WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear lattice simulations

  1. Nuclear lattice simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epelbaum E.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We review recent progress on nuclear lattice simulations using chiral effective field theory. We discuss lattice results for dilute neutron matter at next-to-leading order, three-body forces at next-to-next-toleading order, isospin-breaking and Coulomb effects, and the binding energy of light nuclei.

  2. Temperature-dependent errors in nuclear lattice simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dean; Thomson, Richard

    2007-01-01

    We study the temperature dependence of discretization errors in nuclear lattice simulations. We find that for systems with strong attractive interactions the predominant error arises from the breaking of Galilean invariance. We propose a local 'well-tempered' lattice action which eliminates much of this error. The well-tempered action can be readily implemented in lattice simulations for nuclear systems as well as cold atomic Fermi systems

  3. Nuclear Lattice Simulations with Chiral Effective Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dean

    2008-01-01

    We present recent results on lattice simulations using chiral effective field theory. In particular we discuss lattice simulations for dilute neutron matter at next-to-leading order and three-body forces in light nuclei at next-to-next-to-leading order.

  4. Nuclear lattice simulations using symmetry-sign extrapolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laehde, Timo A.; Luu, Thomas [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut fuer Kernphysik, and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Lee, Dean [North Carolina State University, Department of Physics, Raleigh, NC (United States); Meissner, Ulf G. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut fuer Kernphysik, and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, JARA - High Performance Computing, Juelich (Germany); Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Bochum (Germany); Rupak, Gautam [Mississippi State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Projection Monte Carlo calculations of lattice Chiral Effective Field Theory suffer from sign oscillations to a varying degree dependent on the number of protons and neutrons. Hence, such studies have hitherto been concentrated on nuclei with equal numbers of protons and neutrons, and especially on the alpha nuclei where the sign oscillations are smallest. Here, we introduce the ''symmetry-sign extrapolation'' method, which allows us to use the approximate Wigner SU(4) symmetry of the nuclear interaction to systematically extend the Projection Monte Carlo calculations to nuclear systems where the sign problem is severe. We benchmark this method by calculating the ground-state energies of the {sup 12}C, {sup 6}He and {sup 6}Be nuclei, and discuss its potential for studies of neutron-rich halo nuclei and asymmetric nuclear matter. (orig.)

  5. Nuclear physics research front line by K computer. Elucidation of inter-hadron interactions by lattice QCD simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Takumi

    2013-01-01

    Research of nuclear forces by lattice QCD including inter-hadron interactions is presented. Determination of nuclear forces based on the first principle of QCD means to give underpinning of nuclear physics from the elementary particle standard model. Determining the unknown interactions such as hyperon forces or three-body ones gives large impacts not only to the nuclear physics but also to the universe or astrophysics. In this paper, the most up-to-date achievements as well as the scientific visions of future by using K computer is introduced. The nuclear potential is shown to be determined by the first principle simulation based on the purely fundamental theory without using any input from experiments. When this research is completed, nuclear physics is consolidated in the frame of standard model of elementary particles. The formulation of nuclear potentials was though very problematic but solved by using HAL method. The way to use Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter wave functions to go to the QCD is explained. The results of the lattice QCD simulation are shown about the nuclear force potential of 1 S 0 channel and the scattering phase differences. About the hyperon forces, computer results from the limit of flavor SU(3) where the masses of u, d and s quarks are equal are introduced here. Further studies using different quark masses are necessary and calculation taking the SU(3) breaking into consideration is in progress. The calculation result of triple proton channel is shown as an example of three-body forth, which is another important nuclear force. To let the lattice QCD exert the predicting ability further steps are left. Calculations on real quark masses are considered especially important as the future problem. Confronting the large problem of hadron many-body systems, K computer is the biggest challenging force as well as the new formalism of HAL QCD and Unified Contraction Algorithm (UCA). (S. Funahashi)

  6. Simulations and measurements of adiabatic annular flows in triangular, tight lattice nuclear fuel bundle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Abhishek, E-mail: asaxena@lke.mavt.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Laboratory for Nuclear Energy Systems, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Zboray, Robert [Laboratory for Thermal-hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Prasser, Horst-Michael [ETH Zurich, Laboratory for Nuclear Energy Systems, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Laboratory for Thermal-hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-04-01

    High conversion light water reactors (HCLWR) having triangular, tight-lattice fuels bundles could enable improved fuel utilization compared to present day LWRs. However, the efficient cooling of a tight lattice bundle has to be still proven. Major concern is the avoidance of high-quality boiling crisis (film dry-out) by the use of efficient functional spacers. For this reason, we have carried out experiments on adiabatic, air-water annular two-phase flows in a tight-lattice, triangular fuel bundle model using generic spacers. A high-spatial-resolution, non-intrusive measurement technology, cold neutron tomography, has been utilized to resolve the distribution of the liquid film thickness on the virtual fuel pin surfaces. Unsteady CFD simulations have also been performed to replicate and compare with the experiments using the commercial code STAR-CCM+. Large eddies have been resolved on the grid level to capture the dominant unsteady flow features expected to drive the liquid film thickness distribution downstream of a spacer while the subgrid scales have been modeled using the Wall Adapting Local Eddy (WALE) subgrid model. A Volume of Fluid (VOF) method, which directly tracks the interface and does away with closure relationship models for interfacial exchange terms, has also been employed. The present paper shows first comparison of the measurement with the simulation results.

  7. Nuclear physics on the lattice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonin, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to try to adapt lattice gauge theory to build in some biases in order for being applicable to nuclear physics. In so doing the calculations are made more precise, and the author can address questions like the size of the nucleon, the nucleon-nucleon potential, the modifications of the nucleon in the nuclear medium, etc. (Auth.)

  8. Nuclear Physics from Lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Detmold, Silas Beane, Konstantinos Orginos, Martin Savage

    2011-01-01

    We review recent progress toward establishing lattice Quantum Chromodynamics as a predictive calculational framework for nuclear physics. A survey of the current techniques that are used to extract low-energy hadronic scattering amplitudes and interactions is followed by a review of recent two-body and few-body calculations by the NPLQCD collaboration and others. An outline of the nuclear physics that is expected to be accomplished with Lattice QCD in the next decade, along with estimates of the required computational resources, is presented.

  9. Lattice QCD for nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    With ever increasing computational resources and improvements in algorithms, new opportunities are emerging for lattice gauge theory to address key questions in strongly interacting systems, such as nuclear matter. Calculations today use dynamical gauge-field ensembles with degenerate light up/down quarks and the strange quark and it is possible now to consider including charm-quark degrees of freedom in the QCD vacuum. Pion masses and other sources of systematic error, such as finite-volume and discretization effects, are beginning to be quantified systematically. Altogether, an era of precision calculation has begun, and many new observables will be calculated at the new computational facilities.  The aim of this set of lectures is to provide graduate students with a grounding in the application of lattice gauge theory methods to strongly interacting systems, and in particular to nuclear physics.  A wide variety of topics are covered, including continuum field theory, lattice discretizations, hadron spect...

  10. Advancements in simulations of lattice quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippert, T.

    2008-01-01

    An introduction to lattice QCD with emphasis on advanced fermion formulations and their simulation is given. In particular, overlap fermions will be presented, a quite novel fermionic discretization scheme that is able to exactly preserve chiral symmetry on the lattice. I will discuss efficiencies of state-of-the-art algorithms on highly scalable supercomputers and I will show that, due to many algorithmic improvements, overlap simulations will soon become feasible for realistic physical lattice sizes. Finally I am going to sketch the status of some current large scale lattice QCD simulations. (author)

  11. Deflation acceleration of lattice QCD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luescher, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Close to the chiral limit, many calculations in numerical lattice QCD can potentially be accelerated using low-mode deflation techniques. In this paper it is shown that the recently introduced domain-decomposed deflation subspaces can be propagated along the field trajectories generated by the Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) algorithm with a modest effort. The quark forces that drive the simulation may then be computed using a deflation-accelerated solver for the lattice Dirac equation. As a consequence, the computer time required for the simulations is significantly reduced and an improved scaling behaviour of the simulation algorithm with respect to the quark mass is achieved

  12. Deflation acceleration of lattice QCD simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Lüscher, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Close to the chiral limit, many calculations in numerical lattice QCD can potentially be accelerated using low-mode deflation techniques. In this paper it is shown that the recently introduced domain-decomposed deflation subspaces can be propagated along the field trajectories generated by the Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) algorithm with a modest effort. The quark forces that drive the simulation may then be computed using a deflation-accelerated solver for the lattice Dirac equation. As a consequence, the computer time required for the simulations is significantly reduced and an improved scaling behaviour of the simulation algorithm with respect to the quark mass is achieved.

  13. Monte Carlo simulations of lattice gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forcrand, P. de; Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN

    1989-01-01

    Lattice gauge simulations are presented in layman's terms. The need for large computer resources is justified. The main aspects of implementations on vector and parallel machines are explained. An overview of state of the art simulations and dedicated hardware projects is presented. 8 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table

  14. Lattice QCD simulation of meson exchange forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, D.G.; Sinclair, D.K.; Sivers, D.

    1990-01-01

    We present the formalism for investigating the bar Qq bar Qq system in lattice QCD. This system serves as a model for describing exchange forces between heavy, static hadrons. We use this formalism to calculate the exchange potential from gauge configurations which incorporate the effects of dynamical quarks. Our data can be interpreted as giving preliminary results on the range of the nuclear force

  15. Simulation of diffusion in concentrated lattice gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehr, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    Recently the diffusion of particles in lattice gases was studied extensively by theoretical methods and numerical simulations. This paper reviews work on collective and, in particular, on tracer diffusion. The diffusion of tagged particles is characterized by a correlation factor whose behavior as a function of concentration is now well understood. Also the detailed kinetics of the tracer transitions was investigated. A special case is the one-dimensional lattice gas where the tracer diffusion coefficient vanishes. An interesting extension is the case of tagged atoms with a different transition rate. This model allows to study various physical situations, including impurity diffusion, percolation, and diffusion in partially blocked lattices. Finally some recent work on diffusion in lattice gases under the influence of a drift field will be reported. (author)

  16. Topology in dynamical lattice QCD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Florian

    2012-08-20

    Lattice simulations of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the quantum field theory which describes the interaction between quarks and gluons, have reached a point were contact to experimental data can be made. The underlying mechanisms, like chiral symmetry breaking or the confinement of quarks, are however still not understood. This thesis focuses on topological structures in the QCD vacuum. Those are not only mathematically interesting but also closely related to chiral symmetry and confinement. We consider methods to identify these objects in lattice QCD simulations. Based on this, we explore the structures resulting from different discretizations and investigate the effect of a very strong electromagnetic field on the QCD vacuum.

  17. Topology in dynamical lattice QCD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Lattice simulations of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the quantum field theory which describes the interaction between quarks and gluons, have reached a point were contact to experimental data can be made. The underlying mechanisms, like chiral symmetry breaking or the confinement of quarks, are however still not understood. This thesis focuses on topological structures in the QCD vacuum. Those are not only mathematically interesting but also closely related to chiral symmetry and confinement. We consider methods to identify these objects in lattice QCD simulations. Based on this, we explore the structures resulting from different discretizations and investigate the effect of a very strong electromagnetic field on the QCD vacuum.

  18. Lattice BGK simulation of natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yu; Ohashi, Hirotada; Akiyama, Mamoru

    1995-01-01

    Recently a new thermal lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook fluid model was suggested by the authors. In this study, this new model was applied into the numerical simulation of natural convection, namely the Rayleigh Benard flow. The critical number for the onset of convective phenomenon was numerically measured and compared with that of theoretical prediction. A gravity dependent deviation was found in the numerical simulation, which is explained as an unavoidable consequence of the incorporation of gravity force in the lattice BGK system. (author)

  19. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of droplet evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; Vella, Dominic; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. We study the utility and validity of lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations to explore droplet evaporation driven by a concentration gradient. Using a binary-fluid lattice-Boltzmann algorithm based on Cahn-Hilliard dynamics, we study the evaporation of planar films and 3D sessile droplets from smooth solid surfaces. Our results show that LB simulations accurately reproduce the classical regime of quasi-static dynamics. Beyond this limit, we show that the algorithm can be used to explore regimes where the evaporative and diffusive timescales are not widely separated, and to include the effect of boundaries of prescribed driving concentration. We illustrate the method by considering the evaporation of a droplet from a solid surface that is chemically patterned with hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes. This journal is

  20. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of droplet evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo

    2014-09-04

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. We study the utility and validity of lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations to explore droplet evaporation driven by a concentration gradient. Using a binary-fluid lattice-Boltzmann algorithm based on Cahn-Hilliard dynamics, we study the evaporation of planar films and 3D sessile droplets from smooth solid surfaces. Our results show that LB simulations accurately reproduce the classical regime of quasi-static dynamics. Beyond this limit, we show that the algorithm can be used to explore regimes where the evaporative and diffusive timescales are not widely separated, and to include the effect of boundaries of prescribed driving concentration. We illustrate the method by considering the evaporation of a droplet from a solid surface that is chemically patterned with hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes. This journal is

  1. Simulating colloid hydrodynamics with lattice Boltzmann methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cates, M E; Stratford, K; Adhikari, R; Stansell, P; Desplat, J-C; Pagonabarraga, I; Wagner, A J

    2004-01-01

    We present a progress report on our work on lattice Boltzmann methods for colloidal suspensions. We focus on the treatment of colloidal particles in binary solvents and on the inclusion of thermal noise. For a benchmark problem of colloids sedimenting and becoming trapped by capillary forces at a horizontal interface between two fluids, we discuss the criteria for parameter selection, and address the inevitable compromise between computational resources and simulation accuracy

  2. Energy Dependent Streaming in Lattice Boltzmann Simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlo, Pavol; Vahala, G.; Vahala, L.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 8 (2001), s. 241 ISSN 0003-0503. [Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society/43rd./. Long Beach, CA, 29.10.2001-02.11.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/00/1216 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : Lattice Boltzmann Simulations Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  3. Lattice gas simulations of replicating domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, S.P.; Hasslacher, B.; Pearson, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    We use the lattice gas cellular automation (LGCA) developed to simulate a process of pattern-formation recently observed in reaction-diffusion systems. We study the reaction mechanism, which is an extension of the Selkov model for glycolytic oscillations. We are able to reproduce the self-replicating domains observed in this work. We use the LGCA simulation to estimate the smallest length-scale on which this process can occur under conditions encountered in the cell. These estimates are similar to those obtained for Turing patterns in the same setting

  4. Lattice gas simulations of replicating domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, S.P.; Hasslacher, B.; Pearson, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    We use the lattice gas cellular automation (LGCA) developed to simulate a process of pattern-formation recently observed in reaction-diffusion systems. We study the reaction mechanism, which is an extension of the Selkov model for glycolytic oscillations. We are able to reproduce the self-replicating domains observed in this work. We use the LGCA simulation to estimate the smallest length-scale on which this process can occur under conditions encountered in the cell. These estimates are similar to those obtained for Turing patterns in the same setting.

  5. Efficient LBM visual simulation on face-centered cubic lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, Kaloian; Qiu, Feng; Fan, Zhe; Kaufman, Arie E; Mueller, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for visual simulation of fluid flow generally employs cubic Cartesian (CC) lattices such as the D3Q13 and D3Q19 lattices for the particle transport. However, the CC lattices lead to suboptimal representation of the simulation space. We introduce the face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice, fD3Q13, for LBM simulations. Compared to the CC lattices, the fD3Q13 lattice creates a more isotropic sampling of the simulation domain and its single lattice speed (i.e., link length) simplifies the computations and data storage. Furthermore, the fD3Q13 lattice can be decomposed into two independent interleaved lattices, one of which can be discarded, which doubles the simulation speed. The resulting LBM simulation can be efficiently mapped to the GPU, further increasing the computational performance. We show the numerical advantages of the FCC lattice on channeled flow in 2D and the flow-past-a-sphere benchmark in 3D. In both cases, the comparison is against the corresponding CC lattices using the analytical solutions for the systems as well as velocity field visualizations. We also demonstrate the performance advantages of the fD3Q13 lattice for interactive simulation and rendering of hot smoke in an urban environment using thermal LBM.

  6. First results from simulations of supersymmetric lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catterall, Simon

    2009-01-01

    We conduct the first numerical simulations of lattice theories with exact supersymmetry arising from the orbifold constructions of \\cite{Cohen:2003xe,Cohen:2003qw,Kaplan:2005ta}. We consider the Script Q = 4 theory in D = 0,2 dimensions and the Script Q = 16 theory in D = 0,2,4 dimensions. We show that the U(N) theories do not possess vacua which are stable non-perturbatively, but that this problem can be circumvented after truncation to SU(N). We measure the distribution of scalar field eigenvalues, the spectrum of the fermion operator and the phase of the Pfaffian arising after integration over the fermions. We monitor supersymmetry breaking effects by measuring a simple Ward identity. Our results indicate that simulations of Script N = 4 super Yang-Mills may be achievable in the near future.

  7. Multispeed models in off-lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardow, A.; Karlin, I.V.; Gusev, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method is a highly promising approach to the simulation of complex flows. Here, we realize recently proposed multispeed lattice Boltzmann models [S. Chikatamarla et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 190601 (2006)] by exploiting the flexibility offered by off-lattice Boltzmann methods.

  8. Lattice-Boltzmann Simulation of Tablet Disintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiaolong; Sun, Ning; Gersappe, Dilip

    Using the lattice-Boltzmann method, we developed a 2D model to study the tablet disintegration involving the swelling and wicking mechanisms. The surface area and disintegration profile of each component were obtained by tracking the tablet structure in the simulation. Compared to pure wicking, the total surface area is larger for swelling and wicking, which indicates that the swelling force breaks the neighboring bonds. The disintegration profiles show that the tablet disintegrates faster than pure wicking, and there are more wetted active pharmaceutical ingredient particles distributed on smaller clusters. Our results indicate how the porosity would affect the disintegration process by changing the wetting area of the tablet as well as by changing the swelling force propagation.

  9. Cluster computing for lattice QCD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coddington, P.D.; Williams, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Simulations of lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) require enormous amounts of compute power. In the past, this has usually involved sharing time on large, expensive machines at supercomputing centres. Over the past few years, clusters of networked computers have become very popular as a low-cost alternative to traditional supercomputers. The dramatic improvements in performance (and more importantly, the ratio of price/performance) of commodity PCs, workstations, and networks have made clusters of off-the-shelf computers an attractive option for low-cost, high-performance computing. A major advantage of clusters is that since they can have any number of processors, they can be purchased using any sized budget, allowing research groups to install a cluster for their own dedicated use, and to scale up to more processors if additional funds become available. Clusters are now being built for high-energy physics simulations. Wuppertal has recently installed ALiCE, a cluster of 128 Alpha workstations running Linux, with a peak performance of 158 G flops. The Jefferson Laboratory in the US has a 16 node Alpha cluster and plans to upgrade to a 256 processor machine. In Australia, several large clusters have recently been installed. Swinburne University of Technology has a cluster of 64 Compaq Alpha workstations used for astrophysics simulations. Early this year our DHPC group constructed a cluster of 116 dual Pentium PCs (i.e. 232 processors) connected by a Fast Ethernet network, which is used by chemists at Adelaide University and Flinders University to run computational chemistry codes. The Australian National University has recently installed a similar PC cluster with 192 processors. The Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter (CSSM) undertakes large-scale high-energy physics calculations, mainly lattice QCD simulations. The choice of the computer and network hardware for a cluster depends on the particular applications to be run on the machine. Our

  10. Lattice gauge theories and Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebbi, C.

    1981-11-01

    After some preliminary considerations, the discussion of quantum gauge theories on a Euclidean lattice takes up the definition of Euclidean quantum theory and treatment of the continuum limit; analogy is made with statistical mechanics. Perturbative methods can produce useful results for strong or weak coupling. In the attempts to investigate the properties of the systems for intermediate coupling, numerical methods known as Monte Carlo simulations have proved valuable. The bulk of this paper illustrates the basic ideas underlying the Monte Carlo numerical techniques and the major results achieved with them according to the following program: Monte Carlo simulations (general theory, practical considerations), phase structure of Abelian and non-Abelian models, the observables (coefficient of the linear term in the potential between two static sources at large separation, mass of the lowest excited state with the quantum numbers of the vacuum (the so-called glueball), the potential between two static sources at very small distance, the critical temperature at which sources become deconfined), gauge fields coupled to basonic matter (Higgs) fields, and systems with fermions

  11. Testing the holographic principle using lattice simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Raghav G.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The lattice studies of maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills (MSYM theory at strong coupling and large N is important for verifying gauge/gravity duality. Due to the progress made in the last decade, based on ideas from topological twisting and orbifolding, it is now possible to study these theories on the lattice while preserving an exact supersymmetry on the lattice. We present some results from the lattice studies of two-dimensional MSYM which is related to Type II supergravity. Our results agree with the thermodynamics of different black hole phases on the gravity side and the phase transition (Gregory–Laflamme between them.

  12. Nuclear ship engineering simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Yasuyoshi; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Hashidate, Koji

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear ship engineering simulator, which analyzes overall system response of nuclear ship numerically, is now being developed by JAERI as an advanced design tool with the latest computer technology in software and hardware. The development of the nuclear ship engineering simulator aims at grasping characteristics of a reactor plant under the situation generated by the combination of ocean, a ship hull and a reactor. The data from various tests with the nuclear ship 'MUTSU' will be used for this simulator to modulate and verify its functions of reproducing realistic response of nuclear ship, and then the simulator will be utilized for the research and development of advanced marine reactors. (author)

  13. Lattice Methods and the Nuclear Few- and Many-Body Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dean

    This chapter builds upon the review of lattice methods and effective field theory of the previous chapter. We begin with a brief overview of lattice calculations using chiral effective field theory and some recent applications. We then describe several methods for computing scattering on the lattice. After that we focus on the main goal, explaining the theory and algorithms relevant to lattice simulations of nuclear few- and many-body systems. We discuss the exact equivalence of four different lattice formalisms, the Grassmann path integral, transfer matrix operator, Grassmann path integral with auxiliary fields, and transfer matrix operator with auxiliary fields. Along with our analysis we include several coding examples and a number of exercises for the calculations of few- and many-body systems at leading order in chiral effective field theory.

  14. Comparing the results of lattice and off-lattice simulations for the melt of nonconcatenated rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halverson, Jonathan D; Kremer, Kurt; Grosberg, Alexander Y

    2013-01-01

    To study the conformational properties of unknotted and nonconcatenated ring polymers in the melt, we present a detailed qualitative and quantitative comparison of simulation data obtained by molecular dynamics simulation using an off-lattice bead-spring model and by Monte Carlo simulation using a lattice model. We observe excellent, and sometimes even unexpectedly good, agreement between the off-lattice and lattice results for many quantities measured including the gyration radii of the ring polymers, gyration radii of their subchains, contact probabilities, surface characteristics, number of contacts between subchains, and the static structure factors of the rings and their subchains. These results are, in part, put in contrast to Moore curves, and the open, linear polymer counterparts. While our analysis is extensive, our understanding of the ring melt conformations is still rather preliminary. (paper)

  15. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panich, A.M., E-mail: pan@bgu.ac.i [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Sergeev, N.A. [Institute of Physics, University of Szczecin, 70-451 Szczecin (Poland)

    2010-04-15

    Interpretation of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation data in the carbon nanostructures is usually based on the analysis of fluctuations of dipole-dipole interactions of nuclear spins and anisotropic electron-nuclear interactions responsible for chemical shielding, which are caused by molecular dynamics. However, many nanocarbon systems such as fullerene and nanotube derivatives, nanodiamonds and carbon onions reveal noticeable amount of paramagnetic defects with unpaired electrons originating from dangling bonds. The interaction between nuclear and electron spins strongly influences the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation, but usually is not taken into account, thus the relaxation data are not correctly interpreted. Here we report on the temperature dependent NMR spectra and spin-lattice relaxation measurements of intercalated fullerenes C{sub 60}(MF{sub 6}){sub 2} (M=As and Sb), where nuclear relaxation is caused by both molecular rotation and interaction between nuclei and unpaired electron spins. We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the spin-lattice relaxation data taking into account both these contributions. Good agreement between the experimental data and calculations is obtained. The developed approach would be useful in interpreting the NMR relaxation data in different nanostructures and their intercalation compounds.

  16. Uncertainty quantification in lattice QCD calculations for nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beane, Silas R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Detmold, William [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Orginos, Kostas [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Savage, Martin J. [Institute for Nuclear Theory, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-02-05

    The numerical technique of Lattice QCD holds the promise of connecting the nuclear forces, nuclei, the spectrum and structure of hadrons, and the properties of matter under extreme conditions with the underlying theory of the strong interactions, quantum chromodynamics. A distinguishing, and thus far unique, feature of this formulation is that all of the associated uncertainties, both statistical and systematic can, in principle, be systematically reduced to any desired precision with sufficient computational and human resources. As a result, we review the sources of uncertainty inherent in Lattice QCD calculations for nuclear physics, and discuss how each is quantified in current efforts.

  17. Simulations to study the static polarization limit for RHIC lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhe; Qin, Qing

    2016-01-01

    A study of spin dynamics based on simulations with the Polymorphic Tracking Code (PTC) is reported, exploring the dependence of the static polarization limit on various beam parameters and lattice settings for a practical RHIC lattice. It is shown that the behavior of the static polarization limit is dominantly affected by the vertical motion, while the effect of beam-beam interaction is small. In addition, the “nonresonant beam polarization” observed and studied in the lattice-independent model is also observed in this lattice-dependent model. Therefore, this simulation study gives insights of polarization evolution at fixed beam energies, that are not available in simple spin tracking. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-98CH10886), Hundred-Talent Program (Chinese Academy of Sciences), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11105164)

  18. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation of the sedimentation of charged disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capuani, F.; Pagonabarraga, I.; Frenkel, D.

    2006-01-01

    We report a series of lattice-Boltzmann simulations of the sedimentation velocity of charged disks. In these simulations, we explicitly account for the hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces on disks and on their electrical double layer. By comparing our results with those for spheres with equal

  19. Lattice simulation of 2d Gross-Neveu-type models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limmer, M.; Gattringer, C.; Hermann, V.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: We discuss a Monte Carlo simulation of 2d Gross-Neveu-type models on the lattice. The four-Fermi interaction is written as a Gaussian integral with an auxiliary field and the fermion determinant is included by reweighting. We present results for bulk quantities and correlators and compare them to a simulation using a fermion-loop representation. (author)

  20. Nuclear reactor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, Vinicius Damas

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Simulator was projected to help the basic training in the formation of the Nuclear Power Plants operators. It gives the trainee the opportunity to see the nuclear reactor dynamics. It's specially indicated to be used as the support tool to NPPT (Nuclear Power Preparatory Training) from NUS Corporation. The software was developed to Intel platform (80 x 86, Pentium and compatible ones) working under the Windows operational system from Microsoft. The program language used in development was Object Pascal and the compiler used was Delphi from Borland. During the development, computer algorithms were used, based in numeric methods, to the resolution of the differential equations involved in the process. (author)

  1. Numerical simulation of flow behavior in tight lattice rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yiqi; Yang Yanhua; Gu Hanyang; Cheng Xu; Song Xiaoming; Wang Xiaojun

    2009-01-01

    The Numerical investigation is performed on the air turbulent flow in triangular rod bundle array. Based on the experimental data, the eddy viscosity turbulent model and the Reynold stress turbulent model are evaluated to simulate the flow behavior in the tight lattice. The results show that SSG Reynolds Stress Model has shown superior predictive performance than other Reynolds-stress models, which indicates that the simulation of the anisotropy of the turbulence is significant in the tight lattice. The result with different Reynolds number and geometry shows that the magnitude of the secondary flow is almost independent of the Reynolds number, but it increases with the decrease of the P/D. (authors)

  2. Critical slowing down and error analysis in lattice QCD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virotta, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    In this work we investigate the critical slowing down of lattice QCD simulations. We perform a preliminary study in the quenched approximation where we find that our estimate of the exponential auto-correlation time scales as τ exp (a)∝a -5 , where a is the lattice spacing. In unquenched simulations with O(a) improved Wilson fermions we do not obtain a scaling law but find results compatible with the behavior that we find in the pure gauge theory. The discussion is supported by a large set of ensembles both in pure gauge and in the theory with two degenerate sea quarks. We have moreover investigated the effect of slow algorithmic modes in the error analysis of the expectation value of typical lattice QCD observables (hadronic matrix elements and masses). In the context of simulations affected by slow modes we propose and test a method to obtain reliable estimates of statistical errors. The method is supposed to help in the typical algorithmic setup of lattice QCD, namely when the total statistics collected is of O(10)τ exp . This is the typical case when simulating close to the continuum limit where the computational costs for producing two independent data points can be extremely large. We finally discuss the scale setting in N f =2 simulations using the Kaon decay constant f K as physical input. The method is explained together with a thorough discussion of the error analysis employed. A description of the publicly available code used for the error analysis is included.

  3. Nuclear analysis of the experimental VHTR fuel lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Takeshi; Shindo, Ryuiti; Hirano, Mitsumasa; Takano, Makoto

    1984-11-01

    Nuclear properties of a fuel lattice in the experimental VHTR core were analyzed with DELIGHT-6 and SRAC codes. Analytical results by both codes were compared by using various calculational model. The nuclear parameters were analyzed, such as a multiplication factor of a fuel lattice and it's variation with burnup, a temperature effect on reactivity, an effect of double-heterogeniety in a resonance absorption calculation, a resonance integral of 238 U and a reactivity worth of burnable poison. From these analyses, following results were obtained. Firstly, on calculational models, 1) Effect of double-heterogeniety in the resonance absorption calculation for Mark-III fuel element, causing a decrease of about 5.5 barns in the resonance integral and an increase of about 2.6 %ΔK in the infinite multiplication factor, 2) The heterogeneous calculation with the collision probability method resulted in about 0.6 %ΔK higher the multiplication factor of fuel lattice than that with the point model, 3) The reactivity worth of burnable poison rod by a multi-region model is about 20 % less than that by a 2-region model at an initial state of burnup and it's variation with burnup are fairly different, Secondly, on comparison between the results by DELIGHT-6 and SRAC, 4) The nuclear parameters obtained with both codes agreed well, Lastly, on the improvement in DELIGHT-6, 5) Consideration of the neutron spectrum shielding effect in the resonance effective cross section calculation caused a decrease of about 2.4 %ΔK in the multiplication factor of fuel lattice, 6) The lattice multiplication factor increased about 0.5 %ΔK by introducing lambda-parameters for the non-resonant nuclie. (J.P.N.)

  4. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of attenuation-driven acoustic streaming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydock, David; Yeomans, J M

    2003-01-01

    We show that lattice Boltzmann simulations can be used to model the attenuation-driven acoustic streaming produced by a travelling wave. Comparisons are made to analytical results and to the streaming pattern produced by an imposed body force approximating the Reynolds stresses. We predict the streaming patterns around a porous material in an attenuating acoustic field

  5. A new simulation algorithm for lattice QCD with dynamical quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Bunk, B.; Jegerlehner, B.; Luscher, M.; Simma, H.; Sommer, R.; Bunk, B; Jansen, K; Jegerlehner, B; Luscher, M; Simma, H

    1994-01-01

    A previously introduced multi-boson technique for the simulation of QCD with dynamical quarks is described and some results of first test runs on a 6^3\\times12 lattice with Wilson quarks and gauge group SU(2) are reported.

  6. Simulation of plume dynamics by the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Peter; Yuen, David A.

    2017-09-01

    The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is a semi-microscopic method to simulate fluid mechanics by modelling distributions of particles moving and colliding on a lattice. We present 2-D simulations using the LBM of a fluid in a rectangular box being heated from below, and cooled from above, with a Rayleigh of Ra = 108, similar to current estimates of the Earth's mantle, and a Prandtl number of 5000. At this Prandtl number, the flow is found to be in the non-inertial regime where the inertial terms denoted I ≪ 1. Hence, the simulations presented lie within the regime of relevance for geodynamical problems. We obtain narrow upwelling plumes with mushroom heads and chutes of downwelling fluid as expected of a flow in the non-inertial regime. The method developed demonstrates that the LBM has great potential for simulating thermal convection and plume dynamics relevant to geodynamics, albeit with some limitations.

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of Frustrated Kondo Lattice Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toshihiro; Assaad, Fakher F.; Grover, Tarun

    2018-03-01

    The absence of the negative sign problem in quantum Monte Carlo simulations of spin and fermion systems has different origins. World-line based algorithms for spins require positivity of matrix elements whereas auxiliary field approaches for fermions depend on symmetries such as particle-hole symmetry. For negative-sign-free spin and fermionic systems, we show that one can formulate a negative-sign-free auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo algorithm that allows Kondo coupling of fermions with the spins. Using this general approach, we study a half-filled Kondo lattice model on the honeycomb lattice with geometric frustration. In addition to the conventional Kondo insulator and antiferromagnetically ordered phases, we find a partial Kondo screened state where spins are selectively screened so as to alleviate frustration, and the lattice rotation symmetry is broken nematically.

  8. Lattice QCD Calculations in Nuclear Physics towards the Exascale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Balint

    2017-01-01

    The combination of algorithmic advances and new highly parallel computing architectures are enabling lattice QCD calculations to tackle ever more complex problems in nuclear physics. In this talk I will review some computational challenges that are encountered in large scale cold nuclear physics campaigns such as those in hadron spectroscopy calculations. I will discuss progress in addressing these with algorithmic improvements such as multi-grid solvers and software for recent hardware architectures such as GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi, Knights Landing. Finally, I will highlight some current topics for research and development as we head towards the Exascale era This material is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office Of Science, Offices of Nuclear Physics, High Energy Physics and Advanced Scientific Computing Research, as well as the Office of Nuclear Physics under contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  9. Lattice gas automata simulations of flow through porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsukuma, Yosuke; Abe, Yutaka; Adachi, Hiromichi; Takahashi, Ryoichi

    1998-01-01

    In the course of a severe accident, a debris bed may be formed from once- molten and fragmented fuel elements. In order to avoid further degradation of the reactor core, it is necessary to remove the heat from the debris bed since the debris bed still release the decay heat. So as to predict the coolability of the debris bed, it is important to precisely estimate flow patterns through complex geometry of debris bed in microscopic level. Lattice gas automata could be powerful tool to simulate such a complex geometry. As a first step of the study, fundamental numerical simulation were conducted in two dimensional systems by using the lattice gas automata method to clarify single phase flow patterns through porous media in mesoscopic level. Immiscible lattice gas model is one of the lattice gas automata method and utilized for spinodal decomposition simulation of binary fluids. This model was applied to generate the complex flow geometry simulating porous media. It was approved that the complex flow geometries were successfully generated by the present method. Flow concentration was observed in specified flow channels for lower Reynolds number. Two dimensional flow concentration was caused by the irregular flow geometry generated by the present method, since the flow selects the channels of lower friction. Two dimensional pressure distribution was observed relating to the concentrations of flow in specified channels. The simulating results of the flow through the porous media by the present method qualitatively agree with the Ergun's equation. Quantitatively, the present results approach to Ergun's equation in higher Reynolds number than 10, although concentration of the flow in a specified flow channels were observed in lower Reynolds number than 10. It can be concluded that this technique is useful is useful to simulate flow through complex geometry like porous media. (author)

  10. Aspects of confinement in QCD from lattice simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielmann, Daniel

    2011-01-12

    We study confinement in quantum chromodynamics via numerical simulations in the framework of lattice gauge theory. In Landau gauge, the mechanism of confinement is related to the infrared behavior of the ghost and gluon propagators via the Gribov-Zwanziger and Kugo- Ojima scenarios. These scenarios entail a scaling behavior. Functional methods in the continuum allow both for this behavior and for decoupling solutions, while lattice simulations in three and four dimensions yield only the latter. A possible explanation for this mismatch is based on limitations of standard lattice gauge fixing methods. Hence, we investigate a number of alternative gauge fixing algorithms in pure SU(2) gauge theory in two, three and four dimensions. We find that stochastic quantization yields an infrared behavior of the propagators in agreement with the results of standard procedures, even though the Faddeev-Popov operator spectrum indicates some different properties. In the strong-coupling limit, our results challenge the standard picture. In particular, we find in a non-perturbative completion of Landau gauge an enormous effect of the Gribov ambiguity. It entails that no subset of infrared solutions can be excluded yet. Moreover, we study the gluon propagator with free boundary conditions. On large lattices, the results mostly show the standard behavior. We also examine non-periodic gauge transformations. Furthermore, we analyze two topics related to the phase diagram of QCD. First, we explore the sign problem for fermions on the lattice by simulating the three-dimensional Thirring model with a complex Langevin equation. The algorithm succeeds in yielding a 'Silver Blaze' behavior of observables, but it does not reliably describe the onset to a phase with non-zero density. Second, we determine properties of the deconfinement phase transition of pure SU(2) gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions, like the critical temperature, by means of the gluon propagator in Landau gauge. (orig.)

  11. Aspects of confinement in QCD from lattice simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielmann, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We study confinement in quantum chromodynamics via numerical simulations in the framework of lattice gauge theory. In Landau gauge, the mechanism of confinement is related to the infrared behavior of the ghost and gluon propagators via the Gribov-Zwanziger and Kugo- Ojima scenarios. These scenarios entail a scaling behavior. Functional methods in the continuum allow both for this behavior and for decoupling solutions, while lattice simulations in three and four dimensions yield only the latter. A possible explanation for this mismatch is based on limitations of standard lattice gauge fixing methods. Hence, we investigate a number of alternative gauge fixing algorithms in pure SU(2) gauge theory in two, three and four dimensions. We find that stochastic quantization yields an infrared behavior of the propagators in agreement with the results of standard procedures, even though the Faddeev-Popov operator spectrum indicates some different properties. In the strong-coupling limit, our results challenge the standard picture. In particular, we find in a non-perturbative completion of Landau gauge an enormous effect of the Gribov ambiguity. It entails that no subset of infrared solutions can be excluded yet. Moreover, we study the gluon propagator with free boundary conditions. On large lattices, the results mostly show the standard behavior. We also examine non-periodic gauge transformations. Furthermore, we analyze two topics related to the phase diagram of QCD. First, we explore the sign problem for fermions on the lattice by simulating the three-dimensional Thirring model with a complex Langevin equation. The algorithm succeeds in yielding a 'Silver Blaze' behavior of observables, but it does not reliably describe the onset to a phase with non-zero density. Second, we determine properties of the deconfinement phase transition of pure SU(2) gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions, like the critical temperature, by means of the gluon propagator in Landau gauge. (orig.)

  12. Nuclear system test simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, S.D.; Hill, W.D.; Wilson, P.A.; Steiner, W.M.

    1987-01-01

    A transportable test simulator is described for a nuclear power plant. The nuclear power plant includes a control panel, a reactor having actuated rods for moving into and out of a reactor for causing the plant to operate, and a control rod network extending between the control panel and the reactor rods. The network serially transmits command words between the panel and rods, and has connecting interfaces at preselected points remote from the control panel between the control panel and rods. The test simulator comprises: a test simulator input for transport to and connection into the network at at least one interface for receiving the serial command words from the network. Each serial command includes an identifier portion and a command portion; means for processing interior of the simulator for the serial command words for identifying that portion of the power plant designated in the identifier portion and processing the word responsive to the command portion of the word after the identification; means for generating a response word responsive to the command portion; and output means for sending and transmitting the response word to the nuclear power plant at the interface whereby the control panel responds to the response word

  13. Critical slowing down and error analysis in lattice QCD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virotta, Francesco

    2012-02-21

    In this work we investigate the critical slowing down of lattice QCD simulations. We perform a preliminary study in the quenched approximation where we find that our estimate of the exponential auto-correlation time scales as {tau}{sub exp}(a){proportional_to}a{sup -5}, where a is the lattice spacing. In unquenched simulations with O(a) improved Wilson fermions we do not obtain a scaling law but find results compatible with the behavior that we find in the pure gauge theory. The discussion is supported by a large set of ensembles both in pure gauge and in the theory with two degenerate sea quarks. We have moreover investigated the effect of slow algorithmic modes in the error analysis of the expectation value of typical lattice QCD observables (hadronic matrix elements and masses). In the context of simulations affected by slow modes we propose and test a method to obtain reliable estimates of statistical errors. The method is supposed to help in the typical algorithmic setup of lattice QCD, namely when the total statistics collected is of O(10){tau}{sub exp}. This is the typical case when simulating close to the continuum limit where the computational costs for producing two independent data points can be extremely large. We finally discuss the scale setting in N{sub f}=2 simulations using the Kaon decay constant f{sub K} as physical input. The method is explained together with a thorough discussion of the error analysis employed. A description of the publicly available code used for the error analysis is included.

  14. U(1) Wilson lattice gauge theories in digital quantum simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschik, Christine; Heyl, Markus; Martinez, Esteban; Monz, Thomas; Schindler, Philipp; Vogell, Berit; Dalmonte, Marcello; Hauke, Philipp; Blatt, Rainer; Zoller, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Lattice gauge theories describe fundamental phenomena in nature, but calculating their real-time dynamics on classical computers is notoriously difficult. In a recent publication (Martinez et al 2016 Nature 534 516), we proposed and experimentally demonstrated a digital quantum simulation of the paradigmatic Schwinger model, a U(1)-Wilson lattice gauge theory describing the interplay between fermionic matter and gauge bosons. Here, we provide a detailed theoretical analysis of the performance and the potential of this protocol. Our strategy is based on analytically integrating out the gauge bosons, which preserves exact gauge invariance but results in complicated long-range interactions between the matter fields. Trapped-ion platforms are naturally suited to implementing these interactions, allowing for an efficient quantum simulation of the model, with a number of gate operations that scales polynomially with system size. Employing numerical simulations, we illustrate that relevant phenomena can be observed in larger experimental systems, using as an example the production of particle-antiparticle pairs after a quantum quench. We investigate theoretically the robustness of the scheme towards generic error sources, and show that near-future experiments can reach regimes where finite-size effects are insignificant. We also discuss the challenges in quantum simulating the continuum limit of the theory. Using our scheme, fundamental phenomena of lattice gauge theories can be probed using a broad set of experimentally accessible observables, including the entanglement entropy and the vacuum persistence amplitude.

  15. Energy gains from lattice-enabled nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The energy gain of a system is defined as the ratio of its output energy divided by the energy provided to operate the system. Most familiar systems have energy gains less than one due to various inefficiencies. By contrast, lattice-enabled nuclear reactions (LENR) offer high energy gains. Theoretical values in excess of 1000 are possible. Energy gains over 100 have already been reported. But, they have not yet been sustained for commercially significant durations. This article summarizes the current status of LENR energy gains. (author)

  16. Lattice gas simulations of dynamical geometry in two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klales, Anna; Cianci, Donato; Needell, Zachary; Meyer, David A; Love, Peter J

    2010-10-01

    We present a hydrodynamic lattice gas model for two-dimensional flows on curved surfaces with dynamical geometry. This model is an extension to two dimensions of the dynamical geometry lattice gas model previously studied in one dimension. We expand upon a variation of the two-dimensional flat space Frisch-Hasslacher-Pomeau (FHP) model created by Frisch [Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 1505 (1986)] and independently by Wolfram, and modified by Boghosian [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 360, 333 (2002)]. We define a hydrodynamic lattice gas model on an arbitrary triangulation whose flat space limit is the FHP model. Rules that change the geometry are constructed using the Pachner moves, which alter the triangulation but not the topology. We present results on the growth of the number of triangles as a function of time. Simulations show that the number of triangles grows with time as t(1/3), in agreement with a mean-field prediction. We also present preliminary results on the distribution of curvature for a typical triangulation in these simulations.

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of lattice models for single polymer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Single linear polymer chains in dilute solutions under good solvent conditions are studied by Monte Carlo simulations with the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method up to the chain length N ˜ O(10^4). Based on the standard simple cubic lattice model (SCLM) with fixed bond length and the bond fluctuation model (BFM) with bond lengths in a range between 2 and sqrt{10}, we investigate the conformations of polymer chains described by self-avoiding walks on the simple cubic lattice, and by random walks and non-reversible random walks in the absence of excluded volume interactions. In addition to flexible chains, we also extend our study to semiflexible chains for different stiffness controlled by a bending potential. The persistence lengths of chains extracted from the orientational correlations are estimated for all cases. We show that chains based on the BFM are more flexible than those based on the SCLM for a fixed bending energy. The microscopic differences between these two lattice models are discussed and the theoretical predictions of scaling laws given in the literature are checked and verified. Our simulations clarify that a different mapping ratio between the coarse-grained models and the atomistically realistic description of polymers is required in a coarse-graining approach due to the different crossovers to the asymptotic behavior.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of lattice models for single polymer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Single linear polymer chains in dilute solutions under good solvent conditions are studied by Monte Carlo simulations with the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method up to the chain length N∼O(10 4 ). Based on the standard simple cubic lattice model (SCLM) with fixed bond length and the bond fluctuation model (BFM) with bond lengths in a range between 2 and √(10), we investigate the conformations of polymer chains described by self-avoiding walks on the simple cubic lattice, and by random walks and non-reversible random walks in the absence of excluded volume interactions. In addition to flexible chains, we also extend our study to semiflexible chains for different stiffness controlled by a bending potential. The persistence lengths of chains extracted from the orientational correlations are estimated for all cases. We show that chains based on the BFM are more flexible than those based on the SCLM for a fixed bending energy. The microscopic differences between these two lattice models are discussed and the theoretical predictions of scaling laws given in the literature are checked and verified. Our simulations clarify that a different mapping ratio between the coarse-grained models and the atomistically realistic description of polymers is required in a coarse-graining approach due to the different crossovers to the asymptotic behavior

  19. Critical slowing down and error analysis in lattice QCD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Stefan [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Sommer, Rainer; Virotta, Francesco [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2010-09-15

    We study the critical slowing down towards the continuum limit of lattice QCD simulations with Hybrid Monte Carlo type algorithms. In particular for the squared topological charge we find it to be very severe with an effective dynamical critical exponent of about 5 in pure gauge theory. We also consider Wilson loops which we can demonstrate to decouple from the modes which slow down the topological charge. Quenched observables are studied and a comparison to simulations of full QCD is made. In order to deal with the slow modes in the simulation, we propose a method to incorporate the information from slow observables into the error analysis of physical observables and arrive at safer error estimates. (orig.)

  20. Critical slowing down and error analysis in lattice QCD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Stefan; Sommer, Rainer; Virotta, Francesco

    2010-09-01

    We study the critical slowing down towards the continuum limit of lattice QCD simulations with Hybrid Monte Carlo type algorithms. In particular for the squared topological charge we find it to be very severe with an effective dynamical critical exponent of about 5 in pure gauge theory. We also consider Wilson loops which we can demonstrate to decouple from the modes which slow down the topological charge. Quenched observables are studied and a comparison to simulations of full QCD is made. In order to deal with the slow modes in the simulation, we propose a method to incorporate the information from slow observables into the error analysis of physical observables and arrive at safer error estimates. (orig.)

  1. Overview: Understanding nucleation phenomena from simulations of lattice gas models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, Kurt; Virnau, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in Ising/lattice gas models are reviewed with an emphasis on the general insight gained on the mechanisms by which metastable states decay. Attention is paid to the proper distinction of particles that belong to a cluster (droplet), that may trigger a nucleation event, from particles in its environment, a problem crucial near the critical point. Well below the critical point, the lattice structure causes an anisotropy of the interface tension, and hence nonspherical droplet shapes result, making the treatment nontrivial even within the conventional classical theory of homogeneous nucleation. For temperatures below the roughening transition temperature facetted crystals rather than spherical droplets result. The possibility to find nucleation barriers from a thermodynamic analysis avoiding a cluster identification on the particle level is discussed, as well as the question of curvature corrections to the interfacial tension. For the interpretation of heterogeneous nucleation at planar walls, knowledge of contact angles and line tensions is desirable, and methods to extract these quantities from simulations will be mentioned. Finally, also the problem of nucleation near the stability limit of metastable states and the significance of the spinodal curve will be discussed, in the light of simulations of Ising models with medium range interactions.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann model for simulating immiscible two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, T; Phillips, T N

    2007-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann equation is often promoted as a numerical simulation tool that is particularly suitable for predicting the flow of complex fluids. This paper develops a two-dimensional 9-velocity (D2Q9) lattice Boltzmann model for immiscible binary fluids with variable viscosities and density ratio using a single relaxation time for each fluid. In the macroscopic limit, this model is shown to recover the Navier-Stokes equations for two-phase flows. This is achieved by constructing a two-phase component of the collision operator that induces the appropriate surface tension term in the macroscopic equations. A theoretical expression for surface tension is determined. The validity of this analysis is confirmed by comparing numerical and theoretical predictions of surface tension as a function of density. The model is also shown to predict Laplace's law for surface tension and Poiseuille flow of layered immiscible binary fluids. The spinodal decomposition of two fluids of equal density but different viscosity is then studied. At equilibrium, the system comprises one large low viscosity bubble enclosed by the more viscous fluid in agreement with theoretical arguments of Renardy and Joseph (1993 Fundamentals of Two-Fluid Dynamics (New York: Springer)). Two other simulations, namely the non-equilibrium rod rest and the coalescence of two bubbles, are performed to show that this model can be used to simulate two fluids with a large density ratio

  3. Lattice dynamics and molecular dynamics simulation of complex materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplot, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    In this article we briefly review the lattice dynamics and molecular dynamics simulation techniques, as used for complex ionic and molecular solids, and demonstrate a number of applications through examples of our work. These computational studies, along with experiments, have provided microscopic insight into the structure and dynamics, phase transitions and thermodynamical properties of a variety of materials including fullerene, high temperature superconducting oxides and geological minerals as a function of pressure and temperature. The computational techniques also allow the study of the structures and dynamics associated with disorder, defects, surfaces, interfaces etc. (author)

  4. NN-Es Fault Diagnosis Method in Nuclear Power Equipment Based on Concept Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yongkuo; Xie Chunli; Xia Hong

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve the fault diagnosis accuracy of nuclear power plant,neural network and expert systems were combined to give full play to their advantages. In this paper, the concept lattice was applied to get the object properties, extracting the core attributes, dispensable attributes and relative necessary attributes from a large number raw data of fault symptoms.Based on these attributes, neural networks with different levels of importance were designed to improve the learning speed and diagnosis accuracy, and the diagnosis results of the neural networks were verified by using rule-based reasoning expert system. To verify the accuracy of this method, some simulation experiments about the typical faults of nuclear power plant were conducted. And the simulation results show that it is feasible to diagnose nuclear power plant faults with the confederation diagnosis methods combined the neural networks based on the concept lattice theory and expert system, with the distinctive features such as the efficiency of neural network learning, less calculation and reliability of diagnosis results and so on. (authors)

  5. Simulation of bubble motion under gravity by lattice Boltzmann method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Naoki; Misawa, Masaki; Tomiyama, Akio; Hosokawa, Shigeo

    2001-01-01

    We describe the numerical simulation results of bubble motion under gravity by the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which assumes that a fluid consists of mesoscopic fluid particles repeating collision and translation and a multiphase interface is reproduced in a self-organizing way by repulsive interaction between different kinds of particles. The purposes in this study are to examine the applicability of LBM to the numerical analysis of bubble motions, and to develop a three-dimensional version of the binary fluid model that introduces a free energy function. We included the buoyancy terms due to the density difference in the lattice Boltzmann equations, and simulated single-and two-bubble motions, setting flow conditions according to the Eoetvoes and Morton numbers. The two-dimensional results by LBM agree with those by the Volume of Fluid method based on the Navier-Stokes equations. The three-dimensional model possesses the surface tension satisfying the Laplace's law, and reproduces the motion of single bubble and the two-bubble interaction of their approach and coalescence in circular tube. There results prove that the buoyancy terms and the 3D model proposed here are suitable, and that LBM is useful for the numerical analysis of bubble motion under gravity. (author)

  6. Thermal lattice Boltzmann simulation for multispecies fluid equilibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahala, Linda; Wah, Darren; Vahala, George; Carter, Jonathan; Pavlo, Pavol

    2000-01-01

    The equilibration rate for multispecies fluids is examined using thermal lattice Boltzmann simulations. Two-dimensional free-decay simulations are performed for effects of velocity shear layer turbulence on sharp temperature profiles. In particular, parameters are so chosen that the lighter species is turbulent while the heavier species is laminar--and so its vorticity layers would simply decay and diffuse in time. With species coupling, however, there is velocity equilibration followed by the final relaxation to one large co- and one large counter-rotating vortex. The temperature equilibration proceeds on a slower time scale and is in good agreement with the theoretical order of magnitude estimate of Morse [Phys. Fluids 6, 1420 (1963)]. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  7. Thermal lattice Boltzmann simulation for multispecies fluid equilibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, Linda [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States); Wah, Darren [Department of Physics, William and Mary College, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); Vahala, George [Department of Physics, William and Mary College, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); Carter, Jonathan [NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 97320 (United States); Pavlo, Pavol [Institute of Plasma Physics, Czech Academy of Science, Praha 8, (Czech Republic)

    2000-07-01

    The equilibration rate for multispecies fluids is examined using thermal lattice Boltzmann simulations. Two-dimensional free-decay simulations are performed for effects of velocity shear layer turbulence on sharp temperature profiles. In particular, parameters are so chosen that the lighter species is turbulent while the heavier species is laminar--and so its vorticity layers would simply decay and diffuse in time. With species coupling, however, there is velocity equilibration followed by the final relaxation to one large co- and one large counter-rotating vortex. The temperature equilibration proceeds on a slower time scale and is in good agreement with the theoretical order of magnitude estimate of Morse [Phys. Fluids 6, 1420 (1963)]. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  8. Improved local lattice Monte Carlo simulation for charged systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2018-03-01

    Maggs and Rossetto [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 196402 (2002)] proposed a local lattice Monte Carlo algorithm for simulating charged systems based on Gauss's law, which scales with the particle number N as O(N). This method includes two degrees of freedom: the configuration of the mobile charged particles and the electric field. In this work, we consider two important issues in the implementation of the method, the acceptance rate of configurational change (particle move) and the ergodicity in the phase space sampled by the electric field. We propose a simple method to improve the acceptance rate of particle moves based on the superposition principle for electric field. Furthermore, we introduce an additional updating step for the field, named "open-circuit update," to ensure that the system is fully ergodic under periodic boundary conditions. We apply this improved local Monte Carlo simulation to an electrolyte solution confined between two low dielectric plates. The results show excellent agreement with previous theoretical work.

