WorldWideScience

Sample records for nuclear installations consequences

  1. Nuclear installations abroad the accident risks and their potential consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turvey, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper endeavors to assess the threat to Ireland from severe accidents at civil nuclear installations. Among the various types of nuclear installations worldwide, reactors and reprocessing plants are considered to be the most threatening and so the paper focuses on these. The threat is assumed to be a function of the risk of severe accidents at the above types of installations and the probability of unfavourable weather conditions carrying the radioactive releases to Ireland. Although nuclear installations designed in eastern Europe and Asia are less safe than others, the greatest threat to Ireland arises from nearby installations in the UK. The difficulty of measuring the probabilities and consequences of severe nuclear accidents at nuclear installations in general is explained. In the case of the UK installations, this difficulty is overcome to some degree by using values of 'tolerable' risk adopted by the national nuclear regulator to define the radiotoxic releases from nuclear accidents. These are used as input to atmospheric dispersion models in which unfavourable weather conditions for Ireland are assumed and radiation doses are calculated to members of the Irish public. No countermeasures, such as sheltering, are assumed. In the worst cast scenario no deaths would be expected in Ireland in the immediate aftermath of the accident however, an increase in cancers over a period of 25 years or so would be expected assuming present-day models for the effect of low level radiation are valid

  2. Nuclear installations abroad the accident risks and their potential consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turvey, F J [Radiological Protection Inst. of Ireland (Ireland)

    1996-10-01

    This paper endeavors to assess the threat to Ireland from severe accidents at civil nuclear installations. Among the various types of nuclear installations worldwide, reactors and reprocessing plants are considered to be the most threatening and so the paper focuses on these. The threat is assumed to be a function of the risk of severe accidents at the above types of installations and the probability of unfavourable weather conditions carrying the radioactive releases to Ireland. Although nuclear installations designed in eastern Europe and Asia are less safe than others, the greatest threat to Ireland arises from nearby installations in the UK. The difficulty of measuring the probabilities and consequences of severe nuclear accidents at nuclear installations in general is explained. In the case of the UK installations, this difficulty is overcome to some degree by using values of `tolerable` risk adopted by the national nuclear regulator to define the radiotoxic releases from nuclear accidents. These are used as input to atmospheric dispersion models in which unfavourable weather conditions for Ireland are assumed and radiation doses are calculated to members of the Irish public. No countermeasures, such as sheltering, are assumed. In the worst cast scenario no deaths would be expected in Ireland in the immediate aftermath of the accident however, an increase in cancers over a period of 25 years or so would be expected assuming present-day models for the effect of low level radiation are valid.

  3. Assessment of the radiological consequences in case of an emergency on a nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manesse, D.; Crabol, B.

    1988-04-01

    The French Institute for Health Physics and Nuclear Safety (IPSN) has, for emergency cases on nuclear installations, an Emergency Technical Centre (Centre Technique de Crise - CTC) to provide the public authorities with the technical analysis of the events and with information concerning possible developments in terms of potential releases and radiological consequences to the environment. The CTC is connected, by a special line, to the French Meteorological Office so as to have access to meteorological parameters and local forecasts on the nuclear site at all times. For atmospheric dispersion and radiological consequences, three methods have been developed: a set of operational graphs (for first aid), a gaussian plume model and a gaussian puff model (SIROCCO); the latter two models are implanted on a VAX 8530 computer (with graphical monitors) reserved for that purpose [fr

  4. Nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 2 of the document contains some details about the existing Brazilian nuclear installations. Also, safety improvements at Angra 1 and aspects of Angra 2 and 3 are reported

  5. Nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 2 of the document contains some details about the existing Brazilian nuclear installations. Also, safety improvements at Angra 1 and aspects of Angra 2 and 3 are reported

  6. Nuclear Installations Act 1965

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    This Act governs all activities related to nuclear installations in the United Kingdom. It provides for the licensing procedure for nuclear installations, the duties of licensees, the competent authorities and carriers of nuclear material in respect of nuclear occurrences, as well as for the system of third party liability and compensation for nuclear damage. The Act repeals the Nuclear Installations (Licensing and Insurance) Act 1959 and the Nuclear Installations (Amendment Act) 1965 except for its Section 17(2). (NEA) [fr

  7. Accident consequence analysis models applied to licensing process of nuclear installations, radioactive and conventional industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senne Junior, Murillo; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Jordao, Elizabete

    2002-01-01

    The industrial accidents happened in the last years, particularly in the eighty's decade, had contributed in a significant way to call the attention to government authorities, industry and society as a whole, demanding mechanisms for preventing episodes that could affect people's safety and environment quality. Techniques and methods already thoroughly used in the nuclear, aeronautic and war industries were then adapted for performing analysis and evaluation of the risks associated to other industrial activities, especially in the petroleum, chemistry and petrochemical areas. Some models for analyzing the consequences of accidents involving fire and explosion, used in the licensing processes of nuclear and radioactive facilities, are presented in this paper. These models have also application in the licensing of conventional industrial facilities. (author)

  8. The new recommendations of ICRP and their possible consequences for operating nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, Bernd; Hesse, Johannes; Schwarz, Wolfgang; Kapteinat, Heinzpeter; Holl, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Full text: After an extensive and very open debate within the Radiation Protection Community the new recommendations of the ICRP on the basic principles of radiation protection have been issued in 2007. The German nuclear industry has watched the process intensively and tried to bring in their large amount of experience from the daily radiation protection practice in numerous nuclear installations. Notably the ICRP seemed to follow some of the comments given by those experienced operators. The ICRP key message 'stability and continuity' is highly welcomed by industry. The dose levels resulting from well managed operations today are far below the dose limits due to a working system of ALARA thinking and doing. The basic principles of radiation protection as pointed out by ICRP decades ago have been proven to be an effective tool and are an essential part of the legal system of most countries with developed nuclear industries. Unfortunately, not all of the comments of the experienced operators have been considered to the desirable extend. A mayor point of criticism is the central role ICRP devoted to the use of dose constraints for any source. Dose constraints do play a role in today's practice of radiation protection but they have been rather supplementary than central in the system. The idea that for all sources, and there might be Hundreds or Thousands sometimes very tiny sources in a practice, a dose constraint shall exist sounds quite inappropriate. Another example which might disturb the great vision of 'stability and continuity' is the change of ICRP into a different view on protection. Instead of processes now situations are in the focus. There are some doubts about the benefits of such a move. People will always ask if there is a change of content when using a different terminology. A lot of fruitless discussions will probably result. Nevertheless, in spite of some criticism the new ICRP will contribute to strengthen the protection regime and industry will

  9. Circumstances and consequences of Oural nuclear plant spoils; Circonstances et consequences des rejets des installations nucleaires de l`Oural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenot, J C

    1994-12-31

    The environment pollution frames serious long-dated problem. The civil nuclear power unhappily does not rest. The liquid waste fuel cycle plant prospective, particularly at their working beginning. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  10. The safety of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This Safety Fundamental publication sets out basic objectives, concepts and principles for ensuring safety that can be used both by the IAEA in its international assistance operations and by Member States in their national nuclear programmes. These Safety Fundamentals apply primarily to those nuclear installations in which the stored energy developed in certain situations could potentially results in the release of radioactive material from its designated location with the consequent risk of radiation exposure of people. These principles are applicable to a broad range of nuclear installations, but their detailed application will depend on the particular technology and the risks posed by it. In addition to nuclear power plants, such installations may include: research reactors and facilities, fuel enrichment, manufacturing and reprocessing plants; and certain facilities for radioactive waste treatment and storage

  11. Nuclear Installations Act 1969

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    The purpose of this Act is to amend the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 to bring it into full compliance with the international conventions on nuclear third party liability to which the United Kingdom is a Signatory, namely, the Paris Convention, the Brussels Supplementary Convention and the Vienna Convention. (NEA) [fr

  12. The insurance of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, H.W.

    1977-01-01

    A brief account is given of the development of nuclear insurance. The subject is dealt with under the following headings: the need for nuclear insurance, nuclear insurance pools, international co-operation, nuclear installations which may be insured, international conventions relating to the liability of operators of nuclear installations, classes of nuclear insurance, nuclear reactor hazards and their assessment, future developments. (U.K.)

  13. Safety of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    In accordance with the Nuclear Energy Act, a Licence may only be issued if the precautions required by the state of the art have been taken to prevent damage resulting from the construction and operation of the installation. The maximum admissible body doses in the area around the installation which must be observed in planning constructional and other technical protective measures to counter accidents in or at a nuclear power station (accident planning values, are established). According to the Radiological Protection Ordinance the Licensing Authority can consider these precautions to have been taken if, in designing the installation against accidents, the applicant has assumed the accidents which, according to the Safety Criteria and Guidelines for Nuclear Power Stations published in the Federal Register by the Federal Minister of the Interior after hearing the competent senior state authorities, must determine the design of a nuclear power station. On the basis of previous experience from safety analysis, assessment and operation of nuclear power stations, the accident guidelines published here define which accidents are determinative for the safety-related design of PWR power stations and what verification -particularly with regard to compliance with the accident planning values of the Radiological Protection Ordinance -must be provided by the applicant. (author)

  14. SNRIU nuclear installation modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goroshanskyi, Andrii

    2013-01-01

    Design stages of Nuclear Instalations (NI): NI design is performed in three stages: • Feasibility study: - Feasibility study is developed on the basis of the customer task for production facilities and linear facilities engineering and transport infrastructure that require detailed study of relevant decisions and identify options for and feasibility of construction. • Design: - The design is developed on the basis of design task, initial data and approved the previous stage under three-stage design. • Detailed documentation

  15. Nuclear reactor installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, W.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor installation includes a pressurized-water coolant reactor vessel and a concrete biological shield surrounding this vessel. The shield forms a space between it and the vessel large enough to permit rapid escape of the pressurized-water coolant therefrom in the event the vessel ruptures. Struts extend radially between the vessel and shield for a distance permitting normal radial thermal movement of the vessel, while containing the vessel in the event it ruptures, the struts being interspaced from each other to permit rapid escape of the pressurized-water coolant from the space between the shield and the vessel

  16. Decommissioning nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadoumont, J.

    2010-01-01

    When a nuclear installation is permanently shut down, it is crucial to completely dismantle and decontaminate it on account of radiological safety. The expertise that SCK-CEN has built up in the decommissioning operation of its own BR3 reactor is now available nationally and internationally. Last year SCK-CEN played an important role in the newly started dismantling and decontamination of the MOX plant (Mixed Oxide) of Belgonucleaire in Dessel, and the decommissioning of the university research reactor Thetis in Ghent.

  17. Nuclear installations sites safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, P.; Candes, P.; Duclos, P.; Doumenc, A.; Faure, J.; Hugon, J.; Mohammadioun, B.

    1988-11-01

    This report is divided into ten parts bearing: 1 Safety analysis procedures for Basis Nuclear Installations sites (BNI) in France 2 Site safety for BNI in France 3 Industrial and transport activities risks for BNI in France 4 Demographic characteristics near BNI sites in France 5 Meteorologic characteristics of BNI sites in France 6 Geological aspects near the BNI sites in France 7 Seismic studies for BNI sites in France 8 Hydrogeological aspects near BNI sites in France 9 Hydrological aspects near BNI sites in France 10 Ecological and radioecological studies of BNI sites in France [fr

  18. Nuclear reactor installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, A.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor metal pressure vessel is surrounded by a concrete wall forming an annular space around the vessel. Thermal insulation is in this space and surrounds the vessel, and a coolant-conductive layer is also in this space surrounding the thermal insulation, coolant forced through this layer reducing the thermal stress on the concrete wall. The coolant-conductive layer is formed by concrete blocks laid together and having coolant passages, these blocks being small enough individually to permit them to be cast from concrete at the reactor installation, the thermal insulation being formed by much larger sheet-metal clad concrete segments. Mortar is injected between the interfaces of the coolant-conductive layer and concrete wall and the interfaces between the fluid-conductive layer and the insulation, a layer of slippery sheet material being interposed between the insulation and the mortar. When the pressure vessel is thermally expanded by reactor operation, the annular space between it and the concrete wall is completely filled by these components so that zero-excursion rupture safeguard is provided for the vessel. 4 claims, 1 figure

  19. Nuclear installations and their environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieu, Ch.; Berge-Thierry, C.; Duval, C.; Bonnet, Ch.; Gaubert, B.; Riffard, Th.; Greffier, G.; Cervantes, J.C.; Le Breton, F.; Clement, C.; Charbonnier, R.; Andreani, A.M.; Maubert, H.; Maisonneuve, A.

    2002-01-01

    This dossier deals with protection of nuclear installations against external risks. The articles come from the presentations of the Conference on 'Nuclear installations and their environment', held by the 'Safety and Environment Protection' Section of the French Nuclear Energy Society on October 15, 2002. Floods, earthquakes, winter cold, snow-falls, wind, fires are the main natural risks taken into account. Risks from industrial environment and communication lines are also considered. (authors)

  20. UK nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronow, W.S.

    Regulations and conditions for the commissioning of nuclear power plants in the UK, their siting, licence conditions, design safety assessment, inspection during construction and conditions for safety in operation are listed. (J.P.)

  1. Offshore nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albano, R.

    1976-01-01

    It is possible now to foresee the creation of nuclear power plants on floating or fixed islands although from the safety viewpoint, floating islands are preferable. The definition of the legal nature of artificial islands raises a first problem insofar as artificial islands are neither islands nor ships. Furthermore, their statute would differ according to whether they were sited in territorial seas or in the new 'economic zones'. This leads to consideration of the applicability of Italian maritime legislation to nuclear power plants on floating islands without setting aside that of international regulations on radioactive maritime pollution. (N.E.A.) [fr

  2. Seismic evaluation of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattar Neto, Miguel

    1997-01-01

    Some considerations regarding extreme external events, natural or man-induce, such as earthquakes, floods, air crashes, etc, shall be done for nuclear facilities to minimizing the potential impact of the installation on the public and the environment. In this paper the main aspects of the seismic evaluation of nuclear facilities (except the nuclear power reactors) will be presented based on different codes and standards. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs

  3. Safety of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    The safety philosophy of a PWR type reactor distinguishing three levels of safety, is presented. At the first level, the concept of reactivity defining coefficients which measure the reactivity variation is introduced. At the second level, the reactor protection system establishing the design criteria to assure the high reliability, is defined. At the third level, the protection barriers to contain the consequences of accident evolution, are defined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  4. Leasing of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capaccioli, Enzo.

    1977-01-01

    The high costs to be borne in industrialised countries for expanding nuclear programmes make leasing, in terms of funding, an attractive proposition even in times of recession. This system is advantageous to both parties: the bodies providing funds make substantial profits without untoward risk, given the internationally-recognised regime of channelling liability onto the nuclear operator and because such contracts usually provide that ownership of the property involved will eventually be transferred to the operator. The latter obtains the sums needed by a simple, speedy procedure enabling him to start operations more quickly than if he had to seek funds by a more conventional method. The problem in Italy is that nuclear electricity generating plants are a State monopoly while leasing is a private enterprise. The Italian 1975 Siting Act provides a consultation procedure of regional and State authorities, with the ultimate decision taken by the latter. To maintain the momentum, arrangements could be made for leasing, before starting the licensing procedure proper according to the Act. (NEA) [fr

  5. Leukaemia near british nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, D.

    1991-01-01

    An excess of childhood leukaemia has been seen near some British nuclear installations, especially near the Sellafield reprocessing plant. The same result was found in a more general study including a large number of nuclear sites. Similar studies made in USA, Canada and France have been negative. Moreover, epidemiological studies made in England have discovered other childhood leukaemia clusters in areas far from nuclear facilities, and especially near potential sites of nuclear installations. Several explanations are suggested but no definite conclusion is yet possible. Doses from radioactive releases seem to be too low to account for the additional deaths from leukaemia by environmental contamination. A virus activation, which might be associated with population influx into rural isolated areas, has been considered. The hypothesis of genetic mutation induced by ionising radiation in the fathers of children with leukaemia has been made because a higher risk of leukaemia was observed for children of fathers employed at Sellafield. No firm conclusion is possible considering the small number of observed cases and the lack of excess leukaemias in the offspring of Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors. The possibility of internal contamination, chemicals or even radon is discussed as other causes. Studies in progress might allow to find an answer to the problem of leukaemia in the vicinity of British nuclear installations [fr

  6. Statement of nuclear incidents at nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    A statement of nuclear incidents at nuclear installations in Britain during the first quarter of 2002 is published today by the Health and Safety Executive. It covers the period 1 January to 31 March 2002. There are two installations mentioned in the statement: Dungeness B and Heysham 1. The statement is published under arrangements that came into effect from the first quarter of 1993, derived from the Health and Safety Commission's powers under section 11 of the Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act 1974

  7. Quality assurance in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres M, Nelson.

    1985-08-01

    It has been proven that the bad quality of products, equipment, installations, and services is not due to the lack of tests, experiments and verifications. The main causes are associated with insufficient organization of the activities that have influence on the quality. The garantee of quality is conceptualized as an appropriate instrument composed of normalized criteria initially in advanced technologies. Such as nuclear science and aerospace technology. However, with the appropriate modifications it can be applied to conventional technologies

  8. Nuclear installations: decommissioning and dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of seven talks given during the 1995 EUROFORUM conference about decommissioning and dismantling of Nuclear installations in the European Community. The first two papers give a detailed description of the legal, financial and regulatory framework of decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities in the European Union and a review of the currently available decommissioning techniques for inventory, disassembly, decontamination, remote operations and management of wastes. Other papers describe some legal and technical aspects of reactor and plants dismantling in UK, Germany, Spain and France. (J.S.)

  9. Statement of nuclear incidents at nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    A statement of nuclear incidents at nuclear installations in Britain during the first quarter of 2001 is published today by the Health and Safety Executive. It covers the period 1 January to 31 March 2001. The statement is published under arrangements that came into effect from the first quarter of 1993, derived from the Health and Safety Commission's powers under section 11 of the Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act 1974

  10. Civilian protection and Britain's commercial nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The subject is treated as follows: initial conclusions (major nuclear attack on military installations; nuclear attack including civil nuclear targets; conventional attack on civil nuclear installations); nature of nuclear weapons explosions and power reactor releases (general; dose effects and biologically significant isotopes; nuclear weapon effects; effect of reactors and other fuel-cycle installations in a thermonuclear area; implications of reactor releases due to conventional attack, sabotage, civil disorder or major accident). (U.K.)

  11. The dismantling of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacoste, A.C.; Duthe, M.; Mignon, H.; Lambert, F.; Pradel, Ph.; Hillewaere, J.P.; Dupre la Tour, St.; Mandil, C.; Weil, L.; Eickelpasch, N.; Finsterwalder, L.

    1997-01-01

    for nuclear installations, the dismantling is an important part of their exploitation. The technology of dismantling is existing and to get a benefit from the radioactive decay, it seems more easy for operating company such E.D.F. to wait for fifty years before dismantling. But in order to get the knowledge of this operation, the Safety Authority wanted to devote this issue of 'Controle'to the dismantling method. This issue includes: the legal aspects, the risks assessment, the dismantling policy at E.D.F., the site of Brennilis (first French experience of dismantling), the dismantling techniques, the first dismantling of a fuel reprocessing plant, comparison with classical installations, economic aspect, some German experiences, the cleansing of the american site of Handford. (N.C.)

  12. Environmental assessment [of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsley, M.

    1989-01-01

    The European Community has introduced a directive which instructs that for all projects likely to have a significant effect on the environment consent should only be given after a rigorous assessment of such effects has been carried out and presented as an environmental statement. Projects requiring environmental assessment include nuclear power stations, any thermal power station over 300MW, any radioactive waste storage or disposal facility, any installation which produces electricity, power lines, installations for fuel production, fuel reprocessing, radioactive waste processing and fuel enrichment. The statement must include a description of the likely effects, direct and indirect, on the environment of the development, with reference to human beings, flora, fauna, soil, water, air, climate, landscape, interactions of two or more of these, material assets and cultural heritage. Measures to avoid or remedy the impact must be included. (U.K.)

  13. Decommissioning of nuclear installations - regulations - financing - responsibility - insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, E.H.; Andersson, C.; Deprimoz, J.; Mayoux, J.C.; Richard, M.; Sartorelli, C.; Nocera, F.

    1983-01-01

    This paper highlights three aspects of decommissioning of nuclear installations which relate, more or less directly, to legal options already applied or advocated. It reviews the regulatory conditions for decommissioning a nuclear installation and indicates legal provisions for financing decommissioning expenditures. It also describes the legal provisions to determine liabilities in case of nuclear damage and the assistance which insurers may provide to cover the consequences of such liabilities. (NEA) [fr

  14. Public perception of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiipper, Felipe de Moura

    2011-01-01

    The key for nuclear renaissance is public acceptance. Facing energetic needs that occur around the world and lack of resources, the work of characterizing and proposing new models to represent public opinion is extremely important to all stakeholders. Even though public opinion's study on risks is relatively recent, may approaches of this subject have been suggested and presented, especially for the topic of perceptions on nuclear installations. Actual definitions on risk exist between objective and subjective models, that reflect opinions of lay public and experts. Strategies on communications with the public may be evaluated from many developed models, and its results may be registered. The use of structural models may present an exploratory character as well as confirmatory theories, as an adequate tool for the development of studies on public perception. In this work, a structural model is presented from data obtained in a previous report, and added to data collected before and after the Fukushima nuclear accident, in Japan. The effects developed from this accident offered a unique opportunity to study public opinion through the effects of a serious nuclear accident and its effects on risk communications. Aside, this work attempted to check the structural model according with obtained results, in order to sustain a constant improvement of the working tools. Yet, a comparison between data according to experts' respondents and lay public ones as well as a comparison among different students before and after a visit to nuclear station is considered. Obtained data for the structural models has been applied for on a structural model and analyzed by structural correlation matrix, latent variable structural coefficients and R 2 values. Results indicate that public opinion maintains its rejection on nuclear energy and the perception of benefits, facing perceived risks before the accident, has diminished. A new model that included a latent variable for corresponding

  15. Safety of nuclear installations in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In this part next aspects are described: (1) Site selection (Legislation related to site selection; Meeting criteria at Bohunice and Mochovce sites; International agreements); (2) Design preparation and construction (Designing and construction-relevant legislation; Nuclear installation project preparation of nuclear installation at Mochovce site); (3) Operation (Operator licensing procedure; Operation limits and conditions; Maintenance testing and control documentation for management and operation; Technical support of operation; Analysis of events at nuclear installations and Radioactive waste production); (4) Planned safety upgrading activities at nuclear installations

  16. Possible consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Speeches of Soviet and foreign scientists at the Second Section of 2d All-UNION conference of scientists on problems of peace and prevention of nuclear war related to possible consequences of nuclear war have been considered. It is noted that production of a large amount of aerosol particles, dust, smoke and combustion products due to forest-fires, fires in cities, which change considerably atmosphere properties, will be the greatest effect of nuclear strike from the point of view of global consequencies. ''Nuclear winter'', photosynthesis suppression, plant bioproductivity weakening, long-term climate changes, ozone layer disturbance, mass and irreversible degeneration of all biosphere on the whole are great consequencies of nuclear conflict. Attention is paid to medical service, industrial accidents, radioactive fallouts consequence of radiation and other harmful factors for people in nuclear war

  17. The nuclear installations face to their environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieu, Ch.; Berge-Thierry, C.; Duval, C.; Bonnet, Ch.; Gaubert, B.; Riffard, Th.; Greffier, G.; Cervantes, J.C.; Le Breton, F.; Clement, C.; Charbonnier, R.; Andreani, A.M.; Maubert, H.; Maisonneuve, A.

    2002-01-01

    This dossier deals with protection of nuclear installations against external risks. The articles come from the presentations of the Conference on 'Nuclear installations and their environment', held by the 'Safety and Environment Protection' Section of the French Nuclear Energy Society on October fifteenth 2002. Floods, earthquakes, winter cold, snow-falls, wind, fires are the main natural risks taken into account. Risks from industrial environment and communication lines are also considered. (author)

  18. Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelzer, N.

    1993-01-01

    The German law governing decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear installations can be called to be embryonic as compared to other areas of the nuclear regulatory system, and this is why the AIDN/INLA regional meeting organised by the German national committee in July 1992 in Schwerin has been intended to elaborate an assessment of the current legal situation and on this basis establish proposals for enhancement and development, taking into account the experience reported by experts from abroad. The proceedings comprise the paper of the opening session, 'Engineering and safety aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear installations', and the papers and discussions of the technical sessions entitled: - Comparative assessment of the regulatory regimes. - Legislation governing the decommissioning of nuclear installations in Germany. - Analysis of the purpose and law making substance of existing regulatory provisions for the decommissioning of nuclear installations. All seventeen papers of the meeting have been prepared for separate retrieval from the database. (orig./HSCH) [de

  19. Demographic characteristics of nuclear installations sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doumenc, A.; Faure, J.

    1988-01-01

    The selection of a nuclear installations sites can not be conceived without a deep analysis of demographic context. This analysis permits to define the critical populations around the installation and is an essential element of emergency plans. 1 tab., 2 refs. (F.M.)

  20. The Swiss nuclear installations annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This report concerns the safety of the Swiss nuclear installations in the period of 1992. Surveillance of these installations with regard to nuclear safety, including radiation protection, is among the tasks of the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (HSK). In Switzerland five nuclear power plants are operational: Beznau I and II, Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt. Research reactors of thermal capacities below 10 MWth are operational at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne and at the University of Basle. Further subject to HSK's supervision are all activities at PSI involving nuclear fuel or ionizing radiation, the shut down experimental reactor of Lucens, the exploration in Switzerland of final disposal facilities for radwaste and the interim radwaste storage facilities. The present report first deals with the nuclear power plants and covers, in individual sections, the aspects of installation safety, radiation protection as well as personnel and organization, and the resulting overall impression from the point of view of HSK (chapters 1-4). In chapter 5, the corresponding information is given for the research installations. Chapter 6 on radwaste disposal is dedicated to the waste treatment, waste from reprocessing, interim storage and exploration by the NAGRA. In chapter 7, the status of emergency planning in the nuclear power plants' vicinity is reported. Certificates issued for the transport of radioactive materials are dealt with in chapter 8. Finally chapter 9 goes into some general questions relating to the safety of nuclear installations, and in particular covers important events in nuclear installations abroad. In all, the operation of the Swiss nuclear installations in the period of 1992 is rated safe by HSK. (author) 7 figs., 13 tabs

  1. Nuclear war nuclear proliferation and their consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aga Khan, Sadruddin

    1986-01-01

    The paper concerns the proceedings of a conference hosted by the Groupe de Bellerive to explore and discuss the implications for humanity of nuclear war, nuclear proliferation and their consequences, Geneva 1985. The conference was divided into five sessions, headed by the subject titles: the nuclear non-proliferation treaty (NPT) and its future, the spread of nuclear weapons among nations, global effects of a nuclear war, the nuclear arms race and arms control, the NPT and its future. Twenty eight papers were presented in the five sessions. (UK)

  2. Managing for safety at nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This publication, by the Health and Safety Executive's (HSE's) Nuclear Safety Division (NSD), provides a statement of the criteria the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) uses to judge the adequacy of any proposed or existing system for managing a nuclear installation in so far as it affects safety. These criteria have been developed from the basic HSE model, described in the publication Successful health and safety management that applies to industry generally, in order to meet the additional needs for managing nuclear safety. In addition, the publication identifies earlier studies upon which this work was based together with the key management activities and outputs. (Author)

  3. Statement of nuclear incidents at nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) presents the statement of nuclear incidents at nuclear installations published under the Health and Safety Commission's powers derived from section 11 of the Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act 1974. INCIDENT 02/4/1. Harwell (United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority) On 6 November 2002 during operations in a glove box in B220, the over pressure alarm sounded. The operators evacuated and shortly afterwards the airborne activity monitors also sounded. The building emergency arrangements for airborne activity alarms was initiated to ascertain the source and to manage the operations. An investigation by UKAEA confirmed that a release of Americium 241 into the working area had occurred at a quantity in excess of Schedule 8 column 4 of the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999 (IRRs). A number of personnel have received intakes including the two operators and the health physics personnel who attended the event. The highest dose (up to 6 mSv.) was received by the Health Physics charge hand. UKAEA placed an embargo on the use of similar systems and have completed their own management investigation and produced an internal report. It concludes that the likely cause of the event was over-pressurisation of the vacuum equipment used in the process. The report also highlights improvements required to the ventilation system in the laboratory and adjoining areas. An action plan has been developed for this work and progress is being made. NIl has followed the UKAEA investigation and carried out its own study including a visit by a ventilation specialist. This has confirmed the problems with the ventilation system. It is a complex issue that may have a wider impact across the building. A letter has been sent to UKAEA detailing a series of short-term requirements and the need to review implications and produce a longer-term action plan. UKAEA is cooperating fully with these requirements. INCIDENT 02/4/2. Dounreay (United Kingdom Atomic Energy

  4. Physical protection of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toepfer, K.

    1989-01-01

    This contribution investigates the possible danger and the legal basis of physical protection and explains the current, integrated system provided for, as well as the underlying possible scenarios of an assault: (1) by a violent crowd of aggressors outside the installation, (2) by a small group of aggressors outside the installation, (3) by a person allowed to enter (internal assault). The physical protection system supplements the internal safety measures to enhance protection against hypothetical and possible acts of terrorism or other criminal assault. The system covers external and internal controlled areas, access monitoring, physical protection control room and service, security checks of the personnel, and activities to disclose sabotage. Some reflections on the problem field between security controls and the constitutional state conclude this contribution. (orig./HSCH) [de

  5. Culture safety in the nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benar Bukit

    2008-01-01

    Culture safety is aimed to empower all the personnel to contribute and responsible to the installation safety where they work in. Culture safety is important as there were so many accidents happened due to the little attention given to the safety, take as examples of what happened in Three Mille Island installation (1979) and Chernobyl (1986). These remind us that human factor gives a significant contribution to the failure of operational system which influences the safety. Therefore, as one of institutions which has nuclear installation. National Nuclear Energy Agency must apply the culture safety to guarantee the safety operation of nuclear installation to protect the personnel, community and environment from the hazard of radioactive radiation. Culture safety has two main components. The first component under the management responsibility is a framework needed in an organisation. The second component is the personnel attitude in al/ levels to respond and optimize those framework. (author)

  6. Biological consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinin, N.P.

    1986-01-01

    Irradiation probability due to radionuclide fallout is shown to exceed 1 Gy even for the territories which have not been affected by nuclear weapons direct explosions. If some people survive in the nuclear war, their heredity would be affected. Genetic consequences of nuclear war complete the process of Homo sapiens disappearance from the Earth. Space weapons development will deteriorate the prospects of civilization ruin as a result of biological aftereffects of nuclear war and possible application of new arms, as well as chemical and biologic weapons

  7. Computer systems for nuclear installation data control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The computer programs developed by Divisao de Instalacoes Nucleares (DIN) from Brazilian CNEN for data control on nuclear installations in Brazil are presented. The following computer programs are described: control of registered companies, control of industrial sources, irradiators and monitors; control of liable person; control of industry irregularities; for elaborating credence tests; for shielding analysis; control of waste refuge [pt

  8. Construction for Nuclear Installations. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations and guidance based on international good practices in the construction of nuclear installations, which will enable construction to proceed with high quality. It can be applied to support the development, implementation and assessment of construction methods and procedures and the identification of good practices for ensuring the quality of the construction to meet the design intent and ensure safety. It will be a useful tool for regulatory bodies, licensees and new entrant countries for nuclear power plants and other nuclear installations

  9. Meteorological instrumentation for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A.C.L. da.

    1983-01-01

    The main requirements of regulatory agencies, concerning the meteorological instrumentation needed for the licensing of nuclear facilities are discussed. A description is made of the operational principles of sensors for the various meteorological parameters and associated electronic systems. Finally, it is presented an analysis of the problems associated with grounding of a typical meteorological station. (Author) [pt

  10. Site evaluation for nuclear installations. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This Safety Requirements publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Siting, which was issued in 1988 as Safety Series No. 50-C-S (Rev. 1). It takes account of developments relating to site evaluations for nuclear installations since the Code on Siting was last revised. These developments include the issuing of the Safety Fundamentals publication on The Safety of Nuclear Installations, and the revision of various safety standards and other publications relating to safety. Requirements for site evaluation are intended to ensure adequate protection of site personnel, the public and the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation arising from nuclear installations. It is recognized that there are steady advances in technology and scientific knowledge, in nuclear safety and in what is considered adequate protection. Safety requirements change with these advances and this publication reflects the present consensus among States. This Safety Requirements publication was prepared under the IAEA programme on safety standards for nuclear installations. It establishes requirements and provides criteria for ensuring safety in site evaluation for nuclear installations. The Safety Guides on site evaluation listed in the references provide recommendations on how to meet the requirements established in this Safety Requirements publication. The objective of this publication is to establish the requirements for the elements of a site evaluation for a nuclear installation so as to characterize fully the site specific conditions pertinent to the safety of a nuclear installation. The purpose is to establish requirements for criteria, to be applied as appropriate to site and site-installation interaction in operational states and accident conditions, including those that could lead to emergency measures for: (a) Defining the extent of information on a proposed site to be presented by the applicant; (b) Evaluating a proposed site to ensure that the site

  11. The Swiss nuclear installations. Annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    Surveillance of the Swiss nuclear installations with regard to nuclear safety, including radiation protection, is among the tasks of the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (HSK). Five nuclear power plants are operational in Switzerland: the three units Beznau I and II and Muehleberg with electrical capacities in the range of 300 to 400 MWe, and the two units Goesgen and Leibstadt with capacities between 900 and 1200 MWe. These are light water reactors; at Beznau and Goesgen of the PWR type, and at Muehleberg and Leibstadt of the BWR type. Research reactors of thermal capacities below 10 MWth are operational at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne and at the University of Basel. Further subject to HSK`s supervision are all activities at PSI involving nuclear fuel or ionizing radiation, the shut-down experimental reactor of Lucens, the exploration, in Switzerland, of final disposal facilities for radwaste and the interim radwaste storage facilities. The report first deals with the nuclear power and covers, in individual sections, the aspects of installation safety, radiation protection as well as personnel and organization, and the resulting overall impression from the point of view of HSK. In chapter 5, the corresponding information is given for research installations. Chapter 6, on radwaste disposal, is dedicated to the treatment of waste, waste from reprocessing, interim storage and exploration by NAGRA. In chapter 7, the status of emergency planning in the nuclear power plants` proximity is reported. Certificates issued for the transport of radioactive materials are dealt with in chapter 8. Finally chapter 9 goes into general questions relating to the safety of nuclear installations. All in all, the safety of operation of the Swiss nuclear installations, in the period of 1994, is judged as good by HSK. (author) 11 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. The Swiss nuclear installations. Annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    Surveillance of the Swiss nuclear installations with regard to nuclear safety, including radiation protection, is among the tasks of the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (HSK). Five nuclear power plants are operational in Switzerland: the three units Beznau I and II and Muehleberg with electrical capacities in the range of 300 to 400 MWe, and the two units Goesgen and Leibstadt with capacities between 900 and 1200 MWe. These are light water reactors; at Beznau and Goesgen of the PWR type, and at Muehleberg and Leibstadt of the BWR type. Research reactors of thermal capacities below 10 MWth are operational at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne and at the University of Basel. Further subject to HSK's supervision are all activities at PSI involving nuclear fuel or ionizing radiation, the shut-down experimental reactor of Lucens, the exploration of final disposal facilities for radwaste and the interim radwaste storage facilities in Switzerland. The report first deals with the nuclear power and covers, in individual sections, the aspects of installation safety, radiation protection as well as personnel and organization, and the resulting overall impression from the point of view of HSK. In chapter 5, the corresponding information is given for research installations. Chapter 6, on radwaste disposal, is dedicated to the treatment of waste, waste from reprocessing, interim storage and exploration by NAGRA. In chapter 7, the status of emergency planning in the nuclear power plants' proximity is reported. Certificates issued for the transport of radioactive materials are dealt with in chapter 8. Finally chapter 9 goes into general questions relating to the safety of nuclear installations. All in all, the safety of operation of the Swiss nuclear installations, in the period of 1993, is judged as good by HSK. (author) 10 figs., 11 tabs

  13. Cancer risks near nuclear installations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, D.

    1999-01-01

    The descriptive studies actually at disposal bring to the fore some children leukemia aggregates around some nuclear sites. (Sellafield, and Dounreay in the United kingdom, Kruemmel in Germany). Nevertheless, the studies grouping several sites do not find any global excess. The analytical studies have not brought any answer until now, but have allowed to eliminate some hypothesis such the Gardner genetic hypothesis. (N.C.)

  14. Childhood cancer and nuclear installations: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muirhead, C.R.

    1998-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies of childhood cancer around nuclear installations have been conducted in recent years. This article reviews results from Great Britain and elsewhere. Geographical studies have indicated raised risks of childhood leukaemia around some British nuclear installations. However, environmental assessments suggest that the findings are unlikely to be due to radioactive releases from the sites. Case-control studies have allowed more detailed investigation of putative risk factors than is possible from geographical studies. In particular, a recent national study in Britain does not support the hypothesis raised by an earlier study in West Cumbria that paternal radiation exposure prior to conception may increase the risk of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in offspring. Other studies suggest that childhood leukaemia may have an infective basis, although there is still uncertainty about whether this would explain the findings around nuclear installations. The UK Childhood Cancer Study may provide more information on the causes of these diseases. (author)

  15. ALARA in European nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, C.; Croft, J.; Pfeffer, W.; Zeevaert, T.

    1995-01-01

    For over a decade the Commission of the European Community has sponsored research projects on the development and practical implementation of the Optimization principle, or as it is often referred to, ALARA. These projects have given rise to a series of successful international Optimization training courses and have provided a significant input to the periodic European Seminars on Optimization, the last one of which took place in April 1993. This paper reviews the approaches to Optimization that have development within Europe and describes the areas of work in the current project. The on-going CEC research project addresses the problem of ALARA and internal exposures, and tries to define procedures for ALARA implementation, taking account of the perception of the hazard as well as the levels of probability of exposure. The relationships between ALARA and work management, and ALARA and decommissioning of installations appear to be other fruitful research areas. Finally, this paper introduces some software for using ALARA decision aiding techniques and databases containing feed back experience developed in Europe

  16. ALARA in European nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefaure, C. [CEPN, Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France); Croft, J. [NRPB, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom); Pfeffer, W. [GRS, Koeln (Germany); Zeevaert, T. [SCK/CEN, Mol (Belgium)

    1995-03-01

    For over a decade the Commission of the European Community has sponsored research projects on the development and practical implementation of the Optimization principle, or as it is often referred to, ALARA. These projects have given rise to a series of successful international Optimization training courses and have provided a significant input to the periodic European Seminars on Optimization, the last one of which took place in April 1993. This paper reviews the approaches to Optimization that have development within Europe and describes the areas of work in the current project. The on-going CEC research project addresses the problem of ALARA and internal exposures, and tries to define procedures for ALARA implementation, taking account of the perception of the hazard as well as the levels of probability of exposure. The relationships between ALARA and work management, and ALARA and decommissioning of installations appear to be other fruitful research areas. Finally, this paper introduces some software for using ALARA decision aiding techniques and databases containing feed back experience developed in Europe.

  17. Seismic studies for nuclear installations sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadioun, B.; Faure, J.

    1988-01-01

    The french experience in seismic risks assessment for french nuclear installations permits to set out the objectives, the phases the geographic extensions of workings to be realized for the installation safety. The data to be collected for the safety analysis are specified, they concern the regional seismotectonics, the essential seismic data for determining the seism level to be taken into account and defining the soil movement spectra adapted to the site. It is necessary to follow up the seismic surveillance during the installation construction and life. 7 refs. (F.M.)

  18. Questions for the nuclear installations inspectorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conroy, C.; Flood, M.; MacRory, R.; Patterson, W.C.

    1976-01-01

    The responsibilities of the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate are considered, and the responsibilities of other bodies for (a) reprocessing and enrichment, and (b) security. Questions for the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate are then set out under the following heads: general (on such topics as vandalism, sabotage, threats, security, reactor incidents); magnox reactors; corrosion; advanced gas-cooled reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor; fast breeder reactor; reproces-sing and waste. Most of the questions are concerned with technical problems that have been reported or might possibly arise during construction or operation, affecting the safety of the reactor or process. (U.K.)

  19. Iodine filters in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    The present report discusses the significance for environmental exposure of the iodine released with the gaseous effluents of nuclear power stations and reprocessing plants in relation to releases of other airborne radionuclides. Iodine filtration processes are described. The release pathways and the composition of airborne fission product iodine mixtures and their bearing on environmental exposure are discussed on the basis of measured fission product iodine emissions. The sorbents which can be used for iodine filtration, their removal efficiencies and range of applications are dealt with in detail. The particular conditions governing iodine removal, which are determined by the various gaseous iodine species, are illustrated on the basis of experimentally determined retention profiles. Particular attention is given to the limitations imposed by temperature, humidity, radiation and filter poisoning. The types of filter normally used are described, their advantages and drawbacks discussed, the principles underlying their design are outlined and the sources of error indicated. The methods normally applied to test the efficiency of various iodine sorbents are described and assessed. Operating experience with iodine filters, gathered from surveillance periods of many years, is supplemented by a large number of test results and the findings of extensive experiments. Possible ways of prolonging the permissible service lives of iodine filters are discussed and information is given on protective measures. The various iodine removal processes applied in reprocessing plants are described and compared with reference to efficiency and cost. The latest developments in filter technology in reprocessing plants are briefly outlined

  20. Nuclear disasters and their consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastian, T.

    1986-01-01

    The book is intended to serve as a source of information and a line of orientation for all people afraid of or angry about the consequences of the Chernobyl disaster. The author describes the effects of nuclear disasters that might happen as a result of military or 'peaceful' application of nuclear energy; he explains the situation people will have to cope with, gives advice on protective means and methods and topical information with reference to institutions or authorities where assistance might be available, also including a list of addresses and telephone numbers that has been issued by the governments after the Chernobyl accident. (orig.) [de

  1. Public information and licensing procedures for nuclear installations. European experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayoux, J.C.; Chevillard, F.; Mutschler, U.; Stubbe, C.

    1981-10-01

    This paper reviews the licensing procedures for nuclear installations in various European countries and examines the form, content and methods selected for information and consultation of the public. The author stresses the importance of this stage in the procedure, both for the nuclear operator and the public authorities, given the population's concern about the environment. He concludes that, irrespective of its complexity, the nuclear field cannot remain the concern of a few initiates competent to take decisions and that, consequently, this implies creation of new information systems to meet the public's desire to participate more directly in the process. (NEA) [fr

  2. Conflict management in the planning of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, M.

    1989-01-01

    Subsequent to the decision of the Bavarian Higher Administrative Court, which after judicial review declared the development plan for the Wackersdorf site and the reprocessing facility there to be void, the author analyses the situation with regard to the tasks to be accomplished by an installation-specific planning management for coping with arising conflicts - and nuclear hazards in particular -, and for coming to a reconciliation of interests. The author agrees with the decision of the Lueneburg Higher Administrative Court which stated that, in view of the subsequent licensing procedure provided by the law, the development plans need not specify any regulations concerning the specific nuclear hazards or radiological consequences of installations of this type, so that development plans within the meaning of sec. 1, sub-sec. (3) BauGB do not necessarily have to consider nuclear risks or dose limits. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Advanced Measuring (Instrumentation Methods for Nuclear Installations: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qiu-kuan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear technology has been widely used in the world. The research of measurement in nuclear installations involves many aspects, such as nuclear reactors, nuclear fuel cycle, safety and security, nuclear accident, after action, analysis, and environmental applications. In last decades, many advanced measuring devices and techniques have been widely applied in nuclear installations. This paper mainly introduces the development of the measuring (instrumentation methods for nuclear installations and the applications of these instruments and methods.

  4. Statement of nuclear incidents at nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    Three incidents were reported in April-June 1993. The first was on the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) site at Sellafield and concerned leakage of 0.5 TBq of alpha activity from plutonium contaminated waste stored in a steel drum. This was subsequently double contained and moved so it could be inspected regularly. No contamination of personnel occurred. The second concerned the leakage of thorium liquor from a pipe at the UKAEA's Thorium reprocessing plant at Dounreay. Two temporary repairs were made and no personnel were contaminated. The third was at the Sellafield site where a small quantity (5 mls) of plutonium containing liquor had leaked from a package and released alpha activity. The bags were temporary containment of engineering debris which may have had sharp edges. The bags had been piled up and one of the bags had torn. Recommendations were made following inquiries into each of the incidents to improve procedures and prevent similar incidents occurring. (UK)

  5. Meteorological characteristics of nuclear installations sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doumenc, A.

    1988-01-01

    The atmosphere is the most propitious medium to a rapid transport and diffusion of a pollutant. So, it is important to know its local characteristics which is decisive for every evaluation of radioactive release consequences using transfer models. It is also the siege of intense sudden hazardous phenomena, as tornados and typhoons, that should be taken into account in the installation conception. 1 tab., 6 refs. (F.M.)

  6. Drones and safety of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourneur, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Recent flyovers of French nuclear power plants by drones or UAVs (the owners of these drones could not be identified) has made the safety of these nuclear installations a matter of concern. These events also raised the question of balance between secret and information about these installations. The French Parliamentary Office for the Assessment of Scientific and Technological Choices (OPECST) organised two sets of hearings, a confidential one with people in charge of information related to national defence and security, and a public one opened to all stakeholders. This article briefly reports and discusses the results of these hearings. It appeared that these flyovers are not really a threat, are more a communication action than anything else. Suggestions have been made for the development of researches in the field of drone detection, and also for evolutions of French legislation on drones

  7. The dismantling of CEA nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piketty, Laurence

    2016-03-01

    After having indicated locations of French nuclear installations which are currently being dismantled (about 30 installations), and recalled the different categories of radioactive wastes with respect to their activity level and the associated storage options, this article gives an overview of various aspects of dismantling, more precisely in the case of installations owned and managed by the CEA. These operations comprise the dismantling itself, the recovery and packaging of wastes, old effluents and spent fuels. The organisation and responsible departments within the CEA are presented, and the author outlines some operational problematic issues met due to the age of installations (traceability of activities, regulation evolutions). The issue of financing is then discussed, and its uncertainties are outlined. The dismantling strategy within the CEA-DEN is described, with reference to legal and regulatory frameworks. The next parts of the article address the organisation and the economic impact of these decontamination and dismantling activities within the CEA-DEN, highlight how R and D and advanced technology are a support to this activities as R and D actions address all scientific and technical fields of nuclear decontamination and dismantling. An overview of three important dismantling works is proposed: Fontenay-aux-Roses, the Marcoule CEA centre (a reference centre in the field of nuclear dismantling and decontamination) and the Grenoble CEA centre (reconversion in R and D activities in the fields of technologies of information, of communication, technologies, for health, and in renewable energies). The last part addresses the participation to the Strategic Committee of the Nuclear Sector (CSFN)

  8. Safety culture in nuclear installations. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnino, A.; Weimann, G.

    1995-04-01

    These proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations held in Vienna, Austria from 24 to 28 April 1995 provide a wide forum of information exchange and discussions on the topic safety culture in nuclear power plants. Safety culture deals with human factors since it deals with attitudes, organization and management. It then means that it has a natural component in it which is linked to the national culture and education. There are about 95 contributions, some of them presented by title and abstract only. All of them are in the subject scope of INIS. (Botek)

  9. Safety culture in nuclear installations. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnino, A [ed.; International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Weimann, G [ed.; Oesterreichisches Forschungszentrum Seibersdorf GmbH (Austria)

    1995-04-01

    These proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations held in Vienna, Austria from 24 to 28 April 1995 provide a wide forum of information exchange and discussions on the topic safety culture in nuclear power plants. Safety culture deals with human factors since it deals with attitudes, organization and management. It then means that it has a natural component in it which is linked to the national culture and education. There are about 95 contributions, some of them presented by title and abstract only. All of them are in the subject scope of INIS. (Botek).

  10. Regulatory Safety Requirements for Operating Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubela, W.

    2017-01-01

    The National Nuclear Regulator (NNR) is established in terms of the National Nuclear Regulator Act (Act No 47 of 1999) and its mandate and authority are conferred through sections 5 and 7 of this Act, setting out the NNR's objectives and functions, which include exercising regulatory control over siting, design, construction etc of nuclear installations through the granting of nuclear authorisations. The NNR's responsibilities embrace all those actions aimed at providing the public with confidence and assurance that the risks arising from the production of nuclear energy remain within acceptable safety limits -> Therefore: Set fundamental safety standards, conducting pro-active safety assessments, determining licence conditions and obtaining assurance of compliance. The promotional aspects of nuclear activities in South Africa are legislated by the Nuclear Energy Act (Act No 46 of 1999). The NNR approach to regulations of nuclear safety and security take into consideration, amongst others, the potential hazards associated with the facility or activity, safety related programmes, the importance of the authorisation holder's safety related processes as well as the need to exercise regulatory control over the technical aspects such as of the design and operation of a nuclear facility in ensuring nuclear safety and security. South Africa does not have national nuclear industry codes and standards. The NNR is therefore non-prescriptive as it comes to the use of industry codes and standards. Regulatory framework (current) provide for the protection of persons, property, and environment against nuclear damage, through Licensing Process: Safety standards; Safety assessment; Authorisation and conditions of authorisation; Public participation process; Compliance assurance; Enforcement

  11. Nuclear installations inspectorate a public opinion survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennie, S.E.; Davies, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (HMNII) is the regulator responsible for the safety of licensed nuclear sites in the UK. Recognizing the need for public approval on future policy with respect to nuclear waste management, the NII commissioned a public opinion research programme amongst the UK general public. Opinion was sought on a number of issues including attitudes towards the industry in general, perception of nuclear waste and its management, tolerability of risk and attitudes towards current decommissioning plans. In response to the primary objectives of the survey the main findings are: current spontaneous level of concern over the industry in general is low (7%), and lower still for nuclear waste (3%). However, on prompting, 47% of respondents were very concerned about nuclear waste. Top of mind issues of concern about the industry are: nuclear waste; risk of accidents; health risks. Personal risk from nuclear waste is not of overt concern and is significantly less worrisome to respondents than risk from diseases like meningitis or cancer, smoking or road accidents. On being presented with a statement describing current UK decommissioning plans, the sample was generally in favour. However, this issue will require further research. (authors)

  12. Seismic evaluation of nuclear installations; Avaliacao sismica de instalacoes nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattar Neto, Miguel [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1997-10-01

    Some considerations regarding extreme external events, natural or man-induce, such as earthquakes, floods, air crashes, etc, shall be done for nuclear facilities to minimizing the potential impact of the installation on the public and the environment. In this paper the main aspects of the seismic evaluation of nuclear facilities (except the nuclear power reactors) will be presented based on different codes and standards. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Statement of nuclear incidents at nuclear installations: first quarter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    As a requirement of the 1974 Health and Safety at Work Act, the United Kingdom Health and Safety Inspectorate is required to publish reports of nuclear incidents at nuclear installations. This report covers the period 1st January to 31st March 1994. Two incidents are reported for Dungeness A Power Station, one at the Amersham International building on site at Harwell Laboratory, one at AEA Technology's Windscale Plant and one at British Nuclear Fuels Limited's Sellafield site. (UK)

  14. Professional operation and management of nuclear island installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Limin

    2011-01-01

    As an important part of nuclear power plant construction, nuclear island installation mainly involves main equipment installation, pipeline installation, associated procedure examination and other important tasks. However, due to the nuclear island installation management changing from single project to multi-projects, the problems such as professional management of nuclear island installation and the lack of technical staff become more and more prominent and become one of the key restricts to the work of nuclear island installation. Based on analysis of the single project, single-base nuclear island installation management and practice, combined with the current situation that multi-project and multi-base construction of nuclear power are carrying out at the same time, this paper proposes a new management model of nuclear island installation. (author)

  15. Safety of nuclear installations. An international comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renner, Andrea; Diwes, Andreas; Reingardt, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Safeguarding of nuclear power plants against disruptive actions or other external hazards is part of the plant design and presumption of an operation license. The general principle is defense in depth involving different security zones with separate barriers. The safeguards for nuclear installations are organized in three areas of responsibility: governmental measures (police, military), technical (detectors, scanners, illuminations, camera tracking, concrete barriers) and personnel measures (access control, security personnel, alarm) of the operating company. International responsibilities results from the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and several IAEA documents. The authors discuss the national regulations in Germany, Switzerland, United Kingdom and USA. Older NPPs that are not in compliance with actual safety standards will be a topic of increasing importance.

