 In, 113 Sb, 122 Te, 123 I, and 127 Cs nuclei.

  1. Parity dependence of the nuclear level density at high excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, B.V.; Agrawal, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    The basic underlying assumption ρ(l+1, J)=ρ(l, J) in the level density function ρ(U, J, π) has been checked on the basis of high quality data available on individual resonance parameters (E 0 , Γ n , J π ) for s- and p-wave neutrons in contrast to the earlier analysis where information about p-wave resonance parameters was meagre. The missing level estimator based on the partial integration over a Porter-Thomas distribution of neutron reduced widths and the Dyson-Mehta Δ 3 statistic for the level spacing have been used to ascertain that the s- and p-wave resonance level spacings D(0) and D(1) are not in error because of spurious and missing levels. The present work does not validate the tacit assumption ρ(l+1, J)=ρ(l, J) and confirms that the level density depends upon parity at high excitation. The possible implications of the parity dependence of the level density on the results of statistical model calculations of nuclear reaction cross sections as well as on pre-compound emission have been emphasized. (orig.)

  2. Nuclear level density of 166Er with static deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasrabadi, M.N.

    2006-01-01

    The level densities of 166 Er is calculated using the microscopic theory of interacting fermions and is compared with experimental. It is concluded that the data can be reproduced with level density formalism for nuclei with static deformation

  3. Nuclear level density and gamma strength function in 64Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. K.; Spyrou, A.; Ahn, T.; Dombos, A. C.; Liddick, S. N.; Montes, F.; Naqvi, F.; Richman, D.; Schatz, H.; Brown, J.; Childers, K.; Crider, B. P.; Prokop, C. J.; Deleeuw, E.; Deyoung, P. A.; Langer, C.; Lewis, R.; Meisel, Z.; Pereira, J.; Quinn, S. J.; Schmidt, K.; Larsen, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.

    2017-09-01

    The Fe-Cd mass region exhibits enhanced collectivity and an unexpected increased in gamma-decay probability at low energies. These effects could be significant for r-process nucleosynthesis, where masses, beta-decay probabilities, and neutron capture cross sections are among the most important inputs. Neutron capture is notoriously difficult to measure; so the recent development of an indirect technique to constrain neutron-captures far from stability is especially valuable. This is the beta-Oslo method, which allows the extraction of the nuclear level density and gamma-ray strength function to compute neutron-capture cross sections. This work reports on 64Fe, populated via beta-decay of 64Mn at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and measured with the 4pi Summing NaI (SuN) total gamma-ray spectrometer.

  4. Level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatyuk, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    For any applications of the statistical theory of nuclear reactions it is very important to obtain the parameters of the level density description from the reliable experimental data. The cumulative numbers of low-lying levels and the average spacings between neutron resonances are usually used as such data. The level density parameters fitted to such data are compiled in the RIPL Starter File for the tree models most frequently used in practical calculations: i) For the Gilber-Cameron model the parameters of the Beijing group, based on a rather recent compilations of the neutron resonance and low-lying level densities and included into the beijing-gc.dat file, are chosen as recommended. As alternative versions the parameters provided by other groups are given into the files: jaeri-gc.dat, bombay-gc.dat, obninsk-gc.dat. Additionally the iljinov-gc.dat, and mengoni-gc.dat files include sets of the level density parameters that take into account the damping of shell effects at high energies. ii) For the backed-shifted Fermi gas model the beijing-bs.dat file is selected as the recommended one. Alternative parameters of the Obninsk group are given in the obninsk-bs.dat file and those of Bombay in bombay-bs.dat. iii) For the generalized superfluid model the Obninsk group parameters included into the obninsk-bcs.dat file are chosen as recommended ones and the beijing-bcs.dat file is included as an alternative set of parameters. iv) For the microscopic approach to the level densities the files are: obninsk-micro.for -FORTRAN 77 source for the microscopical statistical level density code developed in Obninsk by Ignatyuk and coworkers, moller-levels.gz - Moeller single-particle level and ground state deformation data base, moller-levels.for -retrieval code for Moeller single-particle level scheme. (author)

  5. Large model-space calculation of the nuclear level density parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, B.K.; Samaddar, S.K.; De, J.N.; Shlomo, S.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, several attempts have been made to obtain nuclear level density (ρ) and level density parameter (α) within the microscopic approaches based on path integral representation of the partition function. The results for the inverse level density parameter K es and the level density as a function of excitation energy are presented

  6. IAEA advisory group meeting on basic and applied problems of nuclear level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, M.R.

    1983-06-01

    Separate entries were made in the data base for 17 of the 19 papers included. Two papers were previously included in the data base. Workshop reports are included on (1) nuclear level density theories and nuclear model reaction cross-section calculations and (2) extraction of nuclear level density information from experimental data

  7. The management-retrieval code of nuclear level density sub-library (CENPL-NLD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Zhigang; Su Zongdi; Huang Zhongfu; Dong Liaoyuan

    1995-01-01

    The management-retrieval code of the Nuclear Level Density (NLD) is presented. It contains two retrieval ways: single nucleus (SN) and neutron reaction (NR). The latter contains four kinds of retrieval types. This code not only can retrieve level density parameter and the data related to the level density, but also can calculate the relevant data by using different level density parameters and do comparison of the calculated results with related data in order to help user to select level density parameters

  8. Excitation energy and angular momentum dependence of the nuclear level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi, R.; Kakavand, T.; Behkami, A. N.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the excitation energy (E) dependence of nuclear level density for Bethe formula and constant temperature model. The level density parameter aa nd the back shifted energy from the Bethe formula are obtained by fitting the complete level schemes. Also the level density parameters from the constant temperature model have been determined for several nuclei. we have shown that the microscopic theory provides more precise information on the nuclear level densities. On the other hand, the spin cut-off parameter and effective moment of inertia are determined by studying of the angular momentum (J) dependence of the nuclear level density, and effective moment of inertia is compared with rigid body value.

  9. Nuclear Level Densities for Modeling Nuclear Reactions: An Efficient Approach Using Statistical Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvin W. Johnson

    2005-01-01

    The general goal of the project is to develop and implement computer codes and input files to compute nuclear densities of state. Such densities are important input into calculations of statistical neutron capture, and are difficult to access experimentally. In particular, we will focus on calculating densities for nuclides in the mass range A ∼ 50-100. We use statistical spectroscopy, a moments method based upon a microscopic framework, the interacting shell model. Second year goals and milestones: Develop two or three competing interactions (based upon surface-delta, Gogny, and NN-scattering) suitable for application to nuclei up to A = 100. Begin calculations for nuclides with A = 50-70

  10. Nuclear level densities with pairing and self-consistent ground-state shell effects

    CERN Document Server

    Arnould, M

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear level density calculations are performed using a model of fermions interacting via the pairing force, and a realistic single particle potential. The pairing interaction is treated within the BCS approximation with different pairing strength values. The single particle potentials are derived in the framework of an energy-density formalism which describes self-consistently the ground states of spherical nuclei. These calculations are extended to statistically deformed nuclei, whose estimated level densities include rotational band contributions. The theoretical results are compared with various experimental data. In addition, the level densities for several nuclei far from stability are compared with the predictions of a back-shifted Fermi gas model. Such a comparison emphasizes the possible danger of extrapolating to unknown nuclei classical level density formulae whose parameter values are tailored for known nuclei. (41 refs).

  11. Experimental nuclear level densities and γ-ray strength functions in Sc and V isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.; Ingebretsen, F.; Messelt, S.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Syed, N. U. H.; Chankova, R.; Loennroth, T.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear physics group at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory has developed a method to extract nuclear level density and γ-ray strength function from first-generation γ-ray spectra. This method is applied on the nuclei 44,45 Sc and 50,51 V in this work. The experimental level densities of 44,45 Sc are compared to calculated level densities using a microscopic model based on BCS quasiparticles within the Nilsson level scheme. The γ-ray strength functions are also compared to theoretical expectations, showing an unexpected enhancement of the γ-ray strength for low γ energies (E γ ≤3 MeV) in all the isotopes studied here. The physical origin of this enhancement is not yet understood

  12. Calculation of nuclear level density parameters of some light deformed medical radionuclides using collective excitation modes of observed nuclear spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuducu, S.; Sarac, H.; Akti, N. N.; Boeluekdemir, M. H.; Tel, E.

    2010-01-01

    In this study the nuclear energy level density based on nuclear collective excitation mechanism has been identified in terms of the low-lying collective level bands at near the neutron binding energy. Nuclear level density parameters of some light deformed medical radionuclides used widely in medical applications have been calculated by using different collective excitation modes of observed nuclear spectra. The calculated parameters have been used successfully in estimation of the neutron-capture cross section basic data for the production of new medical radionuclides. The investigated radionuclides have been considered in the region of mass number 40< A< 100. The method used in the present work assumes equidistance spacing of the collective coupled state bands of the interest radionuclides. The present calculated results have been compared with the compiled values from the literatures for s-wave neutron resonance data.

  13. Effects of pairing correlation on nuclear level density parameter and nucleon separation energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesekaran, T.R.; Selvaraj, S.

    2002-01-01

    A systematic study of effects of pairing correlations on nuclear level density parameter 'a' and neutron separation energy S N is presented for 152 Gd using statistical theory of nuclei with deformation, collective and noncollective rotational degrees of freedom, shell effects, and pairing correlations

  14. The Hagedorn spectrum, nuclear level densities and first order phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, Luciano G.; Larsen, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.; Siem, S.

    2015-01-01

    An exponential mass spectrum, like the Hagedorn spectrum, with slope 1/T H was interpreted as fixing an upper limiting temperature T H that the system can achieve. However, thermodynamically, such spectrum indicates a 1 st order phase transition at a fixed temperature T H . A much lower energy example is the log linear level nuclear density below the neutron binding energy that prevails throughout the nuclear chart. We show that, for non-magic nuclei, such linearity implies a 1 st order phase transition from the pairing superfluid to an ideal gas of quasi particles

  15. The Hagedorn spectrum, nuclear level densities and first order phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, Luciano G., E-mail: lgmoretto@lbl.gov [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Larsen, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.; Siem, S. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2015-10-15

    An exponential mass spectrum, like the Hagedorn spectrum, with slope 1/T{sub H} was interpreted as fixing an upper limiting temperature T{sub H} that the system can achieve. However, thermodynamically, such spectrum indicates a 1{sup st} order phase transition at a fixed temperature T{sub H}. A much lower energy example is the log linear level nuclear density below the neutron binding energy that prevails throughout the nuclear chart. We show that, for non-magic nuclei, such linearity implies a 1{sup st} order phase transition from the pairing superfluid to an ideal gas of quasi particles.

  16. Effect of different level density prescriptions on the calculated neutron nuclear reaction cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed investigation is carried out to determine the effect of different level density prescriptions on the computed neutron nuclear data of Ni-58 in the energy range 5-25 MeV. Calculations are performed in the framework of the multistep Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory including the Kalbach exciton model and Brink-Axel giant dipole resonance model for radiative capture. Level density prescriptions considered in this investigation are based on the original Gilbert-Cameron, improved Gilbert-Cameron, backshifted Fermi-gas and the Ignatyuk, et al. approaches. The effect of these prescriptions is discussed, with special reference to (n,p), (n,2n), (n,alpha) and total particle-production cross sections. (author). 17 refs, 8 figs

  17. Nuclear Data for Reactor Physics: Cross sections and level densities in the actinide region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernstein L.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear data in the actinide region are particularly important because they are basis behind all simulations of nuclear reactor core behaviour over both long time scales (fuel depletion and waste production and short time scales (accident scenarios. Nuclear reaction cross sections must be known as precisely as possible so that core reaction rates can be accurately calculated. Although cross section measurements in this region have been widely performed, for certain nuclei, particularly those with short half lives, direct measurements are either very difficult or impossible and thus reactor simulations must rely on theoretical calculations or extrapolations from neighbouring nuclei. The greatest uncertainty in theoretical cross section calculations comes from the lack of knowledge of level densities, for which predicted values can often be incorrect by a factor of two or more. Therefore there is a strong case for a systematic experimental study of level densities in the actinide region for the purpose of a providing a stringent test of theoretical cross section calculations for nuclei where experimental cross section data are available and b for providing better estimations of cross sections for nuclei in which no cross section data are available.

  18. Stochastic estimation of nuclear level density in the nuclear shell model: An application to parity-dependent level density in 58Ni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noritaka Shimizu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a novel method to obtain level densities in large-scale shell-model calculations. Our method is a stochastic estimation of eigenvalue count based on a shifted Krylov-subspace method, which enables us to obtain level densities of huge Hamiltonian matrices. This framework leads to a successful description of both low-lying spectroscopy and the experimentally observed equilibration of Jπ=2+ and 2− states in 58Ni in a unified manner.

  19. On the questions of the nuclear level density and the E1 photon strength functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Dunford, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    New results were derived from average level spacings of neutron resonances for the spin dispersion parameter of the nuclear level density, which demonstrated the influence of shell effects, as well as the interplay of nucleon pairing correlations for nuclei in the mass range from 29 Si to 241 Pu. The volume and surface components of the nuclear level density parameter, as well as the shell-damping factor, were determined as, a v = 0.076 ± 0.009 MeV -1 , a s = 0.180 ± 0.047 MeV -1 , and y 0 = 0.047 ± 0.04 MeV±, respectively. The effective nucleon mass at the Fermi surface is derived as m*/m = 1.09 ± 0.13. New evidence is presented for a dipole-quadrupole interaction term in the primary E1 transitions of average resonance capture data. This evidence is obtained by testing a proposed generalized Landau Fermi liquid model for spherical and deformed nuclei, which includes the effect of the dipole-quadrupole interaction. The Landau-Migdal interaction constant and the effective nucleon mass, are determined as F 0 prime = 1.49 ± 0.08, and m*/m=1.04 ± 0.07, respectively

  20. Improving the description of collective effects within the combinatorial model of nuclear level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilaire, S.; Girod, M.; Goriely, S.

    2011-01-01

    The combinatorial model of nuclear level densities has now reached a level of accuracy comparable to that of the best global analytical expressions without suffering from the limits imposed by the statistical hypothesis on which the latter expressions rely. In particular, it provides naturally, non Gaussian spin distribution as well as non equipartition of parities which are known to have a significant impact on cross section predictions at low energies. Our first global model developed in Ref. 1 suffered from deficiencies, in particular in the way the collective effects - both vibrational and rotational - were treated. We have recently improved this treatment using simultaneously the single particle levels and collective properties predicted by a newly derived Gogny interaction, therefore enabling a microscopic description of energy-dependent shell, pairing and deformation effects. In addition, for deformed nuclei, the transition to sphericity is coherently taken into account on the basis of a temperature-dependent Hartree-Fock calculation which provides at each temperature the structure properties needed to build the level densities. This new method is described and shown to give promising preliminary results with respect to available experimental data. (authors)

  1. Nuclear Level Densities for Modeling Nuclear Reactions: An Efficient Approach Using Statistical Spectroscopy: Annual Scientific Report July 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvin W. Johnson

    2004-01-01

    The general goal of the project is to develop and implement computer codes and input files to compute nuclear densities of state. Such densities are important input into calculations of statistical neutron capture, and are difficult to access experimentally. In particular, we will focus on calculating densities for nuclides in the mass range A ?????? 50 - 100. We use statistical spectroscopy, a moments method based upon a microscopic framework, the interacting shell model. In this report we present our progress for the past year

  2. On the evaluation of semiclassical nuclear many-particle many-hole level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blin, A.H.; Hiller, B.; Schuck, P.; Yannouleas, C.

    1985-10-01

    An exact general scheme is described to calculate the m-particle n-hole fermion level densities for an arbitrary single particle Hamiltonian taking into account the Pauli exclusion principle. This technique is applied to obtain level densities of the three dimensional isotropic harmonic oscillator semiclassically in the Thomas-Fermi approach. In addition, we study the l-particle l-hole level density of the Woods-Saxon potential. For the harmonic oscillator we analyze the temperature dependence of the linear response function and the influence of pairing correlations on the l-particle l-hole level density. Finally, a Taylor expansion method of the m-particle n-hole level densities is discussed

  3. Importance of nuclear triaxiality for electromagnetic strength, level density and neutron capture cross sections in heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Grosse, Eckart; Massarczyk, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Cross sections for neutron capture in the range of unresolved resonances are predicted simultaneously to level distances at the neutron threshold for more than 100 spin-0 target nuclei with A >70. Assuming triaxiality in nearly all these nuclei a combined parameterization for both, level density and photon strength is presented. The strength functions used are based on a global fit to IVGDR shapes by the sum of three Lorentzians adding up to the TRK sum rule and theory-based predictions for the A-dependence of pole energies and spreading widths. For the small spins reached by capture level densities are well described by only one free global parameter; a significant collective enhancement due to the deviation from axial symmetry is observed. Reliable predictions for compound nuclear reactions also outside the valley of stability as expected from the derived global parameterization are important for nuclear astrophysics and for the transmutation of nuclear waste.

  4. Average Nuclear Level Densities and Radiative Strength Functions in 56,57FE from Primary (Gamma)-Ray Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavukcu, E.; Becker, J.A.; Bernstein, L.A.; Garrett, P.E.; Guttormsen, M.; Mitchell, G.E.; Rekstad, J.; Schiller, A.; Siem, S.; Voinov, A.; Younes, W.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental primary γ-ray spectrum vs. excitation-energy bin (P(E x , E γ ) matrix) in a light-ion reaction is obtained for 56,57 Fe isotopes using a subtraction method. By factorizing the P(E x , E γ ) matrix according to the Axel-Brink hypothesis the nuclear level density and the radiative strength function (RSF) in 56,57 Fe are extracted simultaneously. A step structure is observed in the level density for both isotopes, and is interpreted as the breaking of Cooper pairs. The RSFs for 56,57 Fe reveal an anomalous enhancement at low γ-ray energies

  5. Shell Effect and Temperature Influence on Nuclear Level Density Parameter: the role of the effective mass interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queipo-Ruiz, J.; Guzman-Martinez, F.; Rodriguez-Hoyos, O.

    2011-01-01

    The level density parameter is a very important ingredient in statistic study of nuclear reaction, it has been studied to low energies excitation E < 2MeV where it values is approximately constant, experimental results to energies of excitation more than 2 MeV has been obtained of evaporation spectrum, to nuclei with A=160. In this work we present a calculation of densities level parameter, for a wide range of mass and temperature, taking in accounts the shell effects and the mass effective interaction. The result has been carried out within the semi classical approximation, for the single particle level densities. We results have a reasonable agreement with the experimental data available. (Author)

  6. Nuclear level density effects on the evaluated cross-sections of nickel isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, S.B.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed investigation has been made to estimate the effect of various level density options on the computed neutron induced reaction cross-sections of Ni-58 and Ni-60 covering the energy range 5-25 MeV in the framework of the multistep Hauser-Feshbach statistical model scheme which accounts for the pre-equilibrium decay according to the Kalbach exciton model and gamma-ray competition according to the giant dipole radiation model of Brink and Axel. Various level density options considered in this paper are based on the Original Gilbert-Cameron, Improved Gilbert-Cameron, Back-Shifted Fermi gas and the Ingatyuk-Smirenkin-Tishin approaches. The effect of these different level density prescriptions is brought out with special reference to (n,p) (n,2n) (n,α) and total production cross-sections for neutron, hydrogen, helium and gamma-rays which are of technological importance for fission and fusion based reactor systems. (author). 18 refs, 2 figs

  7. Nuclear level densities and γ-ray strength functions of 180,181Ta and neutron capture cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatji, K. L.; Kheswa, B. V.; Wiedeking, M.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Brits, C. P.; Bleuel, D. L.; Giacoppo, F.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Hadynska-Klek, K.; Hagen, T. W.; Ingeberg, V. W.; Klintefjord, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Nyhus, H. T.; Renstrøm, T.; Rose, S.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tveten, G. M.; Zeiser, F.

    2017-09-01

    The γ-ray strength functions and nuclear level densities in the quasi-continuum of 180,181Ta are extracted from particle-γ coincidence events with the Oslo Method, below the Sn. The data were used as input in the TALYS reaction code for calculations of the astrophysical Maxwellian-averaged (n,γ) cross-sections to investigate nucleosynthesis of nature's rarest stable isotope 180Ta.

  8. Nuclear level densities and γ-ray strength functions of 180,181Ta and neutron capture cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malatji K.L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The γ-ray strength functions and nuclear level densities in the quasi-continuum of 180,181Ta are extracted from particle-γ coincidence events with the Oslo Method, below the Sn. The data were used as input in the TALYS reaction code for calculations of the astrophysical Maxwellian-averaged (n,γ cross-sections to investigate nucleosynthesis of nature's rarest stable isotope 180Ta.

  9. Fission level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, V.M.

    1998-01-01

    Fission level densities (or fissioning nucleus level densities at fission saddle deformations) are required for statistical model calculations of actinide fission cross sections. Back-shifted Fermi-Gas Model, Constant Temperature Model and Generalized Superfluid Model (GSM) are widely used for the description of level densities at stable deformations. These models provide approximately identical level density description at excitations close to the neutron binding energy. It is at low excitation energies that they are discrepant, while this energy region is crucial for fission cross section calculations. A drawback of back-shifted Fermi gas model and traditional constant temperature model approaches is that it is difficult to include in a consistent way pair correlations, collective effects and shell effects. Pair, shell and collective properties of nucleus do not reduce just to the renormalization of level density parameter a, but influence the energy dependence of level densities. These effects turn out to be important because they seem to depend upon deformation of either equilibrium or saddle-point. These effects are easily introduced within GSM approach. Fission barriers are another key ingredients involved in the fission cross section calculations. Fission level density and barrier parameters are strongly interdependent. This is the reason for including fission barrier parameters along with the fission level densities in the Starter File. The recommended file is maslov.dat - fission barrier parameters. Recent version of actinide fission barrier data obtained in Obninsk (obninsk.dat) should only be considered as a guide for selection of initial parameters. These data are included in the Starter File, together with the fission barrier parameters recommended by CNDC (beijing.dat), for completeness. (author)

  10. Minimal nuclear energy density functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgac, Aurel; Forbes, Michael McNeil; Jin, Shi; Perez, Rodrigo Navarro; Schunck, Nicolas

    2018-04-01

    We present a minimal nuclear energy density functional (NEDF) called "SeaLL1" that has the smallest number of possible phenomenological parameters to date. SeaLL1 is defined by seven significant phenomenological parameters, each related to a specific nuclear property. It describes the nuclear masses of even-even nuclei with a mean energy error of 0.97 MeV and a standard deviation of 1.46 MeV , two-neutron and two-proton separation energies with rms errors of 0.69 MeV and 0.59 MeV respectively, and the charge radii of 345 even-even nuclei with a mean error ɛr=0.022 fm and a standard deviation σr=0.025 fm . SeaLL1 incorporates constraints on the equation of state (EoS) of pure neutron matter from quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory two-body (NN ) interactions at the next-to-next-to-next-to leading order (N3LO) level and three-body (NNN ) interactions at the next-to-next-to leading order (N2LO) level. Two of the seven parameters are related to the saturation density and the energy per particle of the homogeneous symmetric nuclear matter, one is related to the nuclear surface tension, two are related to the symmetry energy and its density dependence, one is related to the strength of the spin-orbit interaction, and one is the coupling constant of the pairing interaction. We identify additional phenomenological parameters that have little effect on ground-state properties but can be used to fine-tune features such as the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule, the excitation energy of the giant dipole and Gamow-Teller resonances, the static dipole electric polarizability, and the neutron skin thickness.

  11. Pre-equilibrium emission and nuclear level densities in neutron induced reactions on Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivascu, M.; Avrigeanu, M.; Ivascu, I.; Avrigeanu, V.

    1989-01-01

    The experimentally well known (n,p), (n,α) and (n,2n) reaction excitation functions, from threshold to 20 MeV incident energy, and neutron, proton and alpha-particle emission spectra at 14.8 MeV from Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes are calculated in the frame of a generalized Geometry-Dependent-Hybrid pre-equilibrium emission model, including angular momentum and parity conservation and alpha-particle emission, and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Use of a consistent statistical model parameter set enables the validation of the pre-equilibrium emission model. Moreover, an enhanced pre-equilibrium emission from higher spin composite system states, associated with higher incident orbital momenta, has been evidenced. Higher orbital momenta involved also in the emergent channels of this process are suggested by calculations of the residual nuclei level populations. Finally, the unitary account of the (n, p) and (n, 2n) reaction excitation functions for Fe, Cr and Ni isotopes has allowed the proper establishment of the limits of the transition excitation range between the two different nuclear level density models used at medium and higher excitation energies, respectively. (author). 83 refs, 15 figs

  12. Experimental level densities of atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guttormsen, M.; Bello Garrote, F.L.; Eriksen, T.K.; Giacoppo, F.; Goergen, A.; Hagen, T.W.; Klintefjord, M.; Larsen, A.C.; Nyhus, H.T.; Renstroem, T.; Rose, S.J.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T.G.; Tveten, G.M. [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Oslo (Norway); Aiche, M.; Ducasse, Q.; Jurado, B. [University of Bordeaux, CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 120, Gradignan (France); Bernstein, L.A.; Bleuel, D.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Byun, Y.; Voinov, A. [Ohio University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Athens, Ohio (United States); Gunsing, F. [CEA Saclay, DSM/Irfu/SPhN, Cedex (France); Lebois, L.; Leniau, B.; Wilson, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, Orsay Cedex (France); Wiedeking, M. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West (South Africa)

    2015-12-15

    It is almost 80 years since Hans Bethe described the level density as a non-interacting gas of protons and neutrons. In all these years, experimental data were interpreted within this picture of a fermionic gas. However, the renewed interest of measuring level density using various techniques calls for a revision of this description. In particular, the wealth of nuclear level densities measured with the Oslo method favors the constant-temperature level density over the Fermi-gas picture. From the basis of experimental data, we demonstrate that nuclei exhibit a constant-temperature level density behavior for all mass regions and at least up to the neutron threshold. (orig.)

  13. Determination of the nuclear level densities and radiative strength function for 43 nuclei in the mass interval 28≤A≤200

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, David; Jovancevic, Nikola; Sukhovoj, Anatoly M.; Mitsyna, Ludmila V.; Krmar, Miodrag; Cong, Vu D.; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Oberstedt, Stephan; Revay, Zsolt; Stieghorst, Christian; Dragic, Aleksandar

    2018-03-01

    The determination of nuclear level densities and radiative strength functions is one of the most important tasks in low-energy nuclear physics. Accurate experimental values of these parameters are critical for the study of the fundamental properties of nuclear structure. The step-like structure in the dependence of the level densities p on the excitation energy of nuclei Eex is observed in the two-step gamma cascade measurements for nuclei in the 28 ≤ A ≤ 200 mass region. This characteristic structure can be explained only if a co-existence of quasi-particles and phonons, as well as their interaction in a nucleus, are taken into account in the process of gamma-decay. Here we present a new improvement to the Dubna practical model for the determination of nuclear level densities and radiative strength functions. The new practical model guarantees a good description of the available intensities of the two step gamma cascades, comparable to the experimental data accuracy.

  14. Influence of the nuclear level density on the odd-even staggering in 56Fe+p spallation at energies from 300 to 1500 MeV/nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jun; Zhu, Long; Guo, Chenchen

    2018-05-01

    Background: Special attention has been paid to study the shell effect and odd-even staggering (OES) in the nuclear spallation. Purpose: In this paper, we investigate the influence of the nuclear level density on the OES in the 56Fe+p spallations at energies from 300 to 1500 MeV/nucleon. Method: The isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) model is applied to produce the highly excited and equilibrium remnants, which is then de-excited using the statistical model gemini. The excitation energy of the heaviest hot fragments is applied to match the IQMD model with the gemini model. In the gemini model, the statistical description of the evaporation are based on the Hauser-Feshbach formalism, in which level density prescriptions are applied. Results: By investigating the OES of the excited pre-fragments, it is found that the OES originates at the end of the decay process when the excitation energy is close to the nucleon-emission threshold energy, i.e., the smaller value of the neutron separation energy and proton separation energy. The strong influence of level density on the OES is noticed. Two types of the nuclear level densities, the discrepancy of which is only about 7% near the nucleon emission threshold energy, are used in the model. However, the calculated values of the OES differ by the factor of 3 for the relevant nuclei. Conclusions: It is suggested that, although the particle-separation energies play a key role in determining the OES, the level density at excitation energy lower than the particle-separation energies should be taken into consideration

  15. Level density of 57Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, V.; Boukharouba, N.; Brient, C.E.; Grimes, S.M.; Pedroni, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    Levels in 57 Co have been studied in the region of resolved levels (E 57 Fe(p,n) 57 Co neutron spectrum with resolution ΔE∼5 keV. Seventeen previously unknown levels are located. Level density parameters in the continuum region are deduced from thick target measurements of the same reaction and additional level density information is deduced from Ericson fluctuation studies of the reaction 56 Fe(p,n) 56 Co. A set of level density parameters is found which describes the level density of 57 Co at energies up to 14 MeV. Efforts to obtain level density information from the 56 Fe(d,n) 57 Co reaction were unsuccessful, but estimates of the fraction of the deuteron absorption cross section corresponding to compound nucleus formation are obtained

  16. Review of non-nuclear density gauges as possible replacements for ITD's nuclear density gauges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This report examines the possibility of replacing nuclear density gauges (NDGs) with non-nuclear density gauges (NNDGs) to : measure density of hot mix asphalt (HMA) and unbound pavement layers in the field. The research team evaluated the : effectiv...

  17. Realistic microscopic level densities for spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerf, N.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear level densities play an important role in nuclear reactions such as the formation of the compound nucleus. We develop a microscopic calculation of the level density based on a combinatorial evaluation from a realistic single-particle level scheme. This calculation makes use of a fast Monte Carlo algorithm allowing us to consider large shell model spaces which could not be treated previously in combinatorial approaches. Since our model relies on a microscopic basis, it can be applied to exotic nuclei with more confidence than the commonly used semiphenomenological formuals. An exhaustive comparison of our predicted neutron s-wave resonance spacings with experimental data for a wide range of nuclei is presented

  18. High level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Perez, B.

    1987-01-01

    The transformations involved in the nuclear fuels during the burn-up at the power nuclear reactors for burn-up levels of 33.000 MWd/th are considered. Graphs and data on the radioactivity variation with the cooling time and heat power of the irradiated fuel are presented. Likewise, the cycle of the fuel in light water reactors is presented and the alternatives for the nuclear waste management are discussed. A brief description of the management of the spent fuel as a high level nuclear waste is shown, explaining the reprocessing and giving data about the fission products and their radioactivities, which must be considered on the vitrification processes. On the final storage of the nuclear waste into depth geological burials, both alternatives are coincident. The countries supporting the reprocessing are indicated and the Spanish programm defined in the Plan Energetico Nacional (PEN) is shortly reviewed. (author) 8 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Systematics of the level density parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatyuk, A.V.; Istekov, K.K.; Smirenkin, G.N.

    1977-01-01

    The excitation energy dependence of nucleus energy-level density is phenomenologically systematized in terms of the Fermi gas model. The analysis has been conducted in the atomic mass number range of A(>=)150, where the collective effects are mostly pronounced. The density parameter a(U) is obtained using data on neutron resonances. To depict energy spectra of nuclear states in the Fermi gas model (1) the contributions from collective rotational and vibrational modes (2), as well as from pair correlations (3) are also taken into account. It is shown, that at excitation energies close to the neutron binding energy all three systematics of a(U) yield practically the same energy-level densities. At high energies only the (2) and (3) systematics are valid, and at energies lower than the neutron binding energy only the last systematics will be adequate

  20. Global and local level density models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Hilaire, S.; Goriely, S.

    2008-01-01

    Four different level density models, three phenomenological and one microscopic, are consistently parameterized using the same set of experimental observables. For each of the phenomenological models, the Constant Temperature Model, the Back-shifted Fermi gas Model and the Generalized Superfluid Model, a version without and with explicit collective enhancement is considered. Moreover, a recently published microscopic combinatorial model is compared with the phenomenological approaches and with the same set of experimental data. For each nuclide for which sufficient experimental data exists, a local level density parameterization is constructed for each model. Next, these local models have helped to construct global level density prescriptions, to be used for cases for which no experimental data exists. Altogether, this yields a collection of level density formulae and parameters that can be used with confidence in nuclear model calculations. To demonstrate this, a large-scale validation with experimental discrete level schemes and experimental cross sections and neutron emission spectra for various different reaction channels has been performed

  1. Nuclear systems of level measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, A.J.; Cabrera, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the industry there are processes in which is necessary to maintain the products level controlled which are handled for their transformation. The majority of such processes and by the operation conditions, they do not admit measure systems of level of invasive type then the application of nuclear techniques for level measurement results a big aid in these cases, since all the system installation is situated beyond frontiers of vessels that contain the product for measuring. In the Department of Nuclear Technology Applications of Mexican Petroleum Institute was developed a level measurement system by gamma rays transmission which operates in the Low Density Polyethylene plant of Petrochemical Complex Escolin at Poza Rica, Veracruz, Mexico. (Author)

  2. Relativistic density functional for nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book aims to provide a detailed introduction to the state-of-the-art covariant density functional theory, which follows the Lorentz invariance from the very beginning and is able to describe nuclear many-body quantum systems microscopically and self-consistently. Covariant density functional theory was introduced in nuclear physics in the 1970s and has since been developed and used to describe the diversity of nuclear properties and phenomena with great success. In order to provide an advanced and updated textbook of covariant density functional theory for graduate students and nuclear physics researchers, this book summarizes the enormous amount of material that has accumulated in the field of covariant density functional theory over the last few decades as well as the latest developments in this area. Moreover, the book contains enough details for readers to follow the formalism and theoretical results, and provides exhaustive references to explore the research literature.

  3. Recent experimental results on level densities for compound reaction calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voinov, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    There is a problem related to the choice of the level density input for Hauser-Feshbach model calculations. Modern computer codes have several options to choose from but it is not clear which of them has to be used in some particular cases. Availability of many options helps to describe existing experimental data but it creates problems when it comes to predictions. Traditionally, different level density systematics are based on experimental data from neutron resonance spacing which are available for a limited spin interval and one parity only. On the other hand reaction cross section calculations use the total level density. This can create large uncertainties when converting the neutron resonance spacing to the total level density that results in sizable uncertainties in cross section calculations. It is clear now that total level densities need to be studied experimentally in a systematic manner. Such information can be obtained only from spectra of compound nuclear reactions. The question is does level densities obtained from compound nuclear reactions keep the same regularities as level densities obtained from neutron resonances- Are they consistent- We measured level densities of 59-64 Ni isotopes from proton evaporation spectra of 6,7 Li induced reactions. Experimental data are presented. Conclusions of how level density depends on the neutron number and on the degree of proximity to the closed shell ( 56 Ni) are drawn. The level density parameters have been compared with parameters obtained from the analysis of neutron resonances and from model predictions

  4. Level density of radioactive doubly-magic nucleus 56Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santhosh Kumar, S.; Rengaiyan, R.; Victor Babu, A.; Preetha, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this work the single particle energies are obtained by diagonalising the Nilsson Hamiltonian in the cylindrical basis and are generated up to N =11 shells for the isotopes of Ni from A = 48-70, emphasizing the three magic nuclei viz, 48 Ni, 56 Ni and 68 Ni. The statistical quantities like excitation energy, level density parameter and nuclear level density which play the important roles in the nuclear structure and nuclear reactions can be calculated theoretically by means of the Statistical or Partition function method. Hence the statistical model approach is followed to probe the dynamical properties of the nucleus in the microscopic level

  5. Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Joseph; Furnstahl, Richard; Horoi, Mihai; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witold; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. Until recently such an undertaking was hard to imagine, and even at the present time such an ambitious endeavor would be far beyond what a single researcher or a traditional research group could carry out.

  6. ZZ-CENPL, Chinese Evaluated Nuclear Parameter Library. ZZ CENPL-DLS, Discrete Level Schemes and Gamma Branching Ratios Library; ZZ CENPL-FBP, Fission Barrier Parameter Library; ZZ CENPL-GDRP, Giant Dipole Resonance Parameter Library; ZZ CENPL-NLD, Nuclear Level Density Parameter Library; ZZ CENPL-MCC, Nuclear Ground State Atomic Masses Library; ZZ CENPL-OMP, Optical Model Parameter Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Zongdi

    1995-01-01

    Description of program or function: CENPL - GDRP (Giant Dipole Resonance Parameters for Gamma-Ray): - Format: special format described in documentation; - Nuclides: V, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, Lu, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, Hg, Pb, Bi, Th, U, Np, Pu. - Origin: Experimental values offered by S.S. Dietrich and B.L. Berman. CENPL - FBP (Fission Barrier Parameter Sub-Library): - Format: special format described in documentation; - Nuclides: (1) 51 nuclei region from Th-230 to Cf-255, (2) 46 nuclei region from Th-229 to Cf-253, (3) 24 nuclei region from Pa-232 to Cf-253; - Origin: (1) Lynn, (2) Analysis of experimental data by Back et al., (3) Ohsawa. CENPL - DLS (Discrete level scheme and branch ratio of gamma decay: - Format: Special format described in documentation; - Origin: ENSDF - BNL. CENPL - NLD (Nuclear Level Density): - Format: Special format described in documentation; - Origin: Huang Zhongfu et al. CENPL - OMP (Optical model parameter sub-library): - Format: special format described in documentation ; - Origin: CENDL, ENDF/B-VI, JENDL-3. CENPL - MC (I) and (II) (Atomic masses and characteristic constants for nuclear ground states) : - Format: Brief table format; - Nuclides: 4760 nuclides ranging from Z=0 A=1 to Z=122 A=318. - Origin: Experimental data and systematic results evaluated by Wapstra, theoretical results calculated by Moller, ENSDF - BNL and Nuclear Wallet Cards. CENPL contains the following six sub-libraries: 1. Atomic Masses and Characteristic Constants for nuclear ground states (MCC). This data consists of calculated and in most cases also measured mass excesses, atomic masses, total binding energies, spins, parities, and half-lives of nuclear ground states, abundances, etc. for 4800 nuclides. 2. Discrete Level Schemes and branching ratios of gamma decay (DLS). The data on nuclear discrete levels are based on the Evaluated

  7. Development of nuclear density and moisture gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Huaian; Zhu Dichen; Jiang Yulan; Yin Xiling; Li Jianwen; Cheng Jianbing; Yan Haiqing

    1993-01-01

    The model MT5012 nuclear density and moisture gauge is an advanced portable meter to inspect the compactness of a highway roadbed and pavement foundation. It has perfect functions and the advantage of quickness, accuracy and non-destruction. It is also applicable to civil engineering, such as railway, airport and embankment. The model MT5022 nuclear density and moisture gauge is a mobile meter for continuous inspection and control of the compactness of a highway and pavement foundation. It can be installed on road roller, wheelbarrow and other traffic machines while working, and is more efficient than the portable ones

  8. Density dependence of the nuclear energy-density functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, Panagiota; Park, Tae-Sun; Lim, Yeunhwan; Hyun, Chang Ho

    2018-01-01

    Background: The explicit density dependence in the coupling coefficients entering the nonrelativistic nuclear energy-density functional (EDF) is understood to encode effects of three-nucleon forces and dynamical correlations. The necessity for the density-dependent coupling coefficients to assume the form of a preferably small fractional power of the density ρ is empirical and the power is often chosen arbitrarily. Consequently, precision-oriented parametrizations risk overfitting in the regime of saturation and extrapolations in dilute or dense matter may lose predictive power. Purpose: Beginning with the observation that the Fermi momentum kF, i.e., the cubic root of the density, is a key variable in the description of Fermi systems, we first wish to examine if a power hierarchy in a kF expansion can be inferred from the properties of homogeneous matter in a domain of densities, which is relevant for nuclear structure and neutron stars. For subsequent applications we want to determine a functional that is of good quality but not overtrained. Method: For the EDF, we fit systematically polynomial and other functions of ρ1 /3 to existing microscopic, variational calculations of the energy of symmetric and pure neutron matter (pseudodata) and analyze the behavior of the fits. We select a form and a set of parameters, which we found robust, and examine the parameters' naturalness and the quality of resulting extrapolations. Results: A statistical analysis confirms that low-order terms such as ρ1 /3 and ρ2 /3 are the most relevant ones in the nuclear EDF beyond lowest order. It also hints at a different power hierarchy for symmetric vs. pure neutron matter, supporting the need for more than one density-dependent term in nonrelativistic EDFs. The functional we propose easily accommodates known or adopted properties of nuclear matter near saturation. More importantly, upon extrapolation to dilute or asymmetric matter, it reproduces a range of existing microscopic

  9. Supernovae and high density nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahana, S.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) in producing prompt supernova explosions is examined. Results of calculations of Baron, Cooperstein, and Kahana incorporating general relativity and a new high density EOS are presented, and the relevance of these calculations to laboratory experiments with heavy ions considered. 31 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Supernovae and high density nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahana, S.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) in producing prompt supernova explosions is examined. Results of calculations of Baron, Cooperstein, and Kahana incorporating general relativity and a new high density EOS are presented, and the relevance of these calculations to laboratory experiments with heavy ions considered. 31 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Self consitent description of nuclear level densitities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, M.; Treiner, J.

    1980-03-01

    We present a self consistent calculation of the nuclear level density based on a generalization to finite temperature of a modified Thomas-Fermi method. A simple expression is derived for the so-called level density parameter a entering the expression of the density of states Xi(E)=Esup(-5/4)e 2 √aE and relating the excitation energy to the temperature E=a T 2 , in terms of nucleons equilibrium densities at T=0 only. One thus avoids the difficulty of adding external constraints to calculate isolated nuclei at finite temperature which are shown to be unstable against particle emission. The role of the nuclear surface is discussed. It is shown that the effective mass of the interaction plays a crucial role in determining the value of a and comparison with experiment confirms the value m*/m > = 1 near the Fermi level obtained through more microscopic analysis

  12. Moments Method for Shell-Model Level Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelevinsky, V; Horoi, M; Sen'kov, R A

    2016-01-01

    The modern form of the Moments Method applied to the calculation of the nuclear shell-model level density is explained and examples of the method at work are given. The calculated level density practically exactly coincides with the result of full diagonalization when the latter is feasible. The method provides the pure level density for given spin and parity with spurious center-of-mass excitations subtracted. The presence and interplay of all correlations leads to the results different from those obtained by the mean-field combinatorics. (paper)

  13. On radii of nuclear potential and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal'butsev, E.B.; Mikhajlov, I.N.

    1975-01-01

    The Saxon-Woods potential is widely used as an average field in different nuclear models: upsilon(r)=-upsilonsub(0)parameters: upsilonsub(0) is the well depth, Rsub(v) is the well width, a is the diffusivity of the potential edge. The potential parameters should be determined from the data on the nuclear matter distribution. The data available is in agreement with the formula for density: rho(r)=rhosub(0)same sense as Rsub(v), a. The experimental data show that Rsub(v) by 1 Fermi exceed Rsub(rho) approximately. There exist some suggestions that it caused by the finiteness of the radius of action of nuclear forces. It is noted that finiteness of radius of action of forces is a sufficient condition for the presence of this effect. A model is considered in which the matter is limited with a plane surface, so that the density depends only on a single spatial variable normal to the boundary of matter. As is shown by the results, the radius of nuclear potential exceeds that of the volume of the nuclear matter by 0.6 Fermi approximately. The mechanism of this phenomenon takes its origin from a quantum-mechanical effect of turning the wave functions into zero near the infinitely high wall and from their considerable decreasing near the wall of a finite height

  14. Building a universal nuclear energy density functional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, G F

    2007-01-01

    This talk describes a new project in SciDAC II in the area of low-energy nuclear physics. The motivation and goals of the SciDAC are presented as well as an outline of the theoretical and computational methodology that will be employed. An important motivation is to have more accurate and reliable predictions of nuclear properties including their binding energies and low-energy reaction rates. The theoretical basis is provided by density functional theory, which the only available theory that can be systematically applied to all nuclei. However, other methodologies based on wave function methods are needed to refine the functionals and to make applications to dynamic processes

  15. Landau parameters for finite range density dependent nuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farine, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Landau parameters represent the effective particle-hole interaction at Fermi level. Since between the physical observables and the Landau parameters there is a direct relation their derivation from an effective interaction is of great interest. The parameter F 0 determines the incompressibility K of the system. The parameter F 1 determines the effective mass (which controls the level density at the Fermi level). In addition, F 0 ' determines the symmetry energy, G 0 the magnetic susceptibility, and G 0 ' the pion condensation threshold in nuclear matter. This paper is devoted to a general derivation of Landau parameters for an interaction with density dependent finite range terms. Particular carefulness is devoted to the inclusion of rearrangement terms. This report is part of a larger project which aims at defining a new nuclear interaction improving the well-known D1 force of Gogny et al. for describing the average nuclear properties and exotic nuclei and satisfying, in addition, the sum rules

  16. Statistical interpretation of low energy nuclear level schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egidy, T von; Schmidt, H H; Behkami, A N

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear level schemes and neutron resonance spacings yield information on level densities and level spacing distributions. A total of 75 nuclear level schemes with 1761 levels and known spins and parities was investigated. The A-dependence of level density parameters is discussed. The spacing distributions of levels near the groundstate indicate transitional character between regular and chaotic properties while chaos dominates near the neutron binding energy.

  17. Covariant density functional theory for nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badarch, U.

    2007-07-01

    The present thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 2 we study the Nucleon-Nucleon (NN) interaction in Dirac-Brueckner (DB) approach. We start by considering the NN interaction in free-space in terms of the Bethe-Salpeter (BS) equation to the meson exchange potential model. Then we present the DB approach for nuclear matter by extending the BS equation for the in-medium NN interaction. From the solution of the three-dimensional in-medium BS equation, we derive the DB self-energies and total binding energy which are the main results of the DB approach, which we later incorporate in the field theoretical calculation of the nuclear equation of state. In Chapter 3, we introduce the basic concepts of density functional theory in the context of Quantum Hadrodynamics (QHD-I). We reach the main point of this work in Chapter 4 where we introduce the DDRH approach. In the DDRH theory, the medium dependence of the meson-nucleon vertices is expressed as functionals of the baryon field operators. Because of the complexities of the operator-valued functionals we decide to use the mean-field approximation. In Chapter 5, we contrast microscopic and phenomenological approaches to extracting density dependent meson-baryon vertices. Chapter 6 gives the results of our studies of the EOS of infinite nuclear matter in detail. Using formulas derived in Chapters 4 and 5 we calculate the properties of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter. (orig.)

  18. Covariant density functional theory for nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badarch, U.

    2007-01-01

    The present thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 2 we study the Nucleon-Nucleon (NN) interaction in Dirac-Brueckner (DB) approach. We start by considering the NN interaction in free-space in terms of the Bethe-Salpeter (BS) equation to the meson exchange potential model. Then we present the DB approach for nuclear matter by extending the BS equation for the in-medium NN interaction. From the solution of the three-dimensional in-medium BS equation, we derive the DB self-energies and total binding energy which are the main results of the DB approach, which we later incorporate in the field theoretical calculation of the nuclear equation of state. In Chapter 3, we introduce the basic concepts of density functional theory in the context of Quantum Hadrodynamics (QHD-I). We reach the main point of this work in Chapter 4 where we introduce the DDRH approach. In the DDRH theory, the medium dependence of the meson-nucleon vertices is expressed as functionals of the baryon field operators. Because of the complexities of the operator-valued functionals we decide to use the mean-field approximation. In Chapter 5, we contrast microscopic and phenomenological approaches to extracting density dependent meson-baryon vertices. Chapter 6 gives the results of our studies of the EOS of infinite nuclear matter in detail. Using formulas derived in Chapters 4 and 5 we calculate the properties of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter. (orig.)

  19. Central depression of nuclear charge density distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Yanyun; Ren Zhongzhou; Wang Zaijun; Dong Tiekuang

    2010-01-01

    The center-depressed nuclear charge distributions are investigated with the parametrized distribution and the relativistic mean-field theory, and their corresponding charge form factors are worked out with the phase shift analysis method. The central depression of nuclear charge distribution of 46 Ar and 44 S is supported by the relativistic mean-field calculation. According to the calculation, the valence protons in 46 Ar and 44 S prefer to occupy the 1d 3/2 state rather than the 2s 1/2 state, which is different from that in the less neutron-rich argon and sulfur isotopes. As a result, the central proton densities of 46 Ar and 44 S are highly depressed, and so are their central charge densities. The charge form factors of some argon and sulfur isotopes are presented, and the minima of the charge form factors shift upward and inward when the central nuclear charge distributions are more depressed. Besides, the effect of the central depression on the charge form factors is studied with a parametrized distribution, when the root-mean-square charge radii remain constant.

  20. Statistical density of nuclear excited states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Kolomietz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A semi-classical approximation is applied to the calculations of single-particle and statistical level densities in excited nuclei. Landau's conception of quasi-particles with the nucleon effective mass m* < m is used. The approach provides the correct description of the continuum contribution to the level density for realistic finite-depth potentials. It is shown that the continuum states does not affect significantly the thermodynamic calculations for sufficiently small temperatures T ≤ 1 MeV but reduce strongly the results for the excitation energy at high temperatures. By use of standard Woods - Saxon potential and nucleon effective mass m* = 0.7m the A-dependency of the statistical level density parameter K was evaluated in a good qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  1. 2004 Progress Report for Grant No. DE-FG03-03NA00076 Nuclear Level Densities and γ-ray Strength Functions: Stewardship Sciences Academic Alliances Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. E. Mitchell

    2004-01-01

    To verify the apparent large enhancement of the radiative strength function in light and medium nuclei, the 56Fe(n,2gamma)57Fe reaction was measured. The two-step cascade intensities with soft primary intensities confirm the enhancement. The combined results have been published in Physical Review Letters and featured in the Physics News Update. Data for the Yb isotopes have been combined to examine the systematics of level densities and strength function in three Yb isotopes. A paper on these results have been accepted for publication in Physical Review C. Analysis of the gamma rays from neutron induced reactions on 48Ti have been measured and analyzed for neutron energies from 1 to 250 MeV

  2. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Joe A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Furnstahl, Dick; Horoi, Mihai; Lust, Rusty; Nazaewicc, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-30

    During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: First, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; Second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; Third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  3. Nuclear-level densities in the {sup 49}V and {sup 57}Co nuclei on the basis of evaporated-neutron spectra in (p, n) and (d, n) reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravlev, B. V., E-mail: zhurav@ippe.ru; Titarenko, N. N. [Leipunsky Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-15

    The spectra of neutrons from the reactions {sup 49}Ti(p, n){sup 49}V and {sup 57}Fe (p, n){sup 57}Co were measured in the range of proton energies between 8 and 11 MeV along with their counterparts from the reactions {sup 48}Ti(d, n){sup 49}V and {sup 56}Fe (d, n){sup 57}Co at the deuteron energies of 2.7 and 3.8 MeV. These measurements were conducted with the aid of a time-of-flight fast-neutron spectrometer on the basis of the EGP-15 pulsed tandem accelerator of the Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE, Obninsk). An analysis of measured data was performed within the statistical equilibrium and preequilibrium models of nuclear reactions. The respective calculations based on the Hauser–Feshbach formalism of statistical theory were carried out with nuclear-level densities given by the generalized superfluid model of the nucleus, the backshifted Fermi-gas model, and the Gilbert–Cameron composite formula. The nuclear-level densities of {sup 49}V and {sup 57}Co and their energy dependences were determined. The results were discussed together with available experimental data and data recommended by model systematics.