  9. Simulating condensation on microstructured surfaces using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Alexander; Vasyliv, Yaroslav

    2017-11-01

    We simulate a single component fluid condensing on 2D structured surfaces with different wettability. To simulate the two phase fluid, we use the athermal Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) driven by a pseudopotential force. The pseudopotential force results in a non-ideal equation of state (EOS) which permits liquid-vapor phase change. To account for thermal effects, the athermal LBM is coupled to a finite volume discretization of the temperature evolution equation obtained using a thermal energy rate balance for the specific internal energy. We use the developed model to probe the effect of surface structure and surface wettability on the condensation rate in order to identify microstructure topographies promoting condensation. Financial support is acknowledged from Kimberly-Clark.

  10. Lattice Commissioning Strategy Simulation for the B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.; Whittum, D.; Yan, Y.; Cai, Y.; Shoaee, H.

    2011-01-01

    To prepare for the PEP-II turn on, we have studied one commissioning strategy with simulated lattice errors. Features such as difference and absolute orbit analysis and correction are discussed. To prepare for the commissioning of the PEP-II injection line and high energy ring (HER), we have developed a system for on-line orbit analysis by merging two existing codes: LEGO and RESOLVE. With the LEGO-RESOLVE system, we can study the problem of finding quadrupole alignment and beam position (BPM) offset errors with simulated data. We have increased the speed and versatility of the orbit analysis process by using a command file written in a script language designed specifically for RESOLVE. In addition, we have interfaced the LEGO-RESOLVE system to the control system of the B-Factory. In this paper, we describe online analysis features of the LEGO-RESOLVE system and present examples of practical applications.

  11. Neutron-proton scattering at next-to-next-to-leading order in Nuclear Lattice Effective Field Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Jose Manuel [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Theory Center, Newport News, VA (United States); Du, Dechuan; Laehde, Timo A.; Li, Ning; Lu, Bing-Nan; Luu, Thomas [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut fuer Kernphysik, and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Klein, Nico [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Lee, Dean [North Carolina State University, Department of Physics, Raleigh, NC (United States); Meissner, Ulf G. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut fuer Kernphysik, and Juelich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, JARA - High Performance Computing, Juelich (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    We present a systematic study of neutron-proton scattering in Nuclear Lattice Effective Field Theory (NLEFT), in terms of the computationally efficient radial Hamiltonian method. Our leading-order (LO) interaction consists of smeared, local contact terms and static one-pion exchange. We show results for a fully non-perturbative analysis up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), followed by a perturbative treatment of contributions beyond LO. The latter analysis anticipates practical Monte Carlo simulations of heavier nuclei. We explore how our results depend on the lattice spacing a, and estimate sources of uncertainty in the determination of the low-energy constants of the next-to-leading-order (NLO) two-nucleon force. We give results for lattice spacings ranging from a = 1.97 fm down to a = 0.98 fm, and discuss the effects of lattice artifacts on the scattering observables. At a = 0.98 fm, lattice artifacts appear small, and our NNLO results agree well with the Nijmegen partial-wave analysis for S-wave and P-wave channels. We expect the peripheral partial waves to be equally well described once the lattice momenta in the pion-nucleon coupling are taken to coincide with the continuum dispersion relation, and higher-order (N3LO) contributions are included. We stress that for center-of-mass momenta below 100 MeV, the physics of the two-nucleon system is independent of the lattice spacing. (orig.)

  12. SU (2) lattice gauge theory simulations on Fermi GPUs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Nuno; Bicudo, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    In this work we explore the performance of CUDA in quenched lattice SU (2) simulations. CUDA, NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture, is a hardware and software architecture developed by NVIDIA for computing on the GPU. We present an analysis and performance comparison between the GPU and CPU in single and double precision. Analyses with multiple GPUs and two different architectures (G200 and Fermi architectures) are also presented. In order to obtain a high performance, the code must be optimized for the GPU architecture, i.e., an implementation that exploits the memory hierarchy of the CUDA programming model. We produce codes for the Monte Carlo generation of SU (2) lattice gauge configurations, for the mean plaquette, for the Polyakov Loop at finite T and for the Wilson loop. We also present results for the potential using many configurations (50,000) without smearing and almost 2000 configurations with APE smearing. With two Fermi GPUs we have achieved an excellent performance of 200x the speed over one CPU, in single precision, around 110 Gflops/s. We also find that, using the Fermi architecture, double precision computations for the static quark-antiquark potential are not much slower (less than 2x slower) than single precision computations.

  13. A heterogeneous lattice gas model for simulating pedestrian evacuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiwei; Chen, Jianqiao; Zheng, Yaochen; Wei, Junhong

    2012-02-01

    Based on the cellular automata method (CA model) and the mobile lattice gas model (MLG model), we have developed a heterogeneous lattice gas model for simulating pedestrian evacuation processes in an emergency. A local population density concept is introduced first. The update rule in the new model depends on the local population density and the exit crowded degree factor. The drift D, which is one of the key parameters influencing the evacuation process, is allowed to change according to the local population density of the pedestrians. Interactions including attraction, repulsion, and friction between every two pedestrians and those between a pedestrian and the building wall are described by a nonlinear function of the corresponding distance, and the repulsion forces increase sharply as the distances get small. A critical force of injury is introduced into the model, and its effects on the evacuation process are investigated. The model proposed has heterogeneous features as compared to the MLG model or the basic CA model. Numerical examples show that the model proposed can capture the basic features of pedestrian evacuation, such as clogging and arching phenomena.

  14. Circuit QED lattices: Towards quantum simulation with superconducting circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Sebastian [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093, Zurich (Switzerland); Koch, Jens [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    The Jaynes-Cummings model describes the coupling between photons and a single two-level atom in a simplified representation of light-matter interactions. In circuit QED, this model is implemented by combining microwave resonators and superconducting qubits on a microchip with unprecedented experimental control. Arranging qubits and resonators in the form of a lattice realizes a new kind of Hubbard model, the Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard model, in which the elementary excitations are polariton quasi-particles. Due to the genuine openness of photonic systems, circuit QED lattices offer the possibility to study the intricate interplay of collective behavior, strong correlations and non-equilibrium physics. Thus, turning circuit QED into an architecture for quantum simulation, i.e., using a well-controlled system to mimic the intricate quantum behavior of another system too daunting for a theorist to tackle head-on, is an exciting idea which has served as theorists' playground for a while and is now also starting to catch on in experiments. This review gives a summary of the most recent theoretical proposals and experimental efforts. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Boundary Slip and Surface Interaction: A Lattice Boltzmann Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan-Yan, Chen; Hua-Bing, Li; Hou-Hui, Yi

    2008-01-01

    The factors affecting slip length in Couette geometry flows are analysed by means of a two-phase mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann model including non-ideal fluid-fluid and fluid-wall interactions. The main factors influencing the boundary slip are the strength of interactions between fluid-fluid and fluid-wall particles. Other factors, such as fluid viscosity, bulk pressure may also change the slip length. We find that boundary slip only occurs under a certain density (bulk pressure). If the density is large enough, the slip length will tend to zero. In our simulations, a low density layer near the wall does not need to be postulated a priori but emerges naturally from the underlying non-ideal mesoscopic dynamics. It is the low density layer that induces the boundary slip. The results may be helpful to understand recent experimental observations on the slippage of micro flows

  16. Software for simulation of nuclear simulation of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, J.O.; Ramos, L.M.; Arjona, O.; Rodriguez, L.

    1993-01-01

    The software is an instrument to build conceptual-type simulators of low, medium and full scale for used in nuclear installations. The system is composed by composed by two basic modules: one for the edition and the other for the simulation. The first one allows to prepare the information to simulate: mathematical model, technological design (fundamentally, operation board or mnemotechnical design), parameters to be shown, failures to be simulated

  17. Entropic Lattice Boltzmann: an implicit Large-Eddy Simulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauzin, Guillaume; Biferale, Luca; Sbragaglia, Mauro; Gupta, Abhineet; Toschi, Federico; Ehrhardt, Matthias; Bartel, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    We study the modeling of turbulence implied by the unconditionally stable Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Method (ELBM). We first focus on 2D homogeneous turbulence, for which we conduct numerical simulations for a wide range of relaxation times τ. For these simulations, we analyze the effective viscosity obtained by numerically differentiating the kinetic energy and enstrophy balance equations averaged over sub-domains of the computational grid. We aim at understanding the behavior of the implied sub-grid scale model and verify a formulation previously derived using Chapman-Enskog expansion. These ELBM benchmark simulations are thus useful to understand the range of validity of ELBM as a turbulence model. Finally, we will discuss an extension of the previously obtained results to the 3D case. Supported by the European Unions Framework Programme for Research and Innovation Horizon 2020 (2014-2020) under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie Grant Agreement No. 642069 and by the European Research Council under the ERC Grant Agreement No. 339032.

  18. Z{sub c}(3900): confronting theory and lattice simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albaladejo, Miguel; Fernandez-Soler, Pedro; Nieves, Juan [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Valencia (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    We consider a recent T-matrix analysis by Albaladejo et al. (Phys Lett B 755:337, 2016), which accounts for the J/ψπ and D{sup *} anti D coupled-channels dynamics, and which successfully describes the experimental information concerning the recently discovered Z{sub c}(3900){sup ±}. Within such scheme, the data can be similarly well described in two different scenarios, where Z{sub c}(3900) is either a resonance or a virtual state. To shed light into the nature of this state, we apply this formalism in a finite box with the aim of comparing with recent Lattice QCD (LQCD) simulations. We see that the energy levels obtained for both scenarios agree well with those obtained in the single-volume LQCD simulation reported in Prelovsek et al. (Phys Rev D 91:014504, 2015), thus making it difficult to disentangle the two possibilities. We also study the volume dependence of the energy levels obtained with our formalism and suggest that LQCD simulations performed at several volumes could help in discerning the actual nature of the intriguing Z{sub c}(3900) state. (orig.)

  19. Towards quantum simulation of the Kondo-Lattice-Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochanke, Andre

    2017-04-25

    Ultracold quantum gases of alkaline-earth-like metals are a versatile tool to investigate interacting many-body physics by realizing clean and controllable experimental model systems. Their intriguing properties range from energetically low-lying clock transitions, which allow for high-resolution spectroscopy, over meta-stable states, which can be regarded as a second species with orbital degree of freedom, to SU(N) symmetry, allowing novel magnetic phases. These open up new possibilities for quantum simulators. Using them in combination with optical lattices dissipative Fermi-Hubbard models and the Kondo-lattice-model can be realized, two promising examples for probing strongly correlated systems. This thesis presents an experimental apparatus for producing ultracold samples of fermionic {sup 173}Yb (N≤6). A new bicolor dipole trap was implemented with a final, average trap frequency of anti ω=36 Hz. Using optical, resonant pumping and an Optical-Stern-Gerlach scheme, the spin mixture can arbitrarily be changed from a six- to a one-component gas. Typically the degenerate Fermi gases consist of 87000 atoms at 17.5% T{sub F} (N=6) and of 47000 atoms at 19.4% T{sub F} (N=1). The lowest lying meta-stable state {sup 3}P{sub 0} (578 nm) is coherently controlled using a clock-laser setup with a linewidth of FWHM=1 Hz by means of Rabi oscillations or rapid adiabatic passage. By conducting spectroscopic measurements in a 3D magic lattice (759 nm) we demonstrate inter band transitions and observe the {sup 1}S{sub 0}<=>{sup 3}P{sub 0} excitation with a resolution of FWHM=50(2) Hz. Applying these techniques to a two-component spin mixture reveals a shift of the clock-transition caused by spin-exchange interaction between the orbital symmetric vertical stroke eg right angle {sup +} vertical stroke ↑↓ right angle {sup -} and the orbital antisymmetric vertical stroke eg right angle {sup -} vertical stroke ↑↓ right angle {sup +} state. Using the inelastic properties of

  20. Nuclear Power Plant Simulation Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Fran

    1979-01-01

    Presents a nuclear power plant simulation game which is designed to involve a class of 30 junior or senior high school students. Scientific, ecological, and social issues covered in the game are also presented. (HM)

  1. Improved real-time dynamics from imaginary frequency lattice simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlowski Jan M.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The computation of real-time properties, such as transport coefficients or bound state spectra of strongly interacting quantum fields in thermal equilibrium is a pressing matter. Since the sign problem prevents a direct evaluation of these quantities, lattice data needs to be analytically continued from the Euclidean domain of the simulation to Minkowski time, in general an ill-posed inverse problem. Here we report on a novel approach to improve the determination of real-time information in the form of spectral functions by setting up a simulation prescription in imaginary frequencies. By carefully distinguishing between initial conditions and quantum dynamics one obtains access to correlation functions also outside the conventional Matsubara frequencies. In particular the range between ω0 and ω1 = 2πT, which is most relevant for the inverse problem may be more highly resolved. In combination with the fact that in imaginary frequencies the kernel of the inverse problem is not an exponential but only a rational function we observe significant improvements in the reconstruction of spectral functions, demonstrated in a simple 0+1 dimensional scalar field theory toy model.

  2. Improved real-time dynamics from imaginary frequency lattice simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Jan M.; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    The computation of real-time properties, such as transport coefficients or bound state spectra of strongly interacting quantum fields in thermal equilibrium is a pressing matter. Since the sign problem prevents a direct evaluation of these quantities, lattice data needs to be analytically continued from the Euclidean domain of the simulation to Minkowski time, in general an ill-posed inverse problem. Here we report on a novel approach to improve the determination of real-time information in the form of spectral functions by setting up a simulation prescription in imaginary frequencies. By carefully distinguishing between initial conditions and quantum dynamics one obtains access to correlation functions also outside the conventional Matsubara frequencies. In particular the range between ω0 and ω1 = 2πT, which is most relevant for the inverse problem may be more highly resolved. In combination with the fact that in imaginary frequencies the kernel of the inverse problem is not an exponential but only a rational function we observe significant improvements in the reconstruction of spectral functions, demonstrated in a simple 0+1 dimensional scalar field theory toy model.

  3. Cluster evolution and critical cluster sizes for the square and triangular lattice Ising models using lattice animals and Monte Carlo simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eising, G.; Kooi, B. J.

    2012-01-01

    Growth and decay of clusters at temperatures below T-c have been studied for a two-dimensional Ising model for both square and triangular lattices using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and the enumeration of lattice animals. For the lattice animals, all unique cluster configurations with their internal

  4. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in nitroxide spin-label EPR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    that the definition of nitrogen nuclear relaxation rate Wn commonly used in the CW-EPR literature for 14N-nitroxyl spin labels is inconsistent with that currently adopted in time-resolved EPR measurements of saturation recovery. Redefinition of the normalised 14N spin-lattice relaxation rate, b = Wn/(2We), preserves...... of spin-lattice relaxation in this three-level system. Expressions for CW-saturation EPR with the revised definitions are summarised. Data on nitrogen nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are compiled according to the three-level scheme for 14N-relaxation: T1 n = 1/Wn. Results are compared and contrasted...

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of electron trapping in the sapphire lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambaut, C.; Oh, K.H.; Fayeulle, S.; Kohanoff, J.

    1995-10-01

    Energy storage and release in dielectric materials can be described on the basis of the charge trapping mechanism. Most phenomenological aspects have been recently rationalized in terms of the space charge mode. Dynamical aspects are studied here by performing Molecular Dynamics simulations. We show that an excess electron introduced into the sapphire lattice (α -Al 2 O 3 ) can be trapped only at a limited number of sites. The energy gained by allowing the electron to localize in these sites is of the order of 4-5 eV, in good agreement with the results of the space charge model. Displacements of the neighboring ions due to the implanted charge are shown to be localized in a small region of about 5 A. Detrapping is observed at 250 K. The ionic displacements turn out to play an important role in modifying the potential landscape by lowering, in a dynamical way, the barriers that cause localization at low temperature. (author). 18 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  6. Simulators of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanobetti, D.

    1984-01-01

    The report deals with the simulators of nuclear power stations used for the training of operators and for the analysis of operations. It reviews the development of analogical, hybrid and digital simulators up to the present, indicating the impact resulting from the TMI-2 accident. It indicates, the components of simulators and the present accepted terminology for a classification of the various types of simulators. It reviews the present state of the art of the technology: how a basic mathematical model of a nuclear power system is worked out and what are the technical problems associated with more accurate models. Examples of elaborate models are given: for a PWR pressurizer, for an AGR steam generator. It also discusses certain problems of hardware technology. Characteristics of present replica simulators are given with certain details: simulated transient evolutions and malfunctions, accuracy of simulation. The work concerning the assessment of the validity of certain simulators is reported. A list of simulator manufacturers and a survey of the principal simulators in operation in the countries of the European Community, in the United States, and in certain other countries are presented. Problem associated with the use of simulators as training facilities, and their use as operational devices are discussed. Studies and research in progress for the expected future development of simulators are reviewed

  7. Simulators in nuclear power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathey, C.; Roux, J.

    1984-01-01

    The simulator has established itself as an indispensable tool for training nuclear power station operators. After summarizing the main advantages of this training method, the author examines different types of simulators (for training or planning) and their architecture. He then describes the mathematical models used to simulate operation of the various elements of the ''power station'' and guarantee accurate representativity of phenomena associated with the power station operating under normal and accident conditions [fr

  8. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of liquid crystalline fluids: active gels and blue phases

    OpenAIRE

    Cates, M. E.; Henrich, O.; Marenduzzo, D.; Stratford, K.

    2010-01-01

    Lattice Boltzmann simulations have become a method of choice to solve the hydrodynamic equations of motion of a number of complex fluids. Here we review some recent applications of lattice Boltzmann to study the hydrodynamics of liquid crystalline materials. In particular, we focus on the study of (a) the exotic blue phases of cholesteric liquid crystals, and (b) active gels - a model system for actin plus myosin solutions or bacterial suspensions. In both cases lattice Boltzmann studies have...

  9. Simulation of turbulent flow over staggered tube bundles using multi-relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Woon; Choi, Hyun Gyung

    2014-01-01

    A turbulent fluid flow over staggered tube bundles is of great interest in many engineering fields including nuclear fuel rods, heat exchangers and especially a gas cooled reactor lower plenum. Computational methods have evolved for the simulation of such flow for decades and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is one of the attractive methods due to its sound physical basis and ease of computerization including parallelization. In this study to find computational performance of the LBM in turbulent flows over staggered tubes, a fluid flow analysis code employing multi-relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method (MRT-LBM) is developed based on a 2-dimensional D2Q9 lattice model and classical sub-grid eddy viscosity model of Smagorinsky. As a first step, fundamental performance MRT-LBM is investigated against a standard problem of a flow past a cylinder at low Reynolds number in terms of drag forces. As a major step, benchmarking of the MRT-LBM is performed over a turbulent flow through staggered tube bundles at Reynolds number of 18,000. For a flow past a single cylinder, the accuracy is validated against existing experimental data and previous computations in terms of drag forces on the cylinder. Mainly, the MRT-LBM computation for a flow through staggered tube bundles is performed and compared with experimental data and general purpose computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses with standard k-ω turbulence and large eddy simulation (LES) equipped with turbulence closures of Smagrinsky-Lilly and wall-adapting local eddy-viscosity (WALE) model. The agreement between the experimental and the computational results from the present MRT-LBM is found to be reasonably acceptable and even comparable to the LES whereas the computational efficiency is superior. (orig.)

  10. Simulation of turbulent flow over staggered tube bundles using multi-relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Woon; Choi, Hyun Gyung [Dongguk Univ., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of). Nuclear and Energy Engineering Dept.

    2014-02-15

    A turbulent fluid flow over staggered tube bundles is of great interest in many engineering fields including nuclear fuel rods, heat exchangers and especially a gas cooled reactor lower plenum. Computational methods have evolved for the simulation of such flow for decades and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is one of the attractive methods due to its sound physical basis and ease of computerization including parallelization. In this study to find computational performance of the LBM in turbulent flows over staggered tubes, a fluid flow analysis code employing multi-relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method (MRT-LBM) is developed based on a 2-dimensional D2Q9 lattice model and classical sub-grid eddy viscosity model of Smagorinsky. As a first step, fundamental performance MRT-LBM is investigated against a standard problem of a flow past a cylinder at low Reynolds number in terms of drag forces. As a major step, benchmarking of the MRT-LBM is performed over a turbulent flow through staggered tube bundles at Reynolds number of 18,000. For a flow past a single cylinder, the accuracy is validated against existing experimental data and previous computations in terms of drag forces on the cylinder. Mainly, the MRT-LBM computation for a flow through staggered tube bundles is performed and compared with experimental data and general purpose computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses with standard k-ω turbulence and large eddy simulation (LES) equipped with turbulence closures of Smagrinsky-Lilly and wall-adapting local eddy-viscosity (WALE) model. The agreement between the experimental and the computational results from the present MRT-LBM is found to be reasonably acceptable and even comparable to the LES whereas the computational efficiency is superior. (orig.)

  11. Digital Quantum Simulation of Z2 Lattice Gauge Theories with Dynamical Fermionic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Erez; Farace, Alessandro; Reznik, Benni; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    We propose a scheme for digital quantum simulation of lattice gauge theories with dynamical fermions. Using a layered optical lattice with ancilla atoms that can move and interact with the other atoms (simulating the physical degrees of freedom), we obtain a stroboscopic dynamics which yields the four-body plaquette interactions, arising in models with (2 +1 ) and higher dimensions, without the use of perturbation theory. As an example we show how to simulate a Z2 model in (2 +1 ) dimensions.

  12. Simulators for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancarani, A.; Zanobetti, D.

    1983-01-01

    The different types of simulator for nuclear power plants depend on the kind of programme and the degree of representation to be achieved, which in turn determines the functions to duplicate. Different degrees correspond to different simulators and hence to different choices in the functions. Training of nuclear power plant operators takes advantage of the contribution of simulators of various degrees of complexity and fidelity. Reduced scope simulators are best for understanding basic phenomena; replica simulators are best used for formal qualification and requalification of personnel, while modular mini simulators of single parts of a plant are best for replay and assessment of malfunctions. Another category consists of simulators for the development of assistance during operation, with the inclusion of disturbance and alarm analysis. The only existing standard on simulators is, at present, the one adopted in the United States. This is too stringent and is never complied with by present simulators. A description of possible advantages of a European standard is therefore offered: it rests on methods of measurement of basic simulator characteristics such as fidelity in values and time. (author)

  13. arXiv Stochastic locality and master-field simulations of very large lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Lüscher, Martin

    2018-01-01

    In lattice QCD and other field theories with a mass gap, the field variables in distant regions of a physically large lattice are only weakly correlated. Accurate stochastic estimates of the expectation values of local observables may therefore be obtained from a single representative field. Such master-field simulations potentially allow very large lattices to be simulated, but require various conceptual and technical issues to be addressed. In this talk, an introduction to the subject is provided and some encouraging results of master-field simulations of the SU(3) gauge theory are reported.

  14. Lattice gas simulations of dynamical geometry in one dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Peter J; Boghosian, Bruce M; Meyer, David A

    2004-08-15

    We present numerical results obtained using a lattice gas model with dynamical geometry. The (irreversible) macroscopic behaviour of the geometry (size) of the lattice is discussed in terms of a simple scaling theory and obtained numerically. The emergence of irreversible behaviour from the reversible microscopic lattice gas rules is discussed in terms of the constraint that the macroscopic evolution be reproducible. The average size of the lattice exhibits power-law growth with exponent at late times. The deviation of the macroscopic behaviour from reproducibility for particular initial conditions ('rogue states') is investigated as a function of system size. The number of such 'rogue states' is observed to decrease with increasing system size. Two mean-field analyses of the macroscopic behaviour are also presented. Copyright 2004 The Royal Society

  15. Lattice Boltzmann Simulations in the Slip and Transition Flow Regime with the Peano Framework

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp; Rohrmann, Till

    2012-01-01

    We present simulation results of flows in the finite Knudsen range, which is in the slip and transition flow regime. Our implementations are based on the Lattice Boltzmann method and are accomplished within the Peano framework. We validate our code

  16. A new lattice Boltzmann equation to simulate density-driven convection of carbon dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca; Reis, Tim; Sun, Shuyu

    2013-01-01

    -driven convection becomes an important transport process to model. However, the challenge lies in simulating this transport process accurately with high spatial resolution and low CPU cost. This issue can be addressed by using the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE

  17. Microcanonical and hybrid simulations of lattice quantum chromodynamics with dynamical fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, D.K.

    1986-10-01

    Lattice QCD is simulated using Microcanonical and Hybrid (Micro-canonical/Langevin) methods to facilitate the inclusion of dynamical fermions (quarks). We report on simulations with 4 flavors of light dynamical quarks on a 10 3 x 6 lattice to study the finite temperature deconfinement/chiral transition which should be observable in relativistic heavy ion collisions, as a function of quark mass. A first order transition is observed at large mass, weakens at intermediate mass and strengthens for very small quark mass

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of lattice bosons in three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaer, A.; Han, J.

    1992-01-01

    We present an algorithm for calculating the thermodynamic properties of a system of nonrelativistic bosons on a three-dimensional spatial lattice. The method, which maps the three-dimensional quantum system onto a four-dimensional classical system, uses Monte Carlo sampling of configurations in either the canonical or the grand canonical ensemble. Our procedure is applicable to any system of lattice bosons with arbitrary short-range interactions. We test the algorithm by computing the temperature dependence of the energy, the heat capacity, and the condensate fraction of the free Bose gas

  19. Special nuclear material simulation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckey, John H.; DeMint, Amy; Gooch, Jack; Hawk, Todd; Pickett, Chris A.; Blessinger, Chris; York, Robbie L.

    2014-08-12

    An apparatus for simulating special nuclear material is provided. The apparatus typically contains a small quantity of special nuclear material (SNM) in a configuration that simulates a much larger quantity of SNM. Generally the apparatus includes a spherical shell that is formed from an alloy containing a small quantity of highly enriched uranium. Also typically provided is a core of depleted uranium. A spacer, typically aluminum, may be used to separate the depleted uranium from the shell of uranium alloy. A cladding, typically made of titanium, is provided to seal the source. Methods are provided to simulate SNM for testing radiation monitoring portals. Typically the methods use at least one primary SNM spectral line and exclude at least one secondary SNM spectral line.

  20. Nuclear design analysis of square-lattice honeycomb space nuclear rocket engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widargo, Reza; Anghaie, Samim

    1999-01-01

    The square-lattice honeycomb reactor is designed based on a cylindrical core that is determined to have critical diameter and length of 0.50 m and 0.50 c, respectively. A 0.10-cm thick radial graphite reflector, in addition to a 0.20-m thick axial graphite reflector are used to reduce neutron leakage from the reactor. The core is fueled with solid solution of 93% enriched (U, Zr, Nb)C, which is one of several ternary uranium carbides that are considered for this concept. The fuel is to be fabricated as 2 mm grooved (U, Zr, Nb)C wafers. The fuel wafers are used to form square-lattice honeycomb fuel assemblies, 0.10 m in length with 30% cross-sectional flow area. Five fuel assemblies are stacked up axially to form the reactor core. Based on the 30% void fraction, the width of the square flow channel is about 1.3 mm. The hydrogen propellant is passed through these flow channels and removes the heat from the reactor core. To perform nuclear design analysis, a series of neutron transport and diffusion codes are used. The preliminary results are obtained using a simple four-group cross-section model. To optimize the nuclear design, the fuel densities are varied for each assembly. Tantalum, hafnium and tungsten are considered and used as a replacement for niobium in fuel material to provide water submersion sub-criticality for the reactor. Axial and radial neutron flux and power density distributions are calculated for the core. Results of the neutronic analysis indicate that the core has a relatively fast spectrum. From the results of the thermal hydraulic analyses, eight axial temperature zones are chosen for the calculation of group average cross-sections. An iterative process is conducted to couple the neutronic calculations with the thermal hydraulics calculations. Results of the nuclear design analysis indicate that a compact core can be designed based on ternary uranium carbide square-lattice honeycomb fuel. This design provides a relatively high thrust to weight

  1. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of flow around a confined circular cyclinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashrafizaadeh, M.; Zadehgol, A.

    2002-01-01

    A two dimensional lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) based on a single time relaxation BGK model has been developed. Several benchmark problems including the Poiseuille flow, the lid driven cavity flow and the flow around a circular cylinder have been performed employing a d2q9 lattice. The laminar flow around a circular cylinder within a channel has been extensively investigated using the present lattice Boltzmann model. Both symmetric and asymmetric placement configurations of the circular cylinder within the channel have been considered. A new treatment for the outlet velocity and pressure (density) boundary conditions has been proposed and validated. The present LBM results are in excellent agreement with those of the other existing CFD results. Careful examination of the LBM results and an appropriate calculation of the lift coefficient based on the rectangular lattice representation of the circular cylinder reveals that the periodic oscillation of the lift coefficient has a second harmonic when the cylinder is placed asymmetrically within the channel. The second harmonic could be associated with an asymmetrical shedding pattern of the vortices behind the cylinder from the upper and lower sides of the cylinder. (author)

  2. The compact simulator for Tihange nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueben, M.

    1982-01-01

    After an introduction about the simulators for nuclear plants, a description is given of the compact simulator for the Tihange nuclear power plant as well as the simulated circuits and equipments such as the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The extent of simulation, the functions used by the instructor, the use of the simulator, the formation programme and construction planning are described. (AF)

  3. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of antiplane shear loading of a stationary crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Alexander; Kuhn, Charlotte; Müller, Ralf

    2018-01-01

    In this work, the lattice Boltzmann method is applied to study the dynamic behaviour of linear elastic solids under antiplane shear deformation. In this case, the governing set of partial differential equations reduces to a scalar wave equation for the out of plane displacement in a two dimensional domain. The lattice Boltzmann approach developed by Guangwu (J Comput Phys 161(1):61-69, 2000) in 2006 is used to solve the problem numerically. Some aspects of the scheme are highlighted, including the treatment of the boundary conditions. Subsequently, the performance of the lattice Boltzmann scheme is tested for a stationary crack problem for which an analytic solution exists. The treatment of cracks is new compared to the examples that are discussed in Guangwu's work. Furthermore, the lattice Boltzmann simulations are compared to finite element computations. Finally, the influence of the lattice Boltzmann relaxation parameter on the stability of the scheme is illustrated.

  4. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent pipe flow using the lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Geneva, Nicholas; Guo, Zhaoli; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we present a first direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a turbulent pipe flow using the mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) on both a D3Q19 lattice grid and a D3Q27 lattice grid. DNS of turbulent pipe flows using LBM has never been reported previously, perhaps due to inaccuracy and numerical stability associated with the previous implementations of LBM in the presence of a curved solid surface. In fact, it was even speculated that the D3Q19 lattice might be inappropriate as a DNS tool for turbulent pipe flows. In this paper, we show, through careful implementation, accurate turbulent statistics can be obtained using both D3Q19 and D3Q27 lattice grids. In the simulation with D3Q19 lattice, a few problems related to the numerical stability of the simulation are exposed. Discussions and solutions for those problems are provided. The simulation with D3Q27 lattice, on the other hand, is found to be more stable than its D3Q19 counterpart. The resulting turbulent flow statistics at a friction Reynolds number of Reτ = 180 are compared systematically with both published experimental and other DNS results based on solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The comparisons cover the mean-flow profile, the r.m.s. velocity and vorticity profiles, the mean and r.m.s. pressure profiles, the velocity skewness and flatness, and spatial correlations and energy spectra of velocity and vorticity. Overall, we conclude that both D3Q19 and D3Q27 simulations yield accurate turbulent flow statistics. The use of the D3Q27 lattice is shown to suppress the weak secondary flow pattern in the mean flow due to numerical artifacts.

  5. Euclidean Monte Carlo simulation of nuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montvay, Istvan; Bonn Univ.; Urbach, Carsten

    2011-05-01

    We present an exploratory study of chiral effective theories of nuclei with methods adopted from lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD). We show that the simulations in the Euclidean path integral approach are feasible and that we can determine the energy of the two nucleon state. By varying the parameters and the simulated volumes phase shifts can be determined in principle and hopefully tuned to their physical values in the future. The physical cut-off of the theory is realised by blocking of the lattice fields. By keeping this physical cut-off fixed in physical units the lattice cut-off can be changed and in this way the lattice artefacts can be eliminated. (orig.)

  6. Simulating Photons and Plasmons in a Three-dimensional Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletzer, A.; Shvets, G.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional metallic photonic structures are studied using a newly developed mixed finite element-finite difference (FE-FD) code, Curly3d. The code solves the vector Helmholtz equation as an eigenvalue problem in the unit cell of a triply periodic lattice composed of conductors and/or dielectrics. The mixed FE-FD discretization scheme ensures rapid numerical convergence of the eigenvalue and allows the code to run at low resolution. Plasmon and photonic band structure calculations are presented

  7. Non Nuclear NTR Environmental Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emrich, William J. Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Rockets or NTR's have been suggested as a propulsion system option for vehicles traveling to the moon or Mars. These engines are capable of providing high thrust at specific impulses at least twice that of today's best chemical engines. The performance constraints on these engines are mainly the result of temperature limitations on the fuel coupled with a limited ability to withstand chemical attack by the hot hydrogen propellant. To operate at maximum efficiency, fuel forms are desired which can withstand the extremely hot, hostile environment characteristic of NTR operation for at least several hours. The simulation of such an environment would require an experimental device which could simultaneously approximate the power, flow, and temperature conditions which a nuclear fuel element (or partial element) would encounter during NTR operation. Such a simulation would allow detailed studies of the fuel behavior and hydrogen flow characteristics under reactor like conditions to be performed. The goal of these simulations would be directed toward expanding the performance envelope of NTR engines over that which was demonstrated during the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs of the 1970's. Current planning calls for such a simulator to be constructed at the Marshall Space Flight Center over the coming year, and it is anticipated that it will be used in the future to evaluate a wide variety of fuel element designs and the materials of which they are constructed. This present work addresses the initial experimental objectives of the NTR simulator with regard to reproducing the fuel degradation patterns previously observed during the NERVA testing

  8. High-order dynamic lattice method for seismic simulation in anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaolin; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2018-03-01

    The discrete particle-based dynamic lattice method (DLM) offers an approach to simulate elastic wave propagation in anisotropic media by calculating the anisotropic micromechanical interactions between these particles based on the directions of the bonds that connect them in the lattice. To build such a lattice, the media are discretized into particles. This discretization inevitably leads to numerical dispersion. The basic lattice unit used in the original DLM only includes interactions between the central particle and its nearest neighbours; therefore, it represents the first-order form of a particle lattice. The first-order lattice suffers from numerical dispersion compared with other numerical methods, such as high-order finite-difference methods, in terms of seismic wave simulation. Due to its unique way of discretizing the media, the particle-based DLM no longer solves elastic wave equations; this means that one cannot build a high-order DLM by simply creating a high-order discrete operator to better approximate a partial derivative operator. To build a high-order DLM, we carry out a thorough dispersion analysis of the method and discover that by adding more neighbouring particles into the lattice unit, the DLM will yield different spatial accuracy. According to the dispersion analysis, the high-order DLM presented here can adapt the requirement of spatial accuracy for seismic wave simulations. For any given spatial accuracy, we can design a corresponding high-order lattice unit to satisfy the accuracy requirement. Numerical tests show that the high-order DLM improves the accuracy of elastic wave simulation in anisotropic media.

  9. Practical Implementation of Lattice QCD Simulation on Intel Xeon Phi Knights Landing

    OpenAIRE

    Kanamori, Issaku; Matsufuru, Hideo

    2017-01-01

    We investigate implementation of lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) code on the Intel Xeon Phi Knights Landing (KNL). The most time consuming part of the numerical simulations of lattice QCD is a solver of linear equation for a large sparse matrix that represents the strong interaction among quarks. To establish widely applicable prescriptions, we examine rather general methods for the SIMD architecture of KNL, such as using intrinsics and manual prefetching, to the matrix multiplication an...

  10. Simulation and detection of massive Dirac fermions with cold atoms in one-dimensional optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Yafei, E-mail: yfyuks@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Shan Chuanjia [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Science, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002 (China); Mei Feng; Zhang Zhiming [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, LQIT and SIPSE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2012-09-15

    We propose a simple but feasible experimental scheme to simulate and detect Dirac fermions with cold atoms trapped in one-dimensional optical lattice. In our scheme, through tuning the laser intensity, the one-dimensional optical lattice can have two sites in each unit cell and the atoms around the low energy behave as massive Dirac fermions. Furthermore, we show that these relativistic quasiparticles can be detected experimentally by using atomic density profile measurements and Bragg scattering.

  11. Digital Quantum Simulation of Z_{2} Lattice Gauge Theories with Dynamical Fermionic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Erez; Farace, Alessandro; Reznik, Benni; Cirac, J Ignacio

    2017-02-17

    We propose a scheme for digital quantum simulation of lattice gauge theories with dynamical fermions. Using a layered optical lattice with ancilla atoms that can move and interact with the other atoms (simulating the physical degrees of freedom), we obtain a stroboscopic dynamics which yields the four-body plaquette interactions, arising in models with (2+1) and higher dimensions, without the use of perturbation theory. As an example we show how to simulate a Z_{2} model in (2+1) dimensions.

  12. BWR nuclear plant maintenance simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, I.F.

    1985-01-01

    As early as 1977, the General Electric Company, USA, Nuclear Energy Operation was making plans to construct a maintenance-type simulator to support Training and Services. The Company's pioneering experience with control room simulators started in 1968 with the Dresden simulator and showed clearly the benefits of having such facilities for training, checkout of procedures and, in the case of maintenance, match-up of equipment or tools as needed. Since the dedication of the facility, it has proved to be an invaluable resource in the training of refuelling and servicing crews. The facility has also been extensively used as developmental and test facility for in-vessel servicing equipment and procedures. (author)

  13. Second order bounce back boundary condition for the lattice Boltzmann fluid simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Chan

    2000-01-01

    A new bounce back boundary method of the second order in error is proposed for the lattice Boltzmann fluid simulation. This new method can be used for the arbitrarily irregular lattice geometry of a non-slip boundary. The traditional bounce back boundary condition for the lattice Boltzmann simulation is of the first order in error. Since the lattice Boltzmann method is the second order scheme by itself, a boundary technique of the second order has been desired to replace the first order bounce back method. This study shows that, contrary to the common belief that the bounce back boundary condition is unilaterally of the first order, the second order bounce back boundary condition can be realized. This study also shows that there exists a generalized bounce back technique that can be characterized by a single interpolation parameter. The second order bounce back method can be obtained by proper selection of this parameter in accordance with the detailed lattice geometry of the boundary. For an illustrative purpose, the transient Couette and the plane Poiseuille flows are solved by the lattice Boltzmann simulation with various boundary conditions. The results show that the generalized bounce back method yields the second order behavior in the error of the solution, provided that the interpolation parameter is properly selected. Coupled with its intuitive nature and the ease of implementation, the bounce back method can be as good as any second order boundary method

  14. Calibration of modified parallel-plate rheometer through calibrated oil and lattice Boltzmann simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferraris, Chiara F; Geiker, Mette Rica; Martys, Nicos S

    2007-01-01

    inapplicable here. This paper presents the analysis of a modified parallel plate rheometer for measuring cement mortar and propose a methodology for calibration using standard oils and numerical simulation of the flow. A lattice Boltzmann method was used to simulate the flow in the modified rheometer, thus...

  15. Parallel-plate rheometer calibration using oil and lattice Boltzmann simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferraris, Chiara F; Geiker, Mette Rica; Martys, Nicos S.

    2007-01-01

    compute the viscosity. This paper presents a modified parallel plate rheometer, and proposes means of calibration using standard oils and numerical simulation of the flow. A lattice Boltzmann method was used to simulate the flow in the modified rheometer, thus using an accurate numerical solution in place...

  16. Green function simulation of Hamiltonian lattice models with stochastic reconfiguration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beccaria, M.

    2000-01-01

    We apply a recently proposed Green function Monte Carlo procedure to the study of Hamiltonian lattice gauge theories. This class of algorithms computes quantum vacuum expectation values by averaging over a set of suitable weighted random walkers. By means of a procedure called stochastic reconfiguration the long standing problem of keeping fixed the walker population without a priori knowledge of the ground state is completely solved. In the U(1) 2 model, which we choose as our theoretical laboratory, we evaluate the mean plaquette and the vacuum energy per plaquette. We find good agreement with previous works using model-dependent guiding functions for the random walkers. (orig.)

  17. Microcanonical simulation of nuclear disassembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonin, S.E.; Randrup, J.

    1986-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the disassembly of the hot nuclear matter produced in high-energy nuclear collisions. A particular stimulus has been the prospect of observing a nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. On rather general grounds, such a transition is expected to occur in nuclear matter at subsaturation densities with temperatures of 10-20 MeV. However, virtually all previous discussions of this phenomenon have been based on thermodynamical considerations valid for infinite, non-interacting systems and the qualitative validity of the results has not been ascertained for the relatively small, finite, interacting systems of practical relevance. Nor is it clear how the occurrence of the phase transition will manifest itself in the asymptotically observed fragment distribution. To progress in these matters, the authors have formulated a microcanonical simulation of the disassembly process, including interfragment interactions. It is a natural refinement of the grand canonical model first presented in [1] and further developed in [2] and is also a exact version of the model developed in [3] for the generation of complete multifragment events in medium-energy collisions. In this contribution, the authors give a brief description of the key ingredients in the model and its numerical implementation

  18. Development of compact nuclear simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Chang Shik; Kwon, Kee Choon; Lyu, Sung Pil; Kim, Jung Taek; Kim, Young Gill; Hwang, In Ku

    1986-12-01

    Every one knows that the TMI accident resulted from the defeat of the man-machine interfacing of main control room design and of the quality of the operators. So it is necessary to develop CNS which is very efficient to train operators, operation and maintenance supervisors, maintenance personnel and inspectors of regulation committee to uderstand the dynamic transient phenomena. The following are major parts of this projects: 1. Data collection and review. 2. Make into a contract for CNS with STUDSVIK. 3. Selection of malfunction. 4. Design of console panel and modification. 5. List up measuring instruments. We design and make CNS with STUDSVIK in Sweden, and install a simulator in Nuclear Training Center of KAERI not only for fundamental training of nuclear power plant, but also safety analysis by transient analysis and NSSS design. (Author)

  19. Study of heterogeneous nuclear reactor lattice properties in multizone systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisic, N.M.

    1964-12-01

    Described analysis of substitution experiments and its comparison with the classic procedures showed that it could be successfully applied for processing the experimental results. This method shows some advantages and some deficiencies compared to classic methods. Precision of the method is considered sufficient for design of nuclear facilities. Routine standards used in design of nuclear facilities demand following precision of nuclear parameters: about 5% during feasibility study and design of heavy water facility with natural uranium; 2 - 3% in the phase of parameters optimisation and preparing the main project; 1% during optimization of operation. Accuracy of core parameters obtained by analysis of substitution experiments show that they could be successfully used in the phase of reactor parameters optimisation. It is possible to increase the precision of critical parameters and thus apply the proposed method for analysis of reactor parameters needed in the phase of operation optimization

  20. Simulating lattice fermions by microcanonically averaging out the nonlocal dependence of the fermionic action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azcoiti, V.; Cruz, A.; Di Carlo, G.; Grillo, A.F.; Vladikas, A.

    1991-01-01

    We attempt to increase the efficiency of simulations of dynamical fermions on the lattice by calculating the fermionic determinant just once for all the values of the theory's gauge coupling and flavor number. Our proposal is based on the determination of an effective fermionic action by the calculation of the fermionic determinant averaged over configurations at fixed gauge energy. The feasibility of our method is justified by the observed volume dependence of the fluctuations of the logarithm of the determinant. The algorithm we have used in order to calculate the fermionic determinant, based on the determination of all the eigenvalues of the fermionic matrix at zero mass, also enables us to obtain results at any fermion mass, with a single fermionic simulation. We test the method by simulating compact lattice QED, finding good agreement with other standard calculations. New results on the phase transition of compact QED with massless fermions on 6 4 and 8 4 lattices are also presented

  1. New one-flavor hybrid Monte Carlo simulation method for lattice fermions with γ5 hermiticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new method for Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) simulations with odd numbers of dynamical fermions on the lattice. It employs a different approach from polynomial or rational HMC. In this method, γ 5 hermiticity of the lattice Dirac operators is crucial and it can be applied to Wilson, domain-wall, and overlap fermions. We compare HMC simulations with two degenerate flavors and (1+1) degenerate flavors using optimal domain-wall fermions. The ratio of the efficiency, (number of accepted trajectories)/(simulation time), is about 3:2. The relation between pseudofermion action of chirally symmetric lattice fermions in four-dimensional (overlap) and five-dimensional (domain-wall) representation are also analyzed.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Multiple Bubbles Motion under Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deming Nie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The motion of multiple bubbles under gravity in two dimensions is numerically studied through the lattice Boltzmann method for the Eotvos number ranging from 1 to 12. Two kinds of initial arrangement are taken into account: vertical and horizontal arrangement. In both cases the effects of Eotvos number on the bubble coalescence and rising velocity are investigated. For the vertical arrangement, it has been found that the coalescence pattern is similar. The first coalescence always takes place between the two uppermost bubbles. And the last coalescence always takes place between the coalesced bubble and the bottommost bubble. For four bubbles in a horizontal arrangement, the outermost bubbles travel into the wake of the middle bubbles in all cases, which allows the bubbles to coalesce. The coalescence pattern is more complex for the case of eight bubbles, which strongly depends on the Eotvos number.

  3. Variable stiffness lattice support system for a condenser type nuclear reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.A.; Sutherland, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    A support structure for the lattice supporting a fusible material in the annular condenser region of a nuclear reactor containment, the flexibility of which structure can be selectively adjusted in accordance with seismic or other loading requirements. The lattice is affixed to a flexible member in a manner which allows relative movement between the two components. The flexible member is affixed to a rigid support member in a manner which selectively adjusts the resiliency of the flexible member. The support member is rigidly affixed to a wall of the containment annulus, and can also be utilized to support cooling ducts. 6 claims

  4. Canonical simulations with worldlines: An exploratory study in ϕ24 lattice field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orasch, Oliver; Gattringer, Christof

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the perspectives for canonical simulations in the worldline formulation of a lattice field theory. Using the charged ϕ4 field in two dimensions as an example, we present the details of the canonical formulation based on worldlines and outline the algorithmic strategies for canonical worldline simulations. We discuss the steps for converting the data from the canonical approach to the grand canonical picture which we use for cross-checking our results. The canonical approach presented here can easily be generalized to other lattice field theories with a worldline representation.

  5. Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berta, V.T.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end

  6. Nuclear waste repository simulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothfuchs, T.; Wieczorek, K.; Feddersen, H.K.; Staupendahl, G.; Coyle, A.J.; Kalia, H.; Eckert, J.

    1986-12-01

    This document is the third joint annual report on the Cooperative German-American 'Brine Migration Tests' that are in progress at the Asse salt mine in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). This Government supported mine serves as an underground test facility for research and development (R and D)-work in the field of nuclear waste repository research and simulation experiments. The tests are designed to simulate a nuclear waste repository to measure the effects of heat and gamma radiation on brine migration, salt decrepitation, disassociation of brine, and gases collected. The thermal mechanical behavior of salt, such as room closure, stresses and changes of the properties of salt are measured and compared with predicted behavior. This document covers the following sections: Issues and test objectives: This section presents issues that are investigated by the Brine Migration Test, and the test objectives derived from these issues; test site: This section describes the test site location and geology in the Asse mine; test description: A description of the test configuration, procedures, equipment, and instrumentation is given in this section; actual test chronology: The actual history of the test, in terms of the dates at which major activities occured, is presented in this section. Test results: This section presents the test results observed to data and the planned future work that is needed to complete the test; conclusions and recommendations: This section summarizes the conclusions derived to date regarding the Brine Migration Test. Additional work that would be useful to resolve the issues is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of flow across a staggered tube bundle array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiftikçi, A.; Kocar, C., E-mail: ckocar@hacettepe.edu.tr

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Large eddy simulation of the cross-flow in a staggered tube bundle array in 3D was made. • LBM and FVM are used separately as numerical solvers and the results of each method compared with experimental data. • Effect of lattice model is studied for tube bundle flow. • Filter size effects, mesh size effects are studied for VLES turbulence model. - Abstract: The decision on the magnitude of the grid size is a crucial problem in large eddy simulations. Finer mesh requires excessive memory and causes long simulation time. Large eddy simulation model becomes inefficient when the extent of the flow geometry to be simulated with the lattice-Boltzmann method is large. Thus, in this study, it is proposed to investigate the capabilities of three turbulence models, namely, very large eddy simulation, Van Driest and Smagorinsky–Lilly. As a test case, a staggered tube bundle flow experiment is used for the validation and comparison purposes. Sensitivity analyses (including mesh and filter size) have been made. Furthermore, the effect of lattice model is investigated and it is showed that the D3Q27 and D3Q19 models do not differ significantly in lattice-Boltzmann method for this type of flow. The results of turbulence model comparisons for staggered tube bundle flow showed that very large eddy simulation is superior at low resolution. This paper might be considered as a good validation of the lattice-Boltzmann method. In turbulent flow conditions, the code successfully captures the velocity and stress profiles even if the flow is quite complicated.

  8. Interatomic potentials and the simulation of lattice defects in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heugten, W.F.W.M. van.

    1979-01-01

    The computer simulation technique is applied to investigate the properties of point defects and line defects in metals. For that purpose crystallites are constructed in which these defects are simulated. In the case of line defects (dislocations) the initial positions of the atoms, surrounding the dislocations, are determined using the elastic theory of anisotropic media. Hereafter the atoms in such crystallites are allowed to relax to there minimum potential energy positions under the influence of the interatomic forces. These forces are derived from interatomic interaction potentials. These potentials are together with the boundary conditions of the simulated crystallite the main input data in these computer simulation models. The metals considered include molybdenum, tungsten and tantalum. (Auth.)

  9. The nucleon spin and momentum decomposition using lattice QCD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrou, C.; Cyprus Univ., Nicosia; Constantinou, M.; Hadjiyiannakou, K.; Kallidonis, C.; Koutsou, G.; Jansen, K.; Wiese, K.; Vaquero Aviles-Casco, A.

    2017-11-01

    We determine within lattice QCD, the nucleon spin carried by valence and sea quarks, and gluons. The calculation is performed using an ensemble of gauge configurations with two degenerate light quarks with mass fixed to approximately reproduce the physical pion mass. We find that the total angular momentum carried by the quarks in the nucleon is J u+d+s =0.408(61) stat. (48) syst. and the gluon contribution is J g =0.133(11) stat. (14) syst. giving a total of J N =0.54(6) stat. (5) syst. consistent with the spin sum. For the quark intrinsic spin contribution we obtain (1)/(2)ΔΣ u+d+s =0.201(17) stat. (5) syst. All quantities are given in the MS scheme at 2 GeV. The quark and gluon momentum fractions are also computed and add up to left angle x right angle u+d+s + left angle x right angle g =0.804(121) stat. (95) syst. +0.267(12) stat. (10) syst. =1.07(12) stat. (10) syst. satisfying the momentum sum.

  10. The nucleon spin and momentum decomposition using lattice QCD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrou, C. [The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus). Computation-based Science and Technology Research Center; Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Constantinou, M. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Hadjiyiannakou, K.; Kallidonis, C.; Koutsou, G. [The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus). Computation-based Science and Technology Research Center; Jansen, K.; Wiese, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Vaquero Aviles-Casco, A. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2017-11-15

    We determine within lattice QCD, the nucleon spin carried by valence and sea quarks, and gluons. The calculation is performed using an ensemble of gauge configurations with two degenerate light quarks with mass fixed to approximately reproduce the physical pion mass. We find that the total angular momentum carried by the quarks in the nucleon is J{sub u+d+s}=0.408(61){sub stat.}(48){sub syst.} and the gluon contribution is J{sub g}=0.133(11){sub stat.}(14){sub syst.} giving a total of J{sub N}=0.54(6){sub stat.}(5){sub syst.} consistent with the spin sum. For the quark intrinsic spin contribution we obtain (1)/(2)ΔΣ{sub u+d+s}=0.201(17){sub stat.}(5){sub syst.} All quantities are given in the MS scheme at 2 GeV. The quark and gluon momentum fractions are also computed and add up to left angle x right angle {sub u+d+s}+ left angle x right angle {sub g}=0.804(121){sub stat.}(95){sub syst.}+0.267(12){sub stat.}(10){sub syst.}=1.07(12) {sub stat.}(10){sub syst.} satisfying the momentum sum.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation Optimization on Leading Multicore Platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Samuel; Carter, Jonathan; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Yelick, Katherine

    2008-02-01

    We present an auto-tuning approach to optimize application performance on emerging multicore architectures. The methodology extends the idea of search-based performance optimizations, popular in linear algebra and FFT libraries, to application-specific computational kernels. Our work applies this strategy to a lattice Boltzmann application (LBMHD) that historically has made poor use of scalar microprocessors due to its complex data structures and memory access patterns. We explore one of the broadest sets of multicore architectures in the HPC literature, including the Intel Clovertown, AMD Opteron X2, Sun Niagara2, STI Cell, as well as the single core Intel Itanium2. Rather than hand-tuning LBMHD for each system, we develop a code generator that allows us identify a highly optimized version for each platform, while amortizing the human programming effort. Results show that our auto-tuned LBMHD application achieves up to a 14x improvement compared with the original code. Additionally, we present detailed analysis of each optimization, which reveal surprising hardware bottlenecks and software challenges for future multicore systems and applications.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann simulation optimization on leading multicore platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Carter, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Oliker, L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shalf, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yelick, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    We present an auto-tuning approach to optimize application performance on emerging multicore architectures. The methodology extends the idea of searchbased performance optimizations, popular in linear algebra and FFT libraries, to application-specific computational kernels. Our work applies this strategy to a lattice Boltzmann application (LBMHD) that historically has made poor use of scalar microprocessors due to its complex data structures and memory access patterns. We explore one of the broadest sets of multicore architectures in the HPC literature, including the Intel Clovertown, AMD Opteron X2, Sun Niagara2, STI Cell, as well as the single core Intel Itanium2. Rather than hand-tuning LBMHD for each system, we develop a code generator that allows us identify a highly optimized version for each platform, while amortizing the human programming effort. Results show that our autotuned LBMHD application achieves up to a 14 improvement compared with the original code. Additionally, we present detailed analysis of each optimization, which reveal surprising hardware bottlenecks and software challenges for future multicore systems and applications.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann accelerated direct simulation Monte Carlo for dilute gas flow simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Staso, G; Clercx, H J H; Succi, S; Toschi, F

    2016-11-13

    Hybrid particle-continuum computational frameworks permit the simulation of gas flows by locally adjusting the resolution to the degree of non-equilibrium displayed by the flow in different regions of space and time. In this work, we present a new scheme that couples the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method in the limit of isothermal flows. The former handles strong non-equilibrium effects, as they typically occur in the vicinity of solid boundaries, whereas the latter is in charge of the bulk flow, where non-equilibrium can be dealt with perturbatively, i.e. according to Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics. The proposed concurrent multiscale method is applied to the dilute gas Couette flow, showing major computational gains when compared with the full DSMC scenarios. In addition, it is shown that the coupling with LB in the bulk flow can speed up the DSMC treatment of the Knudsen layer with respect to the full DSMC case. In other words, LB acts as a DSMC accelerator.This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in nitroxide spin-label EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear relaxation is a sensitive monitor of rotational dynamics in spin-label EPR. It also contributes competing saturation transfer pathways in T 1 -exchange spectroscopy, and the determination of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement in site-directed spin labelling. A survey shows that the definition of nitrogen nuclear relaxation rate W n commonly used in the CW-EPR literature for 14 N-nitroxyl spin labels is inconsistent with that currently adopted in time-resolved EPR measurements of saturation recovery. Redefinition of the normalised 14 N spin-lattice relaxation rate, b=W n /(2W e ), preserves the expressions used for CW-EPR, whilst rendering them consistent with expressions for saturation recovery rates in pulsed EPR. Furthermore, values routinely quoted for nuclear relaxation times that are deduced from EPR spectral diffusion rates in 14 N-nitroxyl spin labels do not accord with conventional analysis of spin-lattice relaxation in this three-level system. Expressions for CW-saturation EPR with the revised definitions are summarised. Data on nitrogen nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are compiled according to the three-level scheme for 14 N-relaxation: T 1 n =1/W n . Results are compared and contrasted with those for the two-level 15 N-nitroxide system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Understanding nucleon structure using lattice simulations. Recent progress on three different structural observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroers, W.