  16. The Dismantling of Nuclear Installations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnaure, P.

    2011-01-01

    As we saw in the previous article by Pierre Bonnaure, though it has long been decried for the dangers inherent in its production structures and the very long-lived waste that it generates, nuclear power may yet recover its credibility, particularly in France. However, on close examination, we see that the nuclear industry is beset by a number of unresolved questions, beginning with the dismantling of installations that have become obsolete or are set to become so. Nuclear power took off after the Second World War, but several generations of technology have been developed since then, and most currently functioning power-stations - mainly second-generation installations - are theoretically nearing the end of their useful lives, at least in terms of what was said when they were being built. The problem therefore arises of their dismantling and the clean-up of the sites on which they were built, a thorny question on which Pierre Bonnaure casts light in this article (prospects, strategies, financing, management of waste etc.). Unfortunately, it emerges that in France nothing has really been resolved, that public debate on the matter is decidedly limited and that investment (both financial investment and research) is not commensurate with the needs of a sector which is, after all, the source of three quarters of national electricity production. (author)

  17. Environmental consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwell, M.A.; Hutchinson, T.C.; Cropper, W.P. Jr.; Harwell, C.C.; Grover, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book addresses the ecological, agricultural, and human effects of nuclear war. The topics covered include: Ecological principles relevant to nuclear war; Vulnerability of ecological systems to climatic effects on nuclear war; Additional potential effects of nuclear war on ecological systems; Potential effects of nuclear war on agricultural productivity; Food availability after nuclear war; and Experiences and extrapolations from Hiroshima and Nagasaki

  18. Licensing systems and inspection of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The first study analysing the regulations governing the licensing and inspection of nuclear installations in OECD countries was published by OECD/NEA in 1980, and revised in 1986. Since then there have been amendments to national regulations on the subject, which have warranted updating of this publication. This new study provides a description of the licensing regulations and practices applied in the twenty OECD countries with provisions in that field. The national systems have been described according to a standard format to make comparisons and research easier. In most cases, the descriptions are supplemented by flow charts illustrating the procedures and specifying the different authorities involved in the licensing procedures [fr

  19. Statement of nuclear incidents at nuclear installations. Third quarter 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    A statement of nuclear incidents at nuclear installations in Britain during the third quarter of 2001 is published today by the Health and Safety Executive (copy attached). It covers the period 1 July to 30 September 2001. The statement is published under arrangements that came into effect from the first quarter of 1993, derived from the Health and Safety Commission's powers under section 11 of the Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act 1974. Normally each incident mentioned in HSE's Quarterly Incident Statements will already have been made public by the licensee or site operator either through a press statement or by inclusion in the newsletter for the site concerned. The locations of the installations mentioned in the statement are as follows: Heysham 1 (British Energy Generation plc), Sellafield (British Nuclear Fuels plc), Chapelcross (British Nuclear Fuels plc)

  20. Statement of nuclear incidents at nuclear installations. Third quarter 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    A statement of nuclear incidents at nuclear installations in Britain during the third quarter of 2001 is published today by the Health and Safety Executive. It covers the period 1 July to 30 September 2001. The statement is published under arrangements that came into effect from the first quarter of 1993, derived from the Health and Safety Commission's powers under section 11 of the Health and Safety at Work, etc. Act 1974

  1. Nuclear Plant Analyzer: Installation manual. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snider, D.M.; Wagner, K.L.; Grush, W.H.; Jones, K.R.

    1995-01-01

    This report contains the installation instructions for the Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) System. The NPA System consists of the Computer Visual System (CVS) program, the NPA libraries, the associated utility programs. The NPA was developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to provide a highly flexible graphical user interface for displaying the results of these analysis codes. The NPA also provides the user with a convenient means of interactively controlling the host program through user-defined pop-up menus. The NPA was designed to serve primarily as an analysis tool. After a brief introduction to the Computer Visual System and the NPA, an analyst can quickly create a simple picture or set of pictures to aide in the study of a particular phenomenon. These pictures can range from simple collections of square boxes and straight lines to complex representations of emergency response information displays

  2. Arrangements for dealing with emergencies at civil nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.J.; Robinson, I.F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper covers arrangements for dealing with nuclear emergencies at sites licensed by the Health and Safety Executive/Nuclear Installations Inspectorate. Such arrangements are over and above the contingency plans required for radiation incidents as required by the Ionising Radiations Regulations. The statutory position of the NII is described and, although the NII is limited to regulating the activities of the operator, the functions of the other organisations that could be involved in dealing with an emergency are briefly covered in order to give as complete a picture as possible. The basis for emergency planning is given together with the consequences and countermeasures for mitigation of a nuclear emergency, including the use of ERLs. The requirements for emergency exercises are explained. (author)

  3. Importance of human factors on nuclear installations safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    Actually, installations safety and, in particular the nuclear installations infer a strong incidence in human factors related to the design and operation of such installations. In general, the experience aims to that the most important accidents have happened as result of the components' failures combination and human failures in the operation of safety systems. Human factors in the nuclear installations may be divided into two areas: economy and human reliability. Human factors treatments for the safety evaluation of the nuclear installations allow to diagnose the weak points of man-machine interaction. (Author) [es

  4. Software for simulation of nuclear simulation of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, J.O.; Ramos, L.M.; Arjona, O.; Rodriguez, L.

    1993-01-01

    The software is an instrument to build conceptual-type simulators of low, medium and full scale for used in nuclear installations. The system is composed by composed by two basic modules: one for the edition and the other for the simulation. The first one allows to prepare the information to simulate: mathematical model, technological design (fundamentally, operation board or mnemotechnical design), parameters to be shown, failures to be simulated

  5. Renewable energy sources and nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschberg, S.; Bauer, Ch.; Burgherr, P.; Stucki, S.; Vogel, F.; Biollaz, S.; Schulz, T.; Durisch, W.; Hardegger, P.; Foskolos, K.; Meier, A.; Schenler, W.

    2005-02-01

    This comprehensive work report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) made by the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI takes a look at work done in connection with the updating of the office's Energy Perspectives. In particular, the topic of electricity is reviewed in the light of pending important decisions in the area of nuclear energy and the newer renewable sources of energy. The report makes an attempt to estimate the effect on Swiss power production that the new renewables and new nuclear installations could have in the next 30-40 years and to what costs this could be done and which obstacles would have to overcome. The renewable energy sources include small hydro, wind, photovoltaics, solar thermal power plants, biogas, geothermal energy, wave-power and solar chemistry. The methods used include literature study and contacts with internal PSI experts on the various areas involved. The most important system characteristics were noted and learning curves for the various technologies were taken into account. Ecological and social factors were also considered

  6. Climatic Consequences of Nuclear Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.

    2011-12-01

    A nuclear war between Russia and the United States could still produce nuclear winter, even using the reduced arsenals of about 4000 total nuclear weapons that will result by 2017 in response to the New START treaty. A nuclear war between India and Pakistan, with each country using 50 Hiroshima-sized atom bombs as airbursts on urban areas, could produce climate change unprecedented in recorded human history. This scenario, using much less than 1% of the explosive power of the current global nuclear arsenal, would produce so much smoke from the resulting fires that it would plunge the planet to temperatures colder than those of the Little Ice Age of the 16th to 19th centuries, shortening the growing season around the world and threatening the global food supply. Crop model studies of agriculture in the U.S. and China show massive crop losses, even for this regional nuclear war scenario. Furthermore, there would be massive ozone depletion with enhanced ultraviolet radiation reaching the surface. These surprising conclusions are the result of recent research (see URL) by a team of scientists including those who produced the pioneering work on nuclear winter in the 1980s, using the NASA GISS ModelE and NCAR WACCM GCMs. The soot is self-lofted into the stratosphere, and the effects of regional and global nuclear war would last for more than a decade, much longer than previously thought. Nuclear proliferation continues, with nine nuclear states now, and more working to develop or acquire nuclear weapons. The continued environmental threat of the use of even a small number of nuclear weapons must be considered in nuclear policy deliberations in Russia, the U.S., and the rest of the world.

  7. Preparation of site emergency preparedness plans for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    Safety of public, occupational workers and the protection of environment should be assured while activities for economic and social progress are pursued. These activities include the establishment and utilisation of nuclear facilities and use of radioactive sources. This safety guidelines is issued as a lead document to facilitate preparation of specific site manuals by the responsible organisation for emergency response plans at each site to ensure their preparedness to meet any eventuality due to site emergency in order to mitigate its consequences on the health and safety of site personnel. It takes cognizance of an earlier AERB publications on the subject: Safety manual on site emergency plan on nuclear installations. AERB/SM/NISD-1, 1986 and also takes into consideration the urgent need for promoting public awareness and drawing up revised emergency response plans, which has come about in a significant manner after the accidents at Chernobyl and Bhopal

  8. Protection of civilian nuclear installations in time of armed conflict

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamm, V.

    2003-01-01

    The inclusion of article 56 in Protocol 1 of the Geneva convention of 12 August 1949 represents a significant achievement in the development of international humanitarian law. Article 56 of protocol 1 reads as follow: firstly, works or installations containing dangerous forces, namely dams, dykes and nuclear electrical generating stations, shall not not be made the object of attack, even where these objects are military objectives, if such attack may cause the release of dangerous forces and consequent severe losses among the civilian population. Other military objectives located at or in the vicinity of these works or installations shall not be made the object of attack if such attack may cause the release of dangerous forces from the works or installations and consequent severe losses among the civilian population. Secondly, the special protection against attack provided by paragraph 1 shall cease: for a dam or a dyke only if it is used for other than its normal function and in regular, significant and direct support of military operations and if such attack is the only feasible way to terminate such support; for a nuclear electrical generating station only if it provides electric power in regular, significant and direct support of military operations and if such attack is the only feasible way to terminate such support;for other military objectives located at or in the vicinity of these works or installations only if they are used in regular, significant and direct support of military operations and if such attack is the only feasible way to terminate such support. Thirdly, in all cases, the civilian population and individual civilians shall remain entitled to all the protection accorded them by international law, including the protection of the precautionary measures provided for in article 57. If the protection ceases and any of the works, installations or military objectives mentioned in paragraph 1 is attacked, all practical precautions shall be taken to

  9. Statutory Instrument No. 2056, The Nuclear Installations Act 1965 etc. (Repeals and Modifications) Regulations 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    These Regulations contain repeals and modifications of provisions of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 and a modification of the Nuclear Installations (Dangerous Occurrences) Regulations 1965. They are made in consequence of the establishment on 1st January 1975 of the Health and Safety Executive and the coming into operation on that date of provisions of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 which supersede or affect provisions of the 1965 Act and the 1965 Regulations. (NEA) [fr

  10. Legal bases for the installation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, N.M. de; Barros, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    The role of the National Nuclear Energy Comission, the National Department of Water and Electrical Energy and the 'Centrais Eletricas Brasileiras S.A.' for the installation of Nuclear Power Plants is presented. (A.L.) [pt

  11. Managing and regulating organisational change in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyy, P.; Reiersen, C.

    2004-01-01

    To the extent that organisational change in nuclear installations can potentially impact nuclear safety, it is imperative to ensure that such change is property managed and regulated. A number of key elements can help achieve successful management of change. (author)

  12. Development regulation regarding with licensing of nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambang Riyono; Yudi Pramono; Dahlia Cakrawati Sinaga

    2011-01-01

    Provisions of Article 17 paragraph (3) of Law Number 10 Year 1997 on Nuclear cleary mandates for the establishment of government regulations (GR) on Nuclear licensing containing the requirements and procedure, both from the standpoint of their utilization and installation. To use has been rising GR No.29 Year 2008 on the Use of Ionizing Radiation Sources and Nuclear Materials, while for the installation has been published PP No.43 Year 2006 on Nuclear Reactor Licensing, and BAPETEN Chairman Decree No.3 Year 2006 on Non-reactor Nuclear Installation Licensing. Based on the background of the preparation of both the aforementioned are just regulate the reactor and utilization, not yet fully meet the mandate of Article 17 paragraph (3) of Law No.10 of 1997 on Nuclear, including other nuclear installations. For these reasons, it initiated the need for a separate regulation containing provisions concerning licensing of non-reactor nuclear installations. On the other side from the understanding the legal aspects and interpretations of the Law No.10 of 2004 on the Establishment Regulation Legislation, should be in single mandate of Article 17 paragraph (3) of Law No.10 of 1997 on Nuclear would only produce one of the requirements and procedure for the use or installation, or a maximum of two (2) GR related licensing the use and installation. This is encourages conducted the assessing or studies related to how possible it is according to the legal aspect is justified to combine in one Nuclear licensing regulations regarding both the use and installation, by looking at the complexity of installation and wide scope of utilization of nuclear energy in Indonesia. The results of this paper is expected to provide input in the preparation of GR on licensing of nuclear installations. (author)

  13. Philosophy and safety requirements for land-based nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellermann, Otto

    1978-01-01

    The main ideas of safety philosophy for land-based nuclear installations are presented together with their background of protection goals. Today's requirements for design and quality assurance are deductively shown. Finally a proposition is made for a new balancing of safety philosophy according to the high safety level that nuclear installations have reached

  14. Civil consequences of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, D.I.; Verrastro, G.J.

    1978-01-01

    With the proliferation of nuclear power as an energy source, much controversy has developed regarding the compensation of injuries resulting from reactor accidents. In order to promote the continuing quest for safety, this paper suggests a scheme of liability that will protect the component manufacturers and designers and at the same time provide compensation within the current framework of our legal system

  15. Genetic consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oftedal, P.

    1986-01-01

    In the aftermath of a nuclear war, genetic effects may appear trivial in comparison with the enormity of the catastrophic development in the survivors' health and the environment. Gross effects are immediately or subtly demonstrable on the basis of diverse war scenarios. On the other hand, in a great number of organisms, genetic effects of radiation have been shown to occur according to a no-threshold dose-effect curve, thus implying that effects may be found even in situations and population groups where other direct effects are small. The discussions on the effects of nuclear war have indicated that whatever sector of effects is focused on, closer examination has, in each case - be it treatment of casualties, effects on climate, or effects on world trade - led to a picture of possible and often probable catastrophic collapse

  16. Chemical consequences of nuclear transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, C.H.; Lancas, F.M.; Andrade, J.C. de; Collins, K.E.

    1979-01-01

    The recombination processes of chemical bonds in liquid phase, after being split by nuclear transformations, include hot and diffuse reactions. Both processes probably occur by different mechanisms. The direct substitution process as well as processes which involve atoms, ions or other fragments retained in 'cages' formed by surrounding molecules, are processes not sensitive to the presence of a sequestering agent. The diffuse reactions whose fragments escaped from the 'cage' involve reactions with any reactive species found in the medium. (Author) [pt

  17. Psychological consequences caused by nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyankov, I.

    2009-01-01

    The psychological consequences caused by eventual nuclear terrorist act are believed to be some of the most: serious. in this article are presented the issues concerning psychological effects as psychological suffering, alteration of risk estimation, changes of individual and social behavior, etc. The most common psychological consequences as a result of the most popular large-scale nuclear accidents in Chernobyl, TMI (USA), Goiania (Brazil) are described. Some of the main factors, such as sex, age, health status, social status and etc, are analyzed. These factors determine the expression of psychological reactions provoked by nuclear accidents or eventual act of nuclear terrorism. In addition, the main precautions to cope with psychological consequences caused by nuclear terrorism are listed

  18. Social and economic implications of the installation of nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivetti, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the Italian experience with the evaluation, control, and containment of the social and economic impacts of nuclear power plant installations. Social and economic impact is defined as a set of causal relationships, direct and indirect, which are established between a nuclear plant and a surrounding territory. A nuclear plant imposes certain permanent restrictions in the use of the surrounding territory. The utilization of particularly dangerous substances requires that the plants be sited at a due distance from large urban centers and industrial areas. Therefore they are located in rural areas where the social and economic equilibria are less stable and more easily subjected to disturbances from outside factors. Essential services which must be provided for nonresident workers during the construction phase result in massive impacts which are compensated by the inflow of economic resources into the community. Social tension is also a likely consequence of importing workers into a community. There are disruptive effects induced by the high salaries paid to the construction workers such as local inflation. During the operating phase, the impacts will be smaller in proportion to the construction phase. Examples of social and economic impacts of nuclear plants in Italy are cited

  19. Emergency plans for civil nuclear installations in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronow, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    The operators of nuclear installations in the United Kingdom have plans to deal with accidents or emergencies at their nuclear sites. These plans provide for any necessary action, both on and off the nuclear site, to protect members of the public and are regularly exercised. The off-site actions involve the emergency services and other authorities which may be called upon to implement measures to protect the public in any civil emergency. In a recent review of these plans by Government Departments and agencies and the nuclear site operators, a number of possible improvements were identified. These improvements are concerned mainly with the provisions made for liaison with local and national authorities and for public information and have been incorporated into existing plans. An outline is given of the most likely consequences of an accidental release of radioactive material and the scope of emergency plans. Details are also provided on the responsibilities and functions of the operator and other organizations with duties under the plans and the arrangements made for public information. (author)

  20. Code on the safety of civilian nuclear fuel cycle installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The 'Code' was promulgated by the National Nuclear Safety Administration (NSSA) on June 17, 1993, which is applicable to civilian nuclear fuel fabrication, processing, storage and reprocessing installations, not including the safety requirements for the use of nuclear fuel in reactors. The contents of the 'Code' involve siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of fuel cycle installation. The NNSA shall be responsible for the interpretation of this 'Code'

  1. Ecological consequences of nuclear testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, R.G.; Kirkwood, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    Many of the terrestrial disturbances on Amchitka Island resulting from nuclear testing were superimposed on scars remaining from military occupation. Construction, road improvement, and the Milrow and Cannikin nuclear detonations resulted in the loss or deterioration of about 420 ha (1040 acres) of terrestrial habitat, or less than 1.5% of the total area of Amchitka. A few streams and lakes were polluted by drilling effluents or human wastes; normal flushing action is expected to restore the quality of most of these freshwater habitats. Irreversible effects in freshwaters include the drainage of several ponds, gross channel alteration in a part of one stream, and the creation of a new lake which is deeper and which has a greater volume than any of the more than 2100 natural lakes on the southeast half of Amchitka. About 6 ha (15 acres) of intertidal bench was displaced to a level above the intertidal zone, and an undetermined amount of similar habitat was altered to some degree by lesser vertical displacement. No type of habitat on the island was destroyed, and localized habitat losses in the terrestrial, freshwater, and marine ecosystems are believed to have been too slight to have permanent effects on associated biotic populations

  2. Health consequences of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, Roland

    2011-10-01

    The author first outlines that no exposure of mankind to environmental risks has been as exhaustively and continuously studied as that resulting from ionizing radiations. Apart from lethal effects, he describes non lethal cell lesions which are induced in tissues: mutations and modifications of gene expressions, either directly under the effect of radiation, or by water hydrolysis, or indirectly through a biochemical response to these initial events. Then, the author evokes the controversy about Chernobyl: according to scientists, there is no relationship between the health degradation (human morbidity and mortality) and fallouts whereas activist groups state that there is. The author then evokes that the WHO and the IAEA were accused to lie about the issue of victims and health consequences. He outlines that UNSCEAR reports are a reference for radio-biologists, and that the 2011 report confirmed the conclusions of the 2006 report. He comments some published data, notably those on the acute irradiation syndrome (ARS), on carcinogenic effects (essentially thyroid cancers for children, as there is no clear nor admitted relationship for other forms of cancer), on other pathologies. Finally, the author briefly discusses the issue of crisis management, the information about Fukushima, and the issue of Chernobyl fallouts in France

  3. Technical and legal aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowden, M.A.; Fowler, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    Many of the plants licensed at the start of nuclear power programmes will require decommissioning in the 1990's and this issue should now be confronted by the nuclear industry, its regulators and governments. This paper deals with the United States programme and experience in the decommissioning of nuclear installations and describes alternative decommissioning methods including safety and financial aspects. (NEA) [fr

  4. The medical consequences of nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphrey, J.; Hartog, M.; Middleton, H.

    1982-01-01

    A pamphlet has been produced by the Medical Campaign Against Nuclear Weapons (MCANW) and by the Medical Association for the Prevention of War (MAPW) to bring the catastrophic effects that the use of nuclear weapons would entail to the attention of the general public, politicians and members of the medical profession. It describes the medical consequences of the effects of blast, heat and ionizing radiation from nuclear weapons, including details from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. The medical consequences of a nuclear attack including consideration of the casualties, care of the injured, psychological effects and the outcome are also discussed. It is concluded that if for none other than purely medical reasons, nuclear warfare must never be allowed to happen. (UK)

  5. Legal bases for the installation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, N.M. de

    1980-06-01

    The process of installation of nuclear power plants in the context of the Brazilian legal system is analysed. The structure of the political and administrative system related to the matter and the correspondent legislation are discussed. (A.L.) [pt

  6. IRSN press briefing on the issue 'Fukushima, one year after': Situation of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear installations; Accident of the Fukushima Dai-ichi: briefing on the situation in February 2012; The Fukushima 1 accident one year after: assessment of environmental consequences in Japan; assessment of consequences of the Fukushima accident on the environment in Japan, one year after; Health consequences of the Fukushima Dai-ichi: situation briefing in February 2012; Point presse de l'IRSN sur le theme 'Fukushima, un an apres': Situation des installations nucleaires de Fukushima Dai-ichi; Accident survenu a la centrale de Fukushima Dai-Ichi Point de la situation en fevrier 2012; L'accident de Fukushima 1 an apres: bilan des consequences environnementales au Japon; bilan des consequences de l'accident de Fukushima sur l'environnement au Japon, un an apres l'accident; Les consequences sanitaires de l'accident de Fukushima Dai-ichi: point de situation en fevrier 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, T.; Jourdain, Jean-Rene

    2012-02-28

    This document gathers reports and Power Point presentations (with maps, data tables and graphs) dealing with the Fukushima accident, one year after its occurrence. Different issues are addressed: the status of the nuclear installations, the situation of the installations and of the environment, assessments, measurements and investigations on the effects and consequences of the accident (radioactive releases and fallouts) on the ground and marine environment and on public health

  7. Socioeconomic consequences of nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawil, J.J.; Callaway, J.W.; Coles, B.L.; Cronin, F.J.; Currie, J.W.; Imhoff, K.L.; Lewis, P.M.; Nesse, R.J.; Strenge, D.L.

    1984-06-01

    This report identifies and characterizes the off-site socioeconomic consequences that would likely result from a severe radiological accident at a nuclear power plant. The types of impacts that are addressed include economic impacts, health impacts, social/psychological impacts and institutional impacts. These impacts are identified for each of several phases of a reactor accident - from the warning phase through the post-resettlement phase. The relative importance of the impact during each accident phase and the degree to which the impact can be predicted are indicated. The report also examines the methods that are currently used for assessing nuclear reactor accidents, including development of accident scenarios and the estimating of socioeconomic accident consequences with various models. Finally, a critical evaluation is made regarding the use of impact analyses in estimating the contribution of socioeconomic consequences to nuclear accident reactor accident risk. 116 references, 7 figures, 15 tables

  8. Nuclear installations in Belarus: Implications of political and technical issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaitsev, S.I.

    2001-01-01

    The report deals with some aspects of past and present supervisory activities at nuclear installations in Belarus. It briefly describes an existing supervisory system for nuclear installations in the Republic of Belarus, its legislative basis and functions of the supervisory body. Consideration is given to further development and improvement of the supervision in such fields as revision and elaboration of normative documents on nuclear safety, training of inspectors, co-operation with other governmental bodies while examining the nuclear option in the Republic of Belarus. (author)

  9. The Asteroid Threat and the Safety of Surface Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shestopalov, V.M.; Shibetskij, Yu.A.; Makarenko, A.N.

    2015-01-01

    Surface nuclear installations are much more vulnerable to impact events than it has traditionally been considered. They can be destroyed by events with energies greater than 100 Mt. According to the most unfavorable (conservative) estimates, the probability of destruction can reach 10 -7 ...10 -6 year -1 for certain areas of the Earth. In fact, any cosmic body that can reach the surface of the Earth, or an atmospheric explosion can cause a serious accident to or even completely destroy a nuclear facility. The burden of the radiological consequences of such an accident will be determined by the total activity of radioactive substances located on site and by meteorological factors. The most dangerous (probable) are low-energy events (10 0 ...10 2 Mt). They can occur during the collision of the Earth with a cosmic body with a diameter of 30...200 m. The risk of death resulting from the direct effects of the impact of the given energy is approximately two orders of magnitude lower than the risk of death due to additional radiological impacts of the destroyed facility. Within the energy range of 10 2 ...10 5 Mt, the radiological consequences of impact events (opposite to non-radiological) will be global. In our opinion, this is a strong argument for the inclusion of impact events into the list of possible external events when assessing the suitability of sites for placement of NPPs and storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel. The safety analysis of the indicated facilities should consider the complexity of the damaging factors (high temperatures, shock, seismic shock, tsunamis) and also the fact that the loads associated with the phenomena induced by the impact will depend on its energy and can greatly exceed the values of loads typical for the region of the facility location

  10. The Chernobyl nuclear accident and its consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    An AAEC Task Group was set up shortly after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant to monitor and evaluate initial reports and to assess the implications for Australia. The Task Group issued a preliminary report on 9 May 1986. On 25-29 August 1986, the USSR released details of the accident and its consequences and further information has become available from the Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD and the World Health Organisation. The Task Group now presents a revised report summarising this information and commenting on the consequences from the Australian viewpoint

  11. Safety of nuclear installations: Future direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Workshop presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: Environmental impact of fossil fuel energy technologies (5 papers), Future needs for nuclear power (7 papers), Safety objectives (10 papers), Safety aspects of the next generation of current-type nuclear power plants (8 papers), Safety aspects of new designs and concepts for nuclear power plants (6 papers), Special safety issues: Safety aspects of new designs and concepts for nuclear power plants (5 papers), Safety aspects of new designs and processes for the nuclear fuel cycle (5 papers), Closing panel (3 papers), 12 poster presentations and a Summary of the Workshop. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Annual report 1996 concerning the nuclear safety and radiological protection in the Swiss nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The report presents detailed information about the nuclear safety and radiological protection in the Swiss nuclear power plants, the central interim storage at Wuerenlingen, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and other nuclear installations in Switzerland. figs., tabs., refs.

  13. Annual Report 1998 concerning the nuclear safety and radiological protection in the Swiss nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The report presents detailed information about the nuclear safety and radiological protection in the Swiss nuclear power plants, the central interim storage at Wuerenlingen, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and other nuclear installations in Switzerland.

  14. Annual Report 1998 concerning the nuclear safety and radiological protection in the Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    The report presents detailed information about the nuclear safety and radiological protection in the Swiss nuclear power plants, the central interim storage at Wuerenlingen, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and other nuclear installations in Switzerland

  15. Annual Report 1999 concerning the nuclear safety and radiological protection in the Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    The report presents detailed information about the nuclear safety and radiological protection in the Swiss nuclear power plants, the central interim storage at Wuerenlingen, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and other nuclear installations in Switzerland

  16. Annual Report 1999 concerning the nuclear safety and radiological protection in the Swiss nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-15

    The report presents detailed information about the nuclear safety and radiological protection in the Swiss nuclear power plants, the central interim storage at Wuerenlingen, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and other nuclear installations in Switzerland.

  17. Annual report 1996 concerning the nuclear safety and radiological protection in the Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    The report presents detailed information about the nuclear safety and radiological protection in the Swiss nuclear power plants, the central interim storage at Wuerenlingen, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and other nuclear installations in Switzerland. figs., tabs., refs

  18. Character and consequence of nuclear criticality accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xinhua; Liu Hua; Wu Deqiang; Li Bing

    2001-01-01

    The author describes some concepts, the process and magnitude of energy release and the destruction of the nuclear criticality accident and also describes the radiation consequence of criticality accidents from three aspects: prompt radiation, contamination in working place and release of fission products to the environment. It shows that the effects of radioactivity release from criticality accidents in the nuclear fuel processing plants on the environment and the public is minor, the main danger is from the external exposure of prompt rays. The paper make as have a correct understanding of the nuclear criticality accident and it would be helpful to take appropriate emergency response to potential criticality accident

  19. Development of a quality management system for Brazilian nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibrit, Eduardo; Zouain, Desiree Moraes

    2005-01-01

    The present work is a proposal for developing a quality management system for Brazilian nuclear installations, based on applicable standards. The standard ISO 9001:2000 [4] establishes general requirements for the implementation of a quality management system in all kinds of organizations. The standard IAEA 50-C/SG-Q [1] establishes general requirements for the implementation of a quality assurance system in nuclear installations. The standard CNEN-NN- 1.16 [5] establishes the regulating requirements for the quality assurance systems and programs of nuclear installations, for licensing and authorization for operation of these installations in Brazil. The revision of standard IAEA 50-C/SG-Q [1], to be replaced by IAEA DS 338 [2] and IAEA DPP 349 [3], introduces the concept of 'Integrated Management System' for the nuclear area, in preference to the concept of 'Quality Assurance'. This approach is incorporated with the current tendency, because it guides the system to manage, in an integrated way, the requirements of quality, safety, health, environment, security and economics of the installation. The results of the characterization of the quality management systems established in the applicable standards are presented, with the determination of the common and conflicting points among them. Referring data to quality assurance program/quality management system in some nuclear installations of IAEA Member States are also presented. (author)

  20. Change of nuclear reactor installation in the first nuclear ship of Japan Nuclear Ship Development Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The written application concerning the change of nuclear reactor installation in the first nuclear ship was presented from the JNSDA to the prime minister on January 10, 1979. The contents of the change are the repair of the primary and secondary shields of the reactor, the additional installation of a storage tank for liquid wastes, and the extension of the period to stop the reactor in cold state. The inquiry from the prime minister to the Nuclear Safety Commission was made on June 9, 1979, through the examination of safety in the Nuclear Safety Bureau, Science and Technology Agency. The Nuclear Safety Commission instructed to the Committee for the Examination of Nuclear Reactor Safety on June 11, 1979, about the application of criteria stipulated in the law. The relevant letters and the drafts of examination papers concerning the technical capability and the safety in case of the change of nuclear reactor installation in the first nuclear ship are cited. The JNSDA and Sasebo Heavy Industries, Ltd. seem to have the sufficient technical capability to carry out this change. As the result of examination, it is recognized that the application presented by the JNSDA is in compliance with the criteria stipulated in the law concerning the regulation of nuclear raw materials, nuclear fuel materials and nuclear reactors. (Kako, I.)

  1. Nuclear winter: Global consequences of multiple nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turco, R.P.; Toon, O.B.; Ackerman, T.P.; Pollack, J.B.; Sagan, C.

    1984-01-01

    Concern has been raised over the short- and long-term consequences of the dust, smoke, radioactivity, and toxic vapors that would be generated by a nuclear war. The discovery that dense clouds of soil particles may have played a major role in past mass extinctions of life on Earth has encouraged the reconsideration of nuclear war effects. These developments have led the authors to calculate, using new data and improved models, the potential global environmental effects of dust and smoke clouds (henceforth referred to as nuclear dust and smoke) generated in a nuclear war. They neglect the short-term effects of blast, fire, and radiation. Most of the world's population could probably survive the initial nuclear exchange and would inherit the postwar environment. Accordingly, the longer-term and global-scale aftereffects of nuclear war might prove to be as important as the immediate consequences of the war

  2. Performances of nuclear installations in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pate, Z.T.

    1999-01-01

    During the last years the operators of nuclear power plants in the world, have realized numerous improvements. This success is imputable to several factors, especially an important data exchange. The Chernobyl accident, in 1986, provoked the creation of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (W.A.N.O.). It allowed to exchange information and to develop cooperation in order to go beyond cultural barriers, linguistics and policies. Then, operators in the world have brought important improvements in matter of safety, reliability. (N.C.)

  3. Practical design considerations for nuclear cogeneration installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koupal, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Dual-purpose nuclear plants, cogeneration electricity and steam, offer significant economic benefits over comparable electricity generating stations. The design of such a nuclear facility requires the resolution of unique technical challenges. This paper reports on experience gained in the detailed design of such a dual-purpose facility with the steam supplied to a chemical plant for process heating. The following topics are discussed: Siting, Radioactivity of Export Steam, Optimization for Load Combinations, Steam Supply Reliability, Steam Transportation, Water Chemistry, Cost Allocation. (author)

  4. Methodology for risk analysis of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Senne Junior, Murillo; Jordao, Elizabete

    2002-01-01

    Both the licensing standards for general uses in nuclear facilities and the specific ones require a risk assessment during their licensing processes. The risk assessment is carried out through the estimation of both probability of the occurrence of the accident, and their magnitudes. This is a complex task because the great deal of potential hazardous events that can occur in nuclear facilities difficult the statement of the accident scenarios. There are also many available techniques to identify the potential accidents, estimate their probabilities, and evaluate their magnitudes. In this paper is presented a new methodology that systematizes the risk assessment process, and orders the accomplishment of their several steps. (author)

  5. Protection of nuclear installations and materials against malevolent actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurelle, J.

    2001-01-01

    parts: an estimate of the resources required to destroy or sufficiently damage a system or function (for example, the quantity of explosives necessary); qualification of the paths leading to zones or systems deemed sensitive. 3) If need be, counter-measures are taken to protect zones for which the consequences would be unacceptable compared to the force of the aggression. Counter-measures are intended both to minimise sensitivity and make it more difficult to carry out the aggression envisaged. Several types of threats have been identified for the purposes of these studies: Internal threats involving actions taken by insiders acting alone or not; External threats involving actions by small group of attackers. Two assumptions are made when testing the ability of protection systems to counter aggressions of this type. The first involves a small team of attackers with limited resources, and the second takes into account a larger team with more sophisticated resources. Assumptions are also made as to the types of action which could be taken by malevolent workers in sensitive zones and the aggravating factors to be considered. As an example the loss of the offsite power supply could be taken into account. Acceptable consequences are taken as being those leading to levels of radioactive releases less than, or equal to, those taken into account in the facility safety case. This implies that vital zone vulnerability be reduced to a minimum so that an excellent level of protection can be provided for these areas. In the case of critical zones, the level of protection is considered on a case-by-case basis, depending on the consequences of malevolent actions. Finally, the paper will describe the concrete case of a nuclear installation. Emphasis will be paid on the defence in depth approach organized around prevention, management and mitigation measures. (author)

  6. Studies of works management and automation of nuclear power installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besch, P.; Grossmann, J.; Hollasky, R.

    1989-01-01

    Erection and operation of nuclear power installations require investigations on their safety and availability. The works performed on the management of nuclear power plants and nuclear heating stations in the Working Group on Automation Engineering of the Dresden University of Technology are presented. Emphasis of the works is on simulation of dynamical performance of the plants and studies on the utilization of novel techniques concerning plant automation and process management. (author)

  7. The Management System for Nuclear Installations Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This Safety Guide is applicable throughout the lifetime of a nuclear installation, including any subsequent period of institutional control, until there is no significant residual radiation hazard. For a nuclear installation, the lifetime includes site evaluation, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning. These stages in the lifetime of a nuclear installation may overlap. This Safety Guide may be applied to nuclear installations in the following ways: (a)To support the development, implementation, assessment and improvement of the management system of those organizations responsible for research, site evaluation, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of a nuclear installation; (b)As an aid in the assessment by the regulatory body of the adequacy of the management system of a nuclear installation; (c)To assist an organization in specifying to a supplier, via contractual documentation, any specific element that should be included within the supplier's management system for the supply of products. This Safety Guide follows the structure of the Safety Requirements publication on The Management System for Facilities and Activities, whereby: (a)Section 2 provides recommendations on implementing the management system, including recommendations relating to safety culture, grading and documentation. (b)Section 3 provides recommendations on the responsibilities of senior management for the development and implementation of an effective management system. (c)Section 4 provides recommendations on resource management, including guidance on human resources, infrastructure and the working environment. (d)Section 5 provides recommendations on how the processes of the installation can be specified and developed, including recommendations on some generic processes of the management system. (e)Section 6 provides recommendations on the measurement, assessment and improvement of the management system of a nuclear installation. (f

  8. The Management System for Nuclear Installations (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This Safety Guide is applicable throughout the lifetime of a nuclear installation, including any subsequent period of institutional control, until there is no significant residual radiation hazard. For a nuclear installation, the lifetime includes site evaluation, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning. These stages in the lifetime of a nuclear installation may overlap. This Safety Guide may be applied to nuclear installations in the following ways: (a)To support the development, implementation, assessment and improvement of the management system of those organizations responsible for research, site evaluation, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of a nuclear installation; (b)As an aid in the assessment by the regulatory body of the adequacy of the management system of a nuclear installation; (c)To assist an organization in specifying to a supplier, via contractual documentation, any specific element that should be included within the supplier's management system for the supply of products. This Safety Guide follows the structure of the Safety Requirements publication on The Management System for Facilities and Activities, whereby: (a)Section 2 provides recommendations on implementing the management system, including recommendations relating to safety culture, grading and documentation. (b)Section 3 provides recommendations on the responsibilities of senior management for the development and implementation of an effective management system. (c)Section 4 provides recommendations on resource management, including guidance on human resources, infrastructure and the working environment. (d)Section 5 provides recommendations on how the processes of the installation can be specified and developed, including recommendations on some generic processes of the management system. (e)Section 6 provides recommendations on the measurement, assessment and improvement of the management system of a nuclear installation. (f

  9. The Management System for Nuclear Installations. Safety Guide (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This Safety Guide is applicable throughout the lifetime of a nuclear installation, including any subsequent period of institutional control, until there is no significant residual radiation hazard. For a nuclear installation, the lifetime includes site evaluation, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning. These stages in the lifetime of a nuclear installation may overlap. This Safety Guide may be applied to nuclear installations in the following ways: (a) To support the development, implementation, assessment and improvement of the management system of those organizations responsible for research, site evaluation, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of a nuclear installation; (b) As an aid in the assessment by the regulatory body of the adequacy of the management system of a nuclear installation; (c) To assist an organization in specifying to a supplier, via contractual documentation, any specific element that should be included within the supplier's management system for the supply of products. This Safety Guide follows the structure of the Safety Requirements publication on The Management System for Facilities and Activities, whereby: (a) Section 2 provides recommendations on implementing the management system, including recommendations relating to safety culture, grading and documentation. (b) Section 3 provides recommendations on the responsibilities of senior management for the development and implementation of an effective management system. (c) Section 4 provides recommendations on resource management, including guidance on human resources, infrastructure and the working environment. (d) Section 5 provides recommendations on how the processes of the installation can be specified and developed, including recommendations on some generic processes of the management system. (e) Section 6 provides recommendations on the measurement, assessment and improvement of the management system of a nuclear

  10. Nuclear steam supply system and method of installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tower, S.N.; Christenson, J.A.; Braun, H.E.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a method of providing a nuclear reactor power plant at a predetermined use site accessible by predetermined navigable waterways. The method is practiced with apparatus including a nuclear reactor system. The system has a nuclear steam-supply section. The method consists of: constructing a nuclear reactor system at a manufacturing site remote from the predetermined use site but accessible to the predetermined waterways for transportation from the manufacturing site to the predetermined use site, the nuclear reactor system including a barge with the nuclear steam supply section constructed integrally with the barge. Simultaneously with the construction of the nuclear reactor system, constructing facilities at the use site to be integrated with the nuclear reactor system to form the nuclear-reactor power plant; transporting the nuclear reactor system along the waterways to the predetermined use site; at the use site joining the removal parts of the altered nuclear reactor system to the remainder of the altered nuclear reactor system to complete the nuclear reactor system; and installing the nuclear reactor system at the predetermined use site and integrating the nuclear reactor system to interact with the facilities constructed at the predetermined use site to form the nuclear-reactor power plant

  11. Practical methods for radiation survey in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.

    2001-12-01

    This study is placed to those who are responsible to perform radiation survey in the nuclear installations, especially the beginners. Therefore, it gives a comprehensive view to all-important aspects related to their work starting from the structure of atoms to the practical steps for radiation survey works. So, it clarify how to perform personal monitoring, methods for monitoring surface contamination, methods for measuring radioactivity of gases and radioactive aerosols in air, monitoring radiation doses, measuring radiation influences in workplaces and finally measuring internal exposure of radiation workers in nuclear installations. Finally, The study shows some cases of breaches of radiation protection rules in some American nuclear installations and describes the final results of these breaches. The aim of this is to assure that any breach or ignore to radiation protection principles may produce bad results, and there is no leniency in implementing environmental radiation protection principles. (author)

  12. Assessment of safety of the nuclear installations of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, B.A.; Pozniakov, N.; Banga, U.

    1992-01-01

    Incidents and accidents periodically remind us that preventive measures at nuclear installations are not fully reliable. Although sound design is widely recognized to be prerequisite for safe operation, it is not sufficient. An active management that compensates for the weak aspects of the installations design by redundant operational provisions, is the key factor to ensure safe operation. Safety of nuclear installations cannot be assessed on an emotional basis. Since 1986, accurate safety assessment techniques based on an integrated approach to operational safety have been made available by the ASSET services and are applicable to any industrial process dealing with nuclear materials. The ASSET methodology enables to eliminate in advance the Root Causes of the future accidents by introducing practical safety culture principles in the current managerial practices

  13. Environmental consequences of releases from nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1990-01-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of a four-year Nordic cooperation program in the area of consequence assessment of nuclear accidents with large releases to the environment. This program was completed in 1989. Related information from other research programs has also been described, so that many chapters of the report reflect the current status in the respective areas, in addition to containing the results of the Nordic program. (author) 179 refs

  14. Regulatory requirements and administrative practice in safety of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servant, J.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews the current situation of the France regulatory rules and procedures dealing with the safety of the main nuclear facilities and, more broadly, the nuclear security. First, the author outlines the policy of the French administration which requires that the licensee responsible for an installation has to demonstrate that all possible measures are taken to ensure a sufficient level of safety, from the early stage of the project to the end of the operation of the plant. Thus, the administration performs the assessment on a case-by-case basis, of the safety of each installation before granting a nuclear license. On the other hand, the administration settles overall safety requirements for specific categories of installations or components, which determine the ultimate safety performances, but avoid, as far as possible, to detail the technical specifications to be applied in order to comply with these goals. This approach, which allows the designers and the licensees to rely upon sound codes and standards, gains the advantage of a great flexibility without imparing the nuclear safety. The author outlines the licensing progress for the main categories of installations: nuclear power plants of the PWR type, fast breeders, uranium isotope separation plants, and irradiated fuel processing plants. Emphasis is placed on the most noteworthy points: standardization of projects, specific risks of each site, problems of advanced type reactors, etc... The development of the technical regulations is presented with emphasis on the importance of an internationally concerned action within the nuclear international community. The second part of this paper describes the France operating experience of nuclear installations from the safety point of view. Especially, the author examines the technical and administrative utilization of data from safety significant incidents in reactors and plants, and the results of the control performed by the nuclear installations

  15. The control of base nuclear installations; Le controle des installations nucleaires de base (INB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2009-04-15

    The Authority of Nuclear Safety ( A.S.N). presents in this column the current events of the control of the nuclear base installations during november, december 2008 and january 2009, classified by nuclear site. This information is also available in real-time on the A.S.N. web site, www.asn.fr, in the column 'news'. We can consult all the notices of significant incident published as well as the following letters of inspection, the notices of information about the reactors shutdown, press releases and the A.S.N. information notes. (N.C.)

  16. Responsible management: the Dutch licensing policy for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slange, R.

    1994-01-01

    The governmental policy, to tolerate operation of existing nuclear installations not backed by the required operating permits, certainly is applied only in exceptional cases, and this all the more when the plant is a nuclear installation. Any decision to tolerate further operation must be justified by compliance with a number of rigid criteria, there may be a debate in Parliament about the case, third parties have the right participate in the decision-finding procedure, and there is the right of appeal. (orig.) [de

  17. Safety culture in nuclear installations - The role of the regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karigi, Alice W.

    2002-01-01

    Safety culture is an amalgamation of values, standards, morals and norms of acceptable behavior by the licensees, Radiation workers and the Regulator. The role played by a Regulator in establishing safety culture in a nuclear installation is that related to Authorization, review, assessment, inspection and enforcement. The regulator is to follow the development of a facility or activity from initial selection of the site through design, construction, commissioning, radioactive waste management through to decommissioning and closure. He is to ensure safety measures are followed through out the operation of the facility by laying down in the license conditions of controlling construction of nuclear installations and ensuring competence of the operators. (author)

  18. Consequence analysis for nuclear reactors, Yongbyon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Taewook; Jae, Moosung

    2017-01-01

    Since the Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents in 2011, there have been an increased public anxiety about the safety of nuclear power plants in Korea. The lack of safeguards and facility aging issues at the Yongbyon nuclear facilities have increased doubts. In this study, the consequence analysis for the 5-MWe graphite-moderated reactor in North Korea was performed. Various accident scenarios including accidents at the interim spent fuel pool in the 5-MWe reactor have been developed and evaluated quantitatively. Since data on the design and safety system of nuclear facilities are currently insufficient, the release fractions were set by applying the alternative source terms made for utilization in the analysis of a severe accident by integrating the results of studies of severe accidents occurred before. The calculation results show the early fatality zero deaths and latent cancer fatality about only 13 deaths in Seoul. Thus, actual impacts of a radiological release will be psychological in terms of downwind perceptions and anxiety on the part of potentially exposed populations. Even considering the simultaneous accident occurrence in both 5-MWe graphite-moderated reactor and 100-MWt light water reactor, the consequence analysis using the MACCS2 code shows no significant damage to people in South Korea. (author)

  19. Nuclear installations and childhood cancer in the U.K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The report in November 1983 of a cluster of childhood leukemia cases in the vicinity of the Sellafield (Windscale) nuclear facility on the west coast of England has led to a substantial effort to study possible excess cancer in the vicinity of British nuclear installations. Although some additional excesses were found, the causal relationship with radionuclides was thought unlikely because the estimated doses were below those established as causal of increase in human leukemia. Since 1956, we have known that diagnostic x-rays during pregnancy are associated with increased risks from childhood cancer, especially leukemia. Gardner et al. showed that excess cases near Sellafield were in children born there, and no excess occurred among in-migrants. Roman et al. showed that significant elevations in leukemia among children living near three nuclear installations in the Midlands were only at 0-5 y, suggesting that the relevant exposure was prenatal. We identify and discuss a set of epidemiological, dosage estimation, and modeling problems relevant to interpretation of such data. We conclude that: (1) a red bone marrow-based model for brief, high-level exposures of adults associated with myelogenous leukemia is inappropriate for evaluating the impact of internal emitters, relatively continuous exposures in perinatal periods in association with acute lymphatic leukemia; (2) incidence of mortality rates of childhood leukemia should be evaluated in the vicinity of nuclear installations in many countries; and (3) in contrast to nuclear reprocessing and nuclear weapons installations, there is little evidence of excess childhood leukemia among residents in areas adjacent to nuclear power installations in the U.K

  20. Escalation scenarios initiated by gas explosions on offshore installations. Probabilistic cause and consequence modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eknes, Monika Loeland

    1996-12-31

    This Dr. ing. thesis deals with escalation scenarios initiated by gas explosions on offshore installations. Gas explosions is one of the major hazards to such installations. The objectives were to estimate the probability of ignition and frequency of gas explosions for gas leaks on top sides of offshore installations, and to estimate the response and resistance of components that could result in escalation if they failed. Main fields considered cover risk analysis methodology, gas explosions, simplified escalation models, evaluation of structural consequences, case studies, and guidelines. 107 refs., 33 figs., 33 tabs.

  1. Chapter No.3. Assessment and inspection of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The assessment activity of UJD in relation to nuclear installation lies in assessment of safety documentation for constructions realised as nuclear installations, or construction through which changes on nuclear installations are realised. The assessment activity of UJD in 2001 was focused on National Repository of Radwaste in Mochovce, on Radwaste conditioning and treatment technology in Jaslovske Bohunice and on the assessment of documentation for the project of modernisation of Bohunice V-2 NPPs which is under preparation. The assessment of the technical condition of equipment, important in terms of nuclear safety, primarily based on results of in-service inspections and surveillance testing of safety related components and systems, is also a part of the safety assessment of nuclear installation operation. The inspectors take part in training courses and participate in other technical meetings and workshops organised by the IAEA and also take part in special training courses organised by the Nuclear Authorities of European countries, USA and Japan. Bohunice V-1 NPP is equipped with two reactors of WWER 440 type V-230 and was put into operation in 1978-1980 as one of the last nuclear power plants with this type of reactor. Both units of NPP V-1 Bohunice operated in 2001 according to the requirements of energy dispatching at nominal power, or in a regime of tertiary regulation. November 2000, a mission of experts invited by UJD and delegated by IAEA took place at the Bohunice NPPs. The mission members together with experts of the plant operator assessed the safety of the units of WWER-440/V-230 of Bohunice V-1 NPP after the reconstruction. The members of the mission prepared the report on the current status of safety of these units for the IAEA. In 2001, UJD by its decision, issued the approval for further operation of both reactor units of Bohunice V-1 NPP. In sense of the relevant decree on operational events, 20 events have been recorded, at Bohunice V-1 NPP in

  2. Evaluation and surveillance of radioactive releases of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    The two days organised by the section Environment of the SFRP have to objective to connect experts in radiation protection in order to debate around the following questions: the actual evaluations modes of releases impacts from nuclear installations, the organisation of the surveillance, to favour the implication of local actors in the evaluation and surveillance around nuclear facilities, the evolutions to envisage. (N.C.)