  4. Nuclear power: levels of safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidsky, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    The rise and fall of the nuclear power industry in the United States is a well-documented story with enough socio-technological conflict to fill dozens of scholarly, and not so scholarly, books. Whatever the reasons for the situation we are now in, and no matter how we apportion the blame, the ultimate choice of whether to use nuclear power in this country is made by the utilities and by the public. Their choices are, finally, based on some form of risk-benefit analysis. Such analysis is done in well-documented and apparently logical form by the utilities and in a rather more inchoate but not necessarily less accurate form by the public. Nuclear power has failed in the United States because both the real and perceived risks outweigh the potential benefits. The national decision not to rely upon nuclear power in its present form is not an irrational one. A wide ranging public balancing of risk and benefit requires a classification of risk which is clear and believable for the public to be able to assess the risks associated with given technological structures. The qualitative four-level safety ladder provides such a framework. Nuclear reactors have been designed which fit clearly and demonstrably into each of the possible qualitative safety levels. Surprisingly, it appears that safer may also mean cheaper. The intellectual and technical prerequisites are in hand for an important national decision. Deployment of a qualitatively different second generation of nuclear reactors can have important benefits for the United States. Surprisingly, it may well be the nuclear establishment itself, with enormous investments of money and pride in the existing nuclear systems, that rejects second generation reactors. It may be that we will not have a second generation of reactors until the first generation of nuclear engineers and nuclear power advocates has retired

  5. Level densities in rare earth nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siem, S.; Tveter, T.S.; Bergholt, L.; Guttormsen, M.; Melby, E.; Rekstad, J.

    1997-01-01

    An iterative procedure for simultaneous extraction of fine structure in the level density and the γ-ray strength function from a set of primary γ-ray spectra has been developed. Data from the reactions 163 Dy(3He,αγ) 172 Dy and 173 Yb(3He,αγ) 172 Yb reveals step like enhancements in the level density in the region below 5 MeV and peaks in the γ-ray strength function at low γ-energy (E γ ∼ 2 - 3.5 MeV). Tentative physical interpretations are presented. (author)

  6. Nuclear spectroscopy with density dependent effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krewald, S.

    1976-07-01

    The paper investigates excited nuclear states with density-dependent effective interactions. In the first part of the paper, the structure and the width of the multipole giant resonances discovered in 1972 are derived microscopically. Because of their high excitation energy, these giant resonances are unstable to particle emission and thus often have a considerable decay width. Due to their collective structure, the giant resonances can be described by RPA in good approximation. In this paper, the continuum RPA is applied to the spherical nuclei 16 O, 40 Ca, 90 Zr and 208 Pb. The experimental centroid energy are in very good agreement with the calculations performed in the paper. (orig./WL) [de

  7. Continuum Level Density in Complex Scaling Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, R.; Myo, T.; Kato, K.

    2005-01-01

    A new calculational method of continuum level density (CLD) at unbound energies is studied in the complex scaling method (CSM). It is shown that the CLD can be calculated by employing the discretization of continuum states in the CSM without any smoothing technique

  8. Level-density parameter of nuclei at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, C.; Kuo, T.T.S.; Stout, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    The contribution of particle-particle (hole-hole) and of particle-hole ring diagrams to the nuclear level-density parameter at finite temperature is calculated. We first derive the correlated grand potential with the above ring diagrams included to all orders by way of a finite temperature RPA equation. An expression for the correlated level-density parameter is then obtained by differentiating the grand potential. Results obtained for the 40 Ca nucleus with realistic matrix elements derived from the Paris potential are presented. The contribution of the RPA correlations is found to be important, being significantly larger than typical Hartree-Fock results. The temperature dependence of the level-density parameter derived in the present work is generally similar to that obtained in a schematic model. Comparison with available experimental data is discussed. (orig.)

  9. The level density parameters for fermi gas model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuang Youxiang; Wang Cuilan; Zhou Chunmei; Su Zongdi

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear level densities are crucial ingredient in the statistical models, for instance, in the calculations of the widths, cross sections, emitted particle spectra, etc. for various reaction channels. In this work 667 sets of more reliable and new experimental data are adopted, which include average level spacing D D , radiative capture width Γ γ 0 at neutron binding energy and cumulative level number N 0 at the low excitation energy. They are published during 1973 to 1983. Based on the parameters given by Gilbert-Cameon and Cook the physical quantities mentioned above are calculated. The calculated results have the deviation obviously from experimental values. In order to improve the fitting, the parameters in the G-C formula are adjusted and new set of level density parameters is obsained. The parameters is this work are more suitable to fit new measurements

  10. Clustering phenomena in nuclear matter below the saturation density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Hiroki; Fukushima, Masahiro; Chiba, Satoshi; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Akaishi, Yoshinori; Tohsaki, Akihiro

    2004-01-01

    We investigate density-fluctuated states of nuclear matter as a result of clustering below the saturation density ρ 0 by description in terms of the Bloch function. The Bloch description has the advantage of a unified representation for a density-fluctuated state from an aggregate of uncorrelated clusters in extremely low-density regions to the plane-wave state of uniform matter in relatively high-density regions. We treat the density-fluctuated states due to α and 16 O clustering in symmetric nuclear matter and due to 10 He clustering in asymmetric nuclear matter. The density-fluctuated states develop as the density of matter decreases below each critical density around 0.2-0.4 ρ 0 which depends on what kind of effective force we use

  11. Evaluation of the Troxler Model 4640 Thin Lift Nuclear Density Gauge. Research report (Interim)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solaimanian, M.; Holmgreen, R.J.; Kennedy, T.W.

    1990-07-01

    The report describes the results of a research study to determine the effectiveness of the Troxler Model 4640 Thin Lift Nuclear Density Gauge. The densities obtained from cores and the nuclear density gauge from seven construction projects were compared. The projects were either newly constructed or under construction when the tests were performed. A linear regression technique was used to investigate how well the core densities could be predicted from nuclear densities. Correlation coefficients were determined to indicate the degree of correlation between the core and nuclear densities. Using a statistical analysis technique, the range of the mean difference between core and nuclear measurements was established for specified confidence levels for each project. Analysis of the data indicated that the accuracy of the gauge is material dependent. While relatively acceptable results were obtained with limestone mixtures, the gauge did not perform satisfactorily with mixtures containing siliceous aggregate

  12. Ultrasonic level, temperature, and density sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, S.C.; Miller, G.N.

    1982-01-01

    A sensor has been developed to measure simultaneously the level, temperature, and density of the fluid in which it is immersed. The sensor is a thin, rectangular stainless steel ribbon which acts as a waveguide and is housed in a perforated tube. The waveguide is coupled to a section of magnetostrictive magnetic-coil transducers. These tranducers are excited in an alternating sequence to interrogate the sensor with both torsional ultrasonic waves, utilizing the Wiedemann effect, and extensional ultrasonic waves, using the Joule effect. The measured torsional wave transit time is a function of the density, level, and temperature of the fluid surrounding the waveguide. The measured extensional wave transit time is a function of the temperature of the waveguide only. The sensor is divided into zones by the introduction of reflecting surfaces at measured intervals along its length. Consequently, the transit times from each reflecting surface can be analyzed to yield a temperature profile and a density profile along the length of the sensor. Improvements in acoustic wave dampener and pressure seal designs enhance the compatibility of the probe with high-temperature, high-radiation, water-steam environments and increase the likelihood of survival in such environments. Utilization of a microcomputer to automate data sampling and processing has resulted in improved resolution of the sensor

  13. Probing the density content of the nuclear symmetry energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The nature of equation of state for the neutron star matter is crucially governed by the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. We attempt to probe the behaviour of the nuclear symmetry energy around the saturation density by exploiting the empirical values for volume and surface symmetry energy ...

  14. Pion condensation and density isomerism in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecking, P.; Weise, W.

    1979-01-01

    The possible existence of density isomers in nuclear matter, induced by pion condensation, is discussed; the nuclear equation of state is treated within the framework of the sigma model. Repulsive short-range baryon-baryon correlations, the admixture of Δ (1232) isobars and finite-range pion-baryon vertex form factors are taken into account. The strong dependence of density isomerism on the high density extrapolation of the equation of state for normal nuclear matter is also investigated. We find that, once finite range pion-baryon vertices are introduced, the appearance of density isomers becomes unlikely

  15. Nuclear symmetry energy in density dependent hadronic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, S.

    2008-12-01

    The density dependence of the symmetry energy and the correlation between parameters of the symmetry energy and the neutron skin thickness in the nucleus 208 Pb are investigated in relativistic Hadronic models. The dependency of the symmetry energy on density is linear around saturation density. Correlation exists between the neutron skin thickness in the nucleus 208 Pb and the value of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density, but not with the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density. (author)

  16. Level density and thermal properties in rare earth nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siem, S.; Schiller, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Melby, E.; Rekstad, J.

    2000-01-01

    The level density at low spin has been extracted for several nuclei in the rare earth region using the ( 3 He,α) reaction. Within the framework of the microcanonical ensemble, the entropy and the temperature of the nuclei are derived. The temperature curve shows bumps which are associated with the break up of Cooper pairs. The entropies of the even-even and even-odd nuclei have been compared. The nuclear heat capacity is deduced within the framework of the canonical ensemble and exhibits an S-formed shape as function of temperature. (author)

  17. Level density and thermal properties in rare earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Melby, E.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.

    2001-01-01

    A convergent method to extract the nuclear level density and the γ-ray strength function from primary γ-ray spectra has been established. Thermodynamical quantities have been obtained within the microcanonical and canonical ensemble theory. Structures in the caloric curve and in the heat capacity curve are interpreted as fingerprints of breaking of Cooper pairs and quenching of pairing correlations. The strength function can be described using models and common parametrizations for the E1, M1, and pygmy resonance strength. However, a significant decrease of pygmy resonance strength at finite temperatures has been observed [ru

  18. Level density and thermal properties in rare earth nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Melby, E.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.

    2001-01-01

    A convergent method to extract the nuclear level density and the γ-ray strength function from primary γ-ray spectra has been established. Thermodynamical quantities have been obtained within the microcanonical and canonical ensemble theory. Structures in the caloric curve and in the heat capacity curve are interpreted as fingerprints of breaking of Cooper pairs and quenching of pairing correlations. The strength function can be described using models and common parametrizations for the E1, M1, and pygmy resonance strength. However, a significant decrease of the pygmy resonance strength at finite temperatures has been observed

  19. Level density in the complex scaling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ryusuke; Kato, Kiyoshi; Myo, Takayuki

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that the continuum level density (CLD) at unbound energies can be calculated with the complex scaling method (CSM), in which the energy spectra of bound states, resonances and continuum states are obtained in terms of L 2 basis functions. In this method, the extended completeness relation is applied to the calculation of the Green functions, and the continuum-state part is approximately expressed in terms of discretized complex scaled continuum solutions. The obtained result is compared with the CLD calculated exactly from the scattering phase shift. The discretization in the CSM is shown to give a very good description of continuum states. We discuss how the scattering phase shifts can inversely be calculated from the discretized CLD using a basis function technique in the CSM. (author)

  20. Density content of nuclear symmetry energy from nuclear observables

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mail: ... The asymmetry arises due to the requirements that ... nuclear binding energies and the nuclear drip lines and has a crucial role in determining ... neutron-skin thickness based on covariance analysis [6] once again yields a strong cor-.

  1. Nuclear physics at extreme energy density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses topics in the following areas: QCD transport theory; minijets in hadronic and nuclear collisions; lattice gauge theory; hadronic matter and other studies; and strong electromagnetic fields

  2. Multicomponent Density Functional Theory: Impact of Nuclear Quantum Effects on Proton Affinities and Geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsen, Kurt R; Yang, Yang; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2017-08-03

    Nuclear quantum effects such as zero point energy play a critical role in computational chemistry and often are included as energetic corrections following geometry optimizations. The nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) multicomponent density functional theory (DFT) method treats select nuclei, typically protons, quantum mechanically on the same level as the electrons. Electron-proton correlation is highly significant, and inadequate treatments lead to highly overlocalized nuclear densities. A recently developed electron-proton correlation functional, epc17, has been shown to provide accurate nuclear densities for molecular systems. Herein, the NEO-DFT/epc17 method is used to compute the proton affinities for a set of molecules and to examine the role of nuclear quantum effects on the equilibrium geometry of FHF - . The agreement of the computed results with experimental and benchmark values demonstrates the promise of this approach for including nuclear quantum effects in calculations of proton affinities, pK a 's, optimized geometries, and reaction paths.

  3. Three-dimensional structure of low-density nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Minoru; Maruyama, Toshiki; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    2012-01-01

    We numerically explore the pasta structures and properties of low-density nuclear matter without any assumption on the geometry. We observe conventional pasta structures, while a mixture of the pasta structures appears as a metastable state at some transient densities. We also discuss the lattice structure of droplets.

  4. Three-dimensional structure of low-density nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Minoru, E-mail: okamoto@nucl.ph.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Maruyama, Toshiki, E-mail: maruyama.toshiki@jaea.go.jp [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Yabana, Kazuhiro, E-mail: yabana@nucl.ph.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Center of Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Tatsumi, Toshitaka, E-mail: tatsumi@ruby.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2012-07-09

    We numerically explore the pasta structures and properties of low-density nuclear matter without any assumption on the geometry. We observe conventional pasta structures, while a mixture of the pasta structures appears as a metastable state at some transient densities. We also discuss the lattice structure of droplets.

  5. Detailed study of nuclear charge and mass densities. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdichevsky, D.; Mosel, U.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental densities are analyzed and compared in detail, in particular in the surface region. For this purpose nuclear size parameters are discussed and new sets of surface parameters are proposed. It is shown that the densities are very close to the error function in the external part of the surface and can be characterized there by two new parameters. For very large r the densities show an exponential behaviour which is analyzed in terms of single-particle density distributions. Furthermore, the effects of the asymmetry, spin-orbit and Coulomb forces on the density distributions are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Clustering and Symmetry Energy in a Low Density Nuclear Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, S.; Natowitz, J.B.; Shlomo, S.; Wada, R.; Hagel, K.; Wang, J.; Materna, T.; Chen, Z.; Ma, Y.G.; Qin, L.; Botvina, A.S.; Fabris, D.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S.; Rizzi, V.; Viesti, G.; Cinausero, M.; Prete, G.; Keutgen, T.; El Masri, Y.; Majka, Z.; Ono, A.

    2007-01-01

    Temperature and density dependent symmetry energy coefficients have been derived from isoscaling analyses of the yields of nuclei with A= 64 Zn projectiles with 92 Mo and 197 Au target nuclei. The symmetry energies at low density are larger than those obtained in mean field calculations, reflecting the clustering of low density nuclear matter. They are in quite good agreement with results of a recently proposed Virial Equation of State calculation

  7. Non-empirical energy density functional for the nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rot ival, V.

    2008-09-01

    The energy density functional (EDF) formalism is the tool of choice for large-scale low-energy nuclear structure calculations both for stable experimentally known nuclei whose properties are accurately reproduced and systems that are only theoretically predicted. We highlight in the present dissertation the capability of EDF methods to tackle exotic phenomena appearing at the very limits of stability, that is the formation of nuclear halos. We devise a new quantitative and model-independent method that characterizes the existence and properties of halos in medium- to heavy-mass nuclei, and quantifies the impact of pairing correlations and the choice of the energy functional on the formation of such systems. These results are found to be limited by the predictive power of currently-used EDFs that rely on fitting to known experimental data. In the second part of this dissertation, we initiate the construction of non-empirical EDFs that make use of the new paradigm for vacuum nucleon-nucleon interactions set by so-called low-momentum interactions generated through the application of renormalization group techniques. These soft-core vacuum potentials are used as a step-stone of a long-term strategy which connects modern many-body techniques and EDF methods. We provide guidelines for designing several non-empirical models that include in-medium many-body effects at various levels of approximation, and can be handled in state-of-the art nuclear structure codes. In the present work, the first step is initiated through the adjustment of an operator representation of low-momentum vacuum interactions using a custom-designed parallel evolutionary algorithm. The first results highlight the possibility to grasp most of the relevant physics for low-energy nuclear structure using this numerically convenient Gaussian vertex. (author)

  8. Central depression in nucleonic densities: Trend analysis in the nuclear density functional theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetrumpf, B.; Nazarewicz, W.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2017-08-01

    Background: The central depression of nucleonic density, i.e., a reduction of density in the nuclear interior, has been attributed to many factors. For instance, bubble structures in superheavy nuclei are believed to be due to the electrostatic repulsion. In light nuclei, the mechanism behind the density reduction in the interior has been discussed in terms of shell effects associated with occupations of s orbits. Purpose: The main objective of this work is to reveal mechanisms behind the formation of central depression in nucleonic densities in light and heavy nuclei. To this end, we introduce several measures of the internal nucleonic density. Through the statistical analysis, we study the information content of these measures with respect to nuclear matter properties. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme functionals. Using the statistical tools of linear least square regression, we inspect correlations between various measures of central depression and model parameters, including nuclear matter properties. We study bivariate correlations with selected quantities as well as multiple correlations with groups of parameters. Detailed correlation analysis is carried out for 34Si for which a bubble structure has been reported recently, 48Ca, and N =82 , 126, and 184 isotonic chains. Results: We show that the central depression in medium-mass nuclei is very sensitive to shell effects, whereas for superheavy systems it is firmly driven by the electrostatic repulsion. An appreciable semibubble structure in proton density is predicted for 294Og, which is currently the heaviest nucleus known experimentally. Conclusion: Our correlation analysis reveals that the central density indicators in nuclei below 208Pb carry little information on parameters of nuclear matter; they are predominantly driven by shell structure. On the other hand, in the superheavy nuclei there exists a clear relationship between the central nucleonic density and symmetry energy.

  9. Histogram plots and cutoff energies for nuclear discrete levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belgya, T.; Molnar, G.; Fazekas, B.; Oestoer, J.

    1997-05-01

    Discrete level schemes for 1277 nuclei, from 6 Li through 251 Es, extracted from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File were analyzed. Cutoff energies (U max ), indicating the upper limit of level scheme completeness, were deduced from the inspection of histograms of the cumulative number of levels. Parameters of the constant-temperature level density formula (nuclear temperature T and energy shift U 0 ) were obtained by means of the least square fit of the formula to the known levels below cutoff energy. The results are tabulated for all 1277 nuclei allowing for an easy and reliable application of the constant-temperature level density approach. A complete set of cumulative plots of discrete levels is also provided. (author). 5 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Velocity fields and transition densities in nuclear collective modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stringari, S [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Libera Universita di Trento, Italy

    1979-08-13

    The shape of the deformations occurring in nuclear collective modes is investigated by means of a microscopic approach. Analytical solutions of the equations of motion are obtained by using simplified nuclear potentials. It is found that the structure of the velocity field and of the transition density of low-lying modes is considerably different from the predictions of irrotational hydrodynamic models. The low-lying octupole state is studied in particular detail by using the Skyrme force.

  11. RPA correlations and nuclear densities in relativistic mean field approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Giai, N.; Liang, H.Z.; Meng, J.

    2007-02-01

    The relativistic mean field approach (RMF) is well known for describing accurately binding energies and nucleon distributions in atomic nuclei throughout the nuclear chart. The random phase approximation (RPA) built on top of the RMF is also a good framework for the study of nuclear excitations. Here, we examine the consequences of long range correlations brought about by the RPA on the neutron and proton densities as given by the RMF approach. (authors)

  12. On the study of level density parameters for some deformed light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonmezoglu, S.

    2005-01-01

    The nuclear level density, which is the number of energy levels/MeV at an excitation energy Ex , is a characteristic property of every nucleus. Total level densities are among the key quantities in statistical calculations in many fields, such as nuclear physics, astrophysics, spallation s neutrons measurements, and studies of intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions. The nuclear level density is an important physical quantity both from the fundamental point of view as well as in understanding the particle and gamma ray emission in various reactions. In light and heavy deformed nucleus, the gamma-ray energies drop with decreasing spin in a very regular fashion. The nuclear level density parameters have been usually used in investigation of the nuclear level density. This parameter itself changes with excitation energy depending on both shell effect in the single particle model and different excitation modes in the collective models. In this study, the energy level density parameters of some deformed light nucleus (40 C a, 47 T i, 59 N i, 79 S e, 80 B r) are determined by using energy spectrum of the interest nucleus for different band. In calculation of energy-level density parameters dependent upon excitation energy of nuclei studied, a model was considered which relies on the fact that energy levels of deformed light nuclei, just like those of deformed heavy nuclei, are equidistant and which relies on collective motions of their nucleons. The present calculation results have been compared with the corresponding experimental and theoretical results. The obtained results are in good agreement with the experimental results

  13. Simulations of cold nuclear matter at sub-saturation densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giménez Molinelli, P.A., E-mail: pagm@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Nichols, J.I. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); López, J.A. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Dorso, C.O. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina)

    2014-03-01

    Ideal nuclear matter is expected to undergo a first order phase transition at the thermodynamic limit. At such phase transitions the size of density fluctuations (bubbles or droplets) scale with the size of the system. This means that simulations of nuclear matter at sub-saturation densities will inexorably suffer from what is vaguely referred to as “finite size effects”. It is usually thought that these finite size effects can be diminished by imposing periodic boundary conditions and making the system large enough, but as we show in this work, that is actually not the case at sub-saturation densities. In this paper we analyze the equilibrium configurations of molecular dynamics simulations of a classical model for symmetric ideal (uncharged) nuclear matter at sub-saturation densities and low temperatures, where phase coexistence is expected at the thermodynamic limit. We show that the most stable configurations in this density range are almost completely determined by artificial aspects of the simulations (i.e. boundary conditions) and can be predicted analytically by surface minimization. This result is very general and is shown to hold true for several well known semi-classical models of nuclear interaction and even for a simple Lennard-Jones potential. Also, in the limit of very large systems, when “small size” effects can be neglected, those equilibrium configurations seem to be restricted to a few structures reminiscent to the “Pasta Phases” expected in Neutron Star matter, but arising from a completely different origin: In Neutron Star matter, the non-homogeneous structures arise from a competition between nuclear and Coulomb interactions while for ideal nuclear matter they emerge from finite (yet not “small”) size effects. The role of periodic boundary conditions and finite size effects in Neutron Star matter simulations are reexamined.

  14. Combined backscatter and transmission method for nuclear density gauge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golgoun Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the use of nuclear density gauges, due to the ability to work in harsh industrial environments, is very common. In this study, to reduce error related to the ρ of continuous measuring density, the combination of backscatter and transmission are used simultaneously. For this reason, a 137Cs source for Compton scattering dominance and two detectors are simulated by MCNP4C code for measuring the density of 3 materials. Important advantages of this combined radiometric gauge are diminished influence of μ and therefore improving linear regression.

  15. CSR of Lanzhou and nuclear physics at high densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Pengfei; Zhao Weiqin

    1999-01-01

    The possibility to produce highly dense nuclear matter at CSR of Lanzhou and the corresponding signals at final state are discussed. Especially, the maximum baryon density reached at CSR is estimated, and the subthreshold production and hadronic flow risen from the partial restoration of chiral symmetry at CSR energies are analyzed

  16. Momentum and density dependence of the nuclear mean field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behera, B.; Routray, T.R.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this is to analyse the momentum, density and temperature dependence of the mean field in nuclear matter derived from finite range effective interactions and to examine the influence of the functional form of the interaction on the high momentum behaviour of the mean field. Emphasis will be given to use very simple parametrizations of the effective interaction with a minimum number of adjustable parameters and yet capable of giving a good description of the mean field in nuclear matter over a wide range of momentum, density and temperature. As an application of the calculated equation of state of nuclear matter, phase transitions to quark-gluon plasma is studied where the quark phase is described by a zeroth order bag model equation of state

  17. On an inversion procedure for nuclear transition densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overveld, C.W.A.M. van.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to present a method by means of which experimental results can be analysed to establish transition densities of nuclear reactions. The necessity of such a method is explained together with the reaction theory involved. A chapter is devoted to the extension of a computer code for the scattering calculations in order to include the spin-orbit coupling. Detailed attention is paid to the mathematical and numerical properties of the method. The method is applied to some simple one-step reactions. The resulting transition densities are interpreted in terms of the shell model theory of nuclear structure. The final chapter deals with an entirely different approach to the extraction of transition densities from experimental data. Here the possibilities of the classical scattering theory as a method to solve the problem are studied. (Auth.)

  18. KIDS Nuclear Energy Density Functional: 1st Application in Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Hana; Papakonstantinou, Panagiota; Hyun, Chang Ho; Oh, Yongseok

    We apply the KIDS (Korea: IBS-Daegu-Sungkyunkwan) nuclear energy density functional model, which is based on the Fermi momentum expansion, to the study of properties of lj-closed nuclei. The parameters of the model are determined by the nuclear properties at the saturation density and theoretical calculations on pure neutron matter. For applying the model to the study of nuclei, we rely on the Skyrme force model, where the Skyrme force parameters are determined through the KIDS energy density functional. Solving Hartree-Fock equations, we obtain the energies per particle and charge radii of closed magic nuclei, namely, 16O, 28O, 40Ca, 48Ca, 60Ca, 90Zr, 132Sn, and 208Pb. The results are compared with the observed data and further improvement of the model is shortly mentioned.

  19. Influence of tracks densities in solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes O, S.; Hadler N.; Lunes, P.; Saenz T, C.

    1996-01-01

    When Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD) is employed to measure nuclear tracks produced mainly by fission fragments and alpha particles, it is considered that the tracks observation work is performed under an efficiency, ε 0 , which is independent of the track density (number of tracks/area unit). There are not published results or experimental data supporting such an assumption. In this work the dependence of ε 0 with track density is studied basing on experimental data. To perform this, pieces of CR-39 cut from a sole 'mother sheet' were coupled to thin uranium films for different exposition times and the resulting ratios between track density and exposition time were compared. Our results indicate that ε 0 is constant for track densities between 10 3 and 10 5 cm -2 . At our etching conditions track overlapping makes impossible the counting for densities around 1.7 x 10 5 cm -2 . For track densities less than 10 3 cm -2 , ε 0 , was not observed to be constant. (authors). 4 refs., 2 figs

  20. Realistic level densities in fragment emission at high excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, M.G.; Blann, M.; Ignatyuk, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Heavy fragment emission from a 44 100 Ru compound nucleus at 400 and 800 MeV of excitation is analyzed to study the influence of level density models on final yields. An approach is used in which only quasibound shell-model levels are included in calculating level densities. We also test the traditional Fermi gas model for which there is no upper energy limit to the single particle levels. We compare the influence of these two level density models in evaporation calculations of primary fragment excitations, kinetic energies and yields, and on final product yields

  1. Generalized Freud's equation and level densities with polynomial

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 81; Issue 2. Generalized Freud's equation and level densities with polynomial potential. Akshat Boobna Saugata Ghosh. Research Articles Volume 81 ... Keywords. Orthogonal polynomial; Freud's equation; Dyson–Mehta method; methods of resolvents; level density.

  2. Nuclear level mixing resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coussement, R.; Put, P.; Scheveneels, G.; Hardeman, F.

    1985-01-01

    The existent methods for measuring quadrupole interactions are not suited to nuclei with lifetimes in the micro-seconds to minutes region. AD/NQR, a possible candidate in this lifetime gap, has not yet succeeded in overcoming its predicted difficulties. A new resonant method, recently developed and based on the principles of level mixing (cfr atomic spectroscopy) covers this less accessible lifetime range. Many other kinds of resonances can be described according to the level mixing formalism. The particular example of NMR as a level mixing resonance (LMR) is discussed. The underlying theory of LMR and its important consequences, leading to some interesting features of the method, is briefly formulated. Two successfully performed measurements demonstrate the feasibility and the predicted characteristics of this new promising method. (orig.)

  3. Missing and Spurious Level Corrections for Nuclear Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, G E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Pato, M P; Shriner, J F

    2005-01-01

    Neutron and proton resonances provide detailed level density information. However, due to experimental limitations, some levels are missed and some are assigned incorrect quantum numbers. The standard method to correct for missing levels uses the experimental widths and the Porter-Thomas distribution. Analysis of the spacing distribution provides an independent determination of the fraction of missing levels. We have derived a general expression for such an imperfect spacing distribution using the maximum entropy principle and applied it to a variety of nuclear resonance data. The problem of spurious levels has not been extensively addressed

  4. Nuclear moment of inertia and spin distribution of nuclear levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassid, Y.; Fang, L.; Liu, S.; Bertsch, G.F.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a simple model to calculate the nuclear moment of inertia at finite temperature. This moment of inertia describes the spin distribution of nuclear levels in the framework of the spin-cutoff model. Our model is based on a deformed single-particle Hamiltonian with pairing interaction and takes into account fluctuations in the pairing gap. We derive a formula for the moment of inertia at finite temperature that generalizes the Belyaev formula for zero temperature. We show that a number-parity projection explains the strong odd-even effects observed in shell model Monte Carlo studies of the nuclear moment of inertia in the iron region

  5. SURFACE SYMMETRY ENERGY OF NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolov, N; Schunck, N; Nazarewicz, W; Bender, M; Pei, J

    2010-12-20

    We study the bulk deformation properties of the Skyrme nuclear energy density functionals. Following simple arguments based on the leptodermous expansion and liquid drop model, we apply the nuclear density functional theory to assess the role of the surface symmetry energy in nuclei. To this end, we validate the commonly used functional parametrizations against the data on excitation energies of superdeformed band-heads in Hg and Pb isotopes, and fission isomers in actinide nuclei. After subtracting shell effects, the results of our self-consistent calculations are consistent with macroscopic arguments and indicate that experimental data on strongly deformed configurations in neutron-rich nuclei are essential for optimizing future nuclear energy density functionals. The resulting survey provides a useful benchmark for further theoretical improvements. Unlike in nuclei close to the stability valley, whose macroscopic deformability hangs on the balance of surface and Coulomb terms, the deformability of neutron-rich nuclei strongly depends on the surface-symmetry energy; hence, its proper determination is crucial for the stability of deformed phases of the neutron-rich matter and description of fission rates for r-process nucleosynthesis.

  6. Relations among several nuclear and electronic density functional reactivity indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Luis, Josep M.; Duran, Miquel; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Solà, Miquel

    2003-11-01

    An expansion of the energy functional in terms of the total number of electrons and the normal coordinates within the canonical ensemble is presented. A comparison of this expansion with the expansion of the energy in terms of the total number of electrons and the external potential leads to new relations among common density functional reactivity descriptors. The formulas obtained provide explicit links between important quantities related to the chemical reactivity of a system. In particular, the relation between the nuclear and the electronic Fukui functions is recovered. The connection between the derivatives of the electronic energy and the nuclear repulsion energy with respect to the external potential offers a proof for the "Quantum Chemical le Chatelier Principle." Finally, the nuclear linear response function is defined and the relation of this function with the electronic linear response function is given.

  7. Building a universal nuclear energy density functional (UNEDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, Witold [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: First, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties. Second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data. Third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  8. 'Level-level correlation and absorption in nuclear reactions'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    Level-level correlation (LLC) in nuclear reactions is discussed in general and it is shown that in the presence of LLC, N sub(μ) = Σ/g μa/ 2 > divided by gamma μ T tilde, where T tilde is the average absorption in the eigen channels [pt

  9. Development of density and moisture gauge by nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangelaviraj, V.; Karasuddhi, P.; Banchornthevakal, V.; Punyachaiya, S.

    1981-08-01

    A combined soil moisture/density gauge using nuclear technique was developed. Simultaneous density and moisture measurements can take place by means of gamma and neutron sources which are attached to the moisture probe. Backscattered gamma radiation giving information on density is detected by a G.M. counter while slow neutron radiation containing moisture information is detected by a boron-lined proportional counter. The instrument makes use of a 30 mCi americium 241-beryllium neutron source and a 10 mCi cesium 137 gamma source. The instrument was calibrated using soil and sand filled in a 200 litre-barrel in laboratory and field work which was carried out to check the correctness of the calibration curves. (author)

  10. Probing the nuclear symmetry energy at high densities with nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifels, Y.

    2017-11-01

    The nuclear equation of state is a topic of highest current interest in nuclear structure and reactions as well as in astrophysics. The symmetry energy is the part of the equation of state which is connected to the asymmetry in the neutron/proton content. During recent years a multitude of experimental and theoretical efforts on different fields have been undertaken to constraint its density dependence at low densities but also above saturation density (ρ_0=0.16 fm ^{-3} . Conventionally the symmetry energy is described by its magnitude S_v and the slope parameter L , both at saturation density. Values of L = 44 -66MeV and S_v=31 -33MeV have been deduced in recent compilations of nuclear structure, heavy-ion reaction and astrophysics data. Apart from astrophysical data on mass and radii of neutron stars, heavy-ion reactions at incident energies of several 100MeV are the only means do access the high density behaviour of the symmetry energy. In particular, meson production and collective flows upto about 1 AGeV are predicted to be sensitive to the slope of the symmetry energy as a function of density. From the measurement of elliptic flow of neutrons with respect to charged particles at GSI, a more stringent constraint for the slope of the symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities has been deduced. Future options to reach even higher densities will be discussed.

  11. Level densities and γ strength functions in light Sc and Ti isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, A.; Larsen, A.C.; Syed, N.U.H.; Guttormsen, M.; Nyhus, H.; Siem, S.; Harissopulos, S.; Konstantinopoulos, T.; Lagoyannis, A.; Perdidakis, G.; Spyrou, A.; Kmiecik, M.; Mazurek, K.; Krticka, M.; Loennroth, T.; Norby, M.; Voinov, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a measurement of nuclear level densities and the γ-ray strength of light Sc (Sc 43 , Sc 45 ) and Ti (Ti 44 , Ti 45 and Ti 46 ) isotopes using the Oslo Method. The article begins with a presentation of the experimental setup. (authors)

  12. Water level monitoring device in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kiyohide; Otake, Tomohiro.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To monitor the water level in a pressure vessel of BWR type nuclear reactors at high accuracy by improving the compensation functions. Constitution: In the conventional water level monitor in a nuclear reactor, if the pressure vessel is displaced by the change of the pressure in the reactor or the temperature of the reactor water, the relative level of the reference water head in a condensation vessel is changed to cause deviation between the actual water level and the indicated water level to reduce the monitoring accuracy. According to the invention, means for detecting the position of the reference water head and means for detection the position in the condensation vessel are disposed to the pressure vessel. Then, relative positional change between the condensation vessel and the reference water head is calculated based on detection sinals from both of the means. The water level is compensated and calculated by water level calculation means based on the relative positional change, water level signals from the level gage and the pressure signals from the pressure gage. As a result, if the pressure vessel is displaced due to the change of the temperature or pressure, it is possible to measure the reactor water level accurately thereby remakably improve the reliability for the water level control in the nuclear reactor. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. Testing of the level density segment of the RIPL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capote, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    A comparison between RIPL phenomenological state density parameterizations and microscopical state density (SD) codes was performed for nickel and samarium isotopes. All the codes were shown to be complete. More work is needed on calculation of the collective enhancement of the level densities to improve currently used phenomenological recipes. It was shown that phenomenological closed formulae for particle-hole state density fails to describe microscopical calculation for magic nuclei. For deformed nuclei, like Sm-152, the agreement of Williams closed formulae considering Kalbach pairing correction with microscopical SID calculations was very good. (author)

  14. Liquid level measurement in high level nuclear waste slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, G.E.; Heckendorn, F.M.; Postles, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Accurate liquid level measurement has been a difficult problem to solve for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The nuclear waste sludge tends to plug or degrade most commercially available liquid-level measurement sensors. A liquid-level measurement system that meets demanding accuracy requirements for the DWPF has been developed. The system uses a pneumatic 1:1 pressure repeater as a sensor and a computerized error correction system. 2 figs

  15. The Influence of Decreased Levels of High Density Lipoprotein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Changes in lipoproteins levels in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients are well.known, but the physiological ramifications of the low levels observed have not been entirely resolved. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of decreased levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL.c) on ...

  16. Evaluation of population density and distribution criteria in nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, M.

    1994-06-01

    The NRC has proposed revisions to 10 CFR 100 which include the codification of nuclear reactor site population density limits to 500 people per square mile, at the siting stage, averaged over any radial distance out to 30 miles, and 1,000 people per square mile within the 40-year lifetime of a nuclear plant. This study examined whether there are less restrictive alternative population density and/or distribution criteria which would provide equivalent or better protection to human health in the unlikely event of a nuclear accident. This study did not attempt to directly address the issue of actual population density limits because there are no US risk standards established for the evaluation of population density limits. Calculations were performed using source terms for both a current generation light water reactor (LWR) and an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) design. The results of this study suggest that measures which address the distribution of the population density, including emergency response conditions, could result in lower average individual risks to the public than the proposed guidelines that require controlling average population density. Studies also indicate that an exclusion zone size, determined by emergency response conditions and reactor design (power level and safety features), would better serve to protect public health than a rigid standard applied to all sites

  17. Building A Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Joe [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Furnstahl, Dick [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Horoi, Mihai [Central Michigan Univ., Mount Pleasant, MI (United States); Lusk, Rusty [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Nazarewicz, Witek [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Ng, Esmond [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Thompson, Ian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vary, James [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-09-30

    During the period of Dec. 1 2006 - Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: first, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory. The main physics areas of UNEDF, defined at the beginning of the project, were: ab initio structure; ab initio functionals; DFT applications; DFT extensions; reactions.

  18. Serum osteoprotegerin levels and mammographic density among high-risk women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Olivia; Zaman, Tasnim; Eisen, Andrea; Demsky, Rochelle; Blackmore, Kristina; Knight, Julia A; Elser, Christine; Ginsburg, Ophira; Zbuk, Kevin; Yaffe, Martin; Narod, Steven A; Salmena, Leonardo; Kotsopoulos, Joanne

    2018-06-01

    Mammographic density is a risk factor for breast cancer but the mechanism behind this association is unclear. The receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK)/RANK ligand (RANKL) pathway has been implicated in the development of breast cancer. Given the role of RANK signaling in mammary epithelial cell proliferation, we hypothesized this pathway may also be associated with mammographic density. Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for RANKL, is known to inhibit RANK signaling. Thus, it is of interest to evaluate whether OPG levels modify breast cancer risk through mammographic density. We quantified serum OPG levels in 57 premenopausal and 43 postmenopausal women using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cumulus was used to measure percent density, dense area, and non-dense area for each mammographic image. Subjects were classified into high versus low OPG levels based on the median serum OPG level in the entire cohort (115.1 pg/mL). Multivariate models were used to assess the relationship between serum OPG levels and the measures of mammographic density. Serum OPG levels were not associated with mammographic density among premenopausal women (P ≥ 0.42). Among postmenopausal women, those with low serum OPG levels had higher mean percent mammographic density (20.9% vs. 13.7%; P = 0.04) and mean dense area (23.4 cm 2 vs. 15.2 cm 2 ; P = 0.02) compared to those with high serum OPG levels after covariate adjustment. These findings suggest that low OPG levels may be associated with high mammographic density, particularly in postmenopausal women. Targeting RANK signaling may represent a plausible, non-surgical prevention option for high-risk women with high mammographic density, especially those with low circulating OPG levels.

  19. On expectation values for nuclear energy levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wet, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    The nuclear model is built up by constructing measured states, including the ground state, from the vacuum state. All states are, however, not accessible from the ground state so that selection rules may be found which at the same time impose even more stringent conditions on the labelling of energy levels. These are the subject of this paper

  20. Radiation levels in nuclear diagnostic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeulen, A.M.T.I.

    1987-01-01

    To estimate the risks for a pregnant radiological worker, radiation level measurements are executed for common nuclear diagnostic techniques. These measurements are combined with the time which the radiologic worker is present during the performance of the diagnostic techniques. It is concluded that a radiologic worker is receiving less than 5 mSv during pregnancy. This is the case with in vivo determination in a department of nuclear medicine with common diagnostic techniques. Reduction of radiation doses during pregnancy is possible by reduction of heart function examinations, skeletal examinations and brain scans. 1 figure; 13 tabs

  1. Level Densities and Radiative Strength Functions in 170,171Yb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agvaanluvsan, U.; Schiller, A.; Becker, J.A.; Berstein, L.A.; Guttormsen, M.; Mitchell, G.E.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Voinov, A.

    2003-01-01

    Level densities and radiative strength functions in 171 Yb and 170 Yb nuclei have been measured with the 171 Yb( 3 He, 3 He(prime) γ) 171 Yb and 171 Yb( 3 He, αγ) 170 Yb reactions. A simultaneous determination of the nuclear level density and the radiative strength function was made. The present data adds to and is consistent with previous results for several other rare earth nuclei. The method will be briefly reviewed and the result from the analysis will be presented. The radiative strength function for 171 Yb is compared to previously published work.

  2. Calculations on the vibrational level density in highly excited formaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashev, Svetoslav; Moule, David C.

    2003-01-01

    The object of the present work is to develop a model that provides realistic estimates of the vibrational level density in polyatomic molecules in a given electronic state, at very high (chemically relevant) vibrational excitation energies. For S 0 formaldehyde (D 2 CO), acetylene, and a number of triatomics, the estimates using conventional spectroscopic formulas have yielded densities at the dissociation threshold, very much lower than the experimentally measured values. In the present work we have derived a general formula for the vibrational energy levels of a polyatomic molecule, which is a generalization of the conventional Dunham spectroscopic expansion. Calculations were performed on the vibrational level density in S 0 D 2 CO, H 2 C 2 , and NO 2 at excitation energies in the vicinity of the dissociation limit, using the newly derived formula. The results from the calculations are in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured data

  3. Limit cycle analysis of nuclear coupled density wave oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation of limit cycle behavior for the nuclear-coupled density wave oscillation (NCDWO) in a boiling water reactor (BWR) was performed. A simplified nonlinear model of BWR core behavior was developed using a two-region flow channel representation, coupled with a form of the point-kinetics equation. This model has been used to investigate the behavior of large amplitude NCDWO's through conventional time-integration solutions and through application of a direct relaxation-oscillation limit cycle solution in phase space. The numerical solutions demonstrate the potential for severe global power and flow oscillations in a BWR core at off-normal conditions, such as might occur during Anticipated Transients without Scram. Because of the many simplifying assumptions used, it is felt that the results should not be interpreted as an absolute prediction of core behavior, but as an indication of the potential for large oscillations and a demonstration of the corresponding limit cycle mechanisms. The oscillations in channel density drive the core power variations, and are reinforced by heat flux variations due to the changing fuel temperature. A global temperature increase occurs as energy is accumulated in the fuel, and limits the magnitude of the oscillations because as the average channel density decreases, the amplitude and duration of positive void reactivity at a given oscillation amplitude is lessened

  4. Level density of random matrices for decaying systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haake, F.; Izrailev, F.; Saher, D.; Sommers, H.-J.

    1991-01-01

    Analytical and numerical results for the level density of a certain class of random non-Hermitian matrices H=H+iΓ are presented. The conservative part H belongs to the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble while the damping piece Γ is quadratic in Gaussian random numbers and may describe the decay of resonances through various channels. In the limit of a large matrix dimension the level density assumes a surprisingly simple dependence on the relative strength of the damping and the number of channels. 18 refs.; 4 figs

  5. Effect of interstitial low level laser stimulation in skin density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seulki; Ha, Myungjin; Lee, Sangyeob; Yu, Sungkon; Park, Jihoon; Radfar, Edalat; Hwang, Dong Hyun; Lee, Han A.; Kim, Hansung; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    As the interest in skin was increased, number of studies on skin care also have been increased. The reduction of skin density is one of the symptoms of skin aging. It reduces elasticity of skin and becomes the reason of wrinkle formation. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been suggested as one of the effective therapeutic methods for skin aging as in hasten to change skin density. This study presents the effect of a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) (wavelength: 660nm, power: 20mW) in skin density. Rabbits were divided into three groups. Group 1 didn't receive any laser stimulation as a control group. Group 2 and 3 as test groups were exposed to MILNS with energy of 8J and 6J on rabbits' dorsal side once a week, respectively. Skin density of rabbits was measured every 12 hours by using an ultrasound skin scanner.

  6. Ghrelin plasma levels, gastric ghrelin cell density and bone mineral density in women with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksud, F A N; Kakehasi, A M; Guimarães, M F B R; Machado, C J; Barbosa, A J A

    2017-05-18

    Generalized bone loss can be considered an extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that may lead to the occurrence of fractures, resulting in decreased quality of life and increased healthcare costs. The peptide ghrelin has demonstrated to positively affect osteoblasts in vitro and has anti-inflammatory actions, but the studies that correlate ghrelin plasma levels and RA have contradictory results. We aimed to evaluate the correlation between total ghrelin plasma levels, density of ghrelin-immunoreactive cells in the gastric mucosa, and bone mineral density (BMD) in twenty adult women with established RA with 6 months or more of symptoms (mean age of 52.70±11.40 years). Patients with RA presented higher ghrelin-immunoreactive cells density in gastric mucosa (P=0.008) compared with healthy females. There was a positive relationship between femoral neck BMD and gastric ghrelin cell density (P=0.007). However, these same patients presented a negative correlation between plasma ghrelin levels and total femoral BMD (P=0.03). The present results indicate that ghrelin may be involved in bone metabolism of patients with RA. However, the higher density of ghrelin-producing cells in the gastric mucosa of these patients does not seem to induce a corresponding elevation in the plasma levels of this peptide.

  7. Ghrelin plasma levels, gastric ghrelin cell density and bone mineral density in women with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A.N. Maksud

    Full Text Available Generalized bone loss can be considered an extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA that may lead to the occurrence of fractures, resulting in decreased quality of life and increased healthcare costs. The peptide ghrelin has demonstrated to positively affect osteoblasts in vitro and has anti-inflammatory actions, but the studies that correlate ghrelin plasma levels and RA have contradictory results. We aimed to evaluate the correlation between total ghrelin plasma levels, density of ghrelin-immunoreactive cells in the gastric mucosa, and bone mineral density (BMD in twenty adult women with established RA with 6 months or more of symptoms (mean age of 52.70±11.40 years. Patients with RA presented higher ghrelin-immunoreactive cells density in gastric mucosa (P=0.008 compared with healthy females. There was a positive relationship between femoral neck BMD and gastric ghrelin cell density (P=0.007. However, these same patients presented a negative correlation between plasma ghrelin levels and total femoral BMD (P=0.03. The present results indicate that ghrelin may be involved in bone metabolism of patients with RA. However, the higher density of ghrelin-producing cells in the gastric mucosa of these patients does not seem to induce a corresponding elevation in the plasma levels of this peptide.

  8. Evaluation of the Automatic Density Compensation for Pressurizer Level Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Insoo; Min, Seohong; Ahn, Myunghoon

    2014-01-01

    When using two transmitters, it is difficult for the operators to identify the correct level of the pressurizer (PZR) upon failure of one of the two transmitters. For this reason, Korean Utility Requirements Document (KURD) requires that the operators to use three independent level indicators. Two hot calibrated transmitters and one cold calibrated transmitter compose PZR level transmitters in APR1400. In this paper, the deviation between cold calibration and hot calibration is evaluated, and the application of compensated PZR level measurement and uncompen-sated PZR level measurement during the normal operation of APR1400 are introduced. The PZR level signals for APR1400 come in three channels. To satisfy the KURD requirements for PZR level measurement, and at the same time to accomplish correction design and implementation, applicability and differences between hot calibration and cold calibration, compensated level and uncompensated level were evaluated as follows: For proper indication of PZR levels under normal operating condition, two of the three transmitters went through hot calibration and the remaining one transmitter went through cold calibration. This was to allow indicating entire regions of PZR regardless of the plant operation modes. For automatic density compensation per KURD requirements, the algorithm of the density compensated PZR level implemented in the DCS controller and PRV logic is adopted as a signal validation method

  9. Measurement of excited states in 71Ge via (p, nγ) reaction and density of discrete levels in 71Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi, R.; Kakavand, T.; Behkami, A.N.

    2008-01-01

    In all statistical theories the nuclear level density is the most characteristic quantity and plays an essential role in the study of nuclear structure. In this work, additional experimental information about existing level structure of 71 Ge have been provided through the (p, nγ) reaction and then determined nuclear level density parameters of the Bethe formula and constant temperature model for 71 Ge

  10. Single particle level density in a finite depth potential well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlomo, S.; Kolomietz, V.M.; Dejbakhsh, H.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the single particle level density g(ε) of a realistic finite depth potential well, concentrating on the continuum (ε>0) region. We carry out quantum-mechanical calculations of the partial level density g l (ε), associated with a well-defined orbital angular momentum l≤40, using the phase-shift derivative method and the Greens-function method and compare the results with those obtained using the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We also numerically calculate g(ε) as a l sum of g l (ε) up to a certain value of scr(l) max ≤40 and determine the corresponding smooth level densities using the Strutinsky smoothing procedure. We demonstrate, in accordance with Levinson close-quote s theorem, that the partial contribution g l (ε) to the single particle level density from continuum states has positive and negative values. However, g(ε) is nonnegative. We also point out that this is not the case for an energy-dependent potential well. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  11. Partial level density of the n-quasiparticle excitations in the nuclei of the 40≤A≤200 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.; Khitrov, V.A.