    2007-01-01

    This review focuses on the discussion of three key results of nucleon structure calculations on the lattice. These three results are the quark contribution to the nucleon spin, J q , the nucleon-Δ transition form factors, and the nucleon axial coupling, g A . The importance for phenomenology and experiment is discussed and the requirements for future simulations are pointed out. (orig.)

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of diblock copolymer microphases by means of a 'fast' off-lattice model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besold, Gerhard; Hassager, O.; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1999-01-01

    We present a mesoscopic off-lattice model for the simulation of diblock copolymer melts by Monte Carlo techniques. A single copolymer molecule is modeled as a discrete Edwards chain consisting of two blocks with vertices of type A and B, respectively. The volume interaction is formulated in terms...

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of thin film interfacial strength dependency on lattice mismatch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhou; Lian, Jie; Wang, Junlan

    2013-01-01

    Laser-induced thin film spallation experiments have been previously developed to characterize the intrinsic interfacial strength of thin films. In order to gain insights of atomic level thin film debonding processes and the interfacial strength dependence on film/substrate lattice structures, in this study, molecular dynamics simulations of thin film interfacial failure under laser-induced stress waves were performed. Various loading amplitudes and pulse durations were employed to identify the optimum simulation condition. Stress propagation as a function of time was revealed in conjunction with the interface structures. Parametric studies confirmed that while the interfacial strength between a thin film and a substrate does not depend on the film thickness and the duration of the laser pulse, a thicker film and a shorter duration do provide advantage to effectively load the interface to failure. With the optimized simulation condition, further studies were focused on bulk Au/Au bi-crystals with mismatched orientations, and Ni/Al, Cu/Al, Cu/Ag and Cu/Au bi-crystals with mismatched lattices. The interfacial strength was found to decrease with increasing orientation mismatch and lattice mismatch but more significantly dominated by the bonding elements' atomic structure and valence electron occupancy. - Highlights: • Molecular dynamics simulation was done on stress wave induced thin film spallation. • Atomic structure was found to be a primary strength determining factor. • Lattice mismatch was found to be a secondary strength determining factor

  18. A new approach to the problem of dynamical quarks in numerical simulations of lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luescher, M.

    1993-11-01

    Lattice QCD with an even number of degenerate quark flavours is shown to be a limit of a local bosonic field theory. The action of the bosonic theory is real and bounded from below so that standard simulation algorithms can be expected to apply. The feasibility of such calculations is discussed, but no practical tests have yet been made. (orig.)

  19. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of the time-averaged forces on a cylinder in a sound field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydock, David

    2005-01-01

    We show that lattice Boltzmann simulations can be used to model the radiation force on an object in a standing wave acoustic field and comparisons are made to theoretical predictions. We show how viscous effects change the radiation force and predict the motion of a particle placed near a boundary where viscous effects are important

  20. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of the time-averaged forces on a cylinder in a sound field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haydock, David [Unilever R and D Colworth, Sharnbrook, Bedford MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-15

    We show that lattice Boltzmann simulations can be used to model the radiation force on an object in a standing wave acoustic field and comparisons are made to theoretical predictions. We show how viscous effects change the radiation force and predict the motion of a particle placed near a boundary where viscous effects are important.

  1. Development of compact nuclear simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Chang Shik; Kwon, Kee Choon; Lyu, Sung Phil; Kim, Jung Taek; Jung, Chul Hwan; Lee, Dong Young; Hwang, In Koo; Kim, Young Gil; Kim, Jung Soo; Park, Won Man

    1988-12-01

    Compact nuclear simulator is designed to carry out the various operational modes as real nuclear power plant, start-up, preoperational test, preheating, hot start-up, cold shutdown, power control and the operational conditions in steady and accident states. It can be used for the fundamental training of the operators, maintenance personnel, inspectors of regulatory body, system or component designers, NSSS designers, safety analysis by transient analysis and for the making questions for an operator qualifying examination and the training of research fellows in the Nuclear Training Center of KAERI. Everyone knows that the TMI accident resulted from the defect of the man-machine interface of main control room and of the quality of the operators. No proper action on the malfunction of small part in a system can cause severe accident like TMI-2 accident, so it is very important urgent to upgrade the operators' capability and to train operators for the understanding of dynamic transient phenomena in plant system. So it is necessary to develop CNS which is very efficient to train operators, operation and maintenance supervisors, maintenance personnel and inspectors of regulation committee to understand the dynamic transient phenomena. This report is the final report of KAERI-CNS project which was designed and manufactured in '85.7-'88.12. This CNS was designed and fabricated in conjunction with STUDSVIK, Sweden and installed at KAERI-NTC, and entitled KAERI-CNS. KAERI and STUDSVIK have developed math. modeling software. Many parts of CNS hardware were supplied by local firms.The followings are major parts of this project performed in '85.7-'88.12. 1.Contract with STUDSVIK for joint design and manufacturing CNS 2.Selection of malfunctions and design and manufacture of console panel 3.Manufacture of interface card and graphic display system 4.Software module development 5.S/W and H/W integration 6.Factory acceptance test and Site acceptance test 7.Running test. (Author)

  2. MOSRA-SRAC. Lattice calculation module of the modular code system for nuclear reactor analyses MOSRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Keisuke

    2015-10-01

    MOSRA-SRAC is a lattice calculation module of the Modular code System for nuclear Reactor Analyses (MOSRA). This module performs the neutron transport calculation for various types of fuel elements including existing light water reactors, research reactors, etc. based on the collision probability method with a set of the 200-group cross-sections generated from the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library JENDL-4.0. It has also a function of the isotope generation and depletion calculation for up to 234 nuclides in each fuel material in the lattice. In these ways, MOSRA-SRAC prepares the burn-up dependent effective microscopic and macroscopic cross-section data to be used in core calculations. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (J.P.N.)

  3. Lattice-enabled nuclear reactions in the nickel and hydrogen gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of lattice-enabled nuclear reaction (LENR) experiments involving electrochemical loading of deuterium into palladium have been conducted and reported in hundreds of papers. But, it appears that the first commercial LENR power generators will employ gas loading of hydrogen onto nickel. This article reviews the scientific base for LENR in the gas-loaded Ni-H system, and some of the tests of pre-commercial prototype generators based on this combination. (author)

  4. tmLQCD: a program suite to simulate Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Urbach, Carsten [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    We discuss a program suite for simulating Quantum Chromodynamics on a 4-dimensional space-time lattice. The basic Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm is introduced and a number of algorithmic improvements are explained. We then discuss the implementations of these concepts as well as our parallelisation strategy in the actual simulation code. Finally, we provide a user guide to compile and run the program. (orig.)

  5. tmLQCD: a program suite to simulate Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, Karl; Urbach, Carsten

    2009-05-01

    We discuss a program suite for simulating Quantum Chromodynamics on a 4-dimensional space-time lattice. The basic Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm is introduced and a number of algorithmic improvements are explained. We then discuss the implementations of these concepts as well as our parallelisation strategy in the actual simulation code. Finally, we provide a user guide to compile and run the program. (orig.)

  6. Dynamically adaptive Lattice Boltzmann simulation of shallow water flows with the Peano framework

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp

    2015-09-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. We present a dynamically adaptive Lattice Boltzmann (LB) implementation for solving the shallow water equations (SWEs). Our implementation extends an existing LB component of the Peano framework. We revise the modular design with respect to the incorporation of new simulation aspects and LB models. The basic SWE-LB implementation is validated in different breaking dam scenarios. We further provide a numerical study on stability of the MRT collision operator used in our simulations.

  7. Hamiltonian and potentials in derivative pricing models: exact results and lattice simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Corianò, Claudio; Srikant, Marakani

    2004-03-01

    The pricing of options, warrants and other derivative securities is one of the great success of financial economics. These financial products can be modeled and simulated using quantum mechanical instruments based on a Hamiltonian formulation. We show here some applications of these methods for various potentials, which we have simulated via lattice Langevin and Monte Carlo algorithms, to the pricing of options. We focus on barrier or path dependent options, showing in some detail the computational strategies involved.

  8. Polarization simulations in the RHIC run 15 lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Robert-Demolaize, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; White, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    RHIC polarized proton Run 15 uses a new acceleration ramp optics, compared to RHIC Run 13 and earlier runs, in relation with electron-lens beam-beam compensation developments. The new optics induces different strengths in the depolarizing snake resonance sequence, from injection to top energy. As a consequence, polarization transport along the new ramp has been investigated, based on spin tracking simulations. Sample results are reported and discussed.

  9. Lattice QCD simulations using the OpenACC platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, Pushan

    2016-01-01

    In this article we will explore the OpenACC platform for programming Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). The OpenACC platform offers a directive based programming model for GPUs which avoids the detailed data flow control and memory management necessary in a CUDA programming environment. In the OpenACC model, programs can be written in high level languages with OpenMP like directives. We present some examples of QCD simulation codes using OpenACC and discuss their performance on the Fermi and Kepler GPUs. (paper)

  10. Simulation of Cavity Flow by the Lattice Boltzmann Method using Multiple-Relaxation-Time scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Seung Yeob; Kang, Ha Nok; Seo, Jae Kwang; Yun, Ju Hyeon; Zee, Sung Quun

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the lattice Boltzmann method(LBM) has gained much attention for its ability to simulate fluid flows, and for its potential advantages over conventional CFD method. The key advantages of LBM are, (1) suitability for parallel computations, (2) absence of the need to solve the time-consuming Poisson equation for pressure, and (3) ease with multiphase flows, complex geometries and interfacial dynamics may be treated. The LBM using relaxation technique was introduced by Higuerea and Jimenez to overcome some drawbacks of lattice gas automata(LGA) such as large statistical noise, limited range of physical parameters, non- Galilean invariance, and implementation difficulty in three-dimensional problem. The simplest LBM is the lattice Bhatnager-Gross-Krook(LBGK) equation, which based on a single-relaxation-time(SRT) approximation. Due to its extreme simplicity, the lattice BGK(LBGK) equation has become the most popular lattice Boltzmann model in spite of its well-known deficiencies, for example, in simulating high-Reynolds numbers flow. The Multiple-Relaxation-Time(MRT) LBM was originally developed by D'Humieres. Lallemand and Luo suggests that the use of a Multiple-Relaxation-Time(MRT) models are much more stable than LBGK, because the different relaxation times can be individually tuned to achieve 'optimal' stability. A lid-driven cavity flow is selected as the test problem because it has geometrically singular points in the flow, but geometrically simple. Results are compared with those using SRT, MRT model in the LBGK method and previous simulation data using Navier-Stokes equations for the same flow conditions. In summary, LBM using MRT model introduces much less spatial oscillations near geometrical singular points, which is important for the successful simulation of higher Reynolds number flows

  11. Lattice Boltzmann Simulations in the Slip and Transition Flow Regime with the Peano Framework

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    We present simulation results of flows in the finite Knudsen range, which is in the slip and transition flow regime. Our implementations are based on the Lattice Boltzmann method and are accomplished within the Peano framework. We validate our code by solving two- and three-dimensional channel flow problems and compare our results with respective experiments from other research groups. We further apply our Lattice Boltzmann solver to the geometrical setup of a microreactor consisting of differently sized channels and a reactor chamber. Here, we apply static adaptive grids to fur-ther reduce computational costs. We further investigate the influence of using a simple BGK collision kernel in coarse grid regions which are further away from the slip boundaries. Our results are in good agreement with theory and non-adaptive simulations, demonstrating the validity and the capabilities of our adaptive simulation software for flow problems at finite Knudsen numbers.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, Ch.

    2007-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method allows for simulating random processes by using series of pseudo-random numbers. It became an important tool in nuclear medicine to assist in the design of new medical imaging devices, optimise their use and analyse their data. Presently, the sophistication of the simulation tools allows the introduction of Monte Carlo predictions in data correction and image reconstruction processes. The availability to simulate time dependent processes opens up new horizons for Monte Carlo simulation in nuclear medicine. In a near future, these developments will allow to tackle simultaneously imaging and dosimetry issues and soon, case system Monte Carlo simulations may become part of the nuclear medicine diagnostic process. This paper describes some Monte Carlo method basics and the sampling methods that were developed for it. It gives a referenced list of different simulation software used in nuclear medicine and enumerates some of their present and prospective applications. (author)

  13. Loop algorithms for quantum simulations of fermion models on lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, N.; Gubernatis, J.E.; Evertz, H.G.

    1994-01-01

    Two cluster algorithms, based on constructing and flipping loops, are presented for world-line quantum Monte Carlo simulations of fermions and are tested on the one-dimensional repulsive Hubbard model. We call these algorithms the loop-flip and loop-exchange algorithms. For these two algorithms and the standard world-line algorithm, we calculated the autocorrelation times for various physical quantities and found that the ordinary world-line algorithm, which uses only local moves, suffers from very long correlation times that makes not only the estimate of the error difficult but also the estimate of the average values themselves difficult. These difficulties are especially severe in the low-temperature, large-U regime. In contrast, we find that new algorithms, when used alone or in combinations with themselves and the standard algorithm, can have significantly smaller autocorrelation times, in some cases being smaller by three orders of magnitude. The new algorithms, which use nonlocal moves, are discussed from the point of view of a general prescription for developing cluster algorithms. The loop-flip algorithm is also shown to be ergodic and to belong to the grand canonical ensemble. Extensions to other models and higher dimensions are briefly discussed

  14. Multi-component Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the hydrodynamics in drip emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Falcucci

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a fast and efficient numerical technique based on the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM to model the flow through a reference drip emitter geometry. The aim of the study is to demonstrate the applicability of the LBM as a reliable simulation tool for the hydraulic optimisation of irrigation systems. Results for the water flow through a rectangular drip emitter are in good agreement with literature numerical and experimental data. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed model to simulate a multi-component flow that could be used to simulate the presence of additives, contaminants, and suspended particles.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Collision between 2D Circular Particles Suspension in Couette Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Zhong Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Collision between 2D circular particles suspension in Couette flow is simulated by using multiple-relaxation-time based lattice Boltzmann and direct forcing/fictitious domain method in this paper. The patterns of particle collisions are simulated and analyzed in detail by changing the velocity of top and bottom walls in the Couette flow. It can be seen from the simulation results that, while the velocity is large enough, the number of collisions between particles will change little as this velocity varies.

  16. Simulation of N{sub f} = 2 + 1 lattice QCD at realistic quark masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schierholz, Gerrit

    2014-07-01

    So far most lattice QCD simulations are performed neglecting electromagnetic effects. In order to compute physical observables to high precision, it is important to include and control contributions from QED. We have initiated a similar program, as the symmetry of the electromagnetic current is similar to that of the mass matrix mass m=(m{sub u}+m{sub d}+m{sub s})/3=constant versus e{sub u}+e{sub d}+e{sub s}=constant=0. In a follow-up project we shall use this expansion and complement our previous simulations by a fully dynamical simulation of QCD+QED. (orig.)

  17. Size dependence of 13C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in micro- and nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panich, A. M.; Sergeev, N. A.; Shames, A. I.; Osipov, V. Yu; Boudou, J.-P.; Goren, S. D.

    2015-02-01

    Size dependence of physical properties of nanodiamond particles is of crucial importance for various applications in which defect density and location as well as relaxation processes play a significant role. In this work, the impact of defects induced by milling of micron-sized synthetic diamonds was studied by magnetic resonance techniques as a function of the particle size. EPR and 13C NMR studies of highly purified commercial synthetic micro- and nanodiamonds were done for various fractions separated by sizes. Noticeable acceleration of 13C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation with decreasing particle size was found. We showed that this effect is caused by the contribution to relaxation coming from the surface paramagnetic centers induced by sample milling. The developed theory of the spin-lattice relaxation for such a case shows good compliance with the experiment.

  18. Transferring Nuclear Knowledge by NPP Simulators Developers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levchenko, A.; Duginov, O.; Levchenko, V.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: In relation to nuclear power, safety is closely linked with the human factor. Knowledge and skills of staff should more closely match the needs of the industry and employers. This can be achieved through more efficient training using simulators. Such simulators must be available at all stages of study and cover the needs of trainees with different levels of knowledge. Simulator developers can solve this problem by implement knowledge management in the using of simulators for practical training. Due to the nature of their activities, they have everything needed for this. This paper describes the solutions of Simulation Systems Ltd Company for nuclear power plants, universities and other parties. (author

  19. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of heat transfer in fully developed periodic incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zimeng; Shang, Helen; Zhang, Junfeng

    2017-06-01

    Flow and heat transfer in periodic structures are of great interest for many applications. In this paper, we carefully examine the periodic features of fully developed periodic incompressible thermal flows, and incorporate them in the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for flow and heat transfer simulations. Two numerical approaches, the distribution modification (DM) approach and the source term (ST) approach, are proposed; and they can both be used for periodic thermal flows with constant wall temperature (CWT) and surface heat flux boundary conditions. However, the DM approach might be more efficient, especially for CWT systems since the ST approach requires calculations of the streamwise temperature gradient at all lattice nodes. Several example simulations are conducted, including flows through flat and wavy channels and flows through a square array with circular cylinders. Results are compared to analytical solutions, previous studies, and our own LBM calculations using different simulation techniques (i.e., the one-module simulation vs. the two-module simulation, and the DM approach vs. the ST approach) with good agreement. These simple, however, representative simulations demonstrate the accuracy and usefulness of our proposed LBM methods for future thermal periodic flow simulations.

  20. Modeling and simulation of ocean wave propagation using lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuraiman, Dian

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present on modeling and simulation of ocean wave propagation from the deep sea to the shoreline. This requires high computational cost for simulation with large domain. We propose to couple a 1D shallow water equations (SWE) model with a 2D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) model in order to reduce the computational cost. The coupled model is solved using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) with the lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) scheme. Additionally, a special method is implemented to treat the complex behavior of free surface close to the shoreline. The result shows the coupled model can reduce computational cost significantly compared to the full NSE model.

  1. The Linked Neighbour List (LNL) method for fast off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations of fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzeo, M. D.; Ricci, M.; Zannoni, C.

    2010-03-01

    We present a new algorithm, called linked neighbour list (LNL), useful to substantially speed up off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations of fluids by avoiding the computation of the molecular energy before every attempted move. We introduce a few variants of the LNL method targeted to minimise memory footprint or augment memory coherence and cache utilisation. Additionally, we present a few algorithms which drastically accelerate neighbour finding. We test our methods on the simulation of a dense off-lattice Gay-Berne fluid subjected to periodic boundary conditions observing a speedup factor of about 2.5 with respect to a well-coded implementation based on a conventional link-cell. We provide several implementation details of the different key data structures and algorithms used in this work.

  2. Entanglement growth and simulation efficiency in one-dimensional quantum lattice systems

    OpenAIRE

    Perales, Alvaro; Vidal, Guifre

    2007-01-01

    We study the evolution of one-dimensional quantum lattice systems when the ground state is perturbed by altering one site in the middle of the chain. For a large class of models, we observe a similar pattern of entanglement growth during the evolution, characterized by a moderate increase of significant Schmidt coefficients in all relevant bipartite decompositions of the state. As a result, the evolution can be accurately described by a matrix product state and efficiently simulated using the...

  3. A partial entropic lattice Boltzmann MHD simulation of the Orszag-Tang vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Christopher; Vahala, George

    2018-02-01

    Karlin has introduced an analytically determined entropic lattice Boltzmann (LB) algorithm for Navier-Stokes turbulence. Here, this is partially extended to an LB model of magnetohydrodynamics, on using the vector distribution function approach of Dellar for the magnetic field (which is permitted to have field reversal). The partial entropic algorithm is benchmarked successfully against standard simulations of the Orszag-Tang vortex [Orszag, S.A.; Tang, C.M. J. Fluid Mech. 1979, 90 (1), 129-143].

  4. New techniques and results for worldline simulations of lattice field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Mario; Orasch, Oliver; Gattringer, Christof

    2018-03-01

    We use the complex ø4 field at finite density as a model system for developing further techniques based on worldline formulations of lattice field theories. More specifically we: 1) Discuss new variants of the worm algorithm for updating the ø4 theory and related systems with site weights. 2) Explore the possibility of canonical simulations in the worldline formulation. 3) Study the connection of 2-particle condensation at low temperature to scattering parameters of the theory.

  5. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Permeability and Tortuosity for Flow through Dense Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Discrete element method (DEM is used to produce dense and fixed porous media with rigid mono spheres. Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is adopted to simulate the fluid flow in interval of dense spheres. To simulating the same physical problem, the permeability is obtained with different lattice number. We verify that the permeability is irrelevant to the body force and the media length along flow direction. The relationships between permeability, tortuosity and porosity, and sphere radius are researched, and the results are compared with those reported by other authors. The obtained results indicate that LBM is suited to fluid flow simulation of porous media due to its inherent theoretical advantages. The radius of sphere should have ten lattices at least and the media length along flow direction should be more than twenty radii. The force has no effect on the coefficient of permeability with the limitation of slow fluid flow. For mono spheres porous media sample, the relationship of permeability and porosity agrees well with the K-C equation, and the tortuosity decreases linearly with increasing porosity.

  6. Towards the petaflop for Lattice QCD simulations the PetaQCD project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auriac, Jean-Christian Angles; Carbonell, Jaume; Barthou, Denis

    2010-01-01

    The study and design of a very ambitious petaflop cluster exclusively dedicated to Lattice QCD simulations started in early '08 among a consortium of 7 laboratories (IN2P3, CNRS, INRIA, CEA) and 2 SMEs. This consortium received a grant from the French ANR agency in July '08, and the PetaQCD project kickoff took place in January '09. Building upon several years of fruitful collaborative studies in this area, the aim of this project is to demonstrate that the simulation of a 256 x 128 3 lattice can be achieved through the HMC/ETMC software, using a machine with efficient speed/cost/reliability/power consumption ratios. It is expected that this machine can be built out of a rather limited number of processors (e.g. between 1000 and 4000), although capable of a sustained petaflop CPU performance. The proof-of-concept should be a mock-up cluster built as much as possible with off-the-shelf components, and 2 particularly attractive axis will be mainly investigated, in addition to fast all-purpose multi-core processors: the use of the new brand of IBM-Cell processors (with on-chip accelerators) and the very recent Nvidia GP-GPUs (off-chip co-processors). This cluster will obviously be massively parallel, and heterogeneous. Communication issues between processors, implied by the Physics of the simulation and the lattice partitioning, will certainly be a major key to the project.

  7. Magnon and phonon dispersion, lifetime, and thermal conductivity of iron from spin-lattice dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xufei; Liu, Zeyu; Luo, Tengfei

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, the fundamental physics of spin-lattice (e.g., magnon-phonon) interaction has attracted significant experimental and theoretical interests given its potential paradigm-shifting impacts in areas like spin-thermoelectrics, spin-caloritronics, and spintronics. Modelling studies of the transport of magnons and phonons in magnetic crystals are very rare. In this paper, we use spin-lattice dynamics (SLD) simulations to model ferromagnetic crystalline iron, where the spin and lattice systems are coupled through the atomic position-dependent exchange function, and thus the interaction between magnons and phonons is naturally considered. We then present a method combining SLD simulations with spectral energy analysis to calculate the magnon and phonon harmonic (e.g., dispersion, specific heat, and group velocity) and anharmonic (e.g., scattering rate) properties, based on which their thermal conductivity values are calculated. This work represents an example of using SLD simulations to understand the transport properties involving coupled magnon and phonon dynamics.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann simulation for temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids in a porous square cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Licong; Zhang Xinrong; Niu Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann method is developed to simulate temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids in a porous cavity. In the simulation, the magnetic force, efficient gravity, viscous loss term and geometric loss term in porous medium are imported to the momentum equation. To test the reliability of the method, a validation with water in porous cavity is carried out. Good agreements with the previous results verify that the present lattice Boltzmann method is promising for simulation of magnetic fluids in porous medium. In this study, we investigate the change of magnetization with external magnetic field, and we present numerical results for the streamlines, isotherms, and magnetization at vertical or horizontal mid-profiles for different values of Ram. In addition, Nusselt numbers changing with magnetic Rayleigh numbers are also investigated. - Highlights: → Developed a lattice Boltzmann method for magnetic nano-fluids in porous cavity. → Clarified flow and heat transfer for different values of (magnetic) Rayleigh numbers. → Heat transfer enhancement for magnetic fluid in porous cavity.

  9. Lattice Methods for Quantum Chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    DeGrand, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulation of lattice-regulated QCD has become an important source of information about strong interactions. In the last few years there has been an explosion of techniques for performing ever more accurate studies on the properties of strongly interacting particles. Lattice predictions directly impact many areas of particle and nuclear physics theory and phenomenology. This book provides a thorough introduction to the specialized techniques needed to carry out numerical simulations of QCD: a description of lattice discretizations of fermions and gauge fields, methods for actually do

  10. Simulations of relativistic quantum plasmas using real-time lattice scalar QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuan; Xiao, Jianyuan; Qin, Hong; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2018-05-01

    Real-time lattice quantum electrodynamics (QED) provides a unique tool for simulating plasmas in the strong-field regime, where collective plasma scales are not well separated from relativistic-quantum scales. As a toy model, we study scalar QED, which describes self-consistent interactions between charged bosons and electromagnetic fields. To solve this model on a computer, we first discretize the scalar-QED action on a lattice, in a way that respects geometric structures of exterior calculus and U(1)-gauge symmetry. The lattice scalar QED can then be solved, in the classical-statistics regime, by advancing an ensemble of statistically equivalent initial conditions in time, using classical field equations obtained by extremizing the discrete action. To demonstrate the capability of our numerical scheme, we apply it to two example problems. The first example is the propagation of linear waves, where we recover analytic wave dispersion relations using numerical spectrum. The second example is an intense laser interacting with a one-dimensional plasma slab, where we demonstrate natural transition from wakefield acceleration to pair production when the wave amplitude exceeds the Schwinger threshold. Our real-time lattice scheme is fully explicit and respects local conservation laws, making it reliable for long-time dynamics. The algorithm is readily parallelized using domain decomposition, and the ensemble may be computed using quantum parallelism in the future.

  11. Computer simulation of trails on a square lattice. I. Trails at infinite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, H.A.; Meirovitch, H.

    1989-01-01

    A trail is a random walk on a lattice for which two bonds are not allowed to overlap. However, the chain may cross itself and one may associate with each such intersection an attractive energy epsilon-c. We study trails at infinite temperature T = ∞ (i.e., trails without attractions) on a square lattice using the scanning simulation method. Our results for the radius of gyration and the end-to-end distance strongly suggest (as do previous studies) that the shape exponent is ν = 0.75, similar to that for self-avoiding walks (SAW's). We obtain significantly more accurate estimates than have been obtained before for the entropy exponent γ = 1.350 +- 0.012 and for the effective growth parameter μ = 2.720 58 +- 0.000 20 (95% confidence limit). The persistence length is found to increase with increasing chain length N and the data fit slightly better an exponential function N/sup w/ where w = 0.047 +- 0.009 than a logarithmic one. Guttmann [J. Phys. A 18, 567 (1985)] has shown exactly that trails and SAW's on the hexagonal lattice at T = ∞ have the same exponents. Our results suggest that this is true also for the square lattice

  12. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of flow and heat transfer in random porous media constructed by simulated annealing algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Minghua; Shi, Yong; Yan, Jiashu; Yan, Yuying

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A numerical capability combining the lattice Boltzmann method with simulated annealing algorithm is developed. • Digitized representations of random porous media are constructed using limited but meaningful statistical descriptors. • Pore-scale flow and heat transfer information in random porous media is obtained by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. • The effective properties at the representative elementary volume scale are well specified using appropriate upscale averaging. - Abstract: In this article, the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method for transport phenomena is combined with the simulated annealing (SA) algorithm for digitized porous-medium construction to study flow and heat transfer in random porous media. Importantly, in contrast to previous studies which simplify porous media as arrays of regularly shaped objects or effective pore networks, the LB + SA method in this article can model statistically meaningful random porous structures in irregular morphology, and simulate pore-scale transport processes inside them. Pore-scale isothermal flow and heat conduction in a set of constructed random porous media characterized by statistical descriptors were then simulated through use of the LB + SA method. The corresponding averages over the computational volumes and the related effective transport properties were also computed based on these pore scale numerical results. Good agreement between the numerical results and theoretical predictions or experimental data on the representative elementary volume scale was found. The numerical simulations in this article demonstrate combination of the LB method with the SA algorithm is a viable and powerful numerical strategy for simulating transport phenomena in random porous media in complex geometries.

  13. Analytic treatment of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation for diffusion in a cone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnitsky, A. E.

    2011-12-01

    We consider nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate resulted from a diffusion equation for rotational wobbling in a cone. We show that the widespread point of view that there are no analytical expressions for correlation functions for wobbling in a cone model is invalid and prove that nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in this model is exactly tractable and amenable to full analytical description. The mechanism of relaxation is assumed to be due to dipole-dipole interaction of nuclear spins and is treated within the framework of the standard Bloemberger, Purcell, Pound-Solomon scheme. We consider the general case of arbitrary orientation of the cone axis relative the magnetic field. The BPP-Solomon scheme is shown to remain valid for systems with the distribution of the cone axes depending only on the tilt relative the magnetic field but otherwise being isotropic. We consider the case of random isotropic orientation of cone axes relative the magnetic field taking place in powders. Also we consider the cases of their predominant orientation along or opposite the magnetic field and that of their predominant orientation transverse to the magnetic field which may be relevant for, e.g., liquid crystals. Besides we treat in details the model case of the cone axis directed along the magnetic field. The latter provides direct comparison of the limiting case of our formulas with the textbook formulas for free isotropic rotational diffusion. The dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate on the cone half-width yields results similar to those predicted by the model-free approach.

  14. Multiscale Lattice Boltzmann method for flow simulations in highly heterogenous porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for flow simulations in highly heterogeneous porous media at both pore and Darcy scales is proposed in the paper. In the pore scale simulations, flow of two phases (e.g., oil and gas) or two immiscible fluids (e.g., water and oil) are modeled using cohesive or repulsive forces, respectively. The relative permeability can be computed using pore-scale simulations and seamlessly applied for intermediate and Darcy-scale simulations. A multiscale LBM that can reduce the computational complexity of existing LBM and transfer the information between different scales is implemented. The results of coarse-grid, reduced-order, simulations agree very well with the averaged results obtained using fine grid.

  15. Microcanonical simulation of nuclear multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randrup, J.; Koonin, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss the formal basis for the theoretical treatment of nuclear multifragmentation within a microcanonical framework. The important role played by highly excited nuclear states and the interfragment forces is illustrated. The requirement of detailed balance is especially discussed and illustrated for the fission-fusion Metropolis moves in configuration space. 13 refs., 2 figs

  16. Proceedings of the 1994 nuclear simulation symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laughton, P J [ed.; Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1994-12-31

    This symposium on nuclear simulation included sessions on reactor physics, on thermalhydraulics, and on fuel and fuel channels of CANDU type reactors. The individual papers have all been abstracted separately.

  17. Parallelization of simulation code for liquid-gas model of lattice-gas fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Wataru; Ebihara, Kenichi; Kume, Etsuo; Watanabe, Tadashi

    2000-03-01

    A simulation code for hydrodynamical phenomena which is based on the liquid-gas model of lattice-gas fluid is parallelized by using MPI (Message Passing Interface) library. The parallelized code can be applied to the larger size of the simulations than the non-parallelized code. The calculation times of the parallelized code on VPP500 (Vector-Parallel super computer with dispersed memory units), AP3000 (Scalar-parallel server with dispersed memory units), and a workstation cluster decreased in inverse proportion to the number of processors. (author)

  18. Ultracold atoms in optical lattices simulating quantum many-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lewenstein, Maciej; Ahufinger, Verònica

    2012-01-01

    Quantum computers, though not yet available on the market, will revolutionize the future of information processing. Quantum computers for special purposes like quantum simulators are already within reach. The physics of ultracold atoms, ions and molecules offer unprecedented possibilities of control of quantum many body systems and novel possibilities of applications to quantum information processing and quantum metrology. Particularly fascinating is the possibility of usingultracold atoms in lattices to simulate condensed matter or even high energy physics.This book provides a complete and co

  19. Nuclear power plant training simulator fidelity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.J.; Laughery, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    The fidelity assessment portion of a methodology for evaluating nuclear power plant simulation facilities in regard to their appropriateness for conducting the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's operating test was described. The need for fidelity assessment, data sources, and fidelity data to be collected are addressed. Fidelity data recording, collection, and analysis are discussed. The processes for drawing conclusions from the fidelity assessment and evaluating the adequacy of the simulator control-room layout were presented. 3 refs

  20. Simulation of the nuclear power economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triplett, M.B.

    1977-01-01

    Evaluation of nuclear power development policies requires the ability to forecast the economic and resource impacts attributable to a given policy. A computer simulation has been used in several recent evaluations of alternate nuclear power growth scenarios for the U.S. By using a discrete event modeling approach, a flexible tool has been developed that can simulate most planned reactor systems in terms of their overall economics and their impacts upon fuel cycle industries

  1. Chiral Extrapolations of the $\\boldsymbol{ρ(770)}$ Meson in $\\mathbf{N_f=2+1}$ Lattice QCD Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, Raquel [Univ. of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hu, Bitao [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Doering, Michael [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Mai, Maxim [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Alexandru, Andrei [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Several lattice QCD simulations of meson-meson scattering in p-wave and Isospin = 1 in Nf = 2 + 1 flavours have been carried out recently. Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory is used to perform extrapolations to the physical point. In contrast to previous findings on the analyses of Nf = 2 lattice data, where most of the data seems to be in agreement, some discrepancies are detected in the Nf = 2 + 1 lattice data analyses, which could be due to different masses of the strange quark, meson decay constants, initial constraints in the simulation, or other lattice artifacts. In addition, the low-energy constants are compared to the ones from a recent analysis of Nf = 2 lattice data.

  2. A mass-conserving multiphase lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of multiphase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiao-Dong; Li, You; Ma, Yi-Ren; Chen, Mu-Feng; Li, Xiang; Li, Qiao-Zhong

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a mass-conserving multiphase lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is proposed for simulating the multiphase flows. The proposed model developed in the present study is to improve the model of Shao et al. ["Free-energy-based lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of multiphase flows with density contrast," Phys. Rev. E 89, 033309 (2014)] by introducing a mass correction term in the lattice Boltzmann model for the interface. The model of Shao et al. [(the improved Zheng-Shu-Chew (Z-S-C model)] correctly considers the effect of the local density variation in momentum equation and has an obvious improvement over the Zheng-Shu-Chew (Z-S-C) model ["A lattice Boltzmann model for multiphase flows with large density ratio," J. Comput. Phys. 218(1), 353-371 (2006)] in terms of solution accuracy. However, due to the physical diffusion and numerical dissipation, the total mass of each fluid phase cannot be conserved correctly. To solve this problem, a mass correction term, which is similar to the one proposed by Wang et al. ["A mass-conserved diffuse interface method and its application for incompressible multiphase flows with large density ratio," J. Comput. Phys. 290, 336-351 (2015)], is introduced into the lattice Boltzmann equation for the interface to compensate the mass losses or offset the mass increase. Meanwhile, to implement the wetting boundary condition and the contact angle, a geometric formulation and a local force are incorporated into the present mass-conserving LB model. The proposed model is validated by verifying the Laplace law, simulating both one and two aligned droplets splashing onto a liquid film, droplets standing on an ideal wall, droplets with different wettability splashing onto smooth wax, and bubbles rising under buoyancy. Numerical results show that the proposed model can correctly simulate multiphase flows. It was found that the mass is well-conserved in all cases considered by the model developed in the present study. The developed

  3. Numerical simulation of direct methanol fuel cells using lattice Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delavar, Mojtaba Aghajani; Farhadi, Mousa; Sedighi, Kurosh [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Babol University of Technology, Babol, P.O. Box 484 (Iran)

    2010-09-15

    In this study Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) as an alternative of conventional computational fluid dynamics method is used to simulate Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). A two dimensional lattice Boltzmann model with 9 velocities, D2Q9, is used to solve the problem. The computational domain includes all seven parts of DMFC: anode channel, catalyst and diffusion layers, membrane and cathode channel, catalyst and diffusion layers. The model has been used to predict the flow pattern and concentration fields of different species in both clear and porous channels to investigate cell performance. The results have been compared well with results in literature for flow in porous and clear channels and cell polarization curves of the DMFC at different flow speeds and feed methanol concentrations. (author)

  4. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of droplet formation in T-junction geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busuioc, Sergiu; Ambruş, Victor E.; Sofonea, Victor

    2017-01-01

    The formation of droplets in T-junction configurations is investigated using a two-dimensional Lattice Boltzmann model for liquid-vapor systems. We use an expansion of the equilibrium distribution function with respect to Hermite polynomials and an off-lattice velocity set. To evolve the distribution functions we use the second order corner transport upwind numerical scheme and a third order scheme is used to compute the gradient operators in the force term. The droplet formation successfully recovers the squeezing, dripping and jetting regimes. We find that the droplet length decreases proportionally with the flow rate of the continuous phase and increases with the flow rate of the dispersed phase in all simulation configurations and has a linear dependency on the surface tension parameter κ.

  5. Critical point of Nf=3 QCD from lattice simulations in the canonical ensemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Anyi; Alexandru, Andrei; Liu, Keh-Fei

    2011-01-01

    A canonical ensemble algorithm is employed to study the phase diagram of N f =3 QCD using lattice simulations. We lock in the desired quark number sector using an exact Fourier transform of the fermion determinant. We scan the phase space below T c and look for an S-shape structure in the chemical potential, which signals the coexistence phase of a first order phase transition in finite volume. Applying Maxwell construction, we determine the boundaries of the coexistence phase at three temperatures and extrapolate them to locate the critical point. Using an improved gauge action and improved Wilson fermions on lattices with a spatial extent of 1.8 fm and quark masses close to that of the strange, we find the critical point at T E =0.925(5)T c and baryon chemical potential μ B E =2.60(8)T c .

  6. Study of shear viscosity of SU(2)-gluodynamics within lattice simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrakhantsev, N.Yu. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology,Dolgoprudny, 141700 (Russian Federation); Braguta, V.V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); Institute for High Energy Physics NRC “Kurchatov Institute”,Protvino, 142281 Russian Federation (Russian Federation); Far Eastern Federal University, School of Biomedicine,Vladivostok, 690950 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute),Kashirskoe highway, 31, Moscow, 115409 (Russian Federation); Kotov, A.Yu. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute),Kashirskoe highway, 31, Moscow, 115409 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-14

    This paper is devoted to the study of two-point correlation function of the energy-momentum tensor 〈T{sub 12}T{sub 12}〉 for SU(2)-gluodynamics within lattice simulation of QCD. Using multilevel algorithm we carried out the measurement of the correlation function at the temperature T/T{sub c}≃1.2. It is shown that lattice data can be described by spectral functions which interpolate between hydrodynamics at low frequencies and asymptotic freedom at high frequencies. The results of the study of spectral functions allowed us to estimate the ratio of shear viscosity to the entropy density η/s=0.134±0.057.

  7. Lattice Boltzmann method used to simulate particle motion in a conduit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolanský Jindřich

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional numerical simulation of particle motion in a pipe with a rough bed is presented. The simulation based on the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM employs the hybrid diffuse bounce-back approach to model moving boundaries. The bed of the pipe is formed by stationary spherical particles of the same size as the moving particles. Particle movements are induced by gravitational and hydrodynamic forces. To evaluate the hydrodynamic forces, the Momentum Exchange Algorithm is used. The LBM unified computational frame makes it possible to simulate both the particle motion and the fluid flow and to study mutual interactions of the carrier liquid flow and particles and the particle–bed and particle–particle collisions. The trajectories of simulated and experimental particles are compared. The Particle Tracking method is used to track particle motion. The correctness of the applied approach is assessed.

  8. Comparative Study of Algorithms for the Numerical Simulation of Lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luz, Fernando H. P.; Mendes, Tereza

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale numerical simulations are the prime method for a nonperturbative study of QCD from first principles. Although the lattice simulation of the pure-gauge (or quenched-QCD) case may be performed very efficiently on parallel machines, there are several additional difficulties in the simulation of the full-QCD case, i.e. when dynamical quark effects are taken into account. We discuss the main aspects of full-QCD simulations, describing the most common algorithms. We present a comparative analysis of performance for two versions of the hybrid Monte Carlo method (the so-called R and RHMC algorithms), as provided in the MILC software package. We consider two degenerate flavors of light quarks in the staggered formulation, having in mind the case of finite-temperature QCD.

  9. Quantum Simulation with Circuit-QED Lattices: from Elementary Building Blocks to Many-Body Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guanyu

    Recent experimental and theoretical progress in superconducting circuits and circuit QED (quantum electrodynamics) has helped to develop high-precision techniques to control, manipulate, and detect individual mesoscopic quantum systems. A promising direction is hence to scale up from individual building blocks to form larger-scale quantum many-body systems. Although realizing a scalable fault-tolerant quantum computer still faces major barriers of decoherence and quantum error correction, it is feasible to realize scalable quantum simulators with state-of-the-art technology. From the technological point of view, this could serve as an intermediate stage towards the final goal of a large-scale quantum computer, and could help accumulating experience with the control of quantum systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. From the physical point of view, this opens up a new regime where condensed matter systems can be simulated and studied, here in the context of strongly correlated photons and two-level systems. In this thesis, we mainly focus on two aspects of circuit-QED based quantum simulation. First, we discuss the elementary building blocks of the quantum simulator, in particular a fluxonium circuit coupled to a superconducting resonator. We show the interesting properties of the fluxonium circuit as a qubit, including the unusual structure of its charge matrix elements. We also employ perturbation theory to derive the effective Hamiltonian of the coupled system in the dispersive regime, where qubit and the photon frequencies are detuned. The observables predicted with our theory, including dispersive shifts and Kerr nonlinearity, are compared with data from experiments, such as homodyne transmission and two-tone spectroscopy. These studies also relate to the problem of detection in a circuit-QED quantum simulator. Second, we study many-body physics of circuit-QED lattices, serving as quantum simulators. In particular, we focus on two different

  10. Simulation methods for nuclear production scheduling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, W.T.; Markel, L.C.

    1975-01-01

    Recent developments and applications of simulation methods for use in nuclear production scheduling and fuel management are reviewed. The unique characteristics of the nuclear fuel cycle as they relate to the overall optimization of a mixed nuclear-fossil system in both the short-and mid-range time frame are described. Emphasis is placed on the various formulations and approaches to the mid-range planning problem, whose objective is the determination of an optimal (least cost) system operation strategy over a multi-year planning horizon. The decomposition of the mid-range problem into power system simulation, reactor core simulation and nuclear fuel management optimization, and system integration models is discussed. Present utility practices, requirements, and research trends are described. 37 references

  11. Advanced nuclear reactors and their simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaushevski, Anton; Boshevski, Tome

    2003-01-01

    Population growth, economy development and improvement life standard impact on continually energy needs as well as electricity. Fossil fuels have limited reserves, instability market prices and destroying environmental impacts. The hydro energy capacities highly depend on geographic and climate conditions. The nuclear fission is significant factor for covering electricity needs in this century. Reasonable capital costs, low fuel and operating expenses, environmental acceptable are some of the facts that makes the nuclear energy an attractive option especially for the developing countries. The simulators for nuclear reactors are an additional software tool in order to understand, study research and analyze the processes in nuclear reactors. (Original)

  12. Simulation for nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Mathematical modelling forms the cornerstone of both the physical sciences and the engineering sciences. Computer modelling represents an extension of mathematical modelling into areas which are either not sufficiently accurate or not conveniently modelled by analytical techniques and where highly complex models can be investigated on a sufficiently short timescale. Simulation represents the application of these modelling techniques to real systems, thus enabling information on plant characteristics to be gained without either constructing or operating the full-scale plant or system under consideration. Developments in computer systems modelling techniques, safety and operating philosophy, and human psychology studies lead to improvements in simulation practice. New concepts in simulation also lead to a demand for new types of computers, dedicated computer systems are increasingly being developed for plant analysis, and the advent and development of microprocessors has also led to new techniques both in simulation and simulators. Progress in these areas is presented in this book

  13. Design of blast simulators for nuclear testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, A.; Opalka, K.O.; Kitchens, C.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A quasi-one-dimensional computational technique is used to model the flow of a large, complicated shock tube. The shock tube, or Large Blast Simulator, is used to simulate conventional or nuclear explosions by shaping the pressure history. Results from computations show favorable agreement when compared with data taken in the facility at Gramat, France. Such future shock tubes will include a thermal irradiation capability to better simulate a nuclear event. The computations point to the need for venting of the combustion products since the pressure history will be considerably altered as the shock propagates through these hot gases

  14. Programming for a nuclear reactor instrument simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, C.

    1988-01-01

    This note discusses 8086/8087 machine-language programming for simulation of nuclear reactor instrument current inputs by means of a digital-analog converter (DAC) feeding a bank of series input resistors. It also shows FORTRAN programming for generating the parameter tales used in the simulation. These techniques would be generally useful for high-speed simulation of quantities varying over many orders of magnitude

  15. Passive heat transfer in a turbulent channel flow simulation using large eddy simulation based on the lattice Boltzmann method framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Hong [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Aero-Engine Aero-Thermodynamics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang Jiao, E-mail: wangjiao@sjp.buaa.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Aero-Engine Aero-Thermodynamics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Tao Zhi [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Aero-Engine Aero-Thermodynamics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A double MRT-LBM is used to study heat transfer in turbulent channel flow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Turbulent Pr is modeled by dynamic subgrid scale model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature gradients are calculated by the non-equilibrium temperature distribution moments. - Abstract: In this paper, a large eddy simulation based on the lattice Boltzmann framework is carried out to simulate the heat transfer in a turbulent channel flow, in which the temperature can be regarded as a passive scalar. A double multiple relaxation time (DMRT) thermal lattice Boltzmann model is employed. While applying DMRT, a multiple relaxation time D3Q19 model is used to simulate the flow field, and a multiple relaxation time D3Q7 model is used to simulate the temperature field. The dynamic subgrid stress model, in which the turbulent eddy viscosity and the turbulent Prandtl number are dynamically computed, is integrated to describe the subgrid effect. Not only the strain rate but also the temperature gradient is calculated locally by the non-equilibrium moments. The Reynolds number based on the shear velocity and channel half height is 180. The molecular Prandtl numbers are set to be 0.025 and 0.71. Statistical quantities, such as the average velocity, average temperature, Reynolds stress, root mean square (RMS) velocity fluctuations, RMS temperature and turbulent heat flux are obtained and compared with the available data. The results demonstrate great reliability of DMRT-LES in studying turbulence.

  16. Computer simulations of low energy displacement cascades in a face centered cubic lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffgens, J.O.; Bourquin, R.D.

    1976-09-01

    Computer simulations of atomic motion in a copper lattice following the production of primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) with energies from 25 to 200 eV are discussed. In this study, a mixed Moliere-Englert pair potential is used to model the copper lattice. The computer code COMENT, which employs the dynamical method, is used to analyze the motion of up to 6000 atoms per time step during cascade evolution. The atoms are specified as initially at rest on the sites of an ideal lattice. A matrix of 12 PKA directions and 6 PKA energies is investigated. Displacement thresholds in the [110] and [100] are calculated to be approximately 17 and 20 eV, respectively. A table showing the stability of isolated Frenkel pairs with different vacancy and interstitial orientations and separations is presented. The numbers of Frenkel pairs and atomic replacements are tabulated as a function of PKA direction for each energy. For PKA energies of 25, 50, 75, 100, 150, and 200 eV, the average number of Frenkel pairs per PKA are 0.4, 0.6, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, and 2.2 and the average numbers of replacements per PKA are 2.4, 4.0, 3.3, 4.9, 9.3, and 15.8

  17. Simulation of the catalyst layer in PEMFC based on a novel two-phase lattice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jiejing; Yang Wei; Xu Li [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Membrane Science and Desalination Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang Yuxin, E-mail: yxwang@tju.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Membrane Science and Desalination Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2011-08-01

    Highlights: > We propose a novel two phase lattice model of catalyst layer in PEMFC. > The model features a catalyst phase and a mixed ionomer and pores phase. > Transport and electrochemical reaction in the lattice are simulated. > The model enables more accurate results than pore-solid two phase model. > Profiles of oxygen level and reaction rate across catalyst layer vary with cell current. - Abstract: A lattice model of catalyst layer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), consisting of randomly distributed catalyst phase (C phase) and mixed ionomer-pore phase (IP phase), was established by means of Monte Carlo method. Transport and electrochemical reactions in the model catalyst layer were calculated. The newly proposed C-IP model was compared with previously established pore-solid two phase model. The variation of oxygen level and reaction rate along the thickness of catalyst layer with cell current was discussed. The effect of ionomer distribution across catalyst layer was studied by comparing profiles of oxygen level, reaction rate and overpotential, as well as corresponding polarization curves.

  18. Parity simulation for nuclear plant analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, K.F.; Depiente, E.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the transient performance of nuclear plants is sufficiently complex that simulation tools are needed for design and safety studies. The simulation tools are needed for design and safety studies. The simulation tools are normally digital because of the speed, flexibility, generality, and repeatability of digital computers. However, communication with digital computers is an awkward matter, requiring special skill or training. The designer wishing to gain insight into system behavior must expend considerable effort in learning to use computer codes, or else have an intermediary communicate with the machine. There has been a recent development in analog simulation that simplifies the user interface with the simulator, while at the same time improving the performance of analog computers. This development is termed parity simulation and is now in routine use in analyzing power electronic network transients. The authors describe the concept of parity simulation and present some results of using the approach to simulate neutron kinetics problems

  19. Lattice-Boltzmann Method with Dynamic Grid Refinement for Simulating Particle Deposition on a Single Fibre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Schomburg

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work a numerical approach to predict the deposition behaviour of nano-scale particles on the surface of a single fibre by resolving the resulting dendrite-like particle structures in detail is presented. The gas flow simulation is carried out by a two-dimensional Lattice-Boltzmann method, which is coupled with a Lagrangian approach for the particle motion. To decrease calculation time and system requirements the Lattice-Boltzmann model is extended to allow for local grid refinement. Because of the a priori unknown location of deposition, the simulation procedure starts on a coarse mesh which is then locally refined in a fully adaptive way in regions of accumulated particles. After each deposition the fluid flow is recalculated in order to resolve the coupling of the flow with the growing particle structures correctly. For the purpose of avoiding unphysical blocking of flow by growing particle dendrites the Lattice-Boltzmann method is extended to permeable cells in these regions using the Brinkmann equation. This extended deposition model is compared to simpler approaches, where the deposit has no retroaction on the flow or is treated as a solid structure. It is clear that the permeable model is most realistic and allows considering the particle deposition on a fibre as two-dimensional problem. Comprehensive simulations were conducted for analysing the importance of different parameters, i.e. free-stream velocity and particle diameter on the deposit structure. The results of this sensitivity analysis agree qualitatively well with former published numerical and experimental results. Finally the structure of the particle deposit was quantitatively characterised by using a modified fractal dimension.

  20. Lattice models for large-scale simulations of coherent wave scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shumin; Teixeira, Fernando L.

    2004-01-01

    Lattice approximations for partial differential equations describing physical phenomena are commonly used for the numerical simulation of many problems otherwise intractable by pure analytical approaches. The discretization inevitably leads to many of the original symmetries to be broken or modified. In the case of Maxwell’s equations for example, invariance and isotropy of the speed of light in vacuum is invariably lost because of the so-called grid dispersion. Since it is a cumulative effect, grid dispersion is particularly harmful for the accuracy of results of large-scale simulations of scattering problems. Grid dispersion is usually combated by either increasing the lattice resolution or by employing higher-order schemes with larger stencils for the space and time derivatives. Both alternatives lead to increased computational cost to simulate a problem of a given physical size. Here, we introduce a general approach to develop lattice approximations with reduced grid dispersion error for a given stencil (and hence at no additional computational cost). The present approach is based on first obtaining stencil coefficients in the Fourier domain that minimize the maximum grid dispersion error for wave propagation at all directions (minimax sense). The resulting coefficients are then expanded into a Taylor series in terms of the frequency variable and incorporated into time-domain (update) equations after an inverse Fourier transformation. Maximally flat (Butterworth) or Chebyshev filters are subsequently used to minimize the wave speed variations for a given frequency range of interest. The use of such filters also allows for the adjustment of the grid dispersion characteristics so as to minimize not only the local dispersion error but also the accumulated phase error in a frequency range of interest.