  3. Consequences of electricity deregulation on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podjavorsek, M.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of deregulation of electricity market started a couple of years ago and has not been finished yet. Deregulation causes increased pressure to reduce the costs of electricity generation. This presents a new challenge to regulatory bodies. They have to assess the impact of these changes on the safety of nuclear power plants. Accordingly, it is important to identify the risks to the nuclear power industry resulting from the deregulation. Today's trend is that the number of electricity generating power companies will be reduced in Europe and also in Slovenia due to tough competition in the electricity market. The electricity price has decreased after the introduction of the deregulated market in most countries. This has been also the main reason for less investment to new generating capacities since the price has been lower than the generation costs. Investment problems are also present for the existing units, because of danger of inappropriate maintenance and reduction of the number of staff and their qualifications below the desired level that leads to loss of institutional memory. It is expected that only the biggest companies can stand the consequences of competition in electricity prices and consequential pressure to reduce the cost. In order to review the impact of deregulation of the electricity market some relevant points are discussed in this paper such as the need to cut costs of companies by reducing the number of their activities and increasing the efficiency in the remaining activities and /or outsourcing of activities, power station operating regime, safety culture, grid reliability, reliability and safety of operation, increased number of transients, ageing of components, outage duration, extended cycle and response of nuclear regulators. From a regulatory point of view the impact of deregulation on nuclear safety is an important issue. This paper also discusses analyses and evaluations of this impact and proposes some measures how to

  4. Chapter 4. Assessment and inspection of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Supervisory activity of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) upon the safety of nuclear installations in compliance with the 'Atomic Act' and other legal regulations includes also inspection and assessment activities of UJD. Assessment activity of UJD in relation to nuclear installations lies in assessment of safety documentation for constructions realised as nuclear installations, or constructions through which changes are realised on nuclear installations. The scope of safety documentation required for the assessment is stipulated in the Atomic Act. In 2000 the assessment activity focused first of all on Unit 1 of NPP Bohunice after completing its Gradual Reconstruction Programme, on National Repository of Radioactive waste in Mochovce and on radioactive waste conditioning and treatment technology in Jaslovske Bohunice. Activities of UJD in assessment focused mainly on control of compliance with requirements for nuclear safety, assessment of commissioning programmes, operating procedures, limits and conditions, etc. The assessment of changes, which influence nuclear safety of nuclear installations in operation, realisation of which is conditioned by the approval from UJD, is a significant part of the assessment activity of UJD. Mainly it is the assessment of design changes, changes in limits and conditions, operating procedures, changes in programmes of periodical testing of equipment important in terms of nuclear safety, changes in physical protection of nuclear equipment, etc. The assessment of nuclear installations operational safety, based on assessment of operational events, on maintaining limits and conditions of safe operation, on operational safety performance indicators and on inspection results is a separate category in the assessment activity of UJD. Inspection activity specified in the 'Atomic Act' is governed by an internal guideline, an important part of which is an annual inspection plan that considers the following types of

  5. Nuclear installations safety in France. Compilation of regulatory guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    General plan: 1. General organization of public officials. Procedures 1.1. Texts defining the general organization and the procedures 1.2. Interventing organisms; 2. Texts presenting a technical aspect other than basic safety rules and associated organization texts; 2.1. Dispositions relating to safety of nuclear installations 2.2. Dispositions relating to pressure vessels 2.3. Dispositions relating to quality 2.4. Dispositions relating to radioactive wastes release 2.5. Dispositions relating to activities depending of classified installations; 3. Basic Safety Rules (BSR) 3.1. BSR relating to PWR 3.2. BSR relating to nuclear installations other than PWR 3.3. Other BSR [fr

  6. Volcanic Hazards in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-10-15

    This publication provides comprehensive and updated guidance for site evaluation in relation to volcanic hazards. It includes recommendations on assessing the volcanic hazards at a nuclear installation site, in order to identify and characterize, in a comprehensive manner, all potentially hazardous phenomena that may be associated with future volcanic events. It describes how some of these volcanic phenomena may affect the acceptability of the selected site, resulting in exclusion of a site or determining the corresponding design basis parameters for the installation. This Safety Guide is applicable to both existing and new sites, and a graded approach is recommended to cater for all types of nuclear installations. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Overview of volcanic hazard assessment; 3. General recommendations; 4. Necessary information and investigations (database); 5. Screening of volcanic hazards; 6. Site specific volcanic hazard assessment; 7. Nuclear installations other than nuclear power plants; 8. Monitoring and preparation for response; 9. Management system for volcanic hazard assessment; Annex I: Volcanic hazard scenarios; Annex II: Worldwide sources of information.

  7. Radiation protection in Swiss nuclear installations; Strahlenschutz in Schweizer Kernanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, J.; Brunell, M. [Eidgenoessisches Nuklearsicherheitsinspektorat ENSI, Brugg (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    Well developed measures on operational radiation protection within Swiss nuclear installations will be presented. The focus lays on competent authority actions. Results of the last ten years, including events on radiation issues, will be discussed. Finally a view on challenges for radiation protection personnel with respect to a renewed Swiss radiation protection legislation based on recent ICRP recommendations will be given.

  8. Fire protection and fire fighting in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Fires are a threat to all technical installations. While fire protection has long been a well established conventional discipline, its application to nuclear facilities requires special considerations. Nevertheless, for a long time fire engineering has been somewhat neglected in the design and operation of nuclear installations. In the nuclear industry, the Browns Ferry fire in 1975 brought about an essential change in the attention paid to fire problems. Designers and plant operators, as well as insurance companies and regulators, increased their efforts to develop concepts and methods for reducing fire risks, not only to protect the capital investment in nuclear plants but also to consider the potential secondary effects which could lead to nuclear accidents. Although the number of fires in nuclear installations is still relatively large, their overall importance to the safety of nuclear power plants was not considered to be very high. Only more recently have probabilistic analyses changed this picture. The results may well have to be taken into account more carefully. Various aspects of fire fighting and fire protection were discussed during the Symposium, the first of its kind to be organized by the IAEA. It was convened in co-operation with several organizations working in the nuclear or fire protection fields. The intention was to gather experts from nuclear engineering areas and the conventional fire protection field at one meeting with a view to enhancing the exchange of information and experience and to presenting current knowledge on the various disciplines involved. The presentations at the meeting were subdivided into eight sessions: standards and licensing (6 papers); national fire safety practices (7 papers); fire safety by design (11 papers); fire fighting (2 papers); computer fire modeling (7 papers); fire safety in fuel center facilities (7 papers); fire testing of materials (3 papers); fire risk assessment (5 papers). A separate abstract was

  9. [Medical and biological consequences of nuclear disasters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalpers, Lukas J A; van Dullemen, Simon; Franken, N A P Klaas

    2012-01-01

    Medical risks of radiation exaggerated; psychological risks underestimated. The discussion about atomic energy has become topical again following the nuclear accident in Fukushima. There is some argument about the gravity of medical and biological consequences of prolonged exposure to radiation. The risk of cancer following a low dose of radiation is usually estimated by linear extrapolation of the incidence of cancer among survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. The radiobiological linear-quadratic model (LQ-model) gives a more accurate description of observed data, is radiobiologically more plausible and is better supported by experimental and clinical data. On the basis of this model there is less risk of cancer being induced following radiation exposure. The gravest consequence of Chernobyl and Fukushima is not the medical and biological damage, but the psychological and economical impact on rescue workers and former inhabitants.

  10. On the safety of nuclear installations in the Soviet Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The cooperation agreements between authorities and industries of the Soviet Union and West Germany now are gaining shape in practice. In this context, the framework conditions are of great interest that govern the realisation of the extensive nuclear energy programme of the Soviet Union. The chairman of the State Commission established in 1984 for supervision of nuclear installations and guidance on safety-engineering enhancement of nuclear power plant in the USSR has been interviewed by atw on topics of organisations, measures and regulatory activities in the field of reactor safety and radiation protection. The interview is given in full. (orig.) [de

  11. Nuclear relevant installations licensing methodology in the Argentine Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganini, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the requeriments of the Nuclear Installations Advisory Committee on Licensing (CALIN) from the nuclear security point of view, is presented. The methodology applied by the CALIN for the licensing in the Argentine Republic is included as well as codes, standards of applications and the interaction between the licensing Authority and the Responsible Entity during the whole process. Finally, the Atucha II nuclear power plant's licensing, in construction at present, is explained and the standard, of the licensing schedule, is presented graphically. (author) [es

  12. Safeguards Strategy in Physical Protection System for Nuclear Installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ade lndra B; Kasturi; Tatang Eryadi

    2004-01-01

    Safeguards strategy is directed at efforts of eliminating theft of nuclear materials and sabotage of nuclear installation. For achieving the above objective, it is necessary to set up safeguards strategy in physical protection of nuclear materials and installation. The safeguards strategy starts from anticipated security condition, list of thefts, planning referred to as safeguards planning. Safeguards planning are implemented in safeguards implementation, followed up then by evaluation. Results of evaluation are equipped with results of safeguards survey already developed. Safeguards' planning is made from these results and serve as guidelines for next safeguards implementation and is repeated to form a safeguard cycle. One safeguard cycle is made on a periodical basis, at least annually. (author)

  13. Remote installation of risers on underground nuclear waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.P.; Gessner, R.F.

    1988-03-01

    The West Valley Demonstration Project was established to solidify 2120 m 3 (560,000) gallons of high-level nuclear waste generated during six years of commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing. This liquid will be processed to remove radioactive elements which, with the remaining sludge, will be combined with glass formers and be converted into borosilicate glass. Risers were installed on the high-level tank for installation of pumps which will be used to remove the liquid and sludge. The extensive use of remote technology was required to install the risers and to minimize operator exposure to high levels of radiation and contamination. The riser installation required remotely: drilling through two feet of concrete shielding; installing pump access pipes which are welded to the tank top; and cutting holes in tanks located 3658 mm (12) feet below ground. These operations were successfully completed 13 times without exposing personnel to high-level radiation or contamination. Specially designed remote equipment was developed for each step of this operation. Extensive operator training in the use of this equipment was performed on a tank with low radiation prior to work on the high-level tank. This paper discusses the application of remote technology that assured a quality job was safely accomplished. 3 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Licensing of nuclear and radioactive installations in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Gironzini, E.

    1987-01-01

    In Peru, the Regulation for Ionizing Radiation Sources is applied, which establishes the norms and procedures to follow in the nuclear and radioactive installations of the country in order to assure their correct operation as concerns to the nuclear safety and radiological protection, allowing the emission of the respective licenses. As for the nuclear facilities, this authorization includes the Previous License, the Construction License and the Operation License (provisional and definitive) and for radioactive facilities and equipment generating ionizing radiations: the Construction License and the Operation License. The personnel also require a license that can be an operator license (as for nuclear reactors) or a supervisor license (for nuclear and radioactive facilities). In spite of the above mentioned regulation and its long enforcement period, less than 10% of radioactive facilities in this country are licensed, due to different problems which will be solved in the medium term. (Author)

  15. Institutional support to the nuclear power based on transportable installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.P.; Cherepnin, Y.S.

    2010-01-01

    Existing nuclear power uses large-power nuclear plants (more than 1,000 MWe) and enriched uranium fuel ( 2 35 U ). Each plant is treated as an exclusive costly project. As a result, large NPPs are operated predominantly in highly developed big countries. In many countries, construction of large power units is not reasonable because of the economic conditions and national specifics. This calls for the use of small- and medium-power nuclear plants (SMPNP), especially transportable nuclear installations (TNI). TNI feature small power (up to 100 MWe); serial production, and transportability. Small- and medium-power nuclear plants could serve to produce electricity and heat; perform water desalination; provide temporary and emergency energy supply. The authors discuss some findings of the studies carried out on the various aspects of the TNI life, as well as the legal and institutional support to their development, construction and operation. The studies have been performed in the framework of the INPRO Action Plan

  16. Emotional consequences of nuclear power plant disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromet, Evelyn J

    2014-02-01

    The emotional consequences of nuclear power plant disasters include depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and medically unexplained somatic symptoms. These effects are often long term and associated with fears about developing cancer. Research on disasters involving radiation, particularly evidence from Chernobyl, indicates that mothers of young children and cleanup workers are the highest risk groups. The emotional consequences occur independently of the actual exposure received. In contrast, studies of children raised in the shadows of the Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl accidents suggest that although their self-rated health is less satisfactory than that of their peers, their emotional, academic, and psychosocial development is comparable. The importance of the psychological impact is underscored by its chronicity and by several studies showing that poor mental health is associated with physical health conditions, early mortality, disability, and overuse of medical services. Given the established increase in mental health problems following TMI and Chernobyl, it is likely that the same pattern will occur in residents and evacuees affected by the Fukushima meltdowns. Preliminary data from Fukushima indeed suggest that workers and mothers of young children are at risk of depression, anxiety, psychosomatic, and post-traumatic symptoms both as a direct result of their fears about radiation exposure and an indirect result of societal stigma. Thus, it is important that non-mental health providers learn to recognize and manage psychological symptoms and that medical programs be designed to reduce stigma and alleviate psychological suffering by integrating psychiatric and medical treatment within the walls of their clinics.Introduction of Emotional Consequences of Nuclear Power Plant Disasters (Video 2:15, http://links.lww.com/HP/A34).

  17. Biological and medical consequences of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latarjet, R.

    1988-01-01

    The study of the medical and biological consequences of the nuclear accidents is a vast program. The Chernobyl accident has caused some thirty deceases: Some of them were rapid and the others occurred after a certain time. The particularity of these deaths was that the irradiation has been associated to burns and traumatisms. The lesson learnt from the Chernobyl accident is to treat the burn and the traumatism before treating the irradiation. Contrary to what the research workers believe, the first wave of deaths has passed between 15 and 35 days and it has not been followed by any others. But the therapeutic lesson drawn from the accident confirm the research workers results; for example: the radioactive doses band that determines where the therapy could be efficacious or not. the medical cares dispensed to the irradiated people in the hospital of Moscow has confirmed that the biochemical equilibrium of proteinic elements of blood has to be maintained, and the transfusion of the purified elements are very important to restore a patient to health, and the sterilization of the medium (room, food, bedding,etc...) of the patient is indispensable. Therefore, it is necessary to establish an international cooperation for providing enough sterilized rooms and specialists in the irradiation treatment. The genetic consequences and cancers from the Chernobyl accident have been discussed. It is impossible to detect these consequences because of their negligible percentages. (author)

  18. Experience with HEPA filters at United States nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    Part 50 of Title 10 of the United States Code of Federal Regulations requires that a number of atmosphere cleanup systems be included in the design of commercial nuclear power plants to be licensed in the United States. These filtering systems are to contain high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters for removal of radioactive particulate matter generated during normal and accident conditions. Recommendations for the design, testing and maintenance of the filtering systems and HEPA filter components are contained in a number of United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission documents and industry standards. This paper will discuss this published guidance available to designers of filtering systems and the plant operators of U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. The paper will also present a survey of published reports of experience with HEPA filters, failures and possible causes for the failures, and other abnormal occurrences pertaining to HEPA filters installed in U.S. nuclear power installations. A discussion will be included of U.S. practices for qualification of HEPA filters before installation, and verification of continued performance capability at scheduled intervals during operation

  19. Consequences of Illicit Trafficking of Nuclear or Other Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Explosion of a nuclear yield device is probably the worst consequence of Illicit Trafficking of nuclear or other radioactive materials.The nuclear yield device might be a stolen nuclear weapon, or an improvised nuclear device. An improvised nuclear device requires nuclear material design, and construction ability. Use of a radioactive dispersal device probably would not result in large numbers of casualties.However economic losses can be enormous. Non-Technical effects of nuclear trafficking (e.g. public panic, work disruption, etc.) and political and psychological consequences can far exceed technical consequences

  20. Standardization of Nuclear Instrumentation Applied in the NPP and in other nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusnowo, Arlinah; Darmawati, Suzie

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear power plant (NPP) and other nuclear installations have been recognized as applications needing very sophisticated technologies. One of technologies used in this all nuclear facilities is nuclear instrumentation. In order that NPP and other nuclear installations be operated safely, nuclear instrumentation requires standardization from design to its operation. Internationally, standardizations of nuclear instrumentation have been issued by IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission). Formulation of standard in nuclear instrumentation in IEC is carried out by Technical Committee (TC) 45. This paper describes briefly the standardization of nuclear instrumentation applied in Indonesia as Indonesian National Standard (SNI, Standard National Indonesia), standardization of nuclear instrumentation developed by TC 45, SC 45A, and SC 45B, as well as the possibility to adopt and apply those IEC standard in Indonesia

  1. Consequences of severe nuclear accidents in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Petra; Arnold, Delia; Mraz, Gabriele; Arnold, Nikolaus; Gufler, Klaus; Kromp-Kolb, Helga; Kromp, Wolfgang; Sutter, Philipp

    2013-04-01

    A first part of the presentation is devoted to the consequences of the severe accident in the 1986 Chernobyl NPP. It lead to a substantial radioactive contaminated of large parts of Europe and thus raised the awareness for off-site nuclear accident consequences. Spatial patterns of the (transient) contamination of the air and (persistent) contamination of the ground were studied by both measurements and model simulations. For a variety of reasons, ground contamination measurements have variability at a range of spatial scales. Results will be reviewed and discussed. Model simulations, including inverse modelling, have shown that the standard source term as defined in the ATMES study (1990) needs to be updated. Sensitive measurements of airborne activities still reveal the presence of low levels of airborne radiocaesium over the northern hemisphere which stems from resuspension. Over time scales of months and years, the distribution of radionuclides in the Earth system is constantly changing, for example relocated within plants, between plants and soil, in the soil, and into water bodies. Motivated by the permanent risk of transboundary impacts from potential major nuclear accidents, the multidisciplinary project flexRISK (see http://flexRISK.boku.ac.at) has been carried out from 2009 to 2012 in Austria to quantify such risks and hazards. An overview of methods and results of flexRISK is given as a second part of the presentation. For each of the 228 NPPs, severe accidents were identified together with relevant inventories, release fractions, and release frequencies. Then, Europe-wide dispersion and dose calculations were performed for 2788 cases, using the Lagrangian particle model FLEXPART. Maps of single-case results as well as various aggregated risk parameters were produced. It was found that substantial consequences (intervention measures) are possible for distances up to 500-1000 km, and occur more frequently for a distance range up to 100-300 km, which is in

  2. Quality assurance in the structural installations of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnellenbach, G.; Wrage, S.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of quality assurance distinguishes between self-monitoring of the design, manufacturing and executing firms and external monitoring by state institutions or by experts commissioned by them. The long-term control of structures is within the area of responsibility of the owner. This quality assurance concept is controlled in detail by statutes, which clearly define responsibilities. This structural engineering quality assurance system also forms the basis for the design, construction and utilization of structural installations of nuclear power stations; requirements emanating from the Atomic Energy Acts for the structural installations demand, however, to some extent a sharpening of self- and external monitoring. Therefore, today a quality concept has been developed for the important engineering safety-related buildings of nuclear power stations. This concept takes account of the strict requirements imposed and fulfils the requirement of KTA 1401. (orig.) [de

  3. Legal questions relating to nuclear installations close to national frontiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zieger, G.

    1983-01-01

    Main emphasis is placed on the criteria to decide whether the construction and operation of a nulcear power plant close to a national frontier is permissible or not. The author discusses the relevant provisions of the international law and those of the Treaty of Rome pertaining to the settlement of conflicts between neighbour states. According to the opinion of the author, nuclear installations close to borders are incompatible with international law only if they do not comply with accepted safety standards. The international agreements do not prohibit the construction of nuclear installations close to frontiers. It would be desirable, however, the author says, to conclude international treaties providing for mutual consultation and information, thus offering a platform for discussing controversial national interests; this idea already being put into practice in customary international law. (WB) [de

  4. Safety aspects of spent nuclear fuel interim storage installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanato, Luiz Sergio [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. da Qualidade. Div. de Sistemas da Qualidade]. E-mail: romanato@ctmsp.mar.mil.br; Rzyski, Barbara Maria [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Ensino]. E-mail: bmrzyski@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Nowadays safety and security of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) interim storage installations are very important, due to a great concentration of fission products, actinides and activation products. In this kind of storage it is necessary to consider the physical security. Nuclear installations have become more vulnerable. New types of accidents must be considered in the design of these installations, which in the early days were not considered like: fissile material stolen, terrorists' acts and war conflicts, and traditional accidents concerning the transport of the spent fuel from the reactor to the storage location, earthquakes occurrence, airplanes crash, etc. Studies related to airplane falling had showed that a collision of big commercials airplanes at velocity of 800 km/h against SNF storage and specially designed concrete casks, do not result in serious structural injury to the casks, and not even radionuclides liberation to the environment. However, it was demonstrated that attacks with modern military ammunitions, against metallic casks, are calamitous. The casks could not support a direct impact of this ammo and the released radioactive materials can expose the workers and public as well the local environment to harmful radiation. This paper deals about the main basic aspects of a dry SNF storage installation, that must be physically well protected, getting barriers that difficult the access of unauthorized persons or vehicles, as well as, must structurally resist to incidents or accidents caused by unauthorized intrusion. (author)

  5. Safety aspects of spent nuclear fuel interim storage installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanato, Luiz Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays safety and security of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) interim storage installations are very important, due to a great concentration of fission products, actinides and activation products. In this kind of storage it is necessary to consider the physical security. Nuclear installations have become more vulnerable. New types of accidents must be considered in the design of these installations, which in the early days were not considered like: fissile material stolen, terrorists' acts and war conflicts, and traditional accidents concerning the transport of the spent fuel from the reactor to the storage location, earthquakes occurrence, airplanes crash, etc. Studies related to airplane falling had showed that a collision of big commercials airplanes at velocity of 800 km/h against SNF storage and specially designed concrete casks, do not result in serious structural injury to the casks, and not even radionuclides liberation to the environment. However, it was demonstrated that attacks with modern military ammunitions, against metallic casks, are calamitous. The casks could not support a direct impact of this ammo and the released radioactive materials can expose the workers and public as well the local environment to harmful radiation. This paper deals about the main basic aspects of a dry SNF storage installation, that must be physically well protected, getting barriers that difficult the access of unauthorized persons or vehicles, as well as, must structurally resist to incidents or accidents caused by unauthorized intrusion. (author)

  6. Nuclear installations and childhood cancer in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Data on cancer incidence and mortality near nuclear installations in England and Wales have been published, covering the period 1959-1980. Several age classes and a number of cancer sites have been included. Systematic analysis has so far been limited to cancer mortality. This suggests that childhood leukemia is unusually frequent near some types of installations and the excess is greater for years 0-9 than for later ages. In the earlier decade, 1959-1969, there was questionable consistency of incidence reporting. This report uses the incidence and mortality data only for the period 1971-1980; leukemia and non-leukemia cancer data for those 0-9 years are analyzed, and consistency of incidence reporting is evaluated by comparing incidence and mortality. For comparison with reported data for grouped local authority areas (LAAs) near to 21 different installations, 2 sources of expected incidence are used. The first is based on regional data, and the second is based on a group of LAAs similar in location, urban/rural character and population size. The results of this study confirm Cook-Mozaffari et al.'s findings by mortality analysis for the group of installations involved in non-power producing nuclear technology. This study sheds no light on the possible basis for the association, which remains to be clarified. Initial steps have been taken by Gardner et al. using case-referent methods. (author). 15 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  7. Approach to long- term regalement of nuclear energy installation decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryapachenko, Yi.P.; Rudenko, B. A.; Ozimaj, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    In this report we make an accent on because the rules of nuclear installation decommissioning should provide controllability with compounded operations not one generations of the performers. The strategy should take into account problems of the economic completion, environment and standards of health, script of decommissioning and its execution, and so on. These strategies are bound with the social conditions, with accent on work with the low level wastes

  8. Policy and systems analysis for nuclear installation decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Jiande

    1995-01-01

    On the basis of introducing into principal concept for nuclear installation decommissioning, form policy, sciences point of view, the author analyses present problems in the policy, the administrative and programme for decommissioning work in China. According to the physical process of decommissioning, the author studied engineering economics, derived method and formulas to estimate decommissioning cost. It is pointed out that basing on optimization principle for radiation protection and analysing cost-benefit for decommissioning engineering, the corresponding policy decision can be made

  9. Assessment of the nuclear installation's safety significant events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidican, D.

    2005-01-01

    This document tries to establish, based on the available documentation, the main steps in development of Assessment of the Events in Nuclear Installations. It takes into account: selection of the safety significant occurrences, establishing the direct cause and contributors as well as the root cause and contributors. Also, the document presents the necessary corrective actions and generic lessons to be learned from the event. The document is based especially on IAEA - ASSET guidelines and DOE root cause analysis Guidance. (author)

  10. Performance study of the paints for use in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, T.

    1978-01-01

    The performance of some Brazilian commercial paints under physical, chemical and radiation conditions typical of nuclear installations is studied. Resistance to gama rays in the range of 10 4 - 10 9 rad as well as the susceptibility to contamination, ease of decontamination and chemical resistance in 9 different types of paints are studied. Finally, suggestions are provided for the best choice of commercial paints according to their specific uses [pt

  11. Gas turbine installations in nuclear power plants in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevestedt, Lars [Electrical Equipment and Gas Turbines, Swedish State Power Board, Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant, S-430 22 Vaeroebacka (Sweden)

    1986-02-15

    At each of the four nuclear power stations in Sweden (Ringhals, Forsmark, Oskarshamn, Barsebaeck) gas turbine generating sets have been installed. These units are normally used for peak load operation dictated of grid and System requirements but they are also connected to supply the electrical auxiliary load of the nuclear plant as reserve power sources. The gas turbines have automatic start capability under certain abnormal conditions (such as reactor trips, low frequency grid etc) but they can also be started manually from several different locations. Starting time is approximately 2- 3 minutes from start up to full load. (author)

  12. Gas turbine installations in nuclear power plants in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevestedt, Lars

    1986-01-01

    At each of the four nuclear power stations in Sweden (Ringhals, Forsmark, Oskarshamn, Barsebaeck) gas turbine generating sets have been installed. These units are normally used for peak load operation dictated of grid and System requirements but they are also connected to supply the electrical auxiliary load of the nuclear plant as reserve power sources. The gas turbines have automatic start capability under certain abnormal conditions (such as reactor trips, low frequency grid etc) but they can also be started manually from several different locations. Starting time is approximately 2- 3 minutes from start up to full load. (author)

  13. Nuclear Installations (Jersey) Order 1980 SI No. 1527

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Order extends to the Bailiwick of Jersey with the exceptions, adaptations and modifications specified in the Schedule to the Order, certain provisions of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, as amended. It is the 1965 Act which implements the provisions of the Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention in the United Kingdom. These provisions relate to the duty in respect of the carriage of nuclear matter, to the right to compensation for breach of that duty and to the bringing and satisfaction of claims and other matters. This Order came into operation on 3 November 1980. (NEA) [fr

  14. Seismic qualification of existing nuclear installations in India - a proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    In India, the work toward seismic qualification of existing nuclear facilities has been started. Preliminary work is being undertaken with respect to identifying the facilities which would be taken up for seismic qualification, approach and methodology for re-evaluation for seismic safety, acceptance criteria, etc. Work has also been started for framing up the criteria and methodology of the seismic qualification of these facilities. Present paper contains the proposal in this respect. This proposal is on similar lines of the present practice of seismic qualification of NPP, as summarized in the Appendix, but has been modified to suit the special requirements of Indian nuclear installations. (author)

  15. Giving up nuclear energy. Obstacles, conditions, consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koegel-Dorfs, H.

    1990-01-01

    Life on this earth is not possible without using energy. The resources of the energies used so far are limited and their utilization carries certain risks which have now become obvious: climatic problems on the one hand, safety problems on the other. Chernobyl, Wackersdorf, tornados and population growth are issues mentioned all the time in the fight for the best solution. Even church synodes have spoken up and demanded to give up nuclear energy. The energy issue, however, has become a question of survival. This study, worked out by a group of scientists (natural science, energy science, lawyers, theologians) analyses the obstacles, conditions and consequences of such a step. The possible solution of rational energy utilization and substitution of energy services and regenerative energies is discussed in depth. The book concludes that problems can only be coped with if there is a feeling of joint responsibility and global social consensus. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Taking into account chemical safety for French basic nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabard, Laurence; Conte, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Among nuclear installations, some fuel cycle facilities present a high level of chemical hazards. In France, the TSN law of the 13 June 2006 requires taking into account all the risks generated by a basic nuclear installation (BNI). But, as most of the implementing regulatory texts are under development at this time, part of the previous regulation settled down in the 1990's is still applying: the order of the 31 December 1999 concerning technical regulation in order to prevent and to limit hazards generated by nuclear facilities; the decree of the 4 May 1995 and the order of the 26 November 1999 that deal with BNI discharges. Moreover, some parts of BNI or of nuclear sites can be submitted to the general regulation concerning chemical hazards, which is part of the environment code. As a result, even if the TSN law and its implementing decree Nr 2007-1557 of the 2 November 2007 settle clearly that safety of BNI is not only radiological, but must take into account chemical hazards, the latter aspects are still under development. Moreover the application of the existing regulation, even if complex, has helped to assess chemical risks inside BNI and nuclear sites. (authors)

  17. Nuclear Accidents: Consequences for Human, Society and Energy Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Bolshov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article examines radiation and hygienic regulations with regard to the elimination of consequences of the Chernobyl NPP accident in the context of relationships with other aspects, primarily socio-economic and political factors. This experience is reasonable to take into account when defining criteria in other regulatory fields, for example, in radioactive waste classification and remediation of areas. The article presents an analysis of joint features and peculiarities of nuclear accidents in the industry and energy sectors. It is noted that the scale of global consequences of the Chernobyl NPP accident is defined by the large-scale release of radioactivity into the environment, as well as an affiliation of the nuclear installation with the energy sector. Large-scale radiation accidents affect the most diverse spheres of human activities, what, in its turn, evokes the reverse reaction from the society and its institutions, including involvement of political means of settlement. If the latter is seeing for criteria that are scientifically justified and feasible, then the preconditions for minimizing socio-economic impacts are created. In other cases, political decisions, such as nuclear units’ shutdown and phasing out of nuclear energy, appear to be an economic price which society, as a whole and a single industry sector, pay to compensate the negative public response. The article describes fundamental changes in approaches to ensure nuclear and radiation safety that occurred after the Chernobyl NPP accident. Multiple and negative consequences of the Chernobyl accident for human and society are balanced to some extent by a higher level of operational safety, emergency preparedness, and life-cycle safety. The article indicates that harmonization and ensuring consistency of regulations that involve different aspects of nuclear and radiation safety are important to implement practical solutions to the nuclear legacy problems. The

  18. Competent person for radiation protection. Practical radiation protection for base nuclear installations and installations classified for the environment protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, A.; Perez, S.; Videcoq, J.; Ammerich, M.

    2008-01-01

    This book corresponds to the practical module devoted to the base nuclear installations and to the installations classified for the environment protection, that is to say the permanent nuclear installations susceptible to present risks for the public, environment or workers. Complied with the legislation that stipulates this module must allow to apply the acquired theoretical training to practical situations of work, it includes seven chapters as follow: generalities on access conditions in regulated areas of nuclear installation,s or installations classified for environment protection and clothing against contamination; use of control devices and management of damaged situations; methodology of working place studies, completed by the application to a real case of a study on an intervention on a containment wall; a part entitled 'take stock of the situation' ends every chapter and proposes to the reader to check its understanding and acquisition of treated knowledge. (N.C.)

  19. Nuclear liability amounts on the rise for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez-Maignan, Ximena; Schwartz, Julia; Kuzeyli, Kaan

    2015-01-01

    The NEA Table on Nuclear Operator Liability Amounts and Financial Security Limits (NEA 'Liability Table'), which covers 71 countries, aims to provide one of the most comprehensive listings of nuclear liability amounts and financial security limits. The current and revised Paris and Brussels Supplementary Conventions ('Paris-Brussels regime'), the original and revised Vienna Conventions ('Vienna regime') and the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage, newly entered into force in April 2015, provide for the minimum amounts to be transposed in the national legislation of states parties to the conventions, and have served as guidelines for non-convention states. This article examine in more detail increases in the liability amounts provided for under these conventions, as well as examples of non-convention states (China, India and Korea)

  20. Statement on nuclear incidents at nuclear installations -third quarter 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Four incidents are reported. Carbon dioxide containing a small amount of radioactive material was released at the Chapelcross works of British Nuclear Fuels. However, air monitoring showed the contamination to be small. Surfaces contaminated were cleaned and the reactor was allowed to restart as scheduled. Refurbishment work at the Berkeley Nuclear Power Station sewage plant revealed five radioactive particles. The sludge has been isolated until a disposal method is found. Contamination on a coverall was found at the Sellafield reprocessing plant. Both the operators who may have worn the coverall may have received excess doses. Improvements in the possible source of contamination have been made. A leak of gas from the Hunterston B nuclear power station was found to be from a failed joint on a bolted flange on the bypass circuit heat exchanger. The joint has been repaired. (U.K.)

  1. Styles of nuclear regulation and their consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilpert, B.

    2005-01-01

    This contribution is about the document published as 'Announcement of the Basic Principles of Safety Management Systems in Nuclear Power Plants' in the Federal Gazette (Bundesanzeiger) by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Nuclear Safety (BMU) on July 27, 2004. A kind of checklist contains requirements to be taken into account as 'boundary conditions' in the implementation of safety management systems. In fact, every sentence in the document begins with a 'must' provision. Remarkably enough, these 'Basic Principles' were promulgated by the Ministry without any consultation with advisory bodies, such as the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (RSK), or organizations of plant operators. The paper contains much that is worth considering, but also many truisms. This article was written because of the way in which the document had been prepared and publicized. An effort is made in this article to generate some understanding of the consequences, in terms of labor psychology and organizational psychology, of the different approaches pursued by regulatory authorities. A key point in this respect is the fundamental difference it makes whether regulations (reglementations) by supervisory authorities address the design of technical components or human behavior. In the former case, precise criteria without any constraints can serve the purpose. Behavioral rules, on the other hand, need a certain measure of flexibility, also in the way mistakes are handled, in order to avoid negative reactions on the part of those concerned. (orig.)

  2. The work of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency on safety and licensing of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohl, P.

    1975-01-01

    The acceleration of nuclear power programmes in OECD Member countries is reflected in the emphasis given by OECD/NEA to its activities in nuclear safety and regulatory matters. Particular effort is devoted to work on radiation protection and radioactive waste management, safety of nuclear installations and nuclear law development. A Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations reviews the state of the art and identifies areas for research and co-ordination of national programmes. A Sub-Committee on Licensing collates information and data on licensing standards and practices of different countries with a view to considering problems of common interest. Comparative studies of various licensing systems and discussions between licensing authorities should help to improve regulatory control of nuclear installations for which there appears to be a need for internationally accepted standards in the long run. (author)

  3. Nuclear medicine installations supervisors interactive course (CD-ROM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williart, A.; Shaw, M.; Tellez, M.

    2000-01-01

    The professionals who work as Nuclear Medicine Installations Supervisors need a suitable training. This training must be based on the guidelines of the C.S.N. (the Spanish Agency for Nuclear Safety). The traditional training courses must comply with a set of requirements, that not always is possible to get: They are given in a settled place. They are developed during a time, more or less lengthy. This time is pre-established. However, the persons willing to follow these courses have some difficulties with the place and the time. Many of them do not live near the places where the courses are given, in general in big cities, while there are Nuclear Medicine Installations scattered through all Spain. Moreover in some occasions they have not available time to attend the courses. Many times, faced with so many obstacles, the option is not to do the suitable training course. In order to solve this kind of problems we offer an Interactive Training Course (supported by CD-ROM). The course contents are based on Spanish Regulations and on the Safety Guide, established by C.S.N., for approval Radioactive Installations Supervisors Training Courses. This guide includes General Topics for Radioactive Installations and Specific Subjects for Nuclear Medicine. (General topics) Basic knowledge on the fundamental concepts on the action and nature of Ionizing Radiations, their risks and preventions. The ionizing radiations. Biological effects of ionizing radiations. Radiological protection. Legislation on radioactive installations. (Specific Subjects) Knowledge on the radiological risks associated to the proper techniques in the specific field of application. In our case the specific field is Nuclear Medicine Installations, where the radioactive sources are used for diagnostic or for therapy. Specific legal and administrative aspects. Non-encapsulated radioactive sources. Associated radiological risks to the use of non-encapsulated sources. Installations design. Operative procedures

  4. Effective corrective actions to enhance operational safety of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-07-01

    The safe operation of nuclear power plants around the world and the prevention of incidents in these installations remain key concerns for the nuclear community. In this connection the feedback of operating experience plays a major role: every nuclear plant operator needs to have a system in place to identify and feed back the lessons learned from operating experience and to implement effective corrective actions to prevent safety events from reoccurring. An effective operating experience programme also includes a proactive approach that is aimed at preventing the first-time occurrence of safety events. In April 2003, the IAEA issued the PROSPER guidelines for nuclear installations to strengthen and enhance their own operating experience process and for self-assessment on the effectiveness of the feedback process. Subsequently, in the course of the Operational Safety Review Teams missions conducted by the IAEA that focused on the operational safety practices of nuclear power plants, the IAEA enhanced the review of the operating experience in nuclear power plants by implementing a new module that is derived from these guidelines. In order to highlight the effective implementation of the operating experience programme and to provide practical assistance in this area, the IAEA organized workshops and conferences to discuss recent trends in operating experience. The IAEA also performed assistance and review missions at plants and corporate organizations. The IAEA is further developing advice and assistance on operating experience feedback programmes and is reporting on good practices. The present publication is the outcome of two years of coordinated effort involving the participation of experts of nuclear organizations in several Member States. It provides information and good practices for successfully establishing an effective corrective actions programme. This publication forms part of a series that develops the principles set forth in these guidelines

  5. Management of procurement activities in a nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    Discussions held within the framework of IAEA regional technical co-operation projects implemented in the Latin America, Asia-Pacific and eastern Europe regions revealed an area of frequent difficulties related to the proper control, by the management of nuclear utilities, of the effective fulfilment of contractual quality and safety requirements. Evaluation of the results of a number of OSART missions has also pointed to a need for improving the control that some utilities exercise on their suppliers. The IAEA was thus prompted to initiate the development of a technical document providing guidance on these subjects. In October 1995, a consultants meeting was convened to determine the target users of the technical document and to develop the scope, contents, structure and the reference material. A first draft was then prepared. An Advisory Group meeting consisting of experts from 17 Members States was held in Vienna in May 1996 to review and complete the draft. The technical document is intended to provide practical guidance on controlling procurement, with supporting information for senior management, line managers and line supervisors in a nuclear installation. Although the guidance is structured to address the needs during the operating stage of a nuclear power plant, much of the material is also applicable to the construction and decommissioning stages and to other nuclear installations. 1 fig

  6. Reliability of sprinkler systems. Exploration and analysis of data from nuclear and non-nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roenty, V.; Keski-Rahkonen, O.; Hassinen, J.P.

    2004-12-01

    Sprinkler systems are an important part of fire safety of nuclear installations. As a part of effort to make fire-PSA of our utilities more quantitative a literature survey from open sources worldwide of available reliability data on sprinkler systems was carried out. Since the result of the survey was rather poor quantitatively, it was decided to mine available original Finnish nuclear and non-nuclear data, since nuclear power plants present a rather small device population. Sprinklers are becoming a key element for the fire safety in modern, open non-nuclear buildings. Therefore, the study included both nuclear power plants and non-nuclear buildings protected by sprinkler installations. Data needed for estimating of reliability of sprinkler systems were collected from available sources in Finnish nuclear and non-nuclear installations. Population sizes on sprinkler system installations and components therein as well as covered floor areas were counted individually from Finnish nuclear power plants. From non-nuclear installations corresponding data were estimated by counting relevant things from drawings of 102 buildings, and plotting from that sample needed probability distributions. The total populations of sprinkler systems and components were compiled based on available direct data and these distributions. From nuclear power plants electronic maintenance reports were obtained, observed failures and other reliability relevant data were selected, classified according to failure severity, and stored on spreadsheets for further analysis. A short summary of failures was made, which was hampered by a small sample size. From non-nuclear buildings inspection statistics from years 1985.1997 were surveyed, and observed failures were classified and stored on spreadsheets. Finally, a reliability model is proposed based on earlier formal work, and failure frequencies obtained by preliminary data analysis of this work. For a model utilising available information in the non-nuclear

  7. Establishment of the nuclear regulatory framework for the process of decommissioning of nuclear installations in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmeron V, J. A.; Camargo C, R.; Nunez C, A.

    2015-09-01

    Today has not managed any process of decommissioning of nuclear installations in the country; however because of the importance of the subject and the actions to be taken to long term, the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) in Mexico, accordance with its objectives is developing a National Nuclear Regulatory Framework and defined requirements to ensure the implementation of appropriate safety standards when such activities are performed. In this regard, the national nuclear regulatory framework for nuclear installations and the particular case of nuclear power reactors is presented, as well as a proposed licensing process for the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde based on international regulations and origin country regulations of the existing reactors in nuclear facilities in accordance with the license conditions of operation to allow to define and incorporate such regulation. (Author)

  8. Social acceptance for seismic safety of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oiso, Shinichi

    2010-01-01

    The social acceptance of seismic safety of the nuclear installations was considered based on the situation that people's concern and anxieties for it having risen by earthquake suffering of the Kashiwazaki Kariwa facility in 2007, etc. It aimed mainly to extract a social awareness (acknowledgment and evaluation) which is peculiar to the earthquake in the field of nuclear power generation, and to show the attention point concerning the public relations of seismic safety of the nuclear power plant. As a result, it was suggested that we should explain based on the opinion of the third party which has a high trust such as specialist scholars, and emphasize that the severe examinations of outside third parties such as committee of the prefecture are conducted. (author)

  9. The cyber security of French nuclear installations: stakes and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Notably due to the development of the number of connected objects, nuclear installations, their supply chain and all the actors of the chain value are exposed to cyber risks, even if a recent study noticed that successful cyber attacks involving nuclear plants are rare, but real. Thus, the threat is actual and growing, and the IAEA is already working with Interpol on this issue. The author then describes how French actors (EDF, Areva, CEA) have introduced cyber-resilience to better anticipate and identify actual threats and critical vulnerabilities in order to protect infrastructures. He comments some strengthened regulatory measures introduced for the French nuclear sector, and continuous improvements brought in the field of cyber security. He shows that handling these risks is also an opportunity to develop crisis management tools through the development of a specific know-how which also has an industrial value

  10. Safeguards by Design - Experiences from New Nuclear Installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okko, O.; Honkamaa, T.; Kuusi, A.; Rautjaervi, J.

    2010-01-01

    The experiences obtained from the current construction projects at Olkiluoto clearly point out the need to introduce the safeguards requirements into facility design process at an early stage. The early Design Information is completed, in principle, before the construction. However, during the design of containment, surveillance systems, and non-destructive assay equipment and their cabling, the design requirements for safeguards systems were not available either for the new reactor unit or for the disposal plant with a geological repository. Typically, the official Design Information documents are not available early enough for efficient integration of safeguards systems into new facilities. In case of the Olkiluoto projects, this was due to understandable reasons: at the new reactor unit the design acceptance by the ordering company and by the nuclear safety authorities was a long process, ongoing simultaneously with parts of the construction; and at the geological repository the national legislation assigns the repository the status of a nuclear facility only after the initial construction and research phase of the repository when the long-term safety of the disposal concept is demonstrated. As similar factors are likely to delay the completion of the official Design Information documents with any new reactor projects until the construction is well underway and efficient integration of safeguards systems is impossible. Therefore, the proliferation resistance of new nuclear installations should be addressed in the design phase before the official Design Information documents are finished. This approach was demonstrated with the enlargement of the Olkiluoto spent fuel storage building. For this approach to work, strong national contribution is needed to facilitate the early communication and exchange of information between the IAEA and the other stakeholders to enable the design of facilities that can be efficiently safeguarded. With the renaissance of nuclear

  11. The nuclear accidents: Causes and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochd, M.

    1988-01-01

    The author discussed and compared the real causes of T.M.I. and Chernobyl accidents and cited their consequences. To better understand how these accidents occurred, a brief description of PWR type (reactor type of T.M.I.) and of RBMK type (reactor type of Chernobyl) has been presented. The author has also set out briefly the safety analysis objectives and the three barriers established to protect the public against the radiological consequences. To distinguish failures that cause severe accidents and to analyze them in details, it is necessary to classify the accidents. There are many ways to do it according to their initiator event, or to their frequency, or to their degree of gravity. The safety criteria adopted by nuclear industry have been explained. These criteria specify the limits of certain physical parameters that should not be exceeded in case of incidents or accidents. To compare the real causes of T.M.I. and Chernobyl accidents, the events that led to both have been presented. As observed the main common contributing factors in both cases are that the operators did not pay attention to warnings and signals that were available to them and that they were not trained to handle these accident sequences. The essential conclusions derived from these severe accidents are: -The improvement of operators competence contribute to reduce the accident risks; -The rapid and correct diagnosis of real conditions at each point of the accidents permits an appropriate behavior that would bring the plant to a stable state; -Competent technical teams have to intervene and to assist the operators in case of emergency; -Emergency plans and an international collaboration are necessary to limit the accident risks. 11 figs. (author)

  12. Assessment of safety culture in the Iranian nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farahani, H.F.; Davilu, H.; Sepanloo, K.

    2005-01-01

    The deficient safety culture (S.C) is the center of safety issues of nuclear industry. To benefit from the advantages of nuclear technology and considering the fact of potential hazards of accidents in nuclear installations it is essential to view safety as the highest priority. S.C is an amalgamation of values, standards, morals and norms of acceptable behavior. Organizations having effective S.C show constant commitment to safety as a top level priority. Furthermore, the personnel of a nuclear facility shall recognize the safety significance of their tasks. Many people even those who work in the field of safety do not have a correct understanding of what S.C looks like in practical sense. In this study, by conducting a survey according to IAEA-TECDOC-1329 in some nuclear facilities, the S.C within the Iranian nuclear facilities is assessed. The human and organizational factors in Tehran Research Reactor are evaluated using a questionnaire method with active participation of the reactor operators. The results sho w that the operators are pretty aware of the subject. Also it has been identified some areas of improvement. (authors)

  13. A package for environmental impact assessment of nuclear installations (NGLAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yin; Chen Xiaoqiu; Ding Jinhou; Zhao Hui; Xi Xiaojun; Li Hongsheng

    1996-09-01

    The main contents, designing strategies and properties of the microcomputer-based software package NGLAR are described for environmental impact assessment of nuclear installations. The package consists of the following components: NGAS and NACC, the codes for routine and accidental airborne releases respectively; NLIQ, the code for both routine and accidental liquid releases; and NRED, environmental database system of nuclear installations. NGAS and NACC are used for evaluating atmosphere dispersion and doses to public of radioactive materials released from nuclear facilities, giving the concentrations around the facilities of radionuclides in air, on ground surface, and in varieties of animal foods and farm produces, and further estimating collective doses and doses to critical group around the facilities. NLIQ is suitable for liquid effluence released to non-tide rivers, and is modelled to calculate firstly the concentration of radionuclides concerned in the polluted rivers, and then to estimate the resulting doses to public. Under routine releases, the doses obtained from NGAS and NLIQ can be appropriately categorized and summed up together. NRED can be run independently, also used to provide some input data for above programs and save data permanently for them. Having both English and Chinese versions, the package, which was fabricated of multiple functions can be run on IBM 386 or higher and its compatible microcomputers. (3 figs., 1 tabs)

  14. Quality and safety of nuclear installations: the role of administration, and, nuclear safety and regulatory procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queniart, D.

    1979-12-01

    In the first paper the author defines the concepts of safety and quality and describes the means of intervention by the Public Authorities in safety matters of nuclear installations. These include individual authorisations, definition and application of technical rules and surveillance of installations. In the second paper he defines the distinction between radiation protection and safety and presents the legislative and regulatory plan for nuclear safety in France. A central safety service for nuclear installations was created in March 1973 within the Ministry of Industrial and Scientific Development, where, amongst other tasks, it draws up regulatory procedures and organizes inspections of the installations. The main American regulations for light water reactors are outlined and the French regulatory system for different types of reactors discussed

  15. Large fire scenarios in relation to sabotage of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contri, P.; Guerpinar, A.; ); Schneider, U.

    2005-01-01

    The analyses of sabotage scenarios carried out in recent years identified two major damaging mechanisms associated with such scenarios, namely: the mechanical interaction of solid bodies or pressure waves with the installations and the fire-related effects from burning substances. While the former effect may be addressed by available analytical tools developed for accidental scenarios, the latter deserves a new, specific engineering effort. In fact, all nuclear facilities are designed in relation to accidental fires; even so, they need to be assessed in relation to sabotage induced fire scenarios due to the special characteristics of such scenarios, not addressed by the current engineering practice for the design of nuclear installations. Conventional fire hazard analysis is based on the hypothesis of the presence of combustible materials in the buildings and limited number of contemporaneous sources of fire. In addition, conventional fire safety assessment relies upon the presence of mitigation measures and fire related operational procedures. In a sabotage event the validity of all these assumptions need to be checked and if the assumptions cannot be supported, then the analysis should be revised and other alternatives of protection should be developed. Also the implementation of emergency planning should be reviewed to take account of this concern. This paper collects state-of-the-art experience from some Countries, which represents the background information for the development of new IAEA documents in this field. The paper reviews how the current design practice for nuclear installations can cope with large fire scenarios caused by malevolent actions and provides recommendations to designers and operators on how to address these issues in a reasonable framework. (authors)

  16. Practical decommissioning experience with nuclear installations in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skupinski, E.

    1993-01-01

    Initiated by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), this seminar was jointly organized by Kernkraftwerke RWE Bayernwerk GmbH (KRB) and the CEC at Gundremmingen-Guenzburg (D), where the former KRB-A BWR is presently being dismantled. The meeting aimed at gathering a limited number of European experts for the presentation and discussion of operations, the results and conclusions on techniques and procedures presently applied in the dismantling of large-scale nuclear installations in the European Community. Besides the four pilot dismantling projects of the presently running third R and D programme (1989-93) of the European Community on decommissioning of nuclear installations (WAGR, BR-3 PWR, KRB-A BWR and AT-1 FBR fuel reprocessing), the organizers selected the presentation of topics on the following facilities which have a significant scale and/or representative features and are presently being dismantled: the Magnox reprocessing pilot plant at Sellafield, the HWGCR EL4 at Monts d'Arree, the operation of an on-site melting furnace for G2/G3 GCR dismantling waste at Marcoule, an EdF confinement conception of shut-down LWRs for deferred dismantling, and the technical aspects of the Greifswald WWER type NPPs decommissioning. This was completed by a presentation on the decommissioning of material testing reactors in the United Kingdom and by an overview on the conception and implementation of two EC databases on tools, costs and job doses. The seminar concluded with a guided visit of the KRB-A dismantling site. This meeting was attended by managers concerned by the decommissioning of nuclear installations within the European Community, either by practical dismantling work or by decision-making functions. Thereby, the organizers expect to have contributed to the achievement of decommissioning tasks under optimal conditions - with respect to safety and economics - by making available a complete and updated insight into on-going dismantling projects and by

  17. Practical decommissioning experience with nuclear installations in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skupinski, E.

    1992-01-01

    Initiated by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), this seminar was jointly organized by the AEA, BNFL and the CEC at Windermere and the sites of Windscale/Sellafield, where the former Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor and the Windscale piles are currently being dismantled. The meeting aimed at gathering a limited number of European experts for the presentation and discussion of operations, results and conclusions on techniques and procedures currently applied in the dismantling of large scale nuclear installations in the European Community

  18. Topics on Japanese aseismic design for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Masahiko

    2002-01-01

    Major items of of Japanese anti-seismic design for nuclear installations involve three topics: earthquakes and ground motion; seismic design and safety evaluation. The first topic deal with: improvement of geological survey technology, evaluation of ground motion from active faults, and characterisation of earthquake from individual faults. Seismic design involves: evaluation of design ground motion (spectra), classification of structures, systems and components (SSCs) based on the seismic importance, and seismic design criteria and critical loads. Safety evaluation of seismic PSA is dependent on the consistency of the the two previous items. Seismic hazard evaluation methodology, database and examples of analysis are described. Analysis method using fault model is included

  19. Safety aspects of geological studies around nuclear installations sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, J.

    1988-01-01

    The experience of geological studies of about forty french nuclear sites allows to set out the objectives, the phases and the geographic extensions of workings to be realized for confirming a site. The data to be collected for the safety analysis are specified; they concern the local and regional geology, the geotechnical characteristics and the essential elements for evaluating the hazards related to the soil liquefaction, the surface fracturing and in some cases the volcanic risks. It is necessary to follow up the geology during the installation construction and life. 8 refs. (F.M.)