    2005-01-01

    Level density and radiative strength functions are obtained from the analysis of two-step cascades intensities following the thermal neutron capture. The data on level density are approximated by the sum of the partial level densities corresponding to n-quasiparticle excitations. The most probable values of the collective enhancement factor of the level density are found together with the thresholds of the next Cooper nucleons pair breaking. These data allow one to calculate the level density of practically any nucleus in given spin window in the framework of model concepts, taking into account all known nuclear excitation types. The presence of an approximation results discrepancy with theoretical statements specifies the necessity of rather essentially developing the level density models. It also indicates the possibilities to obtain the essentially new information on nucleon correlation functions of the excited nucleus from the experiment

  12. State and level densities for 23<=A<=40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckerman, M.

    1975-01-01

    State and level density parameters are deduced for nuclei in the mass range 23<=A<=40 by combining low energy experimental data with high energy numerical calculations. Low energy experimental information is obtained from direct level counting, s and p-wave neutron resonance measurements, charged particle resonance measurements and stripping and pickup reaction data. Numerical calculations are performed for excitation energies of from 45 to 50 MeV using realistic single particle energies deduced from experimental data. (author)

  13. Shear viscosity to entropy density ratio in nuclear multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Subrata

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear multifragmentation in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions has long been associated with liquid-gas phase transition. We calculate the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio η/s for an equilibrated system of nucleons and fragments produced in multifragmentation within an extended statistical multifragmentation model. The temperature dependence of η/s exhibits behavior surprisingly similar to that of H 2 O. In the coexistence phase of fragments and light particles, the ratio η/s reaches a minimum of depth comparable to that for water in the vicinity of the critical temperature for liquid-gas phase transition. The effects of freeze-out volume and surface symmetry energy on η/s in multifragmentation are studied.

  14. High-level nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkholder, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    The meeting was timely because many countries had begun their site selection processes and their engineering designs were becoming well-defined. The technology of nuclear waste disposal was maturing, and the institutional issues arising from the implementation of that technology were being confronted. Accordingly, the program was structured to consider both the technical and institutional aspects of the subject. The meeting started with a review of the status of the disposal programs in eight countries and three international nuclear waste management organizations. These invited presentations allowed listeners to understand the similarities and differences among the various national approaches to solving this very international problem. Then seven invited presentations describing nuclear waste disposal from different perspectives were made. These included: legal and judicial, electric utility, state governor, ethical, and technical perspectives. These invited presentations uncovered several issues that may need to be resolved before high-level nuclear wastes can be emplaced in a geologic repository in the United States. Finally, there were sixty-six contributed technical presentations organized in ten sessions around six general topics: site characterization and selection, repository design and in-situ testing, package design and testing, disposal system performance, disposal and storage system cost, and disposal in the overall waste management system context. These contributed presentations provided listeners with the results of recent applied RandD in each of the subject areas

  15. Continuum corrections to the level density and its dependence on excitation energy, n-p asymmetry, and deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    In the independent-particle model, the nuclear level density is determined from the neutron and proton single-particle level densities. The single-particle level density for the positive-energy continuum levels is important at high excitation energies for stable nuclei and at all excitation energies for nuclei near the drip lines. This single-particle level density is subdivided into compound-nucleus and gas components. Two methods are considered for this subdivision: In the subtraction method, the single-particle level density is determined from the scattering phase shifts. In the Gamov method, only the narrow Gamov states or resonances are included. The level densities calculated with these two methods are similar; both can be approximated by the backshifted Fermi-gas expression with level-density parameters that are dependent on A, but with very little dependence on the neutron or proton richness of the nucleus. However, a small decrease in the level-density parameter is predicted for some nuclei very close to the drip lines. The largest difference between the calculations using the two methods is the deformation dependence of the level density. The Gamov method predicts a very strong peaking of the level density at sphericity for high excitation energies. This leads to a suppression of deformed configurations and, consequently, the fission rate predicted by the statistical model is reduced in the Gamov method

  16. Neutron emission spectra and level density of hot rotating 132Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta

    2008-01-01

    The neutron emission spectrum of the highly excited compound nuclear system 132 Sn is investigated at high spin. The doubly magic nucleus 132 Sn undergoes a shape transition at high angular momentum which affects the nuclear level density and neutron emission probability considerably. The interplay of temperature, shape, deformation and rotational degrees of freedom and their influence on neutron emission is emphasized. We predict an enhancement of nucleonic emission at those spins where the nucleus suffers a transition from a spherical to deformed shape. (author)

  17. Generalized Freud's equation and level densities with polynomial potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boobna, Akshat; Ghosh, Saugata

    2013-08-01

    We study orthogonal polynomials with weight $\\exp[-NV(x)]$, where $V(x)=\\sum_{k=1}^{d}a_{2k}x^{2k}/2k$ is a polynomial of order 2d. We derive the generalised Freud's equations for $d=3$, 4 and 5 and using this obtain $R_{\\mu}=h_{\\mu}/h_{\\mu -1}$, where $h_{\\mu}$ is the normalization constant for the corresponding orthogonal polynomials. Moments of the density functions, expressed in terms of $R_{\\mu}$, are obtained using Freud's equation and using this, explicit results of level densities as $N\\rightarrow\\infty$ are derived.

  18. Variation of level density parameter with angular momentum in 119Sb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta; Kailas, S.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear level density (NLD), a basic ingredient of Statistical Model has been a subject of interest for various decades as it plays an important role in the understanding of a wide variety of Nuclear reactions. There have been various efforts towards the precise determination of NLD and study its dependence on excitation energy and angular momentum as it is crucial in the determination of cross-sections. Here we report our results of theoretical calculations in a microscopic framework to understand the experimental results on inverse level density parameter (k) extracted for different angular momentum regions for 119 Sb corresponding to different γ-ray multiplicities by comparing the experimental neutron energy spectra with statistical model predictions where an increase in the level density with the increasing angular momentum is predicted. NLD and neutron emission spectra dependence on temperature and spin has been studied in our earlier works where the influence of structural transitions due to angular momentum and temperature on level density of states and neutron emission probability was shown

  19. Quantum phase transitions and collective enhancement of level density in odd–A and odd–odd nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karampagia, S., E-mail: karampag@nscl.msu.edu [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Renzaglia, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Zelevinsky, V. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The nuclear shell model assumes an effective mean-field plus interaction Hamiltonian in a specific configuration space. We want to understand how various interaction matrix elements affect the observables, the collectivity in nuclei and the nuclear level density for odd–A and odd–odd nuclei. Using the sd and pf shells, we vary specific groups of matrix elements and study the evolution of energy levels, transition rates and the level density. In all cases studied, a transition between a “normal” and a collective phase is induced, accompanied by an enhancement of the level density in the collective phase. In distinction to neighboring even–even nuclei, the enhancement of the level density is observed already at the transition point. The collective phase is reached when the single-particle transfer matrix elements are dominant in the shell model Hamiltonian, providing a sign of their fundamental role.

  20. Low energy level density and surface instabilities in heavy transition nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieclawik, W. de; Foucher, R.; Dionisio, J.S.; Vieu, C.; Hoglund, A.; Watzig, W.

    1975-01-01

    A statistical analysis of Au, Pt, Hg nuclear levels was performed with Ericson's method. The odd mass gold experimental number of levels distributions are compared to the theoretical distributions corresponding to vibrational (Alaga and Kisslinger-Sorensen) and rotational (Stephens, Meyer-ter-Vehn) models. The Alaga model gives the most complete description of 193 Au, 195 Au levels and fits the lowest part of Gilbert-Cameron high energy distributions (deduced from the statistical model and neutron capture data). The Ericson's method shows other interesting features of Pt and Hg isotopes (i.e. level density dependence on nuclear shape and pairing correlations, evidence for phase transitions). Consequently, this method is a useful tool for guiding experimental as well as theoretical investigations of transition nuclei [fr

  1. On the relation between the statistical γ-decay and the level density in 162Dy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henden, L.; Bergholt, L.; Guttormsen, M.; Rekstad, J.; Tveter, T.S.

    1994-12-01

    The level density of low-spin states (0-10ℎ) in 162 Dy has been determined from the ground state up to approximately 6 MeV of excitation energy. Levels in the excitation region up to 8 MeV were populated by means of the 163 Dy( 3 He, α) reaction, and the first-generation γ-rays in the decay of these states has been isolated. The energy distribution of the first-generation γ-rays provides a new source of information about the nuclear level density over a wide energy region. A broad peak is observed in the first-generation spectra, and the authors suggest an interpretation in terms of enhanced M1 transitions between different high-j Nilsson orbitals. 30 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Review of methods for level density estimation from resonance parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1983-01-01

    A number of methods are available for statistical analysis of resonance parameter sets, i.e. for estimation of level densities and average widths with account of missing levels. The main categories are (i) methods based on theories of level spacings (orthogonal-ensemble theory, Dyson-Mehta statistics), (ii) methods based on comparison with simulated cross section curves (Monte Carlo simulation, Garrison's autocorrelation method), (iii) methods exploiting the observed neutron width distribution by means of Bayesian or more approximate procedures such as maximum-likelihood, least-squares or moment methods, with various recipes for the treatment of detection thresholds and resolution effects. The present review will concentrate on (iii) with the aim of clarifying the basic mathematical concepts and the relationship between the various techniques. Recent theoretical progress in the treatment of resolution effects, detectability thresholds and p-wave admixture is described. (Auth.)

  3. Rotational-mode component of the density of levels of nuclei with A approx-lt 150

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastopchin, E.M.; Svirin, M.I.; Smirenkin, G.N.

    1992-01-01

    Some difficulties which arise in the use of the generalized superfluid model to describe the density of levels in the region A approx-lt 150, as the result of an imperfect understanding of collective nuclear excitations, are discussed. One possible way to overcome these difficulties is examined. The idea is to depart from the conventional classification of collective nuclear properties and make use of small static deformations predicted theoretically and a corresponding rotational-mode component of the density of levels of these nuclei

  4. Relativistic analysis of nuclear ground state densities at 135 to 200 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    fitting of differential cross-section and analyzing power, and the appearance of wine-bottle- ... So, the effect of different nuclear density distributions is quite conspicuous in the relativistic ap- proach. Hence, we have analyzed five different nuclear ground state .... The NEG and FNEG densities have been used to see the effect.

  5. Understanding the major uncertainties in the nuclear symmetry energy at suprasaturation densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chang; Li Baoan

    2010-01-01

    Within the interacting Fermi gas model for isospin asymmetric nuclear matter, effects of the in-medium three-body interaction and the two-body short-range tensor force owing to the ρ meson exchange, as well as the short-range nucleon correlation on the high-density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy, are demonstrated respectively in a transparent way. Possible physics origins of the extremely uncertain nuclear symmetry energy at suprasaturation densities are discussed.

  6. Enhanced nuclear level decay in hot dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosselin, G.; Morel, P.

    2004-01-01

    A model of nuclear level decay in a plasma environment is described. Nuclear excitation and decay by photon processes, nuclear excitation by electron capture, and decay by internal conversion are taken into account. The electrons in the plasma are described by a relativistic average atom model for the bound electrons and by a relativistic Thomas-Fermi-Dirac model for the free electrons. Nuclear decay of isomeric level may be enhanced through an intermediate level lying above the isomer. An enhanced nuclear decay rate may occur for temperatures far below the excitation energy of the transition to the intermediate level. In most cases, the enhancement factor may reach several decades

  7. Intrinsic Density Matrices of the Nuclear Shell Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deveikis, A.; Kamuntavichius, G.

    1996-01-01

    A new method for calculation of shell model intrinsic density matrices, defined as two-particle density matrices integrated over the centre-of-mass position vector of two last particles and complemented with isospin variables, has been developed. The intrinsic density matrices obtained are completely antisymmetric, translation-invariant, and do not employ a group-theoretical classification of antisymmetric states. They are used for exact realistic density matrix expansion within the framework of the reduced Hamiltonian method. The procedures based on precise arithmetic for calculation of the intrinsic density matrices that involve no numerical diagonalization or orthogonalization have been developed and implemented in the computer code. (author). 11 refs., 2 tabs

  8. Kaon Condensation in Neutron Stars and High Density Behaviour of Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubis, S.; Kutschera, M.

    1999-01-01

    We study the influence of a high density behaviour of the nuclear symmetry energy on a kaon condensation in neutron stars. We find that the symmetry energy typical for several realistic nuclear potentials, which decreases at high densities, inhibits kaon condensation for weaker kaon-nucleon couplings at any density. There exists a threshold coupling above which the kaon condensate forms at densities exceeding some critical value. This is in contrast to the case of rising symmetry energy, as e.g. for relativistic mean field models, when the kaon condensate can form for any coupling at a sufficiently high density. Properties of the condensate are also different in both cases. (author)

  9. Kaon Condensation in Neutron Stars and High Density Behaviour of Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubis, S.; Kutschera, M.

    1999-04-01

    We study the influence of a high density behaviour of the nuclear symmetry energy on a kaon condensation in neutron stars. We find that the symmetry energy typical for several realistic nuclear potentials, which decreases at high densities, inhibits kaon condensation for weaker kaon-nucleon couplings at any density. There exists a threshold coupling above which the kaon condensate forms at densities exceeding some critical value. This is in contrast to the case of rising symmetry energy, as e.g. for relativistic mean field models, when the kaon condensate can form for any coupling at a sufficiently high density. Properties of the condensate are also different in both cases

  10. Simulation study for the nuclear matter below the saturation density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Toshihiko; Maruyama, Toshiki; Chiba, Satoshi; Niita, Koji

    1999-01-01

    The infinite nuclear matter that consists of numerous protons and neutrons is described by using periodic boundary conditions. The motion of each nucleon in the fundamental cell is decided by a Molecular Dynamics. The ground states or the excited states of the nuclear matter are simulated. (author)

  11. Parameters affecting level measurement interpretation of nuclear fuel solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, B.A.; Landat, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a level measurement technique commonly used in the measurement of radioactive liquids and equipment utilised by the inspectors for safeguards purposes. Some of the influencing parameters affecting the measurement results by this technique are characterised. An essential requisite for successful process operations in chemical facilities involving liquids generally require some physical measurements to be made in-line for both process and quality control in order to achieve the necessary final product specifications . In nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities, the same objectives apply coupled however with an additional requirement of achieving nuclear material accountancy and control. In view of the strategic importance of some of the process vessels in nuclear facilities, accountancy has to be supported by volume and density measurements of low uncertainty. Inspectors therefore require instruments which are at the very least as good as or better than operator's equipment. The classical measurement technique and most widely applied for process liquids in nuclear installations is the bubbler probe or dip-tube technique. Here a regulated flow of air passes through tubes inserted to various depths into the vessel and pressure readings are measured which are a function of the presence of liquid height and density of solution in the tank. These readings, taken together with a pre-determined calibration curve are sufficient for the volume and amount of liquor in a tank to be quantified. All measurement equipment and instrumentation are long distances from the tank environment. The key physical parameter to measure at this location is therefore pressure. Equipment designed developed, commissioned and tested in the tank measurement facilities at Ispra and in nuclear installations in Europe, Japan and the USA, house digital pressure transducer modules with manufacture's declared features of better than 0.01% accuracy and long term stability of 0.01% full

  12. The Influence of Decreased Levels of High Density Lipoprotein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride were assayed. ... Abiodun and Gwarzo: Association of high density lipoprotein cholesterol with haemolysis in sickle cell disease ... analyses were carried out to determine the correlation.

  13. Nuclear charge and magnetization densities of single particle states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frois, B.

    1985-01-01

    High energy electron scattering data have recently determined the spatial distributions of nucleons in the center of nuclei with amazing accuracy. For the first time we have access to the structure of the nuclear interior throughout the periodic table. The spatial resolution achieved by high momentum transfer measurements is now sufficient to define clearly the present limits of nuclear theory. The experimental situation is briefly reviewed and the results interpreted in the framework of self-consistent field theory. The shapes of single particle distributions in the nuclear interior are found to be in surprisingly good agreement with the predictions of mean field theory. The effects of correlations are discussed. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear charge and magnetization densities of single particle states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frois, B.

    1985-05-01

    High energy electron scattering data have recently determined the spatial distributions of nucleons in the center of nuclei with amazing accuracy. For the first time we have access to the structure of the nuclear interior throughout the periodic table. The spatial resolution achieved by high momentum transfer measurements is now sufficient to define clearly the present limits of nuclear theory. The experimental situation is briefly reviewed and the results interpreted in the framework of self-consistent field theory. The shapes of single particle distributions in the nuclear interior are found to be in surprisingly good agreement with the predictions of mean field theory. The effects of correlations are discussed

  15. The determination of nuclear matter temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review some of the things we have learned about nuclear matter under extreme conditions during the past few years in relativistic heavy ion studies. High energy heavy-ion collisions provide a unique mechanism for exploring the dependence of the nuclear potential energy epsilon(rho,T) on the degree of compression and excitation, and may even show the existence of new phases of matter. Thus the determination of the nuclear equation of state remains the ultimate goal of many researchers in this field. (orig.)

  16. Two-level convolution formula for nuclear structure function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Boqiang

    1990-05-01

    A two-level convolution formula for the nuclear structure function is derived in considering the nucleus as a composite system of baryon-mesons which are also composite systems of quark-gluons again. The results show that the European Muon Colaboration effect can not be explained by the nuclear effects as nucleon Fermi motion and nuclear binding contributions.

  17. Two-level convolution formula for nuclear structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Boqiang

    1990-01-01

    A two-level convolution formula for the nuclear structure function is derived in considering the nucleus as a composite system of baryon-mesons which are also composite systems of quark-gluons again. The results show that the European Muon Colaboration effect can not be explained by the nuclear effects as nucleon Fermi motion and nuclear binding contributions

  18. Statistical inference of level densities from resolved resonance parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1983-08-01

    Level densities are most directly obtained by counting the resonances observed in the resolved resonance range. Even in the measurements, however, weak levels are invariably missed so that one has to estimate their number and add it to the raw count. The main categories of missinglevel estimators are discussed in the present review, viz. (I) ladder methods including those based on the theory of Hamiltonian matrix ensembles (Dyson-Mehta statistics), (II) methods based on comparison with artificial cross section curves (Monte Carlo simulation, Garrison's autocorrelation method), (III) methods exploiting the observed neutron width distribution by means of Bayesian or more approximate procedures such as maximum-likelihood, least-squares or moment methods, with various recipes for the treatment of detection thresholds and resolution effects. The language of mathematical statistics is employed to clarify the basis of, and the relationship between, the various techniques. Recent progress in the treatment of resolution effects, detection thresholds and p-wave admixture is described. (orig.) [de

  19. Storage of High Level Nuclear Waste in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmar P. F. Möller

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear energy is very often used to generate electricity. But first the energy must be released from atoms what can be done in two ways: nuclear fusion and nuclear fission. Nuclear power plants use nuclear fission to produce electrical energy. The electrical energy generated in nuclear power plants does not produce polluting combustion gases but a renewable energy, an important fact that could play a key role helping to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions and tackling global warming especially as the electricity energy demand rises in the years ahead. This could be assumed as an ideal win-win situation, but the reverse site of the medal is that the production of high-level nuclear waste outweighs this advantage. Hence the paper attempt to highlight the possible state-of-art concepts for the safe and sustaining storage of high-level nuclear waste in Germany.

  20. Properties of 112Cd from the (n,n'γ) reaction: Levels and level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, P. E.; Lehmann, H.; Jolie, J.; McGrath, C. A.; Yeh, Minfang; Younes, W.; Yates, S. W.

    2001-01-01

    Levels in 112 Cd have been studied through the (n,n'γ) reaction with monoenergetic neutrons. An extended set of experiments that included excitation functions, γ-ray angular distributions, and γγ coincidence measurements was performed. A total of 375 γ rays were placed in a level scheme comprising 200 levels (of which 238 γ-ray assignments and 58 levels are newly established) up to 4 MeV in excitation. No evidence to support the existence of 47 levels as suggested in previous studies was found, and these have been removed from the level scheme. From the results, a comparison of the level density is made with the constant temperature and back-shifted Fermi gas models. The back-shifted Fermi gas model with the Gilbert-Cameron spin cutoff parameter provided the best overall fit. Without using the neutron resonance information and only fitting the cumulative number of low-lying levels, the level density parameters extracted are a sensitive function of the maximum energy used in the fit

  1. Calculations of nuclear energies using the energy density formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu, W.W.T.

    1975-01-01

    The energy density formalism (EDF) is used to investigate two problems. In this formalism the energy of the nucleus is expressed as a functional of its density. The nucleus energy is obtained by minimizing the functional with respect to the density. The first problem has to do with the stability of nuclei having shapes of different degrees of central depression (bubble shapes). It is shown that the bubble shapes are energetically favorable only for unrealistically large nuclei. Particularly, the super heavy nucleus that has been suggested (Z = 114, N = 184) prefers a shape with constant central density. These results are in good agreement with earlier calculations using the liquid drop model. The second problem concerns an anomaly detected experimentally in the isotope shift of mercury. The isotope shifts among a long chain of mercury isotopes show a sudden change as the neutron number is reduced. In particular, the experimental result suggests that the effective size of the charge distributions of 183 Hg and 185 Hg are as large as that of 196 Hg. Such sudden changes in other nuclei have been attributed to a sudden onset of permanent quadruple deformation. In the case of mercury there is no experimental evidence for deformed shapes. It was, therefore, suggested that the proton distribution might develop a central depression in the lighter isotopes. The EDF is used to investigate the mercury isotope shift anomaly following the aforementioned suggestion. Specifically, nucleon densities with different degrees of central depression are generated. Energies corresponding to these densities are obtained. To allow for shell effects, nucleon densities are obtained from single-particle wave functions. Calculations are made for a few mercury isotopes, especially for 184 Hg. The results are that in all cases the energy is lower for densities corresponding to a solid spherical shape

  2. Nuclear matter studies with density-dependent meson-nucleon coupling constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, M.K.; Tjon, J.A.; Banerjee, M.K.; Tjon, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Due to the internal structure of the nucleon, we should expect, in general, that the effective meson nucleon parameters may change in nuclear medium. We study such changes by using a chiral confining model of the nucleon. We use density-dependent masses for all mesons except the pion. Within a Dirac-Brueckner analysis, based on the relativistic covariant structure of the NN amplitude, we show that the effect of such a density dependence in the NN interaction on the saturation properties of nuclear matter, while not large, is quite significant. Due to the density dependence of the g σNN , as predicted by the chiral confining model, we find, in particular, a looping behavior of the binding energy at saturation as a function of the saturation density. A simple model is described, which exhibits looping and which is shown to be mainly caused by the presence of a peak in the density dependence of the medium modified σN coupling constant at low density. The effect of density dependence of the coupling constants and the meson masses tends to improve the results for E/A and density of nuclear matter at saturation. From the present study we see that the relationship between binding energy and saturation density may not be as universal as found in nonrelativistic studies and that more model dependence is exhibited once medium modifications of the basic nuclear interactions are considered. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  3. Decay rates of resonance states at high level density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, E.; Technische Univ. Dresden; Gorin, T.; Technische Univ. Dresden; Rotter, I.; Technische Univ. Dresden

    1996-05-01

    The time dependent Schroedinger equation of an open quantum mechanical system is solved by using the stationary bi-orthogonal eigenfunctions of the non-Hermitean time independent Hamilton operator. We calculate the decay rates at low and high level density in two different formalism. The rates are, generally, time dependent and oscillate around an average value due to the non-orthogonality of the wavefunctions. The decay law is studied disregarding the oscillations. In the one-channel case, it is proportional to t -b with b∼3/2 in all cases considered, including the critical region of overlapping where the non-orthogonality of the wavefunctions is large. Starting from the shell model, we get b∼2 for 2 and 4 open decay channels and all coupling strengths to the continuum. When the closed system is described by a random matrix, b∼1+K/2 for K=2 and 4 channels. This law holds in a limited time interval. The distribution of the widths is different in the two models when more than one channel are open. This leads to the different exponents b in the power law. Our calculations are performed with 190 and 130 states, respectively, most of them in the critical region. The theoretical results should be proven experimentally by measuring the time behaviour of de-excitation of a realistic quantum system. (orig.)

  4. Nuclear power and low level radiation hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.; Newcombe, H.B.

    1979-03-01

    Even in the future, nuclear power is expected to contribute less than 1/10th of the present total population exposure to man-made radiation. By the best estimates available, the current health risks of nuclear power generation appear to be much less than those associated with the major alternative sources of energy, with the exception of natural gas which is about equally safe. Uncertainties concerning the radiation risks from nuclear power, from medical x-rays and from the effects of reduced ventillation to conserve heat appear to be less than those associated with estimates of risks from the use of coal and various other sources of energy. This is in part because of the large amount of effort devoted to studies of radiation effects. The benefits in terms of current life expectancy associated with any of the conventional or unconventional methods of power production appear to greatly outweigh the associated current health hazards. (author)

  5. Study of excitation energy dependence of nuclear level density parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanto, G.; Nayak, B.K.; Saxena, A.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we have populated CN by fusion reaction and excitation energy of the intermediate nuclei is determined after first chance α-emission to investigate excitation energy dependence of the NLD parameter. Evaporated neutron spectra were measured following alpha evaporation for obtaining NLD parameter for the reaction 11 B + 197 Au, populating CN 208 Po. This CN after evaporating an α-particle populates intermediate nucleus 204 Pb. The 204 Pb has magic number of Z=82. Our aim is to study the excitation energy dependence of NLD parameter for closed shell nuclei

  6. Density determination of sintered ceramic nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Medek, J.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility was tested of using solids for pycnometric determination of the density of uranium dioxide-based sintered ceramic fuel materials manufactured by the sol-gel method in the shape of spherical particles of 0.7 to 1.0 mm in size and of particles smaller than 200 μm. For fine particles, this is the only usable method of determining their density which is a very important parameter of the fine fraction when it is employed for the manufacture of fuel elements by vibration compacting. The method consists in compacting a mixture of pycnometric material and dispersed particles of uranium dioxide, determining the size and weight of the compact, and in calculating the density of the material measured from the weight of the oxide sample in the mixture. (author)

  7. Critical Analysis of Non-Nuclear Electron-Density Maxima and the Maximum Entropy Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, R.Y.; Briels, Willem J.; Feil, D.; Feil, D.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental evidence for the existence of non-nuclear maxima in charge densities is questioned. It is shown that the non-nuclear maxima reported for silicon are artifacts of the maximum entropy method that was used to analyze the x-ray diffraction data. This method can be improved by the use of

  8. High precision measurement of fuel density profiles in nuclear fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svensson, J.; von Hellermann, M.; Konig, R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a method for deducing fuel density profiles of nuclear fusion plasmas in realtime during an experiment. A Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP) neural network is used to create a mapping between plasma radiation spectra and indirectly deduced hydrogen isotope densities. By combining

  9. The maximum entropy determination of nuclear densities of calcium isotopes from elastic scattering of alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, Y.M.; Friedman, E.; Levine, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Radial moments of the real part of the optical potential for elastic scattering of 104 MeV α particles are used as constraints, in determining the nuclear density of maximal entropy. The potential is related to the density by the folding model. (orig.)

  10. Nuclear interaction potential in a folded-Yukawa model with diffuse densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randrup, J.

    1975-09-01

    The folded-Yukawa model for the nuclear interaction potential is generalized to diffuse density distributions which are generated by folding a Yukawa function into sharp generating distributions. The effect of a finite density diffuseness or of a finite interaction range is studied. The Proximity Formula corresponding to the generalized model is derived and numerical comparison is made with the exact results. (8 figures)

  11. SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL NUMBER DENSITIES FOR MULTI-PURPOSE CANISTER CRITICALITY CALCULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. A. Thomas

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to calculate the number densities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to be used in criticality evaluations of the Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) waste packages. The objective of this analysis is to provide material number density information which will be referenced by future MPC criticality design analyses, such as for those supporting the Conceptual Design Report

  12. Quantum Chromodynamics and Nuclear Physics at Extreme Energy Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, B.; Bass, S.A.; Chandrasekharan, S.; Mehen, T.; Springer, R.P.

    2005-11-07

    The report describes research in theoretical quantum chromodynamics, including effective field theories of hadronic interactions, properties of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy density, phenomenology of relativistic heavy ion collisions, and algorithms and numerical simulations of lattice gauge theory and other many-body systems.

  13. Quantum Chromodynamics and Nuclear Physics at Extreme Energy Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, B.; Bass, S.A.; Chandrasekharan, S.; Mehen, T.; Springer, R.P.

    2005-01-01

    The report describes research in theoretical quantum chromodynamics, including effective field theories of hadronic interactions, properties of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy density, phenomenology of relativistic heavy ion collisions, and algorithms and numerical simulations of lattice gauge theory and other many-body systems.

  14. Determination of nuclear-matter temperature and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, K.L.

    1980-01-01

    Some of the things learned about nuclear matter under extreme conditions during the past few years in relativistic heavy ion studies are reviewed. Two developments are discussed. The completion of analyses and publication of results from the impact parameter selected, single-particle inclusive experiments have proven to be important. Preliminary results from the new generation of two-particle correlation and particle-exclusive measurements, especially those using streamer chambers, look even more definitive. Also the measurement of more exotic ejectiles with long mean free paths in nuclear matter promises to provide more basic information. Calculations are offering real guidance and are providing explanations of high energy collisions. The Monte Carlo and intranuclear cascade calculations discussed are especially informative

  15. Comparison between Nuclear Data Libraries of Different Density of Data for H in Light Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Lourdes; Gillette, Victor

    2003-01-01

    We introduce the results of comparison between nuclear data libraries at different density of data.Nuclear data libraries were produced for hydrogen (H) in light water at different density of data.These libraries were produced using the NJOY nuclear data processing system.With this code we produce pointwise cross sections and related quantities, in the ENDF format, and in the ACE format for MCNP.Experimental neutron spectrum was compared with MCNP4C simulations, based on the produced libraries and calculation time

  16. Nuclear energy density functional from chiral pion-nucleon dynamics revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, N.; Weise, W.

    2009-01-01

    We use a recently improved density-matrix expansion to calculate the nuclear energy density functional in the framework of in-medium chiral perturbation theory. Our calculation treats systematically the effects from $1\\pi$-exchange, iterated $1\\pi$-exchange, and irreducible $2\\pi$-exchange with intermediate $\\Delta$-isobar excitations, including Pauli-blocking corrections up to three-loop order. We find that the effective nucleon mass $M^*(\\rho)$ entering the energy density functional is iden...

  17. Nuclear ``pasta'' phase within density dependent hadronic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avancini, S. S.; Brito, L.; Marinelli, J. R.; Menezes, D. P.; de Moraes, M. M. W.; Providência, C.; Santos, A. M.

    2009-03-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the onset of the “pasta” phase with different parametrizations of the density dependent hadronic model and compare the results with one of the usual parametrizations of the nonlinear Walecka model. The influence of the scalar-isovector virtual δ meson is shown. At zero temperature, two different methods are used, one based on coexistent phases and the other on the Thomas-Fermi approximation. At finite temperature, only the coexistence phases method is used. npe matter with fixed proton fractions and in β equilibrium are studied. We compare our results with restrictions imposed on the values of the density and pressure at the inner edge of the crust, obtained from observations of the Vela pulsar and recent isospin diffusion data from heavy-ion reactions, and with predictions from spinodal calculations.

  18. Nuclear 'pasta' phase within density dependent hadronic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avancini, S. S.; Marinelli, J. R.; Menezes, D. P.; Moraes, M. M. W. de; Brito, L.; Providencia, C.; Santos, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the onset of the 'pasta' phase with different parametrizations of the density dependent hadronic model and compare the results with one of the usual parametrizations of the nonlinear Walecka model. The influence of the scalar-isovector virtual δ meson is shown. At zero temperature, two different methods are used, one based on coexistent phases and the other on the Thomas-Fermi approximation. At finite temperature, only the coexistence phases method is used. npe matter with fixed proton fractions and in β equilibrium are studied. We compare our results with restrictions imposed on the values of the density and pressure at the inner edge of the crust, obtained from observations of the Vela pulsar and recent isospin diffusion data from heavy-ion reactions, and with predictions from spinodal calculations

  19. Method and apparatus for storing nuclear fuel assemblies in maximum density racks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, W.J.; Robbins, T.R.

    1979-01-01

    A maximum density storage rack is provided for long term or semipermanent storage of spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The rack consists of storage cells arranged in a regular array, such as a checkerboard, and intended to be immersed in water. Initially, cap members are placed on alternate cells in such a manner that at least 50% of the cells are left open, some of the caps being removable. Spent fuel assemblies are then placed in the open cells until all of them are filled. The level of reactivity of each of the stored fuel assemblies is then determined by accurate calculation or by measurement, and the removable caps are removed and rearranged so that other cells are opened, permitting the storage of additional fuel assemblies in a pattern based on the actual reactivity such that criticality is prevented

  20. Level Densities and Radiative Strength Functions in 56FE and 57FE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavukcu, Emel [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2002-12-10

    Understanding nuclear level densities and radiative strength functions is important for pure and applied nuclear physics. Recently, the Oslo Cyclotron Group has developed an experimental method to extract level densities and radiative strength functions simultaneously from the primary γ rays after a light-ion reaction. A primary γ-ray spectrum represents the γ-decay probability distribution. The Oslo method is based on the Axel-Brink hypothesis, according to which the primary γ-ray spectrum is proportional to the product of the level density at the final energy and the radiative strength function. The level density and the radiative strength function are fit to the experimental primary γ-ray spectra, and then normalized to known data. The method works well for heavy nuclei. The present measurements extend the Oslo method to the lighter mass nuclei 56Fe and 57Fe. The experimental level densities in 56Fe and 57Fe reveal step structure. This step structure is a signature for nucleon pair breaking. The predicted pairing gap parameter is in good agreement with the step corresponding to the first pair breaking. Thermodynamic quantities for 56Fe and 57Fe are derived within the microcanonical and canonical ensembles using the experimental level densities. Energy-temperature relations are considered using caloric curves and probability density functions. The differences between the thermodynamics of small and large systems are emphasized. The experimental heat capacities are compared with the recent theoretical calculations obtained in the Shell Model Monte Carlo method. Radiative strength functions in 56Fe and 57Fe have surprisingly high values at low γ-ray energies. This behavior has not been observed for heavy nuclei, but has been observed in other light- and medium-mass nuclei. The origin of this low γ-ray energy effect remains unknown.

  1. Fluctuations of the single-particle density in nuclear dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgio, G.F.; Chomaz, P.; Randrup, J.

    1991-01-01

    In recent years semiclassical methods have been developed to study heavy-ion collisions in the framework of the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck theory, in which the collisionless mean field evolution has been augmented by a Pauli-blocked Nordheim collision term. Since these models describe the average dynamic trajectory, they cannot be applied to describe fluctuations of one-body observables, correlations in the emission of light particles and catastrophic processes like multifragmentation. The authors have developed a new method in order to include the stochastic part of the collision integral into BUU-type simulations of the nuclear dynamics. They apply this method to a two-dimensional gas of fermions on a torus, for which the time evolution of the mean trajectory and the associated correlation function are calculated; the variance of the phase-space occupancy follows closely the predictions of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation and relaxes towards the appropriate quantum-statistical limit. The breaking of the translational and spherical symmetry in the model permits the study of unstable situations in phase-space. The introduction of the nonlinear one-body field allows them to explore dynamical instabilities and bifurcations. Therefore the model can be appropriate for studying nuclear multifragmentation

  2. Materials Science of High-Level Nuclear Waste Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, William J.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Stefanovsky, S. V.; Vance, E. R.; Vernaz, Etienne Y.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing demand for the development of more nuclear power comes the responsibility to address the technical challenges of immobilizing high-level nuclear wastes in stable solid forms for interim storage or disposition in geologic repositories. The immobilization of high-level nuclear wastes has been an active area of research and development for over 50 years. Borosilicate glasses and complex ceramic composites have been developed to meet many technical challenges and current needs, although regulatory issues, which vary widely from country to country, have yet to be resolved. Cooperative international programs to develop advanced proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies to close the nuclear fuel cycle and increase the efficiency of nuclear energy production might create new separation waste streams that could demand new concepts and materials for nuclear waste immobilization. This article reviews the current state-of-the-art understanding regarding the materials science of glasses and ceramics for the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste and excess nuclear materials and discusses approaches to address new waste streams

  3. Low- and high-density nuclear equation of state and the hyperon puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colucci, Giuseppe; Sedrakian, Armen [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2013-07-01

    The measurements of the unusually high mass of the millisecond pulsar PSR J1614-2230 (1.97 ± 0.04 M {sub CircleDot}) imposes a strong constraint on the nuclear Equation of State (EoS), in particular for what concerns the finite density behaviour of nuclear and neutron matter. In my talk I first discuss a model for the low-density part of the EoS, based on chiral one-pion exchange. I consider a self-consistent approach at finite temperature and density and show that even in a fully-relativistic theory the one-pion exchange contribution is dominated by a contact interaction. Then, a relativistic mean-field approach is used to discuss the high-density part of the EoS, including the presence of hyperons. In the latter, a density dependent parametrization is used and a parameter study on the hyperon-scalar meson coupling is performed.

  4. Calculation of the level density parameter using semi-classical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canbula, B.; Babacan, H.

    2011-01-01

    The level density parameters (level density parameter a and energy shift δ) for back-shifted Fermi gas model have been determined for 1136 nuclei for which complete level scheme is available. Level density parameter is calculated by using the semi-classical single particle level density, which can be obtained analytically through spherical harmonic oscillator potential. This method also enables us to analyze the Coulomb potential's effect on the level density parameter. The dependence of this parameter on energy has been also investigated. Another parameter, δ, is determined by fitting of the experimental level scheme and the average resonance spacings for 289 nuclei. Only level scheme is used for optimization procedure for remaining 847 nuclei. Level densities for some nuclei have been calculated by using these parameter values. Obtained results have been compared with the experimental level scheme and the resonance spacing data.

  5. University students' understanding level about words related to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oiso, Shinichi; Watabe, Motoki

    2012-01-01

    The authors conducted a survey of university students' understanding level about words related to nuclear power before and after Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant accident, and analyzed the difference between before and after the accident. The results show that university students' understanding level improved after the accident, especially in the case of reported words by mass media. Understanding level of some nuclear power security words which were not reported so much by mass media also improved. That may be caused by rising of people's concern about nuclear power generation after the accident, and there is a possibility that the accident motivated people to access such words via internet, journals, etc. (author)

  6. Answers to your questions on high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This booklet contains answers to frequently asked questions about high-level nuclear wastes. Written for the layperson, the document contains basic information on the hazards of radiation, the Nuclear Waste Management Program, the proposed geologic repository, the proposed monitored retrievable storage facility, risk assessment, and public participation in the program

  7. Level densities and γ-strength functions in 148,149Sm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siem, S.; Guttormsen, M.; Ingeberg, K.; Melby, E.; Rekstad, J.; Schiller, A.; Voinov, A.

    2002-01-01

    The level densities and γ-strength functions of the weakly deformed 148 Sm and 149 Sm nuclei have been extracted. The temperature versus excitation energy curve, derived within the framework of the microcanonical ensemble, shows structures, which we associate with the breakup of Cooper pairs. The nuclear heat capacity is deduced within the framework of both the microcanonical and canonical ensembles. We observe negative heat capacity in the microcanonical ensemble whereas the canonical heat capacity exhibits an S shape as a function of temperature, both signals of a phase transition. The structures in the γ-strength functions are discussed in terms of the pygmy resonance and the scissors mode built on excited states. The samarium results are compared with data for the well-deformed 161,162 Dy, 166,167 Er, and 171,172 Yb isotopes and with data from (n,γ) experiments and giant dipole resonance studies

  8. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  9. The influence of chromosome density variations on the increase in nuclear disorder strength in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Soo; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Backman, Vadim; Szleifer, Igal

    2011-01-01

    Microscopic structural changes have long been observed in cancer cells and used as a marker in cancer diagnosis. Recent development of an optical technique, partial-wave spectroscopy (PWS), enabled more sensitive detection of nanoscale structural changes in early carcinogenesis in terms of the disorder strength related to density variations. These nanoscale alterations precede the well-known microscopic morphological changes. We investigate the influence of nuclear density variations due to chromosome condensation on changes of disorder strength by computer simulations of model chromosomes. Nuclear configurations with different degrees of chromosome condensation are realized from simulations of decondensing chromosomes and the disorder strength is calculated for these nuclear configurations. We found that the disorder strength increases significantly for configurations with slightly more condensed chromosomes. Coupled with PWS measurements, the simulation results suggest that the chromosome condensation and the resulting spatial density inhomogeneity may represent one of the earliest events in carcinogenesis

  10. Systematics of radiation widths and level density parameters in the mass number range region 40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.M.; Grudzevich, O.T.; Plyaskin, V.I.

    1990-01-01

    We suggest a systematics of radiation width based on a reduced radiative capture strength function for the E1-transition, which eliminates fluctuations in the analysed quantity with neutron binding energy, nuclear level density and γ-quanta energy. A smooth dependence for the fitting parameter of the radiative strength function for E1-transitions in relation to the relative atomic mass of the nucleus is obtained. 10 refs, 2 figs

  11. Hyperfine electron-nuclear interactions in the frame of the Density Functional and of the Density Matrix Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, R.L.; Pavlov, L.I.; Raychev, P.P.; Garistov, V.P.; Dimitrova-Ivanovich, M.

    2002-01-01

    The matrix elements and expectation values of the hyperfine interaction operators are presented in a form suitable for numerical implementation in density matrix methods. The electron-nuclear spin-spin (dipolar and contact) interactions are considered, as well as the interaction between nuclear spin and electron-orbital motions. These interactions from the effective Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian determine the hyperfine structure in ESR spectra and contribute to chemical shifts in NMR. Applying the Wigner-Eckart theorem in the irreducible tensor-operator technique and the spin-space separation scheme, the matrix elements and expectation values of these relativistic corrections are expressed in analytical form. The final results are presented as products, or sums of products, of factors determined by the spin and (or) angular momentum symmetry and a spatial part determined by the action of the symmetrized tensor-operators on the normalized matrix or function of the spin or charge distribution.

  12. Power density forecasting device for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzaki, Takaharu; Kiguchi, Takashi.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To attain effective reactor operation in a bwr type reactor by forecasting the power density of the reactor after adjustment and comparing the same with the present status of the reactor by the on-line calculation in a short time. Constitution: The present status for the reactor is estimated in a present status decision section based on a measurement signal from the reactor and it is stored in an operation result collection section. The reactor status after the forecasting is estimated in a forecasting section based on a setting signal from a forecasting condition setting section and it is compared with the result value from the operation results collection section. If the forecast value does not coincide with the result value in the above comparison, the setting value in the forecast condition setting section is changed in the control section. The above procedures are repeated so as to minimize the difference between the forecast value and the result value to thereby exactly forecast the reactor status and operate the reactor effectively. (Moriyama, K.)

  13. Managing the high level waste nuclear regulatory commission licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskin, K.P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the process for obtaining Nuclear Regulatory Commission permits for the high level waste storage facility is basically the same process commercial nuclear power plants followed to obtain construction permits and operating licenses for their facilities. Therefore, the experience from licensing commercial reactors can be applied to the high level waste facility. Proper management of the licensing process will be the key to the successful project. The management of the licensing process was categorized into four areas as follows: responsibility, organization, communication and documentation. Drawing on experience from nuclear power plant licensing and basic management principles, the management requirement for successfully accomplishing the project goals are discussed

  14. Dynamics of the nuclear one-body density: small amplitude regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemes, M.C.; Toledo Piza, A.F.R. de.

    1984-01-01

    A microscopic treatment for the small amplitude limite of the equations of motion for the nuclear one-body density is presented. These were derived previously by means of projection techniques, and allow for the explicit separation of mean-field and collision effects which result from the dynamics of many-body correlations. The form of the nuclear response in the presence of collision effects is derived. An illustrative application to a soluble model is discussed. (Author) [pt

  15. Modeling nuclear weak-interaction processes with relativistic energy density functionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paar, N.; Marketin, T.; Vale, D.; Vretenar, D.

    2015-01-01

    Relativistic energy density functionals have become a standard framework for nuclear structure studies of ground state properties and collective excitations over the entire nuclide chart. In this paper, we review recent developments in modeling nuclear weak-interaction processes: Charge-exchange excitations and the role of isoscalar proton–neutron pairing, charged-current neutrino–nucleus reactions relevant for supernova evolution and neutrino detectors and calculation of β-decay rates for r-process nucleosynthesis. (author)

  16. Lagrangian analysis of two-phase hydrodynamic and nuclear-coupled density-wave oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1974-01-01

    The mathematical technique known as the ''method of characteristics'' has been used to construct an exact, analytical solution to predict the onset of density-wave oscillations in diabatic two-phase systems, such as Boiling Water Nuclear Reactors (BWR's). Specifically, heater wall dynamics, boiling boundary dynamics and nuclear kinetics have been accounted for in this analysis. Emphasis is placed on giving the reader a clear physical understanding of the phenomena of two-phase density-wave oscillations. Explanations are presented in terms of block diagram logic, and phasor representations of the various pressure drop perturbations are given. (U.S.)

  17. Triton-3He relative and differential flows and the high density behavior of nuclear symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong, Gaochan; Li, Baoan; Chen, Liewen

    2010-01-01

    Using a transport model coupled with a phase-space coalescence after-burner we study the triton- 3 He relative and differential transverse flows in semi-central 132 Sn + 124 Sn reactions at a beam energy of 400 MeV/nucleon. We find that the triton- 3 He pairs carry interesting information about the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. The t- 3 He relative flow can be used as a particularly powerful probe of the high-density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy. (author)

  18. Formation and disintegration of high-density nuclear matter in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazoe, Yasuhiro; Matsuoka, Kazuo; Sano, Mitsuo

    1976-01-01

    The formation of high-density nuclear matter which may be expected to be attained in high-energy heavy-ion collisions and the subsequent disintegration of dense matter are investigated by means of the hydrodynamics. Head-on collisions of identical nuclei are considered in the nonrelativistic approximation. The compressed density cannot exceed 4 times of the normal one so long as the freedom of only nucleons is considered, and can become higher than 4 times when other freedoms such as the productions of mesons and also nucleon isobars are additionally taken into account. The angular distributions for ejected particles predominate both forwards and backwards at low collision energies, corresponding to the formation of nuclear density less than 2 times of the normal density and become isotropic at the point of 2 times of the normal one. As the collision energy increases further, lateral ejection is intensified gradually. (auth.)

  19. Reinforced concrete in the intermediable-level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffo, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) is responsible for developing the nuclear waste disposal management programme. This programme contemplates the design and construction of a facility for the final disposal of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The proposed model is a near-surface monolithic repository similar to those in operation in El Cabril, Spain. The design of this type of repository is based on the use of multiple, independent and redundant barriers and the model foresees a period of 300 years of institutional post-closure control. Since the vault and cover are major components of the engineered barriers, the durability of these concrete structures is an important aspect for the facility integrity. This work presents laboratory investigations performed on the corrosion susceptibility of steel rebars embedded in two different types of high performance reinforced concretes, recently developed by the National Institute of Industrial Technology (Argentine). Concretes were made with cement with Blast Furnace Slag (CAH) and Silica Fume cement (CAH + SF). The aim of this work is to predict the service life of the intermediate level radioactive waste disposal vaults from data obtained from electrochemical techniques. Besides, the diffusion coefficients of aggressive species, such as chloride and carbon dioxide, were also determined. On the other hand, data obtained with corrosion sensors embedded in a vault prototype is also included. These sensors allow on-line measurements of several parameters related to the corrosion process such as rebar corrosion potential and corrosion current density; incoming oxygen flow that reaches the metal surface; concrete electrical resistivity; chloride concentration and internal concrete temperature. All the information obtained from both, laboratory tests and sensors will be used for the final design of the container in order to achieve a service life more or equal than the foreseen durability for this type of

  20. Calculation of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants using frozen density embedding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Götz, Andreas W., E-mail: agoetz@sdsc.edu [San Diego Supercomputer Center, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr MC 0505, La Jolla, California 92093-0505 (United States); Autschbach, Jochen [Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260-3000 (United States); Visscher, Lucas, E-mail: visscher@chem.vu.nl [Amsterdam Center for Multiscale Modeling (ACMM), VU University Amsterdam, Theoretical Chemistry, De Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-14

    We present a method for a subsystem-based calculation of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling tensors within the framework of current-spin-density-functional theory. Our approach is based on the frozen-density embedding scheme within density-functional theory and extends a previously reported subsystem-based approach for the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors to magnetic fields which couple not only to orbital but also spin degrees of freedom. This leads to a formulation in which the electron density, the induced paramagnetic current, and the induced spin-magnetization density are calculated separately for the individual subsystems. This is particularly useful for the inclusion of environmental effects in the calculation of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants. Neglecting the induced paramagnetic current and spin-magnetization density in the environment due to the magnetic moments of the coupled nuclei leads to a very efficient method in which the computationally expensive response calculation has to be performed only for the subsystem of interest. We show that this approach leads to very good results for the calculation of solvent-induced shifts of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants in hydrogen-bonded systems. Also for systems with stronger interactions, frozen-density embedding performs remarkably well, given the approximate nature of currently available functionals for the non-additive kinetic energy. As an example we show results for methylmercury halides which exhibit an exceptionally large shift of the one-bond coupling constants between {sup 199}Hg and {sup 13}C upon coordination of dimethylsulfoxide solvent molecules.

  1. Examination of State-Level Nuclear Security Evaluation Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Kim; Yim, Man-Sung

    2015-01-01

    An effective global system for nuclear materials security needs to cover all materials, employing international standards and best practices, to reduce risks by reducing weapons-usable nuclear material stocks and the number of locations where they are found. Such a system must also encourage states to accept peer reviews by outside experts in order to demonstrate that effective security is in place. It is thus critically important to perform state-level evaluation of nuclear security based on an integrative framework of risk assessment. Such evaluation provides a basis of measuring the level and progress of international effort to secure and control all nuclear materials. sensitivity test by differentiating weight factors of each of the indicators and categories will be performed in the future as well

  2. An approach for determining the acceptable levels of nuclear risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a methodology for determining the acceptable levels of risk with respect to nuclear energy. It was concluded that the Atomic Energy Control Board should identify the interest groups that affect its choice of an acceptable level of risk, determine their expectations, and balance the expectations of the various groups such that the resulting acceptable level of risk is still acceptable to the Board. This would be done by interviewing experts on the subject of nuclear safety, developing and pretesting a public questionnaire, and surveying the public on acceptable cost-risk combinations

  3. Technology readiness levels for advanced nuclear fuels and materials development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, W.J., E-mail: jon.carmack@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Braase, L.A.; Wigeland, R.A. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Todosow, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Definition of nuclear fuels system technology readiness level. • Identification of evaluation criteria for nuclear fuel system TRLs. • Application of TRLs to fuel systems. - Abstract: The Technology Readiness process quantitatively assesses the maturity of a given technology. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) pioneered the process in the 1980s to inform the development and deployment of new systems for space applications. The process was subsequently adopted by the Department of Defense (DoD) to develop and deploy new technology and systems for defense applications. It was also adopted by the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the maturity of new technologies in major construction projects. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is needed to improve the performance and safety of current and advanced reactors, and ultimately close the nuclear fuel cycle. Because deployment of new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the assessment process to advanced fuel development is useful as a management, communication, and tracking tool. This article provides definition of technology readiness levels (TRLs) for nuclear fuel technology as well as selected examples regarding the methods by which TRLs are currently used to assess the maturity of nuclear fuels and materials under development in the DOE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Program within the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC).