  1. Numerical simulation of jet breakup behavior by the lattice Boltzmann method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Eiji; Koyama, Kazuya; Abe, Yutaka; Iwasawa, Yuzuru; Ebihara, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the jet breakup behavior of the molten core material into coolant during a core disruptive accident (CDA) for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), we simulated the jet breakup due to the hydrodynamic interaction using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The applicability of the LBM to the jet breakup simulation was validated by comparison with our experimental data. In addition, the influence of several dimensionless numbers such as Weber number and Froude number was examined using the LBM. As a result, we validated applicability of the LBM to the jet breakup simulation, and found that the jet breakup length is independent of Froude number and in good agreement with the Epstein's correlation when the jet interface becomes unstable. (author)

  2. Steady-state hydrodynamic instabilities of active liquid crystals: hybrid lattice Boltzmann simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenduzzo, D; Orlandini, E; Cates, M E; Yeomans, J M

    2007-09-01

    We report hybrid lattice Boltzmann (HLB) simulations of the hydrodynamics of an active nematic liquid crystal sandwiched between confining walls with various anchoring conditions. We confirm the existence of a transition between a passive phase and an active phase, in which there is spontaneous flow in the steady state. This transition is attained for sufficiently "extensile" rods, in the case of flow-aligning liquid crystals, and for sufficiently "contractile" ones for flow-tumbling materials. In a quasi-one-dimensional geometry, deep in the active phase of flow-aligning materials, our simulations give evidence of hysteresis and history-dependent steady states, as well as of spontaneous banded flow. Flow-tumbling materials, in contrast, rearrange themselves so that only the two boundary layers flow in steady state. Two-dimensional simulations, with periodic boundary conditions, show additional instabilities, with the spontaneous flow appearing as patterns made up of "convection rolls." These results demonstrate a remarkable richness (including dependence on anchoring conditions) in the steady-state phase behavior of active materials, even in the absence of external forcing; they have no counterpart for passive nematics. Our HLB methodology, which combines lattice Boltzmann for momentum transport with a finite difference scheme for the order parameter dynamics, offers a robust and efficient method for probing the complex hydrodynamic behavior of active nematics.

  3. Chiral Magnetic Effect and Anomalous Transport from Real-Time Lattice Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, Niklas; Schlichting, Sören; Sharma, Sayantan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a first-principles study of anomaly induced transport phenomena by performing real-time lattice simulations with dynamical fermions coupled simultaneously to non-Abelian S U (N _c) and Abelian U (1) gauge fields. By investigating the behavior of vector and axial currents during a sphaleron transition in the presence of an external magnetic field, we demonstrate how the interplay of the chiral magnetic and chiral separation effect leads to the formation of a propagating wave. Furthermore, we analyze the dependence of the magnitude of the induced vector current and the propagation of the wave on the amount of explicit chiral symmetry breaking due to finite quark masses.

  4. Simulation of a marine nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Kyouya, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Hideo; Ochiai, Masaaki

    1995-01-01

    A Nuclear-powered ship Engineering Simulation SYstem (NESSY) has been developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute as an advanced design tool for research and development of future marine reactors. A marine reactor must respond to changing loads and to the ship's motions because of the ship's maneuvering and its presence in a marine environment. The NESSY has combined programs for the reactor plant behavior calculations and the ship's motion calculations. Thus, it can simulate reactor power fluctuations caused by changing loads and the ship's motions. It can also simulate the behavior of water in the pressurizer and steam generators. This water sloshes in response to the ship's motions. The performance of NESSY has been verified by comparing the simulation calculations with the measured data obtained by experiments performed using the nuclear ship Mutsu. The effects of changing loads and the ship's motions on the reactor behavior can be accurately simulated by NESSY

  5. The innovative simulator for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosawa, A [The Inst. of Applied Energy, Tokyo (Japan); Ohashi, H; Akiyama, M [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1994-12-31

    Nuclear power simulators are becoming more and more important tools for ensuring the safety and the reliability during the whole cycle of plants from design to operation. Recently, there has been remarkable progress in computer science such as increase of computing speed, refinement of mathematical models and emergence of various AI technologies. By fully exploiting this progress to nuclear plant simulators, it becomes possible to achieve much faster, more extensive and more realistic simulation than ever. The Institute of Applied Energy (IAE) has organized a feasibility study on the advanced simulator since 1990, to develop the concept of nuclear power plant simulators in future. In this study, several academic organizations make fundamental researches on parallelization of transient analyses, large-scale parallel computing, thermal-hydraulic analysis using cellular automata, code development methodology by module-integration and task scheduling methods for parallel compilers. The concept and impact of the innovative simulator, as a multipurpose simulator complex, are summarized from the viewpoints of wide range scenarios including severe accidents, 3D multi-media interface, much faster than real-time simulation, and innovative algorithms for analyses of thermal-hydraulics, structure, neutronkinetics and their coupled phenomena. (orig.) (2 refs., 2 figs.).

  6. The innovative simulator for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosawa, A.; Ohashi, H.; Akiyama, M.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear power simulators are becoming more and more important tools for ensuring the safety and the reliability during the whole cycle of plants from design to operation. Recently, there has been remarkable progress in computer science such as increase of computing speed, refinement of mathematical models and emergence of various AI technologies. By fully exploiting this progress to nuclear plant simulators, it becomes possible to achieve much faster, more extensive and more realistic simulation than ever. The Institute of Applied Energy (IAE) has organized a feasibility study on the advanced simulator since 1990, to develop the concept of nuclear power plant simulators in future. In this study, several academic organizations make fundamental researches on parallelization of transient analyses, large-scale parallel computing, thermal-hydraulic analysis using cellular automata, code development methodology by module-integration and task scheduling methods for parallel compilers. The concept and impact of the innovative simulator, as a multipurpose simulator complex, are summarized from the viewpoints of wide range scenarios including severe accidents, 3D multi-media interface, much faster than real-time simulation, and innovative algorithms for analyses of thermal-hydraulics, structure, neutronkinetics and their coupled phenomena. (orig.) (2 refs., 2 figs.)

  7. Qualification of the WIMS lattice code, for the design, operation and accident analysis of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    A basic problem in nuclear reactor physics in that of the description of the neutron population behaviour in the multiplicative medium of a nuclear fuel. Due to the magnitude of the physical problem involved and the present degree of technological evolution regarding computing resources, of increasing complexity and possibilities, the calculation programs or codes have turned to be a basic auxiliary tool in reactor physics. In order to analyze the global problem, several aspects should be taken into consideration. The first aspect to be considered is that of the availability of the necessary nuclear data. The second one is the existence of a variety of methods and models to perform the calculations. The final phase for this kind of analysis is the qualification of the computing programs to be used, i.e. the verification of the validity domain of its nuclear data and the models involved. The last one is an essential phase, and in order to carry it on great variety of calculations are required, that will check the different aspects contained in the code. We here analyze the most important physical processes that take place in a nuclear reactor cell, and we consider the qualification of the lattice code WIMS, that calculates the neutronic parameters associated with such processes. Particular emphasis has been put in the application to natural uranium fuelled reactor, heavy water cooled and moderated, as the Argentinean power reactors now in operation. A wide set of experiments has been chosen: a.-Fresh fuel in zero-power experimental facilities and power reactors; b.-Irradiated fuel in both types of facilities; c.-Benchmark (prototype) experiments with loss of coolant. From the whole analysis it was concluded that for the research reactors, as well as for the heavy water moderated power reactors presently operating in our country, or those that could operate in a near future, the lattice code WIMS is reliable and produces results within the experimental values and

  8. Quantitative study of fluctuation effects by fast lattice Monte Carlo simulations: Compression of grafted homopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Using fast lattice Monte Carlo (FLMC) simulations [Q. Wang, Soft Matter 5, 4564 (2009)] and the corresponding lattice self-consistent field (LSCF) calculations, we studied a model system of grafted homopolymers, in both the brush and mushroom regimes, in an explicit solvent compressed by an impenetrable surface. Direct comparisons between FLMC and LSCF results, both of which are based on the same Hamiltonian (thus without any parameter-fitting between them), unambiguously and quantitatively reveal the fluctuations/correlations neglected by the latter. We studied both the structure (including the canonical-ensemble averages of the height and the mean-square end-to-end distances of grafted polymers) and thermodynamics (including the ensemble-averaged reduced energy density and the related internal energy per chain, the differences in the Helmholtz free energy and entropy per chain from the uncompressed state, and the pressure due to compression) of the system. In particular, we generalized the method for calculating pressure in lattice Monte Carlo simulations proposed by Dickman [J. Chem. Phys. 87, 2246 (1987)], and combined it with the Wang-Landau–Optimized Ensemble sampling [S. Trebst, D. A. Huse, and M. Troyer, Phys. Rev. E 70, 046701 (2004)] to efficiently and accurately calculate the free energy difference and the pressure due to compression. While we mainly examined the effects of the degree of compression, the distance between the nearest-neighbor grafting points, the reduced number of chains grafted at each grafting point, and the system fluctuations/correlations in an athermal solvent, the θ-solvent is also considered in some cases

  9. Mixed Precision Solver Scalable to 16000 MPI Processes for Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics Simulations on the Oakforest-PACS System

    OpenAIRE

    Boku, Taisuke; Ishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Kuramashi, Yoshinobu; Meadows, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (Lattice QCD) is a quantum field theory on a finite discretized space-time box so as to numerically compute the dynamics of quarks and gluons to explore the nature of subatomic world. Solving the equation of motion of quarks (quark solver) is the most compute-intensive part of the lattice QCD simulations and is one of the legacy HPC applications. We have developed a mixed-precision quark solver for a large Intel Xeon Phi (KNL) system named "Oakforest-PACS", empl...

  10. Nuclear power plant simulation facility evaluation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.M.; Carter, R.J.; Laughery, K.R. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A methodology for evaluation of nuclear power plant simulation facilities with regard to their acceptability for use in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) operator licensing exam is described. The evaluation is based primarily on simulator fidelity, but incorporates some aspects of direct operator/trainee performance measurement. The panel presentation and paper discuss data requirements, data collection, data analysis and criteria for conclusions regarding the fidelity evaluation, and summarize the proposed use of direct performance measurment. While field testing and refinement of the methodology are recommended, this initial effort provides a firm basis for NRC to fully develop the necessary methodology

  11. Military nuclear activities. The simulation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpuech, A.

    2000-01-01

    The durability of the French nuclear weapon dissuasion has to integrate two kind of problems: the geopolitical situation with the comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty (CTBT) and the aging of weapons. The replacement of decayed weapons requires a complete safety and reliability validation of the new weapons which is performed using simulation. This paper gives a brief presentation of the simulation program and of the technical means developed by the military division of the French atomic energy commission (CEA-DAM): the Airix X-ray radiography installation and the 'megajoule' laser facility. (J.S.)

  12. Lattice location of O{sup 18} in ion implanted Fe crystals by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, channeling and nuclear reaction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vairavel, Mathayan; Sundaravel, Balakrishnan, E-mail: bsundar@igcar.gov.in; Panigrahi, Binaykumar

    2016-09-15

    There are contradictory theoretical predictions of lattice location of oxygen interstitial atom at tetrahedral and octahedral interstices in bcc Fe. For validating these predictions, 300 keV O{sup 18} ions with fluence of 5 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} are implanted into bcc Fe single crystals at room temperature and annealed at 400 °C. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA)/channeling measurements are carried out with 850 keV protons. The lattice location of implanted O{sup 18} is analysed using the α-particles yield from O{sup 18}(p,α)N{sup 15} nuclear reaction. The tilt angular scans of α-particle yield along 〈110〉 and 〈100〉 axial directions are performed at room temperature. Lattice location of O{sup 18} is found to be at tetrahedral interstitial site by comparing the experimental scan with simulated scans using FLUX7 software.

  13. Upscaled Lattice Boltzmann Method for Simulations of Flows in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An upscaled Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM for flow simulations in heterogeneous porous media at the Darcy scale is proposed in this paper. In the Darcy-scale simulations, the Shan-Chen force model is used to simplify the algorithm. The proposed upscaled LBM uses coarser grids to represent the average effects of the fine-grid simulations. In the upscaled LBM, each coarse grid represents a subdomain of the fine-grid discretization and the effective permeability with the reduced-order models is proposed as we coarsen the grid. The effective permeability is computed using solutions of local problems (e.g., by performing local LBM simulations on the fine grids using the original permeability distribution and used on the coarse grids in the upscaled simulations. The upscaled LBM that can reduce the computational cost of existing LBM and transfer the information between different scales is implemented. The results of coarse-grid, reduced-order, simulations agree very well with averaged results obtained using a fine grid.

  14. Upscaled Lattice Boltzmann Method for Simulations of Flows in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jun

    2017-02-16

    An upscaled Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) for flow simulations in heterogeneous porous media at the Darcy scale is proposed in this paper. In the Darcy-scale simulations, the Shan-Chen force model is used to simplify the algorithm. The proposed upscaled LBM uses coarser grids to represent the average effects of the fine-grid simulations. In the upscaled LBM, each coarse grid represents a subdomain of the fine-grid discretization and the effective permeability with the reduced-order models is proposed as we coarsen the grid. The effective permeability is computed using solutions of local problems (e.g., by performing local LBM simulations on the fine grids using the original permeability distribution) and used on the coarse grids in the upscaled simulations. The upscaled LBM that can reduce the computational cost of existing LBM and transfer the information between different scales is implemented. The results of coarse-grid, reduced-order, simulations agree very well with averaged results obtained using a fine grid.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of the contact angle in a liquid-gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Seung Yeob; Park, Cheon Tae; Kim, Keung Koo

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has gained much attention for its ability to simulate fluid flows, and for its potential advantages over a conventional CFD method. The key advantages of LBM are, (1) suitability for parallel computations, (2) absence of the need to solve the time-consuming Poisson equation for a pressure, and (3) an ease with multiphase flows, complex geometries and interfacial dynamics may be treated. The shape of a moving droplet is difficult to investigate analytically because the classical continuum hydrodynamic equations of motion with the usual no-slip condition at the surface predict a singularity in the stress at the contact line. Briant et al. have proposed a wetting boundary condition by using the wetting potential. In this study, we introduce the wetting boundary condition into the LBM proposed by Zheng et al. The static contact angle of a droplet onto a wall in order to validate the method is calculated. By adopting a finite difference gradient operator of a sufficient isotropy, the spurious currents can be made small in the wall surface. The main objective of the present work is to establish the lattice Boltzmann method as a viable tool for the simulation of multiphase or multi-component flows

  16. A computer simulation of a potential derived from the gay-berne potential for lattice model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habtamu Zewdie

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The lattice model of elongated molecules interacting via a potential derived from the Gay-Berne pair potential is proposed. We made a systematic study of the effect of varying the molecular elongation and intermolecular vector orientation dependence of the pair potential on the thermodynamic as well as the structural properties of liquid crystals. A Monte Carlo simulations of molecules placed at the site of a simple cubic lattice and interacting via the modified Gay-Berne potential with its nearest neighbours is performed. The internal energy, heat capacity, angular pair correlation function and scalar order parameter are obtained. The results are compared against predictions of molecular field theory, experimental results and that of other related simulations wherever possible. It is shown that for more elongated molecules the nematic-isotropic transition becomes stronger first order transition. For a given molecular elongation as the intermolecular vector orientation dependence becomes larger the nematic-isotropic transition becomes a stronger first order transition as measured by the rate of change of the order parameter and the divergence of the heat capacity. Scaling the potential well seems to have dramatic change on the effect of the potential well anisotropy on trends of nematic-isotropic transition temperature and divergence of the heat capacity. It is shown that the behaviour of many nematics can be described by proposed model with the elongation ratio of molecules and potential well anisotropy ranging from 3 to 5.

  17. Quantum Simulation of a Lattice Schwinger Model in a Chain of Trapped Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hauke

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss how a lattice Schwinger model can be realized in a linear ion trap, allowing a detailed study of the physics of Abelian lattice gauge theories related to one-dimensional quantum electrodynamics. Relying on the rich quantum-simulation toolbox available in state-of-the-art trapped-ion experiments, we show how one can engineer an effectively gauge-invariant dynamics by imposing energetic constraints, provided by strong Ising-like interactions. Applying exact diagonalization to ground-state and time-dependent properties, we study the underlying microscopic model and discuss undesired interaction terms and other imperfections. As our analysis shows, the proposed scheme allows for the observation in realistic setups of spontaneous parity- and charge-symmetry breaking, as well as false-vacuum decay. Besides an implementation aimed at larger ion chains, we also discuss a minimal setting, consisting of only four ions in a simpler experimental setup, which enables us to probe basic physical phenomena related to the full many-body problem. The proposal opens a new route for analog quantum simulation of high-energy and condensed-matter models where gauge symmetries play a prominent role.

  18. Non-Newtonian particulate flow simulation: A direct-forcing immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri Delouei, A.; Nazari, M.; Kayhani, M. H.; Kang, S. K.; Succi, S.

    2016-04-01

    In the current study, a direct-forcing immersed boundary-non-Newtonian lattice Boltzmann method (IB-NLBM) is developed to investigate the sedimentation and interaction of particles in shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids. In the proposed IB-NLBM, the non-linear mechanics of non-Newtonian particulate flows is detected by combination of the most desirable features of immersed boundary and lattice Boltzmann methods. The noticeable roles of non-Newtonian behavior on particle motion, settling velocity and generalized Reynolds number are investigated by simulating benchmark problem of one-particle sedimentation under the same generalized Archimedes number. The effects of extra force due to added accelerated mass are analyzed on the particle motion which have a significant impact on shear-thinning fluids. For the first time, the phenomena of interaction among the particles, such as Drafting, Kissing, and Tumbling in non-Newtonian fluids are investigated by simulation of two-particle sedimentation and twelve-particle sedimentation. The results show that increasing the shear-thickening behavior of fluid leads to a significant increase in the kissing time. Moreover, the transverse position of particles for shear-thinning fluids during the tumbling interval is different from Newtonian and the shear-thickening fluids. The present non-Newtonian particulate study can be applied in several industrial and scientific applications, like the non-Newtonian sedimentation behavior of particles in food industrial and biological fluids.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of endothermal catalytic reaction in catalyst porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xunfeng; Cai Jun; Xin Fang; Huai Xiulan; Guo Jiangfeng

    2013-01-01

    Gas catalytic reaction in a fixed bed reactor is a general process in chemical industry. The chemical reaction process involves the complex multi-component flow, heat and mass transfer coupling chemical reaction in the catalyst porous structure. The lattice Boltzmann method is developed to simulate the complex process of the surface catalytic reaction in the catalyst porous media. The non-equilibrium extrapolation method is used to treat the boundaries. The porous media is structured by Sierpinski carpet fractal structure. The velocity correction is adopted on the reaction surface. The flow, temperature and concentration fields calculated by the lattice Boltzmann method are compared with those computed by the CFD software. The effects of the inlet velocity, porosity and inlet components ratio on the conversion are also studied. Highlights: ► LBM is developed to simulate the surface catalytic reaction. ► The Sierpinski carpet structure is used to construct the porous media. ► The LBM results are in agreement with the CFD predictions. ► Velocity, temperature and concentration fields are obtained. ► Effects of the velocity, porosity and concentration on conversion are analyzed.

  20. Simulators for training nuclear power plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Simulator training and retraining of operations personnel is essential for their acquiring the necessary knowledge, skills and qualification for operating a nuclear power plant, and for effective feedback of experience including human based operating errors. Simulator training is the most effective way by far of training operations personnel in co-operation and communication in a team, which also involves instilling attitudes and approaches for achieving excellence and individual responsibility and alertness. This technical document provides guidance to Member States on the procurement, setting up and utilization of a simulator training centre; it will also be useful for organizations with previous experience in the use of simulators for training. The document is the result of a series of advisory and consultants meetings held in the framework of the International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation in 1989-1992. 17 refs, 2 tabs

  1. Recent advances in nuclear power plant simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbino, H.; Plisson, P.; Friant, J.Y.

    1997-01-01

    The field of industrial simulation has experienced very significant progress in recent years, and power plant simulation in particular has been an extremely active area. Improvements may be recorded in practically all simulator subsystems. In Europe, the construction of new full- or optimized-scope nuclear power plant simulators during the middle 1990's has been remarkable intense. In fact, it is possible to identify a distinct simulator generation, which constitutes a new de facto simulation standard. Thomson Training and Simulation has taken part in these developments by designing, building, and validation several of these new simulators for Dutch, German and French nuclear power plants. Their characteristics are discussed in this paper. The following main trends may be identified: Process modeling is clearly evolving towards obtaining engineering-grade performance, even under the added constraints of real-time operation and a very wide range of operating conditions to be covered; Massive use of modern graphic user interfaces (GUI) ensures an unprecedented flexibility and user-friendliness for the Instructor Station; The massive use of GUIs also allows the development of Trainee Stations (TS), which significantly enhance the in-depth training value of the simulators; The development of powerful Software Development Environments (SDE) enables the simulator maintenance teams to keep abreast of modifications carried out in the reference plants; Finally, simulator maintenance and its compliance with simulator fidelity requirements are greatly enhanced by integrated Configuration Management Systems (CMS). In conclusion, the power plant simulation field has attained a strong level of maturity, which benefits its approximately forty years of service to the power generation industry. (author)

  2. Large scale simulations of lattice QCD thermodynamics on Columbia Parallel Supercomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Shigemi

    1989-01-01

    The Columbia Parallel Supercomputer project aims at the construction of a parallel processing, multi-gigaflop computer optimized for numerical simulations of lattice QCD. The project has three stages; 16-node, 1/4GF machine completed in April 1985, 64-node, 1GF machine completed in August 1987, and 256-node, 16GF machine now under construction. The machines all share a common architecture; a two dimensional torus formed from a rectangular array of N 1 x N 2 independent and identical processors. A processor is capable of operating in a multi-instruction multi-data mode, except for periods of synchronous interprocessor communication with its four nearest neighbors. Here the thermodynamics simulations on the two working machines are reported. (orig./HSI)

  3. Lattice Boltzmann simulations for wall-flow dynamics in porous ceramic diesel particulate filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da Young; Lee, Gi Wook; Yoon, Kyu; Chun, Byoungjin; Jung, Hyun Wook

    2018-01-01

    Flows through porous filter walls of wall-flow diesel particulate filter are investigated using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The microscopic model of the realistic filter wall is represented by randomly overlapped arrays of solid spheres. The LB simulation results are first validated by comparison to those from previous hydrodynamic theories and constitutive models for flows in porous media with simple regular and random solid-wall configurations. We demonstrate that the newly designed randomly overlapped array structures of porous walls allow reliable and accurate simulations for the porous wall-flow dynamics in a wide range of solid volume fractions from 0.01 to about 0.8, which is beyond the maximum random packing limit of 0.625. The permeable performance of porous media is scrutinized by changing the solid volume fraction and particle Reynolds number using Darcy's law and Forchheimer's extension in the laminar flow region.

  4. FULL GPU Implementation of Lattice-Boltzmann Methods with Immersed Boundary Conditions for Fast Fluid Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Boroni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM has shown great potential in fluid simulations, but performance issues and difficulties to manage complex boundary conditions have hindered a wider application. The upcoming of Graphic Processing Units (GPU Computing offered a possible solution for the performance issue, and methods like the Immersed Boundary (IB algorithm proved to be a flexible solution to boundaries. Unfortunately, the implicit IB algorithm makes the LBM implementation in GPU a non-trivial task. This work presents a fully parallel GPU implementation of LBM in combination with IB. The fluid-boundary interaction is implemented via GPU kernels, using execution configurations and data structures specifically designed to accelerate each code execution. Simulations were validated against experimental and analytical data showing good agreement and improving the computational time. Substantial reductions of calculation rates were achieved, lowering down the required time to execute the same model in a CPU to about two magnitude orders.

  5. Computer code for the atomistic simulation of lattice defects and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffgens, J.O.; Graves, N.J.; Oster, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    This document has been prepared to satisfy the need for a detailed, up-to-date description of a computer code that can be used to simulate phenomena on an atomistic level. COMENT was written in FORTRAN IV and COMPASS (CDC assembly language) to solve the classical equations of motion for a large number of atoms interacting according to a given force law, and to perform the desired ancillary analysis of the resulting data. COMENT is a dual-purpose intended to describe static defect configurations as well as the detailed motion of atoms in a crystal lattice. It can be used to simulate the effect of temperature, impurities, and pre-existing defects on radiation-induced defect production mechanisms, defect migration, and defect stability

  6. Computer code for the atomistic simulation of lattice defects and dynamics. [COMENT code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffgens, J.O.; Graves, N.J.; Oster, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    This document has been prepared to satisfy the need for a detailed, up-to-date description of a computer code that can be used to simulate phenomena on an atomistic level. COMENT was written in FORTRAN IV and COMPASS (CDC assembly language) to solve the classical equations of motion for a large number of atoms interacting according to a given force law, and to perform the desired ancillary analysis of the resulting data. COMENT is a dual-purpose intended to describe static defect configurations as well as the detailed motion of atoms in a crystal lattice. It can be used to simulate the effect of temperature, impurities, and pre-existing defects on radiation-induced defect production mechanisms, defect migration, and defect stability.

  7. Rahman Prize Lecture: Lattice Boltzmann simulation of complex states of flowing matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succi, Sauro

    Over the last three decades, the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method has gained a prominent role in the numerical simulation of complex flows across an impressively broad range of scales, from fully-developed turbulence in real-life geometries, to multiphase flows in micro-fluidic devices, all the way down to biopolymer translocation in nanopores and lately, even quark-gluon plasmas. After a brief introduction to the main ideas behind the LB method and its historical developments, we shall present a few selected applications to complex flow problems at various scales of motion. Finally, we shall discuss prospects for extreme-scale LB simulations of outstanding problems in the physics of fluids and its interfaces with material sciences and biology, such as the modelling of fluid turbulence, the optimal design of nanoporous gold catalysts and protein folding/aggregation in crowded environments.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of behaviour of particles moving in blood vessels under the rolling massage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou-Hui, Yi; Cai-Feng, Wang; Xiao-Feng, Yang; Hua-Bing, Li

    2009-01-01

    The rolling massage is one of the most important manipulations in Chinese massage, which is expected to eliminate many diseases. Here, the effect of the rolling massage on a pair of particles moving in blood vessels under rolling massage manipulation is studied by the lattice Boltzmann simulation. The simulated results show that the motion of each particle is considerably modified by the rolling massage, and it depends on the relative rolling velocity, the rolling depth, and the distance between particle position and rolling position. Both particles' translational average velocities increase almost linearly as the rolling velocity increases, and obey the same law. The increment of the average relative angular velocity for the leading particle is smaller than that of the trailing one. The result is helpful for understanding the mechanism of the massage and to further develop the rolling techniques. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  9. Nuclear fuel cycle simulation system (VISTA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-02-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Simulation System (VISTA) is a simulation system which estimates long term nuclear fuel cycle material and service requirements as well as the material arising from the operation of nuclear fuel cycle facilities and nuclear power reactors. The VISTA model needs isotopic composition of spent nuclear fuel in order to make estimations of the material arisings from the nuclear reactor operation. For this purpose, in accordance with the requirements of the VISTA code, a new module called Calculating Actinide Inventory (CAIN) was developed. CAIN is a simple fuel depletion model which requires a small number of input parameters and gives results in a very short time. VISTA has been used internally by the IAEA for the estimation of: spent fuel discharge from the reactors worldwide, Pu accumulation in the discharged spent fuel, minor actinides (MA) accumulation in the spent fuel, and in the high level waste (HLW) since its development. The IAEA decided to disseminate the VISTA tool to Member States using internet capabilities in 2003. The improvement and expansion of the simulation code and the development of the internet version was started in 2004. A website was developed to introduce the simulation system to the visitors providing a simple nuclear material flow calculation tool. This website has been made available to Member States in 2005. The development work for the full internet version is expected to be fully available to the interested parties from IAEA Member States in 2007 on its website. This publication is the accompanying text which gives details of the modelling and an example scenario

  10. Color-gradient lattice Boltzmann model for simulating droplet motion with contact-angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Yan; Liu, Haihu; Sun, Jinju; Zheng, Rongye

    2013-10-01

    Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is an effective tool for simulating the contact-line motion due to the nature of its microscopic dynamics. In contact-line motion, contact-angle hysteresis is an inherent phenomenon, but it is neglected in most existing color-gradient based LBMs. In this paper, a color-gradient based multiphase LBM is developed to simulate the contact-line motion, particularly with the hysteresis of contact angle involved. In this model, the perturbation operator based on the continuum surface force concept is introduced to model the interfacial tension, and the recoloring operator proposed by Latva-Kokko and Rothman is used to produce phase segregation and resolve the lattice pinning problem. At the solid surface, the color-conserving wetting boundary condition [Hollis et al., IMA J. Appl. Math. 76, 726 (2011)] is applied to improve the accuracy of simulations and suppress spurious currents at the contact line. In particular, we present a numerical algorithm to allow for the effect of the contact-angle hysteresis, in which an iterative procedure is used to determine the dynamic contact angle. Numerical simulations are conducted to verify the developed model, including the droplet partial wetting process and droplet dynamical behavior in a simple shear flow. The obtained results are compared with theoretical solutions and experimental data, indicating that the model is able to predict the equilibrium droplet shape as well as the dynamic process of partial wetting and thus permits accurate prediction of contact-line motion with the consideration of contact-angle hysteresis.

  11. Large eddy simulation of rotating turbulent flows and heat transfer by the lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Tong-Miin; Wang, Chun-Sheng

    2018-01-01

    Due to its advantage in parallel efficiency and wall treatment over conventional Navier-Stokes equation-based methods, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has emerged as an efficient tool in simulating turbulent heat and fluid flows. To properly simulate the rotating turbulent flow and heat transfer, which plays a pivotal role in tremendous engineering devices such as gas turbines, wind turbines, centrifugal compressors, and rotary machines, the lattice Boltzmann equations must be reformulated in a rotating coordinate. In this study, a single-rotating reference frame (SRF) formulation of the Boltzmann equations is newly proposed combined with a subgrid scale model for the large eddy simulation of rotating turbulent flows and heat transfer. The subgrid scale closure is modeled by a shear-improved Smagorinsky model. Since the strain rates are also locally determined by the non-equilibrium part of the distribution function, the calculation process is entirely local. The pressure-driven turbulent channel flow with spanwise rotation and heat transfer is used for validating the approach. The Reynolds number characterized by the friction velocity and channel half height is fixed at 194, whereas the rotation number in terms of the friction velocity and channel height ranges from 0 to 3.0. A working fluid of air is chosen, which corresponds to a Prandtl number of 0.71. Calculated results are demonstrated in terms of mean velocity, Reynolds stress, root mean square (RMS) velocity fluctuations, mean temperature, RMS temperature fluctuations, and turbulent heat flux. Good agreement is found between the present LBM predictions and previous direct numerical simulation data obtained by solving the conventional Navier-Stokes equations, which confirms the capability of the proposed SRF LBM and subgrid scale relaxation time formulation for the computation of rotating turbulent flows and heat transfer.

  12. Computational modeling of the behavior of nuclear materials (2). Molecular simulations for nuclear materials. Current situation and future perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okita, Taira; Itakura, Mitsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Molecular simulations for nuclear materials aim to reproduce atomistic-scale phenomena induced by irradiation and infer the change in material properties. In the present work, recent progress in this field is presented. In particular, the following three topics are explained: (1) Quantification of lattice defects formation process induced by fast neutron collision. (2) Identification of dislocation-channeling mechanism induced by interactions between defect clusters and dislocations. (3) Modeling of the three dimensional movement of defect clusters using molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. (author)

  13. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emrich, William J. Jr.

    2008-01-01

    To support a potential future development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components could be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts

  14. Nuclear characteristic simulation device for reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Akio; Kobayashi, Yuji.

    1994-01-01

    In a simulation device for nuclear characteristic of a PWR type reactor, there are provided a one-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic model for simulating one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core and average reactor power based on each of inputted signals of control rod pattern, a reactor core flow rate, reactor core pressure and reactor core inlet enthalphy, and a three-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic mode for simulating three-dimensional power distribution of the reactor core, and a nuclear instrumentation model for calculating read value of the nuclear instrumentation disposed in the reactor based on the average reactor core power and the reactor core three-dimensional power distribution. A one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core, a reactor core average power, a reactor core three-dimensional power distribution and a nuclear instrumentation read value are calculated. As a result, the three-dimensional power distribution and the power level are continuously calculated. Further, since the transient change of the three-dimensional neutron flux distribution is calculated accurately on real time, more actual response relative to a power monitoring device of the reactor core and operation performance can be simulated. (N.H.)

  15. Corrosion of simulated nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Ristic, M.; Gotic, M.; Foric, J.

    1988-01-01

    In this study the preparation and characterization of borosilicate glasses of different chemical composition were investigated. Borosilicate glasses were doped with simulated nuclear waste oxides. The chemical corrosion in water of these glasses was followed by measuring the leach rates as a function of time. It was found that a simulated nuclear waste glass with the chemical composition (weight %), 15.61% Na 2 O, 10.39% B 2 O 3 , 45.31% SiO 2 , 13.42% ZnO, 6.61% TiO 2 and 8.66% waste oxides, is characterized by low melting temperature and with good corrosion resistance in water. Influence of passive layers on the leaching behaviour of nuclear waste glasses is discussed. (author) 20 refs.; 7 figs.; 4 tabs

  16. Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power Plants (DSNP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saphier, D.

    1976-01-01

    A new simulation language DSNP (Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power Plants) is being developed. It is a simple block oriented simulation language with an extensive library of component and auxiliary modules. Each module is a self-contained unit of a part of a physical component to be found in nuclear power plants. Each module will be available in four levels of sophistication, the fourth being a user supplied model. A module can be included in the simulation by a single statement. The precompiler translates DSNP statements into FORTRAN statements, takes care of the module parameters and the intermodular communication blocks, prepares proper data files and I/0 statements and searches the various libraries for the appropriate component modules. The documentation is computerized and all the necessary information for a particular module can be retrieved by a special document generator. The DSNP will be a flexible tool which will allow dynamic simulations to be performed on a large variety of nuclear power plants or specific components of these plants

  17. CANDU 9 nuclear power plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kattan, M.; MacBeth, M.J.; Lam, K.

    1995-01-01

    Simulators are playing, an important role in the design and operations of CANDU reactors. They are used to analyze operating procedures under standard and upset conditions. The CANDU 9 nuclear power plant simulator is a low fidelity, near full scope capability simulator. It is designed to play an integral part in the design and verification of the control centre mock-up located in the AECL design office. It will also provide CANDU plant process dynamic data to the plant display system (PDS), distributed control system (DCS) and to the mock-up panel devices. The simulator model employs dynamic mathematical models of the various process and control components that make up a nuclear power plant. It provides the flexibility to add, remove or update user supplied component models. A block oriented process input is provided with the simulator. Individual blocks which represent independent algorithms of the model are linked together to generate the required overall plant model. As a design tool the simulator will be used for control strategy development, human factors studies (information access, readability, graphical display design, operability), analysis of overall plant control performance, tuning estimates for major control loops and commissioning strategy development. As a design evaluation tool, the simulator will be used to perform routine and non-routine procedures, practice 'what if' scenarios for operational strategy development, practice malfunction recovery procedures and verify human factors activities. This paper will describe the CANDU 9 plant simulator and demonstrate its implementation and proposed utility as a tool in the control system and control centre design of a CANDU 9 nuclear power plant. (author). 2 figs

  18. A new lattice Boltzmann equation to simulate density-driven convection of carbon dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    The storage of CO2 in fluid-filled geological formations has been carried out for more than a decade in locations around the world. After CO2 has been injected into the aquifer and has moved laterally under the aquifer\\'s cap-rock, density-driven convection becomes an important transport process to model. However, the challenge lies in simulating this transport process accurately with high spatial resolution and low CPU cost. This issue can be addressed by using the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) to formulate a model for a similar scenario when a solute diffuses into a fluid and density differences lead to convective mixing. The LBE is a promising alternative to the traditional methods of computational fluid dynamics. Rather than discretizing the system of partial differential equations of classical continuum mechanics directly, the LBE is derived from a velocity-space truncation of the Boltzmann equation of classical kinetic theory. We propose an extension to the LBE, which can accurately predict the transport of dissolved CO2 in water, as a step towards fluid-filled porous media simulations. This is achieved by coupling two LBEs, one for the fluid flow and one for the convection and diffusion of CO2. Unlike existing lattice Boltzmann equations for porous media flow, our model is derived from a system of moment equations and a Crank-Nicolson discretization of the velocity-truncated Boltzmann equation. The forcing terms are updated locally without the need for additional central difference approximation. Therefore our model preserves all the computational advantages of the single-phase lattice Boltzmann equation and is formally second-order accurate in both space and time. Our new model also features a novel implementation of boundary conditions, which is simple to implement and does not suffer from the grid-dependent error that is present in the standard "bounce-back" condition. The significance of using the LBE in this work lies in the ability to efficiently

  19. Numerical simulation of the flow field in pump intakes by means of Lattice Boltzmann methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, A; Conrad, D; Böhle, M

    2013-01-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Methods are nowadays popular schemes for solving fluid flow problems of engineering interest. This popularity is due to the advantages of these schemes: For example, the meshing of the fluid domain can be performed fully automatically which results in great simplicity in handling complex geometries. In this paper a numerical scheme for the flow simulation in pump intakes based on a Lattice Boltzmann large eddy approach is presented. The ability of this scheme to capture the flow phenomena of the intake flow at different operating conditions is analysed. For the operational reliability and efficiency of pumps and pump systems, the incoming flow conditions are crucial. Since the efficiency and reliability requirements of pumps are rising and must be guaranteed, the flow conditions in pump intakes have to be evaluated during plant planning. Recent trends show that pump intakes are built more and more compact, which makes the flow in the intake even more complex. Numerical methods are a promising technique for conduction flow analysis in pump intakes, because they can be realised rapidly and cheaply

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of the three-state vector Potts model on a three-dimensional random lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jianbo Zhang; Heping Ying

    1991-09-01

    We have performed a numerical simulation of the three-state vector Potts model on a three-dimensional random lattice. The averages of energy density, magnetization, specific heat and susceptibility of the system in the N 3 (N=8,10,12) lattices were calculated. The results show that a first order nature of the Z(3) symmetry breaking transition appears, as characterized by a thermal hysterisis in the energy density as well as an abrupt drop of magnetization being sharper and discontinuous with increasing of volume in the cross-over region. The results obtained on the random lattice were consistent with those obtained on the three-dimensional cubic lattice. (author). 12 refs, 4 figs

  1. Simulation of regimes of convection and plume dynamics by the thermal Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Peter; Yuen, David A.

    2018-02-01

    We present 2D simulations using the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) of a fluid in a rectangular box being heated from below, and cooled from above. We observe plumes, hot narrow upwellings from the base, and down-going cold chutes from the top. We have varied both the Rayleigh numbers and the Prandtl numbers respectively from Ra = 1000 to Ra =1010 , and Pr = 1 through Pr = 5 ×104 , leading to Rayleigh-Bénard convection cells at low Rayleigh numbers through to vigorous convection and unstable plumes with pronounced vortices and eddies at high Rayleigh numbers. We conduct simulations with high Prandtl numbers up to Pr = 50, 000 to simulate in the inertial regime. We find for cases when Pr ⩾ 100 that we obtain a series of narrow plumes of upwelling fluid with mushroom heads and chutes of downwelling fluid. We also present simulations at a Prandtl number of 0.7 for Rayleigh numbers varying from Ra =104 through Ra =107.5 . We demonstrate that the Nusselt number follows power law scaling of form Nu ∼Raγ where γ = 0.279 ± 0.002 , which is consistent with published results of γ = 0.281 in the literature. These results show that the LBM is capable of reproducing results obtained with classical macroscopic methods such as spectral methods, and demonstrate the great potential of the LBM for studying thermal convection and plume dynamics relevant to geodynamics.

  2. Numerical simulation of bubble growth and departure during flow boiling period by lattice Boltzmann method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Tao; Li, Weizhong; Yang, Shuai

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The bubble departure diameter is proportional to g −0.425 in quiescent fluid. • The bubble release frequency is proportional to g 0.678 in quiescent fluid. • The simulation result supports the transient micro-convection model. • The bubble departure diameter has exponential relation with inlet velocity. • The bubble release frequency has linear relation with inlet velocity. -- Abstract: Nucleate boiling flows on a horizontal plate are studied in this paper by a hybrid lattice Boltzmann method, where both quiescent and slowly flowing ambient are concerned. The process of a single bubble growth on and departure from the superheated wall is simulated. The simulation result supports the transient micro-convection model. The bubble departure diameter and the release frequency are investigated from the simulation result. It is found that the bubble departure diameter and the release frequency are proportional to g −0.425 and g 0.678 in quiescent fluid, respectively, where g is the gravitational acceleration. Nucleate boiling in slowly flowing ambient is also calculated in consideration of forced convection. It is presented that the bubble departure diameter and the release frequency have exponential relationship and linear relationship with inlet velocity in slowly flowing fluid, respectively

  3. Neutronic calculations of hexagonal lattice nuclear reactors: Modelling of the CAREM-25 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacio, Julio Cesar

    2008-01-01

    This work was carried out in the frame of the Cnea CAREM-25 project (Central Argentina de Elementos Modulares).This project involves the development and construction of an argentinian design nuclear reactor for producing electricity. It's a PWR type (light water moderated and enriched U02 fueled) integrated reactor in an hexagonal lattice.The total power of this prototype is 100 MW thermal. In this frame, the main objective of this work is to consolidate and validate a neutronic line of calculus which can be applied to the CAREM-25 core.At a first analysis at cell level, the different fuel elements were modeled with the Dragon code, obtaining homogenised and condensed cross sections.Then a core level analysis with the Puma code was performed at full power condition and room temperature. A comparison of the obtained results is needed.For this reason, a Monte Carlo analysis (at room temperature) was performed.Also a validation of the Dragon code was carried out on the base of experimental data of WWER type lattices (similars to CAREM).The confidence on the results is then granted and their uncertainties were quantified.The Dragon-Puma line of calculus is then established and the main objective of this work is achieved. A full neutronic analysis should be followed by thermohydraulics calculations in an iterative procedure, and it would be the objective of future works.Finally, a burnup analysis was performed, at cell and core level.The design condition for extraction burnup and fuel cycle duration were verified. [es

  4. Nuclear Power Reactor simulator - based training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, S.A.S.

    2009-01-01

    nuclear power stations will continue playing a major role as an energy source for electric generation and heat production in the world. in this paper, a nuclear power reactor simulator- based training program will be presented . this program is designed to aid in training of the reactor operators about the principles of operation of the plant. also it could help the researchers and the designers to analyze and to estimate the performance of the nuclear reactors and facilitate further studies for selection of the proper controller and its optimization process as it is difficult and time consuming to do all experiments in the real nuclear environment.this program is written in MATLAB code as MATLAB software provides sophisticated tools comparable to those in other software such as visual basic for the creation of graphical user interface (GUI). moreover MATLAB is available for all major operating systems. the used SIMULINK reactor model for the nuclear reactor can be used to model different types by adopting appropriate parameters. the model of each component of the reactor is based on physical laws rather than the use of look up tables or curve fitting.this simulation based training program will improve acquisition and retention knowledge also trainee will learn faster and will have better attitude

  5. Operator training simulator for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozuka, Hiromi

    1977-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, training of the operators is important. In Japan, presently there are two training centers, one is BWR operation training center at Okuma-cho, Fukushima Prefecture, and another the nuclear power generation training center in Tsuruga City, Fukui Prefecture, where the operators of PWR nuclear power plants are trained. This report describes the BWR operation training center briefly. Operation of a nuclear power plant is divided into three stages of start-up, steady state operation, and shut down. Start-up is divided into the cold-state start-up after the shut down for prolonged period due to periodical inspection or others and the hot-state start-up from stand-by condition after the shut down for a short time. In the cold-state start-up, the correction of reactivity change and the heating-up control to avoid excessive thermal stress to the primary system components are important. The BWR operation training center offers the next three courses, namely beginner's course, retraining course and specific training course. The training period is 12 weeks and the number of trainees is eight/course in the beginner's course. The simulator was manufactured by modeling No. 3 plant of Fukushima First Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co. The simulator is composed of the mimic central control panel and the digital computer. The software system comprises the monitor to supervise the whole program execution, the logic model simulating the plant interlock system and the dynamic model simulating the plant physical phenomena. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Nuclear plant simulation using the Nuclear Plant Analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beelman, R.J.; Laats, E.T.; Wagner, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA), a state-of-the-art computerized safety analysis and engineering tool, was employed to simulate nuclear plant response to an abnormal transient during a training exercise at the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) in Washington, DC. Information relative to plant status was taken from a computer animated color graphics display depicting the course of the transient and was transmitted to the NRC Operations Center in a manner identical to that employed during an actual event. Recommendations from the Operations Center were implemented during on-line, interactive execution of the RELAP5 reactor systems code through the NPA allowing a degree of flexibility in training exercises not realized previously. When the debriefing was conducted, the RELAP5 calculations were replayed by way of the color graphics display, adding a new dimension to the debriefing and greatly enhancing the critique of the exercise

  7. Control panel handling of a nuclear simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Polo, F.; Jimenez Fraustro, L.A.; Banuelos Galindo, A.; Diamant Rubinstein, A.

    1985-01-01

    The handling of the control panels for a Nuclear Simulator for operating training is described. The control panels are handled by a set of intelligent controllers, each with at least two processors (8035 - Communications Controller and a 8085 - Master processor). The Controllers are connected to the main computers (Two dual processor Gould concept 32/6780 and a single processor Gould concept 32/6705) via serial asynchronous channels in a multidrop, star-like architecture. The controllers transmit to the main computers only the changes detected and receive the whole set of output variables as computed by the mathematical models of the Nuclear Plant

  8. Simulation of Thermomagnetic Convection in a Cavity Using the Lattice Boltzmann Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshid Hadavand

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermomagnetic convection in a differentially heated square cavity with an infinitely long third dimension is numerically simulated using the single relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method (LBM. This problem is of considerable interest when dealing with cooling of microelectronic devices, in situations where natural convection does not meet the cooling requirements, and forced convection is not viable due to the difficulties associated with pumping a ferrofluid. Therefore, circulation is achieved by imposing a magnetic field, which is created and controlled by placing a dipole at the bottom of the enclosure. The magnitude of the magnetic force is controlled by changing the electrical current through the dipole. In this study, the effects of combined natural convection and magnetic convection, which is commonly known as “thermomagnetic convection,” are analysed in terms of the flow modes and heat transfer characteristics of a magnetic fluid.

  9. Computer simulation of the interaction between an extended dislocation and radiation defects in the fcc lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, E.; Nakamura, Y.; Tsutsumi, T.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction between an extended dislocation and a radiation-induced defect, especially, a self-interstitial atom (SIA), has been investigated in the model fcc lattice by computer simulation technique. An SIA was absorbed into the core of one of the two partial dislocations of the extended screw dislocation as a crowdion which extends along the dislocation line. Under the applied shear stress this crowdion acted as a pinning point, resulting in irradiation hardening. On the other hand, an SIA was absorbed at the jog site of the extended edge dislocation (at one of the two jog sites on two partial dislocations) and after some relaxation the total jog was shifted to one atomic distance through the spreading out of the strain due to an SIA from one partial side to the other side. (orig.)

  10. A dynamic mesh refinement technique for Lattice Boltzmann simulations on octree-like grids

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp

    2012-04-27

    In this contribution, we present our new adaptive Lattice Boltzmann implementation within the Peano framework, with special focus on nanoscale particle transport problems. With the continuum hypothesis not holding anymore on these small scales, new physical effects - such as Brownian fluctuations - need to be incorporated. We explain the overall layout of the application, including memory layout and access, and shortly review the adaptive algorithm. The scheme is validated by different benchmark computations in two and three dimensions. An extension to dynamically changing grids and a spatially adaptive approach to fluctuating hydrodynamics, allowing for the thermalisation of the fluid in particular regions of interest, is proposed. Both dynamic adaptivity and adaptive fluctuating hydrodynamics are validated separately in simulations of particle transport problems. The application of this scheme to an oscillating particle in a nanopore illustrates the importance of Brownian fluctuations in such setups. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Spin-lattice dynamics simulation of external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Chui

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of field-induced magnetization in ferromagnetic materials has been an active topic in the last dozen years, yet a dynamic treatment of distance-dependent exchange integral has been lacking. In view of that, we employ spin-lattice dynamics (SLD simulations to study the external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron. Our results show that an external field can increase the inflection point of the temperature. Also the model provides a better description of the effect of spin correlation in response to an external field than the mean-field theory. An external field has a more prominent effect on the long range magnetic order than on the short range counterpart. Furthermore, an external field allows the magnon dispersion curves and the uniform precession modes to exhibit magnetic order variation from their temperature dependence.

  12. Simulating Engineering Flows through Complex Porous Media via the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesselin Krassimirov Krastev

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, recent achievements in the application of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM to complex fluid flows are reported. More specifically, we focus on flows through reactive porous media, such as the flow through the substrate of a selective catalytic reactor (SCR for the reduction of gaseous pollutants in the automotive field; pulsed-flow analysis through heterogeneous catalyst architectures; and transport and electro-chemical phenomena in microbial fuel cells (MFC for novel waste-to-energy applications. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first known application of LBM modeling to the study of MFCs, which represents by itself a highly innovative and challenging research area. The results discussed here essentially confirm the capabilities of the LBM approach as a flexible and accurate computational tool for the simulation of complex multi-physics phenomena of scientific and technological interest, across physical scales.

  13. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for immiscible two-phase flow simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haihu; Valocchi, Albert J; Kang, Qinjun

    2012-04-01

    We present an improved three-dimensional 19-velocity lattice Boltzmann model for immisicible binary fluids with variable viscosity and density ratios. This model uses a perturbation step to generate the interfacial tension and a recoloring step to promote phase segregation and maintain surfaces. A generalized perturbation operator is derived using the concept of a continuum surface force together with the constraints of mass and momentum conservation. A theoretical expression for the interfacial tension is determined directly without any additional analysis and assumptions. The recoloring algorithm proposed by Latva-Kokko and Rothman is applied for phase segregation, which minimizes the spurious velocities and removes lattice pinning. This model is first validated against the Laplace law for a stationary bubble. It is found that the interfacial tension is predicted well for density ratios up to 1000. The model is then used to simulate droplet deformation and breakup in simple shear flow. We compute droplet deformation at small capillary numbers in the Stokes regime and find excellent agreement with the theoretical Taylor relation for the segregation parameter β=0.7. In the limit of creeping flow, droplet breakup occurs at a critical capillary number 0.35simulations and experiments. Droplet breakup can also be promoted by increasing the Reynolds number. Finally, we numerically investigate a single bubble rising under buoyancy force in viscous fluids for a wide range of Eötvös and Morton numbers. Numerical results are compared with theoretical predictions and experimental results, and satisfactory agreement is shown.

  14. An Evaluation of Criticality Margin by an Application of Parallelogram Lattice Arrangement in the Nuclear Fuel Storage Rack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Song Hyun; Kim, Hong Chul; Shin, Chang Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung; Kim, Kyo Youn

    2010-01-01

    The criticality evaluation in the nuclear fuel storage rack is essentially required for the prevention of the criticality accident. The square lattice structure of the storage rack is commonly used because it has a simple structure for the storage of the numerous fuel assemblies as well as the good mechanical strength. For the design of the fuel storage rack, the boron plate is commonly used for the criticality reduction. In this study, an arrangement method with the parallelogram lattice structure is proposed for the reduction of the boron concentration or the rack pitch. The criticality margins by the application of the parallelogram lattice were evaluated with MCNP5 code. From the result, the reduction of the boron concentrated in the borated-Al plate was evaluated

  15. Simulation of Thermal Flow Problems via a Hybrid Immersed Boundary-Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM is presented in this work to simulate the thermal flow problems. In current approach, the flow field is resolved by using our recently developed boundary condition-enforced IB-LBM (Wu and Shu, (2009. The nonslip boundary condition on the solid boundary is enforced in simulation. At the same time, to capture the temperature development, the conventional energy equation is resolved. To model the effect of immersed boundary on temperature field, the heat source term is introduced. Different from previous studies, the heat source term is set as unknown rather than predetermined. Inspired by the idea in (Wu and Shu, (2009, the unknown is calculated in such a way that the temperature at the boundary interpolated from the corrected temperature field accurately satisfies the thermal boundary condition. In addition, based on the resolved temperature correction, an efficient way to compute the local and average Nusselt numbers is also proposed in this work. As compared with traditional implementation, no approximation for temperature gradients is required. To validate the present method, the numerical simulations of forced convection are carried out. The obtained results show good agreement with data in the literature.

  16. Improved thermal lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of liquid-vapor phase change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Zhou, P.; Yan, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, an improved thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is proposed for simulating liquid-vapor phase change, which is aimed at improving an existing thermal LB model for liquid-vapor phase change [S. Gong and P. Cheng, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 55, 4923 (2012), 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2012.04.037]. First, we emphasize that the replacement of ∇ .(λ ∇ T ) /∇.(λ ∇ T ) ρ cV ρ cV with ∇ .(χ ∇ T ) is an inappropriate treatment for diffuse interface modeling of liquid-vapor phase change. Furthermore, the error terms ∂t 0(T v ) +∇ .(T vv ) , which exist in the macroscopic temperature equation recovered from the previous model, are eliminated in the present model through a way that is consistent with the philosophy of the LB method. Moreover, the discrete effect of the source term is also eliminated in the present model. Numerical simulations are performed for droplet evaporation and bubble nucleation to validate the capability of the model for simulating liquid-vapor phase change. It is shown that the numerical results of the improved model agree well with those of a finite-difference scheme. Meanwhile, it is found that the replacement of ∇ .(λ ∇ T ) /∇ .(λ ∇ T ) ρ cV ρ cV with ∇ .(χ ∇ T ) leads to significant numerical errors and the error terms in the recovered macroscopic temperature equation also result in considerable errors.

  17. Numerical simulation of a lattice polymer model at its integrable point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedini, A; Owczarek, A L; Prellberg, T

    2013-01-01

    We revisit an integrable lattice model of polymer collapse using numerical simulations. This model was first studied by Blöte and Nienhuis (1989 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 22 1415) and it describes polymers with some attraction, providing thus a model for the polymer collapse transition. At a particular set of Boltzmann weights the model is integrable and the exponents ν = 12/23 ≈ 0.522 and γ = 53/46 ≈ 1.152 have been computed via identification of the scaling dimensions x t = 1/12 and x h = −5/48. We directly investigate the polymer scaling exponents via Monte Carlo simulations using the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method algorithm. By simulating this polymer model for walks up to length 4096 we find ν = 0.576(6) and γ = 1.045(5), which are clearly different from the predicted values. Our estimate for the exponent ν is compatible with the known θ-point value of 4/7 and in agreement with very recent numerical evaluation by Foster and Pinettes (2012 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45 505003). (paper)

  18. Nuclear engine system simulation (NESS) program update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheil, C.M.; Pelaccio, D.G.; Petrosky, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    The second phase of development of a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) engine system design analysis code has been completed. The standalone, versatile Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS) code provides an accurate, detailed assessment of engine system operating performance, weight, and sizes. The critical information is required to support ongoing and future engine system and stage design study efforts. This recent development effort included incorporation of an updated solid-core nuclear thermal reactor model that yields a reduced core weight and higher fuel power density when compared to a NERVA type reactor. NESS can now analyze expander, gas generator, and bleed cycles, along with multi-redundant propellant pump feed systems. Performance and weight of efficient multi-stage axial turbopump can now be determined, in addition to the traditional centrifugal pump

  19. Simulation of sound waves using the Lattice Boltzmann Method for fluid flow: Benchmark cases for outdoor sound propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.; Lohman, W.J.A.; Zhou, H.