  20. Statement of nuclear incidents: statement of incidents at nuclear installations: third quarter 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    A summary of nuclear incidents occuring at nuclear installations in Britain between 1st July 1990 and 30th September 1990 is presented here, as published by the Health and Safety Executive, two occurring at Harwell Laboratory and one at Winfrith. None of the incidents caused danger to the public, and doses to site workers were not significant. (UK)

  1. Y2K bug and nuclear installations; Le passage a l'an 2000 sur les installations nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    1999-10-01

    Most nuclear installations except power plants, will be shut down on the eve of new year. By september 1999, EDF will have realized all the corrective and preventive actions that are necessary to pass Y2K. CEA has committed to present to safety authorities a complete report concerning preventive actions in its own basic nuclear installations. Safety authorities plan to organize a crisis center in order to face any problem. (A.C.)

  2. Regulatory procedures for the decommissioning of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, P.B.; Basu, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    The basic safety legislation under which operational safety at nuclear installations is regulated does not change when the plant is decommissioned. In the United Kingdom the relevant nuclear safety legislation is embodied in several Acts of Parliament or international conventions. These are listed and described. The potential risk in decommissioning is from radiation exposure of the workers and to a lesser extent of the public and environment. The regulations try to ensure this risk is reduced to acceptable levels. This objective can be achieved if the project is adequately planned, there is reliable information about the plant, the risks are identified and assessed, the quality assurance is good and personnel are trained, and the radioactive wastes produced are managed and disposed of suitably. (U.K.)

  3. Nuclear Winter: Global Consequences of Multiple Nuclear Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Ackerman, T. P.; Pollack, J. B.; Sagan, Carl

    1983-12-01

    The potential global atmospheric and climatic consequences of nuclear war are investigated using models previously developed to study the effects of volcanic eruptions. Although the results are necessarily imprecise, due to a wide range of possible scenarios and uncertainty in physical parameters, the most probable first-order effects are serious. Significant hemispherical attenuation of the solar radiation flux and subfreezing land temperatures may be caused by fine dust raised in high-yield nuclear surface bursts and by smoke from city and forest fires ignited by airbursts of all yields. For many simulated exchanges of several thousand megatons, in which dust and smoke are generated and encircle the earth within 1 to 2 weeks, average light levels can be reduced to a few percent of ambient and land temperatures can reach -15 degrees to -25 degrees C. The yield threshold for major optical and climatic consequences may be very low: only about 100 megatons detonated over major urban centers can create average hemispheric smoke optical depths greater than 2 for weeks and, even in summer, subfreezing land temperatures for months. In a 5000-megaton war, at northern mid-latitude sites remote from targets, radioactive fallout on time scales of days to weeks can lead to chronic mean doses of up to 50 rads from external whole-body gamma-ray exposure, with a likely equal or greater internal dose from biologically active radionuclides. Large horizontal and vertical temperature gradients caused by absorption of sunlight in smoke and dust clouds may greatly accelerate transport of particles and radioactivity from the Northern Hemisphere to the Southern Hemisphere. When combined with the prompt destruction from nuclear blast, fires, and fallout and the later enhancement of solar ultraviolet radiation due to ozone depletion, long-term exposure to cold, dark, and radioactivity could pose a serious threat to human survivors and to other species.

  4. Agreement on exchange of information on nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This Agreement was concluded in furtherance of the IAEA 1986 Convention on early notification of nuclear incidents and reflects its provisions to a large extent. In accordance with this Agreement, the Parties will notify each other immediately through predetermined contact points of all emergency situations which could have radiological consequences and will communicate the type of information required in order to allow the evaluation of associated risks. (NEA) [fr

  5. Virtual instrumentation on mobile devices for deployment in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Marcos Santana; Santos, Isaac Jose A. Luquetti dos; Jesus, Miller F. de; Sant'Anna, Claudio Reis de; Szabo, Andre Pedro; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R. de

    2013-01-01

    The virtual instrumentation can be defined as a layer of software and hardware, added to a general purpose computer, so that users can interact with the computer in the same way that they interacted with traditional electronic instruments such as oscilloscopes, multi-meters and signal generators, and may add other functions defined by software. The virtual instrumentation gets a new integration environment, little explored yet, with the great growth that occurred in the mobile devices area. Nowadays it is possible to take measurements in more places by combining mobile devices with data acquisition hardware to create extremely portable and interconnected measurement systems. This paper shows the development of software and hardware that make possible the use of instrumentation on mobile devices for monitoring nuclear installations. It's presented the hardware and the application software for data acquisition of radiation monitors, developed to iOS devices. It's also shown the possibilities of hardware and software to develop near real-time data transfer to and from the field in nuclear installations, with benefits in efficiency, safety and productivity. (author)

  6. Regulatory oversight report 2008 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-04-01

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (ENSI) reports on the work carried out by the Inspectorate in 2008. This report reviews the regulatory activities in the four Swiss nuclear power stations and in four further nuclear installations in various Swiss research facilities. It deals with topics such as operational details, technologies in use, radiation protection, radioactive wastes, emergency dispositions, personnel and provides an assessment of operations from the safety point of view. Also, the transportation of nuclear materials - both nuclear fuels and nuclear wastes - is reported on. General topics discussed include probabilistic safety analyses and accident management, earthquake damage analysis and agreements on nuclear safety. The underground disposal of highly-radioactive nuclear wastes and work done in the rock laboratories are discussed, as are proposals for additional nuclear power stations

  7. Environmental assessment of nuclear installations using accumulated litterfall cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, Joaquim M.S.; Scapin, Marcos A.; Pires, Maria A.F.

    2011-01-01

    For 25 years the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute - IPEN/SP processed uranium oxide to produce the fuel element. Even with major care in the handling of uranium hexafluoride and uranium compounds, there is the probability of small fractions are dispersed into the atmosphere. Due to this fact, it was proposed a study of these compounds in the environment, aiming at the bio monitoring of toxic substances originating from the fabrications process of fuel element, as well toxic metals. The litterfall it's consisted of fragments of organic vegetable, including leaves, flowers, fruits, branches, twigs and animal waste. The objective of this study was to determine the production and seasonality of litterfall in the gardens of IPEN, establish a correlation between the compartment leaves, wood and reproductive parts and evaluate the chemical composition of leaves originated of litterfall through chemical analysis. Was installed 10 litterfall collectors to determinate the production . The determination of chemical elements was realized by X-ray fluorescence for dispersion of wavelength (WDXRF). The production of dry litterfall during the period was 5.86 Kg m 2 -1. The elements analyzed were Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Th and U. The major constituents of the composition of leaf Ca, Si, and K (1.8%, 0.5% and 0.6% respectively). The results allowed to conclude that the installations used in the nuclear fuel cycle earlier, as well as the installations in operation, actually didn't affect the biogeochemical cycle of plants. (author)

  8. Decree of the Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission concerning the security protection of nuclear installations and nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In compliance with the Czechoslovak State Surveillance over Nuclear Safety of Nuclear Installations Act No. 28/1984, the Decree specifies requirements for assuring security protection of nuclear installations (and their parts) and of nuclear materials with the aim to prevent their abuse for jeopardizing the environment and the health and lives of people. (P.A.)

  9. Complete abandonment of nuclear power and aggregate consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilemann, U.; Weiss, T.

    1986-01-01

    The aggregate social and economic consequences of a complete abandonment of nuclear power very often are pushed to the background in discussions about the MCA. But backing out of nuclear energy will not be achieved or left without costs. The authors present an analysis of the short-term aggregate consequences. (orig./UA) [de

  10. Preparation of Act on State Surveillance of Nuclear Safety of Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyncl, J.

    1983-01-01

    The Czechoslovak Government Decree no. 179 of June 1982 approved the principles underlying the first Czechoslovak legal norm to complexly resolve the problem of State surveillance of nuclear safety of nuclear installations. In the introduction the law will define the concept of nuclear safety of nuclear installations and will justify the reasons for which it has to be assured. The individual parts of the law will deal with the establishment of State surveillance of nuclear safety, the tasks of the Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission in this area, the control activity of Commission personnel, the measures taken against responsible organizations and personnel for failing to observe their duties, the obligations of bodies and organizations, and the cooperation between inspection bodies. (A.K.)

  11. Public information on nuclear safety and incidents at nuclear installations in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gausen, R.; Gronow, W.S.

    1977-01-01

    In recent years public interest in the safety aspects of the use of nuclear energy has been increasing in the UK as in other countries. The Government considers public involvement on this subject to be important and has taken action to promote and encourage public debate. As a result of a Government requirement, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) now publish a quarterly statement which gives particulars of incidents at nuclear installations reported to the HSE under the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, Dangerous Occurrences Regulations and under conditions attached to nuclear site licences granted that Act. The range of incidents covered in the quarterly statement and the present state and background of the public debate on nuclear energy in the UK are described. (author)

  12. Nuclear law and environmental law in the licensing of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raetzke, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Large nuclear installations can have a considerable impact on the environment, both in actual terms, due to the construction and operation of the plant and in potential terms, related to the risk of an accident. A considerable part of the multiple authorisation processes required to develop a large nuclear project is devoted to addressing the possible impact on the environment. Accordingly, environmental protection is not only warranted by requirements and processes arising out of what is generally considered 'environmental law', but also by laws governing the design, siting, construction and operation of nuclear installations. By ensuring prevention and control of radiation releases to the environment, the aspects of nuclear law governing the design, construction, operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities pertain to the field of environmental protection just like other fields of environmental law. The perception of the public that nuclear energy is 'anti-environmental' and the generally antinuclear stance of environmental non-governmental organisations (NGOs) should not deflect attention from the fact that protection of the environment is one of the main functions of the body of nuclear law. In this article, the general relationship between the law governing civil nuclear installations and environmental law will be analysed. The subsequent chapters will deal with environmental requirements and procedures as part of the authorisation process for a nuclear installation. The role of public participation and the involvement of neighbouring states in the licensing process will also be investigated, as they are today mainly based on environmental law. Some other aspects which may also have some relation to environmental protection, such as waste management, emergency planning, multinational early notification and assistance in the case of an accident and nuclear liability, have been omitted from discussion as they lie outside the focus of this article

  13. Procedures for permission of installation of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Yoriaki

    1980-01-01

    The locations of atomic power stations are first selected by electric power enterprises in consultation with the Ministry of International Trade and Industry or under the guidance of authorities concerned. The surveys of the climate, topography, water and plants in the planned sites and the influences of nuclear power generation to the surrounding areas are made by the enterprisers under the administrative guidance of the MITI. Secondly, the basic project shall be submitted to and decided by the Power Resource Development Council headed by the Prime Minister (Article 10, the Power Resource Development Law). The Council shall, if necessary, call for the attendance of the governors of prefectures concerned and hear their opinions (Article 11, the Law). As the third and most complicated phase, various procedures include; (a) permission of the changes of electrical facilities under the Electricity Enterprises Act; (b) authorization of the installation of reactors under the Nuclear Reactor Regulation Law; (c) permission or authorization under other regulations including the Agricultural Land Act, etc.; (d) additional procedures related to the indemnification to fishery and so forth. Finally the reactors are to be operated after receiving the certificates of the Minister of ITI on the inspections of construction works, nuclear fuel materials used for the reactors and welding processes of reactor containment vessels, boilers, turbines, etc. (Okada, K.)

  14. External radiation levels in installations of nuclear technology center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maletta, Paulo Guilherme M.; Filipetto, Joao; Wakabayashi, Tetsuaki; Silva, Teogenes A. da

    2005-01-01

    The radiological protection is a basic activity of nuclear technology center so that can carry through its activities with security, having to be planned and executed with total effectiveness. One of the basic tools of the radiological protection is the adoption of monitoring programs, that have as objective generality to evaluate the radiological conditions of the workstation and to assure that these conditions are acceptable safe for the displayed individuals, either workers or members of the public, as established in the basic norms of radiological protection. The Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN, first institution in Brazil, created in 1952 to entirely dedicate the related works to the nuclear area, to own 39 building, of which they are kept the Triga Reactor, Irradiation Gamma Laboratory, Reject Laboratory, Calibration Dosemeters Laboratory and others. In such installations, radioactive materials are produced, handled, processed and stored, being necessary the levels of external radiation ambient monitoring. As part of the radioprotection plan, monitoring 63 points on strategically located in the external areas to the building of CDTN, using characterized and calibrated thermoluminescence dosemeters. This work describes the dose distribution of the points, the doses evaluation procedure and the 4 results carried through between 2001 and 2004. The data demonstrate the attendance to the level of security established in the basic norm, what it contributed for the operation licensing of to the IBAMA. (author)

  15. Medical consequences of a nuclear plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, S.E.; Reizenstein, P.; Stenke, L.

    1987-01-01

    The report gives background information concerning radiation and the biological medical effects and damages caused by radiation. The report also discusses nuclear power plant accidents and efforts from the medical service in the case of a nuclear power plant accident. (L.F.)

  16. International guidelines for fire protection at nuclear installations including nuclear fuel plants, nuclear fuel stores, teaching reactors, research establishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The guidelines are recommended to designers, constructors, operators and insurers of nuclear fuel plants and other facilities using significant quantities of radioactive materials including research and teaching reactor installations where the reactors generally operate at less than approximately 10 MW(th). Recommendations for elementary precautions against fire risk at nuclear installations are followed by appendices on more specific topics. These cover: fire protection management and organization; precautions against loss during construction alterations and maintenance; basic fire protection for nuclear fuel plants; storage and nuclear fuel; and basic fire protection for research and training establishments. There are numerous illustrations of facilities referred to in the text. (U.K.)

  17. Statement on incidents at nuclear installations - second quarter 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The first incident reported occurred at the Sellafield reprocessing plant when a process worker was contaminated on the right knee of his overalls and received a skin dose in excess of the annual dose limit. Following an inquiry, he was allowed to return to normal working within 3 months. The second incident occurred at the Oldbury nuclear power station when reaction-1 tripped following the failure of one of the three phases of the electricity supply to part of the instrumentation. This caused a loss of forced coolant circulating for a short time following the reactor shutdown. However, following safety checks it was allowed to return to power. Improvements in the instrument supply system protection were subsequently installed on reactor-2 and will be, when possible, on reactor-1. (UK)

  18. The Application of Systemic Safety for Smaller Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper will provide an outline of ARPANSA’s approach to systemic safety as applied to smaller hazard nuclear installations. It will describe ARPANSA’s effort to enable licence holders to better understand the principles of systemic safety so that they may make improvements for themselves. In regard to human and organizational factors, inspections are more often used to highlight areas where performance can be improved to meet best practice rather than strictly as a compliance tool. This takes account of a graded, risk informed approach and is undertaken in a collaborative way that places a premium on openness, clarity, reliability and efficiency. The paper will discuss the challenges faced by the approach, and how ARPANSA is currently managing these. It will describe ARPANSA’s regulatory guidance and inspection processes. The significant stages in ARPANSA development of the systemic approach are provided briefly in the following paragraphs.

  19. Proposal of a dry storage installation in Angra NPP for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanato, Luiz S.; Rzyski, Barbara M.

    2009-01-01

    When nuclear fuel is removed from a power reactor core after the depletion of efficiency in generating energy is called Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). After its withdrawal from the reactor core, SNF is temporarily stored in pools usually at the same site of the reactor. During this time, short-living radioactive elements and generated heat undergo decay until levels that allow removing the SNF from the pool and sending it for reprocessing or a temporary storage whether any of its final destinations has not yet been defined. It can be loaded in casks and disposed during years in a dry storage installations until be sent to a reprocessing plant or deep repositories. Before any decision, reprocessing or disposal, the SNF needs to be safely and efficiently isolated in one of many types of storages that exist around the world. Worldwide, the amount of SNF increases annually and in the next years this amount will be higher as a consequence of new Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) construction. In Brazil, that is about to construct the Angra 3 nuclear power reactor, a project about the final destination of the SNF is not yet ready. This paper presents a proposal for a dry storage installation in the Angra NPP site since it can be an initial solution for the Brazilian's SNF, until a final decision is taken. (author)

  20. Rules specific to nuclear incidence occurring in installations or during transport of nuclear substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocamora, P.

    1976-01-01

    International nuclear third party liability conventions deal in depth with the liability system governing the transport of nuclear substances. Without appropriate legislation, international transport would be likely to meet very serious legal difficulties. The rule of nuclear conventions apply the same system to transport as to nuclear installations and mainly enable a determination of the operator liable. They also allow the person responsible for transport to assume liability therefor in place of the operator who whould normally have been liable. These nuclear conventions do not affect application of international transport conventions and this provision has been the cause of serious difficulties regarding maritime transport. This resulted in the adoption in 1971 in Brussels of a convention relating to civil liability in the field of maritime carriage of nuclear material. The purpose of this convention is to establish in the field of maritime transport, the priority of the system of absolute, exclusive and limited liability in the nuclear conventions. (NEA) [fr

  1. Regulatory oversight report 2007 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-04-01

    This annual report issued by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Inspectorate (HSK) reports on the work carried out by the Inspectorate in 2007. This report reviews the regulatory activities in the four Swiss nuclear power stations and in four further nuclear installations in various Swiss research facilities. It deals with topics such as operational details, technologies in use, radiation protection, radioactive wastes, emergency dispositions and personnel and provides an assessment of operations from the point of view of safety. Also, the transportation of nuclear materials - both nuclear fuels and nuclear wastes - is reported on. General topics discussed include probabilistic safety analyses and accident management. Finally, the disposal of nuclear wastes and work done in the rock laboratories in Switzerland is commented on

  2. The Uncertain Consequences of Nuclear Weapons Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-15

    this genre is the venerable, and classified, official “bible” of nuclear weapons effects, Capabilities of Nuclear Weapons. Widely referred to by...weekly comic Shukan Shonen Jampu and was later made into several film versions, a television drama series, and ten books, which follow Gen’s...civilized behavior. The film , distributed internationally and shown on Soviet television, was widely discussed in the United States and both depressed

  3. S.I. 1987 No.688, The Nuclear Installations (Isle of Man) (Variation) Order 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This Order, which amends the Nuclear Installations (Isle of Man) Order 1977, came into force on 7 May 1987. The Nuclear Installations (Isle of Man) Order 1977 extends certain provisions of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 as appropriate, to the Isle of Man. This Order extends amendments made to that Act by the Energy Act 1983 and the Congenital Disabilities (Civil Liability) Act 1976, as appropriate, to the Isle of Man. (NEA) [fr

  4. Nuclear plant cancellations: causes, costs, and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    This study was commissioned in order to help quantify the effects of nuclear plant cancellations on the Nation's electricity prices. This report presents a historical overview of nuclear plant cancellations through 1982, the costs associated with those cancellations, and the reasons that the projects were terminated. A survey is presented of the precedents for regulatory treatment of the costs, the specific methods of cost recovery that were adopted, and the impacts of these decisions upon ratepayers, utility stockholders, and taxpayers. Finally, the report identifies a series of other nuclear plants that remain at risk of canellation in the future, principally as a result of similar demand, finance, or regulatory problems cited as causes of cancellation in the past. The costs associated with these potential cancellations are estimated, along with their regional distributions, and likely methods of cost recovery are suggested

  5. HCTISN - Plenary extraordinary meeting on the 9 March 2012 - General consequences of the earthquake and tsunami; Status of Fukushima-Dai-ichi nuclear installations; The Fukushima accident, one year after: environmental and health situation in Japan; Protective actions undertaken by Japanese authorities; Support by AREVA to Japan after the Fukushima accident; What went on in Fukushima? Implementation of the IAEA nuclear safety action plan; Review of European stress tests by the peers; Opinion of the ASN on complementary safety assessments (CSAs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Susumu; Charles, T.; Champion, Didier; Jean-Luc Godet; Arnaud GAY; Philippe Jamet

    2012-01-01

    This document contains Power Point presentations proposed during a plenary session of the High Committee transparency and information on nuclear safety (HCTISN). The contributions addressed the Fukushima accident (the earthquake and the tsunami, the technical consequences on the plant, the consequences on the environment and on health, the different actions undertaken in Japan to protect the population, the consequences on nuclear safety in other countries with notably the performance of stress tests or the organisation of complementary safety assessments on the French fleet of nuclear reactors

  6. The medical consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiger, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The author says no one person can successfully communicate what the reality of a nuclear war would be, let alone something smaller, like the reality of a single or a small number of thermonuclear explosions. The author focuses on the effects of a single explosion and what would happen if it occurred in New York City

  7. Nuclear proliferation: Some context and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, C. A.

    2007-01-01

    The article addressed the importance of nonproliferation and supporting and reinforcing nonproliferation commitments. The most important benefit of the NPT has been in its contribution to the security of individual states party, as well as to regional and international security, through the obligations which help to prevent any further proliferation of nuclear weapons. The NPT therefore powerfully augments the national security of every state party, and not merely just the NPT nuclear weapons states. Indeed, it is the countries of the developing world, as well as many other non-nuclear weapon states, that could suffer the most in security terms if a non-nuclear weapons state in the developing world suddenly acquired T he Bomb a nd became emboldened to engage in threats and adventurism against its neighbors. The nonproliferation regime hinges upon the steps that all countries take on their own and with like-minded allies to further nonproliferation goals - and whether the international community can successfully shape the calculations of present-day and future would-be proliferation in useful ways. The nonproliferation regime, therefore, includes not just the NPT and other legally-binding obligations but complex dynamics of persuasion and deterrence that employ many different tools. The NPT helps establish the core nonproliferation obligations toward which many of the tools in the international community's tool kit are directed.

  8. State fund of decommissioning of nuclear installations and handling of spent nuclear fuels and nuclear wastes (Slovak Republic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozma, Milos

    2006-01-01

    State Fund for Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations and Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuels and Nuclear Wastes was established by the Act 254/1994 of the National Council of the Slovak Republic as a special-purpose fund which concentrates financial resources intended for decommissioning of nuclear installations and for handling of spent nuclear fuels and radioactive wastes. The Act was amended in 2000, 2001 and 2002. The Fund is legal entity and independent from operator of nuclear installations Slovak Power Facilities Inc. The Fund is headed by Director, who is appointed and recalled by Minister of Economy of the Slovak Republic. Sources of the Fund are generated from: a) contributions by nuclear installation operators; b) penalties imposed by Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic upon natural persons and legal entities pursuant to separate regulation; c) bank credits; d) interest on Fund deposits in banks; e) grants from State Budget; f) other sources as provided by special regulation. Fund resources may be used for the following purposes: a) decommissioning of nuclear installations; b) handling of spent nuclear fuels and radioactive wastes after the termination of nuclear installation operation; c) handling of radioactive wastes whose originator is not known, including occasionally seized radioactive wastes and radioactive materials stemming from criminal activities whose originator is not known, as confirmed by Police Corps investigator or Ministry of Health of the Slovak Republic; d) purchase of land for the establishment of nuclear fuel and nuclear waste repositories; e) research and development in the areas of decommissioning of nuclear installations and handling of nuclear fuels and radioactive wastes after the termination of the operation of nuclear installations; f) selection of localities, geological survey, preparation, design, construction, commissioning, operation and closure of repositories of spent nuclear fuels and radioactive wastes

  9. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-03-01

    . Accordingly, this publication provides practical guidance on developing and implementing strategies and processes for regulators to employ to monitor a licensee's safety culture in nuclear installations and in related activities. It is based on a compilation of state of the art international and national efforts.

  10. Contributions by emissions from nuclear installations to concentrations of radionuclides in milk

    CERN Document Server

    Green, N

    1983-01-01

    A year-long study has been carried out to determine whether milk produced near nuclear sites contains concentrations of radionuclides that can be attributed to discharges from the installations, and, as a consequence, whether there is enhanced exposure of those members of the public who consume this milk. Eight creameries were chosen and monthly samples of milk were taken for analysis. The concentrations of caesium-137 and strontium-90 were measured and compared with results from a national survey conducted as part of the Board's environmental radioactivity surveillance programme. No effect attributable to discharges from the nuclear establishments was identified. The activity concentrations ranged between 0.1 and 3 times the national average; the variation relates mainly to rainfall in the area, although other factors may also have an effect. However, milk contributes only a small fraction of the total dietary intake of caesium-137 and strontium-90, and so the exposure of persons consuming the milk varies on...

  11. Preparation of off-site emergency preparedness plans for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    Safety of public, occupational workers and the protection of environment should be assured while activities for economic and social progress are pursued. These activities include the establishment and utilisation of nuclear facilities and use of radioactive sources. This document is issued as a lead document to facilitate preparation of specific site manuals by the Responsible Organisation for emergency response plans at each site to ensure their preparedness to meet any eventuality due to site emergency in order to mitigate its consequences on the health and safety of site personnel. It takes cognizance of an earlier AERB publication on the subject: Safety Manual on Off-Site Emergency Plan for Nuclear Installations, AERB/SM/NISD-2, 1988 and also takes into consideration the urgent need for promoting public awareness and drawing up revised emergency response plans, which has come out in a significant manner after the accidents at Chernobyl and Bhopal

  12. Criteria for guidance in the safety assessment of nuclear installations in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gausden, R.; Fryer, D.R.H.

    1977-01-01

    There is an increasing appreciation of the need for a consistent approach to nuclear safety between various groups having an interest in safety and between various types of installation. Licensing for construction and ultimate approval to operate any nuclear installation depend in the United Kingdom upon a searching assessment of the design, construction and operation of the proposed plant. Criteria of the kind discussed in this paper have been used by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate in this assessment process. From time to time they are subject to comments from other bodies in the U.K. One aim of the criteria is to set out the broad objectives that should be met regarding the magnitude of radiological consequences of accidents or normal operation. In addition, the criteria give guidance on the design philosophy for nuclear safety and the principles of fault evaluation. Criteria must be conceived so that while maintaining safety standards their application does not frustrate design and development. It is also important that undue formalism is not induced in the assessment process at the expense of inhibiting the judgement of safety assessors. A balance must, therefore, be struck between detailed and generalised guidance. It is also accepted that experience in the use and interpretation of criteria will indicate a need for improvement and additions: the criteria are, therefore, regarded as living rather than fixed statements which are expected to develop in response to any need for change in a safe direction that may arise. In developing them, the Inspectorate has drawn heavily upon the experience accumulated during its 16 years of operation and has also referred to criteria published by other organisations. The paper deals specifically with certain of the most important sections of the criteria and indicates the total range of subjects which need to be included in such criteria

  13. Nuclear power plants: recent developments in Brazil relating to the legal aspect of installation - erection - operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Moreira, Y.M. de.

    1981-10-01

    A Federal statutory system governs the setting up and operation of nuclear power plants in Brazil. This paper describes the general regulatory framework for electric utilities and in particular analyses the licensing procedure for nuclear installations. (NEA) [fr

  14. The function of specialized organization in work safety engineering for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatore, J.E.L.

    1989-01-01

    The attributions of Brazilian CNEN in the licensing procedures of any nuclear installation are discussed. It is shown that the work safety engineering and industrial safety constitute important functions for nuclear safety. (M.C.K.) [pt

  15. Approaches to 'eternal' accompaniment regalement of nuclear energy installation decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryapachenko, Ihor; Trofimova, Nina

    2003-01-01

    The stunning rate of events after striking the push button AZ5 in April 26, 1986 while that only rises. Boundless even for the super-power world states the complex of scientific, technological, organizational, economical and social problems became in 1991 unique property of Ukraine. It has added to the operational power reactors (now 13) at practical absence of an infrastructure of a closed fuel cycle. At the same time Ukrainian economics always' will depend on nuclear power engineering. In it are very much positive aspect concerning high technological and scientifically based contents and future non-alternative of the nuclear power industry on a global scale. The errors in an estimation of separate links of such composite model are not killed mutually, but only add. Uncertainty in estimations of natural or public processes will cause to large uncertainty of general forecast. A laborious transaction of the rules production or the legitimated algorithms of the activity realization reach the foreseen controllability. On our view the following logical thesis of such concept should be comprehension that the rules of decommissioning of a nuclear-power plant should provide the controllability with matched activities not one generation of performers. The impressive achievements of scientific-technological revolution of last decades are accompanied 'non-regalement' from the point of view of life on a planet by disastrous effects. The nuclear technologies overtake in this sense with that feature, that the 'half-life' periods of these consequences often much more large than the whole written history of mankind. The most distant consequences of the long-term processing with radioactive materials bound on our view with the human factor. If for 30-100 years beforehand it is possible to count destiny of radiological contamination or green meadows but to provide behavior of the people or society, as a whole is high-gravity even per annum forward. Objectivity of laws of history

  16. The biological consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, P.R.

    1984-01-01

    The author presents the consensus of a group of biologists on the likely biological effects of a large-scale nuclear war. Such a war would leave, at most, scattered survivors in the Northern Hemisphere. Those survivors would be facing extreme cold, hunger, water shortages, heavy smog and darkness without the support of an organized society. The ecosystems would be severly stressed and changing in ways that can't be predicted. In the Southern Hemisphere, events would depend on the degree of propagation of the atmospheric effects from North to South. People living in those areas will be very strongly affected by the war

  17. Evaluation of the nuclear installations safety of the CEA in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverie, M.

    1999-09-01

    Michel Laverie, Director of the nuclear safety and quality at the Cea, took stoke of the CEA nuclear installations in 1998. After a recall of the nuclear safety policy and organization, the author presents the risks factors bound to the CEA activities as the dismantling, the wastes and the human factors. A last part is devoted to the list of the accidents occurred during 1998 in the nuclear installations. Tables and statistics illustrate this analysis. (A.L.B.)

  18. Chavir: Virtual reality simulation for interventions in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thevenon, J. B.; Tirel, O.; Lopez, L.; Chodorge, L.; Desbats, P.

    2006-01-01

    Companies involved in the nuclear industry have to prepare for interventions by precisely analyzing the radiological risks and rapidly evaluating the consequences of their operational choices. They also need to consolidate the experiences gained in the field with greater responsiveness and lower costs. This paper brings out the advantages of using virtual reality technology to meet the demands in the industry. The CHAVIR software allows the operators to prepare (and repeat) all the operations they would have to do in a safe virtual world, before performing the actual work inside the facilities. Since the decommissioning or maintenance work is carried out in an environment where there is radiation, the amount of radiation that the operator would be exposed to is calculated and integrated into the simulator. (authors)

  19. The atmospheric and climatic consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagan, C.

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses his recent research that has uncovered the fact that nuclear war may carry in its wake a climatic catastrophe, which he calls ''nuclear winter.'' He says the effects of nuclear war would not be restricted to the combatant nations. Agriculture in the Northern Hemisphere would be devasted by even a ''small'' nuclear war. The propagating ecological consequences all over the Earth are likely to be severe. The Southern Hemisphere will be cold and dark. Global arsenals, now about twenty times the nuclear winter threshold, are growing

  20. Climatic consequences of nuclear war: Working Group No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, J.B.

    1985-12-01

    Research needs on the climate consequences of nuclear war were discussed. These include: (1) a better definition of the emissions from massive urban fires; (2) the exploration of prescribed forest burns; (3) the dirty cloud problem; (4) microphysical studies of soot; and (5) simulation of the second summer season after nuclear war

  1. The Iran nuclear ambitions and the international consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This analysis of the Iran situation concerning the nuclear policy, is presented and discussed in three parts: the data and hypothesis of the iranian nuclear program, the regional strategy of Iran and evolution scenario and their consequences. (A.L.B.)

  2. Reducing the Consequences of a Nuclear Detonation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddemeier, B R

    2007-11-09

    The 2002 National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction states that 'the United States must be prepared to respond to the use of WMD against our citizens, our military forces, and those of friends and allies'. Scenario No.1 of the 15 Department of Homeland Security national planning scenarios is an improvised nuclear detonation in the national capitol region. An effective response involves managing large-scale incident response, mass casualty, mass evacuation, and mass decontamination issues. Preparedness planning activities based on this scenario provided difficult challenges in time critical decision making and managing a large number of casualties within the hazard area. Perhaps even more challenging is the need to coordinate a large scale response across multiple jurisdictions and effectively responding with limited infrastructure and resources. Federal response planning continues to make improvements in coordination and recommending protective actions, but much work remains. The most critical life-saving activity depends on actions taken in the first few minutes and hours of an event. The most effective way to reduce the enormous national and international social and economic disruptions from a domestic nuclear explosion is through planning and rapid action, from the individual to the federal response. Anticipating response resources for survivors based on predicted types and distributions of injuries needs to be addressed.

  3. Seismic methodology in determining basis earthquake for nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameli Zamani, Sh.

    2008-01-01

    Design basis earthquake ground motions for nuclear installations should be determined to assure the design purpose of reactor safety: that reactors should be built and operated to pose no undue risk to public health and safety from earthquake and other hazards. Regarding the influence of seismic hazard to a site, large numbers of earthquake ground motions can be predicted considering possible variability among the source, path, and site parameters. However, seismic safety design using all predicted ground motions is practically impossible. In the determination of design basis earthquake ground motions it is therefore important to represent the influences of the large numbers of earthquake ground motions derived from the seismic ground motion prediction methods for the surrounding seismic sources. Viewing the relations between current design basis earthquake ground motion determination and modem earthquake ground motion estimation, a development of risk-informed design basis earthquake ground motion methodology is discussed for insight into the on going modernization of the Examination Guide for Seismic Design on NPP

  4. Strengthening the culture of safety and performance in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briant, V.S.; Germann, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    In mid-1995, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna brought together a group of safety culture experts from around the world to explore and summarize those practices they viewed as important in establishing sound safety cultures in nuclear installations. This paper will summarize key findings of the Vienna team and also expand those ideas based on related work in which the authors are engaged. The paper includes a definition of safety culture, a description of three stages of safety culture, and five key practices essential to establishing and maintaining a sound safety culture. Additionally, the authors contradicts the conventional view of safety and production as trade-offs, supporting the Vienna team's conclusion that the principles, attitudes, and practices which bring about sustained levels of high performance are the same as those which enhance safety. Based on input from colleagues in several countries, this appears to hold true across geographical and ethnic boundaries. The authors also discuss how this information can be put to practical use to obtain an objective, measurable, and repeated assessment of the current state of the safety culture within a company, plant or work unit. With that information, leaders are then in the position to act on any of the several parameters which affect both safety and performance effectiveness. (author)

  5. Strengthening the culture of safety and performance in nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briant, V S [GPU Nuclear, Parsippany (United States); Germann, R P [Aberdeen Center for Team Learning, Matawan (United States)

    1997-07-01

    In mid-1995, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna brought together a group of safety culture experts from around the world to explore and summarize those practices they viewed as important in establishing sound safety cultures in nuclear installations. This paper will summarize key findings of the Vienna team and also expand those ideas based on related work in which the authors are engaged. The paper includes a definition of safety culture, a description of three stages of safety culture, and five key practices essential to establishing and maintaining a sound safety culture. Additionally, the authors contradicts the conventional view of safety and production as trade-offs, supporting the Vienna team`s conclusion that the principles, attitudes, and practices which bring about sustained levels of high performance are the same as those which enhance safety. Based on input from colleagues in several countries, this appears to hold true across geographical and ethnic boundaries. The authors also discuss how this information can be put to practical use to obtain an objective, measurable, and repeated assessment of the current state of the safety culture within a company, plant or work unit. With that information, leaders are then in the position to act on any of the several parameters which affect both safety and performance effectiveness. (author) 9 refs., 5 tabs.

  6. Design aspects of safety critical instrumentation of nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, P. [Electronics Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)]. E-mail: swamy@igcar.ernet.in

    2005-07-01

    Safety critical instrumentation systems ensure safe shutdown/configuration of the nuclear installation when process status exceeds the safety threshold limits. Design requirements for safety critical instrumentation such as functional and electrical independence, fail-safe design, and architecture to ensure the specified unsafe failure rate and safe failure rate, human machine interface (HMI), etc., are explained with examples. Different fault tolerant architectures like 1/2, 2/2, 2/3 hot stand-by are compared for safety critical instrumentation. For embedded systems, software quality assurance is detailed both during design phase and O and M phase. Different software development models such as waterfall model and spiral model are explained with examples. The error distribution in embedded system is detailed. The usage of formal method is outlined to reduce the specification error. The guidelines for coding of application software are outlined. The interface problems of safety critical instrumentation with sensors, actuators, other computer systems, etc., are detailed with examples. Testability and maintainability shall be taken into account during design phase. Online diagnostics for safety critical instrumentation is detailed with examples. Salient details of design guides from Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, International Atomic Energy Agency and standards from IEEE, BIS are given towards the design of safety critical instrumentation systems. (author)

  7. Design aspects of safety critical instrumentation of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminathan, P.

    2005-01-01

    Safety critical instrumentation systems ensure safe shutdown/configuration of the nuclear installation when process status exceeds the safety threshold limits. Design requirements for safety critical instrumentation such as functional and electrical independence, fail-safe design, and architecture to ensure the specified unsafe failure rate and safe failure rate, human machine interface (HMI), etc., are explained with examples. Different fault tolerant architectures like 1/2, 2/2, 2/3 hot stand-by are compared for safety critical instrumentation. For embedded systems, software quality assurance is detailed both during design phase and O and M phase. Different software development models such as waterfall model and spiral model are explained with examples. The error distribution in embedded system is detailed. The usage of formal method is outlined to reduce the specification error. The guidelines for coding of application software are outlined. The interface problems of safety critical instrumentation with sensors, actuators, other computer systems, etc., are detailed with examples. Testability and maintainability shall be taken into account during design phase. Online diagnostics for safety critical instrumentation is detailed with examples. Salient details of design guides from Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, International Atomic Energy Agency and standards from IEEE, BIS are given towards the design of safety critical instrumentation systems. (author)

  8. Outline of additional installation works in Oi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Atsuo; Matsuoka, Motokazu

    1987-01-01

    At present in Oi Nuclear Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., No.1 and No.2 plants of 1175 MWe each are in operation. In order to stabilize power supply for a long term, the additional installation of No.3 and No.4 plants of 1180 MWe each is in progress. The No.3 and No.4 plants are PWRs, for which prestressed concrete reactor containment vessels were adopted, and the start of operation is scheduled in October, 1991 in No.3 plant and in August, 1992 in No.4 plant. In the execution of main construction works, the preservation of the existing plants is the most important. For excavating the tunnels for seawater channels, tunnel boring machines were used, to avoid blasting. Pneumatic caisson method was adopted for a part of the circulating pump building. No vibration, no noise piling method was adopted for respective sheathing construction. The blasting vibration control in the excavation for foundations and the analysis of the behavior of retaining walls are to be carried out by information-oriented work execution. The outline of the main construction works and the preservation of the existing facilities are reported. (Kako, I.)

  9. Determination of discharge authorizations for French basic nuclear installations 58 and public information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabard, Laurence; Conte, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    The determination of discharge authorized limits for a French nuclear site is initiated by the request of the operator, based on the maximum nuclear and chemical inventory that could be released during normal operating conditions, accompanied with justifications. Request and justifications are analyzed and discussed by the ASN and the IRSN, taking into account nuclear and chemical inventories expected inside BNI, current regulations (BNI specific regulation, environment code, public health code), operating feedback (release feedback for an operating BNI, feedback coming from other nuclear sites or installations, etc.) and best available technologies that can be used to treat liquid or gaseous waste before release. After taking into account potential suggestions coming from public information or public enquiry concerning the operator request, the discharge authorized limits are settled down in specific ASN prescriptions that have to be ratified by the State secretaries in charge of nuclear safety. The whole process runs through 2 or 3 years to be achieved. Communication has revealed to be quite an uneasy task, even for administrative procedures. This aspect is mostly tested while communicating about events. Consequences of this communication can hardly be foreseen because of multiple external parameters like: news on the front pages at the same moment; historic communication difficulties still in the public mind; technical vocabulary not easily understood; public fear of things being hidden; power of ecologist or non-governmental associations. (authors)

  10. Unintended consequences of restoration: loss of riffles and gravel substrates following weir installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salant, Nira L; Schmidt, John C; Budy, Phaedra; Wilcock, Peter R

    2012-10-30

    We used pre- and post-restoration channel surveys of the Donner und Blitzen River, Oregon, to evaluate the effects of grade-control structures on channel morphology and baseflow habitat conditions for native redband trout and other aquatic biota. Six years after installation, we found that the channel had a smaller proportion of riffles and pools and less gravel substrate, combined with an increase in the proportion of flat waters and consolidated clay on the bed surface. Both local scour downstream from weirs and backwater effects upstream from weirs appear to have caused the general flattening and fining of the channel. A direct-step backwater calculation indicates that backwaters extended to the upstream weir at both low and high flows, creating long sections of flat water separated by short, steep drops. Despite backwater effects, a comparison of longitudinal profiles before and six years after weir installation showed bed erosion downstream of nearly all weirs, likely a consequence of the cohesive clay material that dominates the channel bed and banks. A deep inner channel reflects the cohesive nature of the clay and the mechanisms of abrasion, and indicates that sediment load is low relative to the transport capacity of the flow. Unfortunately, weirs were problematic in this system because of the cohesive clay substrate, limited sediment supply, and low channel gradient. Although deeper flows due to backwaters might be more favorable for resident trout, less gravel and fewer riffles are likely to negatively impact trout spawning habitat, macroinvertebrate communities, and biofilm productivity. Our results demonstrate the potential limitations of a single-feature approach to restoration that may be ineffective for a given geomorphic context and may overlook other aspects of the ecosystem. We highlight the need to incorporate geomorphic characteristics of a system into project design and predictions of system response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  11. Memorandum of Understanding on cooperation and consultation on nuclear installations near borders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This Agreement signed on 27 September 1977 lays down that the Contracting Parties will inform each other about all nuclear installations constructed along the common border. Nuclear installations within the meaning of the Agreement are installations for the production, processing, reprocessing, manufacture or fission of nuclear fuels and radioactive waste storage. The information to be communicated includes plans and decisions on siting, construction and operation of such installations and relevant documents. The Agreement provides for consultation between the Parties on safety aspects and lays down in detail all the conditions for communication of information. (NEA) [fr

  12. A fire risk analysis method for nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormieres, Yannick; Lacoue, Jocelyne [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PSN-RES, SA2I, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2013-07-01

    A fire safety analysis (FSA) is requested to justify the adequacy of fire protection measures set by the operator of a nuclear facility. An IRSN document outlines a global process for such a comprehensive fire safety analysis and focuses on compliance with performance criteria for fire protection measures. These performance criteria are related to the vulnerability of targets to effects of fire, and not only based upon outside radiological consequences caused by a fire. In his FSA, the operator has to define the safety functions to be preserved in the case of a fire in order to be compliant with nuclear safety objectives. Then, the operator has to justify the adequacy of fire protection measures, defined according to defence in depth principles. One of the key points of the fire analysis is the assessment of possible fire scenarios in the facility. Given the large number of possible fire scenarios, it is then necessary to evaluate ''reference fires'' which are envelope of all possible fire scenarios and which are used by the operator for the design of fire protection measures. (orig.)

  13. The biological consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    A large-scale nuclear war, as far as we can see, would leave, at most, scattered survivors in the Northern Hemisphere, and those survivors would be facing extreme cold, hunger, water shortages, heavy smog, and so on, and they would be facing it all in twilight or darkness and without the support of an organized society. The ecosystems upon which they would be extremely dependent would be severely stressed, changing in ways that we can hardly predict. Their functioning would be badly impaired. Ecologists do not know enough about these complicated systems to be able to predict their exact state after they had ''recovered''. Whether the biosphere would ever be restored to anything resembling that of today is entirely problematical

  14. The Contribution of Palaeoseismology to Seismic Hazard Assessment in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-06-01

    IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSG-9, Seismic Hazards in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations, published in 2010, covers all aspects of site evaluation relating to seismic hazards and recommends the use of prehistoric, historical and instrumental earthquake data in seismic hazard assessments. Prehistoric data on earthquakes cover a much longer period than do historical and instrumental data. However, gathering such data is generally difficult in most regions of the world, owing to an absence of human records. Prehistoric data on earthquakes can be obtained through the use of palaeoseismic techniques. This publication describes the current status and practices of palaeoseismology, in order to support Member States in meeting the recommendations of SSG-9 and in establishing the necessary earthquake related database for seismic hazard assessment and reassessment. At a donors’ meeting of the International Seismic Safety Centre Extrabudgetary Project in January 2011, it was suggested to develop detailed guidelines on seismic hazards. Soon after the meeting, the disastrous Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami of 11 March 2011 and the consequent accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant occurred. The importance of palaeoseismology for seismic hazard assessment in site evaluation was highlighted by the lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. However, no methodology for performing investigations using palaeoseismic techniques has so far been available in an IAEA publication. The detailed guidelines and practical tools provided here will be of value to nuclear power plant operating organizations, regulatory bodies, vendors, technical support organizations and researchers in the area of seismic hazard assessment in site evaluation for nuclear installations, and the information will be of importance in support of hazard assessments in the future

  15. Note n. SD3-DEM-01 regulations procedures relative to the based nuclear installations dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This note aims to define the regulations procedures relative to the safety of based nuclear installations dismantling defined by the decree of the 11 december 1963 modified. The first part describes the two main phases of a based nuclear installation life, the operating and the dismantling phase. The second part is devoted to the procedures. (A.L.B.)

  16. Nuclear dynamics consequence analysis of SNF disposed in volcanic tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, L.C.; Cochrane, K.; Rath, J.S.; Taylor, L.L.

    1998-05-01

    This paper describes criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuels in a geologic repository. The analyses investigated criticality potential, criticality excursion consequences, and the probability frequency for nuclear criticality. Key findings include: expected number of fissions per excursion range from 10 17 to 10 20 , repeated rate of criticalities range from 3 to 30 per year, and the probability frequency for criticality initiators (based on rough-order-of-magnitude calculations) is 7x10 -7 . Overall results indicate that criticality consequences are a minor contribution to the biological hazards caused by the disposal of spent nuclear material

  17. Seismic Hazards in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations. Specific Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-08-15

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear installations. It supplements the Safety Requirements publication on Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations. The present publication provides guidance and recommends procedures for the evaluation of seismic hazards for nuclear power plants and other nuclear installations. It supersedes Evaluation of Seismic Hazards for Nuclear Power Plants, IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-G-3.3 (2002). In this publication, the following was taken into account: the need for seismic hazard curves and ground motion spectra for the probabilistic safety assessment of external events for new and existing nuclear installations; feedback of information from IAEA reviews of seismic safety studies for nuclear installations performed over the previous decade; collective knowledge gained from recent significant earthquakes; and new approaches in methods of analysis, particularly in the areas of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis and strong motion simulation. In the evaluation of a site for a nuclear installation, engineering solutions will generally be available to mitigate, by means of certain design features, the potential vibratory effects of earthquakes. However, such solutions cannot always be demonstrated to be adequate for mitigating the effects of phenomena of significant permanent ground displacement such as surface faulting, subsidence, ground collapse or fault creep. The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations and guidance on evaluating seismic hazards at a nuclear installation site and, in particular, on how to determine: (a) the vibratory ground motion hazards, in order to establish the design basis ground motions and other relevant parameters for both new and existing nuclear installations; and (b) the potential for fault displacement and the rate of fault displacement that could affect the feasibility of the site or the safe operation of the installation at

  18. The regulation of radioactive effluent release in France (mainly from large nuclear installations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebert, Jean.

    1978-01-01

    In parallel with the licensing system for construction and operation of classified or so-called large nuclear installations (INB) there are in France regulations for the release of radioactive effuents from such installations. The regulations applicable to installations other than INBs are not specifically of a nuclear nature, while those covering INBs, which are analysed in this study, in particular, cover effluent release in liquid or gaseous form. The licensing and control procedures for such release are analysed in detail. (NEA) [fr

  19. Environmental consequences of releases from nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1990-03-01

    The report presents the results of a four-year Nordic cooperation project (AKTU-200). The results have impact upon many facets of accident consequence assessment, ranging from new computational tools to recommendations concerning food preparation methods to be utilized in a fallout situation. Some of the subprojects have approached areas where little or no research has been performed previously, like the project on winter conditions, the project on the physico/chemical form of radionuclides in the Chernobyl fallout, and the project on resuspension. The conclusion from the first of these projects is that the impact of an accident or fallout situation occuring during winter may be considerable smaller than in a similar situation during summer conditions. The most important conclusion from the second of these projects is that bioavailability of radiocesium in soil is significantly lower than that of radiocesium in plant material taken up via the roots. In the third project is was found that the resuspension factor is several orders of magnitude lower than the values traditionally cited, and that resuspension is a local phenomenon in a majority of weather conditions. The development of large-scale testing of mitigating actions to prevent uptake of radiocesium in animals in a fallout situation is also one of the projects where new ground has been sucessfully broken. 189 refs., 89 figs., 55 tabs

  20. Ecological and demographic consequences of a nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svirezhev, Y.M.

    1987-01-01

    The impact of a nuclear war upon ecological and demographic processes is estimated. The direct effect of nuclear detonations, the radioactive contamination of territories, the pollution by heavy metals and acid rain, as well as the effect of the sharp decline in temperature of the atmosphere ('nuclear winter') are taken into consideration. Estimated is the extent of destruction for the ecosystems of different types. The recovery of ecosystems is shown to be extremely slow or impossible. Demographic and genetic predictions for the nuclear war consequences are presented for various regions of the world. (author)

  1. Plutonium: resuspension of aerosols in nuclear installations: bibliographic survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guetat, Ph.; Monfort, M.; Armand, P.; Alloul-Marmor, L.