  4. Effect of broken axial symmetry on the electric dipole strength and the collective enhancement of level densities in heavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, E.; Junghans, A. R.; Wilson, J. N.

    2017-11-01

    The basic parameters for calculations of radiative neutron capture, photon strength functions and nuclear level densities near the neutron separation energy are determined based on experimental data without an ad hoc assumption about axial symmetry—at variance to previous analysis. Surprisingly few global fit parameters are needed in addition to information on nuclear deformation, taken from Hartree Fock Bogolyubov calculations with the Gogny force, and the generator coordinator method assures properly defined angular momentum. For a large number of nuclei the GDR shapes and the photon strength are described by the sum of three Lorentzians, extrapolated to low energies and normalised in accordance to the dipole sum rule. Level densities are influenced strongly by the significant collective enhancement based on the breaking of shape symmetry. The replacement of axial symmetry by the less stringent requirement of invariance against rotation by 180° leads to a novel prediction for radiative neutron capture. It compares well to recent compilations of average radiative widths and Maxwellian average cross sections for neutron capture by even target nuclei. An extension to higher spin promises a reliable prediction for various compound nuclear reactions also outside the valley of stability. Such predictions are of high importance for future nuclear energy systems and waste transmutation as well as for the understanding of the cosmic synthesis of heavy elements.

  5. Shampoo, Soy Sauce, and the Prince's Pendant: Density for Middle-Level Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Meera; Litherland, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a series of activities they have used with middle-level students. The first set of lessons explores density through the layering of liquids. In the second set, they use some of the same liquids to explore the density of solids. The third set investigates how temperature affects the density of…

  6. Level density and gamma-ray strength in sup 2 sup 7 sup , sup 2 sup 8 Si

    CERN Document Server

    Guttormsen, M; Rekstad, J; Siem, S; Schiller, A; Lönnroth, T; Voinov, A

    2003-01-01

    A method to extract simultaneously level densities and gamma-ray transmission coefficients has for the first time been tested on light nuclei utilizing the sup 2 sup 8 Si( sup 3 He,alpha gamma) sup 2 sup 7 Si and sup 2 sup 8 Si( sup 3 He, sup 3 He'gamma) sup 2 sup 8 Si reactions. The extracted level densities for sup 2 sup 7 Si and sup 2 sup 8 Si are consistent with the level densities obtained by counting known levels in the respective nuclei. The extracted gamma-ray strength in sup 2 sup 8 Si agrees well with the known gamma-decay properties of this nucleus. Typical nuclear temperatures are found to be T approx 2.4 MeV at around 7 MeV excitation energy. The entropy gap between nuclei with mass number A and A +- 1 is measured to be delta S approx 1.0 k sub B , which indicates an energy spacing between single-particle orbitals comparable with typical nuclear temperatures.

  7. Density and moisture measurements by nuclear method and its application to compaction control in road construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Azmi Ismail

    1994-01-01

    The application of nuclear technique in civil engineering sector which emphasises on the in-situ density and moisture measurements of soil in road construction is discussed. The nuclear density-moisture gauge utilises both gamma-rays and neutrons for the determination of the density and moisture content, respectively. The knowledge on the density and moisture content will be used to evaluate the degree of compaction of the compacted layers. The technique offers not only a fast and non-destructive measurement but it is also accurate, economical and repeatable. A calibration equation which is stored in the built-in microprocessor is applicable for any type of soil. Corrections for the interferences from needless gamma-rays produced as a result of thermal neutrons interaction with certain nuclei for the density measurement and effects of hydrogen other than absorbed water for the moisture measurement are considered in the equation. This paper describes briefly the theory and the characteristics of the nuclear gauge and its application in road construction work

  8. Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations: [Part]2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singha Roy, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    This article is the second part of the paper entitled 'Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations'. In this part, some of the important properties of heavy density concrete are discussed. They include density, water retentivity, air content, permeability with special reference to concrete mixes used in India's nuclear power reactors. All these properties are affected to various extents by heating. Indian shield concrete is rarely subjected to temperatures above 60degC during its life, because of thermal shield protection. During placement, the maximum anticipated rise in temperature due to heat of hydration is restricted to around 45degC by chilling, if necessary to reduce shrinkage stresses and cracks. (M.G.B.)

  9. Density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liewen; Ko Che Ming; Xu Jun; Li Baoan

    2010-01-01

    Expressing explicitly the parameters of the standard Skyrme interaction in terms of the macroscopic properties of asymmetric nuclear matter, we show in the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach that unambiguous correlations exist between observables of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. We find that existing data on neutron skin thickness Δr np of Sn isotopes give an important constraint on the symmetry energy E sym (ρ 0 ) and its density slope L at saturation density ρ 0 . Combining these constraints with those from recent analyses of isospin diffusion and the double neutron/proton ratio in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies leads to a more stringent limit on L approximately independent of E sym (ρ 0 ). The implication of these new constraints on the Δr np of 208 Pb as well as the core-crust transition density and pressure in neutron stars is discussed.

  10. Nuclear matter at high density: Phase transitions, multiquark states, and supernova outbursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivoruchenko, M. I.; Nadyozhin, D. K.; Rasinkova, T. L.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Trusov, M. A.; Yudin, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    Phase transition from hadronic matter to quark-gluon matter is discussed for various regimes of temperature and baryon number density. For small and medium densities, the phase transition is accurately described in the framework of the Field Correlation Method, whereas at high density predictions are less certain and leave room for the phenomenological models. We study formation of multiquark states (MQS) at zero temperature and high density. Relevant MQS components of the nuclear matter can be described using a previously developed formalism of the quark compound bags (QCB). Partialwave analysis of nucleon-nucleon scattering indicates the existence of 6QS which manifest themselves as poles of P matrix. In the framework of the QCB model, we formulate a self-consistent system of coupled equations for the nucleon and 6QS propagators in nuclear matter and the G matrix. The approach provides a link between high-density nuclear matter with the MQS components and the cumulative effect observed in reactions on the nuclei, which requires the admixture of MQS in the wave functions of nuclei kinematically. 6QS determines the natural scale of the density for a possible phase transition into theMQS phase of nuclear matter. Such a phase transition can lead to dynamic instability of newly born protoneutron stars and dramatically affect the dynamics of supernovae. Numerical simulations show that the phase transition may be a good remedy for the triggering supernova explosions in the spherically symmetric supernovamodels. A specific signature of the phase transition is an additional neutrino peak in the neutrino light curve. For a Galactic core-collapse supernova, such a peak could be resolved by the present neutrino detectors. The possibility of extracting the parameters of the phase of transition from observation of the neutrino signal is discussed also.

  11. Nuclear matter at high density: Phase transitions, multiquark states, and supernova outbursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivoruchenko, M. I.; Nadyozhin, D. K.; Rasinkova, T. L.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Trusov, M. A., E-mail: trusov@itep.ru; Yudin, A. V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-15

    Phase transition from hadronic matter to quark-gluon matter is discussed for various regimes of temperature and baryon number density. For small and medium densities, the phase transition is accurately described in the framework of the Field Correlation Method, whereas at high density predictions are less certain and leave room for the phenomenological models. We study formation of multiquark states (MQS) at zero temperature and high density. Relevant MQS components of the nuclear matter can be described using a previously developed formalism of the quark compound bags (QCB). Partialwave analysis of nucleon-nucleon scattering indicates the existence of 6QS which manifest themselves as poles of P matrix. In the framework of the QCB model, we formulate a self-consistent system of coupled equations for the nucleon and 6QS propagators in nuclear matter and the G matrix. The approach provides a link between high-density nuclear matter with the MQS components and the cumulative effect observed in reactions on the nuclei, which requires the admixture of MQS in the wave functions of nuclei kinematically. 6QS determines the natural scale of the density for a possible phase transition into theMQS phase of nuclear matter. Such a phase transition can lead to dynamic instability of newly born protoneutron stars and dramatically affect the dynamics of supernovae. Numerical simulations show that the phase transition may be a good remedy for the triggering supernova explosions in the spherically symmetric supernovamodels. A specific signature of the phase transition is an additional neutrino peak in the neutrino light curve. For a Galactic core-collapse supernova, such a peak could be resolved by the present neutrino detectors. The possibility of extracting the parameters of the phase of transition from observation of the neutrino signal is discussed also.

  12. Management of the high-level nuclear power facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preda, Marin

    2003-05-01

    This thesis approaches current issues in the management of the high power nuclear facilities and as such it appears to be important particularly for nuclear power plant operation topics. Of special interest are the failure events entailing possible catastrophic situations. The contents is structured onto ten chapters. The first chapter describes the operation regimes of the nuclear high power facilities. Highlighted here are the thesis scope and the original features of the work. The second chapter deals with operational policies developed in order to ensure the preventive maintenance of the nuclear installations. Also managing structures are described devoted to practical warranting the equipment safety function of non-classical power stations. In the third chapter cases of nuclear accidents are analyzed especially stressing the probabilistic risk and the operation regimes having in view the elimination of catastrophic events. In the fourth and fifth chapters the control of nuclear radiation emission is treated focusing the quality issue of nuclear installations required to avoid hazardous effects at level of nuclear reactor operation stage. At the same time set of operational measures is given here for preventing risks, catastrophes and chaotic situations. The chapter five presents both theoretical and practical approaches of the nuclear reactor core management concerning particularly the fuel testing, the water primary system and the quality of the involved equipment. In the sixth and seventh chapters issues of risk-quality correlations are approached as well as the structure of expert systems for monitoring the operational regimes of nuclear facilities. The efficiency of the power systems with nuclear injection is discussed and some original ideas developed in this work are evidenced in the eighth and ninth chapters. Presented are here both the operational principles and models of raising the efficiency of the interconnected nuclear stations and prices' policy

  13. The Fourier transform as a signature for chaos in nuclear energy levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bybee, C.R.; Mitchell, G.E.; Shriner, J.F. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function is an alternative test to characterize level statistics. For GOE statistics there is a suppression of the Fourier transform near the origin; this correlation hole is absent for Poisson statistics. Numerical modeling has been used to quantify the method and determine the dependence of the correlation-hole area on number, density, sampling interval, and fraction of missing or spurious levels. For large N the normalized correlation-hole area is a nearly universal constant and insensitive to missing and spurious levels. However, for the smaller sample sizes typical of nuclear data, application of the FT method yields ambiguous results. (orig.)

  14. The Fourier transform as a signature for chaos in nuclear energy levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bybee, C.R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Mitchell, G.E. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Shriner, J.F. Jr. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function is an alternative test to characterize level statistics. For GOE statistics there is a suppression of the Fourier transform near the origin; this correlation hole is absent for Poisson statistics. Numerical modeling has been used to quantify the method and determine the dependence of the correlation-hole area on number, density, sampling interval, and fraction of missing or spurious levels. For large N the normalized correlation-hole area is a nearly universal constant and insensitive to missing and spurious levels. However, for the smaller sample sizes typical of nuclear data, application of the FT method yields ambiguous results. (orig.)

  15. Guidance notes : safe practice for the use of nuclear density meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-06-01

    These 'Guidance notes' have been written to provide information for owners and users on the safe care and use of instruments containing radioactive materials used for the measurement of moisture content and/or density of materials. They give practical guidance on compliance with the requirements of radiation protection legislation and the 'Code of safe practice for the use of nuclear density meters, NRL C15'. Some of these instruments have been known as 'soil moisture gauges' and others as 'nuclear density meters' or just 'NDMs'. For simplicity, these 'Guidance notes' will follow industry terminology and use the term 'nuclear density meter'. Some parts of these 'Guidance notes' and of the 'Code, NRL C15' are relevant for users of asphalt gauges containing radioactive sources. These are normally laboratory bench instruments, and are not portable field instruments. Nevertheless, the radioactive sources used are similar to those used for moisture measurement and the safety implications are similar. The units of measurement of radioactivity and radiation dose are discussed in Appendix 1. Appendix 2 contains consent application forms while sample transport forms can be found in Appendix 3. (author). 10 refs

  16. Nuclear level repulsion, order vs. chaos and conserved quantum numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the distribution of level spacings for states with the same angular momentum and parity is described in which the average spacing is calculated for the total ensemble. Though the resulting distribution of level spacings for states of deformed nuclei with Z = 62-75 and A = 155-185 is the closest to that of a Poisson distribution yet obtained for nuclear levels, significant deviations are observed for small level spacings. Many, but not all, of the very closely-spaced levels have K-values differing by several units. (orig.)

  17. Structure of single-particle nuclear densities from Hartree-Fock theory and model independent analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starodubskij, V.E.; Shaginyan, V.R.

    1979-01-01

    Friar-Negele method is applied to determine the static densities of neutrons and nuclear matter from the fast proton-nuclei elastic scattering data. This model-independent analysis (MIA) has been carried out for 28 Si, sup(32,34)S, sup(40,42,44,48)Ca, 48 Ti, sup(58,60)Ni, 90 Zr, 208 Pb nuclei. The binding energies, rms radii, densities and scattering cross sections of 1 GeV-proton are calculated in the framework of the Hartree-Fock theory (HF) with Skyrme's interaction. The HF and MIA densities and cross sections have been compared to draw a conclusion on the quality of the HF densities. Calculation of the cross sections has included the spin-orbit interaction with parameters taken from the polarization data

  18. Can the nuclear symmetry potential at supra-saturation densities be negative?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Gaochan

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of an isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (IBUU) transport model, for the central 197 Au+ 197 Au reaction at an incident beam energy of 400 MeV/nucleon, the effect of nuclear symmetry potential at supra-saturation densities on the preequilibrium clusters emission is studied. It is found that for the positive symmetry potential at supra-saturation densities the neutron-to-proton ratio of lighter clusters with mass number A≤3[(n/p) A≤3 ] is larger than that of the heavier clusters with mass number A>3[(n/p) A>3 ], whereas for the negative symmetry potential at supra-saturation densities the (n/p) A≤3 is smaller than the (n/p) A>3 . This may be considered as a probe of the negative symmetry potential at supra-saturation densities.

  19. Verification of surface contamination density standard using clearance automatic laser inspection system for objects from a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Michiya; Ogino, Haruyuki; Ichiji, Takeshi; Hattori, Takatoshi

    2008-01-01

    In the clearance level inspection in Japan, it is necessary to indicate that the activity level of the target object must be less than not only the clearance levels, but also the surface contamination density standards. The classification measurements for these two standards have been performed separately, and the GM survey meters based on beta-ray measurement have mainly been used for surface contamination density measurement so far. Recently the Clearance Automatic Laser Inspection System, named CLALIS, has been developed to estimate the low-level activity concentration. This system consists of 3-dimensional laser scanner for shape measurement and eight large NE102A plastic scintillation detectors for gamma-ray measurement, and it has been clarified that the CLALIS has adequate detection ability for clearance measurement of both metal scraps and concrete debris. In this study, we compared the surface contamination densities for a number of actual contaminated and non-contaminated objects generated inside from the radiation controlled area at the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station by using the CLALIS and the GM survey meter. As a result, since CLALIS could detect the surface contamination as well as the GM survey meter for all measurement targets, it was revealed that CLALIS can rationally achieve clearance level inspection in a single radiation measurement. The practicality of CLALIS in view of the detection limit and processing time was discussed by comparison with the usual radiation monitors for surface contamination measurement. (author)

  20. The implementation of nuclear methods for density measurements on Romanian roads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripadus, V.; Craciun, L.; Peticila, M.; Florea, N.

    2000-01-01

    The implementation of nuclear methods in field measurements presumes steps concerning the fulfillment of the many requirements to be undertaken. First of all the owner of the nuclear equipment must obtain all the documents imposed by the Romanian laws. The second step is connected with the recalibration of the equipment in order to obtain an improved precision of the measurements. In the last few years National Administration of Roads, Research Institute of Roads together with National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, made many efforts in order to implement nuclear methods destined to determine both the density and the moisture content either on asphalt or on compact soils. The American companies CPN and Troxler produced the equipment. On the basis of the comparison between nuclear and core density measurements the correction factor of the equipment was established. A special attention was paid to the definitions of different physical quantities occurring in Romanian Standards in order to connect them properly with the American ones. (authors)

  1. Production of an economic high-density concrete for shielding megavoltage radiotherapy rooms and nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; Maheri, M. R.; Haji-pour, A.; Yousefnia, H.; Zolghadri, S.

    2007-01-01

    In megavoltage radiotherapy rooms, ordinary concrete is usually used due to its low construction costs, although higher density concrete are sometimes used, as well. The use of high-density concrete decreases the required thickness of the concrete barrier; hence, its disadvantage is its high cost. In a nuclear reactor, neutron radiation is the most difficult to shield. A method for production of economic high-density concrete witt, appropriate engineering properties would be very useful. Materials and Methods: Galena (Pb S) mineral was used to produce of a high-density concrete. Galena can be found in many parts of Iran. Two types of concrete mixes were produced. The water-to-concrete (w/c) ratios of the reference and galena concrete mixes were 0.53 and 0.25, respectively. To measure the gamma radiation attenuation of Galena concrete samples, they were exposed to a narrow beam of gamma rays emitted from a cobalt-60 therapy unit. Results: The Galena mineral used in this study had a density of 7400 kg/m 3 . The concrete samples had a density of 4800 kg/m 3 . The measured half value layer thickness of the Galena concrete samples for cobalt 60 gamma rays was much less than that of ordinary concrete (2.6 cm compared to 6.0 cm). Furthermore, the galena concrete samples had significantly higher compressive strength (500 kg/cm 2 compared to 300 kg/cm 2 ). Conclusion: The Galena concrete samples made in our laboratories had showed good shielding/engineering properties in comparison with all samples made by using high-density materials other than depleted uranium. Based on the preliminary results, Galena concrete is maybe a suitable option where high-density concrete is required in megavoltage radiotherapy rooms as well as nuclear reactors

  2. Nuclear reactivity indices in the context of spin polarized density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, Carlos; Lamsabhi, Al Mokhtar; Fuentealba, Patricio

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the nuclear reactivity indices of density functional theory have been generalized to the spin polarized case and their relationship to electron spin polarized indices has been established. In particular, the spin polarized version of the nuclear Fukui function has been proposed and a finite difference approximation has been used to evaluate it. Applications to a series of triatomic molecules demonstrate the ability of the new functions to predict the geometrical changes due to a change in the spin multiplicity. The main equations in the different ensembles have also been presented

  3. Nuclear densities of 1fsub(7/2) nuclei from elastic alpha-particle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, E.; Gils, H.J.; Rebel, H.

    1983-12-01

    The elastic scattering of 104 MeV α particles by sup(40,42,43,44,48)Ca, 50 Ti, 51 V, 52 Cr has been analyzed by phenomenological and semimicroscopic optical potentials in order to get information on isotopic and isotonic differences of the α particle optical potentials and of nuclear matter densities. The phenomenological optical potentials based on a Fourier-Bessel description of the real part reveal different behaviour in size and shape for the isotonic chain as compared to the isotopic chain. Odd-even effects are also indicated to be different for isotones and isotopes. The semi-microscopic analyses use a single-folding model with a density-dependent effective αN-interaction including a realistic local density approximation. The calculated potentials are fully consistent with the phenomenological ones. Isopotic and isotonic differences of the nuclear matter densities obtained from the folding model in general show a similar behavior as the optical potential differences. The results on matter densities are compared to other investigations. (orig.) [de

  4. Table of Half-Lives for Excited Nuclear Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmskog, S G

    1970-07-15

    The knowledge of the half-lives of excited states is often a valuable information in the investigation of the nuclear level structure. The present paper contains a collection of such half-lives being published in the current literature over the period 1967-1970. The data is arranged in increasing order of mass number.

  5. Low-level waste management at the Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montanez, O.; Blanco, D.; Vallarino, V.; Calisto, W.

    1986-01-01

    A general overview of low-level radioactive waste management at the Nuclear Investigation Centre (CIN) of Uruguay is presented. The CIN is a pilot centre of research and development of techniques for implementing measurements for radioactive waste storage and control. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. Studies on the inhomogeneous core density of a fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Hagen, T.H.J.J.; Van Dam, H.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Khotylev, V.A. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Interfaculty Reactor Inst.; Harteveld, W.; Mudde, R.F.

    1997-12-31

    Results are reported on the expected time dependent core density profile of a fluidized-bed nuclear fission reactor. Core densities have been measured in a test facility by the gamma-transmission technique. Bubble and particle-cluster sizes, positions, velocities and frequencies could be determined. Neutronic studies have been performed on the influence of core voids on reactivity using Monte-Carlo and neutron-transport codes. Fuel-particle importance has been determined. Point-kinetic parameters have been calculated for linking reactivity perturbations to power fluctuations. (author)

  7. Radiometric determination of density of fresh shielding concrete (in situ) in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honig, A.

    1985-01-01

    Methods of radiometric determination of density have been in recent years elaborated in detail and successfully. But on the market no instruments are available for measuring fresh concrete when it is possible to repair inhomogeneities, if any, even before hardening, and thus to guarantee safety of biological protection of nuclear reactors. The paper describes an analog and digital radiation density meter and their application in the inspection of radiation protection concrete walls. By repairing defective, insufficiently dense locations still in the course of concrete placement it is possible to attain a laboratory quality of the concrete even under on-site conditions

  8. Nuclear energy density functional from chiral pion-nucleon dynamics revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, N.; Weise, W.

    2010-05-01

    We use a recently improved density-matrix expansion to calculate the nuclear energy density functional in the framework of in-medium chiral perturbation theory. Our calculation treats systematically the effects from 1 π-exchange, iterated 1 π-exchange, and irreducible 2 π-exchange with intermediate Δ-isobar excitations, including Pauli-blocking corrections up to three-loop order. We find that the effective nucleon mass M(ρ) entering the energy density functional is identical to the one of Fermi-liquid theory when employing the improved density-matrix expansion. The strength F(ρ) of the ( surface-term as provided by the pion-exchange dynamics is in good agreement with that of phenomenological Skyrme forces in the density region ρ/2short-range spin-orbit interaction. The strength function F(ρ) multiplying the square of the spin-orbit density comes out much larger than in phenomenological Skyrme forces and it has a pronounced density dependence.

  9. Microscopic calculation of level densities: the shell model Monte Carlo approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassid, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    The shell model Monte Carlo (SMMC) approach provides a powerful technique for the microscopic calculation of level densities in model spaces that are many orders of magnitude larger than those that can be treated by conventional methods. We discuss a number of developments: (i) Spin distribution. We used a spin projection method to calculate the exact spin distribution of energy levels as a function of excitation energy. In even-even nuclei we find an odd-even staggering effect (in spin). Our results were confirmed in recent analysis of experimental data. (ii) Heavy nuclei. The SMMC approach was extended to heavy nuclei. We have studied the crossover between vibrational and rotational collectivity in families of samarium and neodymium isotopes in model spaces of dimension approx. 10 29 . We find good agreement with experimental results for both state densities and 2 > (where J is the total spin). (iii) Collective enhancement factors. We have calculated microscopically the vibrational and rotational enhancement factors of level densities versus excitation energy. We find that the decay of these enhancement factors in heavy nuclei is correlated with the pairing and shape phase transitions. (iv) Odd-even and odd-odd nuclei. The projection on an odd number of particles leads to a sign problem in SMMC. We discuss a novel method to calculate state densities in odd-even and odd-odd nuclei despite the sign problem. (v) State densities versus level densities. The SMMC approach has been used extensively to calculate state densities. However, experiments often measure level densities (where levels are counted without including their spin degeneracies.) A spin projection method enables us to also calculate level densities in SMMC. We have calculated the SMMC level density of 162 Dy and found it to agree well with experiments

  10. Relativistic mean-field approximation with density-dependent screening meson masses in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Baoxi; Lu, Xiaofu; Shen, Pengnian; Zhao, Enguang

    2003-01-01

    The Debye screening masses of the σ, ω and neutral ρ mesons and the photon are calculated in the relativistic mean-field approximation. As the density of the nucleon increases, all the screening masses of mesons increase. A different result with Brown–Rho scaling is shown, which implies a reduction in the mass of all the mesons in the nuclear matter, except the pion. Replacing the masses of the mesons with their corresponding screening masses in the Walecka-1 model, five saturation properties of the nuclear matter are fixed reasonably, and then a density-dependent relativistic mean-field model is proposed without introducing the nonlinear self-coupling terms of mesons. (author)

  11. High-level nuclear waste disposal: Ethical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxey, M.N.

    1985-01-01

    Popular skepticism about, and moral objections to, recent legislation providing for the management and permanent disposal of high-level radioactive wastes have derived their credibility from two major sources: government procrastination in enacting waste disposal program, reinforcing public perceptions of their unprecedented danger and the inflated rhetoric and pretensions to professional omnicompetence of influential scientists with nuclear expertise. Ethical considerations not only can but must provide a mediating framework for the resolution of such a polarized political controversy. Implicit in moral objections to proposals for permanent nuclear waste disposal are concerns about three ethical principles: fairness to individuals, equitable protection among diverse social groups, and informed consent through due process and participation

  12. University-level education in nuclear and radiochemistry in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smodis, B.

    2006-01-01

    The status of education in nuclear and radiochemistry in Slovenia is reviewed and elucidated at both undergraduate and graduate levels. It is observed that both the quantity and the quality of studies have deteriorated during recent years/decades, thus following similar trends in the developed countries. Presently, no dedicated study of radioactivity is offered within the country. The main reason for this deterioration is a general decline of interest for studying nuclear sciences and the limited need for such specialization in a small country such as Slovenia. (author)

  13. High energy-density physics: From nuclear testing to the superlasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teller, E.; Campbell, E.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Libby, S.B.; Remington, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    The authors describe the role for the next-generation ''superlasers'' in the study of matter under extremely high energy density conditions, in comparison to previous uses of nuclear explosives for this purpose. As examples, the authors focus on three important areas of physics that have unresolved issues which must be addressed by experiment: equations of state, turbulent hydrodynamics, and the transport of radiation. They describe the advantages the large lasers will have in a comprehensive experimental program

  14. Nuclear giant resonances in coordinate space. A semiclassical density functional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleissl, P.; Brack, M.; Meyer, J.; Quentin, P.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss the semiclassical description of nuclear giant resonances (GR) using a realistic Skyrme force (SkM*) and complete ETF density functionals. We present monopole (0 + ) eigenmodes of isoscalar (I=0) and isovector (I=1) type, which are in good agreement with experiment, and the corresponding m 1 and m 3 sum rules. We also present the temperature dependence of some typical GR energies (0 + , I=0,1; 1 - , I=1; 2 + , I=0) in 208 Pb

  15. High energy-density physics: From nuclear testing to the superlasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, E.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Libby, S.B.; Remington, B.A.; Teller, E.

    1995-10-20

    We describe the role for the next-generation ``superlasers`` in the study of matter under extremely high energy density conditions, in comparison to previous uses of nuclear explosives for this purpose. As examples, we focus on three important areas of physics that have unresolved issues which must be addressed by experiment: Equations of state, hydrodynamic mixing, and the transport of radiation. We will describe the advantages the large lasers will have in a comprehensive experimental program.

  16. High energy-density physics: From nuclear testing to the superlasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, E.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Libby, S.B.; Remington, B.A.; Teller, E.

    1995-01-01

    We describe the role for the next-generation ''superlasers'' in the study of matter under extremely high energy density conditions, in comparison to previous uses of nuclear explosives for this purpose. As examples, we focus on three important areas of physics that have unresolved issues which must be addressed by experiment: Equations of state, hydrodynamic mixing, and the transport of radiation. We will describe the advantages the large lasers will have in a comprehensive experimental program

  17. High energy-density physics: From nuclear testing to the superlasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teller, E.; Campbell, E.M.; Holmes, N.C.; Libby, S.B.; Remington, B.A.

    1995-08-14

    The authors describe the role for the next-generation ``superlasers`` in the study of matter under extremely high energy density conditions, in comparison to previous uses of nuclear explosives for this purpose. As examples, the authors focus on three important areas of physics that have unresolved issues which must be addressed by experiment: equations of state, turbulent hydrodynamics, and the transport of radiation. They describe the advantages the large lasers will have in a comprehensive experimental program.

  18. Spin assignments of nuclear levels above the neutron binding energy in $^{88}$Sr

    CERN Multimedia

    Neutron resonances reveal nuclear levels in the highly excited region of the nucleus around the neutron binding energy. Nuclear level density models are therefore usually calibrated to the number of observed levels in neutron-induced reactions. The gamma-ray cascade from the decay of the highly excited compound nucleus state to the ground state show dierences dependent on the initial spin. This results in a dierence in the multiplicity distribution which can be exploited. We propose to use the 4${\\pi}$ total absorption calorimeter (TAC) at the n TOF facility to determine the spins of resonances formed by neutrons incident on a metallic $^{87}$Sr sample by measuring the gamma multiplicity distributions for the resolved resonances. In addition we would like to use the available enriched $^{87}$Sr target for cross section measurements with the C$\\scriptscriptstyle{6}$D$\\scriptscriptstyle{6}$ detector setup.

  19. Nuclear ``pasta'' structures in low-density nuclear matter and properties of the neutron-star crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Minoru; Maruyama, Toshiki; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    2013-08-01

    In the neutron-star crust, nonuniform structure of nuclear matter—called the “pasta” structure—is expected. From recent studies of giant flares in magnetars, these structures might be related to some observables and physical quantities of the neutron-star crust. To investigate the above quantities, we numerically explore the pasta structure with a fully three-dimensional geometry and study the properties of low-density nuclear matter, based on the relativistic mean-field model and the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We observe typical pasta structures for fixed proton number fraction and two of them for cold catalyzed matter. We also discuss the crystalline configuration of “pasta.”

  20. Compaction comparison testing using a modified impact soil tester and nuclear density gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erchul, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare test results of a modified Impact Soil Tester (IST) on compacted soil with data obtained from the same soil using a nuclear density gauge at the US Army Corp of Engineer's Buena Vista Flood Wall project in Buena Vista, Virginia. The tests were run during construction of the earth flood wall during the summer of 1996. This comparison testing demonstrated the credibility of the procedure developed for the IST as a compacting testing device. The comparison data was obtained on a variety of soils ranging from silty sands to clays. The Flood Wall comparison compaction data for 90% Standard Proctor shows that the results of the IST as modified are consistent with the nuclear density gauge 89% of the time for all types of soil tested. However, if the soils are more cohesive than the results are consistent with the nuclear density gauge 97% of the time. In addition these comparison tests are in general agreement with comparison compaction testing using the same testing techniques and methods of compacted backfill in utility trenches conducted earlier for the Public Works Department, Chesterfield County, Virginia.

  1. Compaction comparison testing using a modified impact soil tester and nuclear density gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erchul, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare test results of a modified Impact Soil Tester (IST) on compacted soil with data obtained from the same soil using a nuclear density gauge at the US Army Corp of Engineer's Buena Vista Flood Wall project in Buena Vista, Virginia. The tests were run during construction of the earth flood wall during the summer of 1996. This comparison testing demonstrated the credibility of the procedure developed for the IST as a compacting testing device. The comparison data was obtained on a variety of soils ranging from silty sands to clays. The Flood Wall comparison compaction data for 90% Standard Proctor shows that the results of the IST as modified are consistent with the nuclear density gauge 89% of the time for all types of soil tested. However, if the soils are more cohesive than the results are consistent with the nuclear density gauge 97% of the time. In addition these comparison tests are in general agreement with comparison compaction testing using the same testing techniques and methods of compacted backfill in utility trenches conducted earlier for the Public Works Department, Chesterfield County, Virginia

  2. Neutron-capture gamma-ray study of levels in 135Ba and description of nuclear levels in the interacting-boson-fermion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.; Koene, B.K.S.; Stelts, M.L.; Meyer, R.A.; Brant, S.; Paar, V.; Lopac, V.

    1993-01-01

    We have performed neutron-capture gamma-ray studies on natural and enriched targets of 134 Ba in order to investigate the nuclear levels of 135 Ba. The low-energy level spectra were compared with the calculations using the interacting-boson-fermion model (IBFM) and the cluster-vibration model. The level densities up to 5 MeV that are calculated within the IBFM are in accordance with the constant temperature Fermi gas model. From the spin distribution we have determined the corresponding spin cutoff parameter σ and compared it to the prediction from nuclear systematics

  3. Dynamic high energy density plasma environments at the National Ignition Facility for nuclear science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerjan, Ch J.; Bernstein, L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Caggiano, J. A.; Cassata, W. S.; Brune, C. R.; Frenje, J.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gharibyan, N.; Grim, G.; Hagmann, Chr; Hamza, A.; Hatarik, R.; Hartouni, E. P.; Henry, E. A.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D. H.; Khater, H. Y.; Kim, Y.; Kritcher, A.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Merrill, F.; Moody, K.; Neumayer, P.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sayre, D.; Shaughnessy, D.; Spears, B.; Stoeffl, W.; Tommasini, R.; Yeamans, Ch; Velsko, C.; Wiescher, M.; Couder, M.; Zylstra, A.; Schneider, D.

    2018-03-01

    The generation of dynamic high energy density plasmas in the pico- to nano-second time domain at high-energy laser facilities affords unprecedented nuclear science research possibilities. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the primary goal of inertial confinement fusion research has led to the synergistic development of a unique high brightness neutron source, sophisticated nuclear diagnostic instrumentation, and versatile experimental platforms. These novel experimental capabilities provide a new path to investigate nuclear processes and structural effects in the time, mass and energy density domains relevant to astrophysical phenomena in a unique terrestrial environment. Some immediate applications include neutron capture cross-section evaluation, fission fragment production, and ion energy loss measurement in electron-degenerate plasmas. More generally, the NIF conditions provide a singular environment to investigate the interplay of atomic and nuclear processes such as plasma screening effects upon thermonuclear reactivity. Achieving enhanced understanding of many of these effects will also significantly advance fusion energy research and challenge existing theoretical models.

  4. Level densities of iron isotopes and lower-energy enhancement of y-strength function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voinov, A V; Grimes, S M; Agvaanluvsan, U; Algin, E; Belgya, T; Brune, C R; Guttormsen, M; Hornish, M J; Massey, T N; Mitchell, G; Rekstad, J; Schiller, A; Siem, S

    2005-01-01

    The neutron spectrum from the 55 Mn(d,n) 56 Fe reaction has been measured at E d = 7 MeV. The level density of 56 Fe obtained from neutron evaporation spectrum has been compared to the level density from Oslo-type 57 Fe( 3 He, aγ) 56 Fe experiment [1]. The good agreement supports the recent results [1, 8] including an availability of a low-energy enhancement in the γ-strength function for iron isotopes. The new level density function allowed us to investigate an excitation energy dependence of this enhancement, which is shown to increase with increasing excitation energy

  5. Seismic fragility levels of nuclear power plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    Seismic fragility levels of safety-related electrical and mechanical equipment used in nuclear power plants are discussed. The fragility level is defined as the vibration level corresponding to initiation of equipment malfunctions. The test response spectrum is used as a measure of this vibration level. The fragility phenomenon of an equipment is represented by a number of response spectra corresponding to various failure modes. Analysis methods are described for determination of the fragility level by use of existing test data. Useful conversion factors are tabulated to transform test response spectra from one damping value to another. Results are presented for switch-gears and motor control centers. The capacity levels of these equipment assemblies are observed to be limited by malfunctioning of contactors, motor starters, relays and/or switches. The applicability of the fragility levels, determined in terms of test response spectra, to Seismic Margin Studies and Probabilistic Risk Assessments is discussed and specific recommendations are provided

  6. Environmental radioactivity levels, Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant: Annual report, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The report presents data gathered during radiological monitoring program conducted in the environs of the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant. Dose estimates were made from concentrations of radioactivity found in samples of media including air, milk, food products, drinking water, and fish. Inhalation and ingestion doses estimated for persons at the indicator locations were essentially identical to those determined for persons at control locations. Greater than 95% of those doses were contributed by the naturally occurring K-40 and by Sr-90 and Cs-137 which are long-lived radioisotopes found in fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Increased levels of I-131 were reported in air, milk, and rainwater following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station. In addition, Ru-103, Cs-137, and Cs-134 were identified in air particulates, and traces of Ru-103 were found in rainwater

  7. The effect of serum magnesium levels and serum endothelin-1 levels on bone mineral density in protein energy malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, C F; Karakelleoglu, C; Orbak, Z; Yildiz, L

    2012-06-01

    An inadequate and imbalanced intake of protein and energy results in protein-energy malnutrition (PEM). It is known that bone mineral density and serum magnesium levels are low in malnourished children. However, the roles of serum magnesium and endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels in the pathophysiology of bone mineralization are obscure. Thus, the relationships between serum magnesium and ET-1 levels and the changes in bone mineral density were investigated in this study. There was a total of 32 subjects, 25 of them had PEM and seven were controls. While mean serum ET-1 levels of the children with kwashiorkor and marasmus showed no statistically significant difference, mean serum ET-1 levels of both groups were significantly higher than that of the control group. Serum magnesium levels were lower than normal value in 9 (36%) of 25 malnourished children. Malnourished children included in this study were divided into two subgroups according to their serum magnesium levels. While mean serum ET-1 levels in the group with low magnesium levels were significantly higher than that of the group with normal magnesium levels (p malnutrition. Our study suggested that lower magnesium levels and higher ET-1 levels might be important factors in changes of bone mineral density in malnutrition. We recommend that the malnourished patients, especially with hypomagnesaemia, should be treated with magnesium early.

  8. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. 1 figures

  9. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, James G.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel.

  10. Level repulsion, nuclear chaos, and conserved quantum numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the distribution of level spacings for states with the same spin and parity is described in which the average spacing is calculated for the total ensemble. Though the resulting distribution of level spacings for states of deformed nuclei with Z = 62 - 75 and A = 155 - 185 is the closest to that of a Poisson distribution yet obtained for nuclear levels, significant deviations are observed for small level spacings. Many, but not all, of the very closely-spaced levels have K-values differing by several units. The analysis of level spacings in 157 Ho indicate that considerable caution should be excerised when drawing conclusions from such an analysis for a single deformed nucleus, since the sizable number of spacings that can be obtained from a few rotational bands are not all independent

  11. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF): SciDAC-2 Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Joe; Furnstahl, Dick; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-06-30

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1, 2006 - Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold: first, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties; second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data; and third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  12. Chemical digestion of low level nuclear solid waste material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, C.R.; Lerch, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical digestion for treatment of low level combustible nuclear solid waste material is provided and comprises reacting the solid waste material with concentrated sulfuric acid at a temperature within the range of 230 0 --300 0 C and simultaneously and/or thereafter contacting the reacting mixture with concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide. In a special embodiment spent ion exchange resins are converted by this chemical digestion to noncombustible gases and a low volume noncombustible residue. 6 claims, no drawings

  13. Nuclear Accidents Intervention Levels for Protection of the Public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The impact of the 1986 Chernobyl accident called attention to the need to improve international harmonization of the principles and criteria for the protection of the public in the event of a nuclear accident. This report provides observations and guidance related to the harmonization of radiological protection criteria, and is intended to be of use to national authorities and international organizations examining the issue of emergency response planning and intervention levels

  14. Final disposal of high levels waste and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelin, R.

    1984-05-01

    Foreign and international activities on the final disposal of high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel have been reviewed. A considerable research effort is devoted to development of acceptable disposal options. The different technical concepts presently under study are described in the report. Numerous studies have been made in many countries of the potential risks to future generations from radioactive wastes in underground disposal repositories. In the report the safety assessment studies and existing performance criteria for geological disposal are briefly discussed. The studies that are being made in Canada, the United States, France and Switzerland are the most interesting for Sweden as these countries also are considering disposal into crystalline rocks. The overall time-tables in different countries for realisation of the final disposal are rather similar. Normally actual large-scale disposal operations for high-level wastes are not foreseen until after year 2000. In the United States the Congress recently passed the important Nuclear Waste Policy Act. It gives a rather firm timetable for site-selection and construction of nuclear waste disposal facilities. According to this act the first repository for disposal of commercial high-level waste must be in operation not later than in January 1998. (Author)

  15. Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations: [Part]3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singha Roy, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    This article is the third part of the paper entitled 'Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations'. Specific considerations relevant to natural but manufactured heavy aggregates like haematite used in India are briefly discussed. They include water-cement ratio, strength versus water-cement ratio, mix design strength and aggregate grading. Some typical mix proportions in haematite concretes used in India are given. Equipment for heavy density concrete is mentioned. Quality control methods and tests for heavy density concrete are described under the heading: type and chemical composition of the rock, specific gravity and surface absorption of the aggregates, grading of aggregates, cement, batching, mixing, compressive strength, and density. Construction aspects such as form work, placement, vibration, finishing, and temperature control are discussed. Finally it is pointed out that for optimising the design and economy of heavy density concrete, it is necessary to carry out country-wide survey of suitable materials, to study their properties, suitability and effectiveness in shielding radiation. (M.G.B.)

  16. Level density of interacting nucleons inside a shell; Densite de niveaux d'un systeme de nucleons en interaction dans une couche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balian, Roger [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA, Centre d' etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1960-07-01

    Using perturbation theory, the grand partition function is calculated for the completely degenerate system of interacting nucleons inside a shell. The level density is then derived by the Darwin-Fowler method. The purpose is to compare these results to exact levels known for a p-shell. The method gives fairly good results, even for a small number of particles, provided that the self-consistent field is taken into account, and the calculation is carried out in a coherent way; there is no advantage in performing the saddle point method after integration of the level density. Reprint of a paper published in Nuclear Physics, 13, p. 594-620, 1959.

  17. Low-level nuclear waste in Washington State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, H.

    1986-01-01

    A commercial disposal site for low-level nuclear wastes opened at Hanford in 1965. By 1971 a total of six were in operation: Hanford, Nevada, South Carolina, Kentucky, New York State, and Illinois. The history of the operation of these sites is described. Only the first three listed are still open. The effects of the large volumes of waste expected from Three Mile Island are described. This paper examines the case history of Hanford operations with low-level waste disposal for lessons that might apply in other states being considered for disposal sites

  18. Analytical theory for the nuclear level shift of hadronic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtsev, A.E.; Lisin, V.I.; Popov, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    The spectrum problem in the Coulomb potential distorted at small distances is considered. Nuclear shifts of 3-levels in p anti p and Σ - p atoms are calculated. The probabilities of radiative transitions from p-states to the shifted s-states in hadronic atom are also given. It is shown that the reconstruction of atomic levels switches to oscillation regime when absorption increases. The limits of applicability of the perturbation theory in terms of the scattering length for different values of absorption is discussed. An exactly solvable model, Coulomb plus Yamaguchi potential, is considered

  19. Low-level nuclear waste tested for fertilizer value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear power industry keeps coming up with proposals for getting rid of radioactive waste - burying it deep in the ground, sinking it at sea and even sending it into space reports Common Cause magazine under a headline, The Latest in Recycling. At its Sequoyah Fuels facility in Oklahoma, Kerr-McGee manufactures fuel for nuclear power plants, generating a low-level radioactive liquid waste product called raphinate. After processing to remove radioactive substances, Kerr-McGee has gotten approval from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to use the nitrogen-rich residue as a fertilizer - but not to market it. As a result, Kerr-McGee is reported to be buying up thousands of acres of land on which to spread raphinate. The acreage is used to grow hay, which the company has gotten an okay to sell. The recycling effort hasn't exactly won neighborhood friends for the company, noted Common Cause. According to Kerr-McGee's corporate communications direct, When you say to somebody, Sequoyah Fuels is putting nuclear waste (on farmland), people jump up a wall

  20. Level Densities in the actinide region and indirect n,y cross section measurements using the surrogate method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiedeking M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Results from a program of measurements of level densities and gamma ray strength functions in the actinide region are presented. Experiments at the Oslo cyclotron involving the Cactus/Siri detectors and 232Th(d,x and 232Th(3He,x reactions were carried out to help answer the question of which level density model is the most appropriate for actinide nuclei, since it will have an impact on cross section calculations important for reactor physics simulations. A new technique for extracting level densities and gamma ray strength functions from particle-gamma coincidence data is proposed and results from the development of this technique are presented. In addition, simultaneous measurements of compound nuclear gamma decay probabilities have been performed for the key thorium cycle nuclei 233Th, 231Th and 232Pa up to around 1MeV above the neutron binding energy and have enabled extraction of indirect neutron induced capture cross sections for the 232Th, 231Pa and 230Th nuclei using the surrogate reaction method. Since the neutron capture cross section for 232Th is already well known from direct measurements a comparison provides a stringent test of the applicability of the surrogate technique in the actinide region.

  1. PSA Level 2:Scope And Method Of PSA Level 2 For Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widodo, Surip; Antariksawan, Anhar R.

    2001-01-01

    A study of scope and method of PSA Level 2 had been conducted. The background of the study is the need to gain the capability to well perform PSA Level 2 for nuclear facilities. This study is a literature survey. The scope of PSA Level 2 consists of generating plant damage states, accident progression analysis, and grouping source terms. Concerning accident progression analysis, several methods are used, among others event tree method, named accident progression event tree (APET) or containment event tree (CET), and fault tree method. The end result of PSA Level 2 is release end states which is grouped into release bins. The results will be used for PSA Level 3

  2. External radiation levels in installations of nuclear technology center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maletta, Paulo Guilherme M.; Filipetto, Joao; Wakabayashi, Tetsuaki; Silva, Teogenes A. da

    2005-01-01

    The radiological protection is a basic activity of nuclear technology center so that can carry through its activities with security, having to be planned and executed with total effectiveness. One of the basic tools of the radiological protection is the adoption of monitoring programs, that have as objective generality to evaluate the radiological conditions of the workstation and to assure that these conditions are acceptable safe for the displayed individuals, either workers or members of the public, as established in the basic norms of radiological protection. The Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN, first institution in Brazil, created in 1952 to entirely dedicate the related works to the nuclear area, to own 39 building, of which they are kept the Triga Reactor, Irradiation Gamma Laboratory, Reject Laboratory, Calibration Dosemeters Laboratory and others. In such installations, radioactive materials are produced, handled, processed and stored, being necessary the levels of external radiation ambient monitoring. As part of the radioprotection plan, monitoring 63 points on strategically located in the external areas to the building of CDTN, using characterized and calibrated thermoluminescence dosemeters. This work describes the dose distribution of the points, the doses evaluation procedure and the 4 results carried through between 2001 and 2004. The data demonstrate the attendance to the level of security established in the basic norm, what it contributed for the operation licensing of to the IBAMA. (author)

  3. Immobilisation of high level nuclear reactor wastes in SYNROC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringwood, A E; Kesson, S E; Ware, N G; Hibberson, W; Major, A [Australian National Univ., Canberra. Inst. of Advanced Studies

    1979-03-15

    It is stated that the elements occurring in high-level nuclear reactor wastes can be safely immobilised by incorporating them within the crystal lattices of the constituent minerals of a synthetic rock (SYNROC). The preferred form of SYNROC can accept up to 20% of high level waste calcine to form dilute solid solutions. The constituent minerals, or close structural analogues, have survived in a wide range of geochemical environments for periods of 20 to 2,000 Myr whilst immobilising the same elements present in nuclear wastes. SYNROC is unaffected by leaching for 24 hours in pure water or 10 wt % NaCl solution at high temperatures and pressure whereas borosilicate glasses completely decompose in a few hours in much less severe hydrothermal conditions. The combination of these leaching results with the geological evidence of long-term stability indicates that SYNROC would be vastly superior to glass in its capacity to safely immobilise nuclear wastes, when buried in a suitable geological repository. A dense, compact, mechanically strong form of SYNROC suitable for geological disposal can be produced by a process as economical as that which incorporates radioactive waste in borosilicate glasses.

  4. Cell density-dependent nuclear/cytoplasmic localization of NORPEG (RAI14) protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutty, R. Krishnan; Chen, Shanyi; Samuel, William; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Duncan, Todd; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Fariss, Robert N.; Carper, Deborah; Jaworski, Cynthia; Wiggert, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    NORPEG (RAI14), a developmentally regulated gene induced by retinoic acid, encodes a 980 amino acid (aa) residue protein containing six ankyrin repeats and a long coiled-coil domain [Kutty et al., J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001), pp. 2831-2840]. We have expressed aa residues 1-287 of NORPEG and used the recombinant protein to produce an anti-NORPEG polyclonal antibody. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that the subcellular localization of NORPEG in retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells varies with cell density, with predominantly nuclear localization in nonconfluent cells, but a cytoplasmic localization, reminiscent of cytoskeleton, in confluent cultures. Interestingly, an evolutionarily conserved putative monopartite nuclear localization signal (P 27 KKRKAP 276 ) was identified by analyzing the sequences of NORPEG and its orthologs. GFP-NORPEG (2-287 aa), a fusion protein containing this signal, was indeed localized to nuclei when expressed in ARPE-19 or COS-7 cells. Deletion and mutation analysis indicated that the identified nuclear localization sequence is indispensable for nuclear targeting

  5. MADNESS applied to density functional theory in chemistry and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fann, G I; Harrison, R J; Beylkin, G; Jia, J; Hartman-Baker, R; Shelton, W A; Sugiki, S

    2007-01-01

    We describe some recent mathematical results in constructing computational methods that lead to the development of fast and accurate multiresolution numerical methods for solving quantum chemistry and nuclear physics problems based on Density Functional Theory (DFT). Using low separation rank representations of functions and operators in conjunction with representations in multiwavelet bases, we developed a multiscale solution method for integral and differential equations and integral transforms. The Poisson equation, the Schrodinger equation, and the projector on the divergence free functions provide important examples with a wide range of applications in computational chemistry, nuclear physics, computational electromagnetic and fluid dynamics. We have implemented this approach along with adaptive representations of operators and functions in the multiwavelet basis and low separation rank (LSR) approximation of operators and functions. These methods have been realized and implemented in a software package called Multiresolution Adaptive Numerical Evaluation for Scientific Simulation (MADNESS)

  6. Microscopic and Beyond-Mean-Field Constraints for a New Generation of Nuclear Energy Density Functionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesinski, Th.