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of sound waves in air can be considered as a special case of fluid dynamics. Consequently, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow can be used for simulating sound propagation. In this article application of the LBM to sound propagation is illustrated for various cases:

  20. Large-scale grid-enabled lattice-Boltzmann simulations of complex fluid flow in porous media and under shear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harting, J.D.R.; Venturoli, M.; Coveney, P.V.

    2004-01-01

    Well–designed lattice Boltzmann codes exploit the essentially embarrassingly parallel features of the algorithm and so can be run with considerable efficiency on modern supercomputers. Such scalable codes permit us to simulate the behaviour of increasingly large quantities of complex condensed

  1. Shape of the nuclear magnetic resonance line in anisotropic superconductors with an irregular vortex lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkin, A.V.; Tsarevskij, S.L.

    2006-01-01

    For high-temperature superconductors the shape of a NMR spectrum line is built regarding for variation of inhomogeneity of irregular vortex lattice magnetic field near superconductor surface. It is shown that the shape of a NMR line is not simply widened but noticeably varies depending on the degree of irregularity of a superconductor vortex lattice. This variation is associated with a local symmetry decrease in an irregular vortex lattice of the superconductor. Taking into account these circumstances may considerably change conclusions about the type of a vortex lattice and superconductor parameters which are commonly gained from NMR line shape analysis [ru

  2. Lattice Boltzmann flow simulations with applications of reduced order modeling techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Brown, Donald

    2014-01-01

    With the recent interest in shale gas, an understanding of the flow mechanisms at the pore scale and beyond is necessary, which has attracted a lot of interest from both industry and academia. One of the suggested algorithms to help understand flow in such reservoirs is the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). The primary advantage of LBM is its ability to approximate complicated geometries with simple algorithmic modificatoins. In this work, we use LBM to simulate the flow in a porous medium. More specifically, we use LBM to simulate a Brinkman type flow. The Brinkman law allows us to integrate fast free-flow and slow-flow porous regions. However, due to the many scales involved and complex heterogeneities of the rock microstructure, the simulation times can be long, even with the speed advantage of using an explicit time stepping method. The problem is two-fold, the computational grid must be able to resolve all scales and the calculation requires a steady state solution implying a large number of timesteps. To help reduce the computational complexity and total simulation times, we use model reduction techniques to reduce the dimension of the system. In this approach, we are able to describe the dynamics of the flow by using a lower dimensional subspace. In this work, we utilize the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) technique, to compute the dominant modes of the flow and project the solution onto them (a lower dimensional subspace) to arrive at an approximation of the full system at a lowered computational cost. We present a few proof-of-concept examples of the flow field and the corresponding reduced model flow field.

  3. Simulations of Bingham plastic flows with the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, SongGui; Sun, QiCheng; Jin, Feng; Liu, JianGuo

    2014-03-01

    Fresh cement mortar is a type of workable paste, which can be well approximated as a Bingham plastic and whose flow behavior is of major concern in engineering. In this paper, Papanastasiou's model for Bingham fluids is solved by using the multiplerelaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model (MRT-LB). Analysis of the stress growth exponent m in Bingham fluid flow simulations shows that Papanastasiou's model provides a good approximation of realistic Bingham plastics for values of m > 108. For lower values of m, Papanastasiou's model is valid for fluids between Bingham and Newtonian fluids. The MRT-LB model is validated by two benchmark problems: 2D steady Poiseuille flows and lid-driven cavity flows. Comparing the numerical results of the velocity distributions with corresponding analytical solutions shows that the MRT-LB model is appropriate for studying Bingham fluids while also providing better numerical stability. We further apply the MRT-LB model to simulate flow through a sudden expansion channel and the flow surrounding a round particle. Besides the rich flow structures obtained in this work, the dynamics fluid force on the round particle is calculated. Results show that both the Reynolds number Re and the Bingham number Bn affect the drag coefficients C D , and a drag coefficient with Re and Bn being taken into account is proposed. The relationship of Bn and the ratio of unyielded zone thickness to particle diameter is also analyzed. Finally, the Bingham fluid flowing around a set of randomly dispersed particles is simulated to obtain the apparent viscosity and velocity fields. These results help simulation of fresh concrete flowing in porous media.

  4. LBM-EP: Lattice-Boltzmann method for fast cardiac electrophysiology simulation from 3D images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaka, S; Mansi, T; Georgescu, B; Pop, M; Wright, G A; Kamen, A; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    Current treatments of heart rhythm troubles require careful planning and guidance for optimal outcomes. Computational models of cardiac electrophysiology are being proposed for therapy planning but current approaches are either too simplified or too computationally intensive for patient-specific simulations in clinical practice. This paper presents a novel approach, LBM-EP, to solve any type of mono-domain cardiac electrophysiology models at near real-time that is especially tailored for patient-specific simulations. The domain is discretized on a Cartesian grid with a level-set representation of patient's heart geometry, previously estimated from images automatically. The cell model is calculated node-wise, while the transmembrane potential is diffused using Lattice-Boltzmann method within the domain defined by the level-set. Experiments on synthetic cases, on a data set from CESC'10 and on one patient with myocardium scar showed that LBM-EP provides results comparable to an FEM implementation, while being 10 - 45 times faster. Fast, accurate, scalable and requiring no specific meshing, LBM-EP paves the way to efficient and detailed models of cardiac electrophysiology for therapy planning.

  5. KMCLib: A general framework for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leetmaa, Mikael; Skorodumova, Natalia V.

    2014-09-01

    KMCLib is a general framework for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations. The program can handle simulations of the diffusion and reaction of millions of particles in one, two, or three dimensions, and is designed to be easily extended and customized by the user to allow for the development of complex custom KMC models for specific systems without having to modify the core functionality of the program. Analysis modules and on-the-fly elementary step diffusion rate calculations can be implemented as plugins following a well-defined API. The plugin modules are loosely coupled to the core KMCLib program via the Python scripting language. KMCLib is written as a Python module with a backend C++ library. After initial compilation of the backend library KMCLib is used as a Python module; input to the program is given as a Python script executed using a standard Python interpreter. We give a detailed description of the features and implementation of the code and demonstrate its scaling behavior and parallel performance with a simple one-dimensional A-B-C lattice KMC model and a more complex three-dimensional lattice KMC model of oxygen-vacancy diffusion in a fluorite structured metal oxide. KMCLib can keep track of individual particle movements and includes tools for mean square displacement analysis, and is therefore particularly well suited for studying diffusion processes at surfaces and in solids. Catalogue identifier: AESZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AESZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 49 064 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 575 172 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python and C++. Computer: Any computer that can run a C++ compiler and a Python interpreter. Operating system: Tested on Ubuntu 12

  6. High Performance Computation of a Jet in Crossflow by Lattice Boltzmann Based Parallel Direct Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Lei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulation (DNS of a round jet in crossflow based on lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is carried out on multi-GPU cluster. Data parallel SIMT (single instruction multiple thread characteristic of GPU matches the parallelism of LBM well, which leads to the high efficiency of GPU on the LBM solver. With present GPU settings (6 Nvidia Tesla K20M, the present DNS simulation can be completed in several hours. A grid system of 1.5 × 108 is adopted and largest jet Reynolds number reaches 3000. The jet-to-free-stream velocity ratio is set as 3.3. The jet is orthogonal to the mainstream flow direction. The validated code shows good agreement with experiments. Vortical structures of CRVP, shear-layer vortices and horseshoe vortices, are presented and analyzed based on velocity fields and vorticity distributions. Turbulent statistical quantities of Reynolds stress are also displayed. Coherent structures are revealed in a very fine resolution based on the second invariant of the velocity gradients.

  7. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of droplet formation in confined channels with thermocapillary flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Sbragaglia, M.; Belardinelli, D.; Sugiyama, K.

    2016-12-01

    Based on mesoscale lattice Boltzmann simulations with the "Shan-Chen" model, we explore the influence of thermocapillarity on the breakup properties of fluid threads in a microfluidic T-junction, where a dispersed phase is injected perpendicularly into a main channel containing a continuous phase, and the latter induces periodic breakup of droplets due to the cross-flowing. Temperature effects are investigated by switching on-off both positive-negative temperature gradients along the main channel direction, thus promoting a different thread dynamics with anticipated-delayed breakup. Numerical simulations are performed at changing the flow rates of both the continuous and dispersed phases, as well as the relative importance of viscous forces, surface tension forces, and thermocapillary stresses. The range of parameters is broad enough to characterize the effects of thermocapillarity on different mechanisms of breakup in the confined T-junction, including the so-called "squeezing" and "dripping" regimes, previously identified in the literature. Some simple scaling arguments are proposed to rationalize the observed behavior, and to provide quantitative guidelines on how to predict the droplet size after breakup.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Qu, Z. G.; Ding, T.; Miao, J. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media is numerically studied with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method at the pore scale with consideration of interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer performances. Adsorbent structures are reconstructed in two dimensions by employing the quartet structure generation set approach. To implement boundary conditions accurately, all the porous interfacial nodes are recognized and classified into 14 types using a proposed universal program called the boundary recognition and classification program. The multiple-relaxation-time LB model and single-relaxation-time LB model are adopted to simulate flow and mass transport, respectively. The interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer capacities are evaluated with the permeability factor and interparticle transfer coefficient, Langmuir adsorption kinetics, and the solid diffusion model, respectively. Adsorption processes are performed in two groups of adsorbent media with different porosities and particle sizes. External and internal mass transfer resistances govern the adsorption system. A large porosity leads to an early time for adsorption equilibrium because of the controlling factor of external resistance. External and internal resistances are dominant at small and large particle sizes, respectively. Particle size, under which the total resistance is minimum, ranges from 3 to 7 μm with the preset parameters. Pore-scale simulation clearly explains the effect of both external and internal mass transfer resistances. The present paper provides both theoretical and practical guidance for the design and optimization of adsorption systems.

  9. Continuous surface force based lattice Boltzmann equation method for simulating thermocapillary flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Lin; Zheng, Song; Zhai, Qinglan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we extend a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with continuous surface force (CSF) to simulate thermocapillary flows. The model is designed on our previous CSF LBE for athermal two phase flow, in which the interfacial tension forces and the Marangoni stresses as the results of the interface interactions between different phases are described by a conception of CSF. In this model, the sharp interfaces between different phases are separated by a narrow transition layers, and the kinetics and morphology evolution of phase separation would be characterized by an order parameter via Cahn–Hilliard equation which is solved in the frame work of LBE. The scalar convection–diffusion equation for temperature field is resolved by thermal LBE. The models are validated by thermal two layered Poiseuille flow, and two superimposed planar fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers for the thermocapillary driven convection, which have analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature. Then thermocapillary migration of two/three dimensional deformable droplet are simulated. Numerical results show that the predictions of present LBE agreed with the analytical solution/other numerical results. - Highlights: • A CSF LBE to thermocapillary flows. • Thermal layered Poiseuille flows. • Thermocapillary migration.

  10. Lattice Thermal Conductivity from Atomistic Simulations: ZrB2 and HfB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Daw, Murray S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) including ZrB2 and HfB2 have a number of properties that make them attractive for applications in extreme environments. One such property is their high thermal conductivity. Computational modeling of these materials will facilitate understanding of fundamental mechanisms, elucidate structure-property relationships, and ultimately accelerate the materials design cycle. Progress in computational modeling of UHTCs however has been limited in part due to the absence of suitable interatomic potentials. Recently, we developed Tersoff style parameterizations of such potentials for both ZrB2 and HfB2 appropriate for atomistic simulations. As an application, Green-Kubo molecular dynamics simulations were performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of ZrB2 and HfB2. The atomic mass difference in these binary compounds leads to oscillations in the time correlation function of the heat current, in contrast to the more typical monotonic decay seen in monoatomic materials such as Silicon, for example. Results at room temperature and at elevated temperatures will be reported.

  11. Continuous surface force based lattice Boltzmann equation method for simulating thermocapillary flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Lin, E-mail: lz@njust.edu.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Zheng, Song [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Zhejiang University of Finance and Economics, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zhai, Qinglan [School of Economics Management and Law, Chaohu University, Chaohu 238000 (China)

    2016-02-05

    In this paper, we extend a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with continuous surface force (CSF) to simulate thermocapillary flows. The model is designed on our previous CSF LBE for athermal two phase flow, in which the interfacial tension forces and the Marangoni stresses as the results of the interface interactions between different phases are described by a conception of CSF. In this model, the sharp interfaces between different phases are separated by a narrow transition layers, and the kinetics and morphology evolution of phase separation would be characterized by an order parameter via Cahn–Hilliard equation which is solved in the frame work of LBE. The scalar convection–diffusion equation for temperature field is resolved by thermal LBE. The models are validated by thermal two layered Poiseuille flow, and two superimposed planar fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers for the thermocapillary driven convection, which have analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature. Then thermocapillary migration of two/three dimensional deformable droplet are simulated. Numerical results show that the predictions of present LBE agreed with the analytical solution/other numerical results. - Highlights: • A CSF LBE to thermocapillary flows. • Thermal layered Poiseuille flows. • Thermocapillary migration.

  12. Evaluation of the use of color-set geometry during lattice physics constants generation for boiling water reactor simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, S.; Ivanov, K.

    2013-01-01

    Current methods for BWR nuclear design and analysis consist of using lattice physics neutron transport methods to generate the two-group homogenized cross-sections that are then used in a nodal diffusion theory code. The lattice transport solutions are performed for a single assembly with reflective boundary conditions, which is a practical approximation. A method is developed to account for assembly exposure distributions (environment) in the core within the lattice transport calculations with the use of color-sets (2x2) geometry. The loading pattern is examined and an appropriate number of characteristic color-set cells are selected for analysis. Treatment of the co-resident exposed fuel within this method is also presented. The calculation process was followed for a recent BWR cycle design with comparisons being performed on both a lattice and core-wide basis to evaluate the proposed method. The lattice based comparisons show noticeable differences in the pin power distribution predictions, which require further investigation to see how this translates into core performance calculations. The core-wide comparisons show minor differences and are generally in a good agreement, which is expected with this small perturbation. A slight improvement was noticed in the reduction of the power distribution uncertainty. However, given the additional amount of work and computer run time increase, further evaluation, especially of core pin power predictions, is needed to consider this method for production level design and safety analysis calculations. (authors)

  13. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 from Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Murray, Daw S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic Green-Kubo simulations are performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of the ultra high temperature ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 for a range of temperatures. Recently developed interatomic potentials are used for these simulations. Heat current correlation functions show rapid oscillations which can be identified with mixed metal-Boron optical phonon modes. Agreement with available experimental data is good.

  14. Development of a compact nuclear power station engineering simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian Jianfeng; Yang Yanhua; Lin Meng; Hu Rui

    2003-01-01

    The compact nuclear power plant project simulator is developed based on the Chashma nuclear power plant. This simulator consists of simulation computation code, data communication module and human-machine interface. This paper discusses the design and implementation of the simulator from such aspect as computer system, hydrothermal model, programming language, human-machine interface and data communication in details

  15. Lattice strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorn, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of studying non-perturbative effects in string theory using a world sheet lattice is discussed. The light-cone lattice string model of Giles and Thorn is studied numerically to assess the accuracy of ''coarse lattice'' approximations. For free strings a 5 by 15 lattice seems sufficient to obtain better than 10% accuracy for the bosonic string tachyon mass squared. In addition a crude lattice model simulating string like interactions is studied to find out how easily a coarse lattice calculation can pick out effects such as bound states which would qualitatively alter the spectrum of the free theory. The role of the critical dimension in obtaining a finite continuum limit is discussed. Instead of the ''gaussian'' lattice model one could use one of the vertex models, whose continuum limit is the same as a gaussian model on a torus of any radius. Indeed, any critical 2 dimensional statistical system will have a stringy continuum limit in the absence of string interactions. 8 refs., 1 fig. , 9 tabs

  16. Lattice simulation of a center symmetric three dimensional effective theory for SU(2) Yang-Mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Dominik

    2010-01-01

    We present lattice simulations of a center symmetric dimensionally reduced effective field theory for SU(2) Yang Mills which employ thermal Wilson lines and three-dimensional magnetic fields as fundamental degrees of freedom. The action is composed of a gauge invariant kinetic term, spatial gauge fields and a potential for theWilson line which includes a ''fuzzy'' bag term to generate non-perturbative fluctuations between Z(2) degenerate ground states. The model is studied in the limit where the gauge fields are set to zero as well as the full model with gauge fields. We confirm that, at moderately weak coupling, the ''fuzzy'' bag term leads to eigenvalue repulsion in a finite region above the deconfining phase transition which shrinks in the extreme weak-coupling limit. A non-trivial Z(N) symmetric vacuum arises in the confined phase. The effective potential for the Polyakov loop in the theory with gauge fields is extracted from the simulations including all modes of the loop as well as for cooled configurations where the hard modes have been averaged out. The former is found to exhibit a non-analytic contribution while the latter can be described by a mean-field like ansatz with quadratic and quartic terms, plus a Vandermonde potential which depends upon the location within the phase diagram. Other results include the exact location of the phase boundary in the plane spanned by the coupling parameters, correlation lengths of several operators in the magnetic and electric sectors and the spatial string tension. We also present results from simulations of the full 4D Yang-Mills theory and attempt to make a qualitative comparison to the 3D effective theory. (orig.)

  17. Lattice simulation of a center symmetric three dimensional effective theory for SU(2) Yang-Mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Dominik

    2010-11-17

    We present lattice simulations of a center symmetric dimensionally reduced effective field theory for SU(2) Yang Mills which employ thermal Wilson lines and three-dimensional magnetic fields as fundamental degrees of freedom. The action is composed of a gauge invariant kinetic term, spatial gauge fields and a potential for theWilson line which includes a ''fuzzy'' bag term to generate non-perturbative fluctuations between Z(2) degenerate ground states. The model is studied in the limit where the gauge fields are set to zero as well as the full model with gauge fields. We confirm that, at moderately weak coupling, the ''fuzzy'' bag term leads to eigenvalue repulsion in a finite region above the deconfining phase transition which shrinks in the extreme weak-coupling limit. A non-trivial Z(N) symmetric vacuum arises in the confined phase. The effective potential for the Polyakov loop in the theory with gauge fields is extracted from the simulations including all modes of the loop as well as for cooled configurations where the hard modes have been averaged out. The former is found to exhibit a non-analytic contribution while the latter can be described by a mean-field like ansatz with quadratic and quartic terms, plus a Vandermonde potential which depends upon the location within the phase diagram. Other results include the exact location of the phase boundary in the plane spanned by the coupling parameters, correlation lengths of several operators in the magnetic and electric sectors and the spatial string tension. We also present results from simulations of the full 4D Yang-Mills theory and attempt to make a qualitative comparison to the 3D effective theory. (orig.)

  18. Program package for multicanonical simulations of U(1) lattice gauge theory-Second version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazavov, Alexei; Berg, Bernd A.

    2013-03-01

    A new version STMCMUCA_V1_1 of our program package is available. It eliminates compatibility problems of our Fortran 77 code, originally developed for the g77 compiler, with Fortran 90 and 95 compilers. New version program summaryProgram title: STMC_U1MUCA_v1_1 Catalogue identifier: AEET_v1_1 Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html Programming language: Fortran 77 compatible with Fortran 90 and 95 Computers: Any capable of compiling and executing Fortran code Operating systems: Any capable of compiling and executing Fortran code RAM: 10 MB and up depending on lattice size used No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 15059 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 215733 Keywords: Markov chain Monte Carlo, multicanonical, Wang-Landau recursion, Fortran, lattice gauge theory, U(1) gauge group, phase transitions of continuous systems Classification: 11.5 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEET_v1_0 Journal Reference of previous version: Computer Physics Communications 180 (2009) 2339-2347 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation of U(1) lattice gauge theory (or other continuous systems) close to its phase transition. Measurements and analysis of the action per plaquette, the specific heat, Polyakov loops and their structure factors. Solution method: Multicanonical simulations with an initial Wang-Landau recursion to determine suitable weight factors. Reweighting to physical values using logarithmic coding and calculating jackknife error bars. Reasons for the new version: The previous version was developed for the g77 compiler Fortran 77 version. Compiler errors were encountered with Fortran 90 and Fortran 95 compilers (specified below). Summary of revisions: epsilon=one/10**10 is replaced by epsilon/10.0D10 in the parameter statements of the subroutines u1_bmha.f, u1_mucabmha.f, u1wl

  19. Research nuclear reactor start-up simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofo Haro, M.; Cantero, P.

    2009-01-01

    This work presents the design and FPGA implementation of a research nuclear reactor start-up simulator. Its aim is to generate a set of signals that allow replacing the neutron detector for stimulated signals, to feed the measurement electronic of the start-up channels, to check its operation, together with the start-up security logic. The simulator presented can be configured on three independent channels and adjust the shape of the output pulses. Furthermore, each channel can be configured in 'rate' mode, where you can specify the growth rate of the pulse frequency in %/s. Result and details of the implementation on FPGA of the different functional blocks are given. (author)

  20. Numerical simulation of heat transfer in particulate flows using a thermal immersed boundary lattice Boltzmann method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshghinejadfard, A.; Thévenin, D.

    2016-01-01

    In the current work the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is applied to investigate heat transfer phenomena in particulate flows. Different cases involving both two- and three-dimensional configurations are studied. For the fluid–particle interactions the direct-forcing and direct-heating immersed boundary (IB) method are applied to calculate the hydrodynamic force and energy exchange between the particle and the fluid, respectively. This Eulerian–Lagrangian approach captures the fluid flow around the particles with high accuracy. The Boussinesq approximation is applied to the coupling between flow and temperature fields. The energy equation is solved using a double-population model in the LBM framework. Numerical simulations reveal that this thermal IB-LBM can accurately predict the particle motion. A particularly interesting case involves particles with a variable temperature, where the competition between gravity and buoyancy induced by the temperature gradient can make particles sink or rise. It is observed that cold particles settle down faster than hot particles. Also, the thermal IB-LBM has been implemented for a collection of spherical particles. In this manner, the behavior of catalyst particles can be accurately predicted, as demonstrated in the last application, involving 60 particles interacting in an enclosure.

  1. Lift generation by a two-dimensional symmetric flapping wing: immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, Keigo; Suzuki, Kosuke; Inamuro, Takaji, E-mail: inamuro@kuaero.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2012-08-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) symmetric flapping flight is investigated by an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM). In this method, we can treat the moving boundary problem efficiently on the Cartesian grid. We consider a model consisting of 2D symmetric flapping wings without mass connected by a hinge with mass. Firstly, we investigate the effect of the Reynolds number in the range of 40-200 on flows around symmetric flapping wings under no gravity field and find that for high Reynolds numbers (Re Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 55), asymmetric vortices with respect to the horizontal line appear and the time-averaged lift force is induced on the wings, whereas for low Reynolds numbers (Re Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 50), only symmetric vortices appear around the wings and no lift force is induced. Secondly, the effect of the initial position of the wings is investigated, and the range of the initial phases where the upward flight is possible is found. The effects of the mass and flapping amplitude are also studied. Finally, we carry out free flight simulations under gravity field for various Reynolds numbers in the range 60 Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To Re Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 300 and Froude numbers in the range 3 Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To Fr Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 60 and identify the region where upward flight is possible. (paper)

  2. A direct force model for Galilean invariant lattice Boltzmann simulation of fluid-particle flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shi; He, Qing; Chen, Baiman; Yang, Xiaoping; Huang, Simin

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been widely used in the simulation of particulate flows involving complex moving boundaries. Due to the kinetic background of LBM, the bounce-back (BB) rule and the momentum exchange (ME) method can be easily applied to the solid boundary treatment and the evaluation of fluid-solid interaction force, respectively. However, recently it has been found that both the BB and ME schemes may violate the principle of Galilean invariance (GI). Some modified BB and ME methods have been proposed to reduce the GI error. But these remedies have been recognized subsequently to be inconsistent with Newton’s Third Law. Therefore, contrary to those corrections based on the BB and ME methods, a unified iterative approach is adopted to handle the solid boundary in the present study. Furthermore, a direct force (DF) scheme is proposed to evaluate the fluid-particle interaction force. The methods preserve the efficiency of the BB and ME schemes, and the performance on the accuracy and GI is verified and validated in the test cases of particulate flows with freely moving particles.

  3. Phase diagram of dense two-color QCD within lattice simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braguta V.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a low-temperature scan of the phase diagram of dense two-color QCD with Nf = 2 quarks. The study is conducted using lattice simulation with rooted staggered quarks. At small chemical potential we observe the hadronic phase, where the theory is in a confining state, chiral symmetry is broken, the baryon density is zero and there is no diquark condensate. At the critical point μ = mπ/2 we observe the expected second order transition to Bose-Einstein condensation of scalar diquarks. In this phase the system is still in confinement in conjunction with nonzero baryon density, but the chiral symmetry is restored in the chiral limit. We have also found that in the first two phases the system is well described by chiral perturbation theory. For larger values of the chemical potential the system turns into another phase, where the relevant degrees of freedom are fermions residing inside the Fermi sphere, and the diquark condensation takes place on the Fermi surface. In this phase the system is still in confinement, chiral symmetry is restored and the system is very similar to the quarkyonic state predicted by SU(Nc theory at large Nc.

  4. Computer code for the atomistic simulation of lattice defects and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffgens, J.O.; Graves, N.J.; Oster, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    The computer code COMENT used to simulate the effect of temperature, impurities, and pre-existing defects on radiation-induced defect production mechanisms, defect properties, defect migration, and defect stability. This report documents Version IV of COMENT (models, methods, and implementation) and defines current code options. Version IV of COMENT generates only face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystal lattices. However, an effort was made to structure COMENT to allow addition of new options with a minimum of change in the existing version of the code. This document describes the calling program and thirty-two user-defined subroutines. Fourteen subroutines (ALOYORD, DASPKA, DFCT, DSLOAN, DSLOIN, EXPAND, POT1, POT2, POT3, POT4, POT5, POT6, POT7, and THRMAL) are associated with the selection of program options; only a few of these are used in any given analysis. Seven of the other subroutines (CRYSTL, IEAF, INCBOX, LABLE, MINILAT, SPEFORS, and SQUEZ are used to establish a variety of arrays and conditions required for each analysis; most of them are used once in a given calculation. The remaining eleven subroutines (DAMP, DIRECT, IDDEF, NEAF, INBIN, FILBIN, FTBIN, PAC3, UNPAC3, PACF, and UNPACF) are used many times in each calculation; the last eight of these are used many times in each time step during the integration and, therefore, are written in COMPASS (CDC assembly language). The COMPASS subroutines are described in sufficient detail to permit easy conversion to some other assembly language or to FORTRAN

  5. Numerical simulation of the fatigue behavior of additive manufactured titanium porous lattice structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargarian, A; Esfahanian, M; Kadkhodapour, J; Ziaei-Rad, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of cell geometry and relative density on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of Titanium scaffolds produced by selective laser melting and electron beam melting techniques were numerically investigated by finite element analysis. The regular titanium lattice samples with three different unit cell geometries, namely, diamond, rhombic dodecahedron and truncated cuboctahedron, and the relative density range of 0.1-0.3 were analyzed under uniaxial cyclic compressive loading. A failure event based algorithm was employed to simulate fatigue failure in the cellular material. Stress-life approach was used to model fatigue failure of both bulk (struts) and cellular material. The predicted fatigue life and the damage pattern of all three structures were found to be in good agreement with the experimental fatigue investigations published in the literature. The results also showed that the relationship between fatigue strength and cycles to failure obeyed the power law. The coefficient of power function was shown to depend on relative density, geometry and fatigue properties of the bulk material while the exponent was only dependent on the fatigue behavior of the bulk material. The results also indicated the failure surface at an angle of 45° to the loading direction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of immiscible fluid displacement in porous media: Homogeneous versus heterogeneous pore network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haihu; Zhang, Yonghao; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Injection of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into geological formations is a promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. Predicting the amount of CO 2 that can be captured and its long-term storage stability in subsurface requires a fundamental understanding of multiphase displacement phenomena at the pore scale. In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann method is employed to simulate the immiscible displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting one in two microfluidic flow cells, one with a homogeneous pore network and the other with a randomly heterogeneous pore network. We have identified three different displacement patterns, namely, stable displacement, capillary fingering, and viscous fingering, all of which are strongly dependent upon the capillary number (Ca), viscosity ratio (M), and the media heterogeneity. The non-wetting fluid saturation (S nw ) is found to increase nearly linearly with logCa for each constant M. Increasing M (viscosity ratio of non-wetting fluid to wetting fluid) or decreasing the media heterogeneity can enhance the stability of the displacement process, resulting in an increase in S nw . In either pore networks, the specific interfacial length is linearly proportional to S nw during drainage with equal proportionality constant for all cases excluding those revealing considerable viscous fingering. Our numerical results confirm the previous experimental finding that the steady state specific interfacial length exhibits a linear dependence on S nw for either favorable (M ≥ 1) or unfavorable (M < 1) displacement, and the slope is slightly higher for the unfavorable displacement

  7. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of viscoelastic flow past a confined free rotating cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi; Zhang, Peijie; Lin, Jianzhong; Ku, Xiaoke; Nie, Deming

    2018-05-01

    To study the dynamics of rigid body immersed in viscoelastic fluid, an Oldroyd-B fluid flow past an eccentrically situated, free rotating cylinder in a two-dimensional (2D) channel is simulated by a novel lattice Boltzmann method. Two distribution functions are employed, one of which is aimed to solve Navier-Stokes equation and the other to the constitutive equation, respectively. The unified interpolation bounce-back scheme is adopted to treat the moving curved boundary of cylinder, and the novel Galilean invariant momentum exchange method is utilized to obtain the hydrodynamic force and torque exerted on the cylinder. Results show that the center-fixed cylinder rotates inversely in the direction where a cylinder immersed in Newtonian fluid do, which generates a centerline-oriented lift force according to Magnus effect. The cylinder’s eccentricity, flow inertia, fluid elasticity and viscosity would affect the rotation of cylinder in different ways. The cylinder rotates more rapidly when located farther away from the centerline, and slows down when it is too close to the wall. The rotation frequency decreases with increasing Reynolds number, and larger rotation frequency responds to larger Weissenberg number and smaller viscosity ratio, indicating that the fluid elasticity and low solvent viscosity accelerates the flow-induced rotation of cylinder.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of asymmetric flow in nematic liquid crystals with finite anchoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Roberts, Tyler; Aranson, Igor S.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-02-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) display many of the flow characteristics of liquids but exhibit long range orientational order. In the nematic phase, the coupling of structure and flow leads to complex hydrodynamic effects that remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we consider the hydrodynamics of a nematic LC in a hybrid cell, where opposite walls have conflicting anchoring boundary conditions, and we employ a 3D lattice Boltzmann method to simulate the time-dependent flow patterns that can arise. Due to the symmetry breaking of the director field within the hybrid cell, we observe that at low to moderate shear rates, the volumetric flow rate under Couette and Poiseuille flows is different for opposite flow directions. At high shear rates, the director field may undergo a topological transition which leads to symmetric flows. By applying an oscillatory pressure gradient to the channel, a net volumetric flow rate is found to depend on the magnitude and frequency of the oscillation, as well as the anchoring strength. Taken together, our findings suggest several intriguing new applications for LCs in microfluidic devices.

  9. Phase diagram and Chiral Magnetic Effect in Dirac Semimetals from Lattice Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyda D.L.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dirac Semimetals Na3Bi and Cd3As2 are recently discovered materials, which low energy electronic spectrum is described by two flavours of massless 3+1D fermions. In order to study electronic properties of these materials we formulated lattice field theory with rooted staggered fermions on anisotropic lattice. It is shown that in the limit of zero temporal lattice spacing this theory reproduces effective theory of Dirac semimetals. Using the lattice field theory we study the phase diagram of Dirac semimetals in the plane effective coupling constant - Fermi velocity anisotropy. We also measure conductivity of Dirac Semimetals within lattice field theory in external magnetic field. Our results confirm the existence of Chiral Magnetic Effect in Dirac Semimetals.

  10. Analysis of polytype stability in PVT grown silicon carbide single crystal using competitive lattice model Monte Carlo simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jun Guo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Polytype stability is very important for high quality SiC single crystal growth. However, the growth conditions for the 4H, 6H and 15R polytypes are similar, and the mechanism of polytype stability is not clear. The kinetics aspects, such as surface-step nucleation, are important. The kinetic Monte Carlo method is a common tool to study surface kinetics in crystal growth. However, the present lattice models for kinetic Monte Carlo simulations cannot solve the problem of the competitive growth of two or more lattice structures. In this study, a competitive lattice model was developed for kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of the competition growth of the 4H and 6H polytypes of SiC. The site positions are fixed at the perfect crystal lattice positions without any adjustment of the site positions. Surface steps on seeds and large ratios of diffusion/deposition have positive effects on the 4H polytype stability. The 3D polytype distribution in a physical vapor transport method grown SiC ingot showed that the facet preserved the 4H polytype even if the 6H polytype dominated the growth surface. The theoretical and experimental results of polytype growth in SiC suggest that retaining the step growth mode is an important factor to maintain a stable single 4H polytype during SiC growth.

  11. Computer simulation in nuclear science and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mamoru; Miya, Kenzo; Iwata, Shuichi; Yagawa, Genki; Kondo, Shusuke; Hoshino, Tsutomu; Shimizu, Akinao; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Masatoshi.

    1992-01-01

    The numerical simulation technology used for the design of nuclear reactors includes the scientific fields of wide range, and is the cultivated technology which grew in the steady efforts to high calculation accuracy through safety examination, reliability verification test, the assessment of operation results and so on. Taking the opportunity of putting numerical simulation to practical use in wide fields, the numerical simulation of five basic equations which describe the natural world and the progress of its related technologies are reviewed. It is expected that numerical simulation technology contributes to not only the means of design study but also the progress of science and technology such as the construction of new innovative concept, the exploration of new mechanisms and substances, of which the models do not exist in the natural world. The development of atomic energy and the progress of computers, Boltzmann's transport equation and its periphery, Navier-Stokes' equation and its periphery, Maxwell's electromagnetic field equation and its periphery, Schroedinger wave equation and its periphery, computational solid mechanics and its periphery, and probabilistic risk assessment and its periphery are described. (K.I.)

  12. Numerical simulation of the fatigue behavior of additive manufactured titanium porous lattice structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zargarian, A.; Esfahanian, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kadkhodapour, J., E-mail: j.kad@srttu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Materials Testing, Materials Science and Strength of Materials (IMWF), University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Ziaei-Rad, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of cell geometry and relative density on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of Titanium scaffolds produced by selective laser melting and electron beam melting techniques were numerically investigated by finite element analysis. The regular titanium lattice samples with three different unit cell geometries, namely, diamond, rhombic dodecahedron and truncated cuboctahedron, and the relative density range of 0.1–0.3 were analyzed under uniaxial cyclic compressive loading. A failure event based algorithm was employed to simulate fatigue failure in the cellular material. Stress-life approach was used to model fatigue failure of both bulk (struts) and cellular material. The predicted fatigue life and the damage pattern of all three structures were found to be in good agreement with the experimental fatigue investigations published in the literature. The results also showed that the relationship between fatigue strength and cycles to failure obeyed the power law. The coefficient of power function was shown to depend on relative density, geometry and fatigue properties of the bulk material while the exponent was only dependent on the fatigue behavior of the bulk material. The results also indicated the failure surface at an angle of 45° to the loading direction. - Highlights: • Numerical simulation was used to predict fatigue behavior of titanium scaffolds. • Good agreement between numerical and experimental results • S–N curves obeyed the power law. • Fatigue strength of scaffolds was proportional to their Young's modulus. • Failure surface of scaffolds was inclined at an angle of 45° to loading.

  13. A hierarchical lattice spring model to simulate the mechanics of 2-D materials-based composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas eBrely

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the field of engineering materials, strength and toughness are typically two mutually exclusive properties. Structural biological materials such as bone, tendon or dentin have resolved this conflict and show unprecedented damage tolerance, toughness and strength levels. The common feature of these materials is their hierarchical heterogeneous structure, which contributes to increased energy dissipation before failure occurring at different scale levels. These structural properties are the key to exceptional bioinspired material mechanical properties, in particular for nanocomposites. Here, we develop a numerical model in order to simulate the mechanisms involved in damage progression and energy dissipation at different size scales in nano- and macro-composites, which depend both on the heterogeneity of the material and on the type of hierarchical structure. Both these aspects have been incorporated into a 2-dimensional model based on a Lattice Spring Model, accounting for geometrical nonlinearities and including statistically-based fracture phenomena. The model has been validated by comparing numerical results to continuum and fracture mechanics results as well as finite elements simulations, and then employed to study how structural aspects impact on hierarchical composite material properties. Results obtained with the numerical code highlight the dependence of stress distributions on matrix properties and reinforcement dispersion, geometry and properties, and how failure of sacrificial elements is directly involved in the damage tolerance of the material. Thanks to the rapidly developing field of nanocomposite manufacture, it is already possible to artificially create materials with multi-scale hierarchical reinforcements. The developed code could be a valuable support in the design and optimization of these advanced materials, drawing inspiration and going beyond biological materials with exceptional mechanical properties.

  14. Dual simulation of the massless lattice Schwinger model with topological term and non-zero chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göschl, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    We discuss simulation strategies for the massless lattice Schwinger model with a topological term and finite chemical potential. The simulation is done in a dual representation where the complex action problem is solved and the partition function is a sum over fermion loops, fermion dimers and plaquette-occupation numbers. We explore strategies to update the fermion loops coupled to the gauge degrees of freedom and check our results with conventional simulations (without topological term and at zero chemical potential), as well as with exact summation on small volumes. Some physical implications of the results are discussed.

  15. Multi-step magnetization of the Ising model on a Shastry-Sutherland lattice: a Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W C; Huo, L; Tian, G; Qian, H R; Gao, X S; Qin, M H; Liu, J-M

    2012-01-01

    The magnetization behaviors and spin configurations of the classical Ising model on a Shastry-Sutherland lattice are investigated using Monte Carlo simulations, in order to understand the fascinating magnetization plateaus observed in TmB 4 and other rare-earth tetraborides. The simulations reproduce the 1/2 magnetization plateau by taking into account the dipole-dipole interaction. In addition, a narrow 2/3 magnetization step at low temperature is predicted in our simulation. The multi-step magnetization can be understood as the consequence of the competitions among the spin-exchange interaction, the dipole-dipole interaction, and the static magnetic energy.

  16. Numerical simulation for nuclear pumped laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakasai, Kaoru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    To apply nuclear pumped laser of {sup 3}He-Ne-Ar gas to detect neutron, the optimum gas mixture was investigated by numerical simulation. When {sup 3}He-Ne-Ar mixture gas are irradiated by neutron, proton and triton with high velocity are produced by {sup 3}He(np)T and two charge particles ionized {sup 3}He, Ne and Ar which reacted each other and attained to 3p`(1/2){sub 0}-3S`(1/2). The calculation method is constructed by defining the rate equations of each ion and exited atom and the electron energy balance equation and by time integrating the simultaneous differential equations of the above two equations and the law of conservation of charge. Penning ionization and energy transport by elastic collision of neutral atom were considered in the transport process of electron energy direct ionization by secondary charge particle. Calculation time was 1 msec. The optimum component was shown 3 atm He, 24 Torr He and 8 Torr Ar by simulation. Laser oscilation was generated under the conditions 3.3 x 10{sup 14} (N/cm{sup 2}/5) thermal neutron flux at 50 cm laser cell length and 99% coefficient of reflection of mirror. After laser oscilation, laser output was proportional to neutron flux. These results showed nuclear pumped laser of {sup 3}He-Ne-Ar was able to detect optically neutron. (S.Y)

  17. Two-dimensional simulation of intermediate-sized bubbles in low viscous liquids using counter diffusion lattice Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Seungyeob, E-mail: syryu@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 1045 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youngin; Kang, Hanok; Kim, Keung Koo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 1045 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sungho, E-mail: sunghoko@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • We directly simulate intermediate-sized bubbles in low viscous liquids. • The path instability and shape oscillation can be successfully simulated. • The motion of a pair bubble and bubble swarm is presented. • Bubbles with high-Reynolds-number can be simulated with under-resolved grids. • The counter diffusion multiphase method is feasible for the direct simulation of bubbly flows. - Abstract: The counter diffusion lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to simulate intermediate-sized bubbles in low viscous liquids. Bubbles at high Reynolds numbers ranging from hundreds to thousands are simulated successfully, which cannot be done for the existing LBM versions. The characteristics of the path instability of two rising bubbles are studied for a wide range of Eotvos and Morton numbers. Finally, the study presented how bubble swarms move within the flow and how the flow surrounding the bubbles is affected by the bubble motions.

  18. The role of computer simulation in nuclear technologies development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonchev, M.Yu.; Shimansky, G.A.; Lebedeva, E.E.; Lichadeev, V. V.; Ryazanov, D.K.; Tellin, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    In the report the role and purposes of computer simulation in nuclear technologies development is discussed. The authors consider such applications of computer simulation as nuclear safety researches, optimization of technical and economic parameters of acting nuclear plant, planning and support of reactor experiments, research and design new devices and technologies, design and development of 'simulators' for operating personnel training. Among marked applications the following aspects of computer simulation are discussed in the report: neutron-physical, thermal and hydrodynamics models, simulation of isotope structure change and damage dose accumulation for materials under irradiation, simulation of reactor control structures. (authors)

  19. The role of computer simulation in nuclear technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonchev, M.Yu.; Shimansky, G.A.; Lebedeva, E.E.; Lichadeev, VV.; Ryazanov, D.K.; Tellin, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    In the report, the role and purpose of computer simulation in nuclear technology development is discussed. The authors consider such applications of computer simulation as: (a) Nuclear safety research; (b) Optimization of technical and economic parameters of acting nuclear plant; (c) Planning and support of reactor experiments; (d) Research and design new devices and technologies; (f) Design and development of 'simulators' for operating personnel training. Among marked applications, the following aspects of computer simulation are discussed in the report: (g) Neutron-physical, thermal and hydrodynamics models; (h) Simulation of isotope structure change and dam- age dose accumulation for materials under irradiation; (i) Simulation of reactor control structures. (authors)

  20. Coupled lattice Boltzmann method for numerical simulations of fully coupled heart and torso bidomain system in electrocardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Corre , Samuel; Belmiloudi , Aziz

    2016-01-01

    International audience; In this work, a modified coupling Lattice Boltzmann Model (LBM) in simulation of cardiac electrophysiology is developed in order to capture the detailed activities of macro- to micro-scale transport processes. The propagation of electrical activity in the human heart through torso is mathematically modeled by bidomain type systems. As transmembrane potential evolves, we take into account domain anisotropical properties using intracellular and extracellular conductivity...

  1. Three-dimensional simulations of Bingham plastic flows with the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model

    OpenAIRE

    Song-Gui Chen; Chuan-Hu Zhang; Yun-Tian Feng; Qi-Cheng Sun; Feng Jin

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) parallel multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model (MRT-LBM) for Bingham plastics which overcomes numerical instabilities in the simulation of non-Newtonian fluids for the Bhatnagar–Gross–Krook (BGK) model. The MRT-LBM and several related mathematical models are briefly described. Papanastasiou’s modified model is incorporated for better numerical stability. The impact of the relaxation parameters of the model is studied in detail. The MRT-L...

  2. Lattice overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutz, M.

    1984-01-01

    After reviewing some recent developments in supercomputer access, the author discusses a few areas where perturbation theory and lattice gauge simulations make contact. The author concludes with a brief discussion of a deterministic dynamics for the Ising model. This may be useful for numerical studies of nonequilibrium phenomena. 13 references

  3. Simulators in the training program for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, E.

    1988-01-01

    The principle simulator of the reactor school of the Paul Scherrer Institute is described. A compact simulator at the nuclear power plant Beznau is used for beginners as well as for refresher courses. Full simulator training cannot be taken in Switzerland. The Swiss nuclear power plants take advantage of the services of foreign nuclear power plants or training centers. The role of the instructor is discussed

  4. Second-principles method for materials simulations including electron and lattice degrees of freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, Pablo; Wojdeł, Jacek C.; Íñiguez, Jorge; Junquera, Javier

    2016-05-01

    We present a first-principles-based (second-principles) scheme that permits large-scale materials simulations including both atomic and electronic degrees of freedom on the same footing. The method is based on a predictive quantum-mechanical theory—e.g., density functional theory—and its accuracy can be systematically improved at a very modest computational cost. Our approach is based on dividing the electron density of the system into a reference part—typically corresponding to the system's neutral, geometry-dependent ground state—and a deformation part—defined as the difference between the actual and reference densities. We then take advantage of the fact that the bulk part of the system's energy depends on the reference density alone; this part can be efficiently and accurately described by a force field, thus avoiding explicit consideration of the electrons. Then, the effects associated to the difference density can be treated perturbatively with good precision by working in a suitably chosen Wannier function basis. Further, the electronic model can be restricted to the bands of interest. All these features combined yield a very flexible and computationally very efficient scheme. Here we present the basic formulation of this approach, as well as a practical strategy to compute model parameters for realistic materials. We illustrate the accuracy and scope of the proposed method with two case studies, namely, the relative stability of various spin arrangements in NiO (featuring complex magnetic interactions in a strongly-correlated oxide) and the formation of a two-dimensional electron gas at the interface between band insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 (featuring subtle electron-lattice couplings and screening effects). We conclude by discussing ways to overcome the limitations of the present approach (most notably, the assumption of a fixed bonding topology), as well as its many envisioned possibilities and future extensions.

  5. Vortex Lattice Simulations of Attached and Separated Flows around Flapping Wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lambert

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Flapping flight is an increasingly popular area of research, with applications to micro-unmanned air vehicles and animal flight biomechanics. Fast, but accurate methods for predicting the aerodynamic loads acting on flapping wings are of interest for designing such aircraft and optimizing thrust production. In this work, the unsteady vortex lattice method is used in conjunction with three load estimation techniques in order to predict the aerodynamic lift and drag time histories produced by flapping rectangular wings. The load estimation approaches are the Katz, Joukowski and simplified Leishman–Beddoes techniques. The simulations’ predictions are compared to experimental measurements from wind tunnel tests of a flapping and pitching wing. Three types of kinematics are investigated, pitch-leading, pure flapping and pitch lagging. It is found that pitch-leading tests can be simulated quite accurately using either the Katz or Joukowski approaches as no measurable flow separation occurs. For the pure flapping tests, the Katz and Joukowski techniques are accurate as long as the static pitch angle is greater than zero. For zero or negative static pitch angles, these methods underestimate the amplitude of the drag. The Leishman–Beddoes approach yields better drag amplitudes, but can introduce a constant negative drag offset. Finally, for the pitch-lagging tests the Leishman–Beddoes technique is again more representative of the experimental results, as long as flow separation is not too extensive. Considering the complexity of the phenomena involved, in the vast majority of cases, the lift time history is predicted with reasonable accuracy. The drag (or thrust time history is more challenging.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the convective heat transfer from a stream-wise oscillating circular cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Sheng; Chen Sheng; Liu Zhaohui; Zheng Chuguang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Heat transfer is enhanced by small and slow stream-wise oscillation. ► The average Nu decreases with increasing oscillation frequency. ► The RMS Nu increases with increasing frequency. ► The mean and RMS Nu reach a local maximum value in locked regime. ► Similar frequency effect is found for different Reynolds numbers. - Abstract: In this paper, we studied the convective heat transfer from a stream-wise oscillating circular cylinder. Two dimensional numerical simulations are conducted at Re = 100–200, A = 0.1–0.4 and F = f o /f s = 0.2–3.0 with the aid of the lattice Boltzmann method. In particular, detailed attentions are paid on the extensive numerical results elucidating the influence of oscillation frequency, oscillation amplitude and Reynolds number on the time-average and RMS value of the Nusselt number. Over the ranges of conditions considered herein, the heat transfer characteristics are observed to be influenced in an intricate manner by the value of the oscillation frequency (F), oscillation amplitude (A) and Reynolds number (Re). Firstly, the heat transfer is enhanced when the cylinder oscillates stream-wise with small amplitude and low frequency, while it will be reduced by large amplitude and high frequency. Secondly, the average Nusselt number (Nu (ave)) decreases against the increasing value of oscillation frequency, while the RMS value of the Nusselt number, Nu (RMS), displays an opposite trend. Third, we obtained a similar frequency effect on the heat transfer over the range of Reynolds numbers investigated in this paper. In addition, detailed analyses on phase portraits, energy spectrum are also made.

  7. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of immiscible fluid displacement in porous media: Homogeneous versus heterogeneous pore network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haihu, E-mail: haihu.liu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 28 West Xianning Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); James Weir Fluids Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Zhang, Yonghao [James Weir Fluids Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Valocchi, Albert J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Injection of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into geological formations is a promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. Predicting the amount of CO{sub 2} that can be captured and its long-term storage stability in subsurface requires a fundamental understanding of multiphase displacement phenomena at the pore scale. In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann method is employed to simulate the immiscible displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting one in two microfluidic flow cells, one with a homogeneous pore network and the other with a randomly heterogeneous pore network. We have identified three different displacement patterns, namely, stable displacement, capillary fingering, and viscous fingering, all of which are strongly dependent upon the capillary number (Ca), viscosity ratio (M), and the media heterogeneity. The non-wetting fluid saturation (S{sub nw}) is found to increase nearly linearly with logCa for each constant M. Increasing M (viscosity ratio of non-wetting fluid to wetting fluid) or decreasing the media heterogeneity can enhance the stability of the displacement process, resulting in an increase in S{sub nw}. In either pore networks, the specific interfacial length is linearly proportional to S{sub nw} during drainage with equal proportionality constant for all cases excluding those revealing considerable viscous fingering. Our numerical results confirm the previous experimental finding that the steady state specific interfacial length exhibits a linear dependence on S{sub nw} for either favorable (M ≥ 1) or unfavorable (M < 1) displacement, and the slope is slightly higher for the unfavorable displacement.

  8. A lattice-valued linguistic decision model for nuclear safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, D.; Liu, J.; Carchon, R.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we focus our attention on decision making models to process uncertainty-based information directly without transforming them into any particular membership function, i.e., directly using linguistic information (linguistic values) instead of numbers (numerical values). By analyzing the feature of linguistic values ordered by their means of common usage, we argue that the set of linguistic values should be characterized by a lattice structure. We propose the lattice structure based on a logical algebraic structure i.e., lattice implication algebra. Finally, we obtain a multi-objective decision-making model by extending Yager's multi-objective model from the following aspects: (1) extension of linguistic information: from a set of linear ordered linguistic labels (values) to that of lattice-valued linguistic labels; (2) extension of the combination function M, which is used to combine the individual ratings with the weights of criteria. We propose an implication operation form of M. The implication operation can be drawn from lattice implication algebra. As an illustration, we will finally apply this decision model to the evaluation problem in safeguard relevant information. (orig.)

  9. Computer simulation of strain-induced ordering in interstitial solutions based on the b.c.c. Ta lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanter, M.S.; Khachaturyan, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    A computer simulation is made of strain-induced ordering of interstitial atoms within octahedral interstices in the Ta host lattice. The calculation technique allows to take into account infinite-range strain-induced interaction. Computer simulation of ordering process enables to model the sequence of structure changes which occur during the ordering process and to find the equilibrium structure of the stable interstitial superstructures. The structures of high-temperature ordering phases obtained by the method of static concentration waves coincide with those obtained by means of computer simulation. However computer simulation enables to predict the structures of low-temperature ordered phases which cannot be obtained by the method of concentration waves. Comparison of computer simulation results and structures of observed ordered phases demonstrates good agreement. (author)

  10. Compact nuclear simulator and its upgrade plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kee-Choon; Park, Jae-Chang; Jung, Chul-Hwan; Lee, Jang-Soo; Kim, Jang-Yeol

    1997-01-01

    The Compact Nuclear Simulator (CNS) was installed at the nuclear training center of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) in 1998. The CNS has been used for training non-operator personnel, such as NSSS design engineers, maintenance personnel, and inspectors of regulatory body, and for testing fuzzy control algorithm. The CNS mathematical modeling modeled a three loop Westinghouse Pressurizer Water Reactor (PWR), 993 MWe, mostly referred to as the Kori Unit 3 and 4 in Korea. However, the main computer (Micro VAX II), an interface card between a main computer and operator panel, and a graphic display system are faced with frequent troubles due to obsolescence and a lack of spare parts. Accordingly, CNS hardware should be replaced by state of the art equipment. There are plans to replace the main computer with an HP workstation, the dedicated interface card with a PLC-based interface system, and the graphic interface system with a X-terminal based full graphics system. The full graphics user interface system supports an easy and friendly interface between the CNS and users. The software for the instructor console also will be modified from a text-based to a Motif-based user interface. The Motif-based user interface provides a more efficient and easy operation in an instructor console. The real-time executive software programmed under a Micro VMS operating system should also be replaced by software programmed under a HPUX operating system. (author)

  11. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs

  12. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Simulation in NPSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belair, Michael L.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Four nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) models have been created in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) framework. The models are divided into two categories. One set is based upon the ZrC-graphite composite fuel element and tie tube-style reactor developed during the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) project in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The other reactor set is based upon a W-UO2 ceramic-metallic (CERMET) fuel element. Within each category, a small and a large thrust engine are modeled. The small engine models utilize RL-10 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 33.4 kN (7,500 lbf ). The large engine models utilize scaled RL-60 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 111.2 kN (25,000 lbf ). Power deposition profiles for each reactor were obtained from a detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) model of the reactor cores. Performance factors such as thermodynamic state points, thrust, specific impulse, reactor power level, and maximum fuel temperature are analyzed for each engine design.

  13. Classical molecular dynamics simulation of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devanathan, R.; Krack, M.; Bertolus, M.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation using forces calculated from empirical potentials, commonly called classical molecular dynamics, is well suited to study primary damage production by irradiation, defect interactions with fission gas atoms, gas bubble nucleation, grain boundary effects on defect and gas bubble evolution in nuclear fuel, and the resulting changes in thermomechanical properties. This enables one to obtain insights into fundamental mechanisms governing the behaviour of nuclear fuel, as well as parameters that can be used as inputs for mesoscale models. The interaction potentials used for the force calculations are generated by fitting properties of interest to experimental data and electronic structure calculations (see Chapter 12). We present here the different types of potentials currently available for UO 2 and illustrations of applications to the description of the behaviour of this material under irradiation. The results obtained from the present generation of potentials for UO 2 are qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different. There is a need to refine these existing potentials to provide a better representation of the performance of polycrystalline fuel under a variety of operating conditions, develop models that are equipped to handle deviations from stoichiometry, and validate the models and assumptions used. (authors)

  14. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska, E.K.