    2006-01-01

    This document presents an analysis and a bibliographical synthesis of the studies on resuspension factors for plutonium. It aims at helping the engineers of safety to specify the scenarios of accidents which relate to their activities and to bring elements justified for the definition of their term-source 'installation' in the safety reports of the installations. (authors)

  2. Root Cause Analysis Following an Event at a Nuclear Installation: Reference Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Following an event at a nuclear installation, it is important to determine accurately its root causes so that effective corrective actions can be implemented. As stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles: “Processes must be put in place for the feedback and analysis of operating experience”. If this process is completed effectively, the probability of a similar event occurring is significantly reduced. Guidance on how to establish and implement such a process is given in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-G-2.11, A System for the Feedback of Experience from Events in Nuclear Installations. To cater for the diverse nature of operating experience events, several different root cause analysis (RCA) methodologies and techniques have been developed for effective investigation and analysis. An event here is understood as any unanticipated sequence of occurrences that results in, or potentially results in, consequences to plant operation and safety. RCA is not a topic uniquely relevant to event investigators: knowledge of the concepts enhances the learning characteristics of the whole organization. This knowledge also makes a positive contribution to nuclear safety and helps to foster a culture of preventing event occurrence. This publication allows organizations to deepen their knowledge of these methodologies and techniques and also provides new organizations with a broad overview of the RCA process. It is the outcome of a coordinated effort involving the participation of experts from nuclear organizations, the energy industry and research centres in several Member States. This publication also complements IAEA Services Series No. 10, PROSPER Guidelines: Guidelines for Peer Review and for Plant Self- Assessment of Operational Experience Feedback Process, and is intended to form part of a suite of publications developing the principles set forth in these guidelines. In addition to the information and description of RCA

  3. Root Cause Analysis Following an Event at a Nuclear Installation: Reference Manual. Companion CD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Following an event at a nuclear installation, it is important to determine accurately its root causes so that effective corrective actions can be implemented. As stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles: “Processes must be put in place for the feedback and analysis of operating experience”. If this process is completed effectively, the probability of a similar event occurring is significantly reduced. Guidance on how to establish and implement such a process is given in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-G-2.11, A System for the Feedback of Experience from Events in Nuclear Installations. To cater for the diverse nature of operating experience events, several different root cause analysis (RCA) methodologies and techniques have been developed for effective investigation and analysis. An event here is understood as any unanticipated sequence of occurrences that results in, or potentially results in, consequences to plant operation and safety. RCA is not a topic uniquely relevant to event investigators: knowledge of the concepts enhances the learning characteristics of the whole organization. This knowledge also makes a positive contribution to nuclear safety and helps to foster a culture of preventing event occurrence. This publication allows organizations to deepen their knowledge of these methodologies and techniques and also provides new organizations with a broad overview of the RCA process. It is the outcome of a coordinated effort involving the participation of experts from nuclear organizations, the energy industry and research centres in several Member States. This publication also complements IAEA Services Series No. 10, PROSPER Guidelines: Guidelines for Peer Review and for Plant Self- Assessment of Operational Experience Feedback Process, and is intended to form part of a suite of publications developing the principles set forth in these guidelines. In addition to the information and description of RCA

  4. Application of nuclear power station design criteria to non-nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, J.D.; Hughes, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear industry is multi faceted, in that it includes large and complex chemical plants, a large number of different types of nuclear power stations, and on shore ship maintenance facilities, each with its own unique problems. Since the early days the industry has been aware of the additional problem which is superimposed on what may be classed as traditional fire risks, that is, the risk of an uncontrolled release of radioactivity. This has led to the development of sophisticated fire prevention and control techniques which are applied to new plants, and to the backfitting of older plants. The techniques of analysis, design and operation can be applied to both nuclear and non-nuclear installations. Passive protection is preferred backed up by active techniques. Segregation of essential plant to increase the probability of sufficient surviving to ensure safety systems operate and the provision of smoke free, protected escape routes are important aspects of layout and design. Reliability assessments, venting of smoke and hot gases, fire severity analysis, application of mathematical models contribute to the final design to protect against fires. Experiences built up in the fire fighting profession is integrated into the numerical approach by frequent involvement of the local Fire Officers at each stage of the design and layout of installations. (author)

  5. Chapter No.5. Nuclear materials and physical protection of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material (SSAC) is based on requirements resulting from the Safeguards Agreement between the Government of the Slovak Republic and the IAEA. UJD performs this activity according to the 'Atomic Act' and relevant decree. The purpose of the SSAC is also to prevent unauthorised use of nuclear materials, to detect loses of nuclear materials and provide information that could lead to the recovery of missing material. The main part of nuclear materials under jurisdiction of the Slovak Republic is located at NPP Jaslovske Bohunice, NPP Mochovce and at interim storage in Jaslovske Bohunice. Even though that there are located more then 99% of nuclear materials in these nuclear facilities, there are not any significant problems with their accountancy and control due to very simply identification of accountancy units - fuel assemblies, and due to stability of legal subjects responsible for operation and for keeping of information continuity, which is necessary for fulfilling requirements of the Agreement. The nuclear material located outside nuclear facilities is a special category. There are 81 such subjects of different types and orientations on the territory of the Slovak Republic. These subjects use mainly depleted uranium as a shielding and small quantity of natural uranium, low enrichment uranium and thorium for experimental purposes and education. Frequent changes of these subjects, their transformations into the other subjects, extinction and very high fluctuation of employees causes loss of information about nuclear materials and creates problems with fulfilling requirements resulting from the Agreement. In 2001, the UJD carried out 51 inspections of nuclear materials, of which 31 inspections were performed at nuclear installations in co-operation with the IAEA inspectors. No discrepancies concerning the management of nuclear materials were found out during inspections and safeguards goals in year 2001 were

  6. Nuclear 'pasta phase' and its consequences on neutrino opacities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alloy, M. D.; Menezes, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we calculate the diffusion coefficients that are related to the neutrino opacities considering the formation of nuclear pasta and homogeneous matter at low densities. Our results show that the mean-free paths are significantly altered by the presence of nuclear pasta in stellar matter when compared with the results obtained with homogeneous matter. These differences in neutrino opacities certainly influence the Kelvin-Helmholtz phase of protoneutron stars and consequently the results of supernova explosion simulations.

  7. Foreseeable medical consequences of use of nuclear weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiatt, H.H.

    1982-01-01

    An editorial discussion of the environmental impacts of nuclear warfare is presented. It is expected that the bulk of the urban population in the northern hemisphere would be killed. Long-term consequences mentioned include changes in global climate and weather patterns, destruction of the ozone shield and genetic damage. Efforts are underway to provide the public with a realistic understanding of potential problems in the event of a nuclear holocaust. (JMT)

  8. New experience on construction and installation work in Qinshan PHWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Huaxiang

    2004-01-01

    The article provides a summary of the new experience on construction management and construction technology in the field of civil construction and installation work in Qinshan PHWR nuclear power plant, with focus on innovation in project management mode, new technology application and computerized management of construction and installation work. Management innovation, technical innovation and information technology are the key contributors to overall success of Qinshan PHWR nuclear power plant in construction and installation work. The new experience derived in these fields will be of great significance to promote independent construction of the new-round nuclear power projects in China. (author)

  9. Safety related events at nuclear installations in 1995

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear safety related events of significance at least corresponding to level 2 of the International Nuclear Event Scale are described. In 1995 only two events occured at nuclear power plants, and four events occured at plants using ionizing radiation for processing or research.......Nuclear safety related events of significance at least corresponding to level 2 of the International Nuclear Event Scale are described. In 1995 only two events occured at nuclear power plants, and four events occured at plants using ionizing radiation for processing or research....

  10. Utilization of analytical techniques in aid the implantation of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.P.; Sabino, C.V.S.; Avelar, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear, physico-chemical and classic techniques developed and utilized by Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnicas Nucleares are presented, as back up to the implementation and operation of nuclear installations related with several parts of fuel cycle from uranium prospecting to waste treatment samples of soils, ores, alloys, plastics, paints, biological materials, air and water were analysed. (M.C.K) [pt

  11. International Co-operation in providing insurance cover for nuclear damage to third parties and for damage to nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deprimoz, Jacques

    1983-01-01

    This article in three parts analyses cover for damage to third parties by fixed nuclear installations, cover for damage to third parties during transport of nuclear substances and finally, cover for damage to nuclear installations. Part I reviews the principles of nuclear third party liability and describes nuclear insurance pools, the coverage and contracts provided. Part II describes inter alia the role of pools in transport operations as well as the type of contracts available, while Part III discusses material damage, the pools' capacities and the vast sums involved in indemnifying such damage. (NEA) [fr

  12. Applicability of ISO 9001: 2000 standard to design and research activities in nuclear objectives and installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatopol, M.; Patticu, C.

    2001-01-01

    The ISO 9001: 2000 standard contains the results of the latest studies concerning the design and implementation of quality management systems. The continuous improvement of these systems required a new approach, namely, the process-based approach. A process-based model of quality management is presented in terms of client request, input data, management responsibility, resource management, product realisation, measurement / analysis and optimization, product, output data and client request fulfilment. Thus, the quality management system becomes an ensemble of interconnected or interacting processes. Consequently, to implement such a system the necessary processes have to be identified and their ISO 9001: 2000 standard based management ensured. Process based approach also allows better evidencing the input and output data specific to each process. Such an approach grants a wider applicability to the design and research activities in nuclear objectives and installations. This work aims at identifying additional requirements implied in design and research activities in nuclear field, as stipulated in the following standards / documents: - IAEA SG Q8 'Quality assurance in research and development'; - IAEA SG Q10 'Quality assurance in design'; - CAN / CSA N 286.2 - 00 'Design Quality Assurance for Nuclear Power Plants'; CAN 3 - CSA Z 299.1 'Quality Assurance Program - Category 1'; - NQA - 1, SUPPLEMENT 3S-1 'Supplementary requirements for design control'

  13. Seismic risk and safety of nuclear installations. A look at the Cadarache Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verrhiest-Leblanc, G.; Chevallier, A.

    2010-01-01

    After a brief recall of some important seismic events which occurred in the past in the south-eastern part of France, the authors indicate the nuclear installations present in this region. They outline the difference between requirements for a usual building and for basic nuclear installations. They indicate laws and regulations which are to be applied to these installations like to any hazardous industrial installation. They describe the seismic risk as it has been determined for the Cadarache area, and evoke the para-seismic design of new nuclear installations which are to be built in Cadarache and actions for a para-seismic reinforcement of existing constructions. Finally, they evoke organisational aspects (emergency plans) and the approach for a better information and transparency about the seismic risk

  14. Phase transitions in nuclear matter and consequences for neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaempfer, B.

    1983-04-01

    Estimates of the minimal bombarding energy necessary to reach the quark gluon phase in heavy ion collisions are presented within a hydrodynamical scenario. Further, the consequences of first-order phase transitions from nuclear/neutron matter to pion-condensed matter or quark matter are discussed for neutron stars. (author)

  15. Referendum 1978 - Nuclear power plant ban Act 1978 - legal consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudinger, F.

    1981-10-01

    This paper discusses the legal consequences of the 1978 Act banning nuclear power production. It provides a summary outline of the relevant rules of the Austrian Constitution and reviews the legal basis for the organisation of the national electricity system. (NEA) [fr

  16. Nuclear ventilation installations. Method of control of the scrubbing coefficient of iodine trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    The present standard aims at defining a method to control the scrubbing coefficient of radioactive iodine trapping systems, used in nuclear ventilation installations. It applies to the installations where the trapping, efficiency of radioactive iodine has to be known, tested and compared to a reference value generally included in the safety reports. It applies to the installations where the absolute pressure of the air in the ventilation systems is above 1,4. 10 5 Pa (1,4 Bar) [fr

  17. Liabilities identification and long-term management decommissioning of nuclear installations in Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burclova, Jana; Konecny, Ladislav

    2003-01-01

    The decommissioning is defined as the safe removal of nuclear facilities from service and reduction of residual radioactivity and/or risk to a level enabling their use for the purpose of another nuclear facility or unrestricted use (site release) and termination of license. The Legal Basis for Decommissioning and Waste Management are described in 4 acts: - 1. Act 130/98 Coll. on peaceful use of nuclear energy (Atomic Act); - 2. The act No 127/1994 Coll. on environmental impact assessment (amended 2000); - 3. The act No 254/1994 Coll. on creation of state found for NPP decommissioning, spent fuel management and disposal investment (amended 2000, 2001); 4. The act No 272/1994 Coll. on protection of public health (amended 1996,2000). The licensing process for radioactive waste management installations as for all nuclear installations is running in following principal steps. The permits for siting, construction, operation including commissioning, individual steps of decommissioning and site release are issued by municipal environmental office on the basis of the Act No 50/1976 Coll. on territorial planning and construction rules and the decisions of the Nuclear regulatory Authority (UJD SR) based on the Atomic Act. The safety documentation shall be prepared by applicant and it is subject of the regulatory bodies approval, for nuclear safety is responsible UJD SR, for radiation protection Ministry of Health, for fire protection Ministry of Interior and for general safety Ministry of Labour, Social Policy and Family. UJD SR issues the permit for each decommissioning phase based on review and approval of safety documentation. Decommissioning Strategy of Slovak Republic was strongly influenced by the changes of Waste Management Strategy. During the last time UJD SR dedicated the great effort to principal improvement of legislation, to cooperation with Ministry of Economy with the aim to create rules for financial sources for decommissioning activities and to enforcement of

  18. Nuclear energy in Europe and its radiological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellerer, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    In a popular way, the author deals with the impacts of the Chernobyl reactor accident, and with the scientific relevance of reactions to and discussions about the consequences of peaceful nuclear energy use in Germany. He arrives at the conclusion that the use of nuclear energy in Europe does not have any radiological consequences for its population. Radioactive fission product release during normal operation is completely irrelevant in his view; a controversial problem being the potential release in the case of major accidents. According to the author, however, it would be irrational to put an end to the use of nuclear energy in an area where it shows a high degree of safety, and leave it on its own where it is threatening already now. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Decree 2869/1972 of 21 July approving the Regulations on nuclear and radioactive installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    This Decree determines nuclear and radioactive installations and establishes their licensing system which is carried out in several stages and differs according to the category concerned. The procedures cover in particular prior authorization, construction licence and operating licence. Provision is also made for inspections. The Annex to the Decree classifies the radionuclides for determining the category of the installation. (NEA) [fr

  20. Ultrasonic data acquisition installation for basis and in-service testing of nuclear pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutmann, G.; Engl, G.

    1976-01-01

    The safety of nuclear installations requires continuous safety inspections during construction and operation. Essential parts of this safety inspection are the basis and in-line inspections. For this purpose installation systems are used which allow an optimal statement to be made regarding the conditions of tested components

  1. Consequences and countermeasures in a nuclear power accident: Chernobyl experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, Vladimir A; Kirichenko, Alexander V; Werts, Day E

    2012-09-01

    Despite the tragic accidents in Fukushima and Chernobyl, the nuclear power industry will continue to contribute to the production of electric energy worldwide until there are efficient and sustainable alternative sources of energy. The Chernobyl nuclear accident, which occurred 26 years ago in the former Soviet Union, released an immense amount of radioactivity over vast territories of Belarus, Ukraine, and the Russian Federation, extending into northern Europe, and became the most severe accident in the history of the nuclear industry. This disaster was a result of numerous factors including inadequate nuclear power plant design, human errors, and violation of safety measures. The lessons learned from nuclear accidents will continue to strengthen the safety design of new reactor installations, but with more than 400 active nuclear power stations worldwide and 104 reactors in the Unites States, it is essential to reassess fundamental issues related to the Chernobyl experience as it continues to evolve. This article summarizes early and late events of the incident, the impact on thyroid health, and attempts to reduce agricultural radioactive contamination.

  2. Performances of nuclear installations in the world; Performances des installations nucleaires dans le monde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pate, Z.T. [World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO), 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-01-01

    During the last years the operators of nuclear power plants in the world, have realized numerous improvements. This success is imputable to several factors, especially an important data exchange. The Chernobyl accident, in 1986, provoked the creation of the World Association of Nuclear Operators (W.A.N.O.). It allowed to exchange information and to develop cooperation in order to go beyond cultural barriers, linguistics and policies. Then, operators in the world have brought important improvements in matter of safety, reliability. (N.C.)

  3. Feasible research on VLLW disposal in control area of nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Jinsong; Guo Weiqun

    2013-01-01

    Based on the basic requirements on the VLLW landfill disposal specified by the national codes and standards, a on-site disposal of VLLW in the control area of nuclear installation was proposed. A detail analysis of the advantages and disadvantages about the disposal method and the problem to be solved were described. Results showed that the on-site disposal of VLLW in the control area of nuclear installation was feasible in practice. (authors)

  4. Ordinance of 14 March 1983 concerning the Federal Commission for the Safety of Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Frederal Council issued a new Ordinance concerning the Federal Commission for the Safety of Nuclear Installations. This Ordinance replaces an Ordinance of 13 June 1960 and takes into account the distribution of tasks decided several years ago between the Commission, which operates on a part-time basis, and the principal Division for the Safety of Nuclear Installations attached to the Federal Office of Energy. (NEA) [fr

  5. Interpretation of the concepts of ALARA and bat for radioactive effluent releases from nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoqiu

    2009-01-01

    Based on the understanding of the important concepts of both ALARA and BAT associated with the characteristics of effluent releases from the existing nuclear installations and the abatement techniques for effluents, this paper elaborates the principle of controlling radioactive effluent concentration from nuclear installation, that is based on the BAT focusing on the abatement techniques for effluents, introduces the good practice in the projects, and optimize the effluent releases with account taken of external factors such as the site condition. (authors)

  6. Probabilistic risk assessment from potential exposures to the public applied for innovative nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorzhak, Alla; Mora, Juan C.; Robles, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Potential exposures are those that may occur as a result of unanticipated operational performance or accidents. Potential exposure situations are probabilistic in nature because they depend on uncertain events such as equipment failure, operator errors or external initiators beyond the control of the operator. Consequently, there may exist a range of possible radiological impacts that need to be considered. In this paper a Level 3 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for a hypothetical scenario relevant to Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems (INS) was conducted using computer code MACCS (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code Systems). The acceptability of an INS was analyzed taking into account the general requirement that relocation or evacuation measures must not be necessary beyond the site boundary. In addition, deterministic modeling of the accident consequences for the critical meteorological conditions was carried out using the JRODOS decision support system (Real-time On-line Decision Support system for off-site emergency management in Europe). The approach used for dose and risk assessment from potential exposure of accidental releases and their comparison with acceptance criteria are presented. The methodology described can be used as input to the licensing procedure and engineering design considerations to help satisfy relevant health and environmental impact criteria for fission or fusion nuclear installations. - Highlights: • PSA Level-3 based on WinMACCS code is carried out for accidental release. • Family curves of percentiles for radiation exposure doses are constructed. • Risk indicators for potential exposure are defined. • Using of risk acceptance curve criteria is proposed for decision making process.

  7. Atomic Energy and Radioactive Substances. The Nuclear Installations (Isle of Man) Order 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This Order extends to the Isle of Man, with the exceptions, adaptations and modifications specified in the Schedule, those provisions of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, as amended, which relate to the duty in respect of the carriage of nuclear matter, to the right to compensation for breach of that duty and to the bringing and satisfaction of claims. Under the Nuclear Installations Act, the duty of the operator is to secure that no nuclear occurrence taking place within the realm of the Act causes injury to persons or damage to property. (NEA) [fr

  8. Liability for injury to the unborn - Recent amendments to the United Kingdom Nuclear Installations Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    The adoption in the United Kingdom in 1976 of an Act to determine liability for injury to the unborn (foetus) has provided the opportunity to amend the Nuclear Installations Act which governs the liability of nuclear operators, which is now extended to such injury. Any 'injury' attributable to a nuclear operator which so affects a mother that her child is born disabled involves the liability of that operator within the meaning of the Nuclear Installations Act whether or not either parent has suffered an injury on that occasion. (NEA) [fr

  9. A study on the nuclear computer codes installation and management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeon Seung; Huh, Young Hwan; Kim, Hee Kyung; Kang, Byung Heon; Kim, Ko Ryeo; Suh, Soong Hyok; Choi, Young Gil; Lee, Jong Bok

    1990-12-01

    From 1987 a number of technical transfer related to nuclear power plant had been performed from C-E for YGN 3 and 4 construction. Among them, installation and management of the computer codes for YGN 3 and 4 fuel and nuclear steam supply system was one of the most important project. Main objectives of this project are to establish the nuclear computer code management system, to develop QA procedure for nuclear codes, to secure the nuclear code reliability and to extend techanical applicabilities including the user-oriented utility programs for nuclear codes. Contents of performing the project in this year was to produce 215 transmittal packages of nuclear codes installation including making backup magnetic tape and microfiche for software quality assurance. Lastly, for easy reference about the nuclear codes information we presented list of code names and information on the codes which were introduced from C-E. (Author)

  10. Practical problems of third party liability connected with nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, F.

    1975-01-01

    A special regime of liability for nuclear damage was established by the Paris Convention, 1960, and the Vienna Convention, 1963. The same basic principles are embodied in both Conventions. Some discrepancies, however, still exist between them despite the adoption of an additional protocol to the Paris Convention in 1964 for harmonization purposes. Practical problems facing insurers and suggestions for suitable solutions are presented. International transport of nuclear material raises, in particular, complex issues. With regard to civil liability arising out of the carriage of nuclear material by sea, a possible conflict between maritime transport conventions and nuclear liability conventions was resolved by the Brussels' Convention, 1971. Wider ratification of the nuclear conventions appears to be the only way for coping with some remaining difficulties, in particular with respect to nuclear material in transit

  11. Decree No 74-945 of 6 November 1974 concerning gaseous radioactive effluent releases from large nuclear installations and nuclear installations located on the same site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This Decree prescribes the licensing for the release of gaseous wastes from nuclear installations as well as the technical supervision of such operations. It does not apply to the transport of radioactive effluents which is governed by the regulations on the transport of dangerous goods. (NEA) [fr

  12. Licensing and decommissioning of nuclear installations in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoyama, Shunji.

    1986-01-01

    The present report discusses the current status of Japan's licensing system and legislation concerning reactor decommissioning operations. Besides Japan is working to promote worldwide nuclear safety research. However, developing nuclear safety regulations that are uniformely applicable is a difficult job due to big differences in geographical, political, economical, and technological conditions. (CW) [de

  13. Safety management at nuclear installations with research reactors. A comparison of five European installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troen, H.; Lauridsen, B.

    1997-11-01

    Five European institutions with nuclear research reactors were visited to compare safety management among institutions similar to Risoe. Risoe is a National Laboratory and the main activities are research and development. In 1996 it was decided to look into safety management at Risoe again; the last revision was in 1972. The purpose was to make it more efficient and to emphasise, that the responsibility lies in the operating organisation. Information such as nuclear facilities at the institutions, the safety management organisation, emergency preparedness, and lists of radiation doses to the employees from the years 1995 and 1996 is given in the report. Also international requirements and recommendations are given in short. Furthermore the report contains some reflections on the development in safety management organisations in resent years and the conclusions drawn from the information gathered

  14. Planned reliability in the transport and installation of large nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieler, L.

    1988-01-01

    The transport and installation of heavy and bulky large components require detailed planning of all jobs and activities, trained and experienced personnel and corresponding technical equipment for reliable and quality-assured implementation. The correct approach to the planning and implementation of such transports and installations has been confirmed by years of successful performance of these jobs e.g. in reactor pressure vessels and steam generators for nuclear power plants. Large components for nuclear power plants are truly extreme examples but will be all the better suited for demonstrating the problems inherent in transport and installation. (orig.) [de

  15. Investigation And Mitigation Techniques Of Power Quality Problems In Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayad, N.; Elsherbiny, E.; Eleissawi, H.; Zaher, M.; AbdelSalam, G.

    2013-01-01

    The electrical power systems are exposed to different types of power quality disturbances problems. Investigation and monitoring of power quality is necessary to maintain accurate operation of sensitive equipment especially for nuclear installations. The present research discusses investigation and monitoring of power quality problems for the electrical sources of nuclear installations. Field power quality data is collected by power analyzer and analyzed with reference to power quality standards. There were several disturbances exceeded the thresholds, they were voltage harmonics and voltage flicker. Mitigation techniques were suggested to install a passive filter at low voltage side and all sensitive and critical loads should be isolated and fed through uninterruptible power supply (UPS)

  16. Peculiarities of physical protection assurance of the nuclear materials at nuclear installation decommissioning stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinchuk, M.G.

    2001-01-01

    On December 15, 2000 Unit 3 of Chernobyl NPP, which is the last one in Ukraine having RBMK-type reactor, was permanently shutdown before the end of its lifetime. A number of projects related to establishing infrastructure for the plant decommissioning are being implemented in compliance with the Ukraine's commitments. Decommissioning stage includes activities on fuel unloading from the cores of Unit I and Unit 3, fuel cooling in the ponds followed by the fuel transportation to the spent fuel dry storage facility (currently under construction) for its safe long-term storage. Special facilities are being created for liquid and solid radioactive waste treatment. Besides, it is planned to implement a number of projects to convert Shelter Object in environmentally safe structure. Physical protection work being an essential part of the nuclear material management is organized in line with the recommendations of the IAEA, and the Laws of Ukraine 'On Nuclear Energy Utilization and Radiation Safety', 'On Physical Protection of Nuclear Installations and Materials', 'Regulations on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials and Installations', other codes and standards. While organizing physical protection on ChNPP decommissioning stage we have to deal with some specific features, namely: Significant amount of fuel assemblies, which are continuously transferred between various storage and operation facilities; Big amount of odd nuclear material at Shelter Object; 'Theft of new fuel fragments from the central hall of the Shelter Object in 1995 with the intention of their further sale. The thieves were detained and sentenced. The stolen material was withdrawn, that prevented its possible proliferation and illicit trafficking. At present physical protection of ChNPP does not fully satisfy the needs of the decommissioning stage and Ukraine's commitments on non-admission of illicit trafficking. Work is carried out, aimed to improve nuclear material physical protection, whose main

  17. HCTISN - Plenary extraordinary meeting on the 9 March 2012 - General consequences of the earthquake and tsunami; Status of Fukushima-Dai-ichi nuclear installations; The Fukushima accident, one year after: environmental and health situation in Japan; Protective actions undertaken by Japanese authorities; Support by AREVA to Japan after the Fukushima accident; What went on in Fukushima? Implementation of the IAEA nuclear safety action plan; Review of European stress tests by the peers; Opinion of the ASN on complementary safety assessments (CSAs); HCTISN - Reunion pleniere extraordinaire du 9 mars 2012: Consequences generales du seisme et du tusnami; Situation des installations nucleaires de Fukushima Dai-ichi; L'accident de Fukushima 1 an apres: situation environnementale et sanitaire au Japon; Les actions de protection engagees par les autorites japonaises; Aide apportee par AREVA au Japon suite a l'accident de Fukushima; Que s'est-il passe a Fukushima?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Susumu [Ambassade du Japon en France, 7 Avenue Hoche, 75008 Paris (France); Charles, T.; Champion, Didier [Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire - IRSN, 31, avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Jean-Luc Godet [Autorite de surete nucleaire, 6, place du Colonel Bourgoin, 75012 Paris (France); ASN/DIS, 10, Route du Panorama, 92266 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); Arnaud GAY [Business Unit Valorisation - AREVA (France); Philippe Jamet [European Nuclear Safety Regulators Group - ENSREG, Autorite de surete nucleaire, 6, place du Colonel Bourgoin, 75012 Paris (France)

    2012-03-09

    This document contains Power Point presentations proposed during a plenary session of the High Committee transparency and information on nuclear safety (HCTISN). The contributions addressed the Fukushima accident (the earthquake and the tsunami, the technical consequences on the plant, the consequences on the environment and on health, the different actions undertaken in Japan to protect the population, the consequences on nuclear safety in other countries with notably the performance of stress tests or the organisation of complementary safety assessments on the French fleet of nuclear reactors

  18. Potential strategic consequences of the nuclear energy revival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, Ch.D.

    2010-01-01

    Many people have projected their hopes and fears onto nuclear power. Nuclear energy has both benefits and risks, and disagreement persists about whether this energy source is, on balance, more of an asset than a liability. This debate involves a complicated set of factors that are difficult to assess, let alone fully resolve because of the differing interests in various countries' use and pursuit of nuclear power. Renewed interest throughout the globe in harnessing this energy source has stoked this perennial debate and raised concern about security threats from states and non-state actors while holding out the promise of more electricity for more people. While the motivations for nuclear energy vary among states, the two primary public goods this energy source offers are countering human-induced climate change and providing for greater energy security. Although views on how to achieve energy security differ, the essential aspect for nuclear energy is that for several countries, especially those with scarce indigenous energy sources from fossil fuels, investing in nuclear power plants diversifies electricity production portfolios and helps reduce dependence on foreign sources of energy. The focus here is on assessing the potential security consequences of increased use of nuclear power in the existing nuclear power states and most importantly in many more states that have in recent years expressed interest in this power source. The risks of nuclear power include possible reactor accidents, release of radioactive waste to the environment, attacks on or sabotage of nuclear facilities, and misuse of peaceful nuclear technologies to make nuclear weapons. While safety of nuclear plants and disposal of radioactive waste are important issues, this paper analyzes the latter two issues. In addition, it addresses two under-examined risks: military attacks on nuclear facilities and the effects on security alliances and conventional arms buildups as more countries seek to

  19. Potential strategic consequences of the nuclear energy revival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, Ch.D.

    2010-07-01

    Many people have projected their hopes and fears onto nuclear power. Nuclear energy has both benefits and risks, and disagreement persists about whether this energy source is, on balance, more of an asset than a liability. This debate involves a complicated set of factors that are difficult to assess, let alone fully resolve because of the differing interests in various countries' use and pursuit of nuclear power. Renewed interest throughout the globe in harnessing this energy source has stoked this perennial debate and raised concern about security threats from states and non-state actors while holding out the promise of more electricity for more people. While the motivations for nuclear energy vary among states, the two primary public goods this energy source offers are countering human-induced climate change and providing for greater energy security. Although views on how to achieve energy security differ, the essential aspect for nuclear energy is that for several countries, especially those with scarce indigenous energy sources from fossil fuels, investing in nuclear power plants diversifies electricity production portfolios and helps reduce dependence on foreign sources of energy. The focus here is on assessing the potential security consequences of increased use of nuclear power in the existing nuclear power states and most importantly in many more states that have in recent years expressed interest in this power source. The risks of nuclear power include possible reactor accidents, release of radioactive waste to the environment, attacks on or sabotage of nuclear facilities, and misuse of peaceful nuclear technologies to make nuclear weapons. While safety of nuclear plants and disposal of radioactive waste are important issues, this paper analyzes the latter two issues. In addition, it addresses two under-examined risks: military attacks on nuclear facilities and the effects on security alliances and conventional arms buildups as more countries seek to

  20. Regulatory Aspects for Site Selection for Radiological and Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirag, N.M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to check in one of the considerations necessary for any new nuclear facility. A previous study that was conducted using a questionnaire reported that general admission to the public, aesthetic considerations, and characteristics associated with the site are able to adequately accept the existence of new nuclear facilities. The findings of this research revealed that public involvement in the process of site selection and in the design of nuclear power plants, an understanding of their point of view is an important aspect of a participatory approach. An important factor for any new nuclear program is to improve confidence in the energy choices in the future. A survey was conducted on 1304 adults to, to get the main goal. The study concluded showed that the prevalence of culture of safety reflected on the public acceptance of the site, especially if it takes into account the aesthetic and environmental considerations.

  1. Guide for radiological safety advisers of the disaster control service management for nuclear emergencies. In annex: Radiological fundamentals for decisions on actions for protection of the population against the consequences of accidental release of radionuclides. - Outline recommendations for disaster control actions in the vicinity of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seredynski, J.

    1989-01-01

    This Guide published as vol. 13 of the SSK publications is a revised version of the loose-leaf publication 'Compilation of criteria and decision aids for technical advisers for nuclear emergency control services'. The general arrangement of the material has been maintained as it proved to be useful, so that this issue as the previous one presents information on determining the source strength of the radioactive substances, their dispersion characteristics, and resulting radiation exposure on doses. Special attention has been paid to presenting helpful data for shortening as much as possible the calculation time required, as e.g. by pre-evaluation data presented in the form of graphs. Realistic dose assessments are made possible on the basis of the latest scientific knowledge, including the results of the German Risk. Assessment Study for Nuclear Power Plants, and the dose factors given by the Federal Health Office. Aids given for dose assessment are the following: Forms together with tables and graphs; nomograms; isometric representations of isopleths and isodose curves. In addition, information is given for evaluation of dose assessments and recommendations to be inferred for protective actions. (orig./HP) With 21 figs., 37 tabs [de

  2. Site release in the decommissioning of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revilla, Jose Luis; Sanz, Maria Teresa; Marugan, Inmaculada; Simon, Inmaculada; Martin, Manuel; Solis, Susana; Sterling, Agustina

    2008-01-01

    Spanish regulatory framework for the decommissioning process of a nuclear facility ends up with a decommission statement, which releases the licence-holder of the facility from its responsibilities as an operator. It also establishes -where a restricted site release applies- the appropriate future use restrictions, and the responsible of both maintaining such restrictions and ensuring their compliance. Releasing a site implies eliminating all radiological monitoring. The Regulations, however, did not specify either the radiological conditions to be met for the site to be released, or the possibility of a partial release -with or without restrictions-. In case of restricted site release, the Regulations did not specify either the required criteria for such a release. This paper presents the main features of the Safety Instruction IS-13 'Radiological criteria for the release of nuclear facilities sites' issued recently by the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council as a new specific regulation. This Safety Instruction establishes the requirements and conditions for the release of nuclear facility sites, that is, radiological criteria on the effective dose to the public, partial release of nuclear facility sites and restricted release of nuclear facility sites. (author).

  3. Consequences of a withdrawal from the use of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.J.; Bundschuh, V.; Duering, K.; Martinsen, D.; Riemer, H.; Walbeck, M.

    1986-01-01

    First the consequences of an immediate withdrawal are considered, i.e. a replacement of electricity generation capacity can not be built up in time. Then assumptions and results for a withdrawal in stages are presented. This means, that a replacement of nuclear generation capacity is possible. The applied energy model allows statements about the future structure of energy supply, the mass balances, the costs, and the SO 2 , NO x and CO 2 emissions from increased coal combustion. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Vulnerability of ecological systems for nuclear war climatic consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharuehll, M.; Khatchinson, T.; Kropper, U.; Kharuehll, K.

    1988-01-01

    Vulnerability of ecological systems of Northern hemisphere (terrestrial, aquatic and tropical) as well as Southern one in relation to climatic changes following large nuclear war is considered. When analyzing potential sensitivity of ecological systems to climatic changes, possible consequences are considered for different stress categories under various war scenarios. The above-mentioned stresses correspond to those adopted in published work by Pittok and others. To estimate the less important climatic disturbances a few additional computer-simulated models are developed

  5. The consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear accident in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    In this report the radioactive fallout on Greece from the Chernobyl nuclear accident is described. The flow pattern to Greece of the radioactive materials released, the measurements performed on environmental samples and samples of the food chain, as well as some estimations of the population doses and of the expected consequences of the accident are presented. The analysis has shown that the radiological impact of the accident in Greece can be considered minor. (J.K.)

  6. Assessment of off-site consequences of nuclear accidents (MARIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    A brief report is given of a workshop held in Luxembourg in 1985 on methods for assessing the off-site radiological consequences of nuclear accidents (MARIA). The sessions included topics such as atmospheric dispersion; foodchain transfer; urban contamination; demographic and land use data; dosimetry, health effects, economic and countermeasures models; uncertainty analysis; and application of probabilistic risk assessment results as input to decision aids. (U.K.)

  7. A description of nuclear reactor accidents and their consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, A.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear reactor accidents which have caused core damage, released a significant amount of radioactivity, or caused death or serious injury are described. The reactor accidents discussed in detail include Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, SL-1 and Windscale, although information on other less consequential accidents is also provided. The consequences of these accidents are examined in terms of the amounts of radioactivity released, the radiation doses received, and remedial actions and interventions taken following the accident. 10 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  8. Fatigue damage of nuclear facilities; Endommagement par fatigue des installations nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The conference on the fatigue damage of nuclear facilities, organized by the SFEN (french society of nuclear energy), took place at Paris the 23. of november 2000. Eleven papers were presented, showing the state of the art and the research programs in the domain of the sizing rules, safety, installations damage, examination and maintenance. (A.L.B.)

  9. The Regulation of Major Risks in Relation to Large Nuclear Installations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan Van, L.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, major risk prevention has generated legislative and regulatory texts in French law, particularly regarding nuclear installations. This article reviews the context and analyses the scope of the new regulations. They require the nuclear operator to take preventive measures, namely more stringent obligations from the safety viewpoint to inform the public. These include risk assessments and preparing emergency plans in case if accidents. (NEA)

  10. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamson, S.; Bender, M.A.; Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R.

    1993-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has sponsored several studies to identify and quantify, through the use of models, the potential health effects of accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear power plants. The Reactor Safety Study provided the basis for most of the earlier estimates related to these health effects. Subsequent efforts by NRC-supported groups resulted in improved health effects models that were published in the report entitled open-quotes Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Consequence Analysisclose quotes, NUREG/CR-4214, 1985 and revised further in the 1989 report NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2. The health effects models presented in the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report were developed for exposure to low-linear energy transfer (LET) (beta and gamma) radiation based on the best scientific information available at that time. Since the 1989 report was published, two addenda to that report have been prepared to (1) incorporate other scientific information related to low-LET health effects models and (2) extend the models to consider the possible health consequences of the addition of alpha-emitting radionuclides to the exposure source term. The first addendum report, entitled open-quotes Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, Modifications of Models Resulting from Recent Reports on Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Low LET Radiation, Part 2: Scientific Bases for Health Effects Models,close quotes was published in 1991 as NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 2, Addendum 1. This second addendum addresses the possibility that some fraction of the accident source term from an operating nuclear power plant comprises alpha-emitting radionuclides. Consideration of chronic high-LET exposure from alpha radiation as well as acute and chronic exposure to low-LET beta and gamma radiations is a reasonable extension of the health effects model

  11. Strategic considerations for the sustainable remediation of nuclear installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobbs, S; Orr, P; Weber, I

    2017-08-05

    Nuclear sites around the world are being decommissioned and remedial actions are being undertaken to enable the sites or parts of the sites to be reused. Although this is relatively straightforward for most sites, experience has suggested that preventative action is needed to minimise the impact of remediation activities on the environment and the potential burden to future generations. Removing all contamination in order to make a site suitable for any use generates waste and has associated environmental, social and economic detriments and benefits that should be taken into account. Recent experience of OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) member countries in the remediation of contaminated land, predominantly contaminated soil and groundwater, on nuclear sites during decommissioning has been assessed by an NEA task group. The experience was used to identify strategic considerations for nuclear site remediation, to consider the application of sustainability principles to nuclear site remediation, to describe good practice, and to make recommendations for further research and development. The key aspects that were identified were that 1) site remediation should be sustainable by resulting in an overall net benefit; and 2) an adaptive approach is essential in order to take into account the inherent uncertainty associated with the decommissioning and site remediation timescales. A report describing the findings was published by OECD/NEA in 2016. The conclusions provide insights to decision makers, regulators, implementers and stakeholders involved in nuclear site decommissioning so that they can achieve sustainable remediation of nuclear sites, now and in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Installation Of A Training Center With Nuclear Instruments In The I.N.E.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo B, Ana C.; Periaza C, A.

    1993-01-01

    In the framework of the regional technical cooperation of the countries in development, at present, the IAEA executes some investigation projects such as the program of Regional Arrangements of Technical Cooperation for Latin America and Caribbean (ARCAL), from which the program of nuclear instrumentation ARCAL II is derived and by agreement the INEA should install a reference center in Electronic and Nuclear Instrumentation. To complete this objective it has assigned the development of different sub projects, among which is the installation of a training center for operation, cares and quality control of nuclear instruments of medical applications

  13. Quality assurance for pipeline installations in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Approximately 25% of the cost of a nuclear power plant are caused by the pipeline system, i.e. pipes and fixtures. This is an enourmous portion, demanding of the supplier and fitter of these components a very high safety standard. Against the background of the sociopolitical discussion on the safety of nuclear power plants it was a very useful idea of Mannesmann AG, one of the most important manufacturers in this sector, to lay open its quality assurance concept. On the occasion of the symposium ''Safe components for nuclear energy'' held for the expert press it was pointed out that the share of 17% electric energy coming at present from 15 nuclear power plants will increase in future for economic and ecologic reasons. So, it was maintained, the question is not about the ''pro and the con'', but exclusively about the safety standard for nuclear power plants. Specialists from the various branches of the undertaking informed on how this safety concept for the components pipelines and control equipment is realized. (orig./RW) [de

  14. Recent assessments of the environmental consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turco, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Since late 1984 a number of important scientific studies have considered the global-scale consequences of a major nuclear war. These studies look beyond the immediate and direct effects of nuclear explosions (blast, thermal radiation, and local radioactive fallout) to investigate the more widespread effects of dispersed radioactivity and severe climatic disturbances - the nuclear winter. Assessments of the relevant phenomena have been carried out by the U.S. National Research Council, the Royal Society of Canada, and the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment of the International Council of Scientific Unions. Numerous physicists, atmospheric scientists, biologists, and physicians from around the world have contributed to these projects. In each case the findings are similar. While cautioning that significant uncertainties remain to be resolved, each report concludes that a nuclear winter is a clear possibility following a nuclear exchange. The SCOPE report goes even further, describing the biological, ecological, and human implications of a nuclear war and its aftermath. This unique treatise is summarized in the paper by M. Harwell in this volume

  15. Regulatory oversight report 2016 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-06-01

    ENSI, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, assesses and monitors safety in the Swiss nuclear facilities. These include the five nuclear power plants: Beznau Units 1 and 2 (KKB1 and KKB2), Muehleberg (KKM), Goesgen (KKG) and Leibstadt (KKL), the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (Zwilag) in Wuerenlingen together with the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the University of Basel (UniB) and the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL). Using a combination of inspections, regulatory meetings, checks, analyses and the reporting of the operators of individual facilities, ENSI obtains the required overview of nuclear safety in these facilities. It ensures that they operate as required by law. ENSI's regulatory responsibilities also include the transport of radioactive materials from and to nuclear facilities and preparations for a deep geological repository for radioactive waste. ENSI maintains its own emergency organisation, which is an integral part of the national emergency structure that would be activated in the event of a serious incident at a nuclear facility in Switzerland. ENSI reports periodically on its supervisory activities. It informs the public about special events and findings in the nuclear installations. All five nuclear power plants in Switzerland operated safely during the past year. Nuclear safety at all plants in operation was rated as good or satisfactory. In 2016, there were 31 reportable events at the nuclear power plants. 30 events were rated Level 0 (event of no or low safety significance) on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES) and one was rated Level 1 (anomaly) at KKL. Zwilag consists of several interim storage buildings, a conditioning plant and a plasma plant (incineration/melting plant). At the end of 2016, the cask storage hall contained 56 transport/storage casks with spent fuel assemblies and vitrified residue

  16. Current emergency programs for nuclear installations in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chino, Masamichi

    2007-01-01

    Large effort has been taken for nuclear emergency programs in Japan especially after the JCO accident. A special law for nuclear emergency was established after the accident. The law extended the scope of emergency preparedness to fuel cycle facilities, research reactors, etc. and clarified the roles and responsibilities of the national government, local governments and license holders. For initial responses, the action levels and action procedures are defined based on environmental doses and specific initial events of NPPs. A senior specialist was dispatched to each site for nuclear emergency and a facility 'Off-site center' to be used as the local emergency headquator was designated at each site. This paper describes the structure of emergency program, responsibility of related organizations and the definition of unusual events for notification and emergency. Emergency preparedness, emergency radiation monitoring and computer-based prediction of on- and off-site situation are also addressed. (author)

  17. Standard rules for liability and cover for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfaffelhuber, J.K.; Kuckuck, B.

    1980-01-01

    To afford full protection for possible victims, the authors of this article are in favour of doing away with the limitation of liability of nuclear operators presently provided under the German Atomic Energy Act, the principle of which is based on the Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention. In support of this argument reference is made to the recent accident at Three Mile Island, trends in other national legislation towards unlimited liability as well as high safety standards in German nuclear plants. Finally, possible ways of providing unlimited liability are proposed, in particular increased insurance cover and the constitution of an interest-bearing fund in addition to State intervention in case of a major nuclear incident. (NEA) [fr

  18. Decommissioning Licensing Process of Nuclear Installations in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa Sainz, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The Enresa experience related to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities includes the decommissioning of the Vandellos I and Jose Cabrera NPPs. The Vandellos I gas-graphite reactor was decommissioned in about five years (from 1998 to 2003) to what is known as level 2. In February 2010, the decommissioning of Jose Cabrera power plant has been initiated and it is scheduled to be finished by 2018. The decommissioning of a nuclear power plant is a complex administrative process, the procedure for changing from operation to decommissioning is established in the Spanish law. This paper summarizes the legal framework defining the strategies, the main activities and the basic roles of the various agents involved in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Spain. It also describes briefly the Licensing documents required to obtain the decommissioning authorization and the Enresa point of view, as licensee, on the licensing decommissioning process. (author)

  19. Environmental consequences to water resources from alternatives of managing spent nuclear fuel at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, G.; McDonald, J.P.; Sato, C.

    1994-11-01

    With an environmental restoration and waste management program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is involved in developing policies pertinent to the transport, storage, and management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The DOE Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Programmatic SNF management is documented in a Volume 1 report, which contains an assessment of the Hanford installation, among others. Because the Hanford installation contains approximately 80% of the SNF associated with the DOE complex, it has been included in the decision for the ultimate disposition of the fuel. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performed a series of assessments on five alternatives at Hanford for managing the SNF: No-Action, Decentralization, 1992/1993 Planning Basis, Regionalization, and Centralization. The environmental consequences associated with implementing these assessment alternatives potentially impact socioeconomic conditions; environmental quality of the air, groundwater, surface water, and surface soil; ecological, cultural, and geological resources; and land-use considerations. The purpose of this report is to support the Programmatic SNF-EIS by investigating the environmental impacts associated with water quality and related consequences, as they apply to the five assessment alternatives at the Hanford installation. The results of these scenarios are discussed and documented

  20. The Nuclear Installations (Excepted Matter) Regulations 1978 (Statutory Instrument No. 1779, 4 December 1978)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    These Regulations prescribe, for the purposes of the definition of 'excepted matter' in the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, certain specified quantities and forms of nuclear matter, and supersede the Nuclear Installations (excepted Matter) Regulations 1965. They bring the definition of excepted matter in those Regulations into line with the decisions of 27 October 1977 of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's Steering Committee excluding certain kinds and quantities of nuclear substances from the scope of the Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy. Compared with the 1965 Regulations, the principal changes in relation to consignments are that activity limits and packing requirements now take account of the most recent IAEA Regulations. (NEA) [fr

  1. Dynamic Fault Diagnosis for Nuclear Installation Using Probabilistic Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djoko Hari Nugroho; Deswandri; Ahmad Abtokhi; Darlis

    2003-01-01

    Probabilistic based fault diagnosis which represent the relationship between cause and consequence of the events for trouble shooting is developed in this research based on Bayesian Networks. Contribution of on-line data comes from sensors and system/component reliability in node cause is expected increasing the belief level of Bayesian Networks. (author)

  2. Seveso II directive in prevention and mitigation of consequences of chemical terrorism, safety management systems in hazardous installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klicek, M.

    2009-01-01

    Mayor accidents caused by hazardous substances are great threat to public. The consequences are often very severe with great number of injured people or even deaths and a great material damage. Statistic data shows that the main cause of accidents in hazardous installations is 'human factor', including the possibility of terrorist attack, or classic military operations. In order to ensure effective chemical safety, the actions should be taken by industry, public authorities, communities and other stake holders to prevent industrial accidents. Safety should be an integral part of the business activities of an enterprise, and all hazardous installations should strive to reach the ultimate goal of zero incidents. Safety management systems (SMS) should include appropriate technology and processes, as well as establishing an effective organisational structure. To mitigate consequences of accidents, emergency planning, land-use planning and risk communication is necessary. Adequate response in the event of accident should limit adverse consequences to health, environment and property. Follow-up actions are needed to learn from the accidents and other unexpected events, in order to reduce future incidents. In this paper the author will discus the implementing of SEVESO II directive in obtaining two main goals: major accident prevention and mitigation of consequences for men and environment in case of possible terrorist actions or military activities. Some Croatian experiences in implementing of UNEP APELL Programme, and its connection with SEVESO II directive will be shown.(author)

  3. Authorization procedure for the construction and operation of nuclear installations within the EEC member states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didier, J.M.

    1974-12-01

    For Belgium and Luxembourg, the authorization procedure varies according to the class in which the installation concerned falls (assigned according to the degree of hazard involved classes I, II or III). Moreover, separate authorizations are needed, one for construction and another for operation of class I and II installations. With respect to Germany also, two such separate authorizations are needed, but there is no specific procedure relating to the potential extent of hazard involved in the installation concerned. In France, the basic nuclear installations are subject to a special procedure. Furthermore, the construction and operation of these installations are also subject to two separate authorizations. While the latter two authorizations are required in Italy for the main nuclear installations, no system of classified installations exists according to extent of hazard involved. Similar legislation is applicable in the Netherlands. Neither does such a system of classified installations exist in the United Kingdom. Moreover, there is only one single authorization (the site licence), which is successively adapted during construction. On the other hand, in Denmark and Ireland, no detailed legislation has been developed on the subject

  4. Licensing procedure for the construction and operation of nuclear installations within the EEC member states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didier, J.M.

    1976-08-01

    For Belgium and Luxembourg, the authorization procedure varies according to the Class in which the installation concerned falls (assigned according to the degree of hazard involved: Classes I, II or III). Moreover, separate authorizations are needed, one for construction and another for operation of Class I and II installations. With respect to Germany also, two such separate authorization are needed, but there is no specific procedure relating to the potential extent of hazard involved in the installation concerned. In France, the 'basic' nuclear installations are subject to a special procedure. Furthermore, the construction and operation of these installations are also subject to two separate authorizations. While the latter two authorizations are required in Italy for the main nuclear installations, no system of 'classified' installations exists according to extent of hazard involved. Similar legislation is applicable in the Netherlands. Neither does such a system of 'classified' installations exist in the United Kingdom. Moreover, there is only one single authorization (the 'site licence'), which is succesively adapted during construction. On the other hand, in Denmark and Ireland, no detailed legislation has been developed on the subject

  5. Strategic Considerations for the Sustainable Remediation of Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Susan; Wilson, Ian; Decung, Fabien; Ollivier Dehaye, Catherine; Pellenz, Gilles; Palut-Laurent, Odile; Nitzsche, Olaf; Rehs, Bernd; Altavilla, Massimo; Osimani, Celso; Florya, Sergey; Revilla, Jose-Luis; Efraimsson, Henrik; Baines, Kim; Clark, Anna; Cruickshank, Julian; Mitchell, Nick; Mobbs, Shelly; Orr, Peter; Abu-Eid, Rateb Boby; Durham, Lisa; Morse, John; Walker, Stuart; Weber, Inge; ); Monken-Fernandes, Horst; )

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear sites around the world are being decommissioned and remedial actions are being undertaken to enable sites, or parts of sites, to be reused. Although such activities are relatively straightforward for most sites, experience has suggested that preventative action is needed to minimise the impact of remediation activities on the environment and the potential burden to future generations. Removing all contamination in order to make a site suitable for any use generates waste and has associated environmental, social and economic drawbacks and benefits. Site remediation should thus be sustainable and result in an overall net benefit. This report draws on recent experience of NEA member countries in nuclear site remediation during decommissioning in order to identify strategic considerations for the sustainable remediation of subsurface contamination - predominantly contaminated soil and groundwater - to describe good practice, and to make recommendations for further research and development. It provides insights for the decision makers, regulators, implementers and stakeholders involved in nuclear site decommissioning so as to ensure the sustainable remediation of nuclear sites, now and in the future. (authors)

  6. Reliability of fossil-fuel and nuclear power installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The conference heard a total of 37 papers of which 24 were inputted in INIS. The subject area was mainly the use of reliability information systems and the production of data banks for these systems, the application of the reliability theory and the reliability analysis of equipment and systems of nuclear power plants. (J.P.)

  7. Radiation and ecological safety of nuclear fuel cycle installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbasheva, S.V.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear power plants (NPP) and radioactive waste facilities safety issues are discussed; Chernobyl NPP personnel radiation doses for 1986 are indicated; radiation contamination of environment by Am-241 is investigated; data on radioactive contamination in southern part of Kiev Poles'e are considered

  8. The consequences of underground nuclear testing in French Polynesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, E.T.

    1998-01-01

    France began atmospheric nuclear testing at Mururoa and Fangataufa atolls in the South Pacific in July 1966. Following international protest, atmospheric testing ceased in August 1970. In late 1995, an International Geomechanical Commission (IGC) was created to assess the short- and long-term effects of underground nuclear testing on the stability and hydrology of Mururoa and Fangataufa. With the aid of its consultants, the Commission sought to develop its own understanding of the mechanics and consequences of the underground nuclear tests. It carried out extensive numerical analyses of shock wave effects, seismic wave propagation, slope stability and pre- and post-test hydrology. However, in its studies, the IGC was constrained to use the data made available to it by the French authorities. The Commission's report (International Geomechanical Commission 1998) has been submitted to the French Government. This article draws heavily on parts of that report. The Commission's observations and analyses show that there has been no apparent change, on the atoll scale, to the overall mechanical stability of either atoll as a consequence of the underground nuclear tests. The main observable consequences of the tests are underwater slope failures, open fractures on the rim surface and surface settlements. The fractures visible on the surface are generally associated with subsurface slope displacements and occur only in the carbonates. There is no evidence that slope failures or settlements have occurred in the underlying volcanics. There has been no significant change in the long-term (beyond 500 years) hydrology of either atoll. The IGC estimates that the long-term change in the natural groundwater flow will be no more than 1%. There are, however, significant short-term changes locally around the test sites, which are briefly outlined

  9. Volcanic Hazard Assessments for Nuclear Installations: Methods and Examples in Site Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-07-01

    To provide guidance on the protection of nuclear installations against the effects of volcanoes, the IAEA published in 2012 IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSG-21, Volcanic Hazards in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations. SSG-21 addresses hazards relating to volcanic phenomena, and provides recommendations and general guidance for evaluation of these hazards. Unlike seismic hazard assessments, models for volcanic hazard assessment have not undergone decades of review, evaluation and testing for suitability in evaluating hazards at proposed nuclear installations. Currently in volcanology, scientific developments and detailed methodologies to model volcanic phenomena are evolving rapidly.This publication provides information on detailed methodologies and examples in the application of volcanic hazard assessment to site evaluation for nuclear installations, thereby addressing the recommendations in SSG-21. Although SSG-21 develops a logical framework for conducting a volcanic hazard assessment, this publication demonstrates the practicability of evaluating the recommendations in SSG-21 through a systematic volcanic hazard assessment and examples from Member States. The results of this hazard assessment can be used to derive the appropriate design bases and operational considerations for specific nuclear installations

  10. The directive establishing a community framework for the nuclear safety of nuclear installations: the European Union approach to nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garribba, M.; Chirtes, A.; Nauduzaite, M.