    2008-09-01

    Nuclear structure is subject to a major renewal linked with the development of radioactive ion beams (such as the SPIRAL 1 and 2 beams at GANIL). Mean-field and density-functional methods are among the best suited for studying nuclei produced at such facilities. The present work aims at demonstrating how existing functionals can be improved so as to exhibit a better predictive power in little-explored regions of the nuclear chart. We propose a better description of the isospin-dependence of the effective interaction, and examine the relevance of adding a tensor coupling. We also show how a new generation of functionals can be better constrained by considering results obtained beyond the mean-field approximation. Finally, we attempt establishing a link with the bare nucleon-nucleon potential for the description of pairing, thus participating in the construction of a non-empirical functional. (author)

  7. Exothermic reaction induced by high-density current in metals: Possible nuclear origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufour, J. [Laboratoire des sciences nucleaires, CNAM 2, rue Conte 75141, Cedex 03 Paris (France)]. E-mail: dufourj@cnam.fr; Murat, D.; Dufour, X.; Foos, J. [Laboratoire des sciences nucleaires, CNAM 2, rue Conte 75141, Cedex 03 Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    Since 1989, many experimenters worked on low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR). They face both an experimental and a theoretical dilemma: how to design simple and convincing experiments in a complex system and if the phenomenon has a nuclear origin, why do they observe no radiation. A rather simple water mass flow calorimeter was designed to study this phenomenon under different experimental conditions. First results indicate that a high-density current induced an exothermic reaction in a hydrogen processed palladium wire. A working hypothesis is presented to solve the theoretical dilemma. This working hypothesis is based on the possible existence of a still hypothetical proton/electron resonance. We underline that a working hypothesis is not a theory presented to explain the phenomenon; this is just a conceptual scheme to drive the authors to build experiments. (author)

  8. Exothermic reaction induced by high-density current in metals: Possible nuclear origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufour, J.; Murat, D.; Dufour, X.; Foos, J.

    2005-01-01

    Since 1989, many experimenters worked on low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR). They face both an experimental and a theoretical dilemma: how to design simple and convincing experiments in a complex system and if the phenomenon has a nuclear origin, why do they observe no radiation. A rather simple water mass flow calorimeter was designed to study this phenomenon under different experimental conditions. First results indicate that a high-density current induced an exothermic reaction in a hydrogen processed palladium wire. A working hypothesis is presented to solve the theoretical dilemma. This working hypothesis is based on the possible existence of a still hypothetical proton/electron resonance. We underline that a working hypothesis is not a theory presented to explain the phenomenon; this is just a conceptual scheme to drive the authors to build experiments. (author)

  9. Towards the improvement of spin-isospin properties in nuclear energy density functionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Colò, G.; Liang, H. Z.; Sagawa, H.; Meng, J.; Ring, P.; Zhao, P. W.

    2016-01-01

    We address the problem of improving existing nuclear Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) in the spin-isospin channel. For that, we propose two different ways. The first one is to carefully take into account in the fitting protocol some of the key ground state properties for an accurate description of the most studied spin-isospin resonances: the Gamow-Teller Resonance (GTR) [1]. The second consists in providing a strategy to build local covariant EDF keeping the main features from their non-local counterparts [2]. The RHF model based on a Lagrangian where heavy mesons carry the nuclear effective interaction have been shown to be successful in the description of spin-isospin resonances [3]. (paper)

  10. Critical enrichment and critical density of infinite systems for nuclear criticality safety evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka; Koyama, Takashi; Komuro, Yuichi

    1986-03-01

    Critical enrichment and critical density of homogenous infinite systems, such as U-H 2 O, UO 2 -H 2 O, UO 2 F 2 aqueous solution, UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 aqueous solution, Pu-H 2 O, PuO 2 -H 2 O, Pu(NO 3 ) 4 aqueous solution and PuO 2 ·UO 2 -H 2 O, were calculated with the criticality safety evaluation computer code system JACS for nuclear criticality safety evaluation on fuel facilities. The computed results were compared with the data described in European and American criticality handbooks and showed good agreement with each other. (author)

  11. Water level control for a nuclear steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Tan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → A water level control system for a nuclear steam generator (SG) is proposed. → The parameters of the control system are directly related to those of the plant model thus scheduling is easy to implement in practice. → The proposed gain-scheduled controller can achieve good performance at both low and high power levels. - Abstract: A water level control system for a nuclear steam generator (SG) is proposed. The control system consists of a feedback controller and a feedforward controller. The feedback controller is of first order, the feedforward controller is of second order, and parameters of the two controllers are directly related to the parameters of plant model thus scheduling is easy to implement in practice. Robustness and performance of the feedback and the feedforward controllers are analyzed in details and tuning of the two parameters of the controllers are discussed. Comparisons among a single robust controller, a multi-model controller and a gain-scheduled controller are studied. It is shown that the proposed gain-scheduled controller can achieve good performance at both low and high power levels.

  12. Competing Quantum Hall Phases in the Second Landau Level in Low Density Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Serafin, A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab); Xia, J. S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab); Liang, Y. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab); Sullivan, N. S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab. (MagLab); Baldwin, K. W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); West, K. W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Pfeiffer, L. N. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Tsui, D. C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Up to date, studies of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) states in the second Landau level have mainly been carried out in the high electron density regime, where the electron mobility is the highest. Only recently, with the advance of high quality low density MBE growth, experiments have been pushed to the low density regime [1], where the electron-electron interactions are strong and the Landau level mixing parameter, defined by κ = e2/εIB/ℏωe, is large. Here, lB = (ℏe/B)1/2 is the magnetic length and ωc = eB/m the cyclotron frequency. All other parameters have their normal meanings. It has been shown that a large Landau level mixing effect strongly affects the electron physics in the second Landau level [2].

  13. Probing the nuclear matter at high baryon and isospin density with heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Toro, M.; Colonna, M.; Ferini, G.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy Ion Collisions (HIC) represent a unique tool to probe the in-medium nuclear interaction in regions away from saturation. High Energy Collisions are studied in order to access nuclear matter properties at high density. Particular attention is devoted to the selection of observables sensitive to the poorly known symmetry energy at high baryon density, of large fundamental interest, even for the astrophysics implications. Using fully consistent covariant transport simulations built on effective field theories we are testing isospin observables ranging from nucleon/cluster emissions, collective flows (in particular the elliptic, squeeze out, part) and meson production. The possibility to shed light on the controversial neutron/proton effective mass splitting in asymmetric matter is also stressed. The "symmetry" repulsion at high baryon density will also lead to an "earlier" hadron-deconfinement transition in n-rich matter. The phase transition of hadronic to quark matter at high baryon and isospin density is analyzed. Nonlinear relativistic mean field models are used to describe hadronic matter, and the MIT bag model is adopted for quark matter. The boundaries of the mixed phase and the related critical points for symmetric and asymmetric matter are obtained. Isospin effects appear to be rather significant. The binodal transition line of the (T,ρ B ) diagram is lowered in a region accessible to heavy ion collisions in the energy range of the new planned FAIR/NICA facilities. Some observable effects of the mixed phase are suggested, in particular a neutron distillation mechanism. Theoretically a very important problem appears to be the suitable treatment of the isovector part of the interaction in effective QCD lagrangian approaches. (author)

  14. Population-Level Density Dependence Influences the Origin and Maintenance of Parental Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Reyes

    Full Text Available Parental care is a defining feature of animal breeding systems. We now know that both basic life-history characteristics and ecological factors influence the evolution of care. However, relatively little is known about how these factors interact to influence the origin and maintenance of care. Here, we expand upon previous work and explore the relationship between basic life-history characteristics (stage-specific rates of mortality and maturation and the fitness benefits associated with the origin and the maintenance of parental care for two broad ecological scenarios: the scenario in which egg survival is density dependent and the case in which adult survival is density dependent. Our findings suggest that high offspring need is likely critical in driving the origin, but not the maintenance, of parental care regardless of whether density dependence acts on egg or adult survival. In general, parental care is more likely to result in greater fitness benefits when baseline adult mortality is low if 1 egg survival is density dependent or 2 adult mortality is density dependent and mutant density is relatively high. When density dependence acts on egg mortality, low rates of egg maturation and high egg densities are less likely to lead to strong fitness benefits of care. However, when density dependence acts on adult mortality, high levels of egg maturation and increasing adult densities are less likely to maintain care. Juvenile survival has relatively little, if any, effect on the origin and maintenance of egg-only care. More generally, our results suggest that the evolution of parental care will be influenced by an organism's entire life history characteristics, the stage at which density dependence acts, and whether care is originating or being maintained.

  15. Population-Level Density Dependence Influences the Origin and Maintenance of Parental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Elijah; Thrasher, Patsy; Bonsall, Michael B; Klug, Hope

    2016-01-01

    Parental care is a defining feature of animal breeding systems. We now know that both basic life-history characteristics and ecological factors influence the evolution of care. However, relatively little is known about how these factors interact to influence the origin and maintenance of care. Here, we expand upon previous work and explore the relationship between basic life-history characteristics (stage-specific rates of mortality and maturation) and the fitness benefits associated with the origin and the maintenance of parental care for two broad ecological scenarios: the scenario in which egg survival is density dependent and the case in which adult survival is density dependent. Our findings suggest that high offspring need is likely critical in driving the origin, but not the maintenance, of parental care regardless of whether density dependence acts on egg or adult survival. In general, parental care is more likely to result in greater fitness benefits when baseline adult mortality is low if 1) egg survival is density dependent or 2) adult mortality is density dependent and mutant density is relatively high. When density dependence acts on egg mortality, low rates of egg maturation and high egg densities are less likely to lead to strong fitness benefits of care. However, when density dependence acts on adult mortality, high levels of egg maturation and increasing adult densities are less likely to maintain care. Juvenile survival has relatively little, if any, effect on the origin and maintenance of egg-only care. More generally, our results suggest that the evolution of parental care will be influenced by an organism's entire life history characteristics, the stage at which density dependence acts, and whether care is originating or being maintained.

  16. Uncertainty quantification for nuclear density functional theory and information content of new measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, J D; Schunck, N; Higdon, D; Sarich, J; Wild, S M; Nazarewicz, W

    2015-03-27

    Statistical tools of uncertainty quantification can be used to assess the information content of measured observables with respect to present-day theoretical models, to estimate model errors and thereby improve predictive capability, to extrapolate beyond the regions reached by experiment, and to provide meaningful input to applications and planned measurements. To showcase new opportunities offered by such tools, we make a rigorous analysis of theoretical statistical uncertainties in nuclear density functional theory using Bayesian inference methods. By considering the recent mass measurements from the Canadian Penning Trap at Argonne National Laboratory, we demonstrate how the Bayesian analysis and a direct least-squares optimization, combined with high-performance computing, can be used to assess the information content of the new data with respect to a model based on the Skyrme energy density functional approach. Employing the posterior probability distribution computed with a Gaussian process emulator, we apply the Bayesian framework to propagate theoretical statistical uncertainties in predictions of nuclear masses, two-neutron dripline, and fission barriers. Overall, we find that the new mass measurements do not impose a constraint that is strong enough to lead to significant changes in the model parameters. The example discussed in this study sets the stage for quantifying and maximizing the impact of new measurements with respect to current modeling and guiding future experimental efforts, thus enhancing the experiment-theory cycle in the scientific method.

  17. Uncertainty quantification for nuclear density functional theory and information content of new measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonnell, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schunck, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Higdon, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sarich, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wild, S. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Nazarewicz, W. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-03-24

    Statistical tools of uncertainty quantification can be used to assess the information content of measured observables with respect to present-day theoretical models, to estimate model errors and thereby improve predictive capability, to extrapolate beyond the regions reached by experiment, and to provide meaningful input to applications and planned measurements. To showcase new opportunities offered by such tools, we make a rigorous analysis of theoretical statistical uncertainties in nuclear density functional theory using Bayesian inference methods. By considering the recent mass measurements from the Canadian Penning Trap at Argonne National Laboratory, we demonstrate how the Bayesian analysis and a direct least-squares optimization, combined with high-performance computing, can be used to assess the information content of the new data with respect to a model based on the Skyrme energy density functional approach. Employing the posterior probability distribution computed with a Gaussian process emulator, we apply the Bayesian framework to propagate theoretical statistical uncertainties in predictions of nuclear masses, two-neutron dripline, and fission barriers. Overall, we find that the new mass measurements do not impose a constraint that is strong enough to lead to significant changes in the model parameters. As a result, the example discussed in this study sets the stage for quantifying and maximizing the impact of new measurements with respect to current modeling and guiding future experimental efforts, thus enhancing the experiment-theory cycle in the scientific method.

  18. On superconductivity of matter at hight density and the effects of inducing nuclear chirality in molecular structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Providëncia, J.; Jalkanen, Karl J.; Bohr, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    relativistic fluid of elementary particles is studied. We find that the magnetic field of spin polarized matter with densities of 2 to 30, where 0 is the equilibrium density of nuclear matter, is rather huge, of the order of 1017 Gauss. Finally we look at the chiral nature of nuclear forces and interactions...... as they possibly relate to chirality of nuclei (atoms) in molecules as a source of chirality in amino acids and hence in life. Previous works have not investigated the nuclear forces as a possible bias which initiated the bias towards L-amino acids as the building blocks on proteins, and later life....

  19. Correlation between High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (HDL) Level and Aerobic Activity Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    over a 40 day period for HDtJICholesteroll and Total Choleis- added with the "reverse" technique, This technique is only poai- tarot . The results are...Stand- tarot and Total Cholestero levels, it is beat that eet laoatr ard and a control Serum were each analyzed 10 times giving the * determinle its

  20. Simulation and control of the site-dependent neutron density in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, K.

    1974-01-01

    The present work deals with the simulation and control of a pressurized-water reactor such as is used in nuclear power plants today. In the first part of the work, the mathematical model equations of the reactor are set up. They take into consideration the local distribution of the various reactor parameters as far as seems necessary for further investigations. Taking the given approximations, the mathematical model is locally one-dimensional; it is valid for the period of time in which a power control of the reactor must work. The model equations set up are calculated on an analog/hybride computer according to the modal simulation method in true time. The method is distinguished in the present problem here through good convergence and enables the observation of the simulation results as a stationary picture on an oscillograph screen. For this reason, a simulation of this type seems particularly suitable for the training of operational personnel. The aim of the second part of the work is the development of a simple control concept which enables the control of the total power of the reactor as well as of the distribution of the power density in the reactor core. The fundamentals of the control design are the non-linear system equations of the nuclear reactor. The developed control is based on the controlling of eigenfunctions; it controls the total power of the reactor as well as the distribution of the power density in the reactor core where a uniform burn-up of the nuclear fuel is seen to. Part-absorbing control rods amongst others are used as actuators like they are already used in that type of reactors. (orig./LH) [de

  1. Complex-energy approach to sum rules within nuclear density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinohara, Nobuo; Kortelainen, Markus; Nazarewicz, Witold; Olsen, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Background: The linear response of the nucleus to an external field contains unique information about the effective interaction, the correlations governing the behavior of the many-body system, and the properties of its excited states. To characterize the response, it is useful to use its energy-weighted moments, or sum rules. By comparing computed sum rules with experimental values, the information content of the response can be utilized in the optimization process of the nuclear Hamiltonian or the nuclear energy density functional (EDF). But the additional information comes at a price: compared to the ground state, computation of excited states is more demanding. Purpose: To establish an efficient framework to compute energy-weighted sum rules of the response that is adaptable to the optimization of the nuclear EDF and large-scale surveys of collective strength, we have developed a new technique within the complex-energy finite-amplitude method (FAM) based on the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA). Methods: To compute sum rules, we carry out contour integration of the response function in the complex-energy plane. We benchmark our results against the conventional matrix formulation of the QRPA theory, the Thouless theorem for the energy-weighted sum rule, and the dielectric theorem for the inverse-energy-weighted sum rule. Results: We derive the sum-rule expressions from the contour integration of the complex-energy FAM. We demonstrate that calculated sum-rule values agree with those obtained from the matrix formulation of the QRPA. We also discuss the applicability of both the Thouless theorem about the energy-weighted sum rule and the dielectric theorem for the inverse-energy-weighted sum rule to nuclear density functional theory in cases when the EDF is not based on a Hamiltonian. Conclusions: The proposed sum-rule technique based on the complex-energy FAM is a tool of choice when optimizing effective interactions or energy functionals. The method

  2. Generalized nuclear Fukui functions in the framework of spin-polarized density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamorro, E.; Proft, F. de; Geerlings, P.

    2005-01-01

    An extension of Cohen's nuclear Fukui function is presented in the spin-polarized framework of density-functional theory (SP-DFT). The resulting new nuclear Fukui function indices Φ Nα and Φ Sα are intended to be the natural descriptors for the responses of the nuclei to changes involving charge transfer at constant multiplicity and also the spin polarization at constant number of electrons. These generalized quantities allow us to gain new insights within a perturbative scheme based on DFT. Calculations of the electronic and nuclear SP-DFT quantities are presented within a Kohn-Sham framework of chemical reactivity for a sample of molecules, including H 2 O, H 2 CO, and some simple nitrenes (NX) and phosphinidenes (PX), with X=H, Li, F, Cl, OH, SH, NH 2 , and PH 2 . Results have been interpreted in terms of chemical bonding in the context of Berlin's theorem, which provides a separation of the molecular space into binding and antibinding regions

  3. Power probability density function control and performance assessment of a nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abharian, Amir Esmaeili; Fadaei, Amir Hosein

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • In this paper, the performance assessment of static PDF control system is discussed. • The reactor PDF model is set up based on the B-spline functions. • Acquaints of Nu, and Th-h. equations solve concurrently by reformed Hansen’s method. • A principle of performance assessment is put forward for the PDF of the NR control. - Abstract: One of the main issues in controlling a system is to keep track of the conditions of the system function. The performance condition of the system should be inspected continuously, to keep the system in reliable working condition. In this study, the nuclear reactor is considered as a complicated system and a principle of performance assessment is used for analyzing the performance of the power probability density function (PDF) of the nuclear research reactor control. First, the model of the power PDF is set up, then the controller is designed to make the power PDF for tracing the given shape, that make the reactor to be a closed-loop system. The operating data of the closed-loop reactor are used to assess the control performance with the performance assessment criteria. The modeling, controller design and the performance assessment of the power PDF are all applied to the control of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) power in a nuclear process. In this paper, the performance assessment of the static PDF control system is discussed, the efficacy and efficiency of the proposed method are investigated, and finally its reliability is proven

  4. Alpha particle emission as a probe of the level density in highly excited A∼200 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabris, D.; Fioretto, E.; Viesti, G.; Cinausero, M.; Gelli, N.; Hagel, K.; Lucarelli, F.; Natowitz, J.B.; Nebbia, G.; Prete, G.; Wada, R.

    1994-01-01

    The alpha particle emission from 90 to 140 MeV 19 F+ 181 Ta fusion-evaporation reactions has been studied. The comparisons of the experimental spectral shapes and multiplicities with statistical model predictions indicate a need to use an excitation energy dependent level-density parameter a=A/K in which K increases with excitation energy. This increase is more rapid than that in lower mass nuclei. The effect of this change in level density on the prescission multiplicities in fission is significant

  5. Anharmonic thermal vibrations of be metal found in the MEM nuclear density map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takata, Masaki; Sakata, Makoto; Larsen, F.K.; Kumazawa, Shintaro; Iversen, B.B.

    1993-01-01

    A direct observation of the thermal vibrations of Be metal was performed by the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) using neutron single crystal data. In the previous study, the existence of the small but significant cubic anharmonicity of Be has been found by the conventional least squares refinement of the observed structure factors [Larsen, Lehmann and Merisalo (1980) Acta Cryst. A36, 159-163]. In the present study, the same data were used for the MEM analysis which are comprised of 48 reflections up to sinθ/λ = 1.41A -1 in order to obtain the high resolution nuclear density of Be without using any thermal vibrational model. It was directly visible in the MEM map that not only the cubic terms but also quartic anharmonicities exist in the thermal vibrations of Be nuclei. In order to evaluate thermal parameters of Be including anharmonic terms quantitatively, the least squares refinement of the effective one-particle potential (OPP) parameters up to quartic term was carried out by using the MEM nuclear densities around atomic sites as the data set to be fitted. It was found that the present treatment has a great advantage to decide the most appropriate model of OPP by visually comparing the model with MEM density map. As a result of the least squares refinement, the anharmonic thermal parameters are obtained as α 33 = -0.340(5)[eV/A 3 ], α 40 = 0, β 20 = 9.89(1)[eV/A 4 ] and γ 00 = 0. No other anharmonic term was significant. (author)

  6. A density variational approach to nuclear giant resonances at zero and finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleissl, P.; Brack, M.; Quentin, P.; Meyer, J.

    1989-02-01

    We present a density functional approach to the description of nuclear giant resonances (GR), using Skyrme type effective interactions. We exploit hereby the theorems of Thouless and others, relating RPA sum rules to static (constrained) Hartree-Fock expectation values. The latter are calculated both microscopically and, where shell effects are small enough to allow it, semiclassically by a density variational method employing the gradient-expanded density functionals of the extended Thomas-Fermi model. We obtain an excellent overall description of both systematics and detailed isotopic dependence of GR energies, in particular with the Skyrme force SkM. For the breathing modes (isoscalar and isovector giant monopole modes), and to some extent also for the isovector dipole mode, the A-dependence of the experimental peak energies is better described by coupling two different modes (corresponding to two different excitation operators) of the same spin and parity and evaluating the eigenmodes of the coupled system. Our calculations are also extended to highly excited nuclei (without angular momentum) and the temperature dependence of the various GR energies is discussed

  7. Global trends in nuclear education at the tertiary level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    2001-01-01

    The public perception of nuclear science and engineering and the nuclear industry is today, primarily shaped by radical greens, nuclear-opponents, the media and socio-political opportunists. Only countries with a well diversified tertiary education system embracing all aspects of nuclear science and engineering can counter efficiently the pseudo-science and socio-political manipulation which has severely restricted nuclear energy development over the past three decades. National laboratories alone find this task extremely difficult, if not impossible

  8. Effects of shape differences in the level densities of three formalisms on calculated cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, C.Y.; Larson, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    Effects of shape differences in the level densities of three formalisms on calculated cross-sections and particle emission spectra are described. Reactions for incident neutrons up to 20 MeV on 58 Ni are chosen for illustrations. Level density parameters for one of the formalisms are determined from the available neutron resonance data for one residual nuclide in the binary channels and from fitting the measured (n,n'), (n,p) and (n,α) cross-sections for the other two residual nuclides. Level density parameters for the other two formalisms are determined such that they yield the same values as the above one at two selected energies. This procedure forces the level densities from the three formalisms used for the binary pat of the calculation to be as close as possible. The remaining differences are in their energy dependences (shapes). It is shown that these shape differences alone are enough to cause the calculated cross-sections and particle emission spectra to be different by up to 60%. (author)

  9. Gold nanocrystal labeling allows low-density lipoprotein imaging from the subcellular to macroscopic level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allijn, Iris E.; Leong, Wei; Tang, Jun; Gianella, Anita; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Fay, Francois; Ma, Ge; Russell, Stewart; Callo, Catherine B.; Gordon, Ronald E.; Korkmaz, Emine; Post, Jan Andries; Zhao, Yiming; Gerritsen, Hans C.; Thran, Axel; Proksa, Roland; Daerr, Heiner; Storm, Gert; Fuster, Valentin; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Cormode, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) plays a critical role in cholesterol transport and is closely linked to the progression of several diseases. This motivates the development of methods to study LDL behavior from the microscopic to whole-body level. We have developed an approach to efficiently load LDL

  10. Extraction of level density and γ strength function from primary γ spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, A.; Bergholt, L.; Guttormsen, M.; Melby, E.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.

    2000-01-01

    We present a new iterative procedure to extract the level density and the γ strength function from primary γ spectra for energies close up to the neutron binding energy. The procedure is tested on simulated spectra and on data from the 173 Yb( 3 He,α) 172 Yb reaction

  11. Technical basis for staffing levels at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Morisseau, D. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this project is to provide a technical basis for the establishment of criteria for minimum staffing levels of licensed and non-licensed NPP shift personnel. Minimum staffing levels for the purpose of this study, are defined as those necessary for successful accomplishment of all safety and additional functions that must be performed in order for the licensee to meet applicable regulatory requirements. This project involves a multi-faceted approach to the investigation of the issue. Relevant NRC documentation was identified and reviewed. Using the information obtained from this documentation review, a test plan was developed to aid in the collection of further information regarding the adequacy of current shift staffing levels. The test plan addresses three different activities to be conducted to provide information to the NRC for use in the assessment of current minimum staffing levels. The first activity is collection of data related to industry shift staffing practices through site visits to seven nuclear power plants. The second activity is a simulator study, which will use licensed operator crews responding to a simulated event, under two different staffing levels. Finally, workload models will be constructed for both licensed and non-licensed personnel, using a priori knowledge of the simulator scenarios with data resulting from one of the staffing levels studied in the simulator, and the data collected from the site visits. The model will then be validated against the data obtained from the second staffing level studied in the simulator. The validated model can then be used to study the impact of changing staffing-related variables on the plant shift crew`s ability to effectively mitigate an event.

  12. Temperature and level measurements realized for Nuclear Safety Level Improvement of Slovak NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badiar, S.; Slanina, M.; Stanc, S.; Golan, P.; Krupa, J.

    2001-01-01

    Process of continual safety improvement in the individual Slovak nuclear power plants has been in progress since the beginning of nineties with the objective to upgrade the safety level of units in operation up to the European standards. In the framework of these activities, safety instrumentation systems with 1E qualification for the control of WWER reactor coolant systems were built and added. Methods for implementation of safety instrumentation systems for monitoring temperature and level in reactor coolant systems in the particular plants in Slovakia are presented showing the objectives and methods of their implementation. (Authors)

  13. Innovative designs for low-level nuclear waste disposal trenches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowatzki, E.A.; Armstrong, G.; McCray, J.

    1985-01-01

    Shallow land burial of low-level nuclear wastes presents many problems that are within the scope of civil engineering analysis and design. These include groundwater seepage, surface water runoff and collection, and the subsidence of trench backfills. Unfortunately, at the time the first disposal sites were being developed, major emphasis was placed on the health-physics aspects of the problem with the result that many of the civil engineering aspects were overlooked and severe problems relating to site integrity exist today. This paper presents the results of a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsored research project conducted at the University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, to assess trench cap design from the viewpoint of stability, water infiltration, and economy. Full-scale trenches were constructed that incorporated four different designs. These designs range from a relatively simple cap consisting of engineered backfill with a sloping, compacted soil crown to a more complex cap-crown system that incorporates compacted backfill and a steel reinforced soil-cement cap with an overlaying ''wick'' drain. The results of structural and hydrological monitoring over a period of approximately 15 months are presented. Recommendations are made regarding standard design criteria for future sites based on the results of this research

  14. Geology of high-level nuclear waste disposal: an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roxbugh, I.S.

    1987-01-01

    Hazardous waste is produced by the nuclear fuel cycle from mining and milling of uranium ore, refinement and enrichment, reactor use, and during reprocessing of spent fuel. Waste can be classified according to origin, physical state, and levels of radioactivity and radiotoxicity. The method of the long-term waste disposal is based on the degree of the hazard and the length of time (1000 years to millions of years) for the waste to become safe. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has classified radioactive waste into five categories (I-V) based on the amount of radioactivity and heat output of the waste. The text is concerned mainly with the two most hazardous categories (I and II). Disposal at various geological sites using proven mining, engineering, and deep drilling techniques has been proposed and studied. An ideal geological repository would have (1) minimum ground water movement, (2) geochemical and mineralogical properties to retard or immobilize the effects of the nuclear waste from reaching the biosphere, (3) thermochemical properties to allow for heat loading without damage, and (4) structural strength for the operational period. Types of geological environments (both undersea and on land) include evaporites, crystalline rocks, and argillaceous deposits. European and North American case histories are described, and there is a glossary and an extensive list of references in this concise review

  15. Analytical method for reconstruction pin to pin of the nuclear power density distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessoa, Paulo O.; Silva, Fernando C.; Martinez, Aquilino S., E-mail: ppessoa@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: fernando@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: aquilino@imp.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    An accurate and efficient method for reconstructing pin to pin of the nuclear power density distribution, involving the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for two-dimensional neutron energy groups in homogeneous nodes, is presented. The boundary conditions used for analytic as solution are the four currents or fluxes on the surface of the node, which are obtained by Nodal Expansion Method (known as NEM) and four fluxes at the vertices of a node calculated using the finite difference method. The analytical solution found is the homogeneous distribution of neutron flux. Detailed distributions pin to pin inside a fuel assembly are estimated by the product of homogeneous flux distribution by local heterogeneous form function. Furthermore, the form functions of flux and power are used. The results obtained with this method have a good accuracy when compared with reference values. (author)

  16. Analytical method for reconstruction pin to pin of the nuclear power density distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessoa, Paulo O.; Silva, Fernando C.; Martinez, Aquilino S.

    2013-01-01

    An accurate and efficient method for reconstructing pin to pin of the nuclear power density distribution, involving the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for two-dimensional neutron energy groups in homogeneous nodes, is presented. The boundary conditions used for analytic as solution are the four currents or fluxes on the surface of the node, which are obtained by Nodal Expansion Method (known as NEM) and four fluxes at the vertices of a node calculated using the finite difference method. The analytical solution found is the homogeneous distribution of neutron flux. Detailed distributions pin to pin inside a fuel assembly are estimated by the product of homogeneous flux distribution by local heterogeneous form function. Furthermore, the form functions of flux and power are used. The results obtained with this method have a good accuracy when compared with reference values. (author)

  17. Towards superdeformation in the quasicontinuum: microscopic view of the excited superdeformed bands and the corresponding level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, T.R.; Dudek, J.

    1991-01-01

    Microscopic calculations of both the normal and the superdeformed rotational bands have been performed for a number of Rare Earth nuclei. The 'universal' Woods-Saxon potential and the extended Strutinsky method have been used. Excited bands up to a prescribed energy limit E * (usually 2.5 to 3.5 MeV) have been calculated individually by minimizing the corresponding nuclear energies over the quadrupole and hexadecapole deformations. This turns out to be essential, when comparing with experimental results for the known discrete bands. An important influence of the superdeformed neutron (N = 86) shell closure on the microscopically calculated rotational-level densities is illustrated and discussed. (author) 11 refs., 4 figs

  18. A 90 minute soccer match decreases triglyceride and low density lipoprotein but not high-density lipoprotein and cholesterol levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader - Rahnama

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: The association between the lipid profiles level and the incidence and severity of coronary heart disease (CHD is very pronounced in epidemiological studies, and an inverse relation between physical fitness and the incidence of coronary heart disease has been observed in many studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a soccer match on lipid parameters of professional soccer players.
    • METHODS: Twenty two professional soccer players participated in the study. Blood (10ml for determination of lipid profiles was obtained at rest and immediately after a 90 minute soccer match. Lipid parameters were measured using Boehringer Mannheim kits and Clinilab and BioMerieux analyser.
    • RESULTS: The results of this study showed that the triglyceride was significantly higher before the match than afterwards (159.09 ± 58.2 vs. 88.63 ± 34.1 mg/dl, p < 0.001, whereas the low-density lipoprotein (LDL was lower before the match than after it (98.04 ± 28.9 vs. 112.31 ± 30.5 mg/dl. Moreover, there were no significant differences in cholesterol concentration (171.4 ± 30.28 mg/dl vs. 173.18 ± 32.75 mg/dl and high-density lipoprotein (HDL concentration (34.04 ± 5.58 mg/dl vs. 34.4 ± 4.6 mg/dl between before and after the match.
    • CONCLUSIONS: Although the soccer competitive match has no favourable acute effect on lipid

    • Geology of high-level nuclear waste disposal

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Roxburgh, I.S.

      1988-01-01

      The concept of geological disposal is set out by describing the major rock types in terms of their ability to isolate high-level nuclear waste. The advantages and problems posed by particular rock formations are explored and the design and construction of geological repositories is considered, along with the methods used to estimate their safety. It gives special consideration to the use of sea-covered rock and sediment as well as the on-land situation. Throughout the book the various principles and problems inherent in geological disposal are explained and illustrated by reference to a multitude of European and North American case studies, backed up by a large number of tables, figures and an extensive bibliography

    • Finite difference applied to the reconstruction method of the nuclear power density distribution

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Pessoa, Paulo O.; Silva, Fernando C.; Martinez, Aquilino S.

      2016-01-01

      Highlights: • A method for reconstruction of the power density distribution is presented. • The method uses discretization by finite differences of 2D neutrons diffusion equation. • The discretization is performed homogeneous meshes with dimensions of a fuel cell. • The discretization is combined with flux distributions on the four node surfaces. • The maximum errors in reconstruction occur in the peripheral water region. - Abstract: In this reconstruction method the two-dimensional (2D) neutron diffusion equation is discretized by finite differences, employed to two energy groups (2G) and meshes with fuel-pin cell dimensions. The Nodal Expansion Method (NEM) makes use of surface discontinuity factors of the node and provides for reconstruction method the effective multiplication factor of the problem and the four surface average fluxes in homogeneous nodes with size of a fuel assembly (FA). The reconstruction process combines the discretized 2D diffusion equation by finite differences with fluxes distribution on four surfaces of the nodes. These distributions are obtained for each surfaces from a fourth order one-dimensional (1D) polynomial expansion with five coefficients to be determined. The conditions necessary for coefficients determination are three average fluxes on consecutive surfaces of the three nodes and two fluxes in corners between these three surface fluxes. Corner fluxes of the node are determined using a third order 1D polynomial expansion with four coefficients. This reconstruction method uses heterogeneous nuclear parameters directly providing the heterogeneous neutron flux distribution and the detailed nuclear power density distribution within the FAs. The results obtained with this method has good accuracy and efficiency when compared with reference values.

  1. Continuum level density of a coupled-channel system in the complex scaling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ryusuke; Kato, Kiyoshi; Kruppa, Andras; Giraud, Bertrand G.

    2008-01-01

    We study the continuum level density (CLD) in the formalism of the complex scaling method (CSM) for coupled-channel systems. We apply the formalism to the 4 He=[ 3 H+p]+[ 3 He+n] coupled-channel cluster model where there are resonances at low energy. Numerical calculations of the CLD in the CSM with a finite number of L 2 basis functions are consistent with the exact result calculated from the S-matrix by solving coupled-channel equations. We also study channel densities. In this framework, the extended completeness relation (ECR) plays an important role. (author)

  2. Derived intervention levels in early stage of nuclear accident development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladar, M; Fojtik, M [Inst. of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, Bratislava (Slovakia); Stubna, M [Research Inst. of Nuclear Power Plants, Bohunuce (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the measures for protection of health and property of public in the case of nuclear accident are discussed. They are based on optimal application of so called intervention levels. The actual flow of decision depends on: (1) prognosis of mathematical modelling of possible course of nuclear accident, and (2) results of monitoring of radiation situation.The aim of this contribution was to analyze their mutual cooperation and to suggest such procedure of monitoring or radiation situation which could be used for suggestion of protective measures. In this contribution the zones of protection planning in the accident place surrounding for the urgent measures were specified : (1) regulation of free movement of persons; (2) sheltering; (3) iodine prophylaxis; (4) temporary evacuation; (5) long term or permanent emigration. At the specification of zones of planned protection it is also coming out that regulation of movement of persons, sheltering and iodine prophylaxis were ordered in advance based on the evaluation of the crashed establishment state. In such situation the decision on protective measures in the time interval 6 to 12 hours after the beginning of accidental release is forwarding to: withdrawing the accepted orders on measures and transition from sheltering to temporary evacuation. The criterion for temporary evacuation is: (1) probability of exceeding the effective dose 100 mSv for children up to 10 years of age and pregnant women and 500 mSv for other population within 48 hours after beginning of accidental release; (2) probability of averting the effective dose 50 mSv up to 7 days, 100 mSv up to 15 days and 150 mSv up to 30 days for all population groups. In next part the intervention level, interpretation of values of kerma dose rate in air and determination of the size of planned protection zones are discussed. (J.K.) 3 tabs.

  3. Development of radiation detection and measurement systems - Development of level gauge and density gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Su Man; Kim, Sung Hun; Jang, Jung Hun; Yun, Mung Hun; Yun Jun Hyung; Kang, Sung Youn [Techvalley co., Ltd., Research Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    -Pervasive effect of R and D results. Technical development of level/density measuring instruments has a definitely significant effect on the quality test of various products in the filled on the heavy industry. As measurement of flow increasingly becomes important in the plant design in the chemical industry, development of our products is applicable to various equipment in the field of industries. -Applications of R and D results. Technical development of level/density measurement copes with a technical difficulty in inspecting the internal conditions of chemical plants by transmission through metal materials in a non-destructive manner and thereby enables non-destructive flow and level tests in the field of industries. 11 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs. (Author)

  4. Corrosion issues in high-level nuclear waste containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asl, Samin Sharifi

    In this dissertation different aspects of corrosion and electrochemistry of copper, candidate canister material in Scandinavian high-level nuclear waste disposal program, including the thermodynamics and kinetics of the reactions that are predicted to occur in the practical system have been studied. A comprehensive thermodynamic study of copper in contact with granitic groundwater of the type and composition that is expected in the Forsmark repository in Sweden has been performed. Our primary objective was to ascertain whether copper would exist in the thermodynamically immune state in the repository, in which case corrosion could not occur and the issue of corrosion in the assessment of the storage technology would be moot. In spite of the fact that metallic copper has been found to exist for geological times in granitic geological formations, copper is well-known to be activated from the immune state to corrode by specific species that may exist in the environment. The principal activator of copper is known to be sulfur in its various forms, including sulfide (H2S, HS-, S2-), polysulfide (H2Sx, HSx -, Sx 2-), poly sulfur thiosulfate ( SxO3 2-), and polythionates (SxO6 2-). A comprehensive study of this aspect of copper chemistry has never been reported, and yet an understanding of this issue is vital for assessing whether copper is a suitable material for fabricating canisters for the disposal of HLNW. Our study identifies and explores those species that activate copper; these species include sulfur-containing entities as well as other, non-sulfur species that may be present in the repository. The effects of temperature, solution pH, and hydrogen pressure on the kinetics of the hydrogen electrode reaction (HER) on copper in borate buffer solution have been studied by means of steady-state polarization measurements, including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). In order to obtain electrokinetic parameters, such as the exchange current density and the

  5. A new baryonic equation of state at sub-nuclear densities for core-collapse simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki [Department of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Department of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan) and Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Yamazaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2012-11-12

    We construct a new equation of state for baryons at sub-nuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The formulation is based on the nuclear statistical equilibrium description and the liquid drop approximation of nuclei. The model free energy to minimize is calculated by using relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with atomic number up to {approx} 1000. We have also taken into account the pasta phase. We find that the free energy and other thermodynamical quantities are not very different from those given in the standard EOSs that adopt the single nucleus approximation. On the other hand, the average mass is systematically different, which may have an important effect to the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores. It is also interesting that the root mean square of the mass number is not very different from the average mass number, since the former is important for the evaluation of coherent scattering rates on nuclei but has been unavailable so far.

  6. A new baryonic equation of state at sub-nuclear densities for core-collapse simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    We construct a new equation of state for baryons at sub-nuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The formulation is based on the nuclear statistical equilibrium description and the liquid drop approximation of nuclei. The model free energy to minimize is calculated by using relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with atomic number up to ∼ 1000. We have also taken into account the pasta phase. We find that the free energy and other thermodynamical quantities are not very different from those given in the standard EOSs that adopt the single nucleus approximation. On the other hand, the average mass is systematically different, which may have an important effect to the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores. It is also interesting that the root mean square of the mass number is not very different from the average mass number, since the former is important for the evaluation of coherent scattering rates on nuclei but has been unavailable so far.

  7. A new baryonic equation of state at sub-nuclear densities for core-collapse simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi; Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2012-11-01

    We construct a new equation of state for baryons at sub-nuclear densities for the use in core-collapse simulations of massive stars. The formulation is based on the nuclear statistical equilibrium description and the liquid drop approximation of nuclei. The model free energy to minimize is calculated by using relativistic mean field theory for nucleons and the mass formula for nuclei with atomic number up to ~ 1000. We have also taken into account the pasta phase. We find that the free energy and other thermodynamical quantities are not very different from those given in the standard EOSs that adopt the single nucleus approximation. On the other hand, the average mass is systematically different, which may have an important effect to the rates of electron captures and coherent neutrino scatterings on nuclei in supernova cores. It is also interesting that the root mean square of the mass number is not very different from the average mass number, since the former is important for the evaluation of coherent scattering rates on nuclei but has been unavailable so far.

  8. A journey from nuclear criticality methods to high energy density radflow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-30

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a nuclear weapons laboratory supporting our nation's defense. In support of this mission is a high energy-density physics program in which we design and execute experiments to study radiationhydrodynamics phenomena and improve the predictive capability of our largescale multi-physics software codes on our big-iron computers. The Radflow project’s main experimental effort now is to understand why we haven't been able to predict opacities on Sandia National Laboratory's Z-machine. We are modeling an increasing fraction of the Z-machine's dynamic hohlraum to find multi-physics explanations for the experimental results. Further, we are building an entirely different opacity platform on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's National Ignition Facility (NIF), which is set to get results early 2017. Will the results match our predictions, match the Z-machine, or give us something entirely different? The new platform brings new challenges such as designing hohlraums and spectrometers. The speaker will recount his history, starting with one-dimensional Monte Carlo nuclear criticality methods in graduate school, radiative transfer methods research and software development for his first 16 years at LANL, and, now, radflow technology and experiments. Who knew that the real world was more than just radiation transport? Experiments aren't easy, but they sure are fun.

  9. A journey from nuclear criticality methods to high energy density radflow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-08

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is a nuclear weapons laboratory supporting our nation's defense. In support of this mission is a high energy-density physics program in which we design and execute experiments to study radiationhydrodynamics phenomena and improve the predictive capability of our largescale multi-physics software codes on our big-iron computers. The Radflow project’s main experimental effort now is to understand why we haven't been able to predict opacities on Sandia National Laboratory's Z-machine. We are modeling an increasing fraction of the Z-machine's dynamic hohlraum to find multi-physics explanations for the experimental results. Further, we are building an entirely different opacity platform on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's National Ignition Facility (NIF), which is set to get results early 2017. Will the results match our predictions, match the Z-machine, or give us something entirely different? The new platform brings new challenges such as designing hohlraums and spectrometers. The speaker will recount his history, starting with one-dimensional Monte Carlo nuclear criticality methods in graduate school, radiative transfer methods research and software development for his first 16 years at LANL, and, now, radflow technology and experiments. Who knew that the real world was more than just radiation transport? Experiments aren't easy and they are as saturated with politics as a presidential election, but they sure are fun.

  10. Relativistic mean field theory with density dependent coupling constants for nuclear matter and finite nuclei with large charge asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Typel, S; Wolter, H H [Sektion Physik, Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    Nuclear matter and ground state properties for (proton and neutron) semi-closed shell nuclei are described in relativistic mean field theory with coupling constants which depend on the vector density. The parametrization of the density dependence for {sigma}-, {omega}- and {rho}-mesons is obtained by fitting to properties of nuclear matter and some finite nuclei. The equation of state for symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter is discussed. Finite nuclei are described in Hartree approximation, including a charge and an improved center-of-mass correction. Pairing is considered in the BCS approximation. Special attention is directed to the predictions for properties at the neutron and proton driplines, e.g. for separation energies, spin-orbit splittings and density distributions. (orig.)

  11. High U-density nuclear fuel development with application of centrifugal atomization technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Kim, Ki Hwan; Lee, Don Bae

    1997-01-01

    In order to simplify the preparation process and improve the properties of uranium silicide fuels prepared by mechanical comminution, a fuel fabrication process applying rotating-disk centrifugal atomization technology was invented in KAERI in 1989. The major characteristic of atomized U 3 Si and U 3 Si 2 powders have been examined. The out-pile properties, including the thermal compatibility between atomized particle and aluminum matrix in uranium silicide dispersion fuels, have generally showed a superiority to the comminuted fuels. Moreover, the RERTR (reduced enrichment for research and test reactors) program, which recently begins to develop very-high-density uranium alloy fuels, including U-Mo fuels, requires the centrifugal atomization process to overcome the contaminations of impurities and the difficulties of the comminution process. In addition, a cooperation with ANL in the U.S. has been performed to develop high-density fuels with an application of atomization technology since December 1996. If the microplate and miniplate irradiation tests of atomized fuels, which have been performed with ANL, demonstrated the stability and improvement of in-reactor behaviors, nuclear fuel fabrication technology by centrifugal atomization could be most-promising to the production method of very-high-uranium-loading fuels. (author). 22 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs

  12. Effect of deformation and orientation on spin orbit density dependent nuclear potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rajni; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-11-01

    Role of deformation and orientation is investigated on spin-orbit density dependent part VJ of nuclear potential (VN=VP+VJ) obtained within semi-classical Thomas Fermi approach of Skyrme energy density formalism. Calculations are performed for 24-54Si+30Si reactions, with spherical target 30Si and projectiles 24-54Si having prolate and oblate shapes. The quadrupole deformation β2 is varying within range of 0.023 ≤ β2 ≤0.531 for prolate and -0.242 ≤ β2 ≤ -0.592 for oblate projectiles. The spin-orbit dependent potential gets influenced significantly with inclusion of deformation and orientation effect. The spin-orbit barrier and position gets significantly influenced by both the sign and magnitude of β2-deformation. Si-nuclei with β220. The possible role of spin-orbit potential on barrier characteristics such as barrier height, barrier curvature and on the fusion pocket is also probed. In reference to prolate and oblate systems, the angular dependence of spin-orbit potential is further studied on fusion cross-sections.

  13. Dose estimation for nuclear power plant 4 accident in Taiwan at Fukushima nuclear meltdown emission level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mei-Ling; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Kuo, Pei-Hsuan

    2016-05-01

    An advanced Gaussian trajectory dispersion model is used to evaluate the evacuation zone due to a nuclear meltdown at the Nuclear Power Plant 4 (NPP4) in Taiwan, with the same emission level as that occurred at Fukushima nuclear meltdown (FNM) in 2011. Our study demonstrates that a FNM emission level would pollute 9% of the island's land area with annual effective dose ≥50 mSv using the meteorological data on 11 March 2011 in Taiwan. This high dose area is also called permanent evacuation zone (denoted as PEZ). The PEZ as well as the emergency-planning zone (EPZ) are found to be sensitive to meteorological conditions on the event. In a sunny day under the dominated NE wind conditions, the EPZ can be as far as 100 km with the first 7-day dose ≥20 mSv. Three hundred sixty-five daily events using the meteorological data from 11 March 2011 to 9 March 2012 are evaluated. It is found that the mean land area of Taiwan in becoming the PEZ is 11%. Especially, the probabilities of the northern counties/cities (Keelung, New Taipei, Taipei, Taoyuan, Hsinchu City, Hsinchu County and Ilan County) to be PEZs are high, ranging from 15% in Ilan County to 51% in Keelung City. Note that the total population of the above cities/counties is as high as 10 million people. Moreover, the western valleys of the Central Mountain Range are also found to be probable being PEZs, where all of the reservoirs in western Taiwan are located. For example, the probability can be as high as 3% in the far southern-most tip of Taiwan Island in Pingtung County. This shows that the entire populations in western Taiwan can be at risk due to the shortage of clean water sources under an event at FNM emission level, especially during the NE monsoon period. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Concrete conditioners for low-intermediate level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehl, J.L.; Lorentz, R.G.; Franzen, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    The conditioning of low-intermediate level radioactive waste disposal, in Brazil, with concrete packages designed in such way that, in spite of being destined to receive compacted materials in long term sub-surface disposal, they may also be able to attend other storage or disposal necessities, is analysed. A design of a reinforced concrete package with a net volume of 360 l and, with compatible diameter to contain compacted 200 l drums, was developed. A study on compactation of 200 l steel packages is done. A pressure of 30.000 KN for compacting these 200 l drums was adapted, and two series of tests to verify the pressure volume reduction ratio and, the final dimensions and density of the compacted elements, was executed. (Author) [pt

  15. Four-Component Relativistic Density-Functional Theory Calculations of Nuclear Spin-Rotation Constants: Relativistic Effects in p-Block Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Malkin, Elena; Demissie, Taye B; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-08-11

    We present an implementation of the nuclear spin-rotation (SR) constants based on the relativistic four-component Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian. This formalism has been implemented in the framework of the Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham theory, allowing assessment of both pure and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. In the density-functional theory (DFT) implementation of the response equations, a noncollinear generalized gradient approximation (GGA) has been used. The present approach enforces a restricted kinetic balance condition for the small-component basis at the integral level, leading to very efficient calculations of the property. We apply the methodology to study relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants by performing calculations on XHn (n = 1-4) for all elements X in the p-block of the periodic table and comparing the effects of relativity on the nuclear SR tensors to that observed for the nuclear magnetic shielding tensors. Correlation effects as described by the density-functional theory are shown to be significant for the spin-rotation constants, whereas the differences between the use of GGA and hybrid density functionals are much smaller. Our calculated relativistic spin-rotation constants at the DFT level of theory are only in fair agreement with available experimental data. It is shown that the scaling of the relativistic effects for the spin-rotation constants (varying between Z(3.8) and Z(4.5)) is as strong as for the chemical shieldings but with a much smaller prefactor.