    1999-01-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  15. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Nuclear Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  16. Application of the lattice Boltzmann model to simulated stenosis growth in a two-dimensional carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J; Buick, J; Cosgrove, J A; Stansell, P

    2005-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann model is used to observe changes in the velocity flow and shear stress in a carotid artery model during a simulated stenosis growth. Near wall shear stress in the unstenosed artery is found to agree with literature values. The model also shows regions of low velocity, rotational flow and low near wall shear stress along parts of the walls of the carotid artery that have been identified as being prone to atherosclerosis. These regions persist during the simulated stenosis growth, suggesting that atherosclerotic plaque build-up creates regions of flow with properties that favour atherosclerotic progression

  17. Atucha II nuclear power plant digital simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santome, D.; Rovere, L.A.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the start-up of a digital simulation code apt to be performed in real time of Atucha II nuclear power plant, foreseeing its subsequent usage in a Basic Principles Simulator. Adaptability and modification of existing routines and development of modules in order to incorporate the necessary variables dynamics to couple the different modes, were the main tasks. The mathematical model used allows the representation of the following sub-systems: a) a reactor's core point model, which comprehends the neutronic kinetics, fission and decaying powers, thermal transfer and Xe-poisoning calculation; b) pressurizer, which considers two sub-systems that may or may not be in thermodynamic equilibrium, both in two phases; c) coolants and moderators bonds considering separate moderator loops with the aim of introducing asymmetric perturbations; d) secondary sub-subsystem, which includes the feed water loop, pumps, steam generators and control valves; e) steam generators; f) control and safety systems, including power control, steam generators levels, moderator's temperature primary loop system, limitations and protection. (Author)

  18. Direct numerical simulation of circular-cap bubbles in low viscous liquids using counter diffusion lattice Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Seungyeob, E-mail: syryu@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 1045 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youngin; Yoon, Juhyeon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 1045 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sungho, E-mail: sunghoko@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • We directly simulate circular-cap bubbles in low viscous liquids. • The counter diffusion multiphase lattice Boltzmann method is proposed. • The present method is validated through benchmark tests and experimental results. • The high-Reynolds-number bubbles can be simulated without any turbulence models. • The present method is feasible for the direct simulation of bubbly flows. -- Abstract: The counter diffusion lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to directly simulate rising circular-cap bubbles in low viscous liquids. A counter diffusion model for single phase flows has been extended to multiphase flows, and the implicit formulation is converted into an explicit one for easy calculation. Bubbles at high Reynolds numbers ranging from O(10{sup 2}) to O(10{sup 4}) are simulated successfully without any turbulence models, which cannot be done for the existing LBM versions. The characteristics of the circular-cap bubbles are studied for a wide range of Morton numbers and compared with the previous literature. Calculated results agree with the theoretical and experimental data. Consequently, the wake phenomena of circular-cap bubbles and bubble induced turbulence are presented.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of the lattice thermal conductivity of thermoelectric material CuInTe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Liu, H.J., E-mail: phlhj@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Cheng, L.; Zhang, J.; Jiang, P.H.; Liang, J.H.; Fan, D.D.; Shi, J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2017-05-10

    Highlights: • A simple but effective Morse potential is constructed to accurately describe the interatomic interactions of CuInTe{sub 2}. • The lattice thermal conductivity of CuInTe{sub 2} predicted by MD agrees well with those measured experimentally, as well as those calculated from phonon BTE. • Introducing Cd impurity or Cu vacancy can effectively reduce the lattice thermal conductivity of CuInTe{sub 2} and thus further enhance its thermoelectric performance. - Abstract: The lattice thermal conductivity of thermoelectric material CuInTe{sub 2} is predicted using classical molecular dynamics simulations, where a simple but effective Morse-type interatomic potential is constructed by fitting first-principles total energy calculations. In a broad temperature range from 300 to 900 K, our simulated results agree well with those measured experimentally, as well as those obtained from phonon Boltzmann transport equation. By introducing the Cd impurity or Cu vacancy, the thermal conductivity of CuInTe{sub 2} can be effectively reduced to further enhance the thermoelectric performance of this chalcopyrite compound.

  20. On the zero-crossing of the three-gluon Green's function from lattice simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athenodorou, Andreas [Univ. of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus; Boucaud, Philippe [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); de Soto, Feliciano [Univ. Pablo de Olavide, 41013 Sevilla; Spain; Univ. of Granada (Spain); Rodriguez-Quintero, Jose [Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva; Spain; Univ. of Granada (Spain); Zafeiropoulos, Savvas [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretische Physik

    2018-04-01

    We report on some efforts recently made in order to gain a better understanding of some IR properties of the 3-point gluon Green’s function by exploiting results from large-volume quenched lattice simulations. These lattice results have been obtained by using both tree-level Symanzik and the standard Wilson action, in the aim of assessing the possible impact of effects presumably resulting from a particular choice for the discretization of the action. The main resulting feature is the existence of a negative log-aritmic divergence at zero-momentum, which pulls the 3-gluon form factors down at low momenta and, consequently, yields a zero-crossing at a given deep IR momentum. The results can be correctly explained by analyzing the relevant Dyson-Schwinger equations and appropriate truncation schemes.

  1. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of travelling pulses and spiral waves in the lattice Lotka-Volterra model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeev, Alexei G; Kurkina, Elena S; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G

    2012-06-01

    Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the stochastic two-species Lotka-Volterra model on a square lattice. For certain values of the model parameters, the system constitutes an excitable medium: travelling pulses and rotating spiral waves can be excited. Stable solitary pulses travel with constant (modulo stochastic fluctuations) shape and speed along a periodic lattice. The spiral waves observed persist sometimes for hundreds of rotations, but they are ultimately unstable and break-up (because of fluctuations and interactions between neighboring fronts) giving rise to complex dynamic behavior in which numerous small spiral waves rotate and interact with each other. It is interesting that travelling pulses and spiral waves can be exhibited by the model even for completely immobile species, due to the non-local reaction kinetics.

  2. Atomic quantum simulation of the lattice gauge-Higgs model: Higgs couplings and emergence of exact local gauge symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2013-09-13

    Recently, the possibility of quantum simulation of dynamical gauge fields was pointed out by using a system of cold atoms trapped on each link in an optical lattice. However, to implement exact local gauge invariance, fine-tuning the interaction parameters among atoms is necessary. In the present Letter, we study the effect of violation of the U(1) local gauge invariance by relaxing the fine-tuning of the parameters and showing that a wide variety of cold atoms is still a faithful quantum simulator for a U(1) gauge-Higgs model containing a Higgs field sitting on sites. The clarification of the dynamics of this gauge-Higgs model sheds some light upon various unsolved problems, including the inflation process of the early Universe. We study the phase structure of this model by Monte Carlo simulation and also discuss the atomic characteristics of the Higgs phase in each simulator.

  3. Phase transitions in cooperative coinfections: Simulation results for networks and lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassberger, Peter; Chen, Li; Ghanbarnejad, Fakhteh; Cai, Weiran

    2016-04-01

    We study the spreading of two mutually cooperative diseases on different network topologies, and with two microscopic realizations, both of which are stochastic versions of a susceptible-infected-removed type model studied by us recently in mean field approximation. There it had been found that cooperativity can lead to first order transitions from spreading to extinction. However, due to the rapid mixing implied by the mean field assumption, first order transitions required nonzero initial densities of sick individuals. For the stochastic model studied here the results depend strongly on the underlying network. First order transitions are found when there are few short but many long loops: (i) No first order transitions exist on trees and on 2-d lattices with local contacts. (ii) They do exist on Erdős-Rényi (ER) networks, on d -dimensional lattices with d ≥4 , and on 2-d lattices with sufficiently long-ranged contacts. (iii) On 3-d lattices with local contacts the results depend on the microscopic details of the implementation. (iv) While single infected seeds can always lead to infinite epidemics on regular lattices, on ER networks one sometimes needs finite initial densities of infected nodes. (v) In all cases the first order transitions are actually "hybrid"; i.e., they display also power law scaling usually associated with second order transitions. On regular lattices, our model can also be interpreted as the growth of an interface due to cooperative attachment of two species of particles. Critically pinned interfaces in this model seem to be in different universality classes than standard critically pinned interfaces in models with forbidden overhangs. Finally, the detailed results mentioned above hold only when both diseases propagate along the same network of links. If they use different links, results can be rather different in detail, but are similar overall.

  4. Free surface entropic lattice Boltzmann simulations of film condensation on vertical hydrophilic plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hygum, Morten Arnfeldt; Karlin, Iliya; Popok, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    A model for vapor condensation on vertical hydrophilic surfaces is developed using the entropic lattice Boltzmann method extended with a free surface formulation of the evaporation–condensation problem. The model is validated with the steady liquid film formation on a flat vertical wall. It is sh......A model for vapor condensation on vertical hydrophilic surfaces is developed using the entropic lattice Boltzmann method extended with a free surface formulation of the evaporation–condensation problem. The model is validated with the steady liquid film formation on a flat vertical wall...

  5. Evaluating variability with atomistic simulations: the effect of potential and calculation methodology on the modeling of lattice and elastic constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Lucas M.; Trautt, Zachary T.; Becker, Chandler A.

    2018-07-01

    Atomistic simulations using classical interatomic potentials are powerful investigative tools linking atomic structures to dynamic properties and behaviors. It is well known that different interatomic potentials produce different results, thus making it necessary to characterize potentials based on how they predict basic properties. Doing so makes it possible to compare existing interatomic models in order to select those best suited for specific use cases, and to identify any limitations of the models that may lead to unrealistic responses. While the methods for obtaining many of these properties are often thought of as simple calculations, there are many underlying aspects that can lead to variability in the reported property values. For instance, multiple methods may exist for computing the same property and values may be sensitive to certain simulation parameters. Here, we introduce a new high-throughput computational framework that encodes various simulation methodologies as Python calculation scripts. Three distinct methods for evaluating the lattice and elastic constants of bulk crystal structures are implemented and used to evaluate the properties across 120 interatomic potentials, 18 crystal prototypes, and all possible combinations of unique lattice site and elemental model pairings. Analysis of the results reveals which potentials and crystal prototypes are sensitive to the calculation methods and parameters, and it assists with the verification of potentials, methods, and molecular dynamics software. The results, calculation scripts, and computational infrastructure are self-contained and openly available to support researchers in performing meaningful simulations.

  6. Design of compact nuclear power marine engineering simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Jinghui; Xing Hongchuan; Zhang Ronghua; Yang Yanhua; Xu Jijun

    2004-01-01

    The essentiality of compact nuclear power marine engineering simulator (NPMES) is discussed. The technology of nuclear power plant engineering simulator (NPPES) for NPMES development is introduced, and the function design, general design and model design are given in details. A compact NPMES based on the nuclear power marine of 'Mutsu' is developed. The design can help the development of NPMES, which will improve operation safety and management efficiency of marine. (authors)

  7. Regularized lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model for two- and three-dimensional cavity flow simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montessori, A; Falcucci, G; Prestininzi, P; La Rocca, M; Succi, S

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the accuracy and performance of the regularized version of the single-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann equation for the case of two- and three-dimensional lid-driven cavities. The regularized version is shown to provide a significant gain in stability over the standard single-relaxation time, at a moderate computational overhead.

  8. Fully coupled Lattice Boltzmann simulation of fiber reinforced self compacting concrete flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svec, Oldrich; Skocek, Jan; Stang, Henrik

    accurately the most important phenomena is introduced. A conventional Lattice Boltzmann method has been chosen as a fluid dynamics solver of the non-Newtonian fluid. A Mass Tracking Algorithm has been implemented to correctly represent a free surface and a modified Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) with direct...

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of Su(2) lattice gauge theory with internal quark loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azcoiti, V.; Nakamura, A.

    1982-01-01

    Dynamical effects of quark loops in lattice gauge theory with icosahedral group are studied. The standard Wilson action is employed and the fermionic part by a discretize pseudo fermionic method is calculated. The masses of π, rho, ω are computed and the average value of an effective fermionic action is evaluated

  10. Lattice Boltzmann based multicomponent reactive transport model coupled with geochemical solver for scale simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, R.A.; Perko, J.; Jaques, D.; De Schutter, G.; Ye, G.; Van Breugel, K.

    2013-01-01

    A Lattice Boltzmann (LB) based reactive transport model intended to capture reactions and solid phase changes occurring at the pore scale is presented. The proposed approach uses LB method to compute multi component mass transport. The LB multi-component transport model is then coupled with the

  11. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Water Isotope Fractionation During Growth of Ice Crystals in Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Depaolo, D.; Kang, Q.; Zhang, D.

    2006-12-01

    The isotopic composition of precipitation, especially that of snow, plays a special role in the global hydrological cycle and in reconstruction of past climates using polar ice cores. The fractionation of the major water isotope species (HHO, HDO, HHO-18) during ice crystal formation is critical to understanding the global distribution of isotopes in precipitation. Ice crystal growth in clouds is traditionally treated with a spherically- symmetric steady state diffusion model, with semi-empirical modifications added to account for ventilation and for complex crystal morphology. Although it is known that crystal growth rate, which depends largely on the degree of vapor over-saturation, determines crystal morphology, there are no existing quantitative models that directly relate morphology to the vapor saturation factor. Since kinetic (vapor phase diffusion-controlled) isotopic fractionation also depends on growth rate, there should be a direct relationship between vapor saturation, crystal morphology, and crystal isotopic composition. We use a 2D Lattice-Boltzmann model to simulate diffusion-controlled ice crystal growth from vapor- oversaturated air. In the model, crystals grow solely according to the diffusive fluxes just above the crystal surfaces, and hence crystal morphology arises from the initial and boundary conditions in the model and does not need to be specified a priori. The input parameters needed are the isotope-dependent vapor deposition rate constant (k) and the water vapor diffusivity in air (D). The values of both k and D can be computed from kinetic theory, and there are also experimentally determined values of D. The deduced values of k are uncertain to the extent that the sticking coefficient (or accommodation coefficient) for ice is uncertain. The ratio D/k is a length that determines the minimum scale of dendritic growth features and allows us to scale the numerical calculations to atmospheric conditions using a dimensionless Damkohler number

  12. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Kinetic Isotope Effect During Snow Crystal Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Depaolo, D. J.; Kang, Q.; Zhang, D.

    2007-12-01

    The isotopic composition of precipitation, especially that of snow, plays a special role in the global hydrological cycle and in reconstruction of past climates using polar ice cores. The fractionation of the major water isotope species (HHO, HDO, HHO-18) during ice crystal formation is critical to understanding the global distribution of isotopes in precipitation. Ice crystal growth in clouds is traditionally treated with a spherically-symmetric steady state diffusion model, with semi-empirical modifications added to account for ventilation and for complex crystal morphology. Although it is known that crystal growth rate, which depends largely on the degree of vapor over- saturation, determines crystal morphology, there are no quantitative models that relate morphology to the vapor saturation factor. Since kinetic (vapor phase diffusion-controlled) isotopic fractionation also depends on growth rate, there should be direct relationships between vapor saturation, crystal morphology, and crystal isotopic composition. We use a 2D lattice Boltzmann model to simulate diffusion-controlled ice crystal growth from vapor- oversaturated air. In the model, crystals grow solely according to the diffusive fluxes just above the crystal surfaces, and hence crystal morphology arises from the initial and boundary conditions in the model and does not need to be specified a priori. Crystal growth patterns can be varied between random growth and deterministic growth (along the maximum concentration gradient for example). The input parameters needed are the isotope- dependent vapor deposition rate constant (k) and the water vapor diffusivity in air (D). The values of both k and D can be computed from kinetic theory, and there are also experimentally determined values of D. The deduced values of k are uncertain to the extent that the condensation coefficient for ice is uncertain. The ratio D/k is a length (order 1 micron) that determines the minimum scale of dendritic growth features

  13. Baryon interactions from lattice QCD with physical quark masses - Nuclear forces and ΞΞ forces -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Takumi; Iritani, Takumi; Aoki, Sinya; Gongyo, Shinya; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Ikeda, Yoichi; Inoue, Takashi; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Miyamoto, Takaya; Nemura, Hidekatsu; Sasaki, Kenji

    2018-03-01

    We present the latest lattice QCD results for baryon interactions obtained at nearly physical quark masses. Nf = 2 + 1 nonperturbatively O(a)-improved Wilson quark action with stout smearing and Iwasaki gauge action are employed on the lattice of (96a)4 ≃(8.1fm)4 with a-1 ≃2.3 GeV, where mπ ≃146 MeV and mK ≃525 MeV. In this report, we study the two-nucleon systems and two-Ξ systems in 1S0 channel and 3S1-3D1 coupled channel, and extract central and tensor interactions by the HAL QCD method. We also present the results for the NΩ interaction in 5S2 channel which is relevant to the NΩ pair-momentum correlation in heavy-ion collision experiments.

  14. Operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tadasu

    1988-01-01

    For the operation management of nuclear power stations with high reliability and safety, the role played by operators is very important. The effort of improving the man-machine interface in the central control rooms of nuclear power stations is energetically advanced, but the importance of the role of operators does not change. For the training of the operators of nuclear power stations, simulators have been used from the early stage. As the simulator facilities for operator training, there are the full scope simulator simulating faithfully the central control room of an actual plant and the small simulator mainly aiming at learning the plant functions. For BWR nuclear power stations, two full scope simulators are installed in the BWR Operator Training Center, and the training has been carried out since 1974. The plant function learning simulators have been installed in respective electric power companies as the education and training facilities in the companies. The role of simulators in operator training, the BTC No.1 simulator of a BWR-4 of 780 MWe and the BTC No.2 simulator of a BWR-5 of 1,100 MWe, plant function learning simulators, and the design of the BTC No.2 simulator and plant function learning simulators are reported. (K.I.)

  15. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of pressure-driven flows in microchannels using Navier–Maxwell slip boundary conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Reis, Tim

    2012-01-01

    We present lattice Boltzmann simulations of rarefied flows driven by pressure drops along two-dimensional microchannels. Rarefied effects lead to non-zero cross-channel velocities, nonlinear variations in the pressure along the channel. Both effects are absent in flows driven by uniform body forces. We obtain second-order accuracy for the two components of velocity the pressure relative to asymptotic solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with slip boundary conditions. Since the common lattice Boltzmann formulations cannot capture Knudsen boundary layers, we replace the usual discrete analogs of the specular diffuse reflection conditions from continuous kinetic theory with a moment-based implementation of the first-order Navier-Maxwell slip boundary conditions that relate the tangential velocity to the strain rate at the boundary. We use these conditions to solve for the unknown distribution functions that propagate into the domain across the boundary. We achieve second-order accuracy by reformulating these conditions for the second set of distribution functions that arise in the derivation of the lattice Boltzmann method by an integration along characteristics. Our moment formalism is also valuable for analysing the existing boundary conditions. It reveals the origin of numerical slip in the bounce-back other common boundary conditions that impose conditions on the higher moments, not on the local tangential velocity itself. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  16. A volume-preserving sharpening approach for the propagation of sharp phase boundaries in multiphase lattice Boltzmann simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Reis, T.; Dellar, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Lattice Boltzmann models that recover a macroscopic description of multiphase flow of immiscible liquids typically represent the boundaries between phases using a scalar function, the phase field, that varies smoothly over several grid points. Attempts to tune the model parameters to minimise the widths of these interfaces typically lead to the interfaces becoming fixed to the underlying grid instead of advecting with the fluid velocity. This phenomenon, known as lattice pinning, is strikingly similar to that associated with the numerical simulation of conservation laws coupled to stiff algebraic source terms. We present a lattice Boltzmann formulation of the model problem proposed by LeVeque and Yee (1990) [3] to study the latter phenomenon in the context of computational combustion, and offer a volume-conserving extension in multiple space dimensions. Inspired by the random projection method of Bao and Jin (2000) [1] we further generalise this formulation by introducing a uniformly distributed quasi-random variable into the term responsible for the sharpening of phase boundaries. This method is mass conserving, gives correct average propagation speeds over many timesteps, and is shown to significantly delay the onset of pinning as the interface width is reduced. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. A volume-preserving sharpening approach for the propagation of sharp phase boundaries in multiphase lattice Boltzmann simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Reis, T.

    2011-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann models that recover a macroscopic description of multiphase flow of immiscible liquids typically represent the boundaries between phases using a scalar function, the phase field, that varies smoothly over several grid points. Attempts to tune the model parameters to minimise the widths of these interfaces typically lead to the interfaces becoming fixed to the underlying grid instead of advecting with the fluid velocity. This phenomenon, known as lattice pinning, is strikingly similar to that associated with the numerical simulation of conservation laws coupled to stiff algebraic source terms. We present a lattice Boltzmann formulation of the model problem proposed by LeVeque and Yee (1990) [3] to study the latter phenomenon in the context of computational combustion, and offer a volume-conserving extension in multiple space dimensions. Inspired by the random projection method of Bao and Jin (2000) [1] we further generalise this formulation by introducing a uniformly distributed quasi-random variable into the term responsible for the sharpening of phase boundaries. This method is mass conserving, gives correct average propagation speeds over many timesteps, and is shown to significantly delay the onset of pinning as the interface width is reduced. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Simulation of Micro-Channel and Micro-Orifice Flow Using Lattice Boltzmann Method with Langmuir Slip Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Rahmati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of its kinetic nature and computational advantages, the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM has been well accepted as a useful tool to simulate micro-scale flows. The slip boundary model plays a crucial role in the accuracy of solutions for micro-channel flow simulations. The most used slip boundary condition is the Maxwell slip model. The results of Maxwell slip model are affected by the accommodation coefficient significantly, but there is not an explicitly relationship between properties at wall and accommodation coefficient. In the present wok, Langmuir slip model is used beside LBM to simulate micro-channel and micro-orifice flows. Slip velocity and nonlinear pressure drop profiles are presented as two major effects in such flows. The results are in good agreement with existing results in the literature.

  19. Simulation of capillary infiltration into packing structures for the optimization of ceramic materials using the lattice Boltzmann method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Sergi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study uses the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM to simulate in 2D the capillary infiltration into porous structures obtained from the packing of particles. The experimental problem motivating the work is the densification of carbon preforms by reactive melt infiltration. The aim is to determine the optimization principles for the manufacturing of high-performance ceramics. Simulations are performed for packings with varying structural properties. The results suggest that the observed slow infiltrations can be ascribed to interface dynamics. Pinning represents the primary factor retarding fluid penetration. The mechanism responsible for this phenomenon is analyzed in detail. When surface growth is allowed, it is found that the phenomenon of pinning becomes stronger. Systems trying to reproduce typical experimental conditions are also investigated. It turns out that the standard for accurate simulations is challenging. The primary obstacle to overcome for enhanced accuracy seems to be the over-occurrence of pinning.

  20. Isotensor Axial Polarizability and Lattice QCD Input for Nuclear Double- β Decay Phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanahan, Phiala E.; Tiburzi, Brian C.; Wagman, Michael L.; Winter, Frank; Chang, Emmanuel; Davoudi, Zohreh; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Savage, Martin J.

    2017-08-01

    The potential importance of short-distance nuclear effects in double-$\\beta$ decay is assessed using a lattice QCD calculation of the $nn\\rightarrow pp$ transition and effective field theory methods. At the unphysical quark masses used in the numerical computation, these effects, encoded in the isotensor axial polarisability, are found to be of similar magnitude to the nuclear modification of the single axial current, which phenomenologically is the quenching of the axial charge used in nuclear many-body calculations. This finding suggests that nuclear models for neutrinoful and neutrinoless double-$\\beta$ decays should incorporate this previously neglected contribution if they are to provide reliable guidance for next-generation neutrinoless double-$\\beta$ decay searches. The prospects of constraining the isotensor axial polarisabilities of nuclei using lattice QCD input into nuclear many-body calculations are discussed.

  1. Autonomous dynamic decision making in a nuclear fuel cycle simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelakauskas, Martynas; Auzans, Aris; Schneider, Erich A.; Tkaczyk, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Objective criteria based decision making in a nuclear fuel cycle simulator. • Simulation driven by an evolving performance metric. • Implementation of the model in a nuclear fuel cycle simulator. • Verification of dynamic decision making based on uranium price evolution. -- Abstract: Growing energy demand and the push to move toward carbon-free ways of electricity generation have renewed the world's interest in nuclear energy. Due to the high technical and economic uncertainties related to nuclear energy, simulation tools have become a necessity in order to plan and evaluate possible nuclear fuel cycles (NFCs). Most of the NFC simulators today work by running the simulation with a user-defined set of facility build orders and preferences. While this allows for a simple way to change the simulation conditions, it may not always lead to optimal results and strongly relies on the user defining the correct parameters. This study looks into the possibility of using the expected cost of electricity (CoE) as the driving build decision variable instead of relying on user-defined build orders. This is a first step toward a more general decision making strategy in dynamic fuel cycle simulation. For this purpose, additional modules were implemented in an NFC simulator, VEGAS, with the consumption dependent price of uranium as a time-varying NFC cost component that drives the cost competitiveness of available NFC options. The model was demonstrated to verify the correct operation of a CoE-driven NFC simulator

  2. Current experience with nuclear power plant simulators and analysers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozd, A.

    1998-01-01

    Topics of a Specialist Meeting are presented on Simulators and Plant Analyzers: Current Issues in Nuclear Power Plant Simulation (Espoo, Finland). They dealt with the need for maintaining expertise, training and education, control rooms and operator support tools, simulators as tools for plant safety analysis. The major conclusions of the payers and the meeting are discussed. (R.P.)

  3. Simulation of 4-turn algorithms for reconstructing lattice optic functions from orbit measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koscielniak, S.; Iliev, A.

    1994-06-01

    We describe algorithms for reconstructing tune, closed-orbit, beta-function and phase advance from four individual turns of beam orbit acquisition data, under the assumption of coherent, almost linear and uncoupled betatron oscillations. To estimate the beta-function at, and phase advance between, position monitors, we require at least one anchor location consisting of two monitors separated by a drift. The algorithms were submitted to a Monte Carlo analysis to find the likely measurement accuracy of the optics functions in the KAON Factory Booster ring racetrack lattice, assuming beam position monitors with surveying and reading errors, and assuming an imperfect lattice with gradient and surveying errors. Some of the results of this study are reported. (author)

  4. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of the permeability and capillary adsorption of cement model microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalzale, M. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); McDonald, P.J., E-mail: p.mcdonald@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    The lattice Boltzmann method is used to investigate the permeability of microstructures of cement pastes generated using the numerical models CEMHYD3D (Bentz, 1997) and {mu}IC (Bishnoi and Scrivener, 2009). Results are reported as a function of paste water-to-cement ratio and degree of hydration. The permeability decreases with increasing hydration and decreasing water-to-cement ratio in agreement with experiment. However the permeability is larger than the experimental data recorded using beam bending methods (Vichit-Vadakan and Scherer, 2002). Notwithstanding, the lattice Boltzmann results compare favourably with alternate numerical methods of permeability calculation for cement model microstructures. In addition, we show early results for the liquid/vapour capillary adsorption and desorption isotherms in the same model {mu}IC structures. The broad features of the experimental capillary porosity isotherm are reproduced, although further work is required to adequately parameterise the model.

  5. Lattice QCD simulations on big cats, sea monsters and clock towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Balint, E-mail: bjoo@jlab.or [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2009-07-01

    We present details of lattice QCD computations we are performing on the Cray XT series of computers, from BigBen - an XT3 hosted at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) - through Jaguar (XT4) and Kraken (XT5) - which are hosted at the National Center for Computational Science (NCCS) and the National Institute of Computational Science (NICS), respectively, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). We discuss algorithmic tuning to make the computation more efficient and present some recent results.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann method used to simulate particle motion in a conduit

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dolanský, Jindřich; Chára, Zdeněk; Vlasák, Pavel; Kysela, Bohuš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 2 (2017), s. 105-113 ISSN 0042-790X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-18870S Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : Lattice Boltzmann method * particle motion * particle–fluid interaction * PIV * particle tracking Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 1.654, year: 2016

  7. Lattice QCD simulations on big cats, sea monsters and clock towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Balint

    2009-01-01

    We present details of lattice QCD computations we are performing on the Cray XT series of computers, from BigBen - an XT3 hosted at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) - through Jaguar (XT4) and Kraken (XT5) - which are hosted at the National Center for Computational Science (NCCS) and the National Institute of Computational Science (NICS), respectively, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). We discuss algorithmic tuning to make the computation more efficient and present some recent results.

  8. Numerical simulations of a family of the coupled viscous Burgers, equation using the lattice Boltzmann method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Y B; Tang, X H

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, in order to extend the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to deal with more nonlinear systems, a one-dimensional and five-velocity lattice Boltzmann scheme with an amending function for a family of the coupled viscous Burgers’ equation (CVBE) is proposed. With the Taylor and Chapman–Enskog expansion, a family of the CVBE is recovered correctly from the lattice Boltzmann equation through selecting the equilibrium distribution functions and amending functions properly. The method is applied to some test examples with an analytical solution. The results are compared with those obtained by the finite difference method (FDM); it is shown that the numerical solutions agree well with the analytical solutions and the errors obtained by the present method are smaller than the FDM. Furthermore, some problems without analytical solutions are numerically studied by the present method and the FDM. The results show that the numerical solutions of the LBM are in good agreement with those obtained by the FDM, which can validate the effectiveness and stability of the LBM. (paper: classical statistical mechanics, equilibrium and non-equilibrium)

  9. Temperature dependence of shear viscosity of SU(3)-gluodynamics within lattice simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrakhantsev, N.Yu. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,25 B. Cheremushkinskaya St., 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology,9 Institutskii per., 141700, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Braguta, V.V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,25 B. Cheremushkinskaya St., 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for High Energy Physics NRC “Kurchatov Institute”,1 Pobedy St., Protvino, 142281 (Russian Federation); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University,8 Sukhanova St., 690950, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Kotov, A.Yu. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics,25 B. Cheremushkinskaya St., 117218, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-18

    In this paper we study the SU(3)-gluodynamics shear viscosity temperature dependence on the lattice. To do so, we measure the correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in the range of temperatures T/T{sub c}∈[0.9,1.5]. To extract the shear viscosity we used two approaches. The first one is to fit the lattice data with a physically motivated ansatz for the spectral function with unknown parameters and then determine the shear viscosity. The second approach is to apply the Backus-Gilbert method allowing to extract the shear viscosity from the lattice data nonparametrically. The results obtained within both approaches agree with each other. Our results allow us to conclude that within the range T/T{sub c}∈[0.9,1.5] the SU(3)-gluodynamics reveals the properties of a strongly interacting system, which cannot be described perturbatively, and has the ratio η/s close to the value 1/4π of the N=4 Supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  10. Validation of CENDL and JEFF evaluated nuclear data files for TRIGA calculations through the analysis of integral parameters of TRX and BAPL benchmark lattices of thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddin, M.N.; Sarker, M.M.; Khan, M.J.H.; Islam, S.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the validation of evaluated nuclear data files CENDL-2.2 and JEFF-3.1.1 through the analysis of the integral parameters of TRX and BAPL benchmark lattices of thermal reactors for neutronics analysis of TRIGA Mark-II Research Reactor at AERE, Bangladesh. In this process, the 69-group cross-section library for lattice code WIMS was generated using the basic evaluated nuclear data files CENDL-2.2 and JEFF-3.1.1 with the help of nuclear data processing code NJOY99.0. Integral measurements on the thermal reactor lattices TRX-1, TRX-2, BAPL-UO 2 -1, BAPL-UO 2 -2 and BAPL-UO 2 -3 served as standard benchmarks for testing nuclear data files and have also been selected for this analysis. The integral parameters of the said lattices were calculated using the lattice transport code WIMSD-5B based on the generated 69-group cross-section library. The calculated integral parameters were compared to the measured values as well as the results of Monte Carlo Code MCNP. It was found that in most cases, the values of integral parameters show a good agreement with the experiment and MCNP results. Besides, the group constants in WIMS format for the isotopes U-235 and U-238 between two data files have been compared using WIMS library utility code WILLIE and it was found that the group constants are identical with very insignificant difference. Therefore, this analysis reflects the validation of evaluated nuclear data files CENDL-2.2 and JEFF-3.1.1 through benchmarking the integral parameters of TRX and BAPL lattices and can also be essential to implement further neutronic analysis of TRIGA Mark-II research reactor at AERE, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

  11. Hydraulic fracture conductivity: effects of rod-shaped proppant from lattice-Boltzmann simulations and lab tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiptsov, Andrei A.

    2017-06-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the conductivity of random close packings of non-spherical, rod-shaped proppant particles under the closure stress using numerical simulation and lab tests, with application to the conductivity of hydraulic fractures created in subterranean formation to stimulate production from oil and gas reservoirs. Numerical simulations of a steady viscous flow through proppant packs are carried out using the lattice Boltzmann method for the Darcy flow regime. The particle packings were generated numerically using the sequential deposition method. The simulations are conducted for packings of spheres, ellipsoids, cylinders, and mixtures of spheres with cylinders at various volumetric concentrations. It is demonstrated that cylinders provide the highest permeability among the proppants studied. The dependence of the nondimensional permeability (scaled by the equivalent particle radius squared) on porosity obtained numerically is well approximated by the power-law function: K /Rv2 = 0.204ϕ4.58 in a wide range of porosity: 0.3 ≤ ϕ ≤ 0.7. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations are cross-verified against finite-volume simulations using Navier-Stokes equations for inertial flow regime. Correlations for the normalized beta-factor as a function of porosity and normalized permeability are presented as well. These formulae are in a good agreement with the experimental measurements (including packings of rod-shaped particles) and existing laboratory data, available in the porosity range 0.3 ≤ ϕ ≤ 0.5. Comparison with correlations by other authors is also given.

  12. Common modelling approaches for training simulators for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    Training simulators for nuclear power plant operating staff have gained increasing importance over the last twenty years. One of the recommendations of the 1983 IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Nuclear Power Plant Training Simulators in Helsinki was to organize a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on some aspects of training simulators. The goal statement was: ''To establish and maintain a common approach to modelling for nuclear training simulators based on defined training requirements''. Before adapting this goal statement, the participants considered many alternatives for defining the common aspects of training simulator models, such as the programming language used, the nature of the simulator computer system, the size of the simulation computers, the scope of simulation. The participants agreed that it was the training requirements that defined the need for a simulator, the scope of models and hence the type of computer complex that was required, the criteria for fidelity and verification, and was therefore the most appropriate basis for the commonality of modelling approaches. It should be noted that the Co-ordinated Research Programme was restricted, for a variety of reasons, to consider only a few aspects of training simulators. This report reflects these limitations, and covers only the topics considered within the scope of the programme. The information in this document is intended as an aid for operating organizations to identify possible modelling approaches for training simulators for nuclear power plants. 33 refs

  13. Simulator of nuclear power plant with WWER-440 units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krcek, V.

    1985-01-01

    The use is discussed of simulators in the training of qualified personnel for the construction and operation of nuclear power plants. Simulators are used for training all activities and thinking processes related to the control of a nuclear reactor in the course of quasi-steady and non-steady states. The development and implementation is summed up of the construction of such a simulator for WWER-440 nuclear power plants. The main parts of the simulator include the unit control room, the computer system, the teacher's workplace and the interface system. The possibility of simulating the functions of the unit for personnel training is based on the description of the behaviour of the simulated object in form of mathematical models of its basic technological subsystems and their interrelations within the range of operating patterns. (J.C.)

  14. Equipment and performance upgrade of compact nuclear simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. C.; Kwon, K. C.; Lee, D. Y.; Hwang, I. K.; Park, W. M.; Cha, K. H.; Song, S. J.; Lee, J. W.; Kim, B. G.; Kim, H. J.

    1999-01-01

    The simulator at Nuclear Training Center in KAERI became old and has not been used effectively for nuclear-related training and researches due to the problems such as aging of the equipment, difficulties in obtaining consumables and their high cost, and less personnel available who can handle the old equipment. To solve the problems, this study was performed for recovering the functions of the simulator through the technical design and replacement of components with new ones. As results of this study, our test after the replacement showed the same simulation status as the previous one, and new graphic displays added to the simulator was effective for the training and easy for maintenance. This study is meaningful as demonstrating the way of upgrading nuclear training simulators that lost their functioning due to the obsolescence of simulators and the unavailability of components

  15. Simulation of Sound Waves Using the Lattice Boltzmann Method for Fluid Flow: Benchmark Cases for Outdoor Sound Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomons, Erik M; Lohman, Walter J A; Zhou, Han

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of sound waves in air can be considered as a special case of fluid dynamics. Consequently, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow can be used for simulating sound propagation. In this article application of the LBM to sound propagation is illustrated for various cases: free-field propagation, propagation over porous and non-porous ground, propagation over a noise barrier, and propagation in an atmosphere with wind. LBM results are compared with solutions of the equations of acoustics. It is found that the LBM works well for sound waves, but dissipation of sound waves with the LBM is generally much larger than real dissipation of sound waves in air. To circumvent this problem it is proposed here to use the LBM for assessing the excess sound level, i.e. the difference between the sound level and the free-field sound level. The effect of dissipation on the excess sound level is much smaller than the effect on the sound level, so the LBM can be used to estimate the excess sound level for a non-dissipative atmosphere, which is a useful quantity in atmospheric acoustics. To reduce dissipation in an LBM simulation two approaches are considered: i) reduction of the kinematic viscosity and ii) reduction of the lattice spacing.

  16. Lattice location of Tm in Si and Ge determined from ion channeling followed by Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Wakaiki, M.; Ikeda, A.; Kido, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The lattice location of Tm implanted into Si(1 0 0) and Ge(1 1 1) with energy of 180 keV was determined precisely by ion channeling followed by Monte Carlo simulations of ion trajectories. The implantations were performed at 550 deg. C with a dose of 5 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 . In the case of Tm in Si, 25 at.% and 50 at.% of Tm are located in the tetrahedral interstitial site and in the random site, respectively and the rest takes the substitutional position. The assumption of the Gaussian distribution centered at the exact tetrahedral site with a standard deviation of 0.2 Angstroms reproduced the azimuth angular-scan spectrum around the [1 1 0] axis. However, the observed angular spectrum is significantly broader than the simulated one. This is probably due to the fact that there exist slightly different Tm lattice sites from the exact tetrahedral position. For Ge(1 1 1) substrates, 25 at.% of Tm occupied the tetrahedral interstitial site and the rest was located randomly

  17. Influence of Boundary Conditions on the Simulation of a Diamond-Type Lattice Structure: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Terriault

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergent additive manufacturing processes allow the use of metallic porous structures in various industrial applications. Because these structures comprise a large number of ordered unit cells, their design using conventional modeling approaches, such as finite elements, becomes a real challenge. A homogenization technique, in which the lattice structure is simulated as a fully dense volume having equivalent material properties, can then be employed. To determine these equivalent material properties, numerical simulations can be performed on a single unit cell of the lattice structure. However, a critical aspect to consider is the boundary conditions applied to the external faces of the unit cell. In the literature, different types of boundary conditions are used, but a comparative study is definitely lacking. In this publication, a diamond-type unit cell is studied in compression by applying different boundary conditions. If the porous structure’s boundaries are free to deform, then the periodic boundary condition is found to be the most representative, but constraint equations must be introduced in the model. If, instead, the porous structure is inserted in a rigid enclosure, it is then better to use frictionless boundary conditions. These preliminary results remain to be validated for other types of unit cells loaded beyond the yield limit of the material.

  18. On the idea of low-energy nuclear reactions in metallic lattices by producing neutrons from protons capturing "heavy" electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennfors, Einar

    2013-02-01

    The present article is a critical comment on Widom and Larsens speculations concerning low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) based on spontaneous collective motion of protons in a room temperature metallic hydride lattice producing oscillating electric fields that renormalize the electron self-energy, adding significantly to the effective electron mass and enabling production of low-energy neutrons. The frequency and mean proton displacement estimated on the basis of neutron scattering from protons in palladium and applied to the Widom and Larsens model of the proton oscillations yield an electron mass enhancement less than one percent, far below the threshold for the proposed neutron production and even farther below the mass enhancement obtained by Widom and Larsen assuming a high charge density. Neutrons are not stopped by the Coulomb barrier, but the energy required for the neutron production is not low.

  19. Galilean-invariant preconditioned central-moment lattice Boltzmann method without cubic velocity errors for efficient steady flow simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajabdollahi, Farzaneh; Premnath, Kannan N.

    2018-05-01

    Lattice Boltzmann (LB) models used for the computation of fluid flows represented by the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations on standard lattices can lead to non-Galilean-invariant (GI) viscous stress involving cubic velocity errors. This arises from the dependence of their third-order diagonal moments on the first-order moments for standard lattices, and strategies have recently been introduced to restore Galilean invariance without such errors using a modified collision operator involving corrections to either the relaxation times or the moment equilibria. Convergence acceleration in the simulation of steady flows can be achieved by solving the preconditioned NS equations, which contain a preconditioning parameter that can be used to tune the effective sound speed, and thereby alleviating the numerical stiffness. In the present paper, we present a GI formulation of the preconditioned cascaded central-moment LB method used to solve the preconditioned NS equations, which is free of cubic velocity errors on a standard lattice, for steady flows. A Chapman-Enskog analysis reveals the structure of the spurious non-GI defect terms and it is demonstrated that the anisotropy of the resulting viscous stress is dependent on the preconditioning parameter, in addition to the fluid velocity. It is shown that partial correction to eliminate the cubic velocity defects is achieved by scaling the cubic velocity terms in the off-diagonal third-order moment equilibria with the square of the preconditioning parameter. Furthermore, we develop additional corrections based on the extended moment equilibria involving gradient terms with coefficients dependent locally on the fluid velocity and the preconditioning parameter. Such parameter dependent corrections eliminate the remaining truncation errors arising from the degeneracy of the diagonal third-order moments and fully restore Galilean invariance without cubic defects for the preconditioned LB scheme on a standard lattice. Several

  20. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J. Jr.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2012-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities

  1. Equipment and performance upgrade of compact nuclear simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Chang; Kwon, Kee Choon; Lee, Dong Young; Cha, Kyung Ho; Park, Won Man; Song, Soon Ja; Lee, Jung Woon; Oh, In Seok; Moon, Byung Sou; Ham, Chang Shik; Seh, Kyung Won; Joo, Young Chang; Lee, Eui Jin

    1999-12-01

    We developed techniques for upgrading nuclear power plant simulators that lost some function due to aging and obsolescence of parts. This project will provide a guidance for resolving the problems with aged simulators. We transplanted the simulation code operated in Macro-VAX II into the HP workstation with operating system version 10.20. If further research is proceeded, it will be possible to build simulator system on PCs. (author)

  2. An Embalse nuclear power plant basic principles simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Oscar; Galdoz, Erwin; Flury, Celso; Fontanini, Horacio

    1989-01-01

    A nuclear power plant basic principles simulator is a package of programs that numerically solve the dynamic equations of the simulated plant. This kind of tools is mainly used in the first step of training of operational personnel, to allow mental representation of physical phenomena governing the plant. They are also used for students or professional training, and experienced operators can also improve there performance under abnormal operation situations using the simulator. For the Embalse nuclear power plant, mainly the thermohydraulic behaviour, is simulated. The mathematical model was adapted from MANUVR, a code developed at the Electric Systems and Control Department of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). (Author) [es

  3. The MARS simulation of the nuclear weapons preparedness LOTTA scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovedal, H.

    2001-03-01

    The simulation method MARS, Mathematical Radiac Simulation, is primarily intended for preparedness exercises in nuclear fallout areas and simulates the ionizing radiation dose rates from fission products deposited on the ground, i.e. fallout from a nuclear weapons explosion or from a release of radioactive material from a nuclear reactor. MARS gives at any time after the fictitious explosion or reactor release the dose rates at any position in the fallout area. MARS has been used for simulation of an exercise scenario called LOTTA, designed for training and test of a radiac preparedness group in the Dept. of Nuclear Protection at FOI. The group is a member of a national preparedness organisation under the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute, SSI. This MARS application was a simulation of the entire course of events following a fictitious nuclear weapons explosion, including the fission product deposition process and the ultimate activity and dose rate distribution in the fallout area. The simulation was based on deposition and fallout prognoses worked out by FOI, using the prognosis model PELLO. This report presents a short description of the simulation of the LOTTA scenario. A more detailed presentation of the general MARS method can be found in the report 'Mathematical Radiac Simulation, MARS'

  4. Innovative real time simulation training and nuclear probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisinger, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    Operator errors have been an area of public concern for the safe operation of nuclear power plants since the TMI2 incident. Simply stated, nuclear plants are very complex systems and the public is skeptical of the operators' ability to comprehend and deal with the vast indications and complexities of potential nuclear power plant events. Prior to the TMI2 incident, operator errors and human factors were not included as contributing factors in the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) studies of nuclear power plant accidents. More recent efforts in nuclear risk assessment have addressed some of the human factors affecting safe nuclear plant operations. One study found four major factors having significant impact on operator effectiveness. This paper discusses human factor PRAs, new applications in simulation training and the specific potential benefits from simulation in promoting safer operation of future power plants as well as current operating power plants

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of Xe bubble nucleation in nanocrystalline UO2 nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Emily; René Corrales, L.; Desai, Tapan; Devanathan, Ram

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We simulated the interactions of defects and fission gas with grain boundaries in nuclear fuel. ► We observed the formation of Xe bubble nuclei that are difficult to observe experimentally. ► The bubble nuclei form by vacancy-assisted diffusion of Xe atoms. ► We also observed the initial stages of grain boundary motion. ► The study offers insights to the design of nuclear fuel to control fission gas release. - Abstract: We have performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the dynamical interactions between vacancy defects, fission gas atoms (Xe), and grain boundaries in a model of polycrystalline UO 2 nuclear fuel with average grain diameter of about 20 nm. We followed the mobility and aggregation of Xe atoms in the vacancy-saturated model compound for up to 2 ns. During this time we observed the aggregation of Xe atoms into nuclei, which are possible precursors to Xe bubbles. The nucleation was driven by the migration of Xe atoms via vacancy-assisted diffusion. The Xe clusters aggregate faster than grain boundary diffusion rates and are smaller than experimentally observed bubbles. As the system evolves towards equilibrium, the Xe atom cluster growth slows down significantly, and the lattice relaxes around the cluster. These simulations provide insights into fundamental physical processes that are inaccessible to experiment.

  6. Flow simulation of fiber reinforced self compacting concrete using Lattice Boltzmann method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svec, Oldrich; Skocek, Jan; Stang, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Self compacting concrete (SCC) is a promising material in the civil engineering industry. One of the benefits of the SCC is a fast and simplified casting followed by decreased labor costs. The SCC as any other type of concrete has a significantly lower tensile and shear strength in comparison to ....... A relatively new group of models - Lattice Boltzmann Modeling (LBM) - is presented in this paper. The conventional LBM is modified to include fiber and particle suspensions and non-Newtonian rheology and is used to model the fiber reinforced self compacting concrete flow....

  7. A lattice Boltzmann model with an amending function for simulating nonlinear partial differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin-Jie, Chen; Chang-Feng, Ma

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a lattice Boltzmann model with an amending function for one-dimensional nonlinear partial differential equations (NPDEs) in the form u t + αuu x + βu n u x + γu xx + δu xxx + ζu xxxx = 0. This model is different from existing models because it lets the time step be equivalent to the square of the space step and derives higher accuracy and nonlinear terms in NPDEs. With the Chapman–Enskog expansion, the governing evolution equation is recovered correctly from the continuous Boltzmann equation. The numerical results agree well with the analytical solutions. (general)

  8. A method of simulating and visualizing nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, C.H.; Paul, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    Teaching nuclear reactions to students is difficult because the mechanisms are complex and directly visualizing them is impossible. As a teaching tool, the authors have developed a method of simulating nuclear reactions using colliding water droplets. Videotaping of the collisions, taken with a high shutter speed camera and run frame-by-frame, shows details of the collisions that are analogous to nuclear reactions. The method for colliding the water drops and videotaping the collisions are shown

  9. Simulation study for the nuclear matter below the saturation density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Toshihiko; Maruyama, Toshiki; Chiba, Satoshi; Niita, Koji

    1999-01-01

    The infinite nuclear matter that consists of numerous protons and neutrons is described by using periodic boundary conditions. The motion of each nucleon in the fundamental cell is decided by a Molecular Dynamics. The ground states or the excited states of the nuclear matter are simulated. (author)

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of nuclear energy study (II). Annual report on Nuclear Code Evaluation Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    In the report, research results discussed in 1999 fiscal year at Nuclear Code Evaluation Committee of Nuclear Code Research Committee were summarized. Present status of Monte Carlo simulation on nuclear energy study was described. Especially, besides of criticality, shielding and core analyses, present status of applications to risk and radiation damage analyses, high energy transport and nuclear theory calculations of Monte Carlo Method was described. The 18 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  11. Simulation language of DSNP: dynamic simulator for nuclear power-plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saphier, D.

    1978-09-01

    The Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power-plants (DSNP) is a system of programs and data sets by which a nuclear power plant or part thereof can be simulated at different levels of sophistication. The acronym DSNP is used interchangeably for the DSNP language, for the DSNP precompiler, for the DSNP libraries, and for the DSNP document generator. The DSNP language is a set of simple block oriented statements, which together with the appropriate data, comprise a simulation of a nuclear power plant. The majority of the DSNP statements will result in the inclusion of a simulated physical module into the program. FORTRAN statements can be inserted with no restrictions among DSNP statements

  12. Programming for a nuclear reactor instrument simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    A new computerized control system for a transient test reactor incorporates a simulator for pre-operational testing of control programs. The part of the simulator pertinent to the discussion here consists of two microprocessors. An 8086/8087 reactor simulator calculates simulated reactor power by solving the reactor kinetics equations. An 8086 instrument simulator takes the most recent power value developed by the reactor simulator and simulates the appropriate reading on each of the eleven reactor instruments. Since the system is required to run on a one millisecond cycle, careful programming was required to take care of all eleven instruments in that short time. This note describes the special programming techniques used to attain the needed performance

  13. Multiscale Lattice Boltzmann method for flow simulations in highly heterogenous porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jun; Brown, Donald; Calo, Victor M.; Efendiev, Yalchin R.; Illiev, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    .g., water and oil) are modeled using cohesive or repulsive forces, respectively. The relative permeability can be computed using pore-scale simulations and seamlessly applied for intermediate and Darcy-scale simulations. A multiscale LBM that can reduce

  14. Twisted mass lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindler, A.

    2007-07-01

    I review the theoretical foundations, properties as well as the simulation results obtained so far of a variant of the Wilson lattice QCD formulation: Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD. Emphasis is put on the discretization errors and on the effects of these discretization errors on the phase structure for Wilson-like fermions in the chiral limit. The possibility to use in lattice simulations different lattice actions for sea and valence quarks to ease the renormalization patterns of phenomenologically relevant local operators, is also discussed. (orig.)

  15. Twisted mass lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindler, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2007-07-15

    I review the theoretical foundations, properties as well as the simulation results obtained so far of a variant of the Wilson lattice QCD formulation: Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD. Emphasis is put on the discretization errors and on the effects of these discretization errors on the phase structure for Wilson-like fermions in the chiral limit. The possibility to use in lattice simulations different lattice actions for sea and valence quarks to ease the renormalization patterns of phenomenologically relevant local operators, is also discussed. (orig.)

  16. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of sound directivity of a cylindrical pipe with mean flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yong; Scavone, Gary P; Silva, Andrey R da

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a numerical scheme based on the lattice Boltzmann method to tackle the classical problem of sound radiation directivity of pipes issuing subsonic mean flows. The investigation is focused on normal mode radiation, which allows the use of a two-dimensional lattice with an axisymmetric condition at the pipe’s longitudinal axis. The numerical results are initially verified against an exact analytical solution for the sound radiation directivity of an unflanged pipe in the absence of a mean flow, which shows a very good agreement. Thereafter, the sound directivity results in the presence of a subsonic mean flow are compared with both analytical models and experimental data. The results are in good agreement, particularly for low values of the Helmholtz number ka. Moreover, the phenomenon known as ‘zone of relative silence’ was observed, even for mean flows associated with very low Mach numbers, though discrepancies were also observed in the comparison between the numerical results and the analytical predictions. A thorough discussion on the scheme implementation and numerical results is provided in the paper. (paper)

  17. Lattice Boltzmann methods for the simulation of heat transfer in particle suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullough, J.W.S.; Leonardi, C.R.; Jones, B.D.; Aminossadati, S.M.; Williams, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of a lattice Boltzmann heat transfer model for curved boundaries. • Thermodynamic coupling aims to ensure continuity of both temperature and heat flux. • Good correlation found in transient comparison of results to analytical solutions. • Illustration of the developed model applied to a moving particle test case. - Abstract: This study examines the use of a lattice Boltzmann method framework to study heat transfer behaviours within particle suspensions. This has been done through the use of an adapted interface condition to attempt to resolve the required continuity of temperature and flux at the boundary between the solid and fluid phases. The proposed method is tested against analytical solutions for layered media in both a 1D bar and a radial layout. These tests showed that the model was able to generate results with first order convergence towards the analytical outcomes. The model was then used to examine the behaviour of two moving particles travelling along a channel to illustrate its potential for resolving complex suspension flows.

  18. Choice of boundary condition for lattice-Boltzmann simulation of moderate-Reynolds-number flow in complex domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Rupert W; Carver, Hywel B; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Hetherington, James; Groen, Derek; Krüger, Timm; Coveney, Peter V

    2014-02-01

    Modeling blood flow in larger vessels using lattice-Boltzmann methods comes with a challenging set of constraints: a complex geometry with walls and inlets and outlets at arbitrary orientations with respect to the lattice, intermediate Reynolds (Re) number, and unsteady flow. Simple bounce-back is one of the most commonly used, simplest, and most computationally efficient boundary conditions, but many others have been proposed. We implement three other methods applicable to complex geometries [Guo, Zheng, and Shi, Phys. Fluids 14, 2007 (2002); Bouzidi, Firdaouss, and Lallemand, Phys. Fluids 13, 3452 (2001); Junk and Yang, Phys. Rev. E 72, 066701 (2005)] in our open-source application hemelb. We use these to simulate Poiseuille and Womersley flows in a cylindrical pipe with an arbitrary orientation at physiologically relevant Re number (1-300) and Womersley (4-12) numbers and steady flow in a curved pipe at relevant Dean number (100-200) and compare the accuracy to analytical solutions. We find that both the Bouzidi-Firdaouss-Lallemand (BFL) and Guo-Zheng-Shi (GZS) methods give second-order convergence in space while simple bounce-back degrades to first order. The BFL method appears to perform better than GZS in unsteady flows and is significantly less computationally expensive. The Junk-Yang method shows poor stability at larger Re number and so cannot be recommended here. The choice of collision operator (lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook vs multiple relaxation time) and velocity set (D3Q15 vs D3Q19 vs D3Q27) does not significantly affect the accuracy in the problems studied.