    2009-01-01

    This article aims at explaining the evolution leading to the adoption of the recent Council Directive 2009/71/EURATOM establishing a Community framework for the nuclear safety of nuclear installations adopted with the consent of all 27 members states following the overwhelming support of the European Parliament, that creates for the first time, a binding legal framework that brings legal certainty to European Union citizens and reinforces the role and independence of national regulators. The paper is divided into three sections. The first section addresses the competence of the European Atomic energy Community to legislate in the area of nuclear safety. It focuses on the 2002 landmark ruling of the European Court of justice that confirmed this competence by recognizing the intrinsic link between radiation protection and nuclear safety. The second part describes the history of the Nuclear safety directive from the initial 2003 European Commission proposal to today 's text in force. The third part is dedicated to a description of the content of the Directive and its implications on the further development of nuclear safety in the European Union. (N.C.)

  11. Regulations concerning licensing of nuclear reactor facilities and other nuclear installations, Decree No 7/9141, 6 January 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This Decree lays down the licensing system for nuclear installations in Turkey and also sets up a Nuclear Safety Committee whose duty is to ensure that the requirements of this Decree are met. The Committee is made up of members of the Atomic Energy Commission specialized in reactors, nuclear safety, health physics, reactor physics as well as two experts respectively appointed by the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare and the Ministry of Energy and National Resources. (NEA) [fr

  12. The Operation Consequence of Nuclear Energy to Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhariyono, Gatot; Sutarman

    2003-01-01

    Objective of the paper is to give information the operation consequence of nuclear energy to environment, so that expected as organizer of PLTN can anticipate or depress as minimum as possible radiology impact to the radiation workers and society in general, and also socialization that operation of nuclear energy do not give the negative impact, if conducted its control to environment seriously. Parts of which it is important to know from this paper are : one. Estimate of equivalent dose of collective effective in a normal condition is the operation cycle for nuclear energy at worker and local or regional resident 10, 100 or 10.000 next years. 2. Equivalent dose of global collective effective is for various the radiation sources. 3. Estimate of dose per cap ut annual of nuclear electric power until year 2500. 4. Aspect of non-radiology is to cooler system, usage of farm, dismissal of chemistry, advantage of hot water waste, its effect to fish, benthos, plankton, vegetation, animal and preparation of nuclear emergency

  13. NUCLEBRAS' installations for tests of nuclear power plants components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos Paiva, I.P. de; Horta, J.A.L.; Avelar Esteves, F. de; Pinheiro, R.B.

    1983-05-01

    The reasons for NUCLEBRAS' Nuclear Technology Development Center to implement a laboratory for supporting Brazilian manufacturers, giving to them the means for performing functional tests of industrial products, are presented. A brief description of the facilities under construction: the Components Test Loop and the Facility for Testing N.P.P. Components under Accident Conditions, and of other already in operation, is given, as well as its objectives and main technical characteristics. Some test results already obtained are also presented. (Author) [pt

  14. Nuclear installations in Slovakia accords to the convention definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In this part the nuclear power plants Bohunice - Units V-1 and V-2 and NPP Mochovce (description of units, safety reports and safety improvement programs) are described. Description of Bohunice A-1, history and current status of the NPP A-1 and NPP decommissioning program are included. In next parts interim spent fuel storage, technologies of Raw processing and treatment, and treated and solid Raw storage sites are described

  15. Nuclebras' installations for performance tests of nuclear power plants components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos Paiva, I.P. de; Avelar Esteves, F. de; Horta, J.A.L.; Resende, M.F.R.; Pinheiro, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    The reasons for Nuclebras' Nuclear Technology Development Center to implement a laboratory for supporting Brazilian manufactures, giving to them the means for performing functional tests of industrial products, are presented. A brief description of facilities under construction: the components Test Loop and Facility for Testing N.P.P. components under Accident conditions, and other already in operation, as well as its objectives and main technical characteristics. Some test results had already obtained are also presented. (Author) [pt

  16. The protection of nuclear installations from outside aggressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aussourd, P.; Candes, P.; Le Quinio, R.

    1976-01-01

    When selecting a site for a nuclear power station, the possibility of outside natural aggressions from atmospheric, hydrologic or seismic origin should be carefully considered. The site being chosen, outside natural or non-natural aggressions which are linked to it, such as plane crashes, projectiles, fires, bursting of dams, deliberate human aggressions... should be thoroughly appraised to take them into account when designing the future plant [fr

  17. Nuclear researches using unique installations and vacuum stands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oprea, C.; Oprea, A.; Curuia, M.; Mateescu, G.; Kappel, W.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In this paper the development and application of nuclear methods using critical technologies for the analysis of nuclear and magnetic nanostructure of different systems are presented. The work consists of 3 parts: - 1.The modernization and use of the thermostat TS-3000K aimed for inelastic and quasi-elastic slow neutron scattering and neutron diffraction experiments in vacuum in condensed matter field, over a very large temperature range (up to 3000 K); - 2. The analysis of the nanostructure of Fe-Cu alloy performing measurements in vacuum by RBS and PIXE methods at the EG-5 Van der Graaf electrostatic accelerator of FLNP, JINR; - 3. Environmental researches conducted on different ecological objects by NAA and IGAA methods at the microtron MT-25. The present report presents the researches within the frame of the three international priority directions: - i. Industry of nanomaterials and nanosystems; - ii. Vacuum technology; - iii. Rational use of natural resources. The results proved that various traditional and new properties of materials which pose a structure at nano level have a good perspective to be further investigated by applying the nuclear methods. (authors)

  18. Installation method for the steel container and vessel of the nuclear heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liying; Guo Jilin; Liu Wei

    2000-01-01

    The Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR) has the advantages of inherent safety and better economics, integrated arrangement, full power natural circulation and dual vessel structure. However, the large thin container presents a new and difficult problem. The characteristics of the dual vessel installation method are analyzed with system engineering theory. Since there is no foreign or domestic experience, a new method was developed for the dual vessel installation for the 5 MW NHR. The result shows that the installation method is safe and reliable. The research on the dual vessel installation method has important significance for the design, manufacture and installation of the NHR dual vessel, as well as the industrialization and standardization of the NHR

  19. Inventory of chemical releases of nuclear installations in the North-Cotentin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-05-01

    The nuclear installations concerned by this study are Cogema La Hague, the Flamanville nuclear power plant, the Manche plant and the National Navy of Cherbourg.The objective followed by the ' source term ' work group has consisted in counting and examining the whole of existing measures relative to the releases of chemical substances in the liquid and gaseous effluents. Then because of the lack of measures for the operation first years of installations, the work group has estimated the order of magnitude of these chemical releases (essentially for Cogema La Hague). This report presents a review of the literature looking at the background levels of chemicals in different environmental compartments: air, soil, plants and animals products. these values have been summarized here to be available for comparisons with concentrations input by the North Cotentin nuclear installations, calculated by the G.R.N.C. (radioecology group of Nord Cotentin)

  20. Internationally Standardized Cost Item Definitions for Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucien Teunckens; Kurt Pflugrad; Candace Chan-Sands; Ted Lazo

    2000-01-01

    The European Commission (EC), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) have agreed to jointly prepare and publish a standardized list of cost items and related definitions for decommissioning projects. Such a standardized list would facilitate communication, promote uniformity, and avoid inconsistency or contradiction of results or conclusions of cost evaluations for decommissioning projects carried out for specific purposes by different groups. Additionally, a standardized structure would also be a useful tool for more effective cost management. This paper describes actual work and result thus far

  1. Ecological and radioecological studies of nuclear installation sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caries, J. C.; Hugon, J.; Grauby, A.

    1988-01-01

    The site study method consists of a dynamic and estimated analysis and of following up the release impact on all natural or non natural media compartments that take a part in the protection of man and his environment. The stages of knowing a nuclear site include the site preliminary radioecological evaluation, diffusion parameters evaluation, the quantification of factors of radioelements transfer to man, the ecological baseline carrying out, the radioactive baseline establishment, the radioecological synthesis of the results, the site radioactive and ecological control. This method applys to selection and detailed study of site. 1 tab., 7 refs. (F.M.)

  2. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in nuclear accident consequence assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlberg, Olof.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains the results of a four year project in research contracts with the Nordic Cooperation in Nuclear Safety and the National Institute for Radiation Protection. An uncertainty/sensitivity analysis methodology consisting of Latin Hypercube sampling and regression analysis was applied to an accident consequence model. A number of input parameters were selected and the uncertainties related to these parameter were estimated within a Nordic group of experts. Individual doses, collective dose, health effects and their related uncertainties were then calculated for three release scenarios and for a representative sample of meteorological situations. From two of the scenarios the acute phase after an accident were simulated and from one the long time consequences. The most significant parameters were identified. The outer limits of the calculated uncertainty distributions are large and will grow to several order of magnitudes for the low probability consequences. The uncertainty in the expectation values are typical a factor 2-5 (1 Sigma). The variation in the model responses due to the variation of the weather parameters is fairly equal to the parameter uncertainty induced variation. The most important parameters showed out to be different for each pathway of exposure, which could be expected. However, the overall most important parameters are the wet deposition coefficient and the shielding factors. A general discussion of the usefulness of uncertainty analysis in consequence analysis is also given. (au)

  3. Civil engineering design for decommissioning of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paton, A.A.; Benwell, P.; Irwin, T.F.; Hunter, I.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the work carried out by Taylor Woodrow Construction Limited (TWC) in a study aimed at identifying features which may be incorporated at the design stage of future nuclear power plants to facilitate their eventual decommissioning and, in so doing, promote economic and radiological benefits at teh decommissioning stage. For the purposes of this study, decommissioning of a nuclear facility means those measures taken at the end of the facility's operating life to remove it from the site and restore the site to green field conditions, and, while so doing, ensure the continued protection of the public from any residual radioactivity or other potential hazards present in or emanating from the facility. The overall decommissioning process involves eventual dismantling and demolition and may also include, where possible and appropriate, the intermediate steps of renewal and refurbishing. The work has been carried out in a number of sequential stages consisting principally of a literature review, identification of problems likely to arise in decommissioning, generation of possible solutions to the problems, first assessment of the feasibility of these solutions, closer investigation of promising solutions and, finally, preparation of conclusions and recommendations. (author)

  4. The atmospheric and climatic consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagan, C.

    1985-01-01

    Four effects-obscuring smoke in the troposphere, obscuring dust in the stratosphere, the fallout of radioactive debris, and the partial destruction of the ozone layer - constitute the four known principal adverse environmental consequences that would occur after a nuclear war is ''over''. There may well be others about which we are still ignorant. The dust, and especially, the dark soot absorb ordinary visible light from the sun, heating the atmosphere and cooling the Earth's surface. All four of these effects have been treated in the authors; recent study, known form the initials of its authors as TTAPS. For the first time it is demonstrated that severe and prolonged low temperatures, the ''nuclear winter'', would follow a nuclear war. The new results have been subjected to detailed scrutiny, and many corroboratory calculations have not been made, including at least two in the Soviet Union. Unlike many previous studies, the effects do not seem to be restricted to northern midlatitudes, where the nuclear exchange would mainly take place. There is now substantial evidence that the heating by sunlight of atmospheric dust and soot over northern midlatitude targets would profoundly change the global circulation. In our studies, several dozen different scenarios where chosen, covering a wide range of possible wars, and the range of uncertainty in each key parameter was considered (e.g., to describe how many fine particles are injected into the atmosphere)

  5. Economic consequences of alternative nuclear power plant lifetimes in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenberger, D.; Wissen, R.; Bartels, M.; Buttermann, H.G.; Hillebrand, B.

    2006-01-01

    The coalition agreement of the Christian Democratic (CDU), Christian Social (CSU), and Social Democratic (SPD) parties contains a provision under which the existing regulations about phasing out the peaceful use of nuclear power will remain in force because of different opinions about the use of nuclear power in Germany. This article studies the consequences of longer lifetimes of the nuclear power plants currently in operation as compared to the provisions in opt-out legislation. The details examined include the effects of longer nuclear power plant lifetimes on the development of generating capacities in Germany, electricity generation, fuel consumption and fuel imports, the resultant CO 2 emissions, costs of electricity generation and electricity prices as well as the associated impact on production and employment in this sector and in industry as a whole. A summary is presented of the findings of a comprehensive study published under the same title in October 2005. The study was compiled by the Institute of Power Economics of the University of Cologne (EWI) and by Energy Environment Forecast Analysis GmbH, and had been commissioned by the Federation of German Industries (BDI). (orig.)

  6. Nuclear installations operated without the required permits: the policy pursued in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huygen, A.

    1994-01-01

    The authoress presents two topical cases from the Netherlands where two nuclear installations are allowed to continue operation by a joint decision of the government and the courts, although the legal operating permits have been declared void by a government senate. The legal basis constructed for this approach allowing plant operation to continue for a limited number of years is an explicit statement by the government to tolerate such procedure. The installations are the Bodeward nuclear power station with a BWR and the Almelo URENCO uranium enrichment facility. (orig./HSCH) [de

  7. International conference on safety culture in nuclear installations. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    Safety culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organisation and individuals which establishes that as an overriding priority nuclear plant safety issues receives the attention warranted by their significance. This definition of safety culture brings out two major components in its manifestation. The framework within which individuals within the organisation works.The attitude and response of individual towards the safety issues over productivity and economics in the organisational work practices. The industry literature provides a great deal of insight at the artefact and espoused value levels, although as yet it remains somewhat disorganized. There is, however, an overall lack of understanding of the assumption level of safety culture. The IAEA has organised the conference on safety culture for better understanding of the safety culture issues on the international level.

  8. International conference on safety culture in nuclear installations. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Safety culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organisation and individuals which establishes that as an overriding priority nuclear plant safety issues receives the attention warranted by their significance. This definition of safety culture brings out two major components in its manifestation. The framework within which individuals within the organisation works.The attitude and response of individual towards the safety issues over productivity and economics in the organisational work practices. The industry literature provides a great deal of insight at the artefact and espoused value levels, although as yet it remains somewhat disorganized. There is, however, an overall lack of understanding of the assumption level of safety culture. The IAEA has organised the conference on safety culture for better understanding of the safety culture issues on the international level

  9. Research on artificial intelligence systems for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Minoru

    1992-01-01

    The development and utilization of atomic energy in Japan has be advanced in conformity with the long term plan of atomic energy development and utilization decided in 1987. As one of the basic targets, the upbringing of creative and innovative science and technology is put up. Artificial intelligence technology has been positioned as one of the important basic technologies for promoting future atomic energy development. The research and development of artificial intelligence technology have been advanced aiming at making nuclear power stations autonomous, by the guidance of Science and Technology Agency and the cooperation of several research institutes. The upbringing of creative science and technology, the preponderant development of basic technology, the concept of developing the basic technology for atomic energy, the concept of autonomous plants, the standard for autonomy, the approach to autonomous plants, the present state of the researches in respective research institutes on autonomous operation and autonomous maintenance are described. (K.I.)

  10. Statement of incidents at nuclear installations: third quarter 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Three incidents are reported for the third quarter of 1992. During a radiological survey of British Nuclear Fuel's site at Sellafield in June, contamination of the ground under a cracked pipebridge was found. Contamination of two workers was removed by washing; the contaminated soil was removed and contained in drums. In September on the same site, a pipe failure occurred and plutonium nitrate leaked into the secondary containment cell leading to a shutdown of the reprocessing plant. However, no discharge of radioactivity to the environment and no additional radiation exposure to workers occurred. This was subsequently classified as a level 3 incident. 25 spots of radioactive contamination of a service road at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority's Winfrith site were removed and disposed of without injury or contamination. Recommendations to improve the site roads and car parks were made. (UK)

  11. Legal requirements concerning the technical safety of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolte, R.

    1984-01-01

    A short survey on nuclear risks and the nuclear safety conception is followed by the attempted clear definition of the semantic import of section 7, sub-section (2), No. 3 of the Atomic Energy Act. There are first beginnings of a concretization of the state-of-the-art in science and technology, i.e. all kinds of sub-legislative regulations such as the regulations of the Radiation Protection Ordinance which show scientific substance, guidelines issued by the Ministers, as well as codes for practice set up by various technical bodies and standardization associations, all of which are designed to compensate for this loop hole in the legislation. This study goes to examine to what extent administration and jurisdiction may take into account such codes of practice for the concretization of the legal requirements, and whether they are even binding on those executing the law. Only the respective regulations of the Radiation Protection Ordinance have a binding effect. All other guidelines and codes of practice are not legally binding per se, nor are they capable of being legally permitted by being referred to in terms of legal norms or by the self-commitment of those executing the law. Any attempt of using them, as the basis of a prime facie evidence or as an anticipating expertise, at least evidentarily for the concretization will have to fail owing to their evaluating character and to the fact that they may interfere in sociological conflict. An exception may be a case where a clear distinction can be made as to what extent the contents of such codes of practice is related to scientific and technological findings or to decisions based on evaluations. In such a case, a prima facil evicdence for the conformity of the regulation in question with the state-of-the-art in science and technology may be considered, which would easy the concretization of Art. 7 II Section 3 of the Atomic Law. (orig./HSCH) [de

  12. Statutory Instrument No. 125, The Nuclear Installations (Falkland Islands and Dependencies) Order 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    This Order extends to the Falkland Islands, with the exceptions, adaptations and modifications specified in the Schedule to the Order, certain provisions of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, as amended. It is the 1965 Act which implements the provisions of the Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention in the United Kingdom. The provisions so extended impose a duty on the nuclear operator to secure that no nuclear occurrence taking place within the territorial limits of the Falkland Islands causes nuclear injury or damage, and relate to the right to compensation for breach of that duty, the bringing and satisfaction of claims and other matters. (NEA) [fr

  13. Statutory Instrument No. 126, The Nuclear Installations (Hong Kong) Order 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    This Order extends to Hong Kong, with the exceptions, adaptations and modifications specified in the Schedule to the Order, certain provisions of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, as amended. It is the 1965 Act which implements the provisions of the Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention in the United Kingdom. The provisions so extended impose a duty on the nuclear operator to secure that no nuclear occurrence taking place within the territorial limits of Hong Kong causes nuclear injury or damage, and relate to the right to compensation for breach of that duty, the bringing and satisfaction of claims and other matters. (NEA) [fr

  14. Statutory Instrument No. 123, The Nuclear Installations (Cayman Islands) Order 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    This Order extends to the Cayman Islands, with the exceptions, adaptations and modifications specified in the Schedule to the Order, certain provisions of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, as amended. It is the 1965 Act which implements the provisions of the Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention in the United Kingdom. The provisions so extended impose a duty on the nuclear operator to secure that no nuclear occurrence taking place within the territorial limits of the Cayman Islands causes nuclear injury or damage, and relate to the right to compensation for breach of that duty, the bringing and satisfaction of claims and other matters. (NEA) [fr

  15. Statutory Instrument No. 125, The Nuclear Installations (Gilbert and Ellice Islands) Order 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    This Order extends to the Gilbert and Ellice Islands, with the exceptions, adaptations and modifications specified in the Schedule to the Order, certain provisions of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, as amended. It is the 1965 Act which implements the provisions of the Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention in the United Kingdom. The provisions so extended impose a duty on the nuclear operator to secure that no nuclear occurrence taking place within the territorial limits of the Gilbert and Ellice Islands causes nuclear injury or damage, and relate to the right to compensation for breach of that duty, the bringing and satisfaction of claims and other matters. (NEA) [fr

  16. The Nuclear Installations (Guernsey) Order 1978 (Statutory Instrument 1528, 24 October 1978)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This Order extends to Guernsey, with the exceptions, adaptations and modifications specified in the Schedule to the Order, certain provisions of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, as amended. It is the 1965 Act which implements the provisions of the Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention in the United Kingdom. The provisions so extended impose a duty on the nuclear operator to secure that no nuclear occurrence taking place within the territorial limits of Guernsey causes nuclear injury or damage, and relate to the right to compensation for breach of that duty, the bringing and satisfaction of claims and other matters. (NEA) [fr

  17. Statutory Instrument No. 122, The Nuclear Installations (British Solomon Islands Protectorate) Order 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    This Order extends to the British Solomon Islands Protectorate, with the exceptions, adaptations and modificatons specified in the Schedule to the Order, certain provisions of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, as amended. It is the 1965 Act which implements the provisions of the Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention in the United Kingdom. The provisions so extended impose a duty on the nuclear operator to secure that no nuclear occurrence taking place within the territorial limits of the British Solomon Islands Protectorate causes nuclear injury or damage, and relate to the right to compensation for breach of that duty, the bringing and satisfaction of claims and other matters. (NEA) [fr

  18. IRSN global process for leading a comprehensive fire safety analysis for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormieres, Yannick; Lacoue, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    A fire safety analysis (FSA) is requested to justify the adequacy of fire protection measures set by the operator. A recent document written by IRSN outlines a global process for such a comprehensive fire safety analysis. Thanks to the French nuclear fire safety regulation evolutions, from prescriptive requirements to objective requirements, the proposed fire safety justification process focuses on compliance with performance criteria for fire protection measures. These performance criteria are related to the vulnerability of targets to effects of fire, and not only based upon radiological consequences out side the installation caused by a fire. In his FSA, the operator has to define the safety functions that should continue to ensure its mission even in the case of fire in order to be in compliance with nuclear safety objectives. Then, in order to maintain these safety functions, the operator has to justify the adequacy of fire protection measures, defined according to defence in depth principles. To reach the objective, the analysis process is based on the identification of targets to be protected in order to maintain safety functions, taken into account facility characteristics. These targets include structures, systems, components and personal important to safety. Facility characteristics include, for all operating conditions, potential ignition sources and fire protections systems. One of the key points of the fire analysis is the assessment of possible fire scenarios in the facility. Given the large number of possible fire scenarios, it is then necessary to evaluate 'reference fires' which are the worst case scenarios of all possible fire scenarios and which are used by the operator for the design of fire protection measures. (authors)

  19. Long-term biological consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, P.R.; Harte, J.; Harwell, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Subfreezing temperatures, low light levels, and high doses of ionizing and ultraviolet radiation extending for many months after a large-scale nuclear war could destroy the biological support systems of civilization, at least in the Northern Hemisphere. Productivity in natural and agricultural ecosystems could be severely restricted for a year or more. Postwar survivors would face starvation as well as freezing conditions in the dark and be exposed to near-lethal doses of radiation. If, as now seems possible, the Southern Hemisphere were affected also, global disruption of the biosphere could ensue, In any event, there would be severe consequences, even in the areas not affected directly, because of the interdependence of the world economy. In either case the extinction of a large fraction of the Earth's animals, plants, and microorganisms seems possible. The population size of Homo sapiens conceivably could be reduced to prehistoric levels or below and extinction of the human species itself cannot be excluded. These conclusions are the concensus from the meeting on Long-Term Worldwide Biological Consequences of Nuclear War

  20. Estimated consequences from severe spent nuclear fuel transportation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnish, J.J.; Monette, F.; LePoire, D.; Biwer, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    The RISKIND software package is used to estimate radiological consequences of severe accident scenarios involving the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. Radiological risks are estimated for both a collective population and a maximally exposed individual based on representative truck and rail cask designs described in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) modal study. The estimate of collective population risk considers all possible environmental pathways, including acute and long-term exposures, and is presented in terms of the 50-y committed effective dose equivalent. Radiological risks to a maximally exposed individual from acute exposure are estimated and presented in terms of the first year and 50-y committed effective dose equivalent. Consequences are estimated for accidents occurring in rural and urban population areas. The modeled pathways include inhalation during initial passing of the radioactive cloud, external exposure from a reduction of the cask shielding, long-term external exposure. from ground deposition, and ingestion from contaminated food (rural only). The major pathways and contributing radionuclides are identified, and the effects of possible mitigative actions are discussed. The cask accident responses and the radionuclide release fractions are modeled as described in the NRC modal study. Estimates of severe accident probabilities are presented for both truck and rail modes of transport. The assumptions made in this study tend to be conservative; however, a set of multiplicative factors are identified that can be applied to estimate more realistic conditions

  1. Economic and envionmental consequences of a nuclear power plant phaseout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, W.D. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Study groups have recently attempted to analyze the issues offered by proponents of halting nuclear power plant construction and those offered by groups in favor of nuclear energy. This paper also analyzes trade-offs, two alternative futures or scenarios for the U.S. being examined: one in which nuclear energy continues to grow at fairly rapid rates vs. one in which nuclear power plants currently operating and those actually under construction are allowed to operate for a normal lifetime but construction of any additional plants is halted. When it is possible and whenever it seems reasonable, the approach taken in this paper is to quantify the relevant trade-offs over the next 50-year period. While this time period is too short to observe the full, ultimate consequences of a nuclear energy phaseout, anything longer would reduce confidence in results to a level too low to make the effort worthwhile. The approach involves consideration of likely developments in each of the major factors that can influence the future in order to determine which assumptions are most reasonable to include in the projection exercise. These assumptions are then incorporated into a model of the U.S. economy that is run for each of the two alternative scenarios in order to estimate the relevant trade-offs. The model and key assumptions used in running both scenarios are described. Results are then compared first in terms of economic and resource impacts and then in terms of environmental impacts. Finally, trade-offs between the two scenarios are reviewed and conclusions given

  2. 1990 No. 1918. The Nuclear Installations Act 1965 (Repeal and Modifications) Regulations 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    These Regulations entered into force on 31 October 1990. They repeal part of Section (1) of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 to remove the exemption of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) from licensing under the Act. The Regulations also amend the 1965 Act to ensure that the UKAEA's duties in respect of the safety of premises it occupies will continue to apply whether or not a nuclear site licence has been granted. (NEA) [fr

  3. Normative questions connected with the procedure for approval and operation of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nocera, F.

    1980-03-01

    Recent regulatory developments in the licensing procedure for nuclear installations in Italy are discussed in the light of technical and scientific developments and international rules. The author then discusses the questions likely to be further defined and regulated, i.e. requirements for possession of fuels and fuel storage facilities, nuclear plant decommissioning, protection of the population with reference to the directives of the European Communities. (NEA) [fr

  4. Order of 10 october 1977 on the special safety measures applicable to certain large nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This Order by the Minister of Industry, Commerce and Crafts and the Minister of Labour was made in implementation of Section 40 of Decree No. 75-306 of 28 April 1975 on the protection of workers against the hazards of ionizing radiation in large nuclear installations. It lays down the safety measures applicable to nuclear reactors and ancillary facilities, particle accelerators, irradiated fuel reprocessing plants and facilities for the storage of radioactive waste. (NEA) [fr

  5. Handling and carrying head for nuclear fuel assemblies and installation including this head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artaud, R.; Cransac, J.P.; Jogand, P.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention proposes a handling and carrying head ensuring efficiently the cooling of the nuclear fuel asemblies it transports so that any storage in liquid metal in a drum within or adjacent the reactor vessel is suppressed. The invention claims also a nuclear fuel handling installation including the head; it allows a longer time between loading and unloading campaigns and the space surrounding the reactor vessel keeps free without occupying a storage zone within the vessel [fr

  6. Can Nuclear Installations and Research Centres Adopt Cloud Computing Platform-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichan, A.; Lazarescu, M.; Soh, S.T.

    2015-01-01

    Cloud Computing is arguably one of the recent and highly significant advances in information technology today. It produces transformative changes in the history of computing and presents many promising technological and economic opportunities. The pay-per-use model, the computing power, abundance of storage, skilled resources, fault tolerance and the economy of scale it offers, provides significant advantages to enterprises to adopt cloud platform for their business needs. However, customers especially those dealing with national security, high end scientific research institutions, critical national infrastructure service providers (like power, water) remain very much reluctant to move their business system to the cloud. One of the main concerns is the question of information security in the cloud and the threat of the unknown. Cloud Service Providers (CSP) indirectly encourages this perception by not letting their customers see what is behind their virtual curtain. Jurisdiction (information assets being stored elsewhere), data duplication, multi-tenancy, virtualisation and decentralized nature of data processing are the default characteristics of cloud computing. Therefore traditional approach of enforcing and implementing security controls remains a big challenge and largely depends upon the service provider. The other biggest challenge and open issue is the ability to perform digital forensic investigations in the cloud in case of security breaches. Traditional approaches to evidence collection and recovery are no longer practical as they rely on unrestricted access to the relevant systems and user data, something that is not available in the cloud model. This continues to fuel high insecurity for the cloud customers. In this paper we analyze the cyber security and digital forensics challenges, issues and opportunities for nuclear facilities to adopt cloud computing. We also discuss the due diligence process and applicable industry best practices which shall be

  7. Consequences of reduced production of electricity in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Power Administration has assessed the possibilities of expanding electric power sources other than nuclear power plants for the years 1980 and 1985. Reports on costs in the form of loss of capital and increased operating costs involved in the dismantling of nuclear power plants are made in Supplement 1. The economics division of the Finance Department, starting with a long-range study model of the Swedish economy, has calculated the consequences of a cutback in electric power up to 1980 for Sweden's economy and employment in that year. The consequences of reduction of electricity supplies up to 1985 are summarized in Supplement 2 in this report. It is concluded that in order to be able to manage the problem of supplying electricity by 1985, it will be necessary to increase oil power above what was assumed in the energy policy program. There will have to be new oil-based power as well. According to the Power Administration, oil-power facilities can be expanded to varying degrees, depending upon when the decision is made. The Power Administration's calculations show that 125 TWh is possible in 1985 without nuclear power only if a decision for discontinuation is made in the fall of 1976. This is based on very optimistic assumptions about the time of execution of a program for oil-steam operation, and also on the assumption that extreme measures will be initiated to force expansion of both district-heating distribution and power + heat facilities. Oil consumption for production of electricity in such an electric power system would be about 9 million m 3 , which is about 5 times more than at present and about one-third of the present total consumption of petroleum products in Sweden

  8. A study into the consequences of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, D.G.

    1987-07-01

    The nuclear industry in Britain would like to believe, and would like the general public to believe, that major accidents such as that at Chernobyl in 1986, could no happen in Britain, because the design and operating procedure have been made as safe as possible. However, because the designers and operators are human, they can make mistakes. Some of these are mentioned; errors of design, errors of maintenance or inspection and errors of judgement. In spite of protestations to the contrary, a major accident could occur at Sizewell-B reactor. Given that this a real possibility, plans should be drawn up to prepare for the situation. The study considers the possible consequences of a nuclear accident under the headings, human error, how nuclear fission works, radioactivity, the truth about Chernobyl, what patterns of reactor accident are possible, what can be done (this includes meteorological information, the issuing of potassium iodate tables, radiation monitoring and evacuation). Practical issues which should concern the local authorities, especially Wrekin Council, are discussed and a recommendation made for an environmental protection officer to be appointed to keep the matter under continuing review. (U.K.)

  9. Analysis of Leukemia incidence (1997-2007) in vicinity area of a nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Rong; Sun Quanfu; Liu Fen; Zhang Xu; Xing Ru; Xu Xinmei; Li Xiaoliang; Su Xu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the leukemia incidence among residents in the vicinity area of a nuclear installation. Methods: The data were collected by the retrospective survey. Diagnosis is based on the medical records in all the relevant hospitals. The study area was those residential areas within 10 km of radium surrounding the installation. All residents who had lived in the study area for six months and over were recruited into the study group. Results: The survey ascertained 643 newly diagnosed leukemia cases in the study area during 1997 to 2007. The crude rate was 2.51/100000, and its standardized rate to national population structure was 2.53/100000. The incidence rate in the study area was slightly lower than that in the whole city. No increase trend was detected during the period. Conclusions: No significant difference of the leukemia incidence rate was found between the vicinity area of the nuclear installation and the whole city. (authors)

  10. Requirements and criteria for choosing sites suitable for the construction of nuclear installations and power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    The present document explains the selection criteria for areas in Italy suitable for the installation of nuclear power stations to be included in the 'National Site Map' provided for in Section 23 of Act No 393 of 2 August 1975. It represents the results of a thorough investigation into the various aspects of the problem of siting nuclear power stations, at the present stage of technology, taking into account the effect of the installations on the environment and the effect of the environment on the installations. The essential aim is to demonstrate that the requirements derived from these analyses, and on which there was full consultation with the other controlling bodies of European countries (in particular, France, Great Britain and West Germany) ensure the optimum choice of areas from the point of view of safety and public health. (author)

  11. Bavarian Constitutional Court, decision of August 14, 1987 (Referendum on sites of nuclear installations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    In the dissenting opinion of one of the judges of the Bavarian Constitutional Court concerning the decision of August 14, 1987, the Land Bavaria has a competence according to the constitution to decide about sites of nuclear installations. Hence it follows that a referendum on this problem has to be permitted. (CW) [de

  12. The Role Of Quality Assurance Program For Safety Operation Of Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harjanto, N.T.; Purwadi, K.P.; Boru, D.S.; Farida; Suharni

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear installations expose potential hazard of radiation, therefore in their construction, operation and maintenance, it is necessary to consider safety aspect, in which the safety requirements which has been determined must be met. One of the requirements that is absolutely needed is quality assurance, which covers arrangement of quality assurance program, organization and administration of the implementation of quality assurance, and supervision. Quality Assurance program is a guideline containing quality policies and basic determination on the realization of activities that effect the quality of equipment's and items used in the operation of nuclear installations in order that the operation of nuclear installation can run safety and in accordance with their design aims and operation limits. Quality Assurance Program includes document control, design control, supply control, control of equipment s and items, operation/process control, inspection and control of equipment test, and control of nonconformance and corrections. General system of nuclear installation operation is equipped with safety and supporting systems. These systems must apply the quality assurance program that cover control of activities in the systems. In the implementation of the quality assurance program, it is necessary to establish procedures, work guidelines/instructions, and quality recording that constitutes documents of quality system 2 nd , 3 th , and 4 th level after the quality assurance program. To ensure the effectivity and to prove whether the realization of the program has been pursuant to the determined requirements, an internal audit must be conducted accordingly

  13. Installation and evaluation of a nuclear power plant operator advisor based on artificial intelligence technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, B.K.; Miller, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on a Nuclear Power Plant operator advisor based on artificial Intelligence Technology; Workstation conversion; Software Conversion; V ampersand V Program Development Development; Simulator Interface Development; Knowledge Base Expansion; Dynamic Testing; Database Conversion; Installation at the Perry Simulator; Evaluation of Operator Interaction; Design of Man-Machine Interface; and Design of Maintenance Facility

  14. Adaptation of high pressure water jets with abrasives for nuclear installations dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouviere, R.; Pinault, M.; Gasc, B.; Guiadeur, R.; Pilot, M.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents the work realized for adjust the cutting technology with high pressure water jet with abrasives for nuclear installation dismantling. It has necessited the conception and the adjustement of a remote tool and the realization of cutting tests with waste produce analysis. This technic can be ameliorated with better viewing systems and better fog suction systems

  15. Legal action initiated by a municipality in order to prevent installation of a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    A municipality is authorized to appeal against the licensing of a nuclear power plant which is about to be installed in the neighbourhood of the municipality in order to protect its water treatment plant. (Non-official headnotes) OVG Rheinland-Pfalz, interlocutary decree of June 3, 1986 - 7 A II 2/85 - (appealable). (orig./HSCH) [de

  16. IAEA Assistance in Helping Member States Develop Effectively Independent and Robust Regulators for Nuclear Installation Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicic, A., E-mail: A.Nicic@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-10-15

    Full text: The International Conference on Topical Issues in Nuclear Installation Safety will be focused on the exchange of information on the latest thinking and advances in the implementation of the concept of Defence-in-Depth (DID) in nuclear installations, and the associated challenges. The focus will be on operating nuclear installations, including nuclear power plants, research reactors and fuel cycle facilities, and on how lessons learned from operating experience and recent events (e.g. the Fukushima Daiichi accident) are used to enhance safety. The implementation of DID covers a number of elements that are directly related to the different states and phases of a nuclear facility. This presentation will discuss the importance of the regulatory body in its oversight role as a cross-cutting element of DID in helping to assure the safety of nuclear installations. Taking note of the numerous challenges in developing an effectively independent and robust regulatory body, the presentation will describe how the IAEA assists Member States in their development of the appropriate regulatory infrastructure and necessary capacity to carry out their regulatory responsibilities – consistent with the IAEA Safety Standards. The presentation will describe the importance of the self-assessment process which serves as a starting point for helping Member States gain an understanding of what support they need and when the support should be provided as they develop into a competent regulatory authority. The presentation will discuss recent improvements in the self-assessment process and related IAEA services in this regard. Once regulatory bodies are established, it is essential that they seek continuous improvement. In this regard, the presentation will describe the IAEA’s assistance provided through the Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) and recent activities to improve the IRRS, consistent with the IAEA’s Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. (author)

  17. Nuclear Installation Safety: General Observations and Trends from IAEA Peer Reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzentkowski, G.

    2016-01-01

    The Safety Review Services (SRSs) for nuclear installations address the needs of Member States at all stages of installations’ lifecycle. SRSs are based on the IAEA Safety Standards and are provided on Member States’ request to peer review national regulatory frameworks and safety provisions for nuclear installations. They result in recommendations and suggestions to improve national regulations and operational safety, and serve to exert peer pressure to ensure that that every Member State with nuclear installations recognizes its safety responsibility and the need to comply with the IAEA Safety Standards. This presentation provides an overview of SRSs for Nuclear Installations, including their structure and main subject areas. The presentation also summarizes general findings and trends which clearly demonstrate that there is continuous improvement in regulation of nuclear installations and in safety of their operation. Nevertheless, there is the need to further enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of SRSs through review of the overall governance model and service delivery to better serve the needs of Member States. The presentation points out some areas of improvements which have already been implemented or are being considered for implementation. Just as important, SRSs are conducted by teams of experts from around the world to strengthening international cooperation, ensure diversity and impartiality, and improve the overall quality of the safety review being conducted. The review team members are also provided with the opportunity for mutual learning and sharing good practices among themselves and with the Member State undergoing the review. As a result, SRAs play an important role in a quest to harmonize regulatory requirements and approaches globally. (author)

  18. A legislative framework for the safety of nuclear installations in the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kus, S.; Emmerechts, S.

    2009-01-01

    For the first time since the inception of the European Community in 1957 and after two previously unsuccessful attempts, on 25 June 2009 the Council of the European Union adopted European-wide, binding requirements on nuclear safety. The goal of the 'Council Directive establishing a Community framework for the nuclear safety of nuclear installations' ('the Directive') is to maintain and to promote the continuous improvement of nuclear safety and to ensure that a high level of nuclear safety is provided by EU member states to protect workers and the general public against the dangers arising from nuclear installations. The Directive is based on the IAEA Safety Fundamentals and the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The 27 member states of the Community are required to bring into force the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with the Directive by 22 July 2011. The Directive applies to a range of nuclear installations that is wider than the one adopted in the Convention on Nuclear Safety.9 The Directive applies to any civilian nuclear installation, defined as: a) an enrichment plant, nuclear fuel fabrication plant, nuclear power plant, reprocessing plant, research reactor facility, spent fuel storage facility; and b) storage facilities for radioactive waste that are on the same site and are directly related to nuclear installations listed under point a). The Directive is without doubt a milestone in international and regional law making in the field of nuclear law, not so much because of its content but because of the supranational nature of European law and the powers of EU institutions. Member states have long resisted the Directive because of the powers which it delegates to the European Commission, and more importantly, to the European Court of Justice. The Commission, as the guardian of the treaties and the measures taken by the institutions, ensures that EU legislation is applied correctly by the member states. It can start

  19. Consequences of Fukushima 11032011 - Radiological consequences from the nuclear accidents in Fukushima on 11 March 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-12-01

    On 11 March 2011 at 14.46 the strongest earthquake ever recorded in Japan struck the Pacific coast in front of Fukushima. The earthquake and the following tsunami damaged the nuclear power plants in Fukushima Dai-ichi to such an extent that the Japanese government declared the state of catastrophic accident with degree 7 according to the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES). At Fukushima Dai-ichi there were 6 boiling water reactors (BWR), a storage pool for spent fuel assemblies and a dry cask storage. 12 km apart at Fukushima Dai-ni there were 4 more BWR. At the moment of the earthquake the reactors 1 to 3 of Fukushima Dai-ichi, as well as the 4 reactors at Fukushima Dai-ni, were at full power, while the reactors 4 to 6 of Fukushima Dai-ichi were shut down for revision. From 12 March 2011 on, fairly large quantities of radioactive materials were released from Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors with meaningful consequences on the population in the near neighbourhood. The irradiation from the radioactivity bearing clouds, the ingestion and inhalation, and the deposit of radioactive materials on the ground threatened the population. The inhabitants of large areas had to be evacuated. Furthermore, radioactive materials contaminated the drinking water, the sea water and finally the plants and animals, i.e. the food chain of the people living there. The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) continuously proceeded with the evaluation of the situation in Japan and a specialists' team made a detailed analysis of the accident, with emphasis on the human and organisational factors and on the lessons learned from this. The present report describes the present knowledge about the radiological consequences of the accident in Fukushima Dai-ichi on the population in the neighbourhood and on the staff at the power plant, until October 2011. First, the unrolling of the accident and its consequences on the plant site are analysed according to international

  20. Post-installed concrete anchors in nuclear power plants: Performance and qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahrenholtz, Philipp; Eligehausen, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Review of qualification and design regulations for anchors in nuclear power plants. • First complete set of nuclear anchor load–displacement data and its evaluation ever. • Demonstration of robust test behavior of a qualified post-installed anchor product. - Abstract: In nuclear power plants (NPPs), post-installed anchors are widely used for structural and non-structural connections to concrete. In many countries, anchor products employed for safety relevant applications have to be approved by the authorities. For the high safety standards in force for NPPs, special requirements have to be met to allow for extreme design situations. This paper presents an experimental test program conducted to evaluate the performance of anchors according to the German Guideline for Anchorages in Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Technology Installations (DIBt KKW Leitfaden, 2010). After a brief introduction to anchor behavior and the regulative context, the results of tension and shear tests carried out on undercut anchors are discussed. Robust load capacities and relatively small displacements determined for demanding load and crack cycling tests demonstrated the suitability of anchors qualified according to a state-of-the-art qualification guideline

  1. Environmental Impact Assessment for the Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations. Vol. 1-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussell, M.J.; Haigh, C.P.; O'Sullivan, P.J.; Mathieson, J.; Braeckeveldt, M.; Deconinck, J.M.; Vidaechea, S.; Beceiro, A.; Ziegenhagen, J.; Biurrun, E.; Codee, H.; Palerm, J.; Bond, A.J.; Warren, L.; Sheate, B.

    2001-06-01

    This Report presents the results of a study concerned with Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for the decommissioning of nuclear installations in European Union Member States and in the Applicant Countries in Central and Eastern Europe. The study, undertaken for the Environment Directorate General of the European Commission, took place between January 2000 and March 2001 under contract number B4-3040/99/136035/MAR/C2 entitled Environmental Impact Assessment for the Decommissioning of nuclear Installations. The study presents an analysis of the current situation in the European Union and in the Applicant Countries, and develops guidance for applying the relevant Directives for EIA to the specific issue of decommissioning nuclear installations although there is also scope for application to other large or controversial projects. The first part of the report (Volume 1) describes the current situation in the EU Member States and Applicant Countries. On the basis of this status, the guidance presented in Volume 2 was developed. Draft versions of these volumes were reviewed by an independent review panel and were then subjected to detailed discussion and debate at a Workshop held in Brussels in January 2001. The Workshop was attended by more than 60 representatives of the nuclear industry, nuclear regulators, public interest groups and EIA experts. Some minor changes were made following the Workshop, a record of which can be found in Volume 3. (author)

  2. Risk of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear installations: Findings and recent controversies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominique Laurier; Bernd Grosche; Hall, Per

    2002-01-01

    The identification of a local excess of cancer cases, possibly associated with ionizing radiation, always receives substantial media coverage and communication about clusters is difficult. We reviewed studies that examined the risk of leukaemia among young people near nuclear installations. An excess of leukaemia exists near some nuclear installations, at least for the reprocessing plants at Sellafield and Dounreay and the nuclear power plant Kruemmel. Nonetheless, the results of multi-site studies invalidate the hypothesis of an increased risk of leukaemia related to nuclear discharge. Up until now, analytic studies have not found an explanation for the leukaemia clusters observed near certain nuclear installations. The hypothesis of an infectious aetiology associated with population mixing has been proposed, but needs to be investigated further. The review illustrates two recent examples in France (La Hague reprocessing plant) and in Germany (Kruemmel power plant), where controversies developed after reports of increased leukaemia risks. These examples show the importance of recalling the current epidemiological knowledge and of using systematic recording of cases to replace the alleged excesses in a more general framework. Some elements should also be suggested from the recent French and German experiences to reinforce credibility in the results

  3. Long-term biological consequences of nuclear war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, P R; Harte, J; Harwell, M A; Raven, P H; Sagan, C; Woodwell, G M; Berry, J; Ayensu, E S; Ehrlich, A H; Eisner, T

    1983-12-23

    Subfreezing temperatures, low light levels, and high doses of ionizing and ultraviolet radiation extending for many months after a large-scale nuclear war could destroy the biological support systems of civilization, at least in the Northern Hemisphere. Productivity in natural and agricultural ecosystems could be severely restricted for a year or more. Postwar survivors would face starvation as well as freezing conditions in the dark and be exposed to near-lethal doses of radiation. If, as now seems possible, the Southern Hemisphere were affected also, global disruption of the biosphere could ensue. In any event, there would be severe consequences, even in the areas not affected directly, because of the interdependence of the world economy. In either case the extinction of a large fraction of the Earth's animals, plants, and microorganisms seems possible. The population size of Homo sapiens conceivably could be reduced to prehistoric levels or below, and extinction of the human species itself cannot be excluded.

  4. Order of 6 October 1977 defining the characteristics of each type of large nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This Order, made by the French Minister of Industry, Commerce and Crafts and the Minister of Labour, lays down the characteristics of large nuclear installations which should be included in the document provided for under Section 10 of decree No. 75-306 of 28 April 1975 on the protection of workers against the hazards of ionizing radiation in large nuclear installations. These include inter alia the reactor type, its nominal power, the nature and cladding of the fuel, the rate of loading/unloading of the fuel, provisions to prevent criticality risks outside normal operation of the reactor, controlled areas and the measures for protection against ionizing radiation. The Order also lays down the characteristics for plants for the preparation and treatment of irradiated nuclear fuels as well as the characteristics of facilities for the storage, use, manufacture and transformation of radioactive substances, and the maximum permissible annual quantities of radioactive releases. (NEA) [fr

  5. Protocol between the Nuclear Protection and Safety Bureau of Portugal and the Nuclear Energy Commission of Spain on Technical Information concerning Nuclear Installations in Border Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Protocol was concluded under the Agreement of the same date on the safety of nuclear installations in border areas. Its purpose is to prescribe the type of information referred to in the Agreement. It lays down in detail all the documents to be supplied concerning the siting, construction, operation and decommissioning of nuclear installations, including the geological, seismological, meteorological, hydrological and ecological aspects of the sites concerned, for purposes of environmental protection; the characteristics of the projected installations and emergency plans must also be provided. Similarly to the Agreement, this Protocol will remain in force for a period of ten years. (NEA) [fr

  6. Consequences of the nuclear power plant accident at Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, H.M.; Reis, E.

    1991-01-01

    The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR), on April 26, 1986, was the first major nuclear power plant accident that resulted in a large-scale fire and subsequent explosions, immediate and delayed deaths of plant operators and emergency service workers, and the radioactive contamination of a significant land area. The release of radioactive material, over a 10-day period, resulted in millions of Soviets, and other Europeans, being exposed to measurable levels of radioactive fallout. Because of the effects of wind and rain, the radioactive nuclide fallout distribution patterns are not well defined, though they appear to be focused in three contiguous Soviet Republics: the Ukrainian SSR, the Byelorussian SSR, and the Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic. Further, because of the many radioactive nuclides (krypton, xenon, cesium, iodine, strontium, plutonium) released by the prolonged fires at Chernobyl, the long-term medical, psychological, social, and economic effects will require careful and prolonged study. Specifically, studies on the medical (leukemia, cancers, thyroid disease) and psychological (reactive depressions, post-traumatic stress disorders, family disorganization) consequences of continued low dose radiation exposure in the affected villages and towns need to be conducted so that a coherent, comprehensive, community-oriented plan may evolve that will not cause those already affected any additional harm and confusion

  7. The Iran nuclear ambitions and the international consequences; Les ambitions nucleaires de l'Iran et leurs consequences internationales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-01-15

    This analysis of the Iran situation concerning the nuclear policy, is presented and discussed in three parts: the data and hypothesis of the iranian nuclear program, the regional strategy of Iran and evolution scenario and their consequences. (A.L.B.)

  8. Organisation arrangements of nuclear medicine services. Planning of installations. Laboratory monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanteur, J.