  16. Harmonization of nuclear and radiation safety regulations for nuclear power plants with reference levels of Western European Nuclear Regulators Association (WENRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojchuk, V.S.; Mikolajchuk, O.A.; Gromov, G.V.; Dibach, O.M.; Godovanyuk, G.M.; Nosovs'kij, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Self-evaluation of the Ukrainian regulations on nuclear and radiation safety that apply to nuclear power plants for compliance with the reference levels of the Western European Nuclear Regulators Association (WENRA) is presented. Proposals on improvement of the regulations upon self-evaluation are provided

  17. INTERACTIVE EFFECT OF CAGE DENSITY AND DIETARY BLACK CUMIN LEVEL ON PRODUCTIVE EFFICIENCY IN BROILER CHICKENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Mahfudz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present research was aimed to evaluate an interactive effect of cage density and level ofdietary black cumin (BC on productive efficiency of broiler chickens. A total of 270 broiler chickens(initial body weight of 163.12 ± 8.10g were allocated into a completely randomized design with a 3 x 3factorial pattern. The first factor was the cage density (bird/m2 namely, D1 = 8; D2 = 10, and D3 = 12.The second factor was BC level (%, namely, B1 = 1; B2 = 2, and B3 = 3. Feed consumption, bodyweight gain (BWG, feed conversion ratio (FCR, protein digestibility, and income over feed cost(IOFC were the parameters measured. Data were subjected to ANOVA and continued to Duncan test.No interaction between cage density and black cumin on all parameters was observed. Feedconsumption and FCR were increased, but BWG was lowered significantly (P<0.05 due to the cagedensities of 10 and 12 birds/m2 on weeks 2 and 3. Protein digestibility was significantly increased byfeeding 2 and 3% BC. IOFC decreased significantly (P<0.05 when cage densities were 10 and 12birds/m2. In conclusion, the improvement of productive efficiency of broiler chicken reared at the cagedensity of 12 birds /m2 can be sufficiently achieved by feeding 1% black cumin.

  18. Serum oxidized low density lipoprotein levels in preeclamptic and normotensive pregnants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozan, A; Yildirmak, S Turkmen; Mihmanli, V; Ayabakan, H; Cicek, Y G; Kalaslioglu, V; Doean, S; Cebeci, H Cerci

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUNDS/AIM: The aim of the study was to determine serum lipids and oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) levels in preeclamptic pregnants and compare with those of normotensives. Ox-LDL levels were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); total cholesterol, hight density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and triglyceride levels were measured by enzymatic colorimetric assay in 26 normotensive and 27 preeclamptic pregnants. LDL and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol was calculated by Friedwald formula. Serum levels of Ox-LDL (U/L), total-cholesterol (mg/dL), HDL-cholesterol (mg/dL), LDL-cholesterol (mg/dL), triglyceride (mg/dL), and VLDL-cholesterol (mg/dL) in normotensive and preeclamptic pregnants were found as 130±60 and 133±69; 248±49 and 248±81; 67±14 and 61±16; 147±61 and 135±59; 207±76 and 256±87; 41±15 and 50±17, respectively. Mean values of Ox-LDL and other lipid parameters were higher than the upper limits of their reference ranges in both of groups. However no significant differences were found in Ox-LDL, total, HDL and LDL-cholesterol levels between two groups. However, the levels of triglyceride and VLDL-cholesterol were significantly higher in preeclampsia group. The present results suggest that the levels of serum Ox-LDL and other lipid parameters rise as a result of pregnancy rather than as a result of preeclampsia.

  19. Dose estimation for nuclear power plant 4 accident in Taiwan at Fukushima nuclear meltdown emission level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Mei-Ling; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Kuo, Pei-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    An advanced Gaussian trajectory dispersion model is used to evaluate the evacuation zone due to a nuclear meltdown at the Nuclear Power Plant 4 (NPP4) in Taiwan, with the same emission level as that occurred at Fukushima nuclear meltdown (FNM) in 2011. Our study demonstrates that a FNM emission level would pollute 9% of the island's land area with annual effective dose ≥50 mSv using the meteorological data on 11 March 2011 in Taiwan. This high dose area is also called permanent evacuation zone (denoted as PEZ). The PEZ as well as the emergency-planning zone (EPZ) are found to be sensitive to meteorological conditions on the event. In a sunny day under the dominated NE wind conditions, the EPZ can be as far as 100 km with the first 7-day dose ≥20 mSv. Three hundred sixty-five daily events using the meteorological data from 11 March 2011 to 9 March 2012 are evaluated. It is found that the mean land area of Taiwan in becoming the PEZ is 11%. Especially, the probabilities of the northern counties/cities (Keelung, New Taipei, Taipei, Taoyuan, Hsinchu City, Hsinchu County and Ilan County) to be PEZs are high, ranging from 15% in Ilan County to 51% in Keelung City. Note that the total population of the above cities/counties is as high as 10 million people. Moreover, the western valleys of the Central Mountain Range are also found to be probable being PEZs, where all of the reservoirs in western Taiwan are located. For example, the probability can be as high as 3% in the far southern-most tip of Taiwan Island in Pingtung County. This shows that the entire populations in western Taiwan can be at risk due to the shortage of clean water sources under an event at FNM emission level, especially during the NE monsoon period. - Highlights: • An advanced Gaussian-type trajectory model to evaluate the evacuation zone at Nuclear Power Plant 4 in Taiwan. • Mean land area of Taiwan in becoming the permanent evacuation zone is 11%. • The probabilities of the northern

  20. Level density approach to perturbation theory and inverse-energy-weighted sum-rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halemane, T.R.

    1983-01-01

    The terms in the familiar Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation series involve eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the unperturbed operator. A level density formalism, that does not involve computation of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions, is given here for the perturbation series. In the CLT (central limit theorem) limit the expressions take very simple linear forms. The evaluation is in terms of moments and traces of operators and operator products. 3 references

  1. Radiometric determinations of linear mass, resin levels and density of composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutaine, J.L.; Pintena, J.; Tanguy, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of the principle, characteristics and performances of a gamma back-scattering gauge developed in cooperation between the CEA and SNPE. This instrument allows for on-line inspection of the linear mass and resin level of strips of composite materials whilst being produced. The industrial application involved boron, carbon and 'Kevlar' fibres. The performance of beta and gamma transmission gauges are also given for inspecting the density of panels and dense composite materials [fr

  2. Scaling properties of S-wave level density for heavy quarkonium from QCD sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    In the framework of a specific scheme of the QCD sum rules for S-wave of the heavy quarkonium one derives an expression, relating the energetic density of quarkonium states and universal characteristics in the heavy quarkonium physics, such as the difference between the masses of a heavy quark Q and meson and the number of heavy quarkonium levels below the threshold decay. 20 refs

  3. Symposium on the development of nuclear waste policy: Siting the high-level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijawka, K.D.; Mushkatel, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) attempted to formulate a viable national policy for managing the disposal of high-level nuclear wastes. The NWPA authorized the selection of two repository sites: the first to be constructed in the West and a second site developed in the eastern United States. A detailed process for site selection was outlined in the NWPA. In addition, the NWPA authorized open-quotes the development of a waste transportation system; required the Department of Energy (DOE) to submit a proposal to construct a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) after conducting a study of the need for, and feasibility of such a facility; and required the President to evaluate the use of the repositories ... for the disposal of high-level waste resulting from defense activitiesclose quotes (DOE, 1988, p. 1). A series of provisions granting oversight participation to states and Indian tribes, as well as a compensation package for the ultimate host state were also included. Responsibility for implementing the NWPA was assigned to DOE

  4. The precautionary principle and high-level nuclear waste policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frishman, S.

    1999-01-01

    The 'Precautionary Principle' has grown from the broadening observation that there is compelling evidence that damage to humans and the world-wide environment is of such a magnitude and seriousness that new principles for conducting human activities are necessary. One of the various statements of the Precautionary Principle is: when an activity raises threats of harm to human health or the environment, precautionary measures should be taken even if some cause and effect relationships are not fully established scientifically. The use of a precautionary principle was a significant recommendation emerging from the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and it is gaining acceptance in discussions ranging from global warming to activities that affect the marine environment, and far beyond. In the US high-level nuclear waste policy, there is a growing trend on the part of geologic repository proponents and regulators to shift the required safety evaluation from a deterministic analysis of natural and engineered barriers and their interactions to risk assessments and total system waste containment and isolation performance assessment. This is largely a result of the realisation that scientific 'proof' of safety cannot be demonstrated to the level repository proponents have led the American public to expect. Therefore, they are now developing other methods in an attempt to effectively lower the repository safety expectations of the public. Implicit in this shift in demonstration of 'proof' is that levels of uncertainty far larger than those generally taken as scientifically acceptable must be accepted in repository safety, simply because greater certainty is either too costly, in time and money, or impossible to achieve at the potential Yucca Mountain repository site. In the context of the Precautionary Principle, the repository proponent must bear the burden of providing 'Acceptable' proof, established by an open

  5. Non-Born-Oppenheimer electronic and nuclear densities for a Hooke-Calogero three-particle model: non-uniqueness of density-derived molecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludeña, E V; Echevarría, L; Lopez, X; Ugalde, J M

    2012-02-28

    We consider the calculation of non-Born-Oppenheimer, nBO, one-particle densities for both electrons and nuclei. We show that the nBO one-particle densities evaluated in terms of translationally invariant coordinates are independent of the wavefunction describing the motion of center of mass of the whole system. We show that they depend, however, on an arbitrary reference point from which the positions of the vectors labeling the particles are determined. We examine the effect that this arbitrary choice has on the topology of the one-particle density by selecting the Hooke-Calogero model of a three-body system for which expressions for the one-particle densities can be readily obtained in analytic form. We extend this analysis to the one-particle densities obtained from full Coulomb interaction wavefunctions for three-body systems. We conclude, in view of the fact that there is a close link between the choice of the reference point and the topology of one-particle densities that the molecular structure inferred from the topology of these densities is not unique. We analyze the behavior of one-particle densities for the Hooke-Calogero Born-Oppenheimer, BO, wavefunction and show that topological transitions are also present in this case for a particular mass value of the light particles even though in the BO regime the nuclear masses are infinite. In this vein, we argue that the change in topology caused by variation of the mass ratio between light and heavy particles does not constitute a true indication in the nBO regime of the emergence of molecular structure.

  6. Spin-dependent level density in interacting Boson-Fermion-Fermion model of the Odd-Odd Nucleus 196Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabashi, S.; Bekteshi, S.; Ahmetaj, S.; Shaqiri, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The level density of the odd-odd nucleus 196 Au is investigated in the interacting boson-fermion-fermion model (IBFFM) which accounts for collectivity and complex interaction between quasiparticle and collective modes.The IBFFM spin-dependent level densities show high-spin reduction with respect to Bethe formula.This can be well accounted for by a modified spin-dependent level density formula. (authors)

  7. First pregnancy characteristics, postmenopausal breast density, and salivary sex hormone levels in a population at high risk for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Mockus

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions and general significance: While reproductive characteristics, in particular parity, generally demonstrated independent associations with postmenopausal breast density and E, P and DHEA levels, T levels showed concordant inverse associations with age-at-first birth and breast density. These findings suggest that reproductive effects and later life salivary sex steroid hormone levels may have independent effects on later life breast density and cancer risk.

  8. Hydraulic properties of buffer and backfill materials for high-level nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komine, Hideo; Ogata, Nobuhide

    2001-01-01

    The design and development of buffer and backfill materials, which fill up the disposal facility, are important for developing the technology of high-level nuclear wastes disposal. The compacted bentonite and sand-bentonite mixture are attracting greater attention as buffer and backfill materials because they have impermeable and swelling properties. This study investigated the hydraulic-conductivities at the different sand-bentonite mass ratio and dry density, which are the specifications of material, by the experimental works. This study also obtained the experimental data of hydraulic conductivities of the materials for 120 days at the farthest, and the permeability changes before and after swelling. Furthermore, this study proposed the evaluation method for hydraulic conductivity using the parameter 'Swelling volumetric strain of montmorillonite', which was proposed by the author. The evaluation method can obtain the hydraulic conductivity of buffer and backfill materials at various dry densities and bentonite contents. Therefore, the evaluation method can be used for designing the bentonite content and compaction density from the viewpoint of 'impermeability'. (author)

  9. Nuclear density distributions of 40,42,44,48Ca from elastic scattering of 104 MeV alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gils, H.J.; Friedman, E.; Majka, Z.

    1979-12-01

    The elastic scattering of 104 MeV α particles from 40 , 42 , 44 , 48 Ca has been analyzed by a single folding model with a density dependent effective interaction. Nuclear density distributions have been extracted using various descriptions including Fourier-Bessel series which distinctly reduces the model dependence of the results and enables realistic estimates of errors. Differences of the density shapes of the Ca-isotopes are well determined showing evidence for a neutron skin in 48 Ca. The resulting root mean square radii are compared to the results obtained from other methods. The sensitivity and limitations of various methods are discussed. (orig.) 891 KBE/orig. 892 BRE

  10. Spectral density of Cooper pairs in two level quantum dot–superconductors Josephson junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhyani, A., E-mail: archana.d2003@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun 248007, Uttarakhand (India); Rawat, P.S. [Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun 248007, Uttarakhand (India); Tewari, B.S., E-mail: bstewari@ddn.upes.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun 248007, Uttarakhand (India)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • The present work deals with the study of the electronic spectral density of electron pairs and its effect in charge transport in superconductor-quantum dot-superconductor junctions. • The charge transfer across such junctions can be controlled by changing the positions of the dot level. • The Josephson supercurrent can also be tuned by controlling the position of quantum dot energy levels. - Abstract: In the present paper, we report the role of quantum dot energy levels on the electronic spectral density for a two level quantum dot coupled to s-wave superconducting leads. The theoretical arguments in this work are based on the Anderson model so that it necessarily includes dot energies, single particle tunneling and superconducting order parameter for BCS superconductors. The expression for single particle spectral function is obtained by using the Green's function equation of motion technique. On the basis of numerical computation of spectral function of superconducting leads, it has been found that the charge transfer across such junctions can be controlled by the positions and availability of the dot levels.

  11. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 5. Control of population densities surrounding nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V.; Schroeder, C.H.; Yen, W.W.S.

    1977-01-01

    In view of the requirement that the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission must specify land-use/population-density control measures to be used in the vicinity of nuclear power plants being granted land use, the possible forms of such measures are examined. Since these measures must maintain population densities below Nuclear Regulatory Commission criteria, if appropriate, NRC criteria for land use and population densities are given particular attention. In addition, a preliminary comparison of the cost of possible control measures with the reduced potential for damage to the public health and safety is made, yielding the result that control measures within approximately one mile of the plant site may be justified, in certain cases, on a strictly cost-benefit basis. However, it is not clear whether controls over such a limited region would satisfy the legal mandate

  12. Synroc - a multiphase ceramic for high level nuclear waste immobilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.; Vance, E.R.; Hart, K.P.; Smith, K.L.; Lumpkin, G.R.; Mercer, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    Many natural minerals - particularly titanates - are very durable geochemically, having survived for millions of years with very little alteration. Moreover, some of these minerals have quantitatively retained radioactive elements and their daughter products over this time. The Synroc concept mimics nature by providing an all-titanate synthetic mineral phase assemblage to immobilise high level waste (HLW) from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations for safe geological disposal. In principle, many chemically hazardous inorganic wastes arising from industry could also be immobilised in highly durable ceramics and disposed of geologically, but in practice the cost structure of most industries is such that lower cost waste management solutions - for example, the development of reusable by-products or the use of cements rather than ceramics - have to be devised. In many thousands of aqueous leach tests at ANSTO, mostly at 70-90 deg C, Synroc has been shown to be exceptionally durable. The emphases of the recent ANSTO program have been on tailoring of the Synroc composition to varying HLW compositions, leach testing of Synroc containing radioactive transuranic actinides, study of leaching mechanisms by SEM and TEM, and the development and costing of a conceptual fully active Synroc fabrication plant design. A summary of recent results on these topics will be presented. 29 refs., 4 figs

  13. Simultaneous estimation of neutron density and reactivity in a nuclear reactor using a bank of Kalman filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina, E.; D'Atellis, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the problem of simultaneously estimating neutron density and reactivity while operating a nuclear reactor. It is solved by using a bank of Kalman filters as an estimator and applying a probabilistic test to determine which filter of the bank has the best performance

  14. The neutron/proton ratio of squeezed-out nucleons and the high density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Gaochan; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen

    2007-01-01

    Within a transport model it is shown that the neutron/proton ratio of squeezed-out nucleons perpendicular to the reaction plane, especially at high transverse momenta, in heavy-ion reactions induced by high energy neutron-rich nuclei can be a useful tool for studying the high density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy

  15. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca 2+ on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery

  16. Intracellular calcium levels can regulate Importin-dependent nuclear import

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Ly-Huynh, Jennifer D.; Jans, David A., E-mail: David.Jans@monash.edu

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • High intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import. • The effect of Ca{sup 2+} on nuclear import does not relate to changes in the nuclear pore. • High intracellular calcium can result in mislocalisation of Impβ1, Ran and RCC1. - Abstract: We previously showed that increased intracellular calcium can modulate Importin (Imp)β1-dependent nuclear import of SRY-related chromatin remodeling proteins. Here we extend this work to show for the first time that high intracellular calcium inhibits Impα/β1- or Impβ1-dependent nuclear protein import generally. The basis of this relates to the mislocalisation of the transport factors Impβ1 and Ran, which show significantly higher nuclear localization in contrast to various other factors, and RCC1, which shows altered subnuclear localisation. The results here establish for the first time that intracellular calcium modulates conventional nuclear import through direct effects on the nuclear transport machinery.

  17. Triton-3He relative and differential flows as probes of the nuclear symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Gaochan; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Zhang Xunchao

    2009-01-01

    Using a transport model coupled with a phase-space coalescence afterburner, we study the triton- 3 He (t- 3 He) ratio with both relative and differential transverse flows in semicentral 132 Sn+ 124 Sn reactions at a beam energy of 400 MeV/nucleon. The neutron-proton ratios with relative and differential flows are also discussed as a reference. We find that similar to the neutron-proton pairs, the t- 3 He pairs also carry interesting information regarding the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Moreover, the nuclear symmetry energy affects more strongly the t- 3 He relative and differential flows than the π - /π + ratio in the same reaction. The t- 3 He relative flow can be used as a particularly powerful probe of the high-density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy.

  18. Natural geochemical analogues of the near field of high-level nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apps, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    United States practice has been to design high-level nuclear waste (HLW) geological repositories with waste densities sufficiently high that repository temperatures surrounding the waste will exceed 100 degrees C and could reach 250 degrees C. Basalt and devitrified vitroclastic tuff are among the host rocks considered for waste emplacement. Near-field repository thermal behavior and chemical alteration in such rocks is expected to be similar to that observed in many geothermal systems. Therefore, the predictive modeling required for performance assessment studies of the near field could be validated and calibrated using geothermal systems as natural analogues. Examples are given which demonstrate the need for refinement of the thermodynamic databases used in geochemical modeling of near-field natural analogues and the extent to which present models can predict conditions in geothermal fields

  19. The LOCV asymmetric nuclear matter two-body density distributions versus those of FHNC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafrihi, Azar

    2018-05-01

    The theoretical computations of the electron-nucleus scattering can be improved, by employing the asymmetric nuclear matter (ASM) two-body density distributions (TBDD) . But, due to the sophistications of the calculations, the TBDD with arbitrary isospin asymmetry have not yet been computed in the Fermi Hypernetted Chain (FHNC) or the Monte Carlo (MC) approaches. So, in the present work, we intend to find the ASM TBDD, in the states with isospin T, spin S and spin projection Sz, in the Lowest Order Constrained Variational (LOCV) method. It is demonstrated that, at small relative distances, independent of the proton to neutron ratio β, the state-dependent TBDD have a universal shape. Expectedly, it is observed that, at low (high) β values, the nucleons prefer to make a pair in the T = 1(0) states. In addition, the strength of the tensor-dependent correlations is investigated, using the ratio of the TBDD in the TSSz = 010 state with θ = π / 2 and that of θ = 0. The mentioned ratios peak at r ∼ 0 . 9 fm, considering different β values. It is hoped that, the present results could help a better reproduction of the experimental data of the electron-nucleus scattering.

  20. AHSG gene polymorphisms are associated with bone mineral density in Caucasian nuclear families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yanjun; Wang Yanbo; Lei Shufeng; Long Jirong; Shen Hui; Zhao Lanjuan; Jiang Deke; Xiao Sumei; Chen Xiangding; Chen Yuan; Deng Hongwen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the role of alpha2-HS glycoprotein (AHSG) gene on bone mineral density (BMD) variation. Methods. A total of 665 subjects from 157 Caucasian nuclear families were genotyped at the AHSG NlaIII, SacI sites. The association and linkage between the single SNP markers and haplotypes constructed by two markers in this gene and BMDs at the spine and hip were determined by using quantitative transmission disequilibrium test (QTDT). Results. Significant within-family associations were obtained for spine BMD at both of studied markers (P = 0.036 and 0.005 at the NlaIII and SacI sites, respectively). Significant (P = 0.008 at the NlaIII locus) (P = 0.004 at the SacI locus) total associations at spine BMD were detected. Haplotype analyses confirmed those within-family and total association. Conclusions. These data suggest the polymorphisms in the AHSG gene may have effects on BMD variation in Caucasian population

  1. Xanthophylls increased HDLC level and nuclear factor PPARγ, RXRγ and RARα expression in hens and chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y-Y; Jin, L; Peng, H; Xu, L-H; Wang, Q-X; Ji, J; Wang, C-K; Bi, Y-Z

    2018-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate effects of xanthophylls on serum lipid profile (triglyceride, TG; cholesterol, CHO; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDLC; and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, LDLC) and nuclear factor (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, PPARγ; PPAR gamma coactivator 1 alpha, PGC1α; retinoid X receptor gamma, RXRγ; and retinoic acid receptor alpha, RARα) gene expression of breeding hens and chicks. In experiment 1, 432 hens were divided into three groups and fed diets supplemented with 0 (as control group), 20 or 40 mg/kg xanthophylls. Blood was sampled at 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days of trial. Liver, duodenum, jejunum and ileum were sampled at 35 days of trial. Results showed that serum HDLC level of hens was increased after dietary 40 mg/kg xanthophyll addition for 21, 28 and 35 days, while serum TG, CHO and LDLC were not affected. Xanthophyll addition also increased PPARγ expression in jejunum, RXRγ expression in duodenum and jejunum, and RARα expression in liver and duodenum. Experiment 2 was a 2 × 2 factorial design. Male chicks hatched from 0 or 40 mg/kg xanthophyll diet of hens were fed diet containing either 0 or 40 mg/kg xanthophylls. Liver, duodenum, jejunum and ileum were sampled at 0, 7, 14 and 21 days after hatching. Blood samples were also collected at 21 days. Results showed that in ovo xanthophylls elevated PPARγ in duodenum and jejunum, and RXRγ and RARα in liver of chicks mainly within 1 week after hatching, while dietary xanthophylls increased serum HDLC level and PPARγ and RXRγ in liver from 2 weeks onwards. In conclusion, our research suggested xanthophylls can regulate serum lipid profile and nuclear factor expression in hens and chicks. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Computer-based control of nuclear power information systems at international level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boniface, Ekechukwu; Okonkwo, Obi

    2011-01-01

    In most highly industrialized countries of the world information plays major role in anti-nuclear campaign. Information and discussions on nuclear power need critical and objective analysis before the structured information presentation to the public to avoid bias anti-nuclear information on one side and neglect of great risk in nuclear power. This research is developing a computer-based information system for the control of nuclear power at international level. The system is to provide easy and fast information highways for the followings: (1) Low Regulatory dose and activity limit as level of high danger for individuals and public. (2) Provision of relevant technical or scientific education among the information carriers in the nuclear power countries. The research is on fact oriented investigation about radioactivity. It also deals with fact oriented education about nuclear accidents and safety. A standard procedure for dissemination of latest findings using technical and scientific experts in nuclear technology is developed. The information highway clearly analyzes the factual information about radiation risk and nuclear energy. Radiation cannot be removed from our environment. The necessity of radiation utilizations defines nuclear energy as two-edge sword. It is therefore, possible to use computer-based information system in projecting and dissemination of expert knowledge about nuclear technology positively and also to use it in directing the public on the safety and control of the nuclear energy. The computer-based information highway for nuclear energy technology is to assist in scientific research and technological development at international level. (author)

  3. [Composition and Density of Soil Fauna in the Region with Enhanced Radioactivity Level (Komi Republic, Vodnyi)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, A A; Kudrin, A A; Konakova, T N; Taskaeva, A A

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the influence of high levels of radiation on soil fauna were carried out in 2012 in the territory formed as a result of the activity of the enterprise for extraction and production of radium from reservoir water and waste of uranium ore from 1931 to 1956. At present the local radioactive pollution in this area is caused by the presence of heavy natural radionuclides 226Ra, 238U and products of their disintegration in soils. The oppression of soil invertebrate.fauna in pine forests and meadows with high levels of radionuclides and heavy metals is revealed. Also shown is the decrease in the number and density of different taxonomic groups of invertebrates, reduction of the diversity and spectrum of trophic groups and vital forms in the area with a high content of radionuclides in soil. Our results are in agreement with the results obtained by the similar studies showing negative influence of high-level ionizing radiation on soil fauna.

  4. Low density lipoprotein levels linkage with the periodontal status patients of coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nafisah Ibrahim; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Lessang, Robert; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Studies found an association between periodontitis and coronary heart disease (CHD), but relationship between periodontal status CHD patients with LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein) levels, as risk factors for atherosclerosis, has not been studied. Objective: To analyze relationship between LDL and periodontal status CHD. Methods: Periodontal status of 60 CHD, 40 controls were examined (PBI, PPD, CAL) and their blood was taken to assess levels of LDL. Result: Found significant differences LDL (p=0.005), correlation between LDL with PPD (p=0.003) and CAL CHD (p=0.013), and PPD (p=0.001), CAL (p=0.008) non-CHD, but no significant correlation between LDL with PBI CAD (p=0.689) and PBI non-CHD (p=0.320). Conclusion: There is a correlation between the LDL levels with periodontal status.

  5. Evaluation of the thermodynamics of a four level system using canonical density matrix method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awoga Oladunjoye A.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider a four-level system with two subsystems coupled by weak interaction. The system is in thermal equilibrium. The thermodynamics of the system, namely internal energy, free energy, entropy and heat capacity, are evaluated using the canonical density matrix by two methods. First by Kronecker product method and later by treating the subsystems separately and then adding the evaluated thermodynamic properties of each subsystem. It is discovered that both methods yield the same result, the results obey the laws of thermodynamics and are the same as earlier obtained results. The results also show that each level of the subsystems introduces a new degree of freedom and increases the entropy of the entire system. We also found that the four-level system predicts a linear relationship between heat capacity and temperature at very low temperatures just as in metals. Our numerical results show the same trend.

  6. Excited-state quantum phase transitions in systems with two degrees of freedom: Level density, level dynamics, thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stránský, Pavel; Macek, Michal; Cejnar, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Quantum systems with a finite number of freedom degrees f develop robust singularities in the energy spectrum of excited states as the system’s size increases to infinity. We analyze the general form of these singularities for low f, particularly f=2, clarifying the relation to classical stationary points of the corresponding potential. Signatures in the smoothed energy dependence of the quantum state density and in the flow of energy levels with an arbitrary control parameter are described along with the relevant thermodynamical consequences. The general analysis is illustrated with specific examples of excited-state singularities accompanying the first-order quantum phase transition. -- Highlights: •ESQPTs found in infinite-size limit of systems with low numbers of freedom degrees f. •ESQPTs related to non-analytical evolutions of classical phase–space properties. •ESQPT signatures analyzed for general f, particularly f=2, extending known case f=1. •ESQPT signatures identified in smoothened density and flow of energy spectrum. •ESQPTs shown to induce a new type of thermodynamic anomalies

  7. Noise-level determination for discrete spectra with Gaussian or Lorentzian probability density functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Netzer

    2010-01-01

    A method, based on binomial filtering, to estimate the noise level of an arbitrary, smoothed pure signal, contaminated with an additive, uncorrelated noise component is presented. If the noise characteristics of the experimental spectrum are known, as for instance the type of the corresponding probability density function (e.g., Gaussian), the noise properties can be extracted. In such cases, both the noise level, as may arbitrarily be defined, and a simulated white noise component can be generated, such that the simulated noise component is statistically indistinguishable from the true noise component present in the original signal. In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the noise level extraction when the additive noise is Gaussian or Lorentzian. We show that the statistical parameters in these cases (mainly the variance and the half width at half maximum, respectively) can directly be obtained from the experimental spectrum even when the pure signal is erratic. Further discussion is given for cases where the noise probability density function is initially unknown.

  8. Pairing in the BCS and LN approximations using continuum single particle level density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Id Betan, R.M.; Repetto, C.E.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the properties of drip line nuclei requires to take into account the correlations with the continuum spectrum of energy of the system. This paper has the purpose to show that the continuum single particle level density is a convenient way to consider the pairing correlation in the continuum. Isospin mean-field and isospin pairing strength are used to find the Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer (BCS) and Lipkin–Nogami (LN) approximate solutions of the pairing Hamiltonian. Several physical properties of the whole chain of the Tin isotope, as gap parameter, Fermi level, binding energy, and one- and two-neutron separation energies, were calculated and compared with other methods and with experimental data when they exist. It is shown that the use of the continuum single particle level density is an economical way to include explicitly the correlations with the continuum spectrum of energy in large scale mass calculation. It is also shown that the computed properties are in good agreement with experimental data and with more sophisticated treatment of the pairing interaction.

  9. Increasing the maximally random jammed density with electric field to reduce the fat level in chocolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, R.; Tang, H.

    Chocolate is one of the most popular food types and flavors in the world. Unfortunately, at present, chocolate products contain too much fat, leading to obesity. For example, a typical molding chocolate has various fat up to 40% in total and chocolate for covering ice cream has fat 50 -60%. Especially, as children are the leading chocolate consumers, reducing the fat level in chocolate products to make them healthier is important and urgent. While this issue was called into attention and elaborated in articles and books decades ago and led to some patent applications, no actual solution was found unfortunately. Why is reducing fat in chocolate so difficult? What is the underlying physical mechanism? We have found that this issue is deeply related to the basic science of soft matters, especially to their viscosity and maximally random jammed (MRJ) density φx. All chocolate productions are handling liquid chocolate, a suspension with cocoa solid particles in melted fat, mainly cocoa butter. The fat level cannot be lower than 1-φxin order to have liquid chocolate to flow. Here we show that that with application of an electric field to liquid chocolate, we can aggregate the suspended particles into prolate spheroids. This microstructure change reduces liquid chocolate's viscosity along the flow direction and increases its MRJ density significantly. Hence the fat level in chocolate can be effectively reduced. We are looking forward to a new class of healthier and tasteful chocolate coming to the market soon. Dept. of Physics, Temple Univ, Philadelphia, PA 19122.

  10. Delayed Proton Emission in the A=70 Region, a Strobe for Level Density and Particle Width

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The delayed particle emission, which is a characteristic signature of the most exotic nuclei decay, provides a wide variety of spectroscopic information among which level density, and gives in some cases access to selected microscopic structures. In regard to these two aspects the $\\beta^+$-EC delayed proton emission in the A=70 neutron deficient mass region is of special interest to be investigated. Indeed, in this area located close to the proton drip line and along the N=Z line, the delayed proton emission constitutes an access to level density in the Q$_{EC}$-S$_p$ window of the emitting nucleus. Moreover, the unbound states populated by the EC process are expected to exhibit lifetimes in the vicinity of the K electronic shell filling time ($\\tau\\!\\sim\\!2\\times10^{-16}$s) and so the particle widths can be reached via proton X-ray coincidence measurements (PXCT). From theoretical approaches strongly deformed low-spin proton unbound levels which may be populated in the T$_Z$ = 1/2 precursors decay are predi...

  11. Extract of mangosteen increases high density lipoprotein levels in rats fed high lipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Laksono Adiputro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background In cardiovascular medicine, Garcinia mangostana has been used as an antioxidant to inhibit oxidation of low density lipoproteins and as an antiobesity agent. The effect of Garcinia mangostana on hyperlipidemia is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an ethanolic extract of Garcinia mangostana pericarp on lipid profile in rats fed a high lipid diet. Methods A total of 40 rats were divided into five groups control, high lipid diet, and high lipid diet + ethanolic extract of Garcinia mangostana pericarp at dosages of 200, 400, and 800 mg/kg body weight. The control group received a standard diet for 60 days. The high lipid diet group received standard diet plus egg yolk, goat fat, cholic acid, and pig fat for 60 days with or without ethanolic extract of Garcinia mangostana pericarp by the oral route. After 60 days, rats were anesthesized with ether for collection of blood by cardiac puncture. Analysis of blood lipid profile comprised colorimetric determination of cholesterol, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein (LDL, and high density lipoprotein (HDL. Results From the results of one-way ANOVA it was concluded that there were significant between-group differences in cholesterol, trygliceride, LDL, and HDL levels (p=0.000. Ethanolic extract of Garcinia mangostana pericarp significantly decreased cholesterol, trygliceride, and LDL levels, starting at 400 mg/kg body weight (p=0.000. Ethanolic extract of Garcinia mangostana pericarp significantly increased HDL level starting at 200 mg/kg body weight (p=0.000. Conclusion Ethanolic extract of Garcinia mangostana pericarp has a beneficial effect on lipid profile in rats on a high lipid diet.

  12. Extract of mangosteen increases high density lipoprotein levels in rats fed high lipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Laksono Adiputro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In cardiovascular medicine, Garcinia mangostana has been used as an antioxidant to inhibit oxidation of low density lipoproteins and as an antiobesity agent. The effect of Garcinia mangostana on hyperlipidemia is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an ethanolic extract of Garcinia mangostana pericarp on lipid profile in rats fed a high lipid diet. METHODS A total of 40 rats were divided into five groups control, high lipid diet, and high lipid diet + ethanolic extract of Garcinia mangostana pericarp at dosages of 200, 400, and 800 mg/kg body weight. The control group received a standard diet for 60 days. The high lipid diet group received standard diet plus egg yolk, goat fat, cholic acid, and pig fat for 60 days with or without ethanolic extract of Garcinia mangostana pericarp by the oral route. After 60 days, rats were anesthesized with ether for collection of blood by cardiac puncture. Analysis of blood lipid profile comprised colorimetric determination of cholesterol, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein (LDL, and high density lipoprotein (HDL. RESULTS From the results of one-way ANOVA it was concluded that there were significant between-group differences in cholesterol, trygliceride, LDL, and HDL levels (p=0.000. Ethanolic extract of Garcinia mangostana pericarp significantly decreased cholesterol, trygliceride, and LDL levels, starting at 400 mg/kg body weight (p=0.000. Ethanolic extract of Garcinia mangostana pericarp significantly increased HDL level starting at 200 mg/kg body weight (p=0.000. CONCLUSION Ethanolic extract of Garcinia mangostana pericarp has a beneficial effect on lipid profile in rats on a high lipid diet.

  13. Threat of nuclear violence at the non-governmental level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feld, B.T.

    1982-01-01

    Safeguarding nuclear weapons from falling into the hands of non-governmental terrorist groups is discussed. Political and technical solutions are seen as necessary before international action can be achieved

  14. Radiological safety for the public during nuclear emergencies: application of intervention levels and derived intervention levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.; Kumar, K.S.

    2006-01-01

    Control of radiation exposures to the public following a major nuclear accident can be achieved through intervention by implementing countermeasures such as sheltering, iodine prophylaxis, evacuation, control of foodstuff, etc. Intervention levels (I.L.) are formulated such that exposure to individuals from all exposure pathways is well below the thresholds for deterministic effects, and risk of stochastic health effects to individuals and overall incidence of stochastic effects in the exposed population are minimized. It is also necessary to translate such I.L. into quantities, called derived intervention levels (D.I.L.) that can be measured. The I.L. followed in various countries for the recommended countermeasures cater to the exposure range of 1-50 mSv for sheltering, 10-500 mSv for evacuation, 30- 1000 mSv for iodine prophylaxis and 1-10 mSv for food control. The models used for these are based on conservative estimations assuming maximum dose delivered to the critical group for the pathway assumed. While the concept of upper dose level above which countermeasures is always justified to avoid deterministic effects, the lower range of dose levels have to be optimised based on various parameters as discussed in this paper. While arriving at the I.L., the question to be addressed is: How much (dose) risk should be averted by the intervention planned? Implementation of any countermeasure will result in some inconvenience/ limitation of resource/ disruption and consequently, a positive net benefit will justify the intervention. Sheltering may result in substantially less disruption than evacuation, but if the type of sheltering is not offering enough radiation shielding or ventilation protection, this may not result in significant reduction of exposure. It is to be ensured that deterministic effects are totally avoided and it is possible to define a safe threshold exposure and above which balancing risks and benefits is not applicable. While the dose limit for the

  15. Level Density In Interacting Boson-Fermion-Fermion Model (IBFFM) Of The Odd-Odd Nucleus 196Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabashi, Skender; Bekteshi, Sadik

    2007-01-01

    The level density of the odd-odd nucleus 196Au is investigated in the interacting boson-fermion-fermion model (IBFFM) which accounts for collectivity and complex interaction between quasiparticle and collective modes.The IBFFM total level density is fitted by Gaussian and its tail is also fitted by Bethe formula and constant temperature Fermi gas model

  16. Spent nuclear fuel project high-level information management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Main, G.C.

    1996-09-13

    This document presents the results of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) Information Management Planning Project (IMPP), a short-term project that identified information management (IM) issues and opportunities within the SNFP and outlined a high-level plan to address them. This high-level plan for the SNMFP IM focuses on specific examples from within the SNFP. The plan`s recommendations can be characterized in several ways. Some recommendations address specific challenges that the SNFP faces. Others form the basis for making smooth transitions in several important IM areas. Still others identify areas where further study and planning are indicated. The team`s knowledge of developments in the IM industry and at the Hanford Site were crucial in deciding where to recommend that the SNFP act and where they should wait for Site plans to be made. Because of the fast pace of the SNFP and demands on SNFP staff, input and interaction were primarily between the IMPP team and members of the SNFP Information Management Steering Committee (IMSC). Key input to the IMPP came from a workshop where IMSC members and their delegates developed a set of draft IM principles. These principles, described in Section 2, became the foundation for the recommendations found in the transition plan outlined in Section 5. Availability of SNFP staff was limited, so project documents were used as a basis for much of the work. The team, realizing that the status of the project and the environment are continually changing, tried to keep abreast of major developments since those documents were generated. To the extent possible, the information contained in this document is current as of the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. Programs and organizations on the Hanford Site as a whole are trying to maximize their return on IM investments. They are coordinating IM activities and trying to leverage existing capabilities. However, the SNFP cannot just rely on Sitewide activities to meet its IM requirements

  17. Disposal of high level nuclear wastes: Thermodynamic equilibrium and environment ethics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RANA Mukhtar Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    Contamination of soil, water or air, due to a failure of containment or disposal of high level nuclear wastes, can potentially cause serious hazards to the environment or human health. Essential elements of the environment and radioactivity dangers to it are illustrated. Issues of high level nuclear waste disposal are discussed with a focus on thermodynamic equilibrium and environment ethics. Major aspects of the issues are analyzed and described briefly to build a perception of risks involved and ethical implications. Nuclear waste containment repository should be as close as possible to thermodynamic equilibrium. A clear demonstration about safety aspects of nuclear waste management is required in gaining public and political confidence in any possible scheme of permanent disposal. Disposal of high level nuclear waste offers a spectrum of environment connected challenges and a long term future of nuclear power depends on the environment friendly solution of the problem of nuclear wastes.

  18. Disposal of high level nuclear wastes: thermodynamic equilibrium and environment ethics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Contamination of soil, water or air, due to a failure of containment or disposal of high level nuclear wastes, can potentially cause serious hazards to the environment or human health. Essential elements of the environment and radioactivity dangers to it are illustrated. Issues of high level nuclear waste disposal are discussed with a focus on thermodynamic equilibrium and environment ethics. Major aspects of the issues are analyzed and described briefly to build a perception of risks involved and ethical implications. Nuclear waste containment repository should be as close as possible to thermodynamic equilibrium. A clear demonstration about safety aspects of nuclear waste management is required in gaining public and political confidence in any possible scheme of permanent disposal. Disposal of high level nuclear waste offers a spectrum of environment connected challenges and a long term future of nuclear power depends on the environment friendly solution of the problem of nuclear wastes. (authors)

  19. Nuclear size is sensitive to NTF2 protein levels in a manner dependent on Ran binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuković, Lidija D.; Jevtić, Predrag; Zhang, Zhaojie; Stohr, Bradley A.; Levy, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Altered nuclear size is associated with many cancers, and determining whether cancer-associated changes in nuclear size contribute to carcinogenesis necessitates an understanding of mechanisms of nuclear size regulation. Although nuclear import rates generally positively correlate with nuclear size, NTF2 levels negatively affect nuclear size, despite the role of NTF2 (also known as NUTF2) in nuclear recycling of the import factor Ran. We show that binding of Ran to NTF2 is required for NTF2 to inhibit nuclear expansion and import of large cargo molecules in Xenopus laevis egg and embryo extracts, consistent with our observation that NTF2 reduces the diameter of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in a Ran-binding-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ectopic NTF2 expression in Xenopus embryos and mammalian tissue culture cells alters nuclear size. Finally, we show that increases in nuclear size during melanoma progression correlate with reduced NTF2 expression, and increasing NTF2 levels in melanoma cells is sufficient to reduce nuclear size. These results show a conserved capacity for NTF2 to impact on nuclear size, and we propose that NTF2 might be a new cancer biomarker. PMID:26823604

  20. Axial asymmetry of excited heavy nuclei as essential feature for the prediction of level densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, Eckart [Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Junghans, Arnd R. [Institute of Radiation Physics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Massarczyk, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico (United States)

    2016-07-01

    In previous studies a considerable improvement of predictions for neutron resonance spacings by a modified back-shifted Fermi-gas model (BSFM) was found. The modifications closely follow the basic principles for a gas of weakly bound Fermions as given in text books of statistical physics: (1) Phase transition at a temperature defined by theory, (2) pairing condensation independent of A, and (3) proportionality of entropy to temperature (and thus the level density parameter) fixed by the Fermi energy. For finite nuclei we add: (4) the back-shift energy is defined by shell correction and (5) the collective enhancement is enlarged by allowing the axial symmetry to be broken. Nearly no parameter fitting is needed to arrive at a good reproduction of level density information obtained by various methods for a number of nuclei in a wide range of A and E. To that end the modified BSFM is complemented by a constant temperature approximation below the phase transition point. The axial symmetry breaking (5), which is an evidently essential feature, will also be regarded with respect to other observables for heavy nuclei.

  1. Draft emergency action level guidelines for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-09-15

    This document is provided for interim use during the initial phases of the NRC effort to promptly improve emergency preparedness at operating nuclear power plants. Changes to the document can be expected as experience is gained in its use and public comments are received. Further, the Commission has initiated a rulemaking procedure, now scheduled for completion in January 1930 in the area of Emergency Planning and Preparedness. Additional requirements are to be expected when rulemaking is completed and some modifications to this document may be necessary. Four classes of Emergency Action Levels are established which replace the classes in Regulatory Guide 1.101, each with associated examples of initiating conditions. The classes are: - Notification of Unusual Event; - Alert; - Site Emergency; - General Emergency. The rationale for the notification and alert classes is to provide early and prompt notification of minor events which could lead to more serious consequences given operator error or equipment failure or which might be indicative of more serious conditions which are not yet fully realized. A gradation is provided to assure fuller response preparations for more serious indicators. The site emergency class reflects conditions where some significant releases are likely or are occurring but where a core melt situation is not indicated based on current information. In this situation full mobilization of emergency personnel in tie :near site environs is indicated as well as dispatch of monitoring teams and associated communications. The general emergency class involves actual or imminent substantial core degradation or malting with the potential for loss of containment. The immediate action for this class is sheltering (staying inside) rather thai evacuation until an assessment can be made that (1) an evacuation is indicated and (2) an evacuation, if indicated, can be completed prior to significant release and transport of radioactive material to the affected

  2. Draft emergency action level guidelines for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    This document is provided for interim use during the initial phases of the NRC effort to promptly improve emergency preparedness at operating nuclear power plants. Changes to the document can be expected as experience is gained in its use and public comments are received. Further, the Commission has initiated a rulemaking procedure, now scheduled for completion in January 1930 in the area of Emergency Planning and Preparedness. Additional requirements are to be expected when rulemaking is completed and some modifications to this document may be necessary. Four classes of Emergency Action Levels are established which replace the classes in Regulatory Guide 1.101, each with associated examples of initiating conditions. The classes are: - Notification of Unusual Event; - Alert; - Site Emergency; - General Emergency. The rationale for the notification and alert classes is to provide early and prompt notification of minor events which could lead to more serious consequences given operator error or equipment failure or which might be indicative of more serious conditions which are not yet fully realized. A gradation is provided to assure fuller response preparations for more serious indicators. The site emergency class reflects conditions where some significant releases are likely or are occurring but where a core melt situation is not indicated based on current information. In this situation full mobilization of emergency personnel in tie :near site environs is indicated as well as dispatch of monitoring teams and associated communications. The general emergency class involves actual or imminent substantial core degradation or malting with the potential for loss of containment. The immediate action for this class is sheltering (staying inside) rather thai evacuation until an assessment can be made that (1) an evacuation is indicated and (2) an evacuation, if indicated, can be completed prior to significant release and transport of radioactive material to the affected

  3. Application of nuclear techniques to the measurement of rock density and transport of solid particles suspended in rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddiki, A.

    1984-10-01

    In order to better understand hydron phenomens in semi-arid regions characterized by torrential rains, we measured solid particles suspended to dums and in rivers. We also determined the density profile of a drilling and density of saline solutions. We designed an automatic nuclear gauge used for measuring the concentration of particles suspended to rivers. The installation, calibration and operations of a LABEN gauge were done in BENI SLIMANE on the 27th and 28th of February, 1984. The first results we obtained were received on the 24th of April, 1984

  4. Possibility of combining nuclear level pumping in plasma with lasing in solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamyan, S.A.; Carroll, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear isomers can be used for the storage and release of 'clean' nuclear energy, and the visible schemes are discussed. Resonance between the atomic and nuclear transitions may be manifested in a form of the hybridization of atomic-nuclear excitation at the appropriate case. The nuclear levels - candidates for triggering via atomic transitions are described. A variety of the ionization states and atomic-shell configurations arises in hot plasma generated by the short powerful pulse of laser light. The nonradiative conversion of the ionization energy within atom can be suppressed in the hot-plasma surroundings. Time-scales of different processes in nuclear, atomic and condensed-matter subsystems are compared. The processes of fast ionization in solid, X-ray radiance in plasma, sample melting and recrystallisation may precede nuclear fluorescence. Time-scale shorter 0.1 ns makes this sequence promising for the group excitation of short-lived modes in nuclear subsystem

  5. Preparedness and planning for nuclear accidents at national level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiukshta, A.

    1998-01-01

    National plan for the protection of population in the case in nuclear accident at Ignalina NPP is presented. The plan was elaborated and approved in 1995, tested in a number of training and practical operations and positively evaluated by experts. The plan provides for measures of protection, their scope, schedule, executive officers and organizations and procedure of implementation

  6. Fingerprints of single nuclear spin energy levels using STM - ENDOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manassen, Yishay; Averbukh, Michael; Jbara, Moamen; Siebenhofer, Bernhard; Shnirman, Alexander; Horovitz, Baruch

    2018-04-01

    We performed STM-ENDOR experiments where the intensity of one of the hyperfine components detected in ESR-STM is recorded while an rf power is irradiated into the tunneling junction and its frequency is swept. When the latter frequency is near a nuclear transition a dip in ESR-STM signal is observed. This experiment was performed in three different systems: near surface SiC vacancies where the electron spin is coupled to a next nearest neighbor 29 Si nucleus; Cu deposited on Si(111)7x7 surface, where the unpaired electron of the Cu atom is coupled to the Cu nucleus ( 63 Cu, 65 Cu) and on Tempo molecules adsorbed on Au(111), where the unpaired electron is coupled to a Nitrogen nucleus ( 14 N). While some of the hyperfine values are unresolved in the ESR-STM data due to linewidth we find that they are accurately determined in the STM-ENDOR data including those from remote nuclei, which are not detected in the ESR-STM spectrum. Furthermore, STM-ENDOR can measure single nuclear Zeeman frequencies, distinguish between isotopes through their different nuclear magnetic moments and detect quadrupole spectra. We also develop and solve a Bloch type equation for the coupled electron-nuclear system that facilitates interpretation of the data. The improved spectral resolution of STM - ENDOR opens many possibilities for nanometric scale chemical analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evidence for low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in Australian indigenous peoples: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jasmine G; O'Dea, Kerin; Walker, Karen Z

    2014-06-02

    Low plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are a strong, independent, but poorly understood risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although this atherogenic lipid abnormality has been widely reported in Australia's Indigenous peoples, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, the evidence has not come under systematic review. This review therefore examines published data for Indigenous Australians reporting 1) mean HDL-C levels for both sexes and 2) factors associated with low HDL-C. PubMed, Medline and Informit ATSI Health databases were systematically searched between 1950 and 2012 for studies on Indigenous Australians reporting mean HDL-C levels in both sexes. Retrieved studies were evaluated by standard criteria. Low HDL-C was defined as: Indigenous populations living in rural and remote communities. Inverse associations between HDL-C and central obesity, diabetes prevalence and inflammatory markers suggest a particularly adverse CVD risk factor profile. An absence of sex dichotomy in HDL-C levels warrants further investigation.

  8. Leveling coatings for reducing the atomic oxygen defect density in protected graphite fiber epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Podojil, G.; McCollum, T.; Anzic, J.

    1992-11-01

    Pinholes or other defect sites in a protective oxide coating provide pathways for atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit to reach underlying material. One concept of enhancing the lifetime of materials in low Earth orbit is to apply a leveling coating to the material prior to applying any reflective and protective coatings. Using a surface tension leveling coating concept, a low viscosity epoxy was applied to the surface of several composite coupons. A protective layer of 1000 A of SiO2 was deposited on top of the leveling coating, and the coupons were exposed to an atomic oxygen environment in a plasma asher. Pinhole populations per unit area were estimated by counting the number of undercut sites observed by scanning electron microscopy. Defect density values of 180,000 defects/sq cm were reduced to about 1000 defects/sq cm as a result of the applied leveling coating. These improvements occur at a mass penalty of about 2.5 mg/sq cm.