  19. Lattice QCD on fine lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Stefan [DESY (Germany). Neumann Inst. for Computing

    2016-11-01

    These configurations are currently in use in many on-going projects carried out by researchers throughout Europe. In particular this data will serve as an essential input into the computation of the coupling constant of QCD, where some of the simulations are still on-going. But also projects computing the masses of hadrons and investigating their structure are underway as well as activities in the physics of heavy quarks. As this initial project of gauge field generation has been successful, it is worthwhile to extend the currently available ensembles with further points in parameter space. These will allow to further study and control systematic effects like the ones introduced by the finite volume, the non-physical quark masses and the finite lattice spacing. In particular certain compromises have still been made in the region where pion masses and lattice spacing are both small. This is because physical pion masses require larger lattices to keep the effects of the finite volume under control. At light pion masses, a precise control of the continuum extrapolation is therefore difficult, but certainly a main goal of future simulations. To reach this goal, algorithmic developments as well as faster hardware will be needed.

  20. Lattice simulations of QCD-like theories at finite baryon density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scior, Philipp Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of the phase diagram of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is of great importance to describe e.g. the properties of neutron stars or heavy-ion collisions. Due to the sign problem of lattice QCD at finite chemical potential we need effective theories to study QCD at finite density. Here, we use a three-dimensional Polyakov-loop theory to study the phase diagrams of QCD-like theories. In particular, we investigate the heavy quark limit of the QCD-like theories where the effective theory can be derived from the full theory by a combined strong coupling and hopping expansion. This expansion can be systematically improved order by order. Since there is no sign problem for the QCD-like theories we consider, we can compare our results to data from lattice calculations of the full theories to make qualitative and quantitative statements of the effective theory's validity. We start by deriving the effective theory up to next-to-next-to leading-order, in particular for two-color and G_2-QCD where replace the three colors in QCD with only two colors or respectively replace the gauge group SU(3) of QCD with G_2. We will then apply the effective theory at finite temperature mainly to test the theory and the implementation but also to make some predictions for the deconfinement phase transition in G_2 Yang-Mills theory. Finally, we turn our attention to the cold and dense regime of the phase diagram where we observe a sharp increase of the baryon density with the quark chemical potential μ, when μ reaches half the diquark mass. At vanishing temperature this is expected to happen in a quantum phase transition with Bose-Einstein-condensation of diquarks. In contrast to the liquid-gas transition in QCD, the phase transition to the Bose-Einstein condensate is continuous. We find evidence that the effective theories for heavy quarks are able to describe the qualitative difference between first and second order phase transitions. For even higher μ we find the rise of the

  1. Lattice simulations of QCD-like theories at finite baryon density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scior, Philipp Friedrich

    2016-07-13

    The exploration of the phase diagram of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is of great importance to describe e.g. the properties of neutron stars or heavy-ion collisions. Due to the sign problem of lattice QCD at finite chemical potential we need effective theories to study QCD at finite density. Here, we use a three-dimensional Polyakov-loop theory to study the phase diagrams of QCD-like theories. In particular, we investigate the heavy quark limit of the QCD-like theories where the effective theory can be derived from the full theory by a combined strong coupling and hopping expansion. This expansion can be systematically improved order by order. Since there is no sign problem for the QCD-like theories we consider, we can compare our results to data from lattice calculations of the full theories to make qualitative and quantitative statements of the effective theory's validity. We start by deriving the effective theory up to next-to-next-to leading-order, in particular for two-color and G{sub 2}-QCD where replace the three colors in QCD with only two colors or respectively replace the gauge group SU(3) of QCD with G{sub 2}. We will then apply the effective theory at finite temperature mainly to test the theory and the implementation but also to make some predictions for the deconfinement phase transition in G{sub 2} Yang-Mills theory. Finally, we turn our attention to the cold and dense regime of the phase diagram where we observe a sharp increase of the baryon density with the quark chemical potential μ, when μ reaches half the diquark mass. At vanishing temperature this is expected to happen in a quantum phase transition with Bose-Einstein-condensation of diquarks. In contrast to the liquid-gas transition in QCD, the phase transition to the Bose-Einstein condensate is continuous. We find evidence that the effective theories for heavy quarks are able to describe the qualitative difference between first and second order phase transitions. For even higher μ we

  2. Possible in-lattice confinement fusion (LCF). Dynamic application of atomic and nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawarasaki, Yuuki

    1995-01-01

    New scheme of a nuclear fusion reactor system is proposed, the basic concept of which comes from ingenious combination of hitherto developed techniques and verified facts; 1) so-called cold fusion (CF), 2) plasma of both magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF), and 3) accelerator-based D-T(D) neutron source. Details of the LCF reactor physics require dynamics of atomic data as well as nuclear data; interaction of ions with matters in solid and the problems of radiation damage. (author)

  3. Computer simulation system of neural PID control on nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yuzhong; Yang Kaijun; Shen Yongping

    2001-01-01

    Neural network proportional integral differential (PID) controller on nuclear reactor is designed, and the control process is simulated by computer. The simulation result show that neutral network PID controller can automatically adjust its parameter to ideal state, and good control result can be gotten in reactor control process

  4. Nuclear Application Programs Development and Integration for a Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun-Joon; Lee, Tae-Woo [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co., Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    KEPCO E and C participated in the NAPS (Nuclear Application Programs) development project for BNPP (Barakah Nuclear Power Plant) simulator. The 3KEY MASTER™ was adopted for this project, which is comprehensive simulation platform software developed by WSC (Western Services Corporation) for the development, and control of simulation software. The NAPS based on actual BNPP project was modified in order to meet specific requirements for nuclear power plant simulators. Considerations regarding software design for BNPP simulator and interfaces between the 3KM platform and application programs are discussed. The repeatability is one of functional requirements for nuclear power plant simulators. In order to migrate software from actual plants to simulators, software functions for storing and retrieving plant conditions and program variables should be implemented. In addition, software structures need to be redesigned to meet the repeatability, and source codes developed for actual plants would have to be optimized to reflect simulator’s characteristics as well. The synchronization is an important consideration to integrate external application programs into the 3KM simulator.

  5. NEPTUNIX, a general program of simulation applied to nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnemay, A.; Dansac Bon, V.

    1978-01-01

    Most simulation languages admit an incremental description and involve explicit integration algorithms. NEPTUNIX is a simulation language directly admitting algebraic differential equations under an implicit form, and it involves a very efficient implicit integration method with variable step and order. NEPTUNIX is a tool used for building large systems models in the field of nuclear reactors [fr

  6. Teaching simulator for divulgation of the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega B, M.G.; Gutierrez F, R.

    2003-01-01

    To solicitude of the authorities of the 'Universum' sciences museum of the UNAM, it develops a highly interactive computational system, to provide of information to the population in general about basic principles, uses and benefits of the nuclear energy. The objective is to achieve a better understanding and acceptance of the nuclear technology in our country. The system allows the visualization and simulation of nuclear processes as well as of its applications. The system is divided in three levels: basic, intermediate and simulation. In the basic level multimedia information is included on diverse basic concepts of the nuclear energy. The intermediate level includes the description and operation of some systems of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant (CNLV). Finally the simulation level contains representative scenarios that the user can control by means of virtual control panels of the main systems of the CNLV. Inside the system a part of interactive games is included with the purpose that the user remembers with more easiness all the concepts and advantages of the nuclear energy mentioned during the previous levels. The system contributes, by means of the development of multimedia computational tools and of simulation, to the popularization of the use and applications of the nuclear energy in Mexico. (Author)

  7. Rethinking Sensitivity Analysis of Nuclear Simulations with Topology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Paul Rosen; Andrea Alfonsi; Giovanni Pastore; Cristian Rabiti; Valerio Pascucci

    2016-01-01

    In nuclear engineering, understanding the safety margins of the nuclear reactor via simulations is arguably of paramount importance in predicting and preventing nuclear accidents. It is therefore crucial to perform sensitivity analysis to understand how changes in the model inputs affect the outputs. Modern nuclear simulation tools rely on numerical representations of the sensitivity information -- inherently lacking in visual encodings -- offering limited effectiveness in communicating and exploring the generated data. In this paper, we design a framework for sensitivity analysis and visualization of multidimensional nuclear simulation data using partition-based, topology-inspired regression models and report on its efficacy. We rely on the established Morse-Smale regression technique, which allows us to partition the domain into monotonic regions where easily interpretable linear models can be used to assess the influence of inputs on the output variability. The underlying computation is augmented with an intuitive and interactive visual design to effectively communicate sensitivity information to the nuclear scientists. Our framework is being deployed into the multi-purpose probabilistic risk assessment and uncertainty quantification framework RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual Control Environment). We evaluate our framework using an simulation dataset studying nuclear fuel performance.

  8. Flavour blindness and patterns of flavour symmetry breaking in lattice simulations of up, down and strange quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bietenholz, W. [Univ. Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares; Bornyakov, V. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Protovino (Russian Federation); Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Goeckeler, M. [Regensburg Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik] (and others)

    2011-02-15

    QCD lattice simulations with 2+1 flavours typically start at rather large up-down and strange quark masses and extrapolate first the strange quark mass to its physical value and then the up-down quark mass. An alternative method of tuning the quark masses is discussed here in which the singlet quark mass is kept fixed, which ensures that the kaon always has mass less than the physical kaon mass. Using group theory the possible quark mass polynomials for a Taylor expansion about the flavour symmetric line are found, first for the general 1+1+1 flavour case and then for the 2+1 flavour case (when two quark flavours are mass degenerate). These enable highly constrained fits to be used in the extrapolation of hadrons to the physical pion mass. Numerical results for the 2+1 flavour case confirm the usefulness of this expansion and an extrapolation to the physical pion mass gives hadron mass values to within a few percent of their experimental values. Singlet quantities remain constant which allows the lattice spacing to be determined from hadron masses (without necessarily being at the physical point). Furthermore an extension of this programme to include partially quenched results is also given. (orig.)

  9. Application of the lattice Boltzmann method for simulation of the mold filling process in the casting industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucki, Michal; Suchy, J. S.; Lelito, J.; Malinowski, P.; Sobczyk, J.

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this work is the development of the lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of the mold filling process. The authors present a simplified approach to the modeling of liquid metal-gas flows with particular emphasis on the interactions between these phases. The boundary condition for momentum transfer of the moving free surface to the gaseous phase is shown. Simultaneously, the method for modeling influence of gas back pressure on a position and shape of the interfacial boundary is explained in details. The problem of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) stability is also analyzed. Since large differences in viscosity of both fluids are a source of the model instability, the so-called fractional step (FS) method allowing to improve the computation stability is applied. The presented solution is verified on the bases of the available reference data and the results of experiments. It is shown that the model describes properly such effects as: gas bubbles formation and air back pressure, accompanying liquid-gas flows in the casting mold. At the same time the proposed approach is easy to be implemented and characterized by a lower demand of operating memory as compared to typical LBM models of two-phase flows.

  10. Hybrid lattice Boltzmann finite difference simulation of mixed convection flows in a lid-driven square cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettaibi, Soufiene, E-mail: Bettaibisoufiene@gmail.com [UR: Rayonnement Thermique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Kuznik, Frédéric [INSA-Lyon, CETHIL, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Université de Lyon, CNRS, UMR5008, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Sediki, Ezeddine [UR: Rayonnement Thermique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2014-06-27

    Highlights: • Mixed convection heat transfer in 2D lid-driven cavity is studied numerically. • Hybrid scheme with multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method is used to obtain the velocity field. • Finite difference method is used to compute the temperature. • Effect of both Richardson and Reynolds numbers for mixed convection is studied. - Abstract: Mixed convection heat transfer in two-dimensional lid-driven rectangular cavity filled with air (Pr=0.71) is studied numerically. A hybrid scheme with multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method (MRT-LBM) is used to obtain the velocity field while the temperature field is deduced from energy balance equation by using the finite difference method (FDM). The main objective of this work is to investigate the model effectiveness for mixed convection flow simulation. Results are presented in terms of streamlines, isotherms and Nusselt numbers. Excellent agreement is obtained between our results and previous works. The different comparisons demonstrate the robustness and the accuracy of our proposed approach.

  11. Testing the Standard Model and Fundamental Symmetries in Nuclear Physics with Lattice QCD and Effective Field Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker-Loud, Andre [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2016-10-14

    The research supported by this grant is aimed at probing the limits of the Standard Model through precision low-energy nuclear physics. The work of the PI (AWL) and additional personnel is to provide theory input needed for a number of potentially high-impact experiments, notably, hadronic parity violation, Dark Matter direct detection and searches for permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) in nucleons and nuclei. In all these examples, a quantitative understanding of low-energy nuclear physics from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), is necessary to interpret the experimental results. The main theoretical tools used and developed in this work are the numerical solution to QCD known as lattice QCD (LQCD) and Effective Field Theory (EFT). This grant is supporting a new research program for the PI, and as such, needed to be developed from the ground up. Therefore, the first fiscal year of this grant, 08/01/2014-07/31/2015, has been spent predominantly establishing this new research effort. Very good progress has been made, although, at this time, there are not many publications to show for the effort. After one year, the PI accepted a job at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, so this final report covers just a single year of five years of the grant.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann simulation for the energy and entropy of excitable systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Min-Yi; Tang Guo-Ning; Kong Ling-Jiang; Liu Mu-Ren

    2011-01-01

    The internal energy and the spatiotemporal entropy of excitable systems are investigated with the lattice Boltzmann method. The numerical results show that the breakup of spiral wave is attributed to the inadequate supply of energy, i.e., the internal energy of system is smaller than the energy of self-sustained spiral wave. It is observed that the average internal energy of a regular wave state reduces with its spatiotemporal entropy decreasing. Interestingly, although the energy difference between two regular wave states is very small, the different states can be distinguished obviously due to the large difference between their spatiotemporal entropies. In addition, when the unstable spiral wave converts into the spatiotemporal chaos, the internal energy of system decreases, while the spatiotemporal entropy increases, which behaves as the thermodynamic entropy in an isolated system.

  13. Nucleon electromagnetic form factors using lattice simulations at the physical point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrou, C.; Cyprus Univ., Nicosia; Constantinou, M.; Hadjiyiannakou, K.; Kallidonis, C.; Koutsou, G.; Jansen, K.; Vaquero Aviles-Casco, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present results for the nucleon electromagnetic form factors using an ensemble of maximally twisted mass clover-improved fermions with pion mass of about 130 MeV. We use multiple sink-source separations and three analysis methods to probe ground-state dominance. We evaluate both the connected and disconnected contributions to the nucleon matrix elements. We find that the disconnected quark loop contributions to the isoscalar matrix elements are small giving an upper bound of up to 2% of the connected and smaller than its statistical error. We present results for the isovector and isoscalar electric and magnetic Sachs form factors and the corresponding proton and neutron form factors. By fitting the momentum dependence of the form factors to a dipole form or to the z-expansion we extract the nucleon electric and magnetic radii, as well as, the magnetic moment. We compare our results to experiment as well as to other recent lattice QCD calculations.

  14. Stochastic inflation lattice simulations: Ultra-large scale structure of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salopek, D.S.

    1990-11-01

    Non-Gaussian fluctuations for structure formation may arise in inflation from the nonlinear interaction of long wavelength gravitational and scalar fields. Long wavelength fields have spatial gradients α -1 triangledown small compared to the Hubble radius, and they are described in terms of classical random fields that are fed by short wavelength quantum noise. Lattice Langevin calculations are given for a ''toy model'' with a scalar field interacting with an exponential potential where one can obtain exact analytic solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation. For single scalar field models that are consistent with current microwave background fluctuations, the fluctuations are Gaussian. However, for scales much larger than our observable Universe, one expects large metric fluctuations that are non-Guassian. This example illuminates non-Gaussian models involving multiple scalar fields which are consistent with current microwave background limits. 21 refs., 3 figs

  15. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of bubble formation in a microfluidic T-junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Bower, Luz; Lee, Taehun

    2011-06-28

    A lattice Boltzmann equation method based on the Cahn-Hilliard diffuse interface theory is developed to investigate the bubble formation process in a microchannel with T-junction mixing geometry. The bubble formation process has different regimes, namely, squeezing, dripping and jetting regimes, which correspond to the primary forces acting on the system. Transition from regime to regime is generally dictated by the capillary number Ca, volumetric flow ratio Q and viscosity ratio λ. A systematic analysis is performed to evaluate these effects. The computations are performed in the range of 10(-4)

  16. Moment-based boundary conditions for lattice Boltzmann simulations of natural convection in cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2016-06-29

    We study a multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann model for natural convection with moment-based boundary conditions. The unknown primary variables of the algorithm at a boundary are found by imposing conditions directly upon hydrodynamic moments, which are then translated into conditions for the discrete velocity distribution functions. The method is formulated so that it is consistent with the second order implementation of the discrete velocity Boltzmann equations for fluid flow and temperature. Natural convection in square cavities is studied for Rayleigh numbers ranging from 103 to 108. An excellent agreement with benchmark data is observed and the flow fields are shown to converge with second order accuracy. Copyright © 2016 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

  17. Nucleon electromagnetic form factors using lattice simulations at the physical point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrou, C. [The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus). Computation-based Science and Technology Research Center; Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Constantinou, M. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Hadjiyiannakou, K.; Kallidonis, C.; Koutsou, G. [The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus). Computation-based Science and Technology Research Center; Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Vaquero Aviles-Casco, A. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2017-09-20

    We present results for the nucleon electromagnetic form factors using an ensemble of maximally twisted mass clover-improved fermions with pion mass of about 130 MeV. We use multiple sink-source separations and three analysis methods to probe ground-state dominance. We evaluate both the connected and disconnected contributions to the nucleon matrix elements. We find that the disconnected quark loop contributions to the isoscalar matrix elements are small giving an upper bound of up to 2% of the connected and smaller than its statistical error. We present results for the isovector and isoscalar electric and magnetic Sachs form factors and the corresponding proton and neutron form factors. By fitting the momentum dependence of the form factors to a dipole form or to the z-expansion we extract the nucleon electric and magnetic radii, as well as, the magnetic moment. We compare our results to experiment as well as to other recent lattice QCD calculations.

  18. Three-dimensional simulations of Bingham plastic flows with the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-Gui Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D parallel multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model (MRT-LBM for Bingham plastics which overcomes numerical instabilities in the simulation of non-Newtonian fluids for the Bhatnagar–Gross–Krook (BGK model. The MRT-LBM and several related mathematical models are briefly described. Papanastasiou’s modified model is incorporated for better numerical stability. The impact of the relaxation parameters of the model is studied in detail. The MRT-LBM is then validated through a benchmark problem: a 3D steady Poiseuille flow. The results from the numerical simulations are consistent with those derived analytically which indicates that the MRT-LBM effectively simulates Bingham fluids but with better stability. A parallel MRT-LBM framework is introduced, and the parallel efficiency is tested through a simple case. The MRT-LBM is shown to be appropriate for parallel implementation and to have high efficiency. Finally, a Bingham fluid flowing past a square-based prism with a fixed sphere is simulated. It is found the drag coefficient is a function of both Reynolds number (Re and Bingham number (Bn. These results reveal the flow behavior of Bingham plastics.

  19. Progress on Beam-Plasma Effect Simulations in Muon Ionization Cooling Lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, James [IIT, Chicago; Snopok, Pavel [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    New computational tools are essential for accurate modeling and simulation of the next generation of muon-based accelerators. One of the crucial physics processes specific to muon accelerators that has not yet been simulated in detail is beam-induced plasma effect in liquid, solid, and gaseous absorbers. We report here on the progress of developing the required simulation tools and applying them to study the properties of plasma and its effects on the beam in muon ionization cooling channels.

  20. Entanglement measures in embedding quantum simulators with nuclear spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tao; Pedernales, Julen S.; Solano, Enrique; Long, Gui-Lu

    2018-02-01

    We implement an embedding quantum simulator (EQS) in nuclear spin systems. The experiment consists of a simulator of up to three qubits, plus a single ancillary qubit, where we are able to efficiently measure the concurrence and the three-tangle of two-qubit and three-qubit systems as they undergo entangling dynamics. The EQS framework allows us to drastically reduce the number of measurements needed for this task, which otherwise would require full-state reconstruction of the qubit system. Our simulator is built of the nuclear spins of four 13C atoms in a molecule of trans-crotonic acid manipulated with NMR techniques.

  1. Equipment and performance upgrade of compact nuclear simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Chang; Kwon, Kee Choon; Cha, Hyung Ho; Park, Won Man; Song, Soon Ja; Seh, Kyung Won; Joo, Young Chang

    1998-12-01

    In this project, the techniques to upgrade obsolescent nuclear power plant simulation were developed: the simulation code operated in Macro-VAX II has been transplanted to the HP workstation: commercial equipment PLC was adopted for the interface system: the protection logic was developed in the prototype level: and the display system was strengthened. These techniques can be directly used to upgrade other obsolescent simulators

  2. Equipment and performance upgrade of compact nuclear simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Chang; Kwon, Kee Choon; Cha, Hyung Ho; Park, Won Man; Song, Soon Ja; Seh, Kyung Won; Joo, Young Chang

    1998-12-01

    In this project, the techniques to upgrade obsolescent nuclear power plant simulation were developed: the simulation code operated in Macro-VAX II has been transplanted to the HP workstation: commercial equipment PLC was adopted for the interface system: the protection logic was developed in the prototype level: and the display system was strengthened. These techniques can be directly used to upgrade other obsolescent simulators.

  3. Principle simulator for a PWR nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, B.

    1975-05-01

    A report is given on a simulator developed for the training of operational and planning staff for the Lovisa nuclear power station in Finland. All main components of the power station are illustrated and trainees can operate the simulator in the power range 3-100 %. The model was originally developed for planning the control system of Lovisa I, for which reason the simulator project could be carried out on a relatively limited budget. (author)

  4. The online simulation of core physics in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Qiang

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional power distribution in core is one of the most important status variables of nuclear reactor. In order to monitor the 3-D in core power distribution timely and accurately, the online simulation system of core physics was designed in the paper. This system combines core physics simulation with the data, which is from the plant and reactor instrumentation. The design of the system consists of the hardware part and the software part. The online simulation system consists of a main simulation computer and a simulation operation station. The online simulation system software includes of the real-time simulation support software, the system communication software, the simulation program and the simulation interface software. Two-group and three-dimensional neutron kinetics model with six groups delayed neutrons was used in the real-time simulation of nuclear reactor core physics. According to the characteristics of the nuclear reactor, the core was divided into many nodes. Resolving the neutron equation, the method of separate variables was used. The input data from the plant and reactor instrumentation system consist of core thermal power, loop temperatures and pressure, control rod positions, boron concentration, core exit thermocouple data, Excore detector signals, in core flux detectors signals. There are two purposes using the data, one is to ensure that the model is as close as the current actual reactor condition, and the other is to calibrate the calculated power distribution. In this paper, the scheme of the online simulation system was introduced. Under the real-time simulation support system, the simulation program is being compiled. Compared with the actual operational data, the elementary simulation results were reasonable and correct. (author)

  5. Lattice Boltzmann simulation on the liquid junction potential in a concentration fuel cell. Paper no. IGEC-1-060

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.; Huh, K.Y.; Li, X.

    2005-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is applied to investigate the liquid junction potential (LJP) at an interface between two electrolyte layers. The Poisson equation for electrostatic field is solved to extend the applicable range to micro and nano scales in which electroneutrality does not hold. The LBM solutions are validated against analytical and finite difference method (FDM) results for evolution of concentration, net charge density and electrostatic potential. Noticeable separation of the concentration profiles of positive and negative ions occurs for kd less than 67 in simulation, where k is the inverse of the thickness of electrical double layer and d is the system length. Parametric study is performed for the peak potential and the time to reach the peak with respect to kd and ξ which is the initial thickness ratio of the lower concentration to entire stream. Simple coding and easy parallelization will allow the LBM to make an efficient analysis tool for complex electrochemical systems. (author)

  6. Deformation of Two-Dimensional Nonuniform-Membrane Red Blood Cells Simulated by a Lattice Boltzmann Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua-Bing, Li; Li, Jin; Bing, Qiu

    2008-01-01

    To study two-dimensional red blood cells deforming in a shear Bow with the membrane nonuniform on the rigidity and mass, the membrane is discretized into equilength segments. The fluid inside and outside the red blood cell is simulated by the D2Q9 lattice Boltzmann model and the hydrodynamic forces exerted on the membrane from the inner and outer of the red blood cell are calculated by a stress-integration method. Through the global deviation from the curvature of uniform-membrane, we find that when the membrane is nonuniform on the rigidity, the deviation first decreases with the time increases and implies that the terminal profile of the red blood cell is static. To a red blood cell with the mass nonuniform on the membrane, the deviation becomes more large, and the mass distribution affects the profile of the two sides of the flattened red blood cell in a shear flow. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  7. A Lattice-Boltzmann model to simulate diffractive nonlinear ultrasound beam propagation in a dissipative fluid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Mohamad; Hajihasani, Mojtaba; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2012-12-01

    Ultrasound waves have been widely used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications. Accurate and effective simulation of ultrasound beam propagation and its interaction with tissue has been proved to be important. The nonlinear nature of the ultrasound beam propagation, especially in the therapeutic regime, plays an important role in the mechanisms of interaction with tissue. There are three main approaches in current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to model and simulate nonlinear ultrasound beams: macroscopic, mesoscopic and microscopic approaches. In this work, a mesoscopic CFD method based on the Lattice-Boltzmann model (LBM) was investigated. In the developed method, the Boltzmann equation is evolved to simulate the flow of a Newtonian fluid with the collision model instead of solving the Navier-Stokes, continuity and state equations which are used in conventional CFD methods. The LBM has some prominent advantages over conventional CFD methods, including: (1) its parallel computational nature; (2) taking microscopic boundaries into account; and (3) capability of simulating in porous and inhomogeneous media. In our proposed method, the propagating medium is discretized with a square grid in 2 dimensions with 9 velocity vectors for each node. Using the developed model, the nonlinear distortion and shock front development of a finiteamplitude diffractive ultrasonic beam in a dissipative fluid medium was computed and validated against the published data. The results confirm that the LBM is an accurate and effective approach to model and simulate nonlinearity in finite-amplitude ultrasound beams with Mach numbers of up to 0.01 which, among others, falls within the range of therapeutic ultrasound regime such as high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) beams. A comparison between the HIFU nonlinear beam simulations using the proposed model and pseudospectral methods in a 2D geometry is presented.

  8. Nuclear Power Plant Simulators: Goals and Evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, J.

    2008-01-01

    OECD / CSNI organised two Specialists Meetings in the field of plant simulators. With the development of the digital computation technology the progress in this field has been fast and there was a distinct need for reviewing the current state-of-the-art and the future development. The meeting were hosted by the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), and they were arranged in 1992 and 1997. The paper discusses the evolution of the simulator technology and especially modelling of the main systems in the simulators used for the operator training and evaluation of the plant characteristics. The model development in 1990 was rapid due the increased computer capability and an interest towards the severe transients and full 3 D core neutronic simulation. The analysis models without real time calculation capability included a detailed model for the primary circuit, core or containment. The simulator models tried to describe the entire plant, but the primary circuit, core and containment were described with a robust, fast running model. After rapid development in the computational speed the detailed analysis models and robust simulator models do not need to be considered separately anymore. But there are new features, which force the simulator technology following the development. The hard control panels are replaced by CRT's, and / or the programmable digital technology replaces the analogue automation. The future full-scope simulators are replica's of the Crt control room and programmed automation. Only the process itself is calculated by the codes. One could ask, how with the fast development the state-of-the-art in 1992 and 1997 is useful still in 2008 in this fast developing area. One argument may be that understanding the history may help in creating the new understanding. And in fact many visions for the future were seen in those meeting. Some of them have been realized, some other not.

  9. Simulation of nuclear fuel reprocessing for safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canty, M.J.; Dayem, H.A.; Kern, E.A.; Spannagel, G.

    1983-11-01

    For safeguarding the chemical process area of future reprocessing plants the near-real-time material accountancy (NRTMA) method might be applied. Experimental data are not yet available for testing the capability of the NRTMA method but can be simulated using a digital computer. This report describes the mathematical modeling of the Pu-bearing components of reprocessing plants and presents first results obtained by simulation models. (orig.) [de

  10. An adaptive mesh refinement-multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver for simulation of complex binary fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, H. Z.; Wang, Y.; Shu, C.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents an adaptive mesh refinement-multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver (AMR-MLBFS) for effective simulation of complex binary fluid flows at large density ratios. In this method, an AMR algorithm is proposed by introducing a simple indicator on the root block for grid refinement and two possible statuses for each block. Unlike available block-structured AMR methods, which refine their mesh by spawning or removing four child blocks simultaneously, the present method is able to refine its mesh locally by spawning or removing one to four child blocks independently when the refinement indicator is triggered. As a result, the AMR mesh used in this work can be more focused on the flow region near the phase interface and its size is further reduced. In each block of mesh, the recently proposed MLBFS is applied for the solution of the flow field and the level-set method is used for capturing the fluid interface. As compared with existing AMR-lattice Boltzmann models, the present method avoids both spatial and temporal interpolations of density distribution functions so that converged solutions on different AMR meshes and uniform grids can be obtained. The proposed method has been successfully validated by simulating a static bubble immersed in another fluid, a falling droplet, instabilities of two-layered fluids, a bubble rising in a box, and a droplet splashing on a thin film with large density ratios and high Reynolds numbers. Good agreement with the theoretical solution, the uniform-grid result, and/or the published data has been achieved. Numerical results also show its effectiveness in saving computational time and virtual memory as compared with computations on uniform meshes.

  11. Scientific codes developed and used at GRS. Nuclear simulation chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffrath, Andreas; Sonnenkalb, Martin; Sievers, Juergen; Luther, Wolfgang; Velkov, Kiril [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching/Muenchen (Germany). Forschungszentrum

    2016-05-15

    Over 60 technical experts of the reactor safety research division of the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH are developing and validating reliable methods and computer codes - summarized under the term nuclear simulation chain - for the safety-related assessment for all types of nuclear power plants (NPP) and other nuclear facilities considering the current state of science and technology. This nuclear simulation chain has to be able to simulate and assess all relevant physical processes and phenomena for all operating states and (severe) accidents. In the present contribution, the nuclear simulation chain developed and applied by GRS as well as selected examples of its application are presented. The latter demonstrate impressively the width of its scope and its performance. The GRS codes can be passed on request to other (national as well as international) organizations. This contributes to a worldwide increase of the nuclear safety standards. The code transfer is especially important for developing and emerging countries lacking the financial means and/or the necessary know-how for this purpose. At the end of this contribution, the respective course of action is described.

  12. Application of virtual reality to simulation in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Pengfei; Yang Yanhua; Yang Yongmu; Duan Dongdong; Luo Jie

    2008-01-01

    Based on detailed analysis of the structure and key techniques of a virtual reality system, the applications of virtual reality to simulation in nuclear power plant (NPP) were developed. In order to meet the requirement of simulation in NPP, motion simulation of control rod drive system, walking system inside the containment and virtual main control room were presented. A simulator of NPP was connected to interchange dynamic data between virtual main control room and the simulator. The simulating results show that the technique of virtual reality can be applied well to the simulation inside containment, which is filled with activity material, and the simulation of virtual main control room, where human factors must be considered. It also can be used well to design virtual education and training system of NPP. (authors)

  13. Quantum simulation of spin models on an arbitrary lattice with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenblit, S; Kafri, D; Campbell, W C; Islam, R; Edwards, E E; Monroe, C; Gong, Z-X; Lin, G-D; Duan, L-M; Kim, J; Kim, K

    2012-01-01

    A collection of trapped atomic ions represents one of the most attractive platforms for the quantum simulation of interacting spin networks and quantum magnetism. Spin-dependent optical dipole forces applied to an ion crystal create long-range effective spin–spin interactions and allow the simulation of spin Hamiltonians that possess nontrivial phases and dynamics. Here we show how the appropriate design of laser fields can provide for arbitrary multidimensional spin–spin interaction graphs even for the case of a linear spatial array of ions. This scheme uses currently available trap technology and is scalable to levels where the classical methods of simulation are intractable. (paper)

  14. Forced vibration tests and simulation analyses of a nuclear reactor building. Part 2: simulation analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuno, M.; Nakagawa, S.; Momma, T.; Naito, Y.; Niwa, M.; Motohashi, S.

    1995-01-01

    Forced vibration tests of a BWR-type reactor building. Hamaoka Unit 4, were performed. Valuable data on the dynamic characteristics of the soil-structure interaction system were obtained through the tests. Simulation analyses of the fundamental dynamic characteristics of the soil-structure system were conducted, using a basic lumped mass soil-structure model (lattice model), and strong correlation with the measured data was obtained. Furthermore, detailed simulation models were employed to investigate the effects of simultaneously induced vertical response and response of the adjacent turbine building on the lateral response of the reactor building. (author). 4 refs., 11 figs

  15. Lattice Boltzmann method and gas-kinetic BGK scheme in the low-Mach number viscous flow simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Kun; He Xiaoyi

    2003-01-01

    Both lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and the gas-kinetic BGK scheme are based on the numerical discretization of the Boltzmann equation with collisional models, such as, the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) model. LBM tracks limited number of particles and the viscous flow behavior emerges automatically from the intrinsic particle stream and collisions process. On the other hand, the gas-kinetic BGK scheme is a finite volume scheme, where the time-dependent gas distribution function with continuous particle velocity space is constructed and used in the evaluation of the numerical fluxes across cell interfaces. Currently, LBM is mainly used for low Mach number, nearly incompressible flow simulation. For the gas-kinetic scheme, the application is focusing on the high speed compressible flows. In this paper, we are going to compare both schemes in the isothermal low-Mach number flow simulations. The methodology for developing both schemes will be clarified through the introduction of operator splitting Boltzmann model and operator averaging Boltzmann model. From the operator splitting Boltzmann model, the error rooted in many kinetic schemes, which are based on the decoupling of particle transport and collision, can be easily understood. As to the test case, we choose to use the 2D cavity flow since it is one of the most extensively studied cases. Detailed simulation results with different Reynolds numbers, as well as the benchmark solutions, are presented

  16. New Approach to Simulation of Heat State of Compartments from Lattice Composite Shells for Space Engineering Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razin Alexander F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to the simulation of the heat state of the compartment of lattice polymer composite materials (PCM, not providing for the use of known commercial software packages, has been proposed. The simulation has been performed using the PCM interstage of the Proton rocket as an example with due account of aerodynamic heating, solar radiation and acting of jets of auxiliary propulsion units. At the first stage of numerical analysis, a problem of unsteady heat conduction in the system “skin-air gap-heat insulation” has been solved. An effect of changing a pressure inside a compartment on thermal conductivity of heat insulation was taken into account. The effective thermal conductivity in gaps was used. An effect of a temperature of equipment on a value of radiant heat flux was also taken into account. At the second stage, the heat state of the system “skin-rib” was analyzed. A mathematical model in the form of a system of nonlinear equations for heat balance of control elements on which a rib and a skin section were partitioned, including an information about a temperature of heat insulation received at the first stage of the simulation, was used.

  17. Off-lattice pattern recognition scheme for kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Kara, Abdelkader; Shah, Syed Islamuddin; Rahman, Talat S.

    2012-01-01

    We report the development of a pattern-recognition scheme for the off-lattice self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method, one that is simple and flexible enough that it can be applied to all types of surfaces. In this scheme, to uniquely identify the local environment and associated processes involving three-dimensional (3D) motion of an atom or atoms, space around a central atom is divided into 3D rectangular boxes. The dimensions and the number of 3D boxes are determined by the accuracy with which a process needs to be identified and a process is described as the central atom moving to a neighboring vacant box accompanied by the motion of any other atom or atoms in its surrounding boxes. As a test of this method to we apply it to examine the decay of 3D Cu islands on the Cu(100) and to the surface diffusion of a Cu monomer and a dimer on Cu(111) and compare the results and computational efficiency to those available in the literature.

  18. Effect of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels: Lattice Boltzmann simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Yakang [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao, Shandong 266580 (China); College of Science, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China); Liu, Xuefeng, E-mail: liuxf@upc.edu.cn [College of Science, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China); Liu, Zilong [College of Science, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China); Lu, Shuangfang [Institute of Unconventional Oil & Gas and New Energy, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China); Xue, Qingzhong, E-mail: xueqingzhong@tsinghua.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao, Shandong 266580 (China); College of Science, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China); National Production Equipment Research Center, Dongying 257064, Shandong (China)

    2016-04-15

    A novel interfacial model was proposed to understand water flow mechanism in nanochannels. Based on our pore-throat nanochannel model, the effect of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels was quantitatively studied using Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). It is found that both the permeability of nanochannel and water velocity in the nanochannel dramatically decrease with increasing the thickness of interfacial layer. The permeability of nanochannel with pore radius of 10 nm decreases by about three orders of magnitude when the thickness of interfacial layer is changed from 0 nm to 3 nm gradually. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the cross-section shape has a great effect on the water flow inside nanochannel and the effect of interfacial layer on the permeability of nanochannel has a close relationship with cross-section shape when the pore size is smaller than 12 nm. Besides, both pore-throat ratio and throat length can greatly affect water flow in nanochannels, and the influence of interfacial layer on water flow in nanochannels becomes more evident with increasing pore-throat ratio and throat length. Our theoretical results provide a simple and effective method to study the flow phenomena in nano-porous media, particularly to quantitatively study the interfacial layer effect in nano-porous media.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of the Hydrodynamic Entrance Region of Rectangular Microchannels in the Slip Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niya Ma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing a three-dimensional laminar flow in the entrance region of rectangular microchannels has been investigated in this paper. When the hydrodynamic development length is the same magnitude as the microchannel length, entrance effects have to be taken into account, especially in relatively short ducts. Simultaneously, there are a variety of non-continuum or rarefaction effects, such as velocity slip and temperature jump. The available data in the literature appearing on this issue is quite limited, the available study is the semi-theoretical approximate model to predict pressure drop of developing slip flow in rectangular microchannels with different aspect ratios. In this paper, we apply the lattice Boltzmann equation method (LBE to investigate the developing slip flow through a rectangular microchannel. The effects of the Reynolds number (1 < Re < 1000, channel aspect ratio (0 < ε < 1, and Knudsen number (0.001 < Kn < 0.1 on the dimensionless hydrodynamic entrance length, and the apparent friction factor, and Reynolds number product, are examined in detail. The numerical solution of LBM can recover excellent agreement with the available data in the literature, which proves its accuracy in capturing fundamental fluid characteristics in the slip-flow regime.

  20. Nanoscopic analysis using Maruhn-Greiner theory by energy based variables in lattice for low energy nuclear reactions (LENRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hyo Sung; WooTae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Maruhn-Greiner theory is investigated for the low energy nuclear reactions (LENRs) in the aspect of the energy productions. Conventional nuclear reactions could give the hints in another kind of the nuclear theoretical utilizations. The results of simulations show the ranges of the configurations for H-ion to Pd with 10; 000 ions as 10 and 180 keV. The most probable ranges are 30 and 600 nanometers respectively. In the simulation result of broad energy regions, the cutoff energy, 350 keV , is very significant in analyzing the LENR, because the range usually depends on the entering particle, target particle, and energy of the entering particle. Therefore, the 350 keV shows there is priority for hydrogen interaction from the energy. In the analysis, the water (H_2O) has the better possibility in LENR after the 350 keV . Following the simulation for searching LENRs, the possible conditions that include the energy based variables of atomic ranges, Debye length, and reaction time has been investigated for the designed energy productions

  1. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in n -type insulating and metallic GaAs single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J.; Hoch, M. J. R.; Kuhns, P. L.; Moulton, W. G.; Gan, Z.; Reyes, A. P.

    2006-09-01

    The coupling of electron and nuclear spins in n-GaAs changes significantly as the donor concentration n increases through the insulator-metal critical concentration nC˜1.2×1016cm-3 . The present measurements of the Ga71 relaxation rates W made as a function of magnetic field (1-13T) and temperature (1.5-300K) for semi-insulating GaAs and for three doped n-GaAs samples with donor concentrations n=5.9×1015 , 7×1016 , and 2×1018cm-3 , show marked changes in the relaxation behavior with n . Korringa-like relaxation is found in both metallic samples for T30K phonon-induced nuclear quadrupolar relaxation is dominant. The relaxation rate measurements permit determination of the electron probability density at Ga71 sites. A small Knight shift of -3.3ppm was measured on the most metallic (2×1018cm-3) sample using magic-angle spinning at room temperature. For the n=5.9×1015cm-3 sample, a nuclear relaxation model involving the Fermi contact hyperfine interaction, rapid spin diffusion, and exchange coupled local moments is proposed. While the relaxation rate behavior with temperature for the weakly metallic sample, n=7×1016cm-3 , is similar to that found for the just-insulating sample, the magnetic field dependence is quite different. For the 5.9×1015cm-3 sample, increasing the magnetic field leads to a decrease in the relaxation rate, while for the 7×1016cm-3 sample this results in an increase in the relaxation rate ascribed to an increase in the density of states at the Fermi level as the Landau level degeneracy is increased.

  2. Application of Nuclear Application Programs to APR1400 Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Do Hyun; Lee, Myeong Soo; Hong, Jin Hyuk

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Power Reactor 1400MWe (APR1400) simulator has been developed and installed at Kori Training Center for operators of ShinKori no.3, 4 nuclear power plant by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power,s Central Research Institute (KHNP CRI). NAPS (Nuclear Application Programs) is a computerbased system which provides operators with past and real-time information for monitoring and controlling NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System), BOP (Balance Of Plant) and Electric system. NAPS consists of several programs such as COLSS (Core Operating Limit Supervisory System), SPADES+ (Safety Parameter Display and Evaluation System), CEA (Control Element Assembly) Application Program, and so on. Each program makes calculations based on its own algorithm and provides information available for operation. In order to use NAPS programs with a simulator even though they are being used in a real plant, they should be modified to add several simulation functions such as reset, snap, run/freeze and backtrack required by ANSI/ANS-3.5 to the original NAPS functionality. On top of that, interfacing programs should be developed for the data communication between respective NAPS programs and simulator sever. The purpose of this paper is to provide the overall architecture of the communication system between NAPS and simulator model, and to describe the method to apply NAPS to APR1400 simulator

  3. Nuclear power plant diagnostics study at the Midland training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifman, J.; Rank, P.; Lee, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    Training simulators provide a real world environment for testing advanced diagnostic and control systems as an aid to nuclear power plant operators. The simulators not only duplicate the hardware din the actual control room, allowing for analysis of man-machine interface, but also represent the dynamic behavior of the reference plant in real-time, in a realistic manner. Training simulators provide the means to representing the reference plant operations in a wide range of operation conditions including off-normal and emergency conditions. Transient events with very low probability of occurrence can then be represented and used to test the capabilities of advanced diagnostic and control systems. For these reasons, full-scope operator training simulators have been used as a test bed for a number of advanced diagnostic concepts. The University of Michigan and Consumers Power Company have been collaborating in a program devoted to the development and study of advanced concepts for automatic diagnostics and control of nuclear power plants. The program has been focused on the use of the full-scope operator training Midland Nuclear Power Plant Unit 2 (MNP-2) Simulator for development, testing, and verification of advanced diagnostics concepts. In their current efforts, the authors have developed two artificial intelligent (AI) diagnostic concepts that have been applied to the MNP-2 Simulator: the systematic generation and updating of a rule-based knowledge system for nuclear power plant diagnostics and a nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm called the simulation filter. The simulation filter algorithm is used with the MNP-2 Simulator to improve the simulation of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. 11 refs., 4 figs

  4. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Analysis and Simulation Tool (FAST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Won Il; Kwon, Eun Ha; Kim, Ho Dong

    2005-06-15

    This paper describes the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Analysis and Simulation Tool (FAST) which has been developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Categorizing various mix of nuclear reactors and fuel cycles into 11 scenario groups, the FAST calculates all the required quantities for each nuclear fuel cycle component, such as mining, conversion, enrichment and fuel fabrication for each scenario. A major advantage of the FAST is that the code employs a MS Excel spread sheet with the Visual Basic Application, allowing users to manipulate it with ease. The speed of the calculation is also quick enough to make comparisons among different options in a considerably short time. This user-friendly simulation code is expected to be beneficial to further studies on the nuclear fuel cycle to find best options for the future all proliferation risk, environmental impact and economic costs considered.

  5. Development of Northeast Asia Nuclear Power Plant Accident Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juyub; Kim, Juyoul; Po, Li-Chi Cliff

    2017-06-15

    A conclusion from the lessons learned after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi accident was that Korea needs a tool to estimate consequences from a major accident that could occur at a nuclear power plant located in a neighboring country. This paper describes a suite of computer-based codes to be used by Korea's nuclear emergency response staff for training and potentially operational support in Korea's national emergency preparedness and response program. The systems of codes, Northeast Asia Nuclear Accident Simulator (NANAS), consist of three modules: source-term estimation, atmospheric dispersion prediction and dose assessment. To quickly assess potential doses to the public in Korea, NANAS includes specific reactor data from the nuclear power plants in China, Japan and Taiwan. The completed simulator is demonstrated using data for a hypothetical release. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. DSNP: a new approach to simulate nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saphier, D.

    1977-01-01

    The DSNP (Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power-plants) is a special purpose block oriented simulation language. It provides for simulations of a large variety of nuclear power plants or various parts of the power plant in a simple straightforward manner. The system is composed of five basic elements, namely, the DSNP language, the precompiler-or the DSNP language translator, the components library, the document generator, and the system data files. The DSNP library of modules includes the selfcontained models of components or physical processes found in a nuclear power plant, and various auxiliary modules such as material properties, control modules, integration schemes, various basic transfer functions etc. In its final form DSNP will have four libraries

  7. Simulations. 3D nuclear reactions; Simulations. Reactions nucleaires en 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleurence, Guillaume

    2012-05-15

    At CEA Saclay, the research programme for the forth generation of nuclear reactors, named 'Astrid' (Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration) of the Direction of nuclear energy (DEN), uses 2D or 3D movies and a 16 m{sup 2} image wall for the display of simulation results. This digest paper focusses on the technological means used for the simulations: the Curie supercomputer designed by Bull and the images display device. (J.S.)

  8. Simulation in training for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stammers, R.B.

    1979-08-01

    The need for simulation in nuclear operator training is reviewed, and the use of simulators is justified on a number of criteria. The role of simulators is discussed against the background of training media that are or could be used. The question of the degree of realism or fidelity of simulation is tackled, with comparisons being made between views from the industry and views from the area of instructional technology. Training research in the general area of process control is outlined and emphasis is placed on the importance of instructional control. Finally, some future directions for study are sketched. (author)

  9. IAEA activities in nuclear reactor simulation for educational purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badulescu, A.; Lyon, R.

    2001-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established a programme in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education and training. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the supply or development of simulation programs and training material, sponsors training courses and workshops, and distributes documentation and computer programs. Currently, the IAEA has simulation programs available for distribution that simulate the behaviour of BWR, PWR and HWR reactor types. (authors)

  10. Off-line programming and simulation in handling nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.P.

    1993-10-01

    IGRIP was used to create a simulation of the robotic workcell design for handling components at the PANTEX nuclear arms facility. This initial simulation identified problems with the customer's proposed worker layout, and allowed a correction to be proposed. Refinement of the IGRIP simulation allowed the design and construction of a workcell mock-up and accurate off-line programming of the system. IGRIP's off-line programming capabilities are being used to develop the motion control code for the workcell. PNLs success in this area suggests that simulation and off-line programming may be valuable tools for developing robotics in some automation resistant industries

  11. A special purpose simulation language for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saphier, D.

    1980-01-01

    A special purpose block-oriented simulation language, 'The Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power Plants' (DSNP), was developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The dominant feature of DSNP is the ability to transform a power plant flowchart or block diagram directly into a simulation program. The user is required to recognize the symbolic DSNP statements for the appropriate physical component, and list these statements in a logical sequence according to the flow of physical properties in the simulated power plant. At present most of the component models in DSNP are of the lumped parameter type. Although DSNP is a special purpose simulation language, it also has all the features of a general purpose simulation language, and in particular a powerful macro processor. The use of DSNP is demonstrated by a sample problem simulating a reactor startup accident. (Auth.)

  12. Simulating Growth Kinetics in a Data-Parallel 3D Lattice Photobioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Husselmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Though there have been many attempts to address growth kinetics in algal photobioreactors, surprisingly little have attempted an agent-based modelling (ABM approach. ABM has been heralded as a method of practical scientific inquiry into systems of a complex nature and has been applied liberally in a range of disciplines including ecology, physics, social science, and microbiology with special emphasis on pathogenic bacterial growth. We bring together agent-based simulation with the Photosynthetic Factory (PSF model, as well as certain key bioreactor characteristics in a visual 3D, parallel computing fashion. Despite being at small scale, the simulation gives excellent visual cues on the dynamics of such a reactor, and we further investigate the model in a variety of ways. Our parallel implementation on graphical processing units of the simulation provides key advantages, which we also briefly discuss. We also provide some performance data, along with particular effort in visualisation, using volumetric and isosurface rendering.

  13. Numerical simulation of electroosmotic flow in rough microchannels using the lattice Poisson-Nernst-Planck methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Reza; Soloklou, Mohsen Nasiri; Hadidi, Hooman

    2018-05-01

    In this study, coupled Lattice Boltzmann method is applied to solve the dynamic model for an electroosmotic flow and investigate the effects of roughness in a 2-D flat microchannel. In the present model, the Poisson equation is solved for the electrical potential, the Nernst- Planck equation is solved for the ion concentration. In the analysis of electroosmotic flows, when the electric double layers fully overlap or the convective effects are not negligible, the Nernst-Planck equation must be used to find the ionic distribution throughout the microchannel. The effects of surface roughness height, roughness interval spacing and roughness surface potential on flow conditions are investigated for two different configurations of the roughness, when the EDL layers fully overlap through the microchannel. The results show that in both arrangements of roughness in homogeneously charged rough channels, the flow rate decreases by increasing the roughness height. A discrepancy in the mass flow rate is observed when the roughness height is about 0.15 of the channel width, which its average is higher for the asymmetric configuration and this difference grows by increasing the roughness height. In the symmetric roughness arrangement, the mass flow rate increases until the roughness interval space is almost 1.5 times the roughness width and it decreases for higher values of the roughness interval space. For the heterogeneously charged rough channel, when the roughness surface potential ψr is less than channel surface potential ψs , the net charge density increases by getting far from the roughness surface, while in the opposite situation, when ψs is more than ψr , the net charge density decreases from roughness surface to the microchannel middle center. Increasing the roughness surface potential induces stronger electric driving force on the fluid which results in larger velocities in the flow.

  14. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A

    2014-03-28

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-"coupled"- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the Bortz-Kalos-Lebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary MATLAB

  15. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-“coupled”- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the Bortz–Kalos–Lebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary

  16. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of immiscible displacement in the cavity with different channel configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qin; Zang, Chenqiang; Yang, Mo; Xu, Hongtao

    In this work, the immiscible displacement in a cavity with different channel configurations is studied using an improved pseudo-potential lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) model. This model overcomes the drawback of the dependence of the fluid properties on the grid size, which exists in the original pseudo-potential LBE model. The approach is first validated by the Laplace law. Then, it is employed to study the immiscible displacement process. The influences of different factors, such as the surface wettability, the distance between the gas cavity and liquid cavity and the surface roughness of the channel are investigated. Numerical results show that the displacement efficiency increases and the displacement time decreases with the increase of the surface contact angle. On the other hand, the displacement efficiency increases with increasing distance between the gas cavity and the liquid cavity at first and finally reaches a constant value. As for the surface roughness, two structures (a semicircular cavity and a semicircular bulge) are studied. The comprehensive results show that although the displacement processes for both the structures depend on the surface wettability, they present quite different behaviors. Specially, for the roughness structure constituted by the semicircular cavity, the displacement efficiency decreases and displacement time increases evidently with the size of the semicircular cavity for the small contact angle. The trend slows down as the increase of the contact angle. Once the contact angle exceeds a certain value, the size of the semicircular cavity almost has no influence on the displacement process. While for the roughness structure of a semicircular bulge, the displacement efficiency increases with the size of bulge first and then it decreases for the small contact angle. The displacement efficiency increases first and finally reaches a constant for the large contact angle. The results also show that the displacement time has an

  17. Lattice gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutz, M.

    1983-04-01

    In the last few years lattice gauge theory has become the primary tool for the study of nonperturbative phenomena in gauge theories. The lattice serves as an ultraviolet cutoff, rendering the theory well defined and amenable to numerical and analytical work. Of course, as with any cutoff, at the end of a calculation one must consider the limit of vanishing lattice spacing in order to draw conclusions on the physical continuum limit theory. The lattice has the advantage over other regulators that it is not tied to the Feynman expansion. This opens the possibility of other approximation schemes than conventional perturbation theory. Thus Wilson used a high temperature expansion to demonstrate confinement in the strong coupling limit. Monte Carlo simulations have dominated the research in lattice gauge theory for the last four years, giving first principle calculations of nonperturbative parameters characterizing the continuum limit. Some of the recent results with lattice calculations are reviewed

  18. Lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenfratz, P.

    1983-01-01

    The author presents a general introduction to lattice gauge theories and discusses non-perturbative methods in the gauge sector. He then shows how the lattice works in obtaining the string tension in SU(2). Lattice QCD at finite physical temperature is discussed. Universality tests in SU(2) lattice QCD are presented. SU(3) pure gauge theory is briefly dealt with. Finally, fermions on the lattice are considered. (Auth.)

  19. A portable high-quality random number generator for lattice field theory simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luescher, M.

    1993-09-01

    The theory underlying a proposed random number generator for numerical simulations in elementary particle physics and statistical mechanics is discussed. The generator is based on an algorithm introduced by Marsaglia and Zaman, with an important added feature leading to demonstrably good statistical properties. It can be implemented exactly on any computer complying with the IEEE-754 standard for single precision floating point arithmetic. (orig.)

  20. Effects of constraints on lattice re-orientation and strain in polycrystal plasticity simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer; McGinty, R.D.; McDowell, D.L.

    2009-01-01

    -constraint simulations while fine scale element-resolved analysis shows large deviations from this prediction. Locally resolved analysis shows the existence of large domains dominated by slip on only a few slip systems. The modelling results are discussed in the light of recent experimental advances with respect to 2...

  1. Upscaled Lattice Boltzmann Method for Simulations of Flows in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jun; Brown, Donald

    2017-01-01

    upscaled LBM uses coarser grids to represent the average effects of the fine-grid simulations. In the upscaled LBM, each coarse grid represents a subdomain of the fine-grid discretization and the effective permeability with the reduced-order models

  2. Direct simulation of liquid–gas–solid flow with a free surface lattice Boltzmann method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogner, S.P.M.; Harting, J.D.P.; Rüde, U.