    1977-01-01

    Apart from safety and quality requirements, the organisation of nuclear medicine services, or more generally of installations where nonsealed radioactive sources are used, is governed by profitability and efficiency criteria. In view of the high price of products and apparatus, the equipment must be based on a rationalisation of options guiding the organisation arrangements as a whole. The following items are dealt with in succession: various categories of installations; general planning of equipment; equipment regulations based on a major requirement, the confinement of contamination sources; practical observations concerning administrative and technical questions

  9. Design, fabrication and installation of irradiation facilities -Advanced nuclear material development-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Seong; Lee, Jeong Yeong; Lee, Seong Ho; Ji, Dae Yeong; Kim, Seok Hoon; An, Seong Ho; Kim, Dong Hoon; Seok, Ho Cheon; Kim, Joon Yeon; Yang, Seong Hong

    1994-07-01

    The objective of this study is to design and construct the steady state fuel test loop and non-instrumented capsules to be installed in KMRR. The principle contents of this project are to design, fabricate the steady-state fuel test loop and non-instrumented capsule to be installed in KMRR for nuclear technology development. This project will be completed in 1996, so preparation of design criteria for fuel test loop have been performed in 1993 as the first year of the first phase in implementing this project. Also design and pressure drop test of non-instrumented capsule have been performed in 1993

  10. Advanced LP turbine installation at 1300 MW nuclear power station Unterweser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, G.; Oeynhausen, H.; Termuehlen, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on Preussen Elektra AG's Unterweser power plant. The steam turbine-generator features a disk-type LP turbine rotor design developed in the late 1960's to early 1970's. This rotor design has been installed in 19 nuclear power plants. The 47 rotors in these plants have been in operation for an average of almost 10 years. The design of the 1970 vintage nuclear LP turbine rotors was based on extensive experience gained with disk-type rotors of fossil turbines built in the 1950's. When EPRI reported about corrosion cracking in nuclear LP turbines, a program was initiated by Siemens/KWU as original steam turbine supplier to ultrasonically inspect all their disk-type rotors in nuclear power plats. Indications on one rotor disk in the Unterweser plant was found. This single event was the only one found out of 310 disks inspected in nuclear power plants

  11. Security of a nuclear material in an installation is determined by how far the installation is to assure that nuclear material remains at a predetermined location

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djoko Hari Nugroho

    2010-01-01

    This paper observed a preliminary design on nuclear material tracking system in the installation for decision making support based on multi sensor fusion that is reliable and accurate to ensure that the nuclear material remains inside the control area. Capability on decision making in the Management Information System is represented by an understanding of perception in the third level of abstraction. The second level will be achieved with the support of image analysis and organizing data. The first level of abstraction is constructed by merger between several CCD camera sensors distributed in a building in a data fusion representation. Data fusion is processed based on Wavelett approach. Simulation utilizing Matlab programming shows that Wavelett fuses multi information from sensors as well. Hope that when the nuclear material out of control regions which have been predetermined before, there will arise a warning alarm and a message in the Management Information System display. Thus the nuclear material movement time event can be obtained and tracked as well. (author)

  12. Inventory of chemical releases of nuclear installations in the North-Cotentin; Inventaire des rejets chimiques des installations nucleaires du Nord-Cotentin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-05-15

    The nuclear installations concerned by this study are Cogema La Hague, the Flamanville nuclear power plant, the Manche plant and the National Navy of Cherbourg.The objective followed by the ' source term ' work group has consisted in counting and examining the whole of existing measures relative to the releases of chemical substances in the liquid and gaseous effluents. Then because of the lack of measures for the operation first years of installations, the work group has estimated the order of magnitude of these chemical releases (essentially for Cogema La Hague). This report presents a review of the literature looking at the background levels of chemicals in different environmental compartments: air, soil, plants and animals products. these values have been summarized here to be available for comparisons with concentrations input by the North Cotentin nuclear installations, calculated by the G.R.N.C. (radioecology group of Nord Cotentin)

  13. International conference on the operational safety performance in nuclear installations. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, the IAEA organized an 'International Conference on Topical Issues in Nuclear Safety'. The issues discussed during the conference were: (1) risk- informed decision-making; (2) influence of external factors on safety; (3) safety of fuel cycle facilities; (4) safety of research reactors; and (5) safety performance indicators. Senior nuclear safety decision makers reviewed the issues and formulated recommendations for future actions by national and international organizations. In 2004, the IAEA organized an 'International Conference on Topical Issues in Nuclear Safety' in Beijing China. The issues discussed during the conference were: (1) changing environment - coping with diversity and globalization; (2) operating experience - managing changes effectively; (3) regulatory management systems - adapting to changes in the environment; and (4) long term operations - maintaining safety margins while extending plant lifetimes. The results of this conference confirmed the importance of operators and regulators of nuclear facilities meeting periodically to share experience and opinion on emerging issues and future challenges of the nuclear industry. Substantial progress has been made, and continues to be made by Member States in enhancing the safety of nuclear installations worldwide. At the same time, more attention is being given to other areas of nuclear safety. The safety standards for research reactors are being updated and new standards are planned on the safety of other facilities in the nuclear fuel cycle. The Agency has taken a lead role in this effort and is receiving much support from its Member States to gain international consensus in these areas. The objective of the conference is to foster the exchange of information on operational safety performance and operating experience in nuclear installations, with the aim of consolidating an international consensus on: - the present status of these issues; - emerging issues with international implications

  14. Technical organization of safety authorities for the event of an accident at a nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherrer, J.; Evrard, J.M.; Ney, J.

    1986-01-01

    Within the general context of nuclear safety, the Central Nuclear Installation Safety Service of the French Ministry for Industry and its technical backup, the Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety of the CEA (Atomic Energy Commission), have established a special organization designed to provide real-time forecasts of the evolution of a nuclear accident situation with sufficient forewarning for the local representative of the Government (the Commissaire de la Republique in the Departement affected) to implement, as required, effective countermeasures to protect the population - for example, confinement indoors or evacuation. Descriptions are given of the principles of this organization and the particular precautions taken to confront the problems of mobilizing experts and of dealing with the saturation of normal telecommunications channels to be expected in the event of a nuclear accident. The organization set up for the installations belonging to Electricite de France is given as a detailed example. Particular stress is placed on the organizational arrangements of the Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety designed to provide the emergency teams with the evaluation and forecasting tools they require to carry out their tasks. The procedures are on the whole well developed for atmospheric radioactivity transport, for which operational models already exist. Computer-backed methods with improved performance are at present being developed. A method of forecasting the behaviour of the releases resulting from nuclear accidents is set out for pressurized water reactors, based on evaluating the physical state of the installation, confinement integrity, availability of safety and backup systems, support systems and feed sources and on forecasting how this state will develop on the basis of measured and inferred physical values transmitted from the affected power station through a national network. The experience acquired during accident

  15. Outline of a future security system to provide physical protection of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossnagel, A.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear energy, within three or four decades, may become a main pillar of the world's energy supply. The author discusses the problems entailed by the necessity to protect nuclear facilities against assaults, and whether this can be ensured without interference with civic rights. The method applied by the author to show the significance of the problems is to explain the current situation, and to compare it with a plausible outline of the developments to be expected over the next 50 years. He shows the hazards to be taken into account due to criminal actions by persons from outside, or by persons working in nuclear facilities. A main problem is the fact that the security system to be set up has to encompass not only the nuclear installation itself, but also the surrounding area, and the measures to be taken will have an impact on the society, which necessarily will curtail personal freedom. The author presumes that the necessity to guarantee physical protection of nuclear facilities will lead to a modification of the meaning of basic rights, and states his anxiety that security for nuclear installations might affect our concept of freedom. (HSCH) [de

  16. Safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic and activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic in 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemanova, D.

    2008-01-01

    Prepared pursuant to the provisions of the Atomic Act, the report provides information on the safety of nuclear installation in the Slovak Republic and activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic ( UJD SR). UJD SR executes its activities in the area of legislation, issuance of authorizations and permissions for the siting, construction, operation and decommissioning of nuclear installations, in the area of reviews, assessments and control of nuclear safety of nuclear installations and emergency planning, in the area of records and accountability of nuclear materials, independent public information and in the area of international co-operation focused on peaceful uses of nuclear power. Based on the results of inspection activities and evaluation of safety indicators, UJD SR assessed the operation of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic as safe and reliable. No significant event that could have a negative impact on the personnel, population or environment occurred in 2007. (orig.)

  17. Seismic Hazard Assessment in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations: Ground Motion Prediction Equations and Site Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this publication is to provide the state-of-the-art practice and detailed technical elements related to ground motion evaluation by ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) and site response in the context of seismic hazard assessments as recommended in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSG-9, Seismic Hazards in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations. The publication includes the basics of GMPEs, ground motion simulation, selection and adjustment of GMPEs, site characterization, and modelling of site response in order to improve seismic hazard assessment. The text aims at delineating the most important aspects of these topics (including current practices, criticalities and open problems) within a coherent framework. In particular, attention has been devoted to filling conceptual gaps. It is written as a reference text for trained users who are responsible for planning preparatory seismic hazard analyses for siting of all nuclear installations and/or providing constraints for anti-seismic design and retrofitting of existing structures

  18. Study on the installation of the evacuation guide signs in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Yuko; Hamasaki, Kenichi; Ohuchi, Hiroko; Akagi, Shigefumi;; Sato, Takeyoshi

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the desirable sign system that leads people to the proper evacuation behavior in the nuclear plant, an experiment was conducted by using 3D simulation of a part of the nuclear buildings. As the condition of the experiment, 3 different simulations on the type of guide signs and the height of installation were provided. Participants in the experiment were asked: to reach the emergency exit as quickly as possible in case of the imaginary fire, to report the signs utilized for finding the way during his evacuation, and to evaluate their comprehensibility to evaluate synthetically each installation and guide sings from the view point of comprehensibility. Synthetic evaluation was highly rated when we indicated the signs on the face of the floor additionally and installed the guide signs at a height of 1000mm above the floor. For the individual guide sign, it tended to evaluate mostly comprehensible that the pathway guide sign was installed at 1,000mm above the floor, though it did not reach a statistical significant level. Furthermore, the necessity was suggested to take into consideration on the spatial relationship between a moving person and the guide signs. (author)

  19. Stakeholder involvement in the management of effluent discharges from nuclear installations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, T.; Gadbois, S.; Heriard Dubreuil, G.; Oudiz, A.

    2004-01-01

    The involvement of local stakeholders in the decision-making process regarding health, safety and environmental issues is developing in many countries. As far as the management of effluent discharges from nuclear installations in France is concerned, members of Local Commission of Information, including elected people and NGOs, are playing an increasing role in that respect. To deepen the understanding of these risk governance processes, a working group of experts from different institutions was set up in 2000 by the Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN). The aim of this working group was to 1) analyse the stakeholder involvement processes already in place in France around nuclear and non-nuclear installations; 2) perform case studies of few national and international experiences around nuclear installations (notably concerning the revision of creation authorisation decree of COGEMA La Hague reprocessing plant, the environmental policy of BNFL Sellafield reprocessing plant, the discharges surveillance of EDF Fessenheim nuclear power plant); 3) study the evolution of the regulatory context for the stakeholder involvement. Four main elements, contributing to the social trust emerge from this analysis: 1) the social dynamics of the consultation process, notably with the emergence of 'new' stakeholders such as elected people and NGOs; 2) the readability of the plant follow-up from the point of view of local stakeholders and their involvement in the decision process (the relay role of these 'new' stakeholders); 3) the contribution of the institutional and pluralist expertise to the social trust (broadening of the range of values taken into account); 4) the issue of the local justification of the plant in the prospect of the sustainable development (no risk being acceptable without counter-parts). This paper will address these different issues on the basis of the case studies in the perspective of examining the radiological risk governance process

  20. Report on activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic in 2009. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-04-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD SR) in 2009 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Foreword; (2) Legislation; (3) Issuance of authorizations, assessment, supervisory activities and enforcement; (4) Nuclear safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic; (5) Safety of other nuclear installations; (6) Management of radioactive waste; (7) Nuclear materials and physical protection of nuclear materials; (8) Emergency planning and preparedness; (9) International activities; (10) Public communication; (11) Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic; (12) UJD SR organization chart; (13) Abbreviations.

  1. Report on activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic in 2008. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemanova, D.; Pirozekova, M.

    2009-04-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD SR) in 2008 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Foreword; (2) Legislation; (3) Issuance of authorizations, assessment, supervisory activities and enforcement; (4) Nuclear safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic; (5) Safety of other nuclear installations; (6) Management of radioactive waste; (7) Nuclear materials and physical protection of nuclear materials; (8) Activity of Building Office; (9) Emergency planning and preparedness; (10) International activities; (11) Public communication; (11) Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic; (12) UJD SR organization chart; (13) Abbreviations

  2. Report on Activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and on Safety of Nuclear Installations in the Slovak Republic in 2005. Annual report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemanova, D.; Seliga, M.; Sladek, V.

    2006-04-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic in 2005 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: Foreword; (1) Vision, Mission and Principles of Activities; (2) Legislation; (3) Issuance of Authorisations, Safety Assessment and Enforcement; (4) Nuclear Safety of Nuclear Installations in the Slovak Republic; (4.1) Nuclear installations in operation in the Slovak Republic; (4.2) Nuclear Installations under construction in the Slovak Republic; (4.3) Decommissioning of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic; (5) Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management and Safety of other Nuclear Installations in the Slovak Republic; (5.1) Generation and minimisation of radioactive waste; (5.2) Management of radioactive waste; (5.3) Pre-disposal management of radioactive waste; (5.4) Disposal of radioactive waste; (5.5) Shipment of radioactive waste; (5.6) Safety of other nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic; (6) Personnel Qualification and Training; (7) Nuclear Materials and Physical Protection of Nuclear installations; (8) Emergency Preparedness; (9) International Co-operation; (10) Public Communication; (11) UJD SR; (11.1) UJD SR organizational chart; (11.2) UJD SR organizational chart; (11.3) Human resources and training; (11.4) Internal system of quality assurance; (11.5) Development of UJD SR regulatory activities; Appendix: Abbreviations; Development of UJD SR regulatory activities

  3. HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate: a bibliography of published work, 1962-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNichol, K.

    1988-04-01

    This bibliography contains references to published reports, conference papers and journal articles produced by individual members of the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate and the Inspectorate as a whole. The bibliography has been compiled from records held by the Health and Safety Executive Library and Information Service. All items have been indexed in HSELINE, HSE's publicly available database. The bibliography is arranged in 2 parts: by author(s) and by subject. (author)

  4. Specifications, tests, and installation of wires and cables for the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, F.J.

    1977-01-01

    The process of selecting wires and cables for the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Project is described. The criteria for the fire and environmental tests, the basis for the specifications, and the reasons for the final choice and acceptance are outlined. A short section is dedicated to the installation of cables in raceways with reference to separation and color coding. Also covered are the selection and testing of fire stops and the selection of seismic supports

  5. Installation of a new type of nuclear reactor in Mexico: advantages and disadvantages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurado P, M.; Martin del Campo M, C.

    2005-01-01

    In this work the main advantages and disadvantages of the installation of a new type of nuclear reactor different to the BWR type reactor in Mexico are presented. A revision of the advanced reactors is made that are at the moment in operation and of the advanced reactors that are in construction or one has already planned its construction in the short term. Specifically the A BWR and EPR reactors are analyzed. (Author)

  6. Some problems of evaluating environmental impacts of nuclear power installation building and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uvirova, E.

    1984-01-01

    The impacts of the construction and operation of a nuclear power installation on the natural environment is discussed, namely on changes in the landscape profile, in the structure of settlement and large-scale agricultural production, the requisition of agricultural land, changes in transport systems, etc., as well as approaches to the evaluation of these environmental impacts with the aim of preserving the optimal state of inter-relations between man and the natural environment. (author)

  7. A problem of optimization for the specific cost of installed electric power in nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sultan, M A; Khattab, M S [Reactors Dept. nuclear research centre, atomic energy authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    The optimization problem analyzed in this paper is related to the thermal cycle parameters in nuclear power stations having steam generators. The optimization the specific cost of installed power with respect to the average operating saturation temperature in the station thermal cycle. The analysis considers the maximum fuel cladding temperature as a limiting factor in the optimization process as it is related to the safe operation of the reactor. 4 figs.

  8. Application and development of dismantling technologies for decommissioning of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, W.; Kremer, G.; Ruemenapp, T.

    2006-01-01

    The decommissioning of nuclear installations poses a challenge to high performance underwater cutting technologies because of complex limiting conditions, like radioactive contamination, accessibility, geometry of work piece, material thickness and composition. For the safe dismantling of the moderator tank and the thermal shield of the Multi-purpose Research Reactor (MZFR) Karlsruhe the development and the use of thermal cutting tools will be demonstrated, in this case the underwater plasma arc cutting and the contact arc metal cutting (CAMC). (orig.)

  9. The Community's research and development programme on decommissioning of nuclear installations. Third annual progress report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This is the third annual progress report of the European Community's programme (1984-88) of research on the decommissioning of nuclear installations. It shows the status of the programme on 31 December 1987. The third progress report describes the objectives, scope and work programme of the 69 research contracts concluded, as well as the progress of work achieved and the results obtained in 1987

  10. The community's research and development programme on decommissioning of nuclear installations. Fourth annual progress report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    This is the fourth annual progress report on the European Community's programme (1984-88) of research on the decommissioning of nuclear installations. It shows the status of the programme at 31 December 1988. The fourth progress report describes the objectives, scope and work programme of the 72 research contracts concluded, as well as the progress of work achieved and the results obtained in 1988

  11. Decree No. 83/7405 of 18 November 1983 on the licensing procedure for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This Decree (No. 83/7405) on the licensing procedure for nuclear installations came into force on 19 December 1983 and supersedes Decree No. 7/9141 of 5 December 1974 on the same subject. The general lines of the licensing procedure laid down by this new Decree are similar to that provided by the 1979 Decree; it is also carried out in three stages: site, construction and operating licences are delivered in succession. (NEA) [fr

  12. The installed nuclear capacity is expected to grow by 70% by 2030 according to WNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2011-01-01

    The installed nuclear capacity is expected to grow by 70% in the next 20 years and to reach 614 GW in 2030 according to the World National Association (WNA). The main demand will come from China, India, Korea and the United-Kingdom. This growth will imply a 70% growth in the demand for uranium. Australia, Canada and Kazakhstan that own the biggest reserves of uranium will benefit from this growing demand. (A.C.)

  13. Installation and evaluation of a nitrogen-16 detector in the Ford nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, R.R.

    1995-01-01

    Core differential temperature is the final measure of steady-state power at the Ford nuclear reactor. During some evolutions, such as changing the number of cooling-tower fans in operation, differential temperature undergoes a transient and does not provide an accurate measure of true power. A 16 N detector was installed to provide a more stable measure of power, even under transient conditions

  14. The European Community's research and development programme on the decommissioning of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skupinski, E.

    1988-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities (CEC) continued with a second research programme on the decommissioning of nuclear installations (1984-88), after having completed a first programme on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants (1979-83). The programme, which has about 70 research contracts with organisations or private firms in the member states, includes the development and testing of advanced techniques, such as decontamination and dismantling, and the consideration of the radioactive waste arising therefrom. Work is done at laboratory scale or in the context of large-scale decommissioning operations. The paper will give an overview on the technical content and on some selected results. (author)

  15. Nuclear reactor installation with outer shell enclosing a primary pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The high temperature nuclear reactor installation described includes a fluid cooled nuclear heat source, a primary pressure vessel and outer shell around the primary pressure vessel and acting as a protection for it against outside projectiles. A floor is provided internally dividing the outside shell into two upper and lower sections and an inside wall dividing the lower section into one part containing the primary pressure vessel and a second part, both made pressure tight with respect to each other and with the outside shell and forming with the latter a secondary means of containment [fr

  16. The Creation of a French Basic Nuclear Installation - Description of the Regulatory Process - 13293

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahe, Carole [CEA Marcoule - BP17171 - 30207 Bagnols-Sur-Ceze (France); Leroy, Christine [CEA Cadarache - 13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2013-07-01

    CEA is a French government-funded technological research organization. It has to build a medium-level waste interim storage facility because the geological repository will not be available until 2025. This interim storage facility, called DIADEM, has to be available in 2017. These wastes are coming from the research facilities for spent fuel reprocessing and the dismantling of the most radioactive parts of nuclear facilities. The CEA handles the waste management by inventorying the needs and updating them regularly. The conception of the facility is mainly based on this inventory. It provides quantity and characteristics of wastes and it gives the production schedule until 2035. Beyond mass and volume, main characteristics of these radioactive wastes are chemical nature, radioisotopes, radioactivity, radiation dose, the heat emitted, corrosive or explosive gas production, etc. These characteristics provide information to study the repository safety. DIADEM mainly consists of a concrete cell, isolated from the outside, wherein stainless steel welded containers are stored, stacked in a vertical position in the racks. DIADEM is scheduled to store three types of 8 mm-thick, stainless steel cylindrical containers with an outside diameter 498 mm and height from 620 to 2120 mm. DIADEM will be a basic nuclear installation (INB in French) because of overall activity of radioactive substances stored. The creation of a French basic nuclear installation is subject to authorization according to the French law No. 2006-686 of 13 June 2006 on Transparency and Security in the Nuclear Field. The authorization takes into account the technical and financial capacities of the licensee which must allow him to conduct his project in compliance with these interests, especially to cover the costs of decommissioning the installation and conduct remediation work, and to monitor and maintain its location site or, for radioactive waste disposal installations, to cover the definitive shut

  17. The Creation of a French Basic Nuclear Installation - Description of the Regulatory Process - 13293

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahe, Carole; Leroy, Christine

    2013-01-01

    CEA is a French government-funded technological research organization. It has to build a medium-level waste interim storage facility because the geological repository will not be available until 2025. This interim storage facility, called DIADEM, has to be available in 2017. These wastes are coming from the research facilities for spent fuel reprocessing and the dismantling of the most radioactive parts of nuclear facilities. The CEA handles the waste management by inventorying the needs and updating them regularly. The conception of the facility is mainly based on this inventory. It provides quantity and characteristics of wastes and it gives the production schedule until 2035. Beyond mass and volume, main characteristics of these radioactive wastes are chemical nature, radioisotopes, radioactivity, radiation dose, the heat emitted, corrosive or explosive gas production, etc. These characteristics provide information to study the repository safety. DIADEM mainly consists of a concrete cell, isolated from the outside, wherein stainless steel welded containers are stored, stacked in a vertical position in the racks. DIADEM is scheduled to store three types of 8 mm-thick, stainless steel cylindrical containers with an outside diameter 498 mm and height from 620 to 2120 mm. DIADEM will be a basic nuclear installation (INB in French) because of overall activity of radioactive substances stored. The creation of a French basic nuclear installation is subject to authorization according to the French law No. 2006-686 of 13 June 2006 on Transparency and Security in the Nuclear Field. The authorization takes into account the technical and financial capacities of the licensee which must allow him to conduct his project in compliance with these interests, especially to cover the costs of decommissioning the installation and conduct remediation work, and to monitor and maintain its location site or, for radioactive waste disposal installations, to cover the definitive shut

  18. Regulations by the DFTCE concerning the Fund for the decommissioning of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    These Regulations were made by the Federal Ministry of Transport, Communications and Energy in implementation of the Ordinance of 5 December 1983 establishing a fund for the decommissioning of nuclear installations. They specify the way in which nuclear operators must contribute to the fund and the method for calculating the contributions. The costs of decommissioning also include dismantling and disposal of the resulting waste. The Regulations entered into force retroactively, on 1 January 1984, on the same date as the 1983 Ordinance. (NEA) [fr

  19. Installation and commissioning of operation nuclear power plant reactor protection system modernization project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weiwei

    2010-01-01

    Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant is the first nuclear power plant in mainland China; it is also the first one which realizes the modernization of analog technology based Reactor Protection System in the operation nuclear power plant of China. The implementation schedule is the shortest one which use same digital technology platform (TELEPERM XS of AREVA NP) to modifying the safety class I and C system in the world, the whole project spent 28 months from equipment contract signed to putting system into operation. It open up a era for operation nuclear power plant using mature digital technology to make safety class I and C system modernization in China. The important practical significance of this successful project is very obvious. This article focus on two important project stage--equipment installation and system commissioning, it is based on a large number of engineering implementation fact, it covers the problems and solutions happened during the installation and commission. The purpose of the article is to share the experience and lessons of safety I and C system modernization for other operation nuclear power plant. (authors)

  20. Acquired experience resulting from transforming a chemical installation into a nuclear one

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamfirache, M.; Stefan, L.; Bornea, A.; Stefanescu, I. [National Research and Development Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies - ICIT, Uzinei (Romania)

    2015-03-15

    ICIT-Valcea has developed an experimental pilot-scale installation for tritium and deuterium separation. The main objective of this pilot was to demonstrate the water detritiation technology and to transfer this technology to the CANDU reactors of the Cernavoda nuclear power plant. The pilot-scale installation was initiated in 1992. The initial design and construction were performed similarly to chemical plants as the separation of isotopes was focused on only hydrogen and deuterium to assess feasibility. In a second phase we have begun to transform it into a nuclear facility with the aim of separating tritium. Moving to tritium separation has imposed a lot of changes. Changes consisted mainly of: -) re-design of the technological systems for nuclear material processing, applying specific codes and standards (ASME, Romanian nuclear specific pressure boundary prescriptions for code classification); -) design and implementation of new systems, classified as safety systems; -) re-design and implementation of command and control systems, complying with the requirements of reliability and maintenance required for the project promoted; -) revaluation of auxiliary systems (utilities, power supply); -) implementing radiation protection systems, including secondary barriers; -) implementing and maintaining environment operational program specific to the new nuclear plant; -) developing and conducting safety analyzes; and -) the production of specific documentation to obtain the necessary permits for construction, commissioning and operation of the plant.

  1. Childhood leukaemia risks: from unexplained findings near nuclear installations to recommendations for future research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurier, D; Jacob, S; Grosche, B; Dehos, A; Hornhardt, S; Ziegelberger, G

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings related to childhood leukaemia incidence near nuclear installations have raised questions which can be answered neither by current knowledge on radiation risk nor by other established risk factors. In 2012, a workshop was organised on this topic with two objectives: (a) review of results and discussion of methodological limitations of studies near nuclear installations; (b) identification of directions for future research into the causes and pathogenesis of childhood leukaemia. The workshop gathered 42 participants from different disciplines, extending widely outside of the radiation protection field. Regarding the proximity of nuclear installations, the need for continuous surveillance of childhood leukaemia incidence was highlighted, including a better characterisation of the local population. The creation of collaborative working groups was recommended for consistency in methodologies and the possibility of combining data for future analyses. Regarding the causes of childhood leukaemia, major fields of research were discussed (environmental risk factors, genetics, infections, immunity, stem cells, experimental research). The need for multidisciplinary collaboration in developing research activities was underlined, including the prevalence of potential predisposition markers and investigating further the infectious aetiology hypothesis. Animal studies and genetic/epigenetic approaches appear of great interest. Routes for future research were pointed out. (review)

  2. Regulation of the life cycle of nuclear installations. Peer discussions on regulatory practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    This report arises from the sixth series of peer discussions on regulatory practices entitled 'Regulation of Life Cycle of Nuclear Installations'. Senior regulators from 18 Member States participated in three peer group discussions during 1997-1998. This report presents the outcome of these meetings and recommendations of good practices identified by senior regulators, which do not necessarily reflect those of the governments of the nominating Member States, the nominating organizations, or the IAEA. The purpose of this report is to disseminate the views which the senior regulators presented at the meetings relating to the policies, principles and requirements imposed by regulatory bodies for the safe management of the life cycle of a nuclear installation. The intention of doing this is to assist Member States in the formulation and enhancement of their regulatory control over PLCM by identifying commonly accepted good practices. This report is structured to cover the subject matter under the following main headings: Policies and Principles for the Life Cycle Management of Nuclear Installations; Responsibilities of the Regulatory Body and the Operating Organization; Requirements and Criteria Imposed by the Regulatory Body; Licensing and Regulatory Assessment for Plant Life Cycle Management; and Good Practices

  3. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.S.; Abrahmson, S.; Bender, M.A.; Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1993-10-01

    This report is a revision of NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990), Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis. This revision has been made to incorporate changes to the Health Effects Models recommended in two addenda to the NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 11, 1989 report. The first of these addenda provided recommended changes to the health effects models for low-LET radiations based on recent reports from UNSCEAR, ICRP and NAS/NRC (BEIR V). The second addendum presented changes needed to incorporate alpha-emitting radionuclides into the accident exposure source term. As in the earlier version of this report, models are provided for early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating the risks of seven types of cancer in adults - leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and ''other''. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Five classes of genetic diseases -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocations, and multifactorial diseases are also considered. Data are provided that should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk

  4. Report on Activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and on Safety of Nuclear Installations in the Slovak Republic in 2006. Annual Report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemanova, D.; Pirozekova, M.

    2007-04-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic in 2006 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: Foreword; (1) Vision, Mission and Principles of Activities; (2) Legislation; (3) Issuance of Authorisations, Safety Assessment and Enforcement; (3.1) Issuance of Authorizations/Permissions; (3.2) Assessment and Inspections Activities; (3.3) Safety Assessment and Enforcement; (4) Nuclear Safety of Nuclear Installations in the Slovak Republic; (4.1) Nuclear installations in operation in the Slovak Republic; (4.2) Nuclear Installations under construction in the Slovak Republic; (4.3) Decommissioning of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic; (5) Safety of Other Nuclear Installations; (5.1) Other Nuclear Installations in Operation; (5.2) Other Nuclear Installations under Construction; (5.3) Other Nuclear Installations under Decommissioning; (6) Management of Radioactive Waste; (6.1) Generation and minimisation of radioactive waste; (6.2) Management of radioactive waste; (6.3) Pre-disposal management of radioactive waste; (6.4) Disposal of radioactive waste; (6.5) Shipment of radioactive waste; (7) Nuclear Materials; (7.1) Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials; (7.2) Shipment of Nuclear Materials; (7.3) Illicit Trafficking of Nuclear Materials and Other Radioactive Material; (8) Emergency Planning and Preparedness; (9) International Activities; (9.1) European Affairs; (9.2) Membership in International Organisations; (9.3) Fulfilment of Obligations under International Contractual Instruments; (9.4) Bilateral Co-operation; (10) Public Communication; (11) UJD SR; (11.1) Economy Data; (11.2) Human resources and training; (11.3) Internal Management Quality System; (11.4) Development of UJD SR Regulatory Activities; (12) Abbreviations

  5. Conceptual Design of On-line Based Licensing Review and Assesment System of Nuclear Installations and Nuclear Materials ('PRIBEN')

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melani, Ai; Chang, Soon Heung

    2008-01-01

    At the present Indonesia has no nuclear power plant in operation yet, although it is expected that the first nuclear power plant will be operated and commercially available in around the year of 2016 to 2017 in Muria Peninsula. There are only three research reactors, one nuclear fuel fabrication plant for research reactors, and one experimental fuel fabrication plant for nuclear power, one isotope production facility and some other research facilities. All the facility is under Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) controlling through regulation, licensing and inspection. The organizations operation submits licensing application to BAPETEN before utilizing the facility. According to the regulation before BAPETEN give license they perform review and assessment for the utility application. Based on the review and assessment result, BAPETEN may stipulate, reject, delay or terminate the license. In anticipation of expansion of the nuclear program in Indonesia, BAPETEN should have an integrated and updated system for review and asses the licensing application. For this reason, an expert system for the review and asses the licensing application, so-called PRIBEN (Perizinan Reaktor, Instalasi dan Bahan Nuklir/Licensing of Reactor, Nuclear Installations and Nuclear Materials), is developed which runs on the online-based reality environment

  6. The economic potential of a cassette-type-reactor-installed nuclear ice-breaking container ship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Koichi; Takamasa, Tomoji

    1999-01-01

    An improved cassette-type marine reactor MRX (Marine Reactor X) which is currently researched and developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is designed to be easily removed and transferred to another ship. If the reactor in a nuclear-powered ship, which is the reason for its higher cost, were replaced by the cassette-type-MRX, the reusability of the MRX would reduce the cost difference between nuclear-powered and diesel ships. As an investigation of one aspect of a cassette-type MRX, we attempted in this study to do an economic review of an MRX-installed nuclear-powered ice-breaking container ship sailing via the Arctic Ocean. The transportation cost between the Far East and Europe to carry one TEU (twenty-foot-equivalent container unit) over the entire life of the ship for an MRX (which is used for a 20-year period)-installed container ship sailing via the Arctic Ocean is about 70% higher than the Suez Canal diesel ship, carrying 8,000 TEU and sailing at 25 knots, and about 10% higher than the Suez Canal diesel ship carrying 4,000 TEU and sailing at 34 knots. The cost for a cassette-type-MRX (which is used for a 40-year period, removed and transferred to a second ship after being used for 20 years in the first ship)-installed nuclear-powered container ship is about 7% lower than that for the one operated for 20 years. Considering any loss or reduction in sales opportunities through the extension of the transportation period, the nuclear-powered container ship via the Arctic Sea is a more suitable means of transportation than a diesel ship sailing at 25 knots via the Suez Canal when the value of the commodities carried exceeds 2,800 dollars per freight ton. (author)

  7. Nuclear catastrophe in Japan. Health consequences resulting from Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulitz, Henrik; Eisenberg, Winfrid; Thiel, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    On 11 March 2011, a nuclear catastrophe occurred at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan in the wake of an earthquake and due to serious safety deficiencies. This resulted in a massive and prolonged release of radioactive fission and decay products. Approximately 20% of the radioactive substances released into the atmosphere have led to the contamination of the landmass of Japan with 17,000 becquerels per square meter of cesium-137 and a comparable quantity of cesium-134. The initial health consequences of the nuclear catastrophe are already now, after only two years, scientifically verifiable. Similar to the case of Chernobyl, a decline in the birth rate was documented nine months after the nuclear catastrophe. Throughout Japan, the total drop in number of births in December 2011 was 4362, with the Fukushima Prefecture registering a decline of 209 births. Japan also experienced a rise in infant mortality, with 75 more children dying in their first year of life than expected statistically. In the Fukushima Prefecture alone, some 55,592 children were diagnosed with thyroid gland nodules or cysts. In contrast to cysts and nodules found in adults, these findings in children must be classified as precancerous. There were also the first documented cases in Fukushima of thyroid cancer in children. The present document undertakes three assessments of the expected incidence of cancer resulting from external exposure to radiation. These are based on publications in scientific journals on soil contamination in 47 prefectures in Japan, the average total soil contamination, and, in the third case, on local dose rate measurements in the fall of 2012. Taking into consideration the shielding effect of buildings, the medical organization IPPNW has calculated the collective lifetime doses for individuals at 94,749 manSv, 206,516 manSv, and 118,171 manSv, respectively. In accordance with the risk factors set by the European Committee on Radiation Risk (ECRR) for death

  8. The decommissioning of nuclear facilities; Le demantelement des installations nucleaires de base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niel, J.Ch.; Rieu, J.; Lareynie, O.; Delrive, L.; Vallet, J.; Girard, A.; Duthe, M.; Lecomte, C.; Rozain, J.P.; Nokhamzon, J.G.; Davoust, M.; Eyraud, J.L.; Bernet, Ph.; Velon, M.; Gay, A.; Charles, Th.; Leschaeva, M.; Dutzer, M.; Maocec, Ch.; Gillet, G.; Brut, F.; Dieulot, M.; Thuillier, D.; Tournebize, F.; Fontaine, V.; Goursaud, V.; Birot, M.; Le Bourdonnec, Th.; Batandjieva, B.; Theis, St.; Walker, St.; Rosett, M.; Cameron, C.; Boyd, A.; Aguilar, M.; Brownell, H.; Manson, P.; Walthery, R.; Wan Laer, W.; Lewandowski, P.; Dorms, B.; Reusen, N.; Bardelay, J.; Damette, G.; Francois, P.; Eimer, M.; Tadjeddine, A.; Sene, M.; Sene, R

    2008-11-15

    This file includes five parts: the first part is devoted to the strategies of the different operators and includes the following files: the decommissioning of nuclear facilities Asn point of view, decommissioning of secret nuclear facilities, decommissioning at the civil Cea strategy and programs, EDF de-construction strategy, Areva strategy for decommissioning of nuclear facilities; the second one concerns the stakes of dismantling and includes the articles as follow: complete cleanup of buildings structures in nuclear facilities, decommissioning of nuclear facilities and safety assessment, decommissioning wastes management issues, securing the financing of long-term decommissioning and waste management costs, organizational and human factors in decommissioning projects, training for the decommissioning professions: the example of the Grenoble University master degree; the third part is devoted to the management of dismantling work sites and includes the different articles as follow: decommissioning progress at S.I.C.N. plant, example of decommissioning work site in Cea Grenoble: Siloette reactor decommissioning, matters related to decommissioning sites, decommissioning of french nuclear installations: the viewpoint of a specialist company, specificities of inspections during decommissioning: the Asn inspector point of view; the fourth part is in relation with the international approach and includes as follow: IAEA role in establishing a global safety regime on decommissioning, towards harmonization of nuclear safety practices in Europe: W.E.N.R.A. and the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, EPA superfund program policy for decontamination and decommissioning, progress with remediation at Sellafield, progress and experiences from the decommissioning of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant in Belgium, activities of I.R.S.N. and its daughter company Risk-audit I.r.s.n./G.r.s. international in the field of decommissioning of nuclear facilities in eastern countries

  9. Atmospheric dispersion and the radiological consequences of normal airborne effluents from a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, D.; Yang, L.; Sun, C.Z.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between the consequences of the normal exhaust of radioactive materials in air from nuclear power plants and atmospheric dispersion is studied. Because the source terms of the exhaust from a nuclear power plant are relatively low and their radiological consequences are far less than the corresponding authoritative limits, the atmospheric dispersion models, their various modifications, and selections of relevant parameters have few effects on those consequences. In the environmental assessment and siting, the emphasis should not be placed on the consequence evaluation of routine exhaust of nuclear power plants, and the calculation of consequences of the exhaust and atmospheric field measurements should be appropriately, simplified. 12 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs

  10. Assessing and improving the safety culture of non-power nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastin, S.J.; Cameron, R.F.; McDonald, N.R.; Adams, A.; Williamson, A.

    2000-01-01

    The development and application of safety culture principles has understandably focused on nuclear power plant and fuel cycle facilities and has been based on studies in Europe, North America, Japan and Korea. However, most radiation injuries and deaths have resulted from the mishandling of radioactive sources, inadvertent over-exposure to X-rays and critically incidents, unrelated to nuclear power plant. Within the Forum on Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA), Australia has been promoting initiatives to apply safety culture principles across all nuclear and radiation application activities and in a manner that is culturally appropriate for Asian countries. ANSTO initiated a Safety Culture Project in 1996 to develop methods for assessing and improving safety culture at nuclear and radiation installations other than power reactors and to trial these at ANSTO and in the Asian region. The project has sensibly drawn on experience from the nuclear power industry, particularly in Japan and Korea. There has been a positive response in the participating countries to addressing safety culture issues in non-power nuclear facilities. This paper reports on the main achievements of the project. Further goals of the project are also identified. (author)

  11. Report on activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic in 2007. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-04-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD SR) in 2007 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Foreword; (2) Legislation; (3) Issuance of authorizations, assessment, supervisory activities and enforcement; (4) Nuclear safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic; (5) Safety of other nuclear installations; (6) Management of radioactive waste; (7) Nuclear materials; (8) Emergency planning and preparedness; (9) International activities; (10) Public communication; (11) Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic; (12) Abbreviations

  12. Basic principles and guidelines governing services of the police for the protection of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, R.; Kern, R.

    1989-01-01

    Services of the police can be ordered for physical protection of nuclear installations of any kind and of nuclear materials transports in cases where there is danger that those first responsible cannot cope with the situation. The contribution discusses physical protection measures as a licensing requirement, the duties of the police forces within the given scope, the measures that can and may be taken by the police, the establishment of special commissions, as well as the particular provisions for nuclear materials transports. The provisions governing police services for physical protection have led to an efficient and well furnished system in terms of organisation, personnel, and materials, which guarantees protection to a great extent. (orig./HSCH) [de

  13. Radioecological danger of failures with nuclear weapons and liquidation of their consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetchko, O.

    2000-01-01

    This report also presents information on elements of the assurance system for nuclear and radiation safety at MINATOM facilities and statistics on traumatic mortality, various accidents, and their consequences. MINATOM is a scientific-industrial complex of technology-related enterprises for the mining of materials, production of fissile materials, and fabrication of nuclear fuels for atomic power engineering and other items for military technology. Additional work is done on industrial and experimental reactors, processing of spent fuel for radioactive waste burial, and sector response systems for possible emergency situations. In a complex system there are various approaches to safety assurance, but they also have some things in common. The level of safety at an installation is largely dictated by the scientific ideas and technical solutions behind its design, and to what degree the components have been corroborated and tested, including the quality of equipment manufacture, construction, assembly, and level of operation. An important feature of the safety assurance system of MINATOM is centralization and coordination of activity for all types of facilities, which includes the Ministry level and the Department of Safety and Emergency Situations, and incorporates all types of safety concerns at the individual sites which are handled by the site senior engineer. (authors)

  14. International Conference on Topical Issues in Nuclear Installation Safety: Defence in Depth — Advances and Challenges for Nuclear Installation Safety. Proceedings of an International Conference held in Vienna, Austria, 21-24 October 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-10-15

    The fifth International Conference on Topical Issues in Nuclear Installation Safety was dedicated to the defence in depth (DID) concept which is fundamental to the safety of nuclear installations. The main focus of the conference was to foster the exchange of information on the implementation of DID and the associated challenges. This CD-ROM contains the papers presented at the conference as well as the summary and conclusions, including recommendations for further actions to strengthen DID and its implementation.

  15. IAEA Assistance to developing countries in the regulation of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phuong, H.V.

    1977-01-01

    The paper analyses the IAEA assistance to developing countries in the regulation of nuclear installations. The projected growth of nuclear power both in industrialised and developing IAEA Member States has led to a reassessment of the role that the Agency should play pursuant to its statutory obligation in the area of nuclear safety. Accelerated work was begun nearly 3 years ago to establish a wide range of recommendations essential in matters of nuclear power plant safety so as to provide an internationally acceptable body of basic criteria and minimum requirements. In recent years the IAEA has increasingly provided advisory services to developing countries for the elaboration of enabling legislation; also intensive training programmes covering specific nuclear safety and regularoty topics have been carried out through special training courses and conducted in co-operation with host countries with extensive nuclear experience and appropriate training facilities. Experience has shown that these services have been of practical help to national authorities in providing guidance and initiatives for speeding up the process of framing laws and regulations. (NEA) [fr

  16. Safety culture in nuclear installations: Summary of an international topical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnino, A.; Derrough, M.; Weimann, G.

    1996-01-01

    An international topical meeting, Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations, was organized by the American Nuclear Society (ANS) Austria Local Section, cosponsored by the ANS Nuclear Reactor Safety and Human Factors Divisions in cooperation with the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (NEA/OECD) and held in Vienna April 24-28, 1995. Some 250 experts from 30 different countries and organizations took part in the 85 paper presentations and two workshops. The concept of safety culture was initially used in the first International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) report on the Chernobyl accident analysis report in 1986. Although some elements of safety culture have been used over the years in nuclear safety activities, the new phrase safety culture and the concept were found interesting as highlighting the 'soft' aspects of safety and as encompassing more than human errors. Unfortunately, for many years it was used more in the way of identifying lack of safety culture. Conscious of this application, INSAG further developed the safety culture concept in the INSAG 4 report: The report contains a definition, the universal aspects of safety culture, the two main components of safety culture management and individual behaviour, and performance indicators of a good safety culture. This report is now quite famous and adopted with some additions or complementary definitions by many institutes and organizations for their daily activities

  17. European Community (Radiological and Nuclear Medicine Installations) Regulations, 1998. Statutory Instrument S.I. No. 250 of 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    These regulations establish the criteria of acceptability to be met for radiological installations and nuclear medicine installations. The regulations implement the provisions of EC Directive 84/466 Euratom of 3 September 1984 laying down the basic measures for radiation protection of persons undergoing medical examinations or treatment and to provide protection for workers and the general public. (author)

  18. The management of radioactive wastes and the dismantling of nuclear installations in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchet, Bertrand

    2014-08-01

    This report first presents the Spanish institutional framework, briefly presents the multi-year national plan of management of radioactive wastes, and indicates the origin and volume of radioactive wastes produced in Spain. It addresses the management of low and medium level wastes, the case of spent fuel and high level wastes (storage in pool and installations of temporary warehousing, project of a centralized temporary storage, the question of definitive management), and proposes an overview of R and D activities in the different domains of waste management in Spain: waste technology, technologies and processes of treatment, packaging and dismantling, materials and containment systems, behaviour and safety assessment, radiological protection and associated modelling, infrastructure and cooperation. The two last parts briefly address the funding of waste management and the dismantling of nuclear installations

  19. ASN guide project. Protection of base nuclear installations against external flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This guide aims at defining criteria to be taken into account to assess risks of flooding of a nuclear installation in case of external flooding, at proposing an acceptable method to assess such risks, at listing recommendations to define protection means adapted to the peculiarities of the flood risk and implemented by the operators with respect to the life phases of the installation, and in taking the climate change into account. The first part proposes an approach allowing the identification of reference situations which are to be taken into account for the flood risk. The second part deals with the quantification of parameters which characterize physical phenomena associated with these situations. The third part identifies the peculiarities of the flood risk as well as the guiding principles for designing options and protection mean selection with respect to a given flood risk

  20. The year 2000 embedded systems problem to maintain the safety of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardisasmita, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    The Y2K problem may impact on nuclear installations in a number of ways because embedded systems are used in nuclear routine operation, monitoring and control system. The very simplest embedded systems are capable of performing only a single function or set of functions to meet a single predetermined purpose. In more complex systems the functioning of the embedded system is determined by an application program that enables the embedded system to be used for a particular purpose in a specific application. The simplest devices consist of a single microprocessor which may itself be packaged with other chips in a hybrid system or Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). Its input comes from a detector or sensor and its output goes to a switch or activator which may start or stop the operation of a positioning motors or, by operating a valve, may control the flow of cooling system to reactor core. Embedded systems in our organization are also be found in Batan security systems. These include systems for the security of buildings and premises, and in the communication systems on which these depend. In the enclosed paper we demonstrate the use of analytic model and reliability analysis. The subject of this reliability test is to detect the components of the embedded system with PLC's that could fail on Y2K problem in nuclear installation and safety system. (author)

  1. The dismantling of nuclear installations in the Grenoble CEA centre - Press book 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laveissiere, Stephane; Coronini, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    After having outlined the importance of the project for the Grenoble CEA centre, this document presents the objectives, issues and challenges of dismantling activities performed on various nuclear installations located in the CEA centre of Grenoble. Objectives are presented in terms of agenda, predicted production of radioactive wastes, budget, personnel and steering committee. The various nuclear installations are presented: experimental reactors (Melusine, Siloe, Siloette), LAMA (laboratory of analysis of active materials), STED (station for the treatment of effluents and wastes). The safety and protection of workers is addressed in terms of protection and monitoring measures, and of exposure to radiations. The next part deals with the monitoring of the environment (actors, history of control of the centre's releases, control points, releases, atmosphere monitoring, and hydrological monitoring). A second part presents the global strategy of the CEA for its activities of sanitation and nuclear dismantling: present operations, dismantling activities in Fontenay-aux-Roses and in Marcoule, economic organization, contribution of advanced technology in radiological measurement and control, simulation and modelling, decontamination techniques, cutting operations, and remotely controlled operations

  2. Virtual dosimetry applied to the physical security of a nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santo, Andre Cotelli do E.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Machado, Daniel M.; Chelles, Daniel R.; Goncalves, Deise G.S.

    2013-01-01

    An important activity to be held in radiation protection is the location of radioactive sources. The present work was devoted to the development of a virtual dosimetry tool for locating and detecting such sources. To this end, was created a three-dimensional virtual model of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear - IEN, endowed with virtual characters (avatars), capable of move and interact with the environment, radiation detectors (fixed and mobile) and radioactive sources. Aiming to assist in planning physical security of nuclear installations, the tool developed allows the detection simulation of individuals carrying radioactive sources through detectors installed at strategic points of the site. In addition, it is possible to detect and locate sources by handling portable detectors, operated by characters within the virtual environment. The results obtained show the behavior of the radiation detectors on continuous profile of radioactive sources, allowing calculate the dose rate at any position of the virtual environment. Thus, this work can assist in the training of security officers, as well as in evaluating the radiological safety of the nuclear site. (author)

  3. Safety culture in nuclear installations: Bangladesh perspectives and key lessons learned from major events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalil, A.; Rabbani, G.

    2002-01-01

    Steps necessary to be taken to ensure safety in nuclear installations are suggested. One of the steps suggested is enhancing the safety culture. It is necessary to gain a common understanding of the concept itself, the development stages of safety culture by way of good management practices and leadership for safety culture improvement in the long-term. International topical meetings on safety culture may serve as an important forum for exchange of experiences. From such conventions new initiatives and programmes may crop up which when implemented around the world is very likely to improve safety management and thus boost up the safety culture in nuclear installations. International co-operation and learning are to be prompted to facilitate the sharing of the achievements to face the challenges involved in the management of safety and fixing priorities for future work and identify areas of co-operations. Key lessons learned from some major events have been reported. Present status and future trend of nuclear safety culture in Bangladesh have been dealt with. (author)

  4. Virtual dosimetry applied to the physical security of a nuclear installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santo, Andre Cotelli do E.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Machado, Daniel M.; Chelles, Daniel R.; Goncalves, Deise G.S., E-mail: cotelli.andre@gmail.com, E-mail: mol@ien.gov.br, E-mail: machado.mol@gmail.com, E-mail: daniel.chelles@gmail.com, E-mail: deise.galvao@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    An important activity to be held in radiation protection is the location of radioactive sources. The present work was devoted to the development of a virtual dosimetry tool for locating and detecting such sources. To this end, was created a three-dimensional virtual model of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear - IEN, endowed with virtual characters (avatars), capable of move and interact with the environment, radiation detectors (fixed and mobile) and radioactive sources. Aiming to assist in planning physical security of nuclear installations, the tool developed allows the detection simulation of individuals carrying radioactive sources through detectors installed at strategic points of the site. In addition, it is possible to detect and locate sources by handling portable detectors, operated by characters within the virtual environment. The results obtained show the behavior of the radiation detectors on continuous profile of radioactive sources, allowing calculate the dose rate at any position of the virtual environment. Thus, this work can assist in the training of security officers, as well as in evaluating the radiological safety of the nuclear site. (author)

  5. Radiation exposure as a result of radioactivity in the vicinity of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van As, Deodandus.

    1975-11-01

    The nuclear industry in South Africa is expected to expand dramatically and, as a result, the effects of radioactive effluent from these installations on the environment will be of great practical and scientific importance. The long-term effects of low-level radiation cannot be clinically predicted; physical determination and prediction is therefore the accepted measure of radiation exposure. This study includes a survey of all forms of natural and man-made radiation to which the general public is constantly exposed. An intensive study was made of radioactive fallout over South Africa from nuclear bomb tests. From this the general radiation exposure of the South African public could be calculated. It also led to valuable scientific information on mesometeorology and health physics. The latter includes the relationship between air concentration and deposition, the transfer of airborne iodine-131 to milk, and the accumulation of strontium-90 and cesium-137 in human beings as a result of their diets. Thorough environmental studies were conducted at existing nuclear installation sites i.e. Pelinbada which is the site of the National Nuclear Research Centre and Dynefontein which is the proposed site of South Africa's first nuclear power station. These included meso-meteorology, atmospheric dispersion by means of neutron-activable tracers, accumulation factors for important radionuclides in edible marine species by means of stable element tracers, population surveys, background radioactivity surveys etc. From these results critical exposure pathways were established for both sites and the relationship between effluent release and radiation dose to the public was determined. This has lead to the establishment of maximum permissible releases for the operation of the SAFARI-1 research reactor by the Atomic Energy Board and for the specifications of the proposed Koeberg power reactors to be operated by the Electricity Supply Commission at Dynefontein [af

  6. The cost of the nuclear energy-turnaround. An early nuclear phase-out and its consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, Metin

    2013-01-01

    The booklet on the consequences of an early nuclear phase-out includes a description of the value creation strategy in the electricity market and the basic relations of the electricity price formation and a survey and evaluation of selected studies. The analysis was performed for the following studies: Energy policy scenarios for a nuclear phase-out in Germany; Economic consequences of a nuclear phase-out in Germany; Transformation of the electricity production systems with a forced nuclear phase-out - a contribution on sustainable energy systems following the reactor accident of Fukushima; Cost of a nuclear phase-out until 2022 in Germany and Bavaria.

  7. IAEA safety fundamentals: the safety of nuclear installations and the defence in depth concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aro, I.