  9. Constraints on the high-density nuclear equation of state from the phenomenology of compact stars and heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaehn, T.; Blaschke, D.; Typel, S.; Dalen, E. N. E. van; Faessler, A.; Fuchs, C.; Gaitanos, T.; Wolter, H. H.; Grigorian, H.; Ho, A.; Weber, F.; Kolomeitsev, E. E.; Miller, M. C.; Roepke, G.; Truemper, J.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2006-01-01

    A new scheme for testing nuclear matter equations of state (EoSs) at high densities using constraints from neutron star (NS) phenomenology and a flow data analysis of heavy-ion collisions is suggested. An acceptable EoS shall not allow the direct Urca process to occur in NSs with masses below 1.5M · , and also shall not contradict flow and kaon production data of heavy-ion collisions. Compact star constraints include the mass measurements of 2.1±0.2M · (1σ level) for PSR J0751+1807 and of 2.0±0.1M · from the innermost stable circular orbit for 4U 1636-536, the baryon mass--gravitational mass relationships from Pulsar B in J0737-3039 and the mass-radius relationships from quasiperiodic brightness oscillations in 4U 0614+09 and from the thermal emission of RX J1856-3754. This scheme is applied to a set of relativistic EoSs which are constrained otherwise from nuclear matter saturation properties. We demonstrate on the given examples that the test scheme due to the quality of the newly emerging astrophysical data leads to useful selection criteria for the high-density behavior of nuclear EoSs

  10. A Study of KHNP Nuclear Power Plant Technology Level Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seung Han; Lee, Sung Jin; Kim, Yo Han

    2016-01-01

    KHNP's 2030 mid and long term plan goal in technology field is securing global No. 1 NPP technology level. Quantifying technology level for this purpose, technology level at present should be surveyed. Technology level of South Korea has been surveyed by KISTEP (Korea Institute of S and T Evaluation and Planning) every two year but the technology level of KHNP has not been surveyed by any organization including KHNP itself. Also the size of technology surveyed by KISTEP was too broad to quantifying technology level of KHNP. In this paper, technology level of KHNP and South Korea are presented. In this study, NPP related technologies were divided into Level I and Level II technologies and conducted a survey for each Level II technologies using Delphi questionnaire survey that is widely used in technology level evaluation. The results of technology level and gap will be used from strategic point of view and also as a reference data for technology improvement planning

  11. A Study of KHNP Nuclear Power Plant Technology Level Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Han; Lee, Sung Jin; Kim, Yo Han [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    KHNP's 2030 mid and long term plan goal in technology field is securing global No. 1 NPP technology level. Quantifying technology level for this purpose, technology level at present should be surveyed. Technology level of South Korea has been surveyed by KISTEP (Korea Institute of S and T Evaluation and Planning) every two year but the technology level of KHNP has not been surveyed by any organization including KHNP itself. Also the size of technology surveyed by KISTEP was too broad to quantifying technology level of KHNP. In this paper, technology level of KHNP and South Korea are presented. In this study, NPP related technologies were divided into Level I and Level II technologies and conducted a survey for each Level II technologies using Delphi questionnaire survey that is widely used in technology level evaluation. The results of technology level and gap will be used from strategic point of view and also as a reference data for technology improvement planning.

  12. Combining the modified Skyrme-like model and the local density approximation to determine the symmetry energy of nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Ren, Zhongzhou; Xu, Chang

    2018-07-01

    Combining the modified Skyrme-like model and the local density approximation model, the slope parameter L of symmetry energy is extracted from the properties of finite nuclei with an improved iterative method. The calculations of the iterative method are performed within the framework of the spherical symmetry. By choosing 200 neutron rich nuclei on 25 isotopic chains as candidates, the slope parameter is constrained to be 50 MeV nuclear matter can be obtained together.

  13. The nuclear pore density in rat liver cells upon regeneration and total body X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'mina, S.N.; Troitskaya, L.P.; Mirkhamidova, P.A.; Bul'dyaeva, T.V.; Zbarskij, I.B.; Grigor'ev, V.B.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Virusologii)

    1979-01-01

    The nuclear pore density has been investigated in rat liver cells in the course of regeneration and X-ray irradiation. It has been found that the number of pore complexes (PC) per nuclear shell (NS) unit area in the liver cells is not constant. In an hour following whole-body irradiation of rats with a regenerating liver at the 1200 R dose the number of PC per 1 μm 2 of the nuclear shell area decreases by 5, 8 times as compared with the PC density in the regenerating liver cells of the irradiated rats, the PC degradation and structural rupture being observed. It has been established by means of the freezing-etching method which enables PC surfaces observation as for cytoplasma as well as for nucleoplasma that the PC peripheral granulas and the central granula consist of subparticles being approximately of the same size. The central granula forms a channel through which the material containing RNA passes from the nucleus to the cytoplasma. On the basis of the fact that the treatement by Triton X-100, disarranging the integrity of the NS membranous structure, preserves PC in relation to the fibrous layer as well as on the basis of the unequal nuclear pore state observed on the platinum-carbon replicas from nuclei splits it is supposed that PC can be formed in the nucleus and then in the course of repening ''built in'' PS

  14. Organic semiconductor density of states controls the energy level alignment at electrode interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehzelt, Martin; Koch, Norbert; Heimel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Minimizing charge carrier injection barriers and extraction losses at interfaces between organic semiconductors and metallic electrodes is critical for optimizing the performance of organic (opto-) electronic devices. Here, we implement a detailed electrostatic model, capable of reproducing the alignment between the electrode Fermi energy and the transport states in the organic semiconductor both qualitatively and quantitatively. Covering the full phenomenological range of interfacial energy level alignment regimes within a single, consistent framework and continuously connecting the limiting cases described by previously proposed models allows us to resolve conflicting views in the literature. Our results highlight the density of states in the organic semiconductor as a key factor. Its shape and, in particular, the energy distribution of electronic states tailing into the fundamental gap is found to determine both the minimum value of practically achievable injection barriers as well as their spatial profile, ranging from abrupt interface dipoles to extended band-bending regions. PMID:24938867

  15. High system-safety level of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, H.R.

    1976-01-01

    A bluntly worded disquisition contrasting the incidence of death and harm to persons in the chemical industry with the low hazards in nuclear power stations. Quotes conclusions from a U.S. accident study that the risk from 100 large power stations is 100 times smaller than from chlorine manufacture and transport. The enclosure of a reactor in a safety container, the well understood effects of radioactivity on man, and the ease of measuring leakage well below safe limits, are safety features which he considers were not matched in the products and plant of the Seveso factory which suffered disaster. Questions the usefulness of warnings about nuclear dangers when chemical dangers are much greater and road dangers very much greater still. (R.W.S.)

  16. Reduction and resource recycling of high-level radioactive wastes through nuclear transmutation with PHITS code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Reiko

    2017-01-01

    In the ImPACT program of the Cabinet Office, programs are underway to reduce long-lived fission products (LLFP) contained in high-level radioactive waste through nuclear transmutation, or to recycle/utilize useful nuclear species. This paper outlines this program and describes recent achievements. This program consists of five projects: (1) separation/recovery technology, (2) acquisition of nuclear transmutation data, (3) nuclear reaction theory model and simulation, (4) novel nuclear reaction control and development of elemental technology, and (5) discussions on process concept. The project (1) develops a technology for dissolving vitrified solid, a technology for recovering LLFP from high-level waste liquid, and a technology for separating odd and even lasers. Project (2) acquires the new nuclear reaction data of Pd-107, Zr-93, Se-79, and Cs-135 using RIKEN's RIBF or JAEA's J-PARC. Project (3) improves new nuclear reaction theory and structural model using the nuclear reaction data measured in (2), improves/upgrades nuclear reaction simulation code PHITS, and proposes a promising nuclear transmutation pathway. Project (4) develops an accelerator that realizes the proposed transmutation route and its elemental technology. Project (5) performs the conceptual design of the process to realize (1) to (4), and constructs the scenario of reducing/utilizing high-level radioactive waste to realize this design. (A.O.)

  17. Increased serum oxidized low-density lipoprotein levels in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Ghaneei

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elevated serum levels of oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (oxLDL have been found in type 2 and in poorly controlled diabetic patients. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM has common features with type 2 diabetes. Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the serum levels of oxLDL in women with GDM compared to normal pregnant women. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, ninety-two subjects were randomly allocated to either GDM (n=46 or control (n=46 groups matched for age, body mass index and parity from March 2013 to March 2014. GDM was diagnosed according to the American Diabetes Association criteria at 24-26 weeks of gestation. OxLDL was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. T-test and Pearson correlation coefficients were applied for analyzing the data by using SPSS version 17. Results: Compared to the controls, significantly higher oxLDL levels were found in the GDM group (17.16 ± 3.71 U/L vs. 8.77 ± 1.84 U/L, respectively, p < 0.001. No significant correlations were found between oxLDL and age and BMI of the patients in the groups. Conclusion: Our study found significant increase of oxLDL in GDM emphasizing the role of short-term hyperglycemia in the formation of oxLDL during GDM. The importance of aptly diagnosis of GDM in maternal health may also be concluded.

  18. Environmental radioactivity levels, Sequoyah Nuclear Plant. Annual report, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    This report describes the environmental radiological monitoring of the Sequoyah Nuclear Plant (SQN) located in Hamilton County, Tennessee, conducted in 1983. Dose estimates were calculated from concentrations of radioactivity found in samples of air, milk, water, and fish. It was concluded there were no significant increases in the exposure to members of the general public attributable to the operation of SQN. 11 figures, 34 tables

  19. The many-body level density; Densite de niveaux du probleme a n-corps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roccia, J

    2007-09-15

    We investigate the many-body level density {rho}{sub MB} for fermion and boson gases. We establish its behavior as a function of the temperature and the number of particles. We deal with correction terms due to finite number of particles effects for {rho}{sub MB}: for fermions, it seems that it exists only one behavior. We propose a semiclassical expression of {rho}{sub MB} for two types of particles with an angular momentum. It is decomposed into a smooth part coming from the saddle point method plus corrective terms due to the expansion of the number of partitions for two types of particles and an oscillating part coming from the fluctuations of the single-particle level density. Our model is validated by a numerical study. For the case of the atomic nucleus, the oscillating part of {rho}{sub MB} is controlled by a temperature factor which depends on the chaotic or integrable nature of the system and on the fluctuation of the ground state energy. This leads to consider in more detail this last quantity. For an isolated system, we give the general expression of the mean value for fixed potentials. We treat the self-bound system case through the example of the three dimensional harmonic oscillator (3DHO). Furthermore we study the oscillating part of {rho}{sub MB} for bosons in the low temperature regime for billiards and for isotropic 3DHO. We note the oscillations disappear leading to a power law correction. In the case of the isotropic 3DHO, these corrections have the same order of magnitude as the smooth part. In the same way, for the high temperature regime we show the oscillating part of {rho}{sub MB} is exponentially negligible compared to the smooth part. (author)

  20. Effects of maximal doses of atorvastatin versus rosuvastatin on small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximal doses of atorvastatin and rosuvastatin are highly effective in lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels; however, rosuvastatin has been shown to be significantly more effective than atorvastatin in lowering LDL cholesterol and in increasing high-density lipo...

  1. Application of system-level FMEA in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, W.; Parmar, R.; Salvador, M.; Forystek, A.; Xu, C.

    2012-01-01

    Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is an analytical technique used to assess risk that is applied in various industries such as aerospace, automotive and health care. A recent application in the nuclear industry of FMEA methodology to support the design modification process at a major electrical utility in Ontario is examined. This application of FMEA involves assessing proposed design changes by systematically identifying various component failure modes and their effect on the parent system with respect to the related employee, environmental, production and nuclear safety impact. In doing so, any design weaknesses are identified along with potential corrective actions such as adding redundant components. FMEA is being applied early in the design process with the focus on finding the problems before equipment is installed where failures may manifest into serious safety and economic consequences. To illustrate the application of FMEA in the nuclear industry, the results of a recent study will be presented with a walk through of the analysis process along with overall study findings. The study involved application of FMEA to support a design modification to replace the existing Condenser Steam Dump Valve (CSDV) actuator and top works (associated instrumentation, e.g., solenoid valves) on an operating reactor. (author)

  2. Application of system-level FMEA in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, W.; Parmar, R.; Salvador, M. [AMEC NSS Ltd., Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Forystek, A.; Xu, C. [Bruce Power, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is an analytical technique used to assess risk that is applied in various industries such as aerospace, automotive and health care. A recent application in the nuclear industry of FMEA methodology to support the design modification process at a major electrical utility in Ontario is examined. This application of FMEA involves assessing proposed design changes by systematically identifying various component failure modes and their effect on the parent system with respect to the related employee, environmental, production and nuclear safety impact. In doing so, any design weaknesses are identified along with potential corrective actions such as adding redundant components. FMEA is being applied early in the design process with the focus on finding the problems before equipment is installed where failures may manifest into serious safety and economic consequences. To illustrate the application of FMEA in the nuclear industry, the results of a recent study will be presented with a walk through of the analysis process along with overall study findings. The study involved application of FMEA to support a design modification to replace the existing Condenser Steam Dump Valve (CSDV) actuator and top works (associated instrumentation, e.g., solenoid valves) on an operating reactor. (author)

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Lens Nuclear Density Using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT with a Liquid Optics Interface: Correlation between OCT Images and LOCS III Grading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Na Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To quantify whole lens and nuclear lens densities using anterior-segment optical coherence tomography (OCT with a liquid optics interface and evaluate their correlation with Lens Opacities Classification System III (LOCS III lens grading and corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA. Methods. OCT images of the whole lens and lens nucleus of eyes with age-related nuclear cataract were analyzed using ImageJ software. The lens grade and nuclear density were represented in pixel intensity units (PIU and correlations between PIU, BCVA, and LOCS III were assessed. Results. Forty-seven eyes were analyzed. The mean whole lens and lens nuclear densities were 26.99 ± 5.23 and 19.43 ± 6.15 PIU, respectively. A positive linear correlation was observed between lens opacities (R2 = 0.187, p<0.01 and nuclear density (R2 = 0.316, p<0.01 obtained from OCT images and LOCS III. Preoperative BCVA and LOCS III were also positively correlated (R2 = 0.454, p<0.01. Conclusions. Whole lens and lens nuclear densities obtained from OCT correlated with LOCS III. Nuclear density showed a higher positive correlation with LOCS III than whole lens density. OCT with a liquid optics interface is a potential quantitative method for lens grading and can aid in monitoring and managing age-related cataracts.

  4. Nuclear data uncertainties for local power densities in the Martin-Hoogenboom benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Marck, S.C.; Rochman, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    The recently developed method of fast Total Monte Carlo to propagate nuclear data uncertainties was applied to the Martin-Hoogenboom benchmark. This Martin- Hoogenboom benchmark prescribes that one calculates local pin powers (of light water cooled reactor) with a statistical uncertainty lower than 1% everywhere. Here we report, for the first time, an estimate of the nuclear data uncertainties for these local pin powers. For each of the more than 6 million local power tallies, the uncertainty due to nuclear data uncertainties was calculated, based on random variation of data for 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu and H in H 2 O thermal scattering. In the center of the core region, the nuclear data uncertainty is 0.9%. Towards the edges of the core, this uncertainty increases to roughly 3%. The nuclear data uncertainties have been shown to be larger than the statistical uncertainties that the benchmark prescribes

  5. Association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and bone mineral density in normal postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasundhara Kamineni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted with the objective of assessing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD in postmenopausal women (PMW, to detect osteopenia or osteoporosis in PMW and to establish a correlation between serum 25(OHD levels and bone mineral density (BMD. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 healthy PMW were selected, and a prospective observational study was conducted to correlate the BMD with serum 25(OHD levels. Their laboratory investigations along with serum 25(OHD levels were done. Their BMD was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at lumbar spine and neck of femur; T-scores were derived. Correlation analysis was done to investigate the relationship between serum 25(OHD levels and BMD. Results: The proportion of osteoporosis at the hip was 31.9% in deficient group, 16.1% in insufficient, and 18.2% in sufficient group and at lumbar spine, it was 27.7%, 16.1%, and 22.7%, respectively. Forty-seven percent of PMW had deficient (<20 ng/ml serum 25(OHD levels and 31% had insufficiency. T-score at hip in deficient group was −2.05 ± 0.25, and in an insufficient group, it was −1.79 ± 0.13; T-score at lumbar spine was −1.92 ± 0.12 and −1.79 ± 0.12, respectively, but both were not statistically significant. Osteoporosis was seen in 24%, osteopenia in 55% at hip level and 23% and 59% respectively at lumbar spine. There was no association between serum 25(OHD levels and BMD neither at hip nor at lumbar spine ( P = 0.51 and P = 0.79 respectively. Conclusion: In this study, among our cohort of patients there was no correlation between serum 25(OHD levels and BMD. However, Vitamin D deficiency coexists with low BMD. Vitamin D insufficiency is a common risk factor for osteoporosis associated with increased bone remodeling and low bone mass.

  6. Effect of planting methods, seed density and nitrogen phosphorus (NP) fertilizer levels on sweet corn (Zea maYs L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, M.; Razzaq, A.; Ullah, R.

    2006-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of planting methods, seed density and nitrogen phosphorus (NP) fertilizer levels on emergence m/sup -2/ growth and grain yield of sweet corn. The fertilizer and interaction of fertilizer x seed density had significant negative effect with increasing level while seed density had a positive effect with increased density on emergence per m/sup 2/. Increased seed density significantly reduced plant growth which increased with application of higher fertilizer dose. The grain yield was improves by ridge planting methods, increased seed density and increased fertilizer levels. The highest grain yield (3,553.50 kg ha/sup-1/) of sweet corn plants was recorded in ridge planting method with highest NP fertilizer level of 300:150 kg ha/sup 1/ and 4 seeds hill/sup -1/. The lowest grain yield (3,493.75 kg ha/sup -1/) of sweet corn was observed in flat sowing planting method with 120:75 NP level and 2 seeds hill/sup -1/ seed density. The ridge planting rank first then furrow and flat planting methods on basis of grain yield per hectare. The sweet corn plant yield was high with 4 seeds hill/sup -1/ compared with 2 seeds hill/sup -1/. (author)

  7. Evaluation of the effect of hemoglobin or hematocrit level on dural sinus density using unenhanced computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Young; Cha, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Sung-Hyun; Shin, Dong-Ick

    2013-01-01

    To identify the relationship between hemoglobin (Hgb) or hematocrit (Hct) level and dural sinus density using unenhanced computed tomography (UECT). Patients who were performed UECT and had records of a complete blood count within 24 hours from UECT were included (n=122). We measured the Hounsfield unit (HU) of the dural sinus at the right sigmoid sinus, left sigmoid sinus and 2 points of the superior sagittal sinus. Quantitative measurement of dural sinus density using the circle regions of interest (ROI) method was calculated as average ROI values at 3 or 4 points. Simple regression analysis was used to evaluate the correlation between mean HU and Hgb or mean HU and Hct. The mean densities of the dural sinuses ranged from 24.67 to 53.67 HU (mean, 43.28 HU). There was a strong correlation between mean density and Hgb level (r=0.832) and between mean density and Hct level (r=0.840). Dural sinus density on UECT is closely related to Hgb and Hct levels. Therefore, the Hgb or Hct levels can be used to determine whether the dural sinus density is within the normal range or pathological conditions such as venous thrombosis.

  8. Test of E1-radiative strength function and level density models by 155 Gd (n,2γ) 156 Gd reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voinov, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    The information about the level density of 156 Gd nucleus and strength functions of γ transitions extracted from two γ-cascade spectra of the 155 Gd (n,2γ) 156 Gd reaction is analyzed. The method of statistical simulation of γ-cascade intensity is applied for calculation of the main parameters of experimental spectra. The method is used to extract the information on the E1-radiative strength function of γ transitions and level density in the 156 Gd nucleus. It is shown that at an excitation energy above 3 MeV the level density of 156 Gd nucleus must decrease in comparison with that calculated within the Fermi gas model. Its is concluded that possible explanation of the observed effect is connected with the influence of pairing correlations on the level density in nuclei

  9. Achieving world's highest level of nuclear safety learning from overseas nuclear trouble events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumoto, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Information Research Project of Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Incorporated (INSS) had acquired trouble information of nuclear power plants (NPPs) up to annual several thousand events issued by overseas regulatory agencies for more than 20 years since INSS established and analyzed it in details respectively after the screening. Lessons extracted from the analysis were offered as suggestions to electric utilities having PWRs in Japan. Such activities would surely contribute to maintain and improve nuclear safety with no objection. However, they could not prevent the occurrence of accident of Fukushima Daiichi NPPs. Thus the project had reviewed usefulness of past activities and how improved could be by listening sincerely to outside opinions. This report introduced outlines of recent activities. Competent suggestions to electric utilities might be made with improved reflection of lessons to needed rules, deepened information sharing within the project and raised awareness of the problem. (T. Tanaka)

  10. Genetically elevated apolipoprotein A-I, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Christiane; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Grande, Peer

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiologically, levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and its major protein constituent, apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), are inversely related to risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD).......Epidemiologically, levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and its major protein constituent, apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), are inversely related to risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD)....

  11. French nuclear safety authorities: for a harmonization of nuclear safety at the European level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    The European Commission is working on 2 directives concerning nuclear energy: the first one is dedicated to nuclear safety and the second to the management of radioactive wastes and spent fuels. In the context of the widening of the European Union and of the inter-connection of the different electric power grids throughout Europe, the harmonization of the rules in the nuclear safety field is seen by manufacturers as a mean to achieve a fair competition between nuclear equipment supplying companies and by the French nuclear safety authorities (FNSA) as a mean to keep on improving nuclear safety and to be sure that competitiveness does not drive safety standards down. According to FNSA the 2 European directives could give a legal framework to the harmonization and should contain principles that reinforce the responsibility of each state. FNSA considers that the EPR (European pressurized water reactor) may be an efficient tool for the harmonization because of existing industrial cooperation programs between France and Germany and between France and Finland. (A.C.)

  12. Resolved nuclear hyperfine structure of muonium in CuCl by means of muon level-crossing resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.W.; Keller, H.; Odermatt, W.; Puempin, B.; Savic, I.M.; Simmler, H.; Dodds, S.A.; Estle, T.L.; Duvarney, R.C.; Chow, K.; Kadono, R.; Kiefl, R.F.; Li, Q.; Riseman, T.M.; Zhou, H.; Lichti, R.L.; Schwab, C.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed muon level-crossing resonance measurements of Mu I and Mu II centres in single crystals of CuCl are presented. The hyperfine and nuclear hyperfine parameters of the closest two shells of nuclei are remarkably similar for the two centres, indicating that both are located at the same tetrahedral interstitial site with four Cu nearest neighbours and six Cl next-nearest neighbours. About 30% of the total unpaired-electron spin density is located on the muon, about 60% on the four nearest neighbours and the rest on the six next-nearest neighbours, with nothing observable for any other shell. (orig.)

  13. Highly absorptive curcumin reduces serum atherosclerotic low-density lipoprotein levels in patients with mild COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funamoto M

    2016-08-01

    and hemoglobin A1c and LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, or high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels after treatment were similar for the two groups. However, the percent change in the AT-LDL level was significantly (P=0.020 lower in the Theracurmin® group compared with the placebo group.Conclusion: Theracurmin® reduced levels of atherosclerotic AT-LDL, which may lead to the prevention of future cardiovascular events in mild COPD subjects. Keywords: curcumin, AT-LDL, COPD, atherosclerosis

  14. Effect of f-level on the density of states of magnetic superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rout, G.C. [Condensed Matter Physics Group, Department of Applied Physics and Ballistics, F.M. University, Balasore, Orissa (India); Pradhan, B. [Government Science College, Malkangiri 764 048, Orissa (India)], E-mail: brunda@iopb.res.in; Behera, S.N. [Institute of Material Science, Planetarium Building, Bhubaneswar 751 013, Orissa (India)

    2008-07-15

    We address a Hamiltonian model to study the coexistence of antiferromagnetism (AFM) and superconductivity (SC) in presence of hybridization between conduction electron and the localized f-level. The AFM and SC long range orders are formulated for the Cu-O plane with an s-wave type pairing symmetry mediated by some boson exchanges. The interplay of these two long range orders is studied through the calculated c-electron density of states (DOS) as well as the localized f-electron DOS. We attempt here to interpret the complex tunneling spectra based upon our model calculation. This model predicts some of the gaps due to the localized low lying excitations appearing near the Fermi level, and the gap structure is consistent with the gapless superconductivity, showing a complex U-shaped s-wave type symmetry. The model calculation helps to separately calculate the AFM and SC order parameters under the special condition of the presence of the weak c-f hybridization.

  15. Effect of f-level on the density of states of magnetic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, G.C.; Pradhan, B.; Behera, S.N.

    2008-01-01

    We address a Hamiltonian model to study the coexistence of antiferromagnetism (AFM) and superconductivity (SC) in presence of hybridization between conduction electron and the localized f-level. The AFM and SC long range orders are formulated for the Cu-O plane with an s-wave type pairing symmetry mediated by some boson exchanges. The interplay of these two long range orders is studied through the calculated c-electron density of states (DOS) as well as the localized f-electron DOS. We attempt here to interpret the complex tunneling spectra based upon our model calculation. This model predicts some of the gaps due to the localized low lying excitations appearing near the Fermi level, and the gap structure is consistent with the gapless superconductivity, showing a complex U-shaped s-wave type symmetry. The model calculation helps to separately calculate the AFM and SC order parameters under the special condition of the presence of the weak c-f hybridization

  16. Circulating levels of IGF-1 directly regulate bone growth and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakar, Shoshana; Rosen, Clifford J.; Beamer, Wesley G.; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Wu, Yiping; Liu, Jun-Li; Ooi, Guck T.; Setser, Jennifer; Frystyk, Jan; Boisclair, Yves R.; LeRoith, Derek

    2002-01-01

    IGF-1 is a growth-promoting polypeptide that is essential for normal growth and development. In serum, the majority of the IGFs exist in a 150-kDa complex including the IGF molecule, IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), and the acid labile subunit (ALS). This complex prolongs the half-life of serum IGFs and facilitates their endocrine actions. Liver IGF-1–deficient (LID) mice and ALS knockout (ALSKO) mice exhibited relatively normal growth and development, despite having 75% and 65% reductions in serum IGF-1 levels, respectively. Double gene disrupted mice were generated by crossing LID+ALSKO mice. These mice exhibited further reductions in serum IGF-1 levels and a significant reduction in linear growth. The proximal growth plates of the tibiae of LID+ALSKO mice were smaller in total height as well as in the height of the proliferative and hypertrophic zones of chondrocytes. There was also a 10% decrease in bone mineral density and a greater than 35% decrease in periosteal circumference and cortical thickness in these mice. IGF-1 treatment for 4 weeks restored the total height of the proximal growth plate of the tibia. Thus, the double gene disruption LID+ALSKO mouse model demonstrates that a threshold concentration of circulating IGF-1 is necessary for normal bone growth and suggests that IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and ALS play a prominent role in the pathophysiology of osteoporosis. PMID:12235108

  17. Relationships between serum Omentin-1 levels and bone mineral density in older men with osteoporosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yang; Xin-Lan Zhao; Bin Liao; Ai-Ping Qin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between serum Omentin-1 levels and the presence of osteoporosis in older men. Methods: Serum Omentin-1, bone turnover biochemical markers, and bone mineral density (BMD) were determined in 45 older men with osteoporosis or 45 older men without osteoporosis (65e70 years old). Results: Omentin-1 levels were increased in older men with osteoporosis, and the differences remained significant after con-trolling for fat mass. Omentin-1 was negatively correlated with BMD. In a multiple linear stepwise regression analysis, Omentin-1, lean mass, but not fat mass, were independent predictors of BMD for the combined group. Significant negative correlations between Omentin-1 and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and bone cross-linked N-telopeptides of typeⅠcollagen (NTX) were found. Omentin-1 was also independently associated with BMD and bone turnover markers in older men with osteoporosis and control groups that were considered separately. Conclusions: Omentin-1 is an independent predictor of BMD in older men with osteoporosis, and it is negatively correlated with bone turnover biochemical markers. It is suggested that Omentin-1 may exert a negative effect on bone mass through the regulation of the osteoblast differentiation in the older men with osteoporosis.

  18. Lead iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe 2 O 3 for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90 0 C, with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10 2 to 10 3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe 2 O 3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear wasteforms

  19. Management of high level nuclear waste - the nordic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engstrom, S.; Aikas, T.

    2000-01-01

    Both the Swedish and the Finnish nuclear waste programmes are aimed at disposal of encapsulated spent nuclear fuel into the crystalline bedrock. In both countries research and development work have been performed since the 1970's. The focus of the programme in both countries is now shifting to practical demonstration of encapsulation technology. In parallel a site-selection programme is being carried out. Finland has selected a site at Eurajoki and is currently waiting for the Government to agree to the choice of the site. In Sweden, at least two sites will be selected by year 2001 with the goal, after performed drillings, to select one of them around 2008. Site selection for the deep repository is probably the most difficult and most sensitive part of the whole programme. The repository will be sited at a suitable place in Sweden respectively Finland where high safety requirements will be met with the consent of the concerned municipality. If there is a Nordic approach to tackle this issue that would probably be: - A stepwise approach in which the disposal is implemented in gradually each step having a decision making stage leading to a commitment of various parties involved to the following stage. -A total transparency of the work performed and the decision making process. - A genuine will from the industry to establish a dialogue with the public in the involved communities. - A will to take the time and the patience necessary to establish a constructive working relationship with the communities participating in the site selection. (authors)

  20. Nuclear developments at the international inter govern mental level (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waynbaum, M.

    1961-01-01

    The United Nations organisation and nuclear energy rose simultaneously, in 1945, to occupy an important place in the public eye. The spiritual succession of the League of Nations which had foundered during the war was taken up by the new organisation which sought to implant its political ideal in a more tangible reality, so that it might thereby be inspired by concrete and substantial objectives. This is one of the reasons for the existence of the dozen specialized agencies created by the family of the United Nations and dealing with Health, Culture, Agriculture, Finance, etc. Nuclear energy is one of these techniques. Becoming suddenly an important power factor and exploiting for itself the prestige of Science, it became the favorite domain for the growth of this new spirit, as much in its universal form in 1945 as in its more regional form which it was later to adopt. The achievements are numerous and of varying importance; they deserve te be studied carefully. (author) [fr

  1. Determination of leveled costs of electric generation for gas plants, coal and nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso V, G.; Palacios H, J.C.; Ramirez S, J.R.; Gomez, A.

    2005-01-01

    The present work analyzes the leveled costs of electric generation for different types of nuclear reactors known as Generation III, these costs are compared with the leveled costs of electric generation of plants with the help of natural gas and coal. In the study several discount rates were used to determine their impact in the initial investment. The obtained results are comparable with similar studies and they show that it has more than enough the base of the leveled cost the nuclear option it is quite competitive in Mexico. Also in this study it is also thinks about the economic viability of a new nuclear power station in Mexico. (Author)

  2. Thomas-Fermi treatment of nuclear masses, deformations and density distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1994-08-01

    A recently completed Thomas-Fermi model of nuclei is described. Six adjustable parameters of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction were fitted to the shell-corrected binding energies of 1654 nuclei and to the diffuseness of the nuclear surface. The model is then successful in reproducing nuclear sizes, and only small deviations are found between calculated and measured fission barriers of 36 nuclei. The model is applied to the prediction of fission barriers of light elements, to drip-line nuclei like 82 Sn and 170 Sn, to the properties of nuclear and neutron matter and to nuclear bubble configurations with Z 2 /A ∼ 100. The relation of a Thomas-Fermi theory to the Droplet and Liquid Drop models is illustrated

  3. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis: Impact of Nuclear Physics Uncertainties on Baryonic Matter Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Michael Scott; Roberts, Luke F.; Hix, William Raphael; Bruner, Blake D.; Kozub, R.L.; Tytler, David; Fuller, George M.; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Nesaraja, Caroline D

    2008-01-01

    We performed new Big Bang Nucleosynthesis simulations with the bigbangonline.org suite of codes to determine, from the nuclear physics perspective, the highest achievable precision of the constraint on the baryon-to-photo ratio η given current observational uncertainties. We also performed sensitivity studies to determine the impact that particular nuclear physics measurements would have on the uncertainties of predicted abundances and on the η constraint.

  4. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis: Impact of Nuclear Physics Uncertainties on Baryonic Matter Density Constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Michael S.; Roberts, Luke F.; Hix, W. Raphael; Bruner, Blake D.; Kozub, Raymond L.; Tytler, David; Fuller, George M.; Lingerfelt, Eric; Nesaraja, Caroline D.

    2008-01-01

    We performed new Big Bang Nucleosynthesis simulations with the bigbangonline.org suite of codes to determine, from the nuclear physics perspective, the highest achievable precision of the constraint on the baryon-to-photo ratio η given current observational uncertainties. We also performed sensitivity studies to determine the impact that particular nuclear physics measurements would have on the uncertainties of predicted abundances and on the η constraint

  5. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis: Impact of Nuclear Physics Uncertainties on Baryonic Matter Density Constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Michael Scott; Bruner, Blake D; KOZUB, RAYMOND L.; Roberts, Luke F.; Tytler, David; Fuller, George M.; Lingerfelt, Eric; Hix, William Raphael; Nesaraja, Caroline D

    2008-01-01

    We ran new Big Bang Nucleosynthesis simulations with the bigbangonline.org suite of codes to determine, from the nuclear physics perspective, the highest achievable precision of the constraint on the baryon-to-photo ratio eta given current observational uncertainties. We also ran sensitivity studies to determine the impact that particular nuclear physics measurements would have on the uncertainties of predicted abundances and on the eta constraint

  6. Wigner-Kirkwood expansion of the phase-space density for half infinite nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, M.; Schuck, P.

    1987-01-01

    The phase space distribution of half infinite nuclear matter is expanded in a ℎ-series analogous to the low temperature expansion of the Fermi function. Besides the usual Wigner-Kirkwood expansion, oscillatory terms are derived. In the case of a Woods-Saxon potential, a smallness parameter is defined, which determines the convergence of the series and explains the very rapid convergence of the Wigner-Kirkwood expansion for average (nuclear) binding energies

  7. Process for solidifying high-level nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Wayne A.

    1978-01-01

    The addition of a small amount of reducing agent to a mixture of a high-level radioactive waste calcine and glass frit before the mixture is melted will produce a more homogeneous glass which is leach-resistant and suitable for long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste products.

  8. The effects of food level and conspecific density on biting and cannibalism in larval long-toed salamanders, Ambystoma macrodactylum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, Erica L; Chivers, Douglas P; Kiesecker, Joseph M; Blaustein, Andrew R

    2001-07-01

    Previous studies have examined abiotic and biotic factors that facilitate agonistic behavior. For larval amphibians, food availability and conspecific density have been suggested as important factors influencing intraspecific aggression and cannibalism. In this study, we examined the separate and combined effects of food availability and density on the agonistic behavior and life history of larval long-toed salamanders, Ambystoma macrodactylum. We designed a 2×2 factorial experiment in which larvae were raised with either a high or low density of conspecifics and fed either a high or low level of food. For each treatment, we quantified the amount of group size variation, biting, and cannibalism occurring. Additionally, we examined survival to, time to and size at metamorphosis for all larvae. Results indicated that differences in both density and food level influenced all three life history traits measured. Moreover, differences in food level at which larvae were reared resulted in higher within-group size variation and heightened intraspecific biting while both density and food level contributed to increased cannibalism. We suggest that increased hunger levels and an uneven size structure promoted biting among larvae in the low food treatments. Moreover, these factors combined with a higher encounter rate with conspecifics in the high density treatments may have prompted larger individuals to seek an alternative food source in the form of smaller conspecifics.

  9. Efficient calculation of nuclear spin-rotation constants from auxiliary density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Gutierrez, Bernardo, E-mail: bzuniga.51@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciencias Computacionales, Universidad de Guadalajara, Blvd. Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Camacho-Gonzalez, Monica [Universidad Tecnológica de Tecámac, División A2, Procesos Industriales, Carretera Federal México Pachuca Km 37.5, Col. Sierra Hermosa, C.P. 55740 Tecámac, Estado de México (Mexico); Bendana-Castillo, Alfonso [Universidad Tecnológica de Tecámac, División A3, Tecnologías de la Información y Comunicaciones, Carretera Federal México Pachuca Km 37.5, Col. Sierra Hermosa, C.P. 55740 Tecámac, Estado de México (Mexico); Simon-Bastida, Patricia [Universidad Tecnlógica de Tulancingo, División Electromecánica, Camino a Ahuehuetitla No. 301, Col. Las Presas, C.P. 43642 Tulancingo, Hidalgo (Mexico); Calaminici, Patrizia; Köster, Andreas M. [Departamento de Química, CINVESTAV, Avenida Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, A.P. 14-740, México D.F. 07000 (Mexico)

    2015-09-14

    The computation of the spin-rotation tensor within the framework of auxiliary density functional theory (ADFT) in combination with the gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) scheme, to treat the gauge origin problem, is presented. For the spin-rotation tensor, the calculation of the magnetic shielding tensor represents the most demanding computational task. Employing the ADFT-GIAO methodology, the central processing unit time for the magnetic shielding tensor calculation can be dramatically reduced. In this work, the quality of spin-rotation constants obtained with the ADFT-GIAO methodology is compared with available experimental data as well as with other theoretical results at the Hartree-Fock and coupled-cluster level of theory. It is found that the agreement between the ADFT-GIAO results and the experiment is good and very similar to the ones obtained by the coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative triples-GIAO methodology. With the improved computational performance achieved, the computation of the spin-rotation tensors of large systems or along Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories becomes feasible in reasonable times. Three models of carbon fullerenes containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions are used for benchmarking the performance. Furthermore, a theoretical study of temperature effects on the structure and spin-rotation tensor of the H{sup 12}C–{sup 12}CH–DF complex is presented. Here, the temperature dependency of the spin-rotation tensor of the fluorine nucleus can be used to identify experimentally the so far unknown bent isomer of this complex. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that temperature effects on the spin-rotation tensor are investigated.

  10. Efficient calculation of nuclear spin-rotation constants from auxiliary density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga-Gutierrez, Bernardo; Camacho-Gonzalez, Monica; Bendana-Castillo, Alfonso; Simon-Bastida, Patricia; Calaminici, Patrizia; Köster, Andreas M.

    2015-01-01

    The computation of the spin-rotation tensor within the framework of auxiliary density functional theory (ADFT) in combination with the gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) scheme, to treat the gauge origin problem, is presented. For the spin-rotation tensor, the calculation of the magnetic shielding tensor represents the most demanding computational task. Employing the ADFT-GIAO methodology, the central processing unit time for the magnetic shielding tensor calculation can be dramatically reduced. In this work, the quality of spin-rotation constants obtained with the ADFT-GIAO methodology is compared with available experimental data as well as with other theoretical results at the Hartree-Fock and coupled-cluster level of theory. It is found that the agreement between the ADFT-GIAO results and the experiment is good and very similar to the ones obtained by the coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative triples-GIAO methodology. With the improved computational performance achieved, the computation of the spin-rotation tensors of large systems or along Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories becomes feasible in reasonable times. Three models of carbon fullerenes containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions are used for benchmarking the performance. Furthermore, a theoretical study of temperature effects on the structure and spin-rotation tensor of the H 12 C– 12 CH–DF complex is presented. Here, the temperature dependency of the spin-rotation tensor of the fluorine nucleus can be used to identify experimentally the so far unknown bent isomer of this complex. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that temperature effects on the spin-rotation tensor are investigated

  11. Efficient calculation of nuclear spin-rotation constants from auxiliary density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga-Gutierrez, Bernardo; Camacho-Gonzalez, Monica; Bendana-Castillo, Alfonso; Simon-Bastida, Patricia; Calaminici, Patrizia; Köster, Andreas M

    2015-09-14

    The computation of the spin-rotation tensor within the framework of auxiliary density functional theory (ADFT) in combination with the gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) scheme, to treat the gauge origin problem, is presented. For the spin-rotation tensor, the calculation of the magnetic shielding tensor represents the most demanding computational task. Employing the ADFT-GIAO methodology, the central processing unit time for the magnetic shielding tensor calculation can be dramatically reduced. In this work, the quality of spin-rotation constants obtained with the ADFT-GIAO methodology is compared with available experimental data as well as with other theoretical results at the Hartree-Fock and coupled-cluster level of theory. It is found that the agreement between the ADFT-GIAO results and the experiment is good and very similar to the ones obtained by the coupled-cluster single-doubles-perturbative triples-GIAO methodology. With the improved computational performance achieved, the computation of the spin-rotation tensors of large systems or along Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories becomes feasible in reasonable times. Three models of carbon fullerenes containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions are used for benchmarking the performance. Furthermore, a theoretical study of temperature effects on the structure and spin-rotation tensor of the H(12)C-(12)CH-DF complex is presented. Here, the temperature dependency of the spin-rotation tensor of the fluorine nucleus can be used to identify experimentally the so far unknown bent isomer of this complex. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that temperature effects on the spin-rotation tensor are investigated.

  12. The disposal of high level nuclear waste in the oceans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilks, Gustavs

    1976-01-01

    A report is given on a meeting held at Woods Hole, Massachusetts to consider the feasibility of using the sea bed as a disposal site for highly radioactive nuclear waste. Some disadvantages are explained, the chief being that ocean water alone, regardless of depth, is a poor barrier. Some delegates discussed emplacement of vitrified waste on the ocean floor, and others its burial in rock or sediment below the floor. The most suitable sites are the mid-plate/mid-gyse localities of abyssal hills. Some engineering work on submarine burial has been done by Sandia Labs., in the U.S.A. Ocean disposal is particularly interesting to Britain and Japan. Data on biological transport rates are needed. (author)

  13. Statistical cluster analysis and diagnosis of nuclear system level performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teichmann, T.; Levine, M.M.; Samanta, P.K.; Kato, W.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The complexity of individual nuclear power plants and the importance of maintaining reliable and safe operations makes it desirable to complement the deterministic analyses of these plants by corresponding statistical surveys and diagnoses. Based on such investigations, one can then explore, statistically, the anticipation, prevention, and when necessary, the control of such failures and malfunctions. This paper, and the accompanying one by Samanta et al., describe some of the initial steps in exploring the feasibility of setting up such a program on an integrated and global (industry-wide) basis. The conceptual statistical and data framework was originally outlined in BNL/NUREG-51609, NUREG/CR-3026, and the present work aims at showing how some important elements might be implemented in a practical way (albeit using hypothetical or simulated data)

  14. Relation of bone mineral density with homocysteine and cathepsin K levels in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukar Mittal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Homocysteine (HCY interferes with collagen cross-linking in bones and stimulates osteoclast activity. The activated osteoclasts secrete cathepsin K (CathK, a cysteine protease, in eminent quantity during bone resorption. Hyperhomocysteinemia may effect bone mineral density (BMD through CathK. We, therefore, examined the relation between HCY and BMD along with CathK, 25-hydroxyvit-D (25[OH]D, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH, and Vitamin B12. Materials and Methods: We recruited a total of 93 postmenopausal women between the age group of 45–60 years, attending the Endocrinology outpatient department at King George's Medical University, Lucknow. BMD was done by DXA scan using Hologic QDR1000 system. Based on the WHO criteria, patients were segregated into three groups as follows; normal bone mass, osteopenia, and osteoporosis. All women underwent routine biochemical laboratory parameters, HCY, Vitamin B12, and CathK levels. Results: Among 93 postmenopausal women, 56% (52 had osteoporosis. Nineteen percent (18 had normal BMD (mean age, 53.22 ± 8.5 years and 23 (25% had osteopenia (mean age 52.86 ± 6.67 years. The mean age in the osteoporetic group was 56.2 ± 6.9 years. The median (interquartile range levels of HCY in the three groups were 14.5 μmol/L (12.2–24.7, 15.05 μmol/L (12.1–19.9 and 13.2 μmol/L (10.3–17.0, respectively. CathK levels were similar in three groups 7.6 ng/ml (7.0–80.5, 8.3 ng/ml (7.3–8.5, and 8.6 ng/ml (7.2–8.9. Both HCY and CathK were found positively associated with serum phosphorus (r = 0.584, P < 2.01 and r = 0.249, P < 0.05, respectively. Levels of HCY positively correlate with PTH (r = 0.303, P < 0.01 and inversely with Vitamin B12 (r = −0.248, P < 0.05. No significant association was seen between CathK level and 25(OH D, iPTH, serum calcium. Conclusion: Low bone mass by DXA is a significant problem in postmenopausal females. HCY and CathK do not reliably correlate with bone loss in

  15. Workshop on the role of natural analogs in geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, W.M.; Kovach, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    A workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste (HLW) was held in San Antonio, Texas, on July 22-25, 1991. It was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). Invitations to the workshop were extended to a large number of individuals with a variety of technical and professional interests related to geologic disposal of nuclear waste and natural analog studies. The objective of the workshop was to examine the role of natural analog studies in performance assessment, site characterization, and prioritization of research related to geologic disposal of HLW

  16. Study on the relationship between serum testosterone level and forearm distal bone density in post-menopausal women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenqi; Zhou Zhengli; Li Xin; Zhou Jiwen

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the androgen level and bone density in post-menopausal women. Methods: Serum testosterone (T) level and forearm distal bone density (BMD) were measured in 39 past-menopausal women who had never taken any estrogen or calcium preparation. Their serum estradiol (E 2 ) levels were about the same. According to their BMD, the 39 subjects were divided into normal (n = 22) and osteoporotic (n = 17) groups. Results: The mean serum testosterone (T) level in the normal group was significantly higher than that in the osteoporotic group (p 1 = 0.72, r 2 0.75; p 1 and r 2 was 0.14, suggesting similarity of the positive cor-relationship for both groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Serum testosterone level seems to bear close relationship with bone density and osteoporosis

  17. Nuclear Level Mixing: From a Curiosity to Applications in Nuclear Physics, Solid State Physics and Gamma Optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neyens, Gerda

    2001-01-01

    The history of 'Nuclear Level Mixing' is closely related to the research that Prof. Coussement performed during the last 25 years. In particular, the impact of this quantum mechanical concept on different research fields will be discussed. Without going in detail, we aim to give the reader an idea of how one single concept may lead to different discoveries

  18. Effects of long-term exposure of tuffs to high-level nuclear waste-repository conditions. Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blacic, J.; Carter, J.; Halleck, P.; Johnson, P.; Shankland, T.; Andersen, R.; Spicochi, K.; Heller, A.

    1982-02-01

    Tests have been performed to explore the effects of extended exposure of tuffs from the southwestern portion of the Nevada Test Site to temperatures and pressures similar to those that will be encountered in a high-level nuclear waste repository. Tuff samples ranging from highly welded, nonzeolitized to unwelded, highly zeolitized varieties were subjected to temperatures of 80, 120, and 180 0 C; confining pressures of 9.7 and 19.7 MPa; and water-pore pressures of 0.5 to 19.7 MPa for durations of 2 to 6 months. The following basic properties were measured before and after exposure and compared: tensile strength, uniaxial compressive strength, grain density, porosity, mineralogy, permeability, thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity. Depending on rock type and exposure conditions, significant changes in ambient tensile strength, compressive strength, grain density, and porosity were measured. Mineralogic examination, permeability, and thermal property measurements remain to be completed

  19. Fluctuation properties of nuclear energy levels and widths: comparison of theory with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohigas, O.; Haq, R.U.; Pandey, A.

    1982-09-01

    We analyze the fluctuation properties of nuclear energy levels and widths with new spectrally averaged measures. A remarkably close agreement between the predictions of random-matrix theories and experiment is found

  20. Bone mineral density levels of college-aged women in northwest Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, Kate; Ford, Mary Allison; Turner, Lori Waite; Denny, George

    2003-11-01

    Osteoporosis has affected more than 20 million American, women, completely altering their way of life. Osteoporosis is highly preventable if steps are taken to build healthy bone; however, many college students do not have lifestyle habits that have a positive effect on their bones. For this study, a questionnaire was used to investigate childhood dairy consumption, high school sport participation, dieting behaviors, eating behaviors and bone mineral density levels of college women at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. Eighty percent of the participants were Caucasian or of Asian descent, while 20% were of other races; 34% of the participants consumed three or more servings of milk a day as children, while current calcium consumption was at an average of 16 servings a week. Many of the participants were active in high school, as 67% participated in high school sports. Fifty-two percent of the college women in the sample had dieted in the past year, and 44% perceived they were not at a desirable weight. Forty-five percent skip more than three meals a week. Of the participants, two had osteoporosis and 23 had osteopenia. Clearly, development of osteoporosis is not limited to older adults, and college women are in need of education related to bone health.

  1. Impact of Hypertriglyceridemia on Carotid Stenosis Progression under Normal Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagami, Masayuki; Yasuda, Ryuta; Toma, Naoki; Shiba, Masato; Nampei, Mai; Yamamoto, Yoko; Nakatsuka, Yoshinari; Sakaida, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2017-08-01

    Dyslipidemia is a well-known risk factor for carotid stenosis progression, but triglycerides have attracted little attention. The aim of this study was to assess if serum triglycerides affect progression of carotid stenosis in patients with well-controlled low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. This is a retrospective study in a single hospital consisting of 71 Japanese patients with internal carotid artery stenosis greater than or equal to 50% and normal serum LDL-C levels who underwent angiographic examination with or without the resultant carotid artery stenting or endarterectomy from 2007 to 2011, and were subsequently followed up for 4 years. Clinical factors including fasting serum triglyceride values were compared between the progression (≥10% increase in degree of carotid stenosis on ultrasonography) and the nonprogression groups. During 4 years, 15 patients (21.1%) had carotid stenosis progression on either side. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that symptomatic cases (hazard ratio [HR], 4.327; P = .019), coexisting intracranial arteriosclerotic stenosis (HR, 5.341; P = .005), and hypertriglyceridemia (HR, 6.228; P = .011) were associated with subsequent progression of carotid stenosis. Kaplan-Meier plots demonstrated that the progression-free survival rate was significantly higher in patients without hypertriglyceridemia and intracranial arteriosclerotic stenosis at baseline. Among patients with moderate to severe carotid stenosis and well-controlled LDL-C, hypertriglyceridemia was an important risk factor for progression of carotid stenosis irrespective of surgical treatments. It would be worthwhile to test if triglyceride-lowering medications suppress carotid stenosis progression. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Secretory IgA, albumin level, and bone density as markers of biostimulatory effects of laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucerova, Hana; Dostalova, Tatjana; Himmlova, Lucia; Bartova, Jirina; Mazanek, Jiri

    1998-12-01

    The aim of contribution is to evaluate the effects of low- level laser radiation on healing process after human molars extraction in lower jaw using frequency 5 Hz, 292 Hz and 9000 Hz. Changes in bone density and monitoring of secretory IgA and albumin levels in saliva were used as a marker of biostimulatory effect. Bone density after extraction and 6 month after surgical treatment was examined using the dental digital radiography. Bone healing was followed by osseointegration of bone structure in extraction wound. Changes of bone density, secretory IgA and albumin levels were compared in groups of patients with laser therapy and control group without laser therapy. Differences in levels of the saliva markers (sIgA and albumin) were found to be significant comparing irradiated and non-irradiated groups, as well as comparing groups irradiated by various modulatory frequencies. Density of alveolar bone (histogram) was examined on five slices acquired from every RVG image. Histograms were evaluated with computer program for microscopic image analysis. Differences of density were verified in area of the whole slice. There were no significant differences found between the bone density in irradiated and non irradiated groups perhaps due to our used therapeutical diagram.

  3. The control density of the administrative courts with regard to nuclear licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deppe, V.

    1982-01-01

    A possibility does not exist to limit the extent of the activities of administrative courts with regard to the control of the nuclear license decision by a shifting of one part of the ultimate decision competence from the jurisdiction to the executive. The responsibility of the administrative courts which is established in the constitution gives them a comprehensive controlling function with regard to nuclear licensing. Their right of ultimate decision, which is established in the constitution, corresponds to a duty of ultimate decision, which is of paramount importance in such a fundamental law relevant area, as it is nuclear law. The legislator has to help the overburdened courts. The courts themselves are bound to their responsibility as it is laid down in the constitution and the Atomic Energy Act to guarantee legal protection so that any form of self-restraint is inadmissable. (orig./HSCH) [de

  4. Low-level radon measurements by nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koksal, E. M.; Goksel, S. A.; Alkan, H.

    1985-01-01

    In the work to be described here we have developed a passive nuclear track dosimeter to measure the integrated value of indoor radon (Rn-222) over a long period of time. Passive radon dosimeter which we have developed in our laboratories makes use of two small pieces of CR-39 plastic (Allyl diglycol carbonate) as detectors for registering tracks of alpha particles emitted by radon. These CR-39 plastic detectors are fixed on the inside bottom of a cup-shaped polystrene enclosure which is closed at the top by a tissue permeable for gases only. CR-39 detectors exposed to radon gas in the indoor air for a period of six months then are removed and chemically etched to make the alpha particle tracks visible under the microscope. The counts of tracks are evaluated to determine the radon concentration in the air in comparison with the number of tracks produced by a known concentration of radon gas. By using the passive dosimeters developed and the chemical etching procedure descriped here, measurements of indoor radon concentrations were carried out in 45 houses in different districts of the city of Istanbul. In this pilot experiment mean radon concentrations between 0.7 and 3.5 pCi/l have been found in these houses. In order to improve the counting of alpha tracks produced on the detectors a prototype electrochemical etching system in addition to chemical etching, is being developed. (author)

  5. Corrosion susceptibility of steel drums containing cemented intermediate level nuclear wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffó, Gustavo S.; Farina, Silvia B.; Schulz, Fátima M.; Marotta, Francesca

    2010-10-01

    Cementation processes are used as immobilization techniques for low or intermediate level radioactive waste for economical and safety reasons and for being a simple operation. In particular, ion-exchange resins commonly used for purification of radioactive liquid waste from nuclear reactors are immobilized before being stored to improve the leach resistance of the waste matrix and to maintain mechanical stability. Combustible solid radioactive waste can be incinerated and the resulting ashes can also be immobilized before storage. The immobilized resins and ashes are then contained in steel drums that may undergo corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The work described in this paper was aimed at evaluating the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins and incineration ashes containing different concentrations of aggressive species (mostly chloride and sulphate ions). A special type of specimen was designed to simulate the cemented waste in the drum. The evolution of the corrosion potential and the corrosion current density of the steel, as well as the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored over a time period of 1 year. The results show the deleterious effect of chloride on the expected lifespan of the waste containers.

  6. Corrosion susceptibility of steel drums containing cemented intermediate level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffo, Gustavo S.; Farina, Silvia B.; Schulz, Fatima M.; Marotta, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Cementation processes are used as immobilization techniques for low or intermediate level radioactive waste for economical and safety reasons and for being a simple operation. In particular, ion-exchange resins commonly used for purification of radioactive liquid waste from nuclear reactors are immobilized before being stored to improve the leach resistance of the waste matrix and to maintain mechanical stability. Combustible solid radioactive waste can be incinerated and the resulting ashes can also be immobilized before storage. The immobilized resins and ashes are then contained in steel drums that may undergo corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The work described in this paper was aimed at evaluating the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins and incineration ashes containing different concentrations of aggressive species (mostly chloride and sulphate ions). A special type of specimen was designed to simulate the cemented waste in the drum. The evolution of the corrosion potential and the corrosion current density of the steel, as well as the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored over a time period of 1 year. The results show the deleterious effect of chloride on the expected lifespan of the waste containers.

  7. Spatial variability in alluvium properties at a low-level nuclear waste site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Istok, J.D.; Blout, D.O.; Barker, L.; Johnejack, K.R.; Hammermeister, D.P.

    1994-01-01

    Geological and statistical models for the spatial variability of soil properties are needed to predict field-scale water flow and solute transport but only limited information is currently available on unsaturated soils below the root zone. Spatial variability of selected physical and hydrologic properties was quantified for fine- and coarse-grained alluvial deposits at a low-level nuclear waste disposal site on the Nevada Test Site. Gravimetric water content (w), bulk density (ρ b ), saturated hydraulic conductivity (K a ), and particle-size distribution were determined for vertical and horizontal core specimens and bulk samples collected from 183-m-long horizontal transects in two existing waste disposal trenches located on a single alluvial fan. The transects were approximately aligned parallel and perpendicular to the principal direction of sediment transport. Properties were modeled as either normally or lognormally distributed random variables. Sample coefficients of variation were smallest for ρ b and largest for log(K a ); a weak correlation was identified between log(K a ) and the grain-size parameter d 10 . Particle-size distributions for the fine- and coarse-grained materials were different and significant differences in the natural logarithm of saturated hydraulic conductivity, log(K a ), existed between coarse and fine layers in an excavation aligned with the principal direction of alluvium deposition but not in a perpendicular direction. 37 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs

  8. Level density, radiative strength functions from the (nth, 2 γ) reaction and main properties of the 96Mo nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.; Khitrov, V.A.

    2008-01-01

    The data published on two-step cascade intensities to 12 final levels of 96 Mo were approximated for different energies of excitations and dipole primary E1- and M1-transitions by a set of different random dependencies of the level density and strength functions. The averaged values of these parameters of gamma-decay well correspond to main dependencies revealed by now from analogous experiments for 42 nuclei from the mass region 40 ≤ A ≤ 200. They do not correspond to the existing ideas of the cascade gamma-decay parameters of compound nuclei with high level density

  9. Examination of the Current Approaches to State-Level Nuclear Security Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan; Yim, Mansung; Kim, So Young

    2014-01-01

    An effective global nuclear materials security system will cover all materials, employ international standards and best practices, and reduce risks by reducing weapons-usable nuclear material stocks and the number of locations where they are found. Such a system must also encourage states to accept peer reviews by outside experts in order to demonstrate that effective security is in place. It is thus critically important to create an integrative framework of state-level evaluation of nuclear security as a basis for measuring the level and progress of international effort to secure and control all nuclear materials. There have been studies to represent state-level nuclear security with a quantitative metric. A prime example is the Nuclear Materials Security Index (NMSI) by the Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI). Another comprehensive study is the State Level Risk Metric by Texas A and M University (TAMU). This paper examines the current methods with respect to their strengths and weaknesses and identifies the directions for future research to improve upon the existing approaches

  10. Developing Curriculum of Nuclear Civil Engineering Degree Programme at Graduate Level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The paper suggests the introduction of a new degree, namely nuclear civil engineering at graduate level for better utilization of civil engineers in nuclear power plant (NPP) design and construction. At present, both nuclear engineering and civil engineering degrees are offered at undergraduate and graduate levels in numerous renowned universities of the world. However, when a civil engineer, even after completion of nuclear engineering at postgraduate level, undertakes an assignment related to NPP design, he comes across various problems which are not covered in the present curricula. For instance, NPPs’ siting issues, design of pre-stressed concrete containment against loads of loss of coolant accident (LOCA), various impulsive and impactive loads (e.g., detonations, aircraft crash analysis, etc.) and shielding calculations are some of the core issues during nuclear power plant design. The paper highlights the importance of introduction of nuclear civil engineering degree at the graduate level. Besides, the contents of the proposed course work have also been discussed. Keeping in view the fact that, currently, no such degree is offered in any university of the world, the paper explores useful avenues to human resource development for introducing and expanding nuclear power programmes. (author

  11. Study on Method of Asphalt Density Measurement Using Low Level Radioactive Isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin-young; Kim, Jung-hoon; Whang, Joo-ho

    2008-01-01

    The fundamental cause of damage to road pavement is insufficient management of asphalt density during construction. Currently, asphalt density in Korea is measured in a laboratory by extracting a core sample after construction. This method delays the overall time of measurement and therefore it is difficult to achieve real-time density management. Using a radioactive isotope for measuring asphalt density during construction reduces measuring time thus enabling realtime measurement. Also, it is provided reliable density measurement to achieve effective density management at work sites. However, existing radiological equipment has not been widely used because of management restrictions and regulations due to the high radiation dose. In this study, we employed a non-destructive method for density measurement. Density is measured by using a portable gamma-ray backscatter device having a radioactivity emission of 100 μCi or less (notice No. 2002-23, Ministry of Science and Technology, standards on radiation protection, etc.), a sealed radioactive source subject to declaration

  12. Reliability and precision of pellet-group counts for estimating landscape-level deer density

    Science.gov (United States)

    David S. deCalesta

    2013-01-01

    This study provides hitherto unavailable methodology for reliably and precisely estimating deer density within forested landscapes, enabling quantitative rather than qualitative deer management. Reliability and precision of the deer pellet-group technique were evaluated in 1 small and 2 large forested landscapes. Density estimates, adjusted to reflect deer harvest and...

  13. Nationwide survey of radon levels in indoor workplaces in Mexico using Nuclear Track Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J.I.; Angeles, A.; Griffith, R.V.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary results of an indoor workplace radon survey conducted during 2006-2007. Monitoring was carried out in 24 of the 32 federal entities of Mexico, incorporating 26 cities and 288 locations. The area monitored was divided into 8 regions for the purposes of the study: Chihuahua (a state with uranium mines), North-Central, South-Central, Southeast, South, Northeast, Northwest, and West. These regions differ in terms of geographic and geological characteristics, climate, altitude, and building materials and architectonic styles. Nuclear Track Methodology (NTM) was employed for the survey, using a passive closed-end cup device with Poly Allyl Diglycol Carbonate (PADC), known by its trade name CR-39 (Lantrack), as detector material. Well-established protocols for making continuous indoor radon measurements were followed, including one-step chemical etching in a 6.25 M KOH solution at 60 ± 1 deg. C with an etching time of 18 h. The track densities were determined with an automatic digital system at the Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (IFUNAM) (Physics Institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico), and calibrated in facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The importance of this survey lies in the fact that it represents the first time a nationwide survey of radon levels in indoor workplaces has been carried out in Mexico. Mean indoor radon levels from continuous measurements taken during and after working hours ranged from 13 Bq m -3 (the lower limit of detection) to 196 Bq m -3 . Analogous official controls or regulations for radon levels in indoor workplaces do not exist in Mexico. The survey described here contributes to knowledge of the natural radiological environment in workplaces, and will aid the relevant authorities in establishing appropriate regulations. The survey was made possible by the efforts of both a private institutions and the Dosimeter Application Project

  14. Application of smart transmitter technology in nuclear engineering measurements with level detection algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyun Gook; Seong, Poong Hyun

    1994-01-01

    In this study a programmable smart transmitter is designed and applied to the nuclear engineering measurements. In order to apply the smart transmitter technology to nuclear engineering measurements, the water level detection function is developed and applied in this work. In the real time system, the application of level detection algorithm can make the operator of the nuclear power plant sense the water level more rapidly. Furthermore this work can simplify the data communication between the level-sensing thermocouples and the main signal processor because the level signal is determined at field. The water level detection function reduces the detection time to about 8.3 seconds by processing the signal which has the time constant 250 seconds and the heavy noise signal

  15. Analytical total reaction cross-section calculations via Fermi-type functions. I. Fermi-step nuclear densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abul-Magd, A.Y.; Talib aly al Hinai, M.

    2000-01-01

    In the framework of Glauber's multiple scattering theory we propose a closed form expression for the total nucleus-nucleus reaction cross-section. We adopt the Gaussian and the two-parameter Fermi step radial shapes to describe the nuclear density distributions of the projectile and the target, respectively. The present formula is used to study different systems over a wide energy range including low energy reactions, where the role of the Coulomb repulsion is taken into account. The present predictions reasonably reproduce experiment

  16. An analysis of instabilities of nuclear-coupled density-wave in BWR using modern frequency-domain control theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yangping; Gao Huahun; Fu Longzhou

    1991-01-01

    A state-of-the-art multi-variable frequency-domain model has been developed for analysis of instabilities of nuclear-coupled density-wave in BWR core. The characteristic locus method is used for analysing the stability of BWR. A computer code-NUCTHIA has been derived. The model has been tested against the existing experimental data and compared with results of past single-variable analyses. By using the NUCTHIA code, the investigations of effects of main system parameters on BWW core stability have also been made. All the results are consistent with the experimental data

  17. 76 FR 35137 - Vulnerability and Threat Information for Facilities Storing Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... High-Level Radioactive Waste AGENCY: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Public meeting... Nuclear Fuel, High-Level Radioactive Waste, and Reactor-Related Greater Than Class C Waste,'' and 73... Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) storage facilities. The draft regulatory...

  18. High density, uniformly distributed W/UO2 for use in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Barnes, Marvin W.; Hone, Lance; Cook, Steven

    2017-04-01

    An inexpensive, quick method has been developed to obtain uniform distributions of UO2 particles in a tungsten matrix utilizing 0.5 wt percent low density polyethylene. Powders were sintered in a Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) furnace at 1600 °C, 1700 °C, 1750 °C, 1800 °C and 1850 °C using a modified sintering profile. This resulted in a uniform distribution of UO2 particles in a tungsten matrix with high densities, reaching 99.46% of theoretical for the sample sintered at 1850 °C. The powder process is described and the results of this study are given below.

  19. Status of the French nuclear high level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.

    1985-09-01

    French research on high level waste processing has led to the development of industrial vitrification facilities. Borosilicate glass is still being investigated for its long-term storage properties, since it is itself a component of the containment system. The other constituents of this system, the engineered barriers, are also being actively investigated. The geological barrier is now being assessed using a methodology applicable to various types of geological formations, and final site qualification should be possible before the end of 1992

  20. Intervention levels for protective measures in nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.

    1992-12-01

    A radiation protection philosophy for exposure situations following an accident has been developed by international organisations such as the ICRP, IAEA, NES/OECD, FAO/WHO, and the CEC during the last decade. After the Chernobyl accident, the application of radiation protection principles for intervention situations such as exposure from accidental contamination or radon in dwellings were further developed and this work is still in progress. The present intervention policy recommended by the international organisations as well as by the Nordic radiation protection authorities is reviewed. The Nordic Intervention levels for foodstuff restrictions, both for the Chernobyl and post-Chernobyl periods, have been based on dose limits and they are therefore in conflict with international intervention policy. Illustrative examples on intervention level setting for relocation and foodstuff restrictions are derived for Nordic conditions from the optimisation principle recommended by the international organisations. Optimised Generic Intervention Levels have been determined to be about 10 mSv x month -1 for relocation/return and 5,000-30,000 Bqxkg -1 for restrictions on various foodstuffs contaminated with 137 Cs and 131 I. (au) (14 tabs., 1 ill., 16 refs.)

  1. Growth Analysis of Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum- graecum L. under Various Levels of Nitrogen and Plant Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Bazrkar-Khatibani

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L. is a specific condiment crop mostly grown for its edible parts, and is used as a green fodder and fresh vegetable. The seeds have medicinal value solely against digestive disorders, whereas its leaves are rich source of minerals and nutrients. The growth and yield of fenugreek is particularly affected by the application of nitrogen fertilizer and planting arrangement. Plant growth is a process of biomass accumulation which in turn is derived out of the interaction of the respiration, photosynthesis, water relations, long-distance transport, and mineral nutrition processes. Growth is the most important process in predicting plant reactions to environment. Irradiance, temperature, soil-water potential, nutrient supply and enhanced concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide are among some external components influencing crop growth and development. Growth analysis is a useful tool in studying the complex interactions between plant growth and the environment, clarifying and interpreting physiological responses. Plants total dry matter (TDM production and accumulation can be appraised via relative growth rate (RGR and crop growth rate (CGR which are the most important growth indices. Leaf area index (LAI is a factor of crop growth analysis that accounts for the potential of the crop to assimilate light energy and is a determinant component in understanding the function of many crop management practices. Materials and Methods A field investigation was conducted in a paddy field at Shaft County (Guilan Province for eight consecutive months (from November 2009 to June 2010, to study the effect of four levels of nitrogen fertilizer (0, 25, 50 and 75 Kg N ha-1 and four levels of planting density (60, 80,100, and 120 plants m-2 on the growth indices of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum L. crop. The soil for the experiment was loam in texture and strongly acidic in reaction (pH 4.5. Sixteen treatment

  2. Are serotonin metabolite levels related to bone mineral density in patients with neuroendocrine tumours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen Gupta, Piya; Grozinsky-Glasberg, Simona; Drake, William M; Akker, Scott A; Perry, Les; Grossman, Ashley B; Druce, Maralyn R

    2014-02-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is influenced by multiple factors. Recent studies have highlighted a possible relationship between serotonin and BMD. Patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) frequently have elevated urinary 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels, a serotonin metabolite. Evaluation of the relationship between 5-HIAA and BMD in patients with NETs may provide insights into the relationship between serotonin and BMD. One-year audit of consecutive patients with NETs within two institutions. Relationships between urinary 5-HIAA and dual X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)-scan-measured BMD were investigated by group comparisons, correlation and regression. Of 65 patients with NETs, 19 did not participate or were excluded. Of 46 subjects evaluated (48·9% males, 63·8 ± 10·5 years, BMI 26·6 ± 4·4 kg/m(2) ) with 32 gastrointestinal, 9 pancreatic, 3 pulmonary and 2 ovarian NETs, 72·3% had the carcinoid syndrome. Median interval from diagnosis was 4·0 years (IQR 2·0-6·0); 41·3% had osteoporosis and 32·6% osteopaenia (WHO definition). The group with a higher urinary 5-HIAA had a lower hip BMD (total T-score and Z-score), confirmed on individual analysis (Spearman's rank correlation -0·41, P = 0·004; -0·44, P = 0·002, respectively); urinary 5-HIAA was not found to be an independent predictor for BMD on multiple linear regression analysis. These data of patients with NETs with higher serotonin metabolites having a lower BMD at the hip in group and individual comparisons, warrants further evaluation. Urinary 5-HIAA measurement alone cannot be used to predict future BMD. A larger cohort with prospective design including fractures as a clinical outcome will aid these data in determining whether patients with NETs should be subject to targeted osteoporosis prevention. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Preliminary analysis of the relationship between serum lutein and zeaxanthin levels and macular pigment optical density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujimura S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Shigeto Fujimura,1,2 Kohei Ueda,1 Yoko Nomura,1 Yasuo Yanagi3,4 1Department of Ophthalmology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kanazawa University School of Medicine, Ishikawa, Japan; 3Singapore Eye Research Institute, 4Medical Retina Department, Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore Purpose: To assess the relationship between combined serum lutein and zeaxanthin (L+Z concentration and macular pigment optical density (MPOD, and to investigate the effect of L+Z+docosahexaenoic acid (DHA dietary supplementation on the spatial distribution of MPOD.Methods: Twenty healthy fellow eyes with unilateral wet age-related macular degeneration or chronic central serous chorioretinopathy were included. All participants received a dietary supplement for 6 months that contained 20 mg L, 1 mg Z, and 200 mg DHA. The best-corrected visual acuity and contrast sensitivity (CS were measured at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months. Serum L+Z concentrations were measured at baseline and at 3 months. MPOD was calculated at each time point using fundus autofluorescent images.Results: Serum L+Z concentration was correlated with MPOD at 1°–2° eccentricity at baseline (r=0.63, P=0.003 and 3 months (r=0.53, P=0.015. Serum L+Z concentration increased by a factor of 2.3±1.0 (P<0.0001. At 6 months, MPOD was significantly higher compared to the baseline level at 0°–0.25° (P=0.034 and 0.25°–0.5° (P=0.032 eccentricity. CS improved after 3 or 6 months of L+Z+DHA supplementation (P<0.05.Conclusion: Juxtafoveal MPOD was associated with serum L+Z concentration. Foveal MPOD was increased by L+Z+DHA dietary supplementation. Keywords: fundus autofluorescence, supplement, spatial distribution

  4. Elevated plasma low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in amenorrheic athletes: effects of endogenous hormone status and nutrient intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friday, K E; Drinkwater, B L; Bruemmer, B; Chesnut, C; Chait, A

    1993-12-01

    To determine the interactive effects of hormones, exercise, and diet on plasma lipids and lipoproteins, serum estrogen and progesterone levels, nutrient intake, and plasma lipid, lipoprotein, and apolipoprotein concentrations were measured in 24 hypoestrogenic amenorrheic and 44 eumenorrheic female athletes. When compared to eumenorrheic athletes, amenorrheic athletes had higher levels of plasma cholesterol (5.47 +/- 0.17 vs. 4.84 +/- 0.12 mmol/L, P = 0.003), triglyceride (0.75 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.61 +/- 0.03 mmol/L, P = 0.046), low-density lipoprotein (LDL; 3.16 +/- 0.15 vs. 2.81 +/- 0.09 mmol/L, P = 0.037), high-density lipoprotein (HDL; 1.95 +/- 0.07 vs. 1.73 +/- 0.05 mmol/L, P = 0.007), and HDL2 (0.84 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.68 +/- 0.04 mmol/L, P = 0.02) cholesterol. Plasma LDL/HDL cholesterol ratios, very low-density lipoprotein and HDL3 cholesterol, and apolipoprotein A-I and A-II levels were similar in the two groups. Amenorrheic athletes consumed less fat than eumenorrheic subjects (52 +/- 5 vs. 75 +/- 3 g/day, P = 0.02), but similar amounts of calories, cholesterol, protein, carbohydrate, and ethanol. HDL cholesterol levels in amenorrheic subjects correlated positively with the percent of dietary calories from fat (r = 0.42, n = 23, P = 0.045) but negatively with the percent from protein (r = -0.49, n = 23, P = 0.017). Thus, exercise-induced amenorrhea may adversely affect cardiovascular risk by increasing plasma LDL and total cholesterol. However, cardioprotective elevations in plasma HDL and HDL2 cholesterol may neutralize the risk of cardiovascular disease in amenorrheic athletes.

  5. Multiple external hazards compound level 3 PSA methods research of nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Handing; Liang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yang, Jianfeng; Liu, Weidong; Lei, Dina

    2017-01-01

    2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant severe accident was caused by both earthquake and tsunami, which results in large amount of radioactive nuclides release. That accident has caused the radioactive contamination on the surrounding environment. Although this accident probability is extremely small, once such an accident happens that is likely to release a lot of radioactive materials into the environment, and cause radiation contamination. Therefore, studying accidents consequences is important and essential to improve nuclear power plant design and management. Level 3 PSA methods of nuclear power plant can be used to analyze radiological consequences, and quantify risk to the public health effects around nuclear power plants. Based on multiple external hazards compound level 3 PSA methods studies of nuclear power plant, and the description of the multiple external hazards compound level 3 PSA technology roadmap and important technical elements, as well as taking a coastal nuclear power plant as the reference site, we analyzed the impact of off-site consequences of nuclear power plant severe accidents caused by multiple external hazards. At last we discussed the impact of off-site consequences probabilistic risk studies and its applications under multiple external hazards compound conditions, and explained feasibility and reasonableness of emergency plans implementation.

  6. Low-lying nuclear levels and radiative transitions in hadronic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, V.S.; Kudryavtsev, A.E.; Lisin, V.I.; Mur, V.D.

    1985-01-01

    The analytic theory of nuclear level shifts permit the position of the nuclear level perturbing the Coulomb spectrum to be calculated on the basis of the magnitude of the level shift of a hadron atom. As an example the K -4 He atom is discussed. The experimental data on the 2p-level shift indicate that a weakly bound p-state with a binding energy and width epsilon approximately γ approximately 0.5 MeV may exist in the system. The probabilities for radiative transitions to this level and the cross section for its creation in a nuclear reaction with 6 Li are calculated. The possible existence of weakly coupled K - and anti p states for other light nuclei is discussed. An exact solution of the model Coulomb problem with short range interaction is obtained and this permits the limits of validity of the initial approximations to be determined

  7. Extracting the noise spectral densities parameters of JFET transistor by modeling a nuclear electronics channel response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assaf, J.

    2009-07-01

    Mathematical model for the RMS noise of JFET transistor has been realized. Fitting the model according to the experimental results gives the noise spectral densities values. Best fitting was for the model of three noise sources and real preamplifier transfer function. After gamma irradiation, an additional and important noise sources appeared and two point defects are estimated through the fitting process. (author)

  8. Nuclear power plant personnel entry level qualifications and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, C.C.; Haas, P.M.; Selby, D.L.; Lowry, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the early results and current status of a research program at ORNL which is intended to provide the methods and technical basis for NRC to initiate the use of the Systems Approach to Training (SAT) in the evaluation of training programs and entry level qualifications for NPP control room personnel. The program is an outgrowth of previous studies of simulator hardware and simulator training requirements under the Safety Related Operator Actions Program which recommended adaptation of a systems methodology to development and evaluation of NPP training programs

  9. Comparative analysis to determine asphalt density and content, using nuclear and traditional methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margffoy S, F.R.; Robayo S, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Quality control for flex pavement construction in Colombia for asphaltic mix, as well as for granular and granular sub base layers is made by means of methods that does not guarantee the quality of the job, due to the difficult execution of tests, which impede more to be done or due to inherent problems of the test process. Thanks to the inherent characteristics and advantages of nuclear techniques, those become the optimal alternative to this quality control job. The present research project has been developed with the objective of justifying the use of new technologies applied to road construction; making a comparative analysis between traditional methods used in our country and nuclear techniques that have been using in United States with great success in quality control in road construction

  10. Study on density distribution and diffusion of deuterons in mono- and polycrystalline Ni absorbers using the nuclear reaction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintze, V.

    1976-01-01

    Irradiation experiments with cooled poly- and monocrystalline Ni absorbers are reported on. A very complex irradiation apparatus was set up, and a nuclear physics method was tested which enables an alignment of low-index crystal directions of monocrystalline absorbers in the target chamber with an exactness of at least 0.1 0 with regard to the ion beam. The nuclear reaction technique for the D(d,p)T reaction was developed far enough to enable a non-destructive determination of deuteron density distributions by analyzing proton spectra of this reaction. At low incorporation doses, there was no dose dependence of density distributions in monocrystalline Ni samples. Profile changes interpreted by a 'blurring' of the incident angle α due to an arching of the surface were only observed at doses Qsub(w) approximately > 3 x 10 18 deuterons/cm 2 . Furthermore, in polycrystalline Ni absorbers, there was a dependence of deuteron distributions on the angle between the beam and the absorber surface, which may be interpreted as a picture of a certain deposition, probability of single ions. In monocrystalline absorbers, range distributions for each of the low-index crystal directions were measured and compared with similar profiles of the polycrystalline absorber which had been measured at the same incident angle α. (orig.) [de

  11. The density jump at the inner core boundary using underground nuclear explosion records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnoshchekov, D.N.; Ovchinnikov, V.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the estimation of the minimum jump value using experimental wave forms reflected from the boundary between the Earth core and mantle (PcP) and the one between the inner and outer core (PKiKP) at a distance of 6 deg. Digital seismic records of underground nuclear tests conducted at the Semipalatinsk test site in 70s by Zerenda-Vostochny-Chkalovo seismic array have been used. (author)

  12. Meson dynamics and the nuclear many-body problem. II. Finite density Hartree-Fock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilets, L.; Puff, R.D.; Chiang, D.; Nutt, W.T.

    1976-01-01

    The field-theoretic many-nucleon problem is formulated, and an analysis which sums all ''uncrossed meson line'' diagrams is investigated in detail. The calculation of energy per nucleon, after proper identification of infinite mass renormalization terms, exhibits effects of nuclear recoil, relativistic kinematics, and retardation. Numerical results are presented for π and ω mesons, and the nucleon interaction energies obtained are compared with the traditional static limit of infinite nucleon mass

  13. Siting high-level nuclear waste repositories: A progress report for Rhode Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frohlich, R.K.; Vild, B.F.

    1986-03-01

    In this booklet, we will not try to argue the pros and cons of nuclear power or weapons production. We will focus instead on the issue of nuclear waste disposal. With the passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, the US Congress and the President charged federal and state regulators with the responsibility of settling that issue by the end of this century - with extensive public involvement. This booklet, now in its second printing, is designed to explain the nature of ''high-level'' nuclear waste, the essential criteria for its safe and permanent disposal, and Rhode Island's participation in the federal repository program. It has been funded from a USDOE grant derived from a utility-financed Nuclear Waste Fund established under the NWPA. 17 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional (UNEDF). SciDAC-2 Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vary, James P. [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Carlson, Joe; Furnstahl, Dick; Horoi, Mihai; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian

    2012-09-29

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. Until recently such an undertaking was hard to imagine, and even at the present time such an ambitious endeavor would be far beyond what a single researcher or a traditional research group could carry out. The UNEDF SciDAC project has developed several key computational codes and algorithms for reaching the goal of solving the nuclear quantum many-body problem throughout the chart of nuclei. Without such developments, scientific progress would not be possible. In addition the UNEDF SciDAC successfully applied these developments to solve many forefront research problems.

  15. Safe immobilization of high-level nuclear reactor wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringwood, A.; Kesson, S.; Ware, N.; Hibberson, W.; Major, A.

    1979-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of methods of immobilizing high-level radioactive wastes are discussed. Problems include the devitrification of glasses and the occurrence of radiation damage. An alternative method of radioctive waste immobilization is described in which the waste is incorporated in the constituent minerals of a synthetic rock, Synroc. Synroc is immune from devitrification and is composed of phases which possess crystal structures identical to those of minerals which are known to have retained radioactive elements in geological environments at elevated pressures and tempertures for long periods. The composition and mineralogy of Synroc is given and the process of immobilizing wastes in Synroc is described. Accelerated leaching tests at elevated pressures and temperatures are also described

  16. Nuclear Regulatory Commission low-level radioactive waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    It is believed that the priorities of NRC work in low-level waste management as described in this action plan are consistent with the needs of the overall national waste management program. Present licensing procedures and criteria are adequate for the short term, and priority attention is being given to the longer term, when the quantities of waste to be managed will be greater and licensing demand will increase. The plan makes use of expertise within NRC to achieve early results and is coordinated with other Federal agencies having related responsibilities. Since NRC decisions will affect industry, other governmental jurisdictions, private interest groups, and the public at large, procedures were developed to involve them in planning the program

  17. Using Direct Sub-Level Entity Access to Improve Nuclear Stockpile Simulation Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Robert Y. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Direct sub-level entity access is a seldom-used technique in discrete-event simulation modeling that addresses the accessibility of sub-level entity information. The technique has significant advantages over more common, alternative modeling methods--especially where hierarchical entity structures are modeled. As such, direct sub-level entity access is often preferable in modeling nuclear stockpile, life-extension issues, an area to which it has not been previously applied. Current nuclear stockpile, life-extension models were demonstrated to benefit greatly from the advantages of direct sub-level entity access. In specific cases, the application of the technique resulted in models that were up to 10 times faster than functionally equivalent models where alternative techniques were applied. Furthermore, specific implementations of direct sub-level entity access were observed to be more flexible, efficient, functional, and scalable than corresponding implementations using common modeling techniques. Common modeling techniques (''unbatch/batch'' and ''attribute-copying'') proved inefficient and cumbersome in handling many nuclear stockpile modeling complexities, including multiple weapon sites, true defect analysis, and large numbers of weapon and subsystem types. While significant effort was required to enable direct sub-level entity access in the nuclear stockpile simulation models, the enhancements were worth the effort--resulting in more efficient, more capable, and more informative models that effectively addressed the complexities of the nuclear stockpile.

  18. Decrease in lower level density due to cooling of gas temperature by thermal dissociation of hydrogen in copper vapor laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Ikuo; Hayashi, Kazuo; Iseki, Yasushi; Suzuki, Setsuo; Noda, Etsuo; Morimiya, Osamu

    1995-01-01

    A gas temperature calculation is carried out in the copper vapor laser (CVL) with a beam diameter of 80 mm in the case of H 2 addition into the Ne buffer gas. The on-axis gas temperature decreases to 2800K with 1% concentration of H 2 , whereas the gas temperature is 3400K without H 2 . The on-axis lower level density decreases due to the cooling of the gas temperature. This decrease in the lower level density is thought to bring about a non annular beam profile in the case of H 2 addition. (author)

  19. Fission fragment charge and mass distributions in 239Pu(n ,f ) in the adiabatic nuclear energy density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, D.; Dubray, N.; Schunck, N.; Verrière, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of fission fragment yields is an essential ingredient of numerous applications ranging from the formation of elements in the r process to fuel cycle optimization for nuclear energy. The need for a predictive theory applicable where no data are available, together with the variety of potential applications, is an incentive to develop a fully microscopic approach to fission dynamics. Purpose: In this work, we calculate the pre-neutron emission charge and mass distributions of the fission fragments formed in the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu using a microscopic method based on nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Methods: Our theoretical framework is the nuclear energy density functional (EDF) method, where large-amplitude collective motion is treated adiabatically by using the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM) under the Gaussian overlap approximation (GOA). In practice, the TDGCM is implemented in two steps. First, a series of constrained EDF calculations map the configuration and potential-energy landscape of the fissioning system for a small set of collective variables (in this work, the axial quadrupole and octupole moments of the nucleus). Then, nuclear dynamics is modeled by propagating a collective wave packet on the potential-energy surface. Fission fragment distributions are extracted from the flux of the collective wave packet through the scission line. Results: We find that the main characteristics of the fission charge and mass distributions can be well reproduced by existing energy functionals even in two-dimensional collective spaces. Theory and experiment agree typically within two mass units for the position of the asymmetric peak. As expected, calculations are sensitive to the structure of the initial state and the prescription for the collective inertia. We emphasize that results are also sensitive to the continuity of the collective landscape near scission. Conclusions: Our analysis confirms

  20. High density, uniformly distributed W/UO{sub 2} for use in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Dennis S., E-mail: dr.dennis.tucker@nasa.gov [EM32, MSFC, Al 35812 (United States); Barnes, Marvin W. [EM32, MSFC, Al 35812 (United States); Hone, Lance; Cook, Steven [Center for Space Nuclear Research, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    An inexpensive, quick method has been developed to obtain uniform distributions of UO{sub 2} particles in a tungsten matrix utilizing 0.5 wt percent low density polyethylene. Powders were sintered in a Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) furnace at 1600 °C, 1700 °C, 1750 °C, 1800 °C and 1850 °C using a modified sintering profile. This resulted in a uniform distribution of UO{sub 2} particles in a tungsten matrix with high densities, reaching 99.46% of theoretical for the sample sintered at 1850 °C. The powder process is described and the results of this study are given below.

  1. Higher-order terms in the nuclear-energy-density functional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, B. G.; Borucki, M.; Dobaczewski, J.

    2009-01-01

    One of the current projects at the Department of Physics in the University of Jyvaeskylae is to explore more general forms of the Skyrme energy-density functional (EDF). The aim is to find new phenomenological terms which are sensitive to experimental data. In this context we have extended the Skyrme functional by including terms which contain higher orders of derivatives allowing for a better description of finite range effects. This was done by employing an expansion in derivatives in a spherical-tensor formalism [1] motivated by ideas of the density-matrix expansion. The resulting functionals have different number of free parameters depending on the order in derivatives and assumed symmetries, see Fig. 1. The usual Skyrme EDF is obtained as a second order expansion while we keep terms up to sixth order.(author)

  2. Survey of ambient electromagnetic and radio-frequency interference levels in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kercel, S.W.; Moore, M.R.; Blakeman, E.D.; Ewing, P.D.; Wood, R.T.

    1996-11-01

    This document reports the results of a survey of ambient electromagnetic conditions in representative nuclear power plants. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research engaged the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform these measurements to characterize the electromagnetic interference (EMI) and radio-frequency interference (RFI) levels that can be expected in nuclear power plant environments. This survey is the first of its kind, being based on long-term unattended observations. The data presented in this report were measured at eight different nuclear units and required 14 months to collect. A representative sampling of power plant conditions (reactor type, operating mode, site location) monitored over extended observation periods (up to 5 weeks) were selected to more completely determine the characteristic electromagnetic environment for nuclear power plants. Radiated electric fields were measured over the frequency range of 5 MHz to 8 GHz. Radiated magnetic fields and conducted EMI events were measured over the frequency range of 305 Hz to 5 MHz. Highest strength observations of the electromagnetic ambient environment across all measurement conditions at each site provide frequency-dependent profiles for EMI/RFI levels in nuclear power plants

  3. Why consider subseabed disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, G.R.; Hollister, C.D.; Anderson, D.R.; Leinen, M.

    1980-01-01

    Large areas of the deep seabed warrant assessment as potential disposal sites for high-level radioactive waste because: (1) they are far from seismically and tectonically active lithospheric plate boundaries; (2) they are far from active or young volcanos; (3) they contain thick layers of very uniform fine-grained clays; (4) they are devoid of natural resources likely to be exploited in the forseeable future; (5) the geologic and oceanographic processes governing the deposition of sediments in such areas are well understood, and are remarkably insensitive to past oceanographic and climatic changes; and (6) sedmentary records of tens of millions of years of slow, uninterrupted deposition of fine grained clay support predictions of the future stability of such sites. Data accumulated to date on the permeability, ion-retardation properties, and mechanical strength of pelagic clay sediments indicate that they can act as a primary barrier to the escape of buried nuclides. Work in progress should determine within the current decade whether subseabed disposal is environmentally acceptable and technically feasible, as well as address the legal, political and social issues raised by this new concept

  4. Why consider subseabed disposal of high-level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, G.R.; Hollister, C.D.; Anderson, D.R.; Leinen, M.

    1983-01-01

    There exist large areas of the deep seabed that warrant assessment as potential disposal sites for high-level radioactive wastes because (1) they are far from seismically and tectonically active lithospheric plate boundaries; (2) they are far from active or young volcanoes; (3) they contain thick layers of very uniform fine-grained clays; (4) they are devoid of natural resources likely to be exploited in the foreseeable future; (5) the geologic and oceanographic processes governing the deposition of sediments in such areas are well understood, and have been remarkably insensitive to past oceanic and climatic changes; and (6) sedimentary records of tens of millions of years of slow, uninterrupted deposition of fine-grained clay support predictions of the future stability of such sites. Data accumulated to date on the permeability, ion-retardation properties, and mechanical strength of pelagic clayey sediments indicate that they can act as a primary barrier to the escape of buried radionuclides. Work in progress should determine within the current decade whether subseabed disposal is environmentally acceptable and technically feasible, as well as address the legal, political, and social issues raised by this new concept

  5. A method for assay of special nuclear material in high level liquid waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkata Subramani, C.R.; Swaminathan, K.; Asuvathraman, R.; Kutty, K.V.G.

    2003-01-01

    The assay of special nuclear material in the high level liquid waste streams assumes importance as this is the first stage in the extraction cycle and considerable losses of plutonium could occur here. This stream contains all the fission products as also the minor actinides and hence normal nuclear techniques cannot be used without prior separation of the special nuclear material. This paper presents the preliminary results carried out using wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence as part of the developmental efforts to assay SNM in these streams by instrumental techniques. (author)

  6. Level-one modules library for DSNP: Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power-plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saphier, D.

    1978-09-01

    The Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power-plants (DSNP) is a system of programs and data sets by which a nuclear power plant or part thereof can be simulated at different levels of sophistication. The acronym DSNP is used interchangeably for the DSNP language, for the DSNP precompiler, for the DSNP libraries, and for the DSNP document generator. The DSNP language is a set of simple block oriented statements, which together with the appropriate data, comprise a simulation of a nuclear power plant. The majority of the DSNP statements will result in the inclusion of a simulated physical module into the program. FORTRAN statements can be inserted with no restrictions among DSNP statements

  7. Determination of activation level energy of nuclear isomers by calibration of microspectra of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veres, A.; Pavlicsek, I.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear isomers with unknown activation level were irradiated by calibrated radioactive sources. The integral cross sections were calculated for different energies of the sources. The activation energy was given by values coinciding with each other within the limits of error. The method made the determination of the unknown level of 1180+-10 keV of 195 Pt nucleus possible. (author)

  8. Evaluation of a Non-Nuclear Soil Density Gauge on Fine-Grained Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    U.S. STANDARD SIEVE NUMBERS HYDROMETER fY, in o/. in. 318 in #140 6 in. 3 in. 2 in. 1 in. ’A in #4 ’" #20 #30 #40 ឬ #100 #200 100 J I ’ I I I I I...1 3-20 31 C L-2 U.S. SIEVE OPENING IN INCHES U.S. STANDARD SIEVE NUMBERS HYDROMETER 1Y,in. ’/.in Un~/8 in #140 6 in 3 in. 2 in. 1in. " #4...Particle Size Distribution Reoort Fine PL 14 HYDROMETER %Fines Silt -------,---- PI Project Non-Nuclear Gau_ge Proiect 27 Area Boring No. 3 Date

  9. Circumstantial Evidence for a Soft Nuclear Symmetry Energy at Suprasaturation Densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Zhigang; Zhang Ming; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Yong Gaochan

    2009-01-01

    Within an isospin- and momentum-dependent hadronic transport model, it is shown that the recent FOPI data on the π - /π + ratio in central heavy-ion collisions at SIS/GSI energies [Willy Reisdorf et al., Nucl. Phys. A 781, 459 (2007)] provide circumstantial evidence suggesting a rather soft nuclear symmetry energy E sym (ρ) at ρ≥2ρ 0 compared to the Akmal-Pandharipande-Ravenhall prediction. Some astrophysical implications and the need for further experimental confirmations are discussed

  10. Lead iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Sales, Brian C.

    1989-01-01

    Lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90.degree. C., with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10.sup.2 to 10.sup.3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. Lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass can be prepared at temperatures as low as 800.degree. C., since they exhibit very low melt viscosities in the 800.degree. to 1050.degree. C. temperature range. These waste-loaded glasses do not readily devitrify at temperatures as high as 550.degree. C. and are not adversely affected by large doses of gamma radiation in H.sub.2 O at 135.degree. C. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear wasteforms.

  11. Comparison of variability in breast density assessment by BI-RADS category according to the level of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Hye-Joung; Cha, Joo Hee; Kang, Ji-Won; Choi, Woo Jung; Kim, Han Jun; Go, EunChae

    2018-05-01

    Background Only few studies have assessed variability in the results obtained by the readers with different experience levels in comparison with automated volumetric breast density measurements. Purpose To examine the variations in breast density assessment according to BI-RADS categories among readers with different experience levels and to compare it with the results of automated quantitative measurements. Material and Methods Density assignment was done for 1000 screening mammograms by six readers with three different experience levels (breast-imaging experts, general radiologists, and students). Agreement level between the results obtained by the readers and the Volpara automated volumetric breast density measurements was assessed. The agreement analysis using two categories-non-dense and dense breast tissue-was also performed. Results Intra-reader agreement for experts, general radiologists, and students were almost perfect or substantial (k = 0.74-0.95). The agreement between visual assessments of the breast-imaging experts and volumetric assessments by Volpara was substantial (k = 0.77). The agreement was moderate between the experts and general radiologists (k = 0.67) and slight between the students and Volpara (k = 0.01). The agreement for the two category groups (nondense and dense) was almost perfect between the experts and Volpara (k = 0.83). The agreement was substantial between the experts and general radiologists (k = 0.78). Conclusion We observed similar high agreement levels between visual assessments of breast density performed by radiologists and the volumetric assessments. However, agreement levels were substantially lower for the untrained readers.

  12. Performance evaluation of drip-fertigated cotton grown under different plant densities using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janat, M.; Kalhout, A.

    2007-04-01

    Field experiment was conducted over two growing seasons to assess different planting densities of cotton variety Aleppo 118 (71.000, 57.000, 48.000, 41.000, 33.500 plants /ha), and two irrigation systems; one irrigation line per one planting row and one irrigation line per two planting rows. Nitrogen fertilizer (120 kg N/ha) as Urea (46% N) was injected through the irrigation system in six equally split applications. A labeled area (1.0 m 2 ) was established for the labeled sub plots and labeled Urea was applied to the labeled sub plots in the same manner as for unlabeled N fertilizer. Irrigation scheduling was accomplished using the direct method of neutron scattering technique. Irrigation was determined when the soil moisture content in the active root depth reached almost 80% of the field capacity. The amount of water applied for one line / one row were 6738 and 9149 m 3 /ha, whereas, for one line/two rows were 7489 and 12653 m 3 / ha for the two growing seasons 2004 and 2005 respectively. The objectives of the experiment were to evaluate the effect of different planting densities and two irrigation system on cotton yield, lint properties, dry matter yield, N-uptake, chlorophyll content and leaf area. The experimental design was randomized block design with 6 replications for each irrigation method. Results revealed that no significant differences between all different plant densities were recorded for all growth parameters tested in this study such as seed cotton yield, dry matter yield, lint properties, chlorophyll content and leaf area.(author)

  13. Sensitivity analysis for reactivity and power density investigations in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naguib, K.; Morcos, H.N.; Sallam, O.H.; Abdelsamei, SH.

    1993-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis theory based on the variational functional approaches was applied to evaluate sensitivities of eigenvalues and power densities due to variation of the absorber concentration in the reactor core. The practical usefulness of this method is illustrated by considering test cases. The result indicates that this method is as accurate as those obtained from direct calculations, yet it provides an economical means in saving computational time since it requires fewer calculations. The SARC-1/2 code have been written in Fortran-77 to solve this problem.3 tab. 1 fig

  14. Impact of Diet Supplemented by Coconut Milk on Corticosterone and Acute Phase Protein Level under High Stocking Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid SHAKERI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of coconut milk supplementation on corticosterone and acute phase protein level under high stocking density. A total 300 Cobb 500 male chicks were placed in cages and stocked as 10 birds/cage (normal stocking density and 15 birds/cage (high stocking density. The treatments were as (i control diet and stocked at 10 and 15 birds/cage (ii control diet + 3% coconut milk from 1-42 day and stocked at 10 and 15 birds/cage (iii control diet + 5% coconut milk from 1-42 day and stocked at 10 and 15 birds/cage. On day 42, 20 birds per treatment were slaughtered to collect blood samples. The results showed higher level of corticosterone and acute phase protein level in control diet compare to other supplemented diets with coconut milk. In conclusion, coconut milk decreased the level of corticosterone and acute phase protein when chicks were subjected to high stocking density.

  15. The Effects of Text Density Levels and the Cognitive Style of Field Dependence on Learning from a CBI Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek, Ismail

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of variations in text density levels and the cognitive style of field dependence on learning from a CBI tutorial, based on the dependent measures of achievement, reading comprehension, and reading rate, and of lesson completion time. Eighty college undergraduate students were randomly…

  16. Variation of interface trap level charge density within the bandgap of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Engineering Research Institute (CEERI)/Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), ... Experimental details of the sample preparation, fabrication .... gives the true evidence of interface trap density at the interface of SiO2/SiC. On the ...

  17. Modelling energy level alignment at organic interfaces and density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores, F.; Ortega, J.; Vazquez, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    A review of our theoretical understanding of the band alignment at organic interfaces is presented with particular emphasis on the metal/organic (MO) case. The unified IDIS (induced density of interface states) and the ICT (integer charge transfer) models are reviewed and shown to describe qualit...

  18. Glycated albumin and direct low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), renal failure, retinopathy, and neuropathy. Lowering glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as well as low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) has been associated with a decreased risk of these complications. We evaluated the ut...

  19. Longitudinal development of hormone levels and grey matter density in 9 and 12-year-old twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Rachel M; Koenis, M M G; Schnack, Hugo G; van Baal, G Caroline; van Soelen, Inge L C; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2015-05-01

    Puberty is characterized by major changes in hormone levels and structural changes in the brain. To what extent these changes are associated and to what extent genes or environmental influences drive such an association is not clear. We acquired circulating levels of luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol and testosterone and magnetic resonance images of the brain from 190 twins at age 9 [9.2 (0.11) years; 99 females/91 males]. This protocol was repeated at age 12 [12.1 (0.26) years] in 125 of these children (59 females/66 males). Using voxel-based morphometry, we tested whether circulating hormone levels are associated with grey matter density in boys and girls in a longitudinal, genetically informative design. In girls, changes in FSH level between the age of 9 and 12 positively associated with changes in grey matter density in areas covering the left hippocampus, left (pre)frontal areas, right cerebellum, and left anterior cingulate and precuneus. This association was mainly driven by environmental factors unique to the individual (i.e. the non-shared environment). In 12-year-old girls, a higher level of circulating estradiol levels was associated with lower grey matter density in frontal and parietal areas. This association was driven by environmental factors shared among the members of a twin pair. These findings show a pattern of physical and brain development going hand in hand.

  20. Development of NUFREQ-N, an analytical model for the stability analysis of nuclear coupled density-wave oscillations in boiling water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    A state-of-the-art one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic model has been developed to be used for the linear analysis of nuclear-coupled density-wave oscillations in a boiling water nuclear reactor (BWR). The model accounts for phasic slip, distributed spacers, subcooled boiling, space/time-dependent power distributions and distributed heated wall dynamics. In addition to a parallel channel stability analysis, a detailed model was derived for the BWR loop analysis of both the natural and forced circulation modes of operation. In its final form, this model constitutes a multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) linear system, which features a general nodal neutron kinetics model. Kinetics parameters for use in the kinetics model have been obtained by utilizing self-consistent nodal data and power distributions. The stability characteristics of a typical BWR/4 has been investigated with the Nyquist criterion. The computer implementation of this mode, NUFREQ-N, was used for the parametric study of a typical BWR/4 and comparison were made with existing in-core and out-of-core data. Also, NUFREQ-N was used to analyze the expected stability characteristics of a typical BWR/4. The parametric results revealed important factors influencing BWR stability margin. It was found that NUFREQ-N generally agreed well with out-of-core data. This was especially true for the predicted power-to-flow transfer function, which is the most important transfer function in thermal-hydraulic stability analysis