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of liquid–gas–solid flows is uncommon due to the considerable computational cost. As the grid spacing is determined by the smallest involved length scale, large grid sizes become necessary–in particular, if the bubble–particle aspect ratio is on the order of 10 or larger.

  3. Dynamically adaptive Lattice Boltzmann simulation of shallow water flows with the Peano framework

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp; Bungartz, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    the modular design with respect to the incorporation of new simulation aspects and LB models. The basic SWE-LB implementation is validated in different breaking dam scenarios. We further provide a numerical study on stability of the MRT collision operator used

  4. Learning about the Unit Cell and Crystal Lattice with Computerized Simulations and Games: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luealamai, Sutha; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed a computer-based learning module on the unit cell of various types of crystal. The module has two components: the virtual unit cell (VUC) part and the subsequent unit cell hunter part. The VUC is a virtual reality simulation for students to actively arrive at the unit cell from exploring, from a broad view, the crystal…

  5. Particle imaging velocimetry experiments and lattice-Boltzmann simulations on a single sphere settling under gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Cate, A.; Nieuwstad, C.H.; Derksen, J.J.; Van den Akker, H.E.A.

    2002-01-01

    A comparison is made between experiments and simulations on a single sphere settling in silicon oil in a box. Cross-correlation particle imaging velocimetry measurements were carried out at particle Reynolds numbers ranging from 1.5 to 31.9. The particle Stokes number varied from 0.2 to 4 and at

  6. Nuclear power plant diagnostics study at the Midland Training Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifman, J.; Rank, P.; Lee, J.C.; Wehe, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of two advanced diagnostic concepts for nuclear power plant diagnostics, the systematic generation and updating of a rule-based system and the simulation filter, at the Midland Nuclear Power Plant Unit 2 Training Simulator. The authors use an entropy minimax pattern recognition algorithm for the systematic construction of the diagnostic rule base. By extracting information from a transient database constructed with the Midland Simulator, the algorithm searches for trends in plant parameters, forming patterns or rules that describe the behavior of the transients. The rules are updated in an incremental manner within the context of the entropy minimax algorithm. The simulation filter is a nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm based on the extended Kalman filter. The authors use the simulation filter to improve the results of crude simulation models by optimally estimating system states given a set of measurements and results from a nonlinear simulation program. The Midland Simulator results of the Three Mile Island accident are significantly improved with the use of the simulation filter

  7. Revisiting the use of the immersed-boundary lattice-Boltzmann method for simulations of suspended particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountrakis, L.; Lorenz, E.; Hoekstra, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    The immersed-boundary lattice-Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) is increasingly being used in simulations of dense suspensions. These systems are computationally very expensive and can strongly benefit from lower resolutions that still maintain the desired accuracy for the quantities of interest. IB-LBM has a number of free parameters that have to be defined, often without exact knowledge of the tradeoffs, since their behavior in low resolutions is not well understood. Such parameters are the lattice constant Δ x , the number of vertices Nv, the interpolation kernel ϕ , and the LBM relaxation time τ . We investigate the effect of these IB-LBM parameters on a number of straightforward but challenging benchmarks. The systems considered are (a) the flow of a single sphere in shear flow, (b) the collision of two spheres in shear flow, and (c) the lubrication interaction of two spheres. All benchmarks are performed in three dimensions. The first two systems are used for determining two effective radii: the hydrodynamic radius rhyd and the particle interaction radius rinter. The last system is used to establish the numerical robustness of the lubrication forces, used to probe the hydrodynamic interactions in the limit of small gaps. Our results show that lower spatial resolutions result in larger hydrodynamic and interaction radii, while surface densities should be chosen above two vertices per LU2 result to prevent fluid penetration in underresolved meshes. Underresolved meshes also failed to produce the migration of particles toward the center of the domain due to lift forces in Couette flow, mostly noticeable for IBM-kernel ϕ2. Kernel ϕ4, despite being more robust toward mesh resolution, produces a notable membrane thickness, leading to the breakdown of the lubrication forces in larger gaps, and its use in dense suspensions where the mean particle distances are small can result in undesired behavior. rhyd is measured to be different from rinter, suggesting that there is

  8. Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

    2006-12-11

    This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

  9. Development of Nuclear ship Engineering Simulation SYstem (NESSY)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Kyouya, Masahiko; Takahashi, Teruo; Kobayashi, Hideo; Ochiai, Masa-aki; Hashidate, Kouji.

    1993-11-01

    NESSY has been developed for design studies of advanced marine reactors as a part of nuclear ship research and development since 1987. Engineering simulation model of the Mutsu, which is the first nuclear ship in Japan, was completed in March of 1993. In this report we concentration on detail description of softwares for Mutsu modeling. The aims of development of NESSY are as follows; (1) Assessment and confirmation on plant performance of an advanced marine reactor in each step of nuclear ship design (2) Development of abnormality diagnosis system and operator support system as a part of enhanced automization study, and study of human interface with hardware The characteristics of NESSY are the followings. (1) Total engineering simulation system simulate simultaneously ship motions, propulsion system behavior, and nuclear plant behavior under given weather and sea conditions. (2) Models based on physical theory as far as possible. (3) The simulator has high extensibility and flexibility. It is able to apply to other reactors, as the simulation model consists of the part of basic model and the part of plant data which are easy to change. After completion of Mutsu modeling, we are planning to utilize this system as one of design tools for an advanced marine reactor. (author)

  10. Precise determination of lattice phase shifts and mixing angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Bing-Nan, E-mail: b.lu@fz-juelich.de [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut für Kernphysik, and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Lähde, Timo A. [Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut für Kernphysik, and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Lee, Dean [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Meißner, Ulf-G. [Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Universität Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Institut für Kernphysik, and Jülich Center for Hadron Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); JARA – High Performance Computing, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2016-09-10

    We introduce a general and accurate method for determining lattice phase shifts and mixing angles, which is applicable to arbitrary, non-cubic lattices. Our method combines angular momentum projection, spherical wall boundaries and an adjustable auxiliary potential. This allows us to construct radial lattice wave functions and to determine phase shifts at arbitrary energies. For coupled partial waves, we use a complex-valued auxiliary potential that breaks time-reversal invariance. We benchmark our method using a system of two spin-1/2 particles interacting through a finite-range potential with a strong tensor component. We are able to extract phase shifts and mixing angles for all angular momenta and energies, with precision greater than that of extant methods. We discuss a wide range of applications from nuclear lattice simulations to optical lattice experiments.

  11. Qualitative simulation for supervision of a nuclear reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyval, L.; Ledoux, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper deals with the first application of a supervision support system to a part of a nuclear reprocessing plant. The system is called DIAPASON; its role is to help the operators to understand the behaviour of the process, and to diagnose failures if needed. This paper is only concerned with the simulation of the behaviour of the process and the associated explanations provided by DIAPASON during the normal operation periods. The modeling, simulation techniques are presented, when applied to a nuclear process. A causal graph linking the relevant variables by Qualitative Transfer Functions models the process behaviour. The simulation consists in propagating through the entire graph the significant events detected on the input variables or on measurable disturbances of the process. As a result, the evolutions of all the other variables are obtained. The explanations that can be provided at the present time are deduced from the simulation

  12. Soft computing simulation tools for nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan Balasubramanian, S.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter deals with simulation, a very powerful tool in designing, constructing and operating nuclear power generating facilities. There are very different types of power plants, and the examples mentioned in this chapter originate from experience with water cooled and water moderated thermal reactors, based on fission of uranium-235. Nevertheless, the methodological achievements in simulation mentioned below can definitely be used not only for this particular type of nuclear power generating reactor. Simulation means: investigation of processes in the time domain. We can calculate the characteristics and properties of different systems, e.g. we can design a bridge over a river, but if we calculate how it would respond to a thunderstorm with high winds, its movement can or can not evolve after a certain time into destructive oscillation - this type of calculations are called simulation

  13. Teaching simulator for divulgation of the nuclear energy; Simulador docente para divulgacion de la energia nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega B, M.G.; Gutierrez F, R. [FI-UNAM, DEPFI Campus Morelos (Mexico)] e-mail: cchavez2@cableonline.com.mx

    2003-07-01

    To solicitude of the authorities of the 'Universum' sciences museum of the UNAM, it develops a highly interactive computational system, to provide of information to the population in general about basic principles, uses and benefits of the nuclear energy. The objective is to achieve a better understanding and acceptance of the nuclear technology in our country. The system allows the visualization and simulation of nuclear processes as well as of its applications. The system is divided in three levels: basic, intermediate and simulation. In the basic level multimedia information is included on diverse basic concepts of the nuclear energy. The intermediate level includes the description and operation of some systems of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant (CNLV). Finally the simulation level contains representative scenarios that the user can control by means of virtual control panels of the main systems of the CNLV. Inside the system a part of interactive games is included with the purpose that the user remembers with more easiness all the concepts and advantages of the nuclear energy mentioned during the previous levels. The system contributes, by means of the development of multimedia computational tools and of simulation, to the popularization of the use and applications of the nuclear energy in Mexico. (Author)

  14. Density functional theory versus quantum Monte Carlo simulations of Fermi gases in the optical-lattice arena★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilati, Sebastiano; Zintchenko, Ilia; Troyer, Matthias; Ancilotto, Francesco

    2018-04-01

    We benchmark the ground state energies and the density profiles of atomic repulsive Fermi gases in optical lattices (OLs) computed via density functional theory (DFT) against the results of diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) simulations. The main focus is on a half-filled one-dimensional OLs, for which the DMC simulations performed within the fixed-node approach provide unbiased results. This allows us to demonstrate that the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) to the exchange-correlation functional of DFT is very accurate in the weak and intermediate interactions regime, and also to underline its limitations close to the strongly-interacting Tonks-Girardeau limit and in very deep OLs. We also consider a three-dimensional OL at quarter filling, showing also in this case the high accuracy of the LSDA in the moderate interaction regime. The one-dimensional data provided in this study may represent a useful benchmark to further develop DFT methods beyond the LSDA and they will hopefully motivate experimental studies to accurately measure the equation of state of Fermi gases in higher-dimensional geometries. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2018-90021-1.

  15. LBflow: An extensible lattice Boltzmann framework for the simulation of geophysical flows. Part II: usage and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellin, E. W.

    2010-02-01

    LBflow is a flexible, extensible implementation of the lattice Boltzmann method, developed with geophysical applications in mind. The theoretical basis for LBflow, and its implementation, are presented in the companion paper, 'Part I'. This article covers the practical usage of LBflow and presents guidelines for obtaining optimal results from available computing power. The relationships among simulation resolution, accuracy, runtime and memory requirements are investigated in detail. Particular attention is paid to the origin, quantification and minimization of errors. LBflow is validated against analytical, numerical and experimental results for a range of three-dimensional flow geometries. The fluid conductance of prismatic pipes with various cross sections is calculated with LBflow and found to be in excellent agreement with published results. Simulated flow along sinusoidally constricted pipes gives good agreement with experimental data for a wide range of Reynolds number. The permeability of packs of spheres is determined and shown to be in excellent agreement with analytical results. The accuracy of internal flow patterns within the investigated geometries is also in excellent quantitative agreement with published data. The development of vortices within a sinusoidally constricted pipe with increasing Reynolds number is shown, demonstrating the insight that LBflow can offer as a 'virtual laboratory' for fluid flow.

  16. Characterization of lattice damage in ion implanted silicon: a Monte Carlo simulation combined with double crystal X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cembali, F.; Mazzone, A.M.; Servidori, M.; Gabilli, E.; Lotti, R.

    1985-01-01

    Double crystal X-ray diffractometry is applied to the characterization of damage in silicon samples, irradiated with 60 keV self-ions for doses ranging from 5 x 10 12 cm -2 to the threshold for amorphisation. The samples were also electron beam annealed in such a condition as to give rise to a temperature of 800 0 C. The in-depth strain and atomic disorder distributions, due to the implantation defects, were determined for the specimens before and after high temperature annealing. This was possible by application of the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction from imperfect crystals and by taking into account the diffuse (thermal, Compton) scattering accompanying Bragg diffraction intensity measurements. Transmission electron microscopy observations, in conventional (planar) and cross-section mode, were also performed. The results of these analyses were compared with a complex simulation method, designed to account for the physical origin of the disorder. The method consists of a Monte Carlo simulation of the damage growth during implantation and of the defect annealing and clustering in a warm lattice. The evolution of disorder is examined either in the phase of spontaneous annealing subsequent to the implantation or during the externally induced annealing. Theory and experiments led to a close characterization of damage in terms of cluster size, type and concentration, both before and after annealing. (author)

  17. BWR modeling capability and Scale/Triton lattice-to-core integration of the Nestle nodal simulator - 331

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, J.; Hernandez, H.; Maldonado, G.I.; Jessee, M.; Popov, E.; Clarno, K.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the status of recent and substantial enhancements made to the NESTLE nodal core simulator, a code originally developed at North Carolina State University (NCSU) of which version 5.2.1 has been available for several years through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) software repository. In its released and available form, NESTLE is a seasoned, well-developed and extensively tested code system particularly useful to model PWRs. In collaboration with NCSU, University of Tennessee (UT) and ORNL researchers have recently developed new enhancements for the NESTLE code, including the implementation of a two-phase drift-flux thermal hydraulic and flow redistribution model to facilitate modeling of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) as well as the development of an integrated coupling of SCALE/TRITON lattice physics to NESTLE so to produce an end-to-end capability for reactor simulations. These latest advancements implemented into NESTLE as well as an update of other ongoing efforts of this project are herein reported. (authors)

  18. Parallelization and automatic data distribution for nuclear reactor simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebrock, L.M. [Liebrock-Hicks Research, Calumet, MI (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Detailed attempts at realistic nuclear reactor simulations currently take many times real time to execute on high performance workstations. Even the fastest sequential machine can not run these simulations fast enough to ensure that the best corrective measure is used during a nuclear accident to prevent a minor malfunction from becoming a major catastrophe. Since sequential computers have nearly reached the speed of light barrier, these simulations will have to be run in parallel to make significant improvements in speed. In physical reactor plants, parallelism abounds. Fluids flow, controls change, and reactions occur in parallel with only adjacent components directly affecting each other. These do not occur in the sequentialized manner, with global instantaneous effects, that is often used in simulators. Development of parallel algorithms that more closely approximate the real-world operation of a reactor may, in addition to speeding up the simulations, actually improve the accuracy and reliability of the predictions generated. Three types of parallel architecture (shared memory machines, distributed memory multicomputers, and distributed networks) are briefly reviewed as targets for parallelization of nuclear reactor simulation. Various parallelization models (loop-based model, shared memory model, functional model, data parallel model, and a combined functional and data parallel model) are discussed along with their advantages and disadvantages for nuclear reactor simulation. A variety of tools are introduced for each of the models. Emphasis is placed on the data parallel model as the primary focus for two-phase flow simulation. Tools to support data parallel programming for multiple component applications and special parallelization considerations are also discussed.

  19. Simulation methods of nuclear electromagnetic pulse effects in integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Jili; Liu Yuan; En Yunfei; Fang Wenxiao; Wei Aixiang; Yang Yuanzhen

    2013-01-01

    In the paper the ways to compute the response of transmission line (TL) illuminated by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) were introduced firstly, which include finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and trans-mission line matrix (TLM); then the feasibility of electromagnetic topology (EMT) in ICs nuclear electromagnetic pulse (NEMP) effect simulation was discussed; in the end, combined with the methods computing the response of TL, a new method of simulate the transmission line in IC illuminated by NEMP was put forward. (authors)

  20. Parallelization and automatic data distribution for nuclear reactor simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebrock, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    Detailed attempts at realistic nuclear reactor simulations currently take many times real time to execute on high performance workstations. Even the fastest sequential machine can not run these simulations fast enough to ensure that the best corrective measure is used during a nuclear accident to prevent a minor malfunction from becoming a major catastrophe. Since sequential computers have nearly reached the speed of light barrier, these simulations will have to be run in parallel to make significant improvements in speed. In physical reactor plants, parallelism abounds. Fluids flow, controls change, and reactions occur in parallel with only adjacent components directly affecting each other. These do not occur in the sequentialized manner, with global instantaneous effects, that is often used in simulators. Development of parallel algorithms that more closely approximate the real-world operation of a reactor may, in addition to speeding up the simulations, actually improve the accuracy and reliability of the predictions generated. Three types of parallel architecture (shared memory machines, distributed memory multicomputers, and distributed networks) are briefly reviewed as targets for parallelization of nuclear reactor simulation. Various parallelization models (loop-based model, shared memory model, functional model, data parallel model, and a combined functional and data parallel model) are discussed along with their advantages and disadvantages for nuclear reactor simulation. A variety of tools are introduced for each of the models. Emphasis is placed on the data parallel model as the primary focus for two-phase flow simulation. Tools to support data parallel programming for multiple component applications and special parallelization considerations are also discussed

  1. A multicomponent multiphase lattice Boltzmann model with large liquid–gas density ratios for simulations of wetting phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qing-Yu; Zhu Ming-Fang; Sun Dong-Ke

    2017-01-01

    A multicomponent multiphase (MCMP) pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with large liquid–gas density ratios is proposed for simulating the wetting phenomena. In the proposed model, two layers of neighboring nodes are adopted to calculate the fluid–fluid cohesion force with higher isotropy order. In addition, the different-time-step method is employed to calculate the processes of particle propagation and collision for the two fluid components with a large pseudo-particle mass contrast. It is found that the spurious current is remarkably reduced by employing the higher isotropy order calculation of the fluid–fluid cohesion force. The maximum spurious current appearing at the phase interfaces is evidently influenced by the magnitudes of fluid–fluid and fluid–solid interaction strengths, but weakly affected by the time step ratio. The density ratio analyses show that the liquid–gas density ratio is dependent on both the fluid–fluid interaction strength and the time step ratio. For the liquid–gas flow simulations without solid phase, the maximum liquid–gas density ratio achieved by the present model is higher than 1000:1. However, the obtainable maximum liquid–gas density ratio in the solid–liquid–gas system is lower. Wetting phenomena of droplets contacting smooth/rough solid surfaces and the dynamic process of liquid movement in a capillary tube are simulated to validate the proposed model in different solid–liquid–gas coexisting systems. It is shown that the simulated intrinsic contact angles of droplets on smooth surfaces are in good agreement with those predicted by the constructed LB formula that is related to Young’s equation. The apparent contact angles of droplets on rough surfaces compare reasonably well with the predictions of Cassie’s law. For the simulation of liquid movement in a capillary tube, the linear relation between the liquid–gas interface position and simulation time is observed, which is identical to

  2. Development of nuclear power plant simulators for Soviet-designed nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, P.; Tutu, N.K.; Cleary, E.J.; Erickson, K.G.; Yoder, J.; Kroshilin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (US DOE), under the US government's International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP), is implementing a program of developing and providing simulators for many of the Russian and Ukrainian Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) manage and provide technical oversight of the various INSP simulator projects for DOE. The program also includes a simulator technology transfer process to simulator design organizations in Russia and Ukraine. Training programs, installation of new simulators, and enhancements in existing simulators, are viewed as providing a relatively fast and cost-effective technology transfer that will result in measurable improvement in the safety culture and operation of NPPs. A review of this program, its present status, and its accomplishments are provided in this paper

  3. Unsteady Flow Simulation of a Sweeping Jet Actuator Using a Lattice-Boltzmann Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, B.; Wessels, M.; Fares, E.; Vatsa, V.

    2016-01-01

    Active flow control technology is increasingly used in aerospace applications to control flow separation and to improve aerodynamic performance. In this paper, PowerFLOW is used to simulate the flow through a sweeping jet actuator at two different pressure ratios. The lower pressure ratio leads to a high subsonic flow, whereas the high pressure ratio produces a choked flow condition. Comparison of numerical results with experimental data is shown, which includes qualitatively good agreement of pressure histories and spectra. PIV measurements are also available but the simulation overestimates mean and fluctuation quantities outside the actuator. If supply pressure is matched at one point inside the mixing chamber a good qualitative agreement is achieved at all other monitor points.

  4. D1+ Simulator: A cost and risk optimized approach to nuclear power plant simulator modernization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wischert, W.

    2006-01-01

    D1-Simulator is operated by Kraftwerks-Simulator-Gesellschaft (KSG) and Gesellschaft f?r Simulatorschulung (GfS) at the Simulator Centre in Essen since 1977. The full-scope control room training simulator, used for Kernkraftwerk Biblis (KWB) is based on a PDP-11 hardware platform and is mainly programmed in ASSEMBLER language. The Simulator has reached a continuous high availability of operation throughout the years due to specialized hardware and software support from KSG maintenance team. Nevertheless, D1-Simulator largely reveals limitations with respect to computer capacity and spares and suffers progressively from the non-availability of hardware replacement materials. In order to ensure long term maintainability within the framework of the consensus on nuclear energy, a 2-years refurbishing program has been launched by KWB focusing on quality and budgetary aspects. The so-called D1+ Simulator project is based on the re-use of validated data from existing simulators. Allowing for flexible project management methods, the project outlines a cost and risk optimized approach to Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Simulator modernization. D1+ Simulator is being built by KSG/GfS in close collaboration with KWB and the simulator vendor THALES by re-using a modern hardware and software development environment from D56-Simulator, used by Kernkraftwerk Obrigheim (KWO) before its decommissioning in 2005. The Simulator project, launched in 2004, is expected to be completed by end of 2006. (author)

  5. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of CO2 reactive transport in network fractured media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhiwei; Wang, Junye

    2017-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) geological sequestration plays an important role in mitigating CO2 emissions for climate change. Understanding interactions of the injected CO2 with network fractures and hydrocarbons is key for optimizing and controlling CO2 geological sequestration and evaluating its risks to ground water. However, there is a well-known, difficult process in simulating the dynamic interaction of fracture-matrix, such as dynamic change of matrix porosity, unsaturated processes in rock matrix, and effect of rock mineral properties. In this paper, we develop an explicit model of the fracture-matrix interactions using multilayer bounce-back treatment as a first attempt to simulate CO2 reactive transport in network fractured media through coupling the Dardis's LBM porous model for a new interface treatment. Two kinds of typical fracture networks in porous media are simulated: straight cross network fractures and interleaving network fractures. The reaction rate and porosity distribution are illustrated and well-matched patterns are found. The species concentration distribution and evolution with time steps are also analyzed and compared with different transport properties. The results demonstrate the capability of this model to investigate the complex processes of CO2 geological injection and reactive transport in network fractured media, such as dynamic change of matrix porosity.

  6. Results of Koo measurements of HTGR lattice by oscillated zero reactivity technique using the AGIP-NUCLEARE RB-2 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, F; Brighenti, G.; Chiodi, P. L.; Ghilardotti, G.; Giuliani, C.

    1974-10-15

    This paper describes k-infinity measurements conducted using an assembly of loose HTGR coated particles in the BR-2 reactor by means of null reactivity oscillating method comparing the effect of poisoned and unpoisoned lattices like tests performed in the Physical Constants Test Reactor (PCTR) at Hanford. The RB-2 reactor was the property of the Italian firm AGIP NUCLEARE and operated at the Montecuccolino Center in Bologna.

  7. Modelling and simulation of containment on full scope simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Tingyun

    1996-01-01

    A multi-node containment thermal-hydraulic model has been developed and adapted in Full Scope Simulator for Qinshan 300 MW Nuclear Power Unit with good realtime simulation effects. Containment pressure for LBLOCA calculated by the model is well agreed with those of CONTEMPT-4/MOD3

  8. Compact simulators for WWER-440 type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegh, E.; Janosy, J.S.

    1991-09-01

    This paper describes a compact simulator for VVER-440 type plants. Up till now three simulators have been delivered: to Paks Nuclear Power Plant (Hungary), and to Kola and Rovno NPPs (Soviet Union). In this compact simulator the modelling complexity of the plant is almost similar to that of a full-scope one apart from the Control Room being replaced by a Control Desk and four colour graphic display units. The simulation of the plant covers the whole operating range: from cold shut-down state to nominal power level. The simulator contains up to 32 different initial conditions. Moreover, every 5 minutes the simulator produces so called 'snapshots', i.e. disc images of the Data Base. Using these snapshots the instructor can go back in time (called backtracking) in order to repeat some previously passed events

  9. Finite-lattice-spacing corrections to masses and g factors on a lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roskies, R.; Wu, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    We suggest an alternative method for extracting masses and g factors from lattice calculations. Our method takes account of more of the infrared and ultraviolet lattice effects. It leads to more reasonable results in simulations of QED on a lattice

  10. Nuclear Human Resources Development Program using Educational Core Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yu Sun; Hong, Soon Kwan

    2015-01-01

    KHNP-CRI(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.-Central Research Institute) has redesigned the existing Core Simulator(CoSi) used as a sort of training tools for reactor engineers in operating nuclear power plant to support Nuclear Human Resources Development (NHRD) Program focusing on the nuclear department of Dalat university in Vietnam. This program has been supported by MOTIE in Korea and cooperated with KNA(Korea Nuclear Association for International Cooperation) and HYU(Hanyang University) for enhancing the nuclear human resources of potential country in consideration with Korean Nuclear Power Plant as a next candidate energy sources. KHNP-CRI has provided Edu-CoSi to Dalat University in Vietnam in order to support Nuclear Human Resources Development Program in Vietnam. Job Qualification Certificates Program in KHNP is utilized to design a training course for Vietnamese faculty and student of Dalat University. Successfully, knowhow on lecturing the ZPPT performance, training and maintaining Edu-CoSi hardware are transferred by several training courses which KHNP-CRI provides

  11. Nuclear Human Resources Development Program using Educational Core Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yu Sun; Hong, Soon Kwan [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    KHNP-CRI(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.-Central Research Institute) has redesigned the existing Core Simulator(CoSi) used as a sort of training tools for reactor engineers in operating nuclear power plant to support Nuclear Human Resources Development (NHRD) Program focusing on the nuclear department of Dalat university in Vietnam. This program has been supported by MOTIE in Korea and cooperated with KNA(Korea Nuclear Association for International Cooperation) and HYU(Hanyang University) for enhancing the nuclear human resources of potential country in consideration with Korean Nuclear Power Plant as a next candidate energy sources. KHNP-CRI has provided Edu-CoSi to Dalat University in Vietnam in order to support Nuclear Human Resources Development Program in Vietnam. Job Qualification Certificates Program in KHNP is utilized to design a training course for Vietnamese faculty and student of Dalat University. Successfully, knowhow on lecturing the ZPPT performance, training and maintaining Edu-CoSi hardware are transferred by several training courses which KHNP-CRI provides.

  12. Building of Nuclear Ship Engineering Simulation System development of the simulator for the integral type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Teruo; Shimazaki, Junya; Yabuuchi, Noriaki; Fukuhara, Yosifumi; Kusunoki, Takeshi; Ochiai, Masaaki [Department of Nuclear Energy Systems, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Nakazawa, Toshio [Department of HTTR Project, Oarai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    JAERI had carried out the design study of a light-weight and compact integral type reactor of power 100 MW{sub th} with passive safety as a power source for the future nuclear ships, and completed an engineering design. To confirm the design and operation performance and to utilize the study of automation of the operations of reactor, we developed a real-time simulator for the integral type reactor. This simulator is a part of Nuclear Ship Engineering Simulation System (NESSY) and on the same hardware as 'Mutsu' simulator which was developed to simulate the first Japanese nuclear ship Mutsu'. Simulation accuracy of 'Mutsu' simulator was verified by comparing the simulation results With data got in the experimental voyage of 'Mutsu'. The simulator for the integral type reactor uses the same programs which were used in 'Mutsu' simulator for the separate type PWR, and the simulated results are approximately consistent with the calculated values using RELAP5/MOD2 (The later points are reported separately). Therefore simulation accuracy of the simulator for the integral type reactor is also expected to be reasonable, though it is necessary to verify by comparing with the real plant data or experimental data in future. We can get the perspectives to use as a real-time engineering simulator and to achieve the above-mentioned aims. This is a report on development of the simulator for the integral type reactor mainly focused on the contents of the analytical programs expressed the structural features of reactor. (author)

  13. Study of Particle Rotation Effect in Gas-Solid Flows using Direct Numerical Simulation with a Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kyung [Tuskegee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States); Fan, Liang-Shih [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Zhou, Qiang [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Yang, Hui [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-09-30

    A new and efficient direct numerical method with second-order convergence accuracy was developed for fully resolved simulations of incompressible viscous flows laden with rigid particles. The method combines the state-of-the-art immersed boundary method (IBM), the multi-direct forcing method, and the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). First, the multi-direct forcing method is adopted in the improved IBM to better approximate the no-slip/no-penetration (ns/np) condition on the surface of particles. Second, a slight retraction of the Lagrangian grid from the surface towards the interior of particles with a fraction of the Eulerian grid spacing helps increase the convergence accuracy of the method. An over-relaxation technique in the procedure of multi-direct forcing method and the classical fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme in the coupled fluid-particle interaction were applied. The use of the classical fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme helps the overall IB-LBM achieve the second order accuracy and provides more accurate predictions of the translational and rotational motion of particles. The preexistent code with the first-order convergence rate is updated so that the updated new code can resolve the translational and rotational motion of particles with the second-order convergence rate. The updated code has been validated with several benchmark applications. The efficiency of IBM and thus the efficiency of IB-LBM were improved by reducing the number of the Lagragian markers on particles by using a new formula for the number of Lagrangian markers on particle surfaces. The immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IBLBM) has been shown to predict correctly the angular velocity of a particle. Prior to examining drag force exerted on a cluster of particles, the updated IB-LBM code along with the new formula for the number of Lagrangian markers has been further validated by solving several theoretical problems. Moreover, the unsteadiness of the drag force is examined when a

  14. Code development for nuclear reactor simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauliac, C.; Verwaerde, D.; Pavageau, O.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Since several years, CEA, EDF and FANP have developed several numerical codes which are currently used for nuclear industry applications and will be remain in use for the coming years. Complementary to this set of codes and in order to better meet the present and future needs, a new system is being developed through a joint venture between CEA, EDF and FANP, with a ten year prospect and strong intermediate milestones. The focus is put on a multi-scale and multi-physics approach enabling to take into account phenomena from microscopic to macroscopic scale, and to describe interactions between various physical fields such as neutronics (DESCARTES), thermal-hydraulics (NEPTUNE) and fuel behaviour (PLEIADES). This approach is based on a more rational design of the softwares and uses a common integration platform providing pre-processing, supervision of computation and post-processing. This paper will describe the overall system under development and present the first results obtained. (authors)

  15. Application of a Russian nuclear reactor simulator VVER-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Peniche S, A.; Salazar S, E.

    2012-10-01

    The objective of the present work is to give to know the most important characteristics in the Russian nuclear reactor of pressurized light water VVER-1000, doing emphasis in the differences that has with the western equivalent the reactor PWR in the design and the safety systems. Therefore, a description of the computerized simulation of the reactor VVER-1000 developed by the company Eniko TSO that the International Atomic of Energy Agency distributes to the states members with academic purposes will take place. The simulator includes mathematical models that represent to the essential systems in the real nuclear power plant, for what is possible to reproduce common faults and transitory characteristic of the nuclear industry with a behavior sufficiently attached to the reality. In this work is analyzed the response of the system before a turbine shot. After the accident in the nuclear power plant of Three Mile Island (US) they have been carried out improvements in the design of the reactor PWR and their safety systems. To know the reach and the limitations of the program, the events that gave place to this accident will be reproduced in the simulator VVER-1000. With base to the results of the simulation we will conclude that so reliable is the response of the safety system of this reactor. (Author)

  16. Couplex1 test case nuclear - Waste disposal far field simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This first COUPLEX test case is to compute a simplified Far Field model used in nuclear waste management simulation. From the mathematical point of view the problem is of convection diffusion type but the parameters are highly varying from one layer to another. Another particularity is the very concentrated nature of the source, both in space and in time. (author)

  17. Proceedings of the 19. Canadian Nuclear Society simulation symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marleau, G.

    1995-01-01

    A majority of the 31 papers in this symposium on nuclear simulation deal with CANDU reactors. The sessions were organized according to the following subjects: reactor physics, hydrogen behaviour, thermalhydraulics, reactor safety and operation. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  18. NMTC/JAM, Simulates High Energy Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear-Meson Transport Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furihata, Shiori

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: NMTC/JAM is an upgraded version of the code system NMTC/JAERI97. NMTC/JAERI97 simulates high energy nuclear reactions and nucleon-meson transport processes. It implements an intra-nuclear cascade model taking account of the in-medium nuclear effects and the pre-equilibrium calculation model based on the exciton one. For treating the nucleon transport process, the nucleon-nucleus cross sections are revised to those derived by the systematics of Pearlstein. Moreover, the level density parameter derived by Ignatyuk is included as a new option for particle evaporation calculation. A geometry package based on the Combinatorial Geometry with multi-array system and the importance sampling technique is implemented in the code. Tally function is also employed for obtaining such physical quantities as neutron energy spectra, heat deposition and nuclide yield without editing a history file. The code can simulate both the primary spallation reaction and the secondary particle transport in the intermediate energy region from 20 MeV to 3.5 GeV by the use of the Monte Carlo technique. The code has been employed in combination with the neutron-photon transport codes available to the energy region below 20 MeV for neutronics calculation of accelerator-based subcritical reactors, analyses of thick target spallation experimented and so on. 2 - Methods: High energy nuclear reactions induced by incident high energy protons, neutrons and pions are simulated with the Monte Carlo Method by the intra-nuclear nucleon-nucleon reaction probabilities based on an intra-nuclear nucleon cascade model followed by the particle evaporation including high energy fission process. Jet-Aa Microscopic transport model (JAM) is employed to simulate high energy nuclear reactions in the energy range of GeV. All reaction channels are taken into account in the JAM calculation. An intra-nuclear cascade model (ISOBAR code) taking account of the in-medium nuclear effects

  19. Computer based training simulator for Hunterston Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowden, R.S.M.; Hacking, D.

    1978-01-01

    For reasons which are stated, the Hunterston-B nuclear power station automatic control system includes a manual over-ride facility. It is therefore essential for the station engineers to be trained to recognise and control all feasible modes of plant and logic malfunction. A training simulator has been built which consists of a replica of the shutdown monitoring panel in the Central Control Room and is controlled by a mini-computer. This paper highlights the computer aspects of the simulator and relevant derived experience, under the following headings: engineering background; shutdown sequence equipment; simulator equipment; features; software; testing; maintenance. (U.K.)

  20. Nuclear power plant training simulator system and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, R.W.; Converse, R.E. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A system is described for simulating the real-time dynamic operation of a full scope nuclear powered electrical generating plant for operator training utilizing apparatus that includes a control console with plant component control devices and indicating devices for monitoring plant operation. A general purpose digital computer calculates the dynamic simulation data for operating the indicating devices in accordance with the operation of the control devices. The functions for synchronization and calculation are arranged in a priority structure so as to insure an execution order that provides a maximum overlap of data exchange and simulation calculations. (Official Gazette)

  1. Reactor Subsystem Simulation for Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; J. Michael Doster; Alan Rominger

    2012-09-01

    Preliminary system models have been developed by Idaho National Laboratory researchers and are currently being enhanced to assess integrated system performance given multiple sources (e.g., nuclear + wind) and multiple applications (i.e., electricity + process heat). Initial efforts to integrate a Fortran-based simulation of a small modular reactor (SMR) with the balance of plant model have been completed in FY12. This initial effort takes advantage of an existing SMR model developed at North Carolina State University to provide initial integrated system simulation for a relatively low cost. The SMR subsystem simulation details are discussed in this report.

  2. Lattice gauge theory using parallel processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.D.; Chou, K.C.; Zichichi, A.

    1987-01-01

    The book's contents include: Lattice Gauge Theory Lectures: Introduction and Current Fermion Simulations; Monte Carlo Algorithms for Lattice Gauge Theory; Specialized Computers for Lattice Gauge Theory; Lattice Gauge Theory at Finite Temperature: A Monte Carlo Study; Computational Method - An Elementary Introduction to the Langevin Equation, Present Status of Numerical Quantum Chromodynamics; Random Lattice Field Theory; The GF11 Processor and Compiler; and The APE Computer and First Physics Results; Columbia Supercomputer Project: Parallel Supercomputer for Lattice QCD; Statistical and Systematic Errors in Numerical Simulations; Monte Carlo Simulation for LGT and Programming Techniques on the Columbia Supercomputer; Food for Thought: Five Lectures on Lattice Gauge Theory

  3. Simulations of cold nuclear matter at sub-saturation densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giménez Molinelli, P.A., E-mail: pagm@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Nichols, J.I. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); López, J.A. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Dorso, C.O. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina)

    2014-03-01

    Ideal nuclear matter is expected to undergo a first order phase transition at the thermodynamic limit. At such phase transitions the size of density fluctuations (bubbles or droplets) scale with the size of the system. This means that simulations of nuclear matter at sub-saturation densities will inexorably suffer from what is vaguely referred to as “finite size effects”. It is usually thought that these finite size effects can be diminished by imposing periodic boundary conditions and making the system large enough, but as we show in this work, that is actually not the case at sub-saturation densities. In this paper we analyze the equilibrium configurations of molecular dynamics simulations of a classical model for symmetric ideal (uncharged) nuclear matter at sub-saturation densities and low temperatures, where phase coexistence is expected at the thermodynamic limit. We show that the most stable configurations in this density range are almost completely determined by artificial aspects of the simulations (i.e. boundary conditions) and can be predicted analytically by surface minimization. This result is very general and is shown to hold true for several well known semi-classical models of nuclear interaction and even for a simple Lennard-Jones potential. Also, in the limit of very large systems, when “small size” effects can be neglected, those equilibrium configurations seem to be restricted to a few structures reminiscent to the “Pasta Phases” expected in Neutron Star matter, but arising from a completely different origin: In Neutron Star matter, the non-homogeneous structures arise from a competition between nuclear and Coulomb interactions while for ideal nuclear matter they emerge from finite (yet not “small”) size effects. The role of periodic boundary conditions and finite size effects in Neutron Star matter simulations are reexamined.

  4. Tools for advanced simulations to nuclear propulsion systems in rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Sepulveda, A.; Perez Vara, R.

    2004-01-01

    While chemical propulsion rockets have dominated space exploration, other forms of rocket propulsion based on nuclear power, electrostatic and magnetic drive, and other principles besides chemical reactions, have been considered from the earliest days of the field. The goal of most of these advanced rocket propulsion schemes is improved efficiency through higher exhaust velocities, in order to reduce the amount of fuel the rocket vehicle needs to carry, though generally at the expense of high thrust. Nuclear propulsion seems to be the most promising short term technology to plan realistic interplanetary missions. The development of a nuclear electric propulsion spacecraft shall require the development of models to analyse the mission and to understand the interaction between the related subsystems (nuclear reactor, electrical converter, power management and distribution, and electric propulsion) during the different phases of the mission. This paper explores the modelling of a nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) spacecraft type using EcosimPro simulation software. This software is a multi-disciplinary simulation tool with a powerful object-oriented simulation language and state-of-the-art solvers. EcosimPro is the recommended ESA simulation tool for environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and has been used successfully within the framework of the European activities of the International Space Station programme. Furthermore, propulsion libraries for chemical and electrical propulsion are currently being developed under ESA contracts to set this tool as standard usage in the propulsion community. At present, there is not any workable NEP spacecraft, but a standardized-modular, multi-purpose interplanetary spacecraft for post-2000 missions, called ISC-2000, has been proposed in reference. The simulation model presented on this paper is based on the preliminary designs for this spacecraft. (Author)

  5. Application perspectives of simulation techniques CFD in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo G, I. F.

    2013-10-01

    The scenarios simulation in nuclear power plants is usually carried out with system codes that are based on concentrated parameters networks. However situations exist in some components where the flow is predominantly 3-D, as they are the natural circulation, mixed and stratification phenomena. The simulation techniques of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have the potential to simulate these flows numerically. The use of CFD simulations embraces many branches of the engineering and continues growing, however, in relation to its application with respect to the problems related with the safety in nuclear power plants, has a smaller development, although is accelerating quickly and is expected that in the future they play a more emphasized paper in the analyses. A main obstacle to be able to achieve a general acceptance of the CFD is that the simulations should have very complete validation studies, sometimes not available. In this article a general panorama of the state of the methods application CFD in nuclear power plants is presented and the problem associated to its routine application and acceptance, including the view point of the regulatory authorities. Application examples are revised in those that the CFD offers real benefits and are also presented two illustrative study cases of the application of CFD techniques. The case of a water recipient with a heat source in its interior, similar to spent fuel pool of a nuclear power plant is presented firstly; and later the case of the Boron dilution of a water volume that enters to a nuclear reactor is presented. We can conclude that the CFD technology represents a very important opportunity to improve the phenomena understanding with a strong component 3-D and to contribute in the uncertainty reduction. (Author)

  6. Nuclear facility safeguards systems modeling using discrete event simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engi, D.

    1977-01-01

    The threat of theft or dispersal of special nuclear material at a nuclear facility is treated by studying the temporal relationships between adversaries having authorized access to the facility (insiders) and safeguards system events by using a GASP IV discrete event simulation. The safeguards system events--detection, assessment, delay, communications, and neutralization--are modeled for the general insider adversary strategy which includes degradation of the safeguards system elements followed by an attempt to steal or disperse special nuclear material. The performance measure used in the analysis is the estimated probability of safeguards system success in countering the adversary based upon a predetermined set of adversary actions. An exemplary problem which includes generated results is presented for a hypothetical nuclear facility. The results illustrate representative information that could be utilized by safeguards decision-makers

  7. Sustained qualification process for full scope nuclear power plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirson, J.; Stubbe, E.; Vanhoenacker, L.

    1994-01-01

    In the past decade, simulator training for all nuclear power plant operators has evolved into a vital requirement. To assure a correct training, the simulator qualification process is an important issue not only for the initial validation but also following major simulator updates, which are necessary during the lifetime of the simulator. In order to avoid degradation of the simulator validated software, the modifications have to be introduced according to a rigorous methodology and a practical requalification process has to be applied. Such methodology has to be enforced at every phase of the simulator construction or updating process from plant data package constitution, over simulator software development to simulator response qualification. The initial qualification and requalification process is based on the 3 levels identified by the ANSI/ANS 3-5 standard for steady-state, operational transients and accident conditions. For the initial certification of the full scope simulators in Belgium, a practical qualification methodology has been applied, which has been adapted into a set of non regression tests for the requalification after major simulator updates. (orig.) (4 refs., 3 figs.)

  8. Tightly coupled simulation of nuclear reactor transients with artificial intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowitz, H.; Ragheb, M.; Laats, E.T.; Bray, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The authors' current efforts are directed toward exploring new avenues of research in simulation of nuclear reactor kinetics transients with artificial intelligence (AI). Being examined are advanced graphics systems such as the Nuclear Plant Analyzer designed to run in parallel with the RELAP5 code, faster than real-time best-estimate simulations, the utilization of the multi-CPU super computers, and simulation as knowledge by attempting to develop new assessment methodologies for artificial intelligence systems and their associated interfaces. This new and fertile area of research should be viewed by the educational and university community as an indication of the future possibilities for AI developments in a number of academic and engineering disciplines

  9. Finite size effects in neutron star and nuclear matter simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giménez Molinelli, P.A., E-mail: pagm@df.uba.ar; Dorso, C.O.

    2015-01-15

    In this work we study molecular dynamics simulations of symmetric nuclear and neutron star matter using a semi-classical nucleon interaction model. Our aim is to gain insight on the nature of the so-called “finite size effects”, unavoidable in this kind of simulations, and to understand what they actually affect. To do so, we explore different geometries for the periodic boundary conditions imposed on the simulation cell: cube, hexagonal prism and truncated octahedron. For nuclear matter simulations we show that, at sub-saturation densities and low temperatures, the solutions are non-homogeneous structures reminiscent of the “nuclear pasta” phases expected in neutron star matter simulations, but only one structure per cell and shaped by specific artificial aspects of the simulations—for the same physical conditions (i.e. number density and temperature) different cells yield different solutions. The particular shape of the solution at low enough temperature and a given density can be predicted analytically by surface minimization. We also show that even if this behavior is due to the imposition of periodic boundary conditions on finite systems, this does not mean that it vanishes for very large systems, and it is actually independent of the system size. We conclude that, for nuclear matter simulations, the cells' size sets the only characteristic length scale for the inhomogeneities, and the geometry of the periodic cell determines the shape of those inhomogeneities. To model neutron star matter we add a screened Coulomb interaction between protons, and perform simulations in the three cell geometries. Our simulations indeed produce the well known nuclear pasta, with (in most cases) several structures per cell. However, we find that for systems not too large results are affected by finite size in different ways depending on the geometry of the cell. In particular, at the same certain physical conditions and system size, the hexagonal prism yields a

  10. IAEA activities in nuclear reactor simulation for educational purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established a programme in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education and training. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the supply or development of simulation programs and training material, sponsors training courses and workshops, and distributes documentation and computer programs. Two simulation programs are presented at this workshop: the Classroom-based Advanced Reactor Demonstrators package, and the Advanced Reactor Simulator. Both packages simulate the behaviour of BWR, PWR and HWR reactor types. For each package, the modeling approach and assumptions are broadly described, together with a general description of the operation of the computer programs. (author)

  11. IAEA activities in nuclear reactors simulation for educational purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established a programme in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education and training. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the supply or development of simulation programs and training material, sponsors training courses and workshops, and distributes documentation and computer programs. Currently, the IAEA has two simulation programs: the Classroom-based Advanced Reactor Demonstrators package, and the Advanced Reactor Simulator. Both packages simulate the behaviour of BWR, PWR and HWR reactor types. For each package, the modeling approach and assumptions are broadly described, together with a general description of the operation of the computer programs. (author)

  12. Numerical simulation of the droplet formation in a cross-junction microchannel using the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zilu; Kang, Jinfen; Park, Jae Hyun; Suh, Yong Kweon

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the numerical simulation of two-dimensional droplet formation and the following motion by using the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) with the phase field equation. The free energy model is used to treat the interfacial force and the deformation of a binary fluid system, drawn into a cross-junction microchannel. While one fluid is introduced through the central inlet channel, the other fluid is drawn into the main channel through the two vertical inlet channels. Due to the effect of surface tension on the interface between the two fluids, the droplets of the first fluid are formed near the cross-junction. The aim in this investigation is to examine the applicability of LBM to the numerical analysis of the droplet formation and its motion in the microchannel. It was found from comparison with the experimentally visualized patterns that LBM with the free energy model can reproduce the droplet formation successfully. However because of the stability problem which is intrinsic for high surface-tension cases, it requires a very long computational time. This issue is to be resolved in the future.

  13. Numerical simulation of the droplet formation in a cross-junction microchannel using the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zi Lu; Kang, Jin Fen; Park, Jae Hyun; Suh, Yong Kweon

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the numerical simulation of two-dimensional droplet formation and the following motion by using the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) with the phase field equation. The free energy model is used to treat the interfacial force and the deformation of a binary fluid system, drawn into a cross-junction microchannel. While one fluid is introduced through the central inlet channel, the other fluid is drawn into the main channel through the two vertical inlet channels. Due to the effect of surface tension on the interface between the two fluids, the droplets of the first fluid are formed near the cross-junction. The aim in this investigation is to examine the applicability of LBM to the numerical analysis of the droplet formation and its motion in the microchannel. It was found from comparison with the experimentally visualized patterns that LBM with the free energy model can reproduce the droplet formation successfully. However because of the stability problem which is intrinsic for high surface-tension cases, it requires a very long computational time. This issue is to be resolved in the future

  14. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of water transport in gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Liang; Cheng, Ping [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Power Machinery and Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, DongChuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2010-06-15

    The effect of wettability on water transport dynamics in gas diffusion layer (GDL) is investigated by simulating water invasion in an initially gas-filled GDL using the multiphase free-energy lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The results show that wettability plays a significant role on water saturation distribution in two-phase flow in the uniform wetting GDL. For highly hydrophobicity, the water transport falls in the regime of capillary fingering, while for neutral wettability, water transport exhibits the characteristic of stable displacement, although both processes are capillary force dominated flow with same capillary numbers. In addition, the introduction of hydrophilic paths in the GDL leads the water to flow through the hydrophilic pores preferentially. The resulting water saturation distributions show that the saturation in the GDL has little change after water breaks through the GDL, and further confirm that the selective introduction of hydrophilic passages in the GDL would facilitate the removal of liquid water more effectively, thus alleviating the flooding in catalyst layer (CL) and GDL. The LBM approach presented in this study provides an effective tool to investigate water transport phenomenon in the GDL at pore-scale level with wettability distribution taken into consideration. (author)

  15. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of three-dimensional incompressible flows in a four-sided lid driven cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Cheng Gong [National Engineering Laboratory for MTO, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Maa, Jerome P-Y, E-mail: chenggongli@dicp.ac.cn [Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, Gloucester Point, VA 23062 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Numerical study on three-dimensional (3D), incompressible, four-sided lid (FSL) driven cavity flows has been conducted to show the effects of the transverse aspect ratio, K , on the flow field by using a multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann equation. The top wall is driven from left to right, the left wall is moved downward, whereas the right wall is driven upward, and the bottom wall is moved from right to left, all the four moving walls have the same speed and the others boundaries are fixed. Numerical computations are performed for several Reynolds numbers for laminar flows, up to 1000, with various transverse aspect ratios. The flow can reach a steady state and the flow pattern is symmetric with respect to the two cavity diagonals (i.e., the center of the cavity). At Reynolds number = 300, the flow structures of the 3D FSL cavity flow at steady state with various transverse aspect ratio, i.e., 3, 2, 1, 0.75, 0.5 and 0.25 only show the unstable symmetrical flow pattern. The stable asymmetrical flow pattern could be reproduced only by increasing the Reynolds number that is above a critical value which is dependent on the aspect ratio. It is found that an aspect ratio of more than 5 is needed to reproduce flow patterns, both symmetric and asymmetric flows, simulated by using 2D numerical models. (paper)

  16. Experience gained in the training of nuclear power plant operating personnel with nuclear power plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buettner, J.; Fueg, J.; Schlegel, G.

    1980-01-01

    The simulator of a PWR-type reactor with 1.200 MW was accomplished in September 1977. In January 1978, the simulator of a BWR-type reactor with 800 MW started operation. The American company Singer/Link supplied computer hardware and software; Kraftwerk Union AG supplied control room equipment, power plant data and acted as consulting engineers for the construction and acceptance of the simulators. This way it is ensured that the simulated process reflects the state of German nuclear engineering. (orig./DG) [de

  17. Monte Carlo simulation on nuclear energy study. Annual report of Nuclear Code Evaluation Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Toshihiro

    1999-03-01

    In this report, research results discussed in 1998 fiscal year at Nuclear Code Evaluation Special Committee of Nuclear Code Committee were summarised. Present status of Monte Carlo calculation in high energy region investigated / discussed at Monte Carlo simulation working-group and automatic compilation system for MCNP cross sections developed at MCNP high temperature library compilation working-group were described. The 6 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  18. On-lattice agent-based simulation of populations of cells within the open-source Chaste framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo, Grazziela P; Joshi, Tanvi V; Osborne, James M; Byrne, Helen M; Owen, Markus R

    2013-04-06

    Over the years, agent-based models have been developed that combine cell division and reinforced random walks of cells on a regular lattice, reaction-diffusion equations for nutrients and growth factors; and ordinary differential equations for the subcellular networks regulating the cell cycle. When linked to a vascular layer, this multiple scale model framework has been applied to tumour growth and therapy. Here, we report on the creation of an agent-based multi-scale environment amalgamating the characteristics of these models within a Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) Exemplar Project. This project enables reuse, integration, expansion and sharing of the model and relevant data. The agent-based and reaction-diffusion parts of the multi-scale model have been implemented and are available for download as part of the latest public release of Chaste (Cancer, Heart and Soft Tissue Environment; http://www.cs.ox.ac.uk/chaste/), part of the VPH Toolkit (http://toolkit.vph-noe.eu/). The environment functionalities are verified against the original models, in addition to extra validation of all aspects of the code. In this work, we present the details of the implementation of the agent-based environment, including the system description, the conceptual model, the development of the simulation model and the processes of verification and validation of the simulation results. We explore the potential use of the environment by presenting exemplar applications of the 'what if' scenarios that can easily be studied in the environment. These examples relate to tumour growth, cellular competition for resources and tumour responses to hypoxia (low oxygen levels). We conclude our work by summarizing the future steps for the expansion of the current system.

  19. On-lattice agent-based simulation of populations of cells within the open-source Chaste framework

    KAUST Repository

    Figueredo, G. P.

    2013-02-21

    Over the years, agent-based models have been developed that combine cell division and reinforced random walks of cells on a regular lattice, reaction-diffusion equations for nutrients and growth factors; and ordinary differential equations for the subcellular networks regulating the cell cycle. When linked to a vascular layer, this multiple scale model framework has been applied to tumour growth and therapy. Here, we report on the creation of an agent-based multi-scale environment amalgamating the characteristics of these models within a Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) Exemplar Project. This project enables reuse, integration, expansion and sharing of the model and relevant data. The agent-based and reaction-diffusion parts of the multi-scale model have been implemented and are available for download as part of the latest public release of Chaste (Cancer, Heart and Soft Tissue Environment; http://www.cs.ox.ac.uk/chaste/), part of the VPH Toolkit (http://toolkit.vph-noe.eu/). The environment functionalities are verified against the original models, in addition to extra validation of all aspects of the code. In this work, we present the details of the implementation of the agent-based environment, including the system description, the conceptual model, the development of the simulation model and the processes of verification and validation of the simulation results. We explore the potential use of the environment by presenting exemplar applications of the \\'what if\\' scenarios that can easily be studied in the environment. These examples relate to tumour growth, cellular competition for resources and tumour responses to hypoxia (low oxygen levels). We conclude our work by summarizing the future steps for the expansion of the current system.

  20. Development of a simulator with thyroid nodules for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, F.C.L.; Peixoto, J.A.; Maciel, M.F.; Souza, D.N.; Cunha, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is one of the methods used to diagnose diseases by the use of ionizing radiation. In this method, a radioisotope is injected into the patient and is directed to the body that should be evaluated. After this the patient is examined by a scintigraphic chamber, which will result in an image to view the organs evaluated. To verify the ability to view the chambers are made of quality control tests using simulators with objects that may have characteristics similar to that of human organs and systems. In this work, an object was made of acrylic thyroid simulator used for quality control in scintillation chamber for use in teaching morphological analysis of the thyroid. To simulate the thyroid nodules were included in the simulator of acrylic columns with different diameters. The analysis of thyroid scintigraphy was also used for quality control tests. These tests were conducted in scintigraphic chamber GE Millennium MG. In quality control was verified the spatial resolution of the equipment. The radiopharmaceutical used was 99m Tc. The phantom image was closer to an image with the presence of thyroid nodules. The simulator thyroid tested in this work can now be used for quality control tests in other scintillation chambers, enabling students and professionals in nuclear medicine know more about the objects simulators. (author)