    2005-01-01

    This presentation is a replica of the similar presentation provided by the IAEA Basic Professional Training Course on Nuclear Safety. The presentation utilizes the IAEA Safety Series document No. 110, Safety Fundamentals: the Safety of Nuclear Installations. The objective of the presentation is to provide the basic rationale for actions in provision of nuclear safety. The presentation also provides basis to understand national nuclear safety requirements. There are three Safety Fundamentals documents in the IAEA Safety Series: one for nuclear safety, one for radiation safety and one for waste safety. The IAEA is currently revising its Safety Fundamentals by combining them into one general Safety Fundamentals document. The IAEA Safety Fundamentals are not binding requirements to the Member States. But, a very similar text has been provided in the Convention on Nuclear Safety which is legally binding for the Member State after ratification by the Parliament. This presentation concentrates on nuclear safety. The Safety Fundamentals documents are the 'policy documents' of the IAEA Safety Standards Series. They state the basic objectives, concepts and principles involved in ensuring protection and safety in the development and application of atomic energy for peaceful purposes. They will state - without providing technical details and without going into the application of principles - the rationale for actions necessary in meeting Safety Requirements. Chapter 7 of this presentation describes the basic features of defence in depth concept which is referred to in the Safety Fundamentals document. The defence in depth concept is a key issue in reaching high level of safety specifically at the design stage but as the reader can see the extended concept also refers to the operational stage. The appendix has been taken directly from the IAEA Basic Professional Training Course on Nuclear Safety and applied to the Finnish conditions. The text originates from the references

  8. Lifetime Management Programs as a basis for the long term operation of nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López González, Manuel; Lobato Galeote, Carlos, E-mail: mlopezg@idom.com, E-mail: carlos.lobato@idom.com [IDOM - Consulting, Engineering & Architecture SAU, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    From the licensing standpoint there are several approaches worldwide to obtain an authorization to operate a NPP beyond its design life. According to the License Renewal Application (LRA) approach, followed in the United States of America and another countries, plants need to develop a Life Time Management Program (LTMP) with which manage the potential aging processes (corrosion, erosion, erosion-corrosion, radiation and thermally induced embrittlement, fatigue, corrosion fatigue, creep, binding and wear) associated to the Structures, Systems and Components. A LTMP is composed of several tasks which represents a technical challenge for a nuclear installation. (author)

  9. Influence of radioactive effluents from nuclear installations on mortality of the woods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoutjesdijk, J.F.

    1986-11-01

    Referring to a theory of Reichelt that also radioactive materials, effused from nuclear installations and uranium ores, can contribute to mortality of the woods, it is checked, by studying corresponding literature, to what extent this agrees with the facts. According to this study the radionuclides seem to contribute to the internal and external radiation doses of plants. However these doses are so small with respect to natural radiation doses that it is highly unprobable that this effect contributes to damage of the woods. (Auth.)

  10. Lifetime Management Programs as a basis for the long term operation of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López González, Manuel; Lobato Galeote, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    From the licensing standpoint there are several approaches worldwide to obtain an authorization to operate a NPP beyond its design life. According to the License Renewal Application (LRA) approach, followed in the United States of America and another countries, plants need to develop a Life Time Management Program (LTMP) with which manage the potential aging processes (corrosion, erosion, erosion-corrosion, radiation and thermally induced embrittlement, fatigue, corrosion fatigue, creep, binding and wear) associated to the Structures, Systems and Components. A LTMP is composed of several tasks which represents a technical challenge for a nuclear installation. (author)

  11. Application of high-strength non-shrink cement based grouting material in nuclear power installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhong; Zuo Weiwei

    2011-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the related technical requirement of secondary grouting during the process of equipment installation in nuclear power projects. The method and procedure are introduced in detail from the aspects of acceptance, preparation, pouring, collecting and maintenance of the high-strength non-shrinking based pouring cement material, and the cautions during the construction is also provided. The factors affecting the quality of the field grouting is analyzed, and the measures to reduce or eliminate the micro-cracks during the process is provided. (authors)

  12. The interest of intervention of foreign communities in the litigation about nuclear installation authorizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lami, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    The author comments the decision of inadmissibility taken by the French State Council about the validity of legal actions undertaken by foreign communities (for instance Swiss communities) to challenge the legality of a decision authorizing the creation of a nuclear installation located in France. The author outlines and comments the fact that, despite this decision of inadmissibility, the Council applies unprecedented criteria to judge the appeal admissibility. In a second part, the author discusses the importance of the risk factor and the way it assessed by the administrative court

  13. Determination of the standards of the thermo-physiological tolerance for working in basic nuclear installation in TIVA protective clothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova, P.; Daret, J.L.; Besnard, Y.; Clerc, N.; Savourey, G.; Launay, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the duration limited exposure (DLE) for working in a contaminated zone in a basic nuclear installation using the new ventilated TIVA protective clothing. Five subjects underwent a treadmill exercise (3.5 km/h, 3% of slope) of up to 2 h in a climatic chamber at 25, 35, and 45 deg. C. Cardiac frequency, rectal temperature and skin temperature were continuously recorded. The dehydration level was measured by the loss of weight during the exercise. At 25 deg. C, thermal and cardiovascular thresholds are not reached; the risk is dehydration if the exercise is prolonged. In contrast, the thresholds for Tre at 39 deg. C (97 ± 29 and 69 ± 28 min for 35 and 45 deg. C, respectively) and for the increase in Tre (+1.5 deg. C) are reached earlier (84 ± 38 min and 57 ± 21 min at 35 and 45 deg. C, respectively). This leads to a higher heat storage (42.2 ± 22.9 W/m 2 and 63.7 ± 29.4 W/m 2 , at 35 and 45 deg. C, respectively), which constitutes a higher risk of heat illnesses. The dehydration level is 2% of the weight for the tests at 35 and 45 deg. C. As a consequence, DLE for working in a contaminated zone in a basic nuclear installation in environmental conditions and using the new ventilated TIVA protective clothing, as encountered in our experiments, are proposed to avoid hyperthermic accidents. (authors)

  14. Planet earth in jeopardy: environmental consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dotto, L.

    1986-01-01

    An attempt is made to describe the details of what nuclear war could actually mean for the world. The events during and following a possible large-scale exchange of nuclear weapons and all the associated uncertainties are presented. The first major uncertainty involves how many nuclear weapons could be used in the event of war. The discussion chooses half the world's stockpile, or 6000 megatons, as a basis for judging nuclear war's effects. Shock waves, an electromagnetic pulse, searing heat, and ionizing radiation account for the initial deaths and destruction. Petroleum and other organic materials combust to set up a nuclear winter and all the disturbances to agriculture, forests, waters, etc. This is where the book's greatest message comes through: the seriousness of the aftereffects, especially on agriculture, could far exceed the immediate effects

  15. The national law on nuclear activity: some consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Acosta, G.

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the contents of the new National Law on Nuclear Activities of the Argentine Republic, analysing the functions of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) (former National Board of Nuclear Regulation -ENREN) and the privatisation of the nuclear power generation performed by the enterprise Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. (NASA). It also includes some comments about political and legislative records of the Law in the framework of the Nation's reorganization undertaken by the National Government for the privatisation of the rendering of public services, such as the production of energy and related activities. The Law was approved by Law 24.804 of April 2, 1997, and published in the Official Bulletin of the Argentine Republic on April 25, 1997. In accordance with the provisions of this Law, the National Government, through the above mentioned organisations, will fix the nuclear policy and the functions of research, development, surveillance and control of the nuclear activity. Also, as part of the execution of the nuclear policy, all the obligations accepted by Argentina as signatory party to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (Tlatelolco Treaty), the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (TNP), the Agreement between the Argentine Republic and the Federative Republic of Brazil through the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to enforce Safeguards, in addition to the commitments signed by Argentina as a member of the Suppliers Group and the National Control System for Sensitive Exports, shall be met [es

  16. Design and installation of a strategically placed algae mesh barrier at OPG Pickering Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marttila, D.; Patrick, P.; Gregoris, C.

    2009-01-01

    Ontario Power Generation's Pickering Nuclear has experienced a number of events in which attached algae have become entrained in the water intake costing approximately $30M over the 1995-2005 period as a result of deratings, Unit shutdowns and other operational issues. In 2005-2006 OPG and Kinectrics worked collaboratively on evaluating different potential solutions to reduce the impact of algae on the station. One of the solutions developed by Kinectrics included a strategically placed barrier net designed to regulate algae flow into the station intake. In 2006, Kinectrics designed and installed the system, the first of its kind at a Nuclear Power Plant in Canada. The system was operational by May 2007. OPG completed an effectiveness study in 2007 and concluded the barrier system had a beneficial effect on reducing algae impact on the station. (author)

  17. Wiring installation for electric devices above the roof slab of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahnke, S.

    1986-01-01

    The wiring installation is situated inside the nuclear reactor building. It includes, associated to electric devices, a first cable which extends from the device to a fixed connector arranged above the cover. A second cable is connected to the said fixed connector and to a connector fixed on a plate situated out of the reactor. According to the present invention each second cable has several sections. A first section can be connected to the said fixed connector situated above the cover and to a fixed lead-in connector of a fluid-tight conduit above the reactor core. A second section is inside the conduit. A third section can be connected to a lead-out connector fixed on the plate which is out of the reactor. The invention applies more particularly to pressurized water nuclear reactors [fr

  18. User requirements in the area of safety of innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycle installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczera, B.; Juhn, P.E.; Fukuda, K.; )

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Against the background of already existing IAEA and INSAC publications in the area of safety, in the framework of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) a set of user requirements for the safety of future nuclear installations has been established. Five top-level requirements are expected to apply to any type of innovative design. They should foster an increased level of safety that is transparent to and fully accepted by the general public. The approach to future reactor safety includes two complementary strategies: increased emphasis on inherent safety characteristics and enhancement of defense in depth. As compared to existing plants, the effectiveness of preventing measures should be highly enhanced, resulting in fewer mitigation measures. The targets and possible approaches of each of the five levels of defense developed for innovative reactor designs are outlined in the paper

  19. Technical organization of safety authorities in case of accident in a nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherrer, J.; Evrard, J.M.; Ney, J.

    1985-11-01

    The Central safety Service of Nuclear Facilities of the French industry Department and the CEA Protection and Nuclear Safety Institut (IPSN) are organized to estimate in real time, the evolution of an accidental situation with a sufficient margin in time to allow the local government representative to develop, in case of necessity, efficient procedures for the protection of the population. This paper presents the principles of this organization and the precautions taken to cope as well with problems of mobilization of experts as the full occupation of current telecommunication lines. The example of the organization concerning the installations of Electricite de France is detailed. The CEA IPSN has developed means widely advanced, concerning the atmospheric transfer of radioactivity. For PWRs, a method allowing to forecast releases in case of accidental situation is presented. Finally, the knowledge acquired with the accident simulations realized during the last years is described [fr

  20. ASN guide project. Safety policy and management in INBs (base nuclear installations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This guide presents the recommendations of the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) in the field of safety policy and management (PMS) for base nuclear installations (INBs). It gives an overview and comments of some prescriptions of the so-called INB order and PMS decision. These regulatory texts define a framework for provisions any INB operator must implement to establish his safety policy, to define and implement a system which allows the safety to be maintained, the improvement of his INB safety to be permanently looked for. The following issues are addressed: operator's safety policy, identification of elements important for safety, of activities pertaining to safety, and of associated requirements, safety management organization and system, management of activities pertaining to safety, documentation and archiving

  1. On alteration of reactor installation (additional installation of No.3 and No.4 plants in the Genkai Nuclear Power Station, Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Safty Commission sent the reply to the Minister of International Trade and Industry on October 4, 1984, on this matter after having received the report from the Committee on Examination of Nuclear Reactor Safety and carried out the deliberation. It was judged that the applicant has the technical capability required for installing and operating these reactor facilities. Also it was judged that on the safety after these reactor plants are installed, there is no obstacle in the prevention of disaster due to contaminated substances and reactors. The policy of the investigation and deliberation is reported. The contents of the investigation and deliberation are the condition of location such as site, geological features and ground, earthquake, weather, hydraulic problem and social environments, the safety design of reactor facilities, the evaluation of radiation exposure dose in normal operation, the analysis of abnormal transient change in operation, accident analysis and the evaluation of location. (Kako, I.)

  2. Regulatory oversight report 2012 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland. These include the five nuclear power plants, the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) and the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), at the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL) and at the University of Basel. Using a combination of inspections, regulatory meetings, examinations and analyses together with reports from the licensees of individual facilities, ENSI obtains the required overview of nuclear safety in the relevant facilities. It ensures that the facilities comply with the regulations and operate as required by law. Its regulatory responsibilities also include the transport of radioactive materials from and to nuclear facilities and the preparations for a deep geological repository for nuclear waste. ENSI maintains its own emergency organisation. It formulates and updates its own guidelines which stipulate the criteria for evaluating the current activities and future plans of the operators of nuclear facilities. ENSI produces regular reports on its regulatory activities and nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear facilities. It fulfils its statutory obligation to provide the public with information on particular events and findings in nuclear facilities. In 2012, the five nuclear power plants in Switzerland were all operated safely. 34 events were reported; on the international INES scale of 0 to 7, ENSI rated 33 events as Level 0 and 1 as Level 1. ENSI evaluates the safety of each nuclear power plant as part of a systematic safety evaluation taking account of both reportable events and other findings, in particular the results of more than 400 inspections conducted by ENSI during 2012. ZWILAG consists of several interim storage halls, a conditioning plant and an incineration/melting plant. At the end of 2012, the cask storage hall contained 40 transport/storage casks

  3. Regulatory overview report 2013 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) acting as the regulatory body of the Swiss Federation assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland: these include five nuclear power plants, the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) at Wuerenlingen together with the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the two universities of Basel and Lausanne. Using a combination of inspections, regulatory meetings, examinations and analyses together with reports from the licensees of individual facilities, ENSI obtains the overview required concerning nuclear safety. It ensures that the facilities comply with regulations. Its regulatory responsibilities include the transport of radioactive materials from and to nuclear facilities and the preparations for a deep geological repository for nuclear waste. ENSI maintains its own emergency organisation, an integral part of the national emergency structure. It provides the public with information on particular events in nuclear facilities. This Surveillance Report describes operational experience, systems technology, radiological protection and management in all the nuclear facilities. Generic issues relevant to all facilities such as probabilistic safety analyses are described. In 2013, the five nuclear power plants in Switzerland (Beznau Units 1 and 2, Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt) were all operated safely and had complied with their approved operating conditions. The nuclear safety at all plants was rated as being good. 34 events were reported. During operation, no reactor scrams were recorded. On the INES scale, ranging from 0-7, ENSI rated all reportable events as Level 0. The ENSI safety evaluation reflects both reportable events and the results of the approximately 460 inspections conducted during 2013. ZWILAG consists of several storage halls, a conditioning plant and a plasma plant. At the end of 2013, the cask storage hall

  4. Regulatory overview report 2014 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-06-01

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI), acting as the regulatory body of the Swiss Federation, assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland: the five nuclear power plants, the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) at Wuerenlingen together with the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the University of Basel (UniB) and the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL). Using a combination of inspections, regulatory meetings, examinations and analyses together with reports from the licensees of individual facilities, ENSI obtains the required overview of nuclear safety. It ensures that they comply with regulations. Its regulatory responsibilities include the transport of radioactive materials from and to nuclear facilities and the preparations for a deep geological repository for nuclear waste. ENSI maintains its own emergency organisation, an integral part of the national emergency structure. It provides the public with information on particular events in nuclear facilities. This Surveillance Report describes the operational experience, systems technology, radiological protection and management in all nuclear facilities. Generic issues relevant to all facilities such as probabilistic safety analyses are described. In 2014, all five nuclear power plants in Switzerland (Beznau Units I and 2, Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt) were operated safely. The nuclear safety at all plants was rated as good. 38 events were reported. There was one reactor scram at the Leibstadt nuclear power plant. On the International Event Scale (INES), ranging from 0--7, 37 events were rated as Level 0; one event was rated as INES 1: drill holes had penetrated the steel wall of the containment to secure two hand-held fire extinguishers. ZWILAG consists of several interim storage halls, a conditioning plant and a plasma plant. At the end of 2014, the cask storage hall contained 42

  5. Study of a brazilian cask and its installation for PWR spent nuclear fuel dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanato, Luiz Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is removed from the nuclear reactor after the depletion on efficiency in generating energy. After the withdrawal from the reactor core, the SNF is temporarily stored in pools at the same site of the reactor. At this time, the generated heat and the short and medium lived radioactive elements decay to levels that allow removing SNF from the pool and sending it to temporary dry storage. In that phase, the fuel needs to be safely and efficiently stored, and then, it can be retrieved in a future, or can be disposed as radioactive waste. The amount of spent fuel increases annually and, in the next years, will still increase more, because of the construction of new nuclear plants. Today, the number of new facilities back up to levels of the 1970's, since it is greater than the amount of decommissioning in old installations. As no final decision on the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle is foreseen in the near future in Brazil, either to recover the SNF or to consider it as radioactive waste, this material has to be isolated in some type of storage model existing around the world. In the present study it is shown that dry SNF storage is the best option. A national cask model for SNF as well these casks storage installation are proposed. It is a multidisciplinary study in which the engineering conceptual task was developed and may be applied to national SNF removed from the Brazilian power reactors, to be safely stored for a long time until the Brazilian authorities will decide about the site for final disposal. (author)

  6. Regulatory oversight report 2010 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-06-01

    Acting as the regulatory body of the Swiss Confederation, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, ENSI, assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland. This includes the five nuclear power plants (NPPs), the plant-based interim storage facilities, the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) at Wuerenlingen, the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the two universities of Basel and Lausanne, the transport of radioactive materials from and to nuclear facilities and the preparation for a deep geologic repository for radioactive waste. Using inspections, surveillance meetings, reviews and analyses as well as reports from plant licensees, ENSI obtains the required overview of the safety of the nuclear facilities. It maintains its own emergency organisation, which is an integral part of the national emergency structure. The legislative framework at the basis of the activity of ENSI specifies the criteria by which it evaluates the activities and plans of the operators of nuclear facilities. ENSI provides the public with information on particular events and observations relating to nuclear facilities. The five nuclear power plants in Switzerland (Beznau Units 1 und 2, Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt) were all operated safely in 2010. Last year, there were 39 notifiable events in Switzerland: 4 events affected both Beznau Units, 10 events the Goesgen NPP, 6 the Leibstadt NPP and 13 the Muehleberg NPP and 6 in other facilities. Based on the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) of 0-7, ENSI rated 38 events as Level 0, and as INES Level 2 the event on 31 August 2010 during maintenance work at the Leibstadt NPP, where a diver was exposed to radiation in excess of the maximum annual exposure rate of 20 mSv. The ZWILAG at Wuerenlingen consists of several interim storage halls, a conditioning plant and the plasma plant (incineration/melting plant). At the end of 2010, the cask storage hall contained 34 transport/storage casks with spent

  7. The Community's research and development programme on decommissioning of nuclear installations: First annual progress report (year 1985)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This is the first Annual Progress Report of the European Community's 1984-88 programme of research on the decommissioning of nuclear installations. It shows the status of implementation reached on 31 December 1985. The 1984-88 programme has the following contents: A. Research and development projects concerning the following subjects: Project No 1: Long-term integrity of building and systems; Project No 2: Decontamination for decommissioning purposes; Project No 3: Dismantling techniques; Project No 4: Treatment of specific waste materials: steel, concrete and graphite; Project No 5: Large containers for radioactive waste produced in the dismantling of nuclear installations; Project No 6: Estimation of the quantities of radioactive wastes arising from the decommissioning of nuclear installations in the Community; Project No 7: Influence of installation design features on decommissioning. B. Identification of guiding principles, namely: - certain guiding principles in the design and operation of nuclear installations with a view to simplifying their subsequent decommissioning, - guiding principles in the decommissioning of nuclear installations which could form the initial elements of a Community policy in this field. C. Testing of new techniques under real conditions, within the framework of large-scale decommissioning operations undertaken in Member States. This first progress report, covering the period of putting the programme into action, describes the work to be carried out under the 27 research contracts concluded, as well as initial work performed and first results obtained

  8. Regulatory oversight report 2011 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate ENSI, acting as the regulatory body of the Swiss Confederation, assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland. These include five nuclear power plants, the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (ZWILAG) at Wuerenlingen together with the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the two universities of Basel and Lausanne. ENSI ensures that the facilities comply with regulations and operate according to the law. Its regulatory responsibilities also include the transport of radioactive materials to and from nuclear facilities and the preparations for a deep geologic repository for nuclear waste. It maintains its own emergency organisation, which is an integral part of a national emergency structure. Building on the legislative framework, ENSI also formulates and updates its own guidelines. It provides the public with information on particular events and findings in nuclear facilities. In 2011, all five nuclear power reactors in Switzerland (Beznau Units 1 and 2, Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt) were operated safely and ENSI concluded that they had complied with their approved operating conditions. There were 27 reportable events in the nuclear power plants in Switzerland: 7 at Beznau, 5 at Goesgen, 11 at Leibstadt und 4 at Muehleberg. On the international INES scale of 0 to 7, ENSI rated 26 events as Level 0. One event, at the Muehleberg nuclear power plant, was rated as INES Level 1. This related to a potential blockage of the emergency water intake system in the event of extreme flooding. The operator BKW shut down the Muehleberg plant ahead of the scheduled maintenance date and upgraded the system. ZWILAG consists of several interim storage halls, a conditioning plant and a plasma plant (incineration/melting plant). At the end of 2011, the cask storage hall contained 34 transport/storage casks with fuel assemblies and vitrified residue packages

  9. The IAEA Response and Assistance Network (RANET) and the New Nuclear Installation Assessment and Advice Functional Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, P.; Chaput, J., E-mail: P.Kenny@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-10-15

    Full text: The Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the global focal point for international preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological safety or security related incidents, emergencies, threats or events of media interest. The Convention on Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention) and the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (Early Notification Convention) are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency. They place specific obligations on the Parties and the IAEA, with the aim of minimizing consequences for health, property and the environment. Parties to the Assistance Convention have agreed to cooperate with each other and with the IAEA to facilitate prompt provision of assistance in case of a nuclear or radiological emergency, in order to mitigate its consequences. As part of the IAEA’s strategy for supporting practical implementation of the Assistance Convention and in order to coordinate a global response, the IEC manages the IAEA’s Response and Assistance Network (RANET). RANET aims to facilitate assistance in case of a nuclear or radiological incident or emergency in a timely and effective manner on a regional basis. States Parties shall, within the limits of their capabilities, identify and notify the Agency of experts, equipment and materials which could be made available for the provision of assistance and register these capabilities in RANET. These capabilities are registered in eight difference Functional Areas which are grouped by the type of assistance that could be provided. Experience gained from past emergencies and based on feedback and direction clearly received from Member States under the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety resulted in the

  10. Regulation and inspection support radiation protection in nuclear and other installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.K.; Potter, C.; Harbison, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Over the past fifty years, radiation protection legislation in the UK has developed from a narrow industry-specific base to a comprehensive package of regulations and supporting Approved Code of Practice, with additional provisions for nuclear installations. Development of this legislation mirrors progress in international understanding about the risks from exposure to ionising radiation. The current Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 largely implement the Euratom 1980 Basic Safety Standards Directive and place particular emphasis on the need to keep exposure as low as reasonably practicable. The regulations have been underpinned by the development of the concept of the Tolerability of Risk and the application of the ALARP/ALARA principle, particularly at nuclear installations. Analysis of dose data on HSE's Central Index of Dose Information has shown the general success of this approach in the UK; the data have also allowed targeting of inspection effort. Currently, the Health and Safety Commission and Executive are developing plans for implementing the revised EU Basic Safety Standards Directive. (author)

  11. The Optimization of Radioactive Waste Management in the Nuclear Installation Decommissioning Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachar, Matej; Necas, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a basic characterization of nuclear installation decommissioning process especially in the term of radioactive materials management. A large amount of solid materials and secondary waste created after implementation of decommissioning activities have to be managed considering their physical, chemical, toxic and radiological characteristics. Radioactive materials should be, after fulfilling all the conditions defined by the authorities, released to the environment for the further use. Non-releasable materials are considered to be a radioactive waste. Their management includes various procedures starting with pre-treatment activities, continuing with storage, treatment and conditioning procedures. Finally, they are disposed in the near surface or deep geological repositories. Considering the advantages and disadvantages of all possible ways of releasing the material from nuclear installation area, optimization of the material management process should be done. Emphasis is placed on the radiological parameters of materials, availability of waste management technologies, waste repositories and on the radiological limits and conditions for materials release or waste disposal. Appropriate optimization of material flow should lead to the significant savings of money, disposal capacities or raw material resources. Using a suitable calculation code e.g. OMEGA, the evaluation of the various material management scenarios and selection of the best one, based on the multi-criterion analysis, should be done. (authors)

  12. Immediate medical consequences of nuclear accidents: lessons from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    The immediate medical response to the nuclear accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station involved containment of the radioactivity and evacuation of the nearby population. The next step consisted of assessment of the radiation dose received by individuals, based on biological dosimetry, and treatment of those exposed. Medical care involved treatment of skin burns; measures to support bone marrow failure, gastrointestinal tract injury, and other organ damage (i.e., infection prophylaxis and transfusions) for those with lower radiation dose exposure; and bone marrow transplantation for those exposed to a high dose of radiation. At Chernobyl, two victims died immediately and 29 died of radiation or thermal injuries in the next three months. The remaining victims of the accident are currently well. A nuclear accident anywhere is a nuclear accident everywhere. Prevention and cooperation in response to these accidents are essential goals

  13. Industrial development - consequences about the implantation of Brazilian Nuclear Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syllus, C.

    1987-07-01

    The strategy to promote the growing industry participation in the Brazilian Nuclear Program, the difficulties, the measurements adopted for overcoming and the results obtained in terms of industrial development, are presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  14. The last traffic jam: psychologic consequences of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipton, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Probable psychologic problems resulting from a nuclear explosion are described. The attendant stresses are difficult to predict but the behavior of victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki serve as models. Behavior patterns during evacuation, shelter period and postattack are described

  15. Circumstances and consequences of Oural nuclear plant spoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenot, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The environment pollution frames serious long-dated problem. The civil nuclear power unhappily does not rest. The liquid waste fuel cycle plant prospective, particularly at their working beginning. 14 refs., 5 tabs

  16. Regulatory oversight report 2015 concerning nuclear safety in Swiss nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    The Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) assesses and monitors nuclear facilities in Switzerland. These include the five nuclear power plants (Beznau Units 1 and 2, Muehleberg, Goesgen and Leibstadt), the interim storage facilities based at each plant, the Central Interim Storage Facility (Zwilag) at Wuerenlingen together with the nuclear facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the University of Basel and the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL), as well as the transport of radioactive materials and the preparatory work for a deep geological repository for nuclear waste. Using a combination of inspections, regulatory meetings, examinations and analyses together with reports from the licensees of individual facilities, ENSI obtains the required overview of nuclear safety in these facilities. ENSI maintains its own emergency organization. It provides the public with information on particular events and findings in nuclear facilities. ENSI publishes an annual Radiological Protection Report and a Research and Experience Report. Chapters 1 to 4 of this Surveillance Report deal with operational experience, systems technology, radiological protection and management of the 5 Swiss nuclear power plants. Chapter 5 deals with Zwilag. Chapters 6 and 7 are devoted to the nuclear facilities at PSI and the research reactor at EPFL as well as the decommissioned University of Basel’s research reactor. Chapter 8 covers the transport of radioactive materials. The subject of Chapter 9 is the deep geological storage of radioactive waste including work within the framework of the Sectoral Plan. Finally, Chapter 10 deals with generic issues relevant to all facilities such as probabilistic safety analyses. In 2015, all five nuclear power plants in Switzerland were safely operated and ENSI concluded that each had adhered to its approved operating conditions. There were 34 reportable events at the nuclear power plants; 32 events were rated at Level 0 on

  17. Thermal tests of large recirculation cooling installations for nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balunov, B. F.; Lychakov, V. D.; Il'in, V. A.; Shcheglov, A. A.; Maslov, O. P.; Rasskazova, N. A.; Rakhimov, R. Z.; Boyarov, R. A.

    2017-11-01

    The article presents the results from thermal tests of some recirculation installations for cooling air in nuclear power plant premises, including the volume under the containment. The cooling effect in such installations is produced by pumping water through their heat-transfer tubes. Air from the cooled room is blown by a fan through a bundle of transversely finned tubes and is removed to the same room after having been cooled. The finning of tubes used in the tested installations was made of Grade 08Kh18N10T and Grade 08Kh18N10 stainless steels or Grade AD1 aluminum. Steel fins were attached to the tube over their entire length by means of high-frequency welding. Aluminum fins were extruded on a lathe from the external tube sheath into which a steel tube had preliminarily been placed. Although the fin extrusion operation was accompanied by pressing the sheath inner part to the steel tube, tight contact between them over the entire surface was not fully achieved. In view of this, the air gap's thermal resistance coefficient was introduced in calculating the heat transfer between the heat-transferring media. The air gap average thickness was determined from the test results taking into account the gap variation with temperature due to different linear expansion coefficients of steel and aluminum. These tests, which are part of the acceptance tests of the considered installations, were carried out at the NPO TsKTI test facility and were mainly aimed at checking if the obtained thermal characteristics were consistent with the values calculated according to the standard recommendations with introduction, if necessary, of modifications to those recommendations.

  18. The nuclear phase-out and its consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwigs, Markus

    2016-01-01

    As a lesson from the Fukushima nuclear disaster, a radical change has taken place in climate and energy policy in Germany since 2011. This is characterized by the phase-out of the nuclear energy, which is fixed by the 13th Atomic Enforcement Act, by the end of 2022. This entails a multitude of complex legal questions and subsequent problems. The latest decisions are the forthcoming decisions of the BVerfG on the constitutional consistency of the nuclear phase-out law and nuclear fuel tax, Vattenfall's much discussed arbitration award before the ICSID arbitration court, and controversial legal questions both in the context of the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear power plants and the disposal of highly radioactive waste. In addition, the moral-ethical evaluation of the nuclear phase-out and the power turn-around is the focus of the interdisciplinary approach. The problem clusters are analyzed by the contributions of the anthology. He documents a conference organized by Professor Dr. Markus Ludwig, which took place on April 8, 2016, at the University of Wuerzburg, within the framework of a project funded by the Fritz Thyssen Stiftung (''The Law of the Energy Transition''). [de

  19. Aspects of chemistry in management of radioactive liquid wastes from nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeotikar, R.G.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear energy is the only source available to the mankind to fulfill the continuous and ever increasing demand of energy. The public acceptance and popularity of nuclear energy depends to a large extent on management of radioactive waste. The nuclear waste management demands eco-friendly process/systems. This article highlights the sources of different types of radioactive liquid wastes generated in the nuclear installation and their treatment process. The radioactive liquid waste is classified mainly into three categories based on activity levels e.g. low, intermediate and high level. The management of radioactive liquid waste is very critical because of its 'mobility and liquid' nature. Secondly the liquid wastes have wide range of activity and chemistry spectrum and their volumes are also different. Hence the methods for management of different types of liquid wastes are also different. Mostly the treatment and conditioning processes are chemical processes. The chemistry involved in the treatment and conditioning of these wastes, problems related with chemistry for each processes and efforts to solve these problems, aspects of adoption on plant scale, etc., have been discussed in this article. (author)

  20. Testing of different data libraries in activation analysis of concrete and graphite from nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cometto, M.; Ancius, D.; Ridikas, D.

    2003-01-01

    With the aging of the nuclear park, decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear installations after their service life is becoming an important issue for the nuclear industry. The radiological characterisation of the equipment and structures present in the reactor and its environment is an essential stage in a decommissioning project since it permits to define and optimize the decommissioning strategy and the disassembling operations. In addition, correct activation estimates are essential for determining the quantity and the nature of the radiological waste generated during decommissioning. The adoption of efficient dismantling procedures and the optimization of the mass flow going to different waste repositories might reduce substantially the total cost of decommissioning. The present work has been done in the framework of the decommissioning and dismantling of the experimental reactor of the University of Strasbourg (RUS). A methodology that combines theoretical calculations and direct measurements has been developed for determining the long-term induced activity in the graphite, concrete and materials present in the reactor. After characterisation of the different elements present in the reactor, it is then possible to plan efficiently the disassembling and dismantling of the system and to optimise the mass flow going to different waste repositories. From a scientific perspective, the comparison of theoretical predictions with experimental values validates the approach and the methodology used in the present study and tests the consistency and the reliability of the nuclear data used for activation analysis. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of nuclear accidents consequences. Risk assessment methodologies, current status and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    General description of the structure and process of the probabilistic methods of assessment the external consequences in the event of nuclear accidents is presented. attention is paid in the interface with Probabilistic Safety Analysis level 3 results (source term evaluation) Also are described key issues in accident consequence evaluation as: effects evaluated (early and late health effects and economic effects due to countermeasures), presentation of accident consequences results, computer codes. Briefly are presented some relevant areas for the applications of Accident Consequence Evaluation

  2. Protection of Basic Nuclear Installations Against External Flooding - Guide No. 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The French regulations require that the flooding hazard be taken into consideration in the demonstration of nuclear safety of basic nuclear installations (BNI). This guide details the recommendations concerning the external flooding hazard which is defined, for the purpose of this guide, as being a flood whose origin is external to the structures, areas or buildings of the BNI accommodating systems or components to be protected, whatever the cause(s) of that flooding (rainfall, river spates, storms, pipes failures, etc.). An external flood therefore means any flood originating outside the perimeter of the BNI and certain floods originating within the BNI perimeter. The terms 'flood' or 'flooding' as used henceforth designate external flooding. The purpose of this guide is to: - define the situations to consider when assessing the flood hazard for the site in question; - propose an acceptable method of quantifying them; - list recommendations for defining means of protection adapted to the specifics of the flooding hazard, implemented by the licensee according to the life cycle phases of the installation. The guide has taken climate change into account when the state of knowledge so allows. It is necessary to take into account - on the basis of current knowledge - the predictable climate changes for a period representative of the installations' foreseeable life times, and until the next safety review. The use of this guide necessitates prior identification - for the installation in question - of the functions required to demonstrate nuclear safety and which shall be preserved in the event of flooding. These functions are called 'safety functions' in this guide. This guide applies to all the basic nuclear installations defined by article L. L.593-2 of the Environment Code. With regard to radioactive waste disposal installations, this guide only applies to above-ground facilities. This guide can be used to assess the external flooding hazards and the associated

  3. Agreement between Portugal and Spain on cooperation with regard to the safety of nuclear installations in border areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Agreement provides for exchange of information on nuclear safety and radiation protection in nuclear installations likely to affect mutually the territories of Portugal and Spain. The Agreement defines the type of nuclear installation concerned, the border areas and the respective competent authorities. The competent authorities of both Parties undertake to establish in their respective territories, the systems required to detect any radiation emergency and to inform each other in cases where such emergency may affect them. The Agreement was concluded for a period of the years as from its entry into force. (NEA) [fr

  4. Nuclear Energy Agency task group on Radiological Characterisation for Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Arne; Weber, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Radiological characterisation plays a significant role in the process of decommissioning of shut-down nuclear facilities in order to ensure the protection of the environment and radiation safety. At all stages of a decommissioning programme or project, adequate radiological characterisation is of crucial importance, not least from a material and waste perspective. The radiological characterisation is a key element for planning, controlling and optimising decommissioning and dismantling activities. Experience has shown that data and information from the operation of a facility can - supplemented by recently collected and analysed data and information - be of crucial importance for decisions on waste management and for characterisation of radioactive waste. Once the dismantling has been done, some information may be hard, costly or even impossible to obtain later in the waste management process. This was the reason why the Working Party on Decommissioning and Dismantling (WPDD) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) decided in late 2013 to extend the mandate of the Task Group on Radiological Characterisation and Decommissioning (TGRCD) for a second phase focusing on nuclear facility characterisation from a waste and material end-state perspective whereas the first phase focused on overall strategies of radiological characterisation. This paper gives an overview of the activities and findings within both phases up to now. (authors)

  5. Rules common to nuclear incidents occurring in installations or during transport of nuclear substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagorce, M.

    1976-01-01

    As concerns the peaceful applications of nuclear power, the traditional third party liability regulations were found to be inadequate to cover the specific aspects of the nuclear risk, and this was likely to hinder the progress of this new activity. This was why the countries involved opted for the elaboration of a special liability regime by adopting the Paris Convention of 29th July 1960, the Convention Supplementary to the Paris Convention of the 31st January 1963 and the Vienna Convention of 21st May 1963. The Paris and Vienna Conventions set up a regime characterized by the nuclear operator's absolute and exclusive liability, the limitation of such liability in amount and in time the uniquity of jurisdictional competence, the obligation to provide financial security for compensation of damage. The purpose of the Brussels Supplementary Convention is to increase the amount of compensation for damage by additional funds supplied partly by the State involved and partly by a collective contribution from the various countries Parties to the Convention, thus setting up a mechanism of international solidarity. (NEA) [fr

  6. Manual on quality assurance for installation and commissioning of instrumentation, control and electrical equipment in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The present Manual on Quality Assurance (QA) for Installation and Commissioning of Instrumentation, Control and Electrical (ICE) Equipment of Nuclear Power Plants contains supporting material and illustrative examples for implementing basic requirements of the quality assurance programme in procurement, receiving, installation and commissioning of this equipment. The Manual on Quality Assurance for Installation and Commissioning of ICE Equipment is designed to supplement and be consistent with the Guidebook as well as with the IAEA Code and Safety Guides on Quality Assurance. It is intended for the use of managerial staff and QA personnel of nuclear power plant owners or the organizations respectively responsible for the legal, technical, administrative and financial aspects of a nuclear power plant. The information provided in the Manual will also be useful to the inspection staff of the regulatory organization in the planning and performance of regulatory inspections at nuclear power plants

  7. Performance of HEPA Filter Medium under Accidental Conditions in Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Fawal, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA Filters) are the main components in ventilation or confinement system for the retention of radioactive particles in nuclear installations. During abnormal conditions or accidents (e.g. fire accident, criticality in a nuclear fuel cycle facility and LOCA in power reactors) the resulting heat, smoke and humidity affect to a large extent the performance of HEPA filters. As a part of a research programme aims at the evaluation and improvement of the performance of HEPA filter media during abnormal conditions, the effect of elevated temperatures up to 400 degree C on the resistance of medium to penetration of water under pressure has been investigated. The test results showed that the resistance of the medium to penetration of water decreases with increase in temperature and thermal exposure time. This could be attributed to burnout of the organic binder used to improve the resistance of the medium to the penetration of water. The results also showed that at 400 degree C the resistance of the medium to the penetration of water disappeared. This was confirmed by inspection of the filter medium samples after exposure to high temperature using a scanning electron microscope. The inspection of the medium samples showed that the organic binder in the medium was deformed and finally collapsed at 400 degree C. Also, a best estimate model for the relation of filter medium resistance to water penetration under elevated temperature has been implemented. The results of this study can help in establishing a regulatory operating limit conditions (OLCs) for HEPA filter operation at high temperatures conditions in nuclear installations

  8. Performance of HEPA Filter Medium under Accidental Conditions in Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElFawal, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA Filters) are the main components in ventilation or confinement system for the retention of radioactive particles in nuclear installations. During abnormal conditions or accidents (e.g. fire accident, criticality in a nuclear fuel cycle facility and LOCA in power reactors) the resulting heat, smoke and humidity affect to a large extent the performance of HEPA filters. As a part of a research programme aims at the evaluation and improvement of the performance of HEPA filter media during abnormal conditions, the effect of elevated temperatures up to 400 degree C on the resistance of medium to penetration of water under pressure has been investigated. The test results showed that the resistance of the medium to penetration of water decreases with increase in temperature and thermal exposure time. This could be attributed to burnout of the organic binder used to improve the resistance of the medium to the penetration of water. The results also showed that at 400 degree C the resistance of the medium to the penetration of water disappeared. This was confirmed by inspection of the filter medium samples after exposure to high temperature using a scanning electron microscope. The inspection of the medium samples showed that the organic binder in the medium was deformed and finally collapsed at 400 degree C. Also, a best estimate model for the relation of filter medium resistance to water penetration under elevated temperature has been implemented. The results of this study can help in establishing a regulatory operating limit conditions (OLCs) for HEPA filter operation at high temperatures conditions in nuclear installations.

  9. Analytical methodology for optimization of waste management scenarios in nuclear installation decommissioning process - 16148

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachar, Matej; Necas, Vladimir; Daniska, Vladimir; Rehak, Ivan; Vasko, Marek

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear installation decommissioning process is characterized by production of large amount of various radioactive and non-radioactive waste that has to be managed, taking into account its physical, chemical, toxic and radiological properties. Waste management is considered to be one of the key issues within the frame of the decommissioning process. During the decommissioning planning period, the scenarios covering possible routes of materials release into the environment and radioactive waste disposal, should be discussed and evaluated. Unconditional and conditional release to the environment, long-term storage at the nuclear site, near surface or deep geological disposal and relevant material management techniques for achieving the final status should be taken into account in the analysed scenarios. At the level of the final decommissioning plan, it is desirable to have the waste management scenario optimized for local specific facility conditions taking into account a national decommissioning background. The analytical methodology for the evaluation of decommissioning waste management scenarios, presented in the paper, is based on the materials and radioactivity flow modelling, which starts from waste generation activities like pre-dismantling decontamination, selected methods of dismantling, waste treatment and conditioning, up to materials release or conditioned radioactive waste disposal. The necessary input data for scenarios, e.g. nuclear installation inventory database (physical and radiological data), waste processing technologies parameters or material release and waste disposal limits, have to be considered. The analytical methodology principles are implemented into the standardised decommissioning parameters calculation code OMEGA, developed in the DECOM company. In the paper the examples of the methodology implementation for the scenarios optimization are presented and discussed. (authors)

  10. Regulatory oversight of safety culture in nuclear installations - New IAEA developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerhoas, Anne; )

    2012-01-01

    Ms. Anne Kerhoas described the IAEA work on guidance for regulatory oversight of safety culture. She summarised the various IAEA, OECD/NEA and ANS meetings that have been held on the topic between 1995 and 2011. The IAEA has carried out two recent projects with the Bulgarian and Romanian regulatory bodies to develop a safety culture oversight program. The work was funded by the Norwegian government and has involved 30 experts from 17 different countries. Draft guidance for regulators on how to monitor licensee safety culture has also been produced (IAEA-TECDOC-DD1070). The document is intended to provide practical guidance on oversight strategies and is applicable to a wide range of nuclear installations, including nuclear power plants, fuel cycle facilities, research reactors and waste management facilities. A number of principles for regulatory oversight of safety culture were summarised. For example, the primary responsibility for safety remains with the licensee, safety culture oversight should be performed at all stages of the life cycle of the nuclear installation, and multiple data collection methods should be used. The overall approach to safety culture described in the draft IAEA Tech doc includes a range of approaches to build up a meaningful picture of the licensee's safety culture. These include interviews, observations, review of documents, review of events, discussions and surveys. The importance of ongoing discussion with the licensee throughout the process to develop a deeper shared understanding of issues was emphasised. The results of the Chester 2 workshop will be used as an input to finalization of the draft Tech Doc

  11. Indemnification for the consequences of a nuclear power phaseout?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roller, G.

    1998-01-01

    Considering the precedents of the German Federal Constitutional Court (BVerfG), there can be no doubt that the fundamental policy decision in favour of or against the peaceful use of nuclear energy for power generation is not a matter of constitutional law but belongs to the political competences of the legislature. The Federal Government as the legislative body is not tied down to earlier policy decisions of former governments. This legal appraisal confirms a government's right to change policy and opt out of nuclear power. The contribution here discusses the conditions set by constitutional law and the precedents with respect to implementation of a Federal law for nuclear power phaseout. (orig./CB) [de

  12. Climatic Consequences and Agricultural Impact of Regional Nuclear Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, O. B.; Robock, A.; Mills, M. J.; Xia, L.

    2013-05-01

    A nuclear war between India and Pakistan, with each country using 50 Hiroshima-sized atom bombs as airbursts on urban areas, would inject smoke from the resulting fires into the stratosphere.This could produce climate change unprecedented in recorded human history and global-scale ozone depletion, with enhanced ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the surface.Simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), run at higher vertical and horizontal resolution than a previous simulation with the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE, and incorporating ozone chemistry for the first time, show a longer stratospheric residence time for smoke and hence a longer-lasting climate response, with global average surface air temperatures still 1.1 K below normal and global average precipitation 4% below normal after a decade.The erythemal dose from the enhanced UV radiation would greatly increase, in spite of enhanced absorption by the remaining smoke, with the UV index more than 3 units higher in the summer midlatitudes, even after a decade. Scenarios of changes in temperature, precipitation, and downward shortwave radiation from the ModelE and WACCM simulations, applied to the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer crop model for winter wheat, rice, soybeans, and maize by perturbing observed time series with anomalies from the regional nuclear war simulations, produce decreases of 10-50% in yield averaged over a decade, with larger decreases in the first several years, over the midlatitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. The impact of the nuclear war simulated here, using much less than 1% of the global nuclear arsenal, would be devastating to world agricultural production and trade, possibly sentencing a billion people now living marginal existences to starvation.The continued environmental threat of the use of even a small number of nuclear weapons must be considered in nuclear policy deliberations in Russia, the U.S., and the rest of

  13. Experience with psychological consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzunov, V.A.; Druzhinin, A.M.; Druzhinina, E.S.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the image of radiation menance. Basic differences in image parameters are revealed for some population groups. The psychological levels of the image are regarded as psychological phenomena. Some specific psychological consequences of mental regression are outlined in the paper

  14. Earthquake experience and seismic qualification by indirect methods in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, many operational nuclear power plants around the world have conducted seismic re-evaluation programmes either as part of a review of seismic hazards or to comply with best international nuclear safety practices. In this connection, Member States have called on the IAEA to carry out several seismic review missions at their plants, primarily those of WWER and RBMK design. One of the critical safety issues that arose during these missions was that of seismic qualification (determination of fitness for service) of already installed plant distribution systems, equipment and components. The qualification of new components, equipment and distribution systems cannot be replicated for equipment that is already installed and operational in plants, as this process is neither feasible nor appropriate. For this reason, seismic safety experts have developed new procedures for the qualification of installed equipment: these procedures seek to demonstrate that installed equipment, through a process of comparison with new equipment, is apt for service. However, these procedures require large sets of criteria and qualification databases and call for the use of engineering judgement and experience, all of which open the door to wide margins of interpretation. In order to guarantee a sound technical basis for the qualification of in-plant equipment, currently applied to 70% to 80% of all plant equipment, the regulatory review of this type of qualification process calls for a detailed assessment of the technical procedures applied. Such an assessment is the first step towards eliminating the risk of large differences in qualification results between different plants, operators and countries, and guaranteeing the reliability of seismic re-evaluation programmes. Bearing this in mind, in 1999, the IAEA convened a seminar and technical meeting on seismic qualification under the auspices of the IAEA Technical Co-operation programme. Altogether 66 senior experts attended the

  15. Radiological consequences of accidents during disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundfelt, Bertil

    2013-07-01

    In this report, an analysis of the radiological consequences of potential accidents during disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes is presented. The results presented should be seen as coarse estimates of possible radiological consequences of a canister being stuck in a borehole during disposal rather than being the results of a full safety analysis. In the concept for deep borehole disposal of spent nuclear fuel developed by Sandia National Laboratories, the fuel is assumed to be encapsulated in mild steel canisters and stacked between 3 and 5 km depth in boreholes that are cased with perforated mild steel casing tubes. The canisters are joined together by couplings to form strings of 40 canisters and lowered into the borehole. When a canister string has been emplaced in the borehole, a bridge plug is installed above the string and a 10 metres long concrete plug is cast on top of the bridge plug creating a floor for the disposal of the next sting. In total 10 canister strings, in all 400 canisters, are assumed to be disposed of at between 3 and 5 kilometres depth in one borehole. An analysis of potential accidents during the disposal operations shows that the potentially worst accident would be that a canister string is stuck above the disposal zone of a borehole and cannot be retrieved. In such a case, the borehole may have to be sealed in the best possible way and abandoned. The consequences of this could be that one or more leaking canisters are stuck in a borehole section with mobile groundwater. In the case of a leaking canister being stuck in a borehole section with mobile groundwater, the potential radiological consequences are likely to be dominated by the release of the so-called Instant Release Fraction (IRF) of the radionuclide inventory, i.e. the fraction of the radionuclides that as a consequence of the in-core conditions are present in the annulus between the fuel pellets and the cladding or on the grain boundaries of the UO 2 matrix. The

  16. Radiological consequences of accidents during disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep borehole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundfelt, Bertil [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-07-15

    In this report, an analysis of the radiological consequences of potential accidents during disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes is presented. The results presented should be seen as coarse estimates of possible radiological consequences of a canister being stuck in a borehole during disposal rather than being the results of a full safety analysis. In the concept for deep borehole disposal of spent nuclear fuel developed by Sandia National Laboratories, the fuel is assumed to be encapsulated in mild steel canisters and stacked between 3 and 5 km depth in boreholes that are cased with perforated mild steel casing tubes. The canisters are joined together by couplings to form strings of 40 canisters and lowered into the borehole. When a canister string has been emplaced in the borehole, a bridge plug is installed above the string and a 10 metres long concrete plug is cast on top of the bridge plug creating a floor for the disposal of the next sting. In total 10 canister strings, in all 400 canisters, are assumed to be disposed of at between 3 and 5 kilometres depth in one borehole. An analysis of potential accidents during the disposal operations shows that the potentially worst accident would be that a canister string is stuck above the disposal zone of a borehole and cannot be retrieved. In such a case, the borehole may have to be sealed in the best possible way and abandoned. The consequences of this could be that one or more leaking canisters are stuck in a borehole section with mobile groundwater. In the case of a leaking canister being stuck in a borehole section with mobile groundwater, the potential radiological consequences are likely to be dominated by the release of the so-called Instant Release Fraction (IRF) of the radionuclide inventory, i.e. the fraction of the radionuclides that as a consequence of the in-core conditions are present in the annulus between the fuel pellets and the cladding or on the grain boundaries of the UO{sub 2} matrix

  17. The application research of MACCS in consequence assessment of the attacked Dayabay Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yuan; Dong Binjiang

    2003-01-01

    The method of radiological consequence assessment as Dayabay nuclear power station being attacked in war is studied in this paper. The Models and software of calculation and the parameters which have been chosen are also studied in this paper. This study estimates the off-site consequences of two different types of being attack accidents spectrum and the spent fuel pool being attacked accidents spectrum. This study calculated the distributing of radiological consequence in different weather. According to the analyse of the consequence, we get such result that the radiate consequence of nuclear reactor of Daya Bay nuclear power plant being attack in war is the same as the consequence of nuclear accident, but the consequence of spent fuel pool being attacked is very serious. If the spent fuel pool was attacked by the enemy, the contaminated area is very large. The effective dose within 30 km under the wind will exceed 1 Sv. Based in part upon the above information the recommendation is made that the Daya Bay nuclear power plant should be closed or run in low power. and the nuclear island should be protected in war. (authors)

  18. Chernobyl accident consequences in Germany: Nuclear safety and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelhauser, H.; Wendling, R.D.; Weiss, W.; Klonk, H.; Weil, L.

    1997-01-01

    A working Programme of the Federal Government was initiated on 26 May 1986 to cover all aspects of nuclear safety and public health, including research and public affairs in the light of the European and international activities resulting from the accident

  19. Psychological consequences of disaster analogies for the nuclear case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.

    1986-01-01

    No disaster experienced in recorded history resembles the potential destruction of major nuclear war. Nonetheless, past disasters can give us pointers to the likely responses of those who survive the immediate effects, though it will always be necessary to interpret the findings carefully with due allowance for the differences that restrict the applicability of the comparison

  20. Health Consequences of Nuclear Fission Products | Ajlouni | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    effects of these radionuclides enter the human body, a large number of fatalities, malignancies, thyroid cancer, born (genic) defects, etc. Nevertheless, the actual data after Chernobyl and TMI accidents, and nuclear detonations, were not consistent with these models. Deep Atomic Binding Hypothesis (DAB)), interprets the